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Sample records for cellular calcium regulatory

  1. Redox Modulation of Cellular Signaling and Metabolism Through Reversible Oxidation of Methionine Sensors in Calcium Regulatory Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2005-01-17

    Adaptive responses associated with environmental stressors are critical to cell survival. These involve the modulation of central signaling protein functions through site-specific and enzymatically reversible oxidative modifications of methionines to coordinate cellular metabolism, energy utilization, and calcium signaling. Under conditions when cellular redox and antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, the selective oxidation of critical methionines within selected protein sensors functions to down-regulate energy metabolism and the further generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mechanistically, these functional changes within protein sensors take advantage of the helix-breaking character of methionine sulfoxide. Thus, depending on either the ecological niche of the organism or the cellular milieu of different organ systems, cellular metabolism can be fine-tuned to maintain optimal function in the face of variable amounts of collateral oxidative damage. The sensitivity of several calcium regulatory proteins to oxidative modification provides cellular sensors that link oxidative stress to cellular response and recovery. Calmodulin (CaM) is one such critical calcium regulatory protein, which is functionally sensitive to methionine oxidation. Helix destabilization resulting from the oxidation of either Met{sup 144} or Met{sup 145} results in the nonproductive association between CaM and target proteins. The ability of oxidized CaM to stabilize its target proteins in an inhibited state with an affinity similar to that of native (unoxidized) CaM permits this central regulatory protein to function as a cellular rheostat that down-regulates energy metabolism in response to oxidative stress. Likewise, oxidation of a methionine within a critical switch region of the regulatory protein phospholamban is expected to destabilize the phosphorylationdependent helix formation necessary for the release of enzyme inhibition, resulting in a down-regulation of the Ca-ATPase in

  2. Evidence for a Regulatory Role of Calcium in Gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments conducted to determine the cellular basis of gravitropism, the phenomenon of calcium migration following gravitropic stimulation, and the preferential accumulation of calcium in cells are described. Results of autoradiographic studies of cross sections of oat, and the pryoantimony precipitation of calcium in situ are discussed. It was found that the movement of calcium during gravimetric stimulation is a redistribution of calcium from the vacuolar regions into the cells walls. This movement requires precipitation of a calcium ATPase. The control of calcium ATPase by calmodulin and whether chlorpromazine is binding to calmodulin in plants are considered.

  3. Bone regeneration: molecular and cellular interactions with calcium phosphate ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Barrère, Florence; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; de Groot, Klaas

    2006-01-01

    Calcium phosphate bioceramics are widely used in orthopedic and dental applications and porous scaffolds made of them are serious candidates in the field of bone tissue engineering. They have superior properties for the stimulation of bone formation and bone bonding, both related to the specific interactions of their surface with the extracellular fluids and cells, ie, ionic exchanges, superficial molecular rearrangement and cellular activity. PMID:17717972

  4. Role of intracellular calcium in cellular volume regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.M.; Chase, H.S. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    We investigated the role of intracellular calcium in epithelial cell volume regulation using cells isolated from the toad urinary bladder. A suspension of cells was prepared by treatment of the bladder with collagenase followed by ethyleneglycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid. The cells retained their ion-transporting capabilities: ouabain (1 mM) and amiloride (10 microM) inhibited cellular uptake of /sup 86/Rb and /sup 22/Na, respectively. Using a Coulter counter to measure cellular volume, we found that we could swell cells either by reducing the extracellular osmolality or by adding the permeant solute urea (45 mM) isosmotically. Under both conditions, cells first swelled and then returned to their base-line volume, in spite of the continued presence of the stimulus to swell. Volume regulation was inhibited when cells were swelled at low extracellular (Ca) (100 nM) and was retarded in cells preloaded with the calcium buffer quin 2. Swelling increased the intracellular free calcium concentration ((Ca)i), as measured by quin 2 fluorescence: (Ca)i increased 35 +/- 9 nM (n = 6) after hypotonic swelling and 42 +/- 3 nM (n = 3) after urea swelling. Reducing extracellular (Ca) to less than 100 nM prevented the swelling-induced increase in (Ca)i, suggesting that the source of the increase in (Ca)i was extracellular. This result was confirmed in measurements of cellular uptake of 45Ca: the rate of uptake was significantly higher in swollen cells compared with control (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1 fmol . cell-1 X 5 min-1). Our experiments provide the first demonstration that cellular swelling increases (Ca)i. This increase is likely to play a critical role in cellular volume regulation.

  5. Phytoplankton calcification as an effective mechanism to prevent cellular calcium poisoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M. N.; Ramos, J. Barcelos e.; Schulz, K. G.; Riebesell, U.; Kaźmierczak, J.; Gallo, F.; Mackinder, L.; Li, Y.; Nesterenko, P. N.; Trull, T. W.; Hallegraeff, G. M.

    2015-08-01

    Marine phytoplankton has developed the remarkable ability to tightly regulate the concentration of free calcium ions in the intracellular cytosol at a level of ~ 0.1 μmol L-1 in the presence of seawater Ca2+ concentrations of 10 mmol L-1. The low cytosolic calcium ion concentration is of utmost importance for proper cell signalling function. While the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the tight control of intracellular Ca2+ concentration are not completely understood, phytoplankton taxonomic groups appear to have evolved different strategies, which may affect their ability to cope with changes in seawater Ca2+ concentrations in their environment on geological time scales. For example, the Cretaceous (145 to 66 Ma ago), an era known for the high abundance of coccolithophores and the production of enormous calcium carbonate deposits, exhibited seawater calcium concentrations up to four times present-day levels. We show that calcifying coccolithophore species (Emiliania huxleyi, Gephyrocapsa oceanica and Coccolithus braarudii) are able to maintain their relative fitness (in terms of growth rate and photosynthesis) at simulated Cretaceous seawater calcium concentrations, whereas these rates are severely reduced under these conditions in some non-calcareous phytoplankton species (Chaetoceros sp., Ceratoneis closterium and Heterosigma akashiwo). Most notably, this also applies to a non-calcifying strain of E. huxleyi which displays a calcium-sensitivity similar to the non-calcareous species. We hypothesize that the process of calcification in coccolithophores provides an efficient mechanism to prevent cellular calcium poisoning and thereby offered a potential key evolutionary advantage, responsible for the proliferation of coccolithophores during times of high seawater calcium concentrations.

  6. Phytoplankton calcification as an effective mechanism to alleviate cellular calcium poisoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M. N.; Ramos, J. Barcelos e.; Schulz, K. G.; Riebesell, U.; Kaźmierczak, J.; Gallo, F.; Mackinder, L.; Li, Y.; Nesterenko, P. N.; Trull, T. W.; Hallegraeff, G. M.

    2015-11-01

    Marine phytoplankton have developed the remarkable ability to tightly regulate the concentration of free calcium ions in the intracellular cytosol at a level of ~ 0.1 μmol L-1 in the presence of seawater Ca2+ concentrations of 10 mmol L-1. The low cytosolic calcium ion concentration is of utmost importance for proper cell signalling function. While the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the tight control of intracellular Ca2+ concentration are not completely understood, phytoplankton taxonomic groups appear to have evolved different strategies, which may affect their ability to cope with changes in seawater Ca2+ concentrations in their environment on geological timescales. For example, the Cretaceous (145 to 66 Ma), an era known for the high abundance of coccolithophores and the production of enormous calcium carbonate deposits, exhibited seawater calcium concentrations up to 4 times present-day levels. We show that calcifying coccolithophore species (Emiliania huxleyi, Gephyrocapsa oceanica and Coccolithus braarudii) are able to maintain their relative fitness (in terms of growth rate and photosynthesis) at simulated Cretaceous seawater calcium concentrations, whereas these rates are severely reduced under these conditions in some non-calcareous phytoplankton species (Chaetoceros sp., Ceratoneis closterium and Heterosigma akashiwo). Most notably, this also applies to a non-calcifying strain of E. huxleyi which displays a calcium sensitivity similar to the non-calcareous species. We hypothesize that the process of calcification in coccolithophores provides an efficient mechanism to alleviate cellular calcium poisoning and thereby offered a potential key evolutionary advantage, responsible for the proliferation of coccolithophores during times of high seawater calcium concentrations. The exact function of calcification and the reason behind the highly ornate physical structures of coccoliths remain elusive.

  7. Calcium-actin waves and oscillations of cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Veksler, Alex; Gov, Nir S

    2009-09-16

    We propose a mechanism for the formation of membrane oscillations and traveling waves, which arise due to the coupling between the actin cytoskeleton and the calcium flux through the membrane. In our model, the fluid cell membrane has a mobile but constant population of proteins with a convex spontaneous curvature, which act as nucleators of actin polymerization and adhesion. Such a continuum model couples the forces of cell-substrate adhesion, actin polymerization, membrane curvature, and the flux of calcium through the membrane. Linear stability analysis shows that sufficiently strong coupling among the calcium, membrane, and protein dynamics may induce robust traveling waves on the membrane. This result was checked for a reduced feedback scheme and is compared to the results without the effects of calcium, where permanent phase separation without waves or oscillations is obtained. The model results are compared to the published observations of calcium waves in cell membranes, and a number of testable predictions are proposed. PMID:19751660

  8. Cellular Architecture Regulates Collective Calcium Signaling and Cell Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Hoying, James B.; Deymier, Pierre A.; Zhang, Donna D.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-01-01

    A key feature of multicellular systems is the ability of cells to function collectively in response to external stimuli. However, the mechanisms of intercellular cell signaling and their functional implications in diverse vascular structures are poorly understood. Using a combination of computational modeling and plasma lithography micropatterning, we investigate the roles of structural arrangement of endothelial cells in collective calcium signaling and cell contractility. Under histamine stimulation, endothelial cells in self-assembled and microengineered networks, but not individual cells and monolayers, exhibit calcium oscillations. Micropatterning, pharmacological inhibition, and computational modeling reveal that the calcium oscillation depends on the number of neighboring cells coupled via gap junctional intercellular communication, providing a mechanistic basis of the architecture-dependent calcium signaling. Furthermore, the calcium oscillation attenuates the histamine-induced cytoskeletal reorganization and cell contraction, resulting in differential cell responses in an architecture-dependent manner. Taken together, our results suggest that endothelial cells can sense and respond to chemical stimuli according to the vascular architecture via collective calcium signaling. PMID:27196735

  9. Molecular and Cellular Regulatory Mechanisms of Tongue Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Parada, C.; Han, D.; Chai, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The tongue exerts crucial functions in our daily life. However, we know very little about the regulatory mechanisms of mammalian tongue development. In this review, we summarize recent findings of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that control tissue-tissue interactions during tongue morphogenesis. Specifically, cranial neural crest cells (CNCC) lead the initiation of tongue bud formation and contribute to the interstitial connective tissue, which ultimately compartmentalizes tongue muscles and serves as their attachments. Occipital somite-derived cells migrate into the tongue primordium and give rise to muscle cells in the tongue. The intimate relationship between CNCC- and mesoderm-derived cells, as well as growth and transcription factors that have been shown to be crucial for tongue myogenesis, clearly indicate that tissue-tissue interactions play an important role in regulating tongue morphogenesis. PMID:22219210

  10. Impaired Cellular Bioenergetics Causes Mitochondrial Calcium Handling Defects in MT-ND5 Mutant Cybrids

    PubMed Central

    Duchen, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause mitochondrial disease, a group of metabolic disorders that affect both children and adults. Interestingly, individual mtDNA mutations can cause very different clinical symptoms, however the factors that determine these phenotypes remain obscure. Defects in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation can disrupt cell signaling pathways, which may shape these disease phenotypes. In particular, mitochondria participate closely in cellular calcium signaling, with profound impact on cell function. Here, we examined the effects of a homoplasmic m.13565C>T mutation in MT-ND5 on cellular calcium handling using transmitochondrial cybrids (ND5 mutant cybrids). We found that the oxidation of NADH and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were significantly reduced in ND5 mutant cybrids. These metabolic defects were associated with a significant decrease in calcium uptake by ND5 mutant mitochondria in response to a calcium transient. Inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose did not affect cytosolic calcium levels in control cybrids, but caused an increase in cytosolic calcium in ND5 mutant cybrids. This suggests that glycolytically-generated ATP is required not only to maintain Δψm in ND5 mutant mitochondria but is also critical for regulating cellular calcium homeostasis. We conclude that the m.13565C>T mutation in MT-ND5 causes defects in both mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial calcium sequestration. This disruption of mitochondrial calcium handling, which leads to defects in cellular calcium homeostasis, may be an important contributor to mitochondrial disease pathogenesis. PMID:27110715

  11. Changes in gravity rapidly alter the magnitude and direction of a cellular calcium current.

    PubMed

    Salmi, Mari L; ul Haque, Aeraj; Bushart, Thomas J; Stout, Stephen C; Roux, Stanley J; Porterfield, D Marshall

    2011-05-01

    In single-celled spores of the fern Ceratopteris richardii, gravity directs polarity of development and induces a directional, trans-cellular calcium (Ca(2+)) current. To clarify how gravity polarizes this electrophysiological process, we measured the kinetics of the cellular response to changes in the gravity vector, which we initially estimated using the self-referencing calcium microsensor. In order to generate more precise and detailed data, we developed a silicon microfabricated sensor array which facilitated a lab-on-a-chip approach to simultaneously measure calcium currents from multiple cells in real time. These experiments revealed that the direction of the gravity-dependent polar calcium current is reversed in less than 25 s when the cells are inverted, and that changes in the magnitude of the calcium current parallel rapidly changing g-forces during parabolic flight on the NASA C-9 aircraft. The data also revealed a hysteresis in the response of cells in the transition from 2g to micro-g in comparison to cells in the micro-g to 2-g transition, a result consistent with a role for mechanosensitive ion channels in the gravity response. The calcium current is suppressed by either nifedipine (calcium-channel blocker) or eosin yellow (plasma membrane calcium pump inhibitor). Nifedipine disrupts gravity-directed cell polarity, but not spore germination. These results indicate that gravity perception in single plant cells may be mediated by mechanosensitive calcium channels, an idea consistent with some previously proposed models of plant gravity perception. PMID:21234599

  12. Parasitoid wasp venom SERCA regulates Drosophila calcium levels and inhibits cellular immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Nathan T.; Goecks, Jeremy; Kacsoh, Balint Z.; Mobley, James A.; Bowersock, Gregory J.; Taylor, James; Schlenke, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Because parasite virulence factors target host immune responses, identification and functional characterization of these factors can provide insight into poorly understood host immune mechanisms. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a model system for understanding humoral innate immunity, but Drosophila cellular innate immune responses remain incompletely characterized. Fruit flies are regularly infected by parasitoid wasps in nature and, following infection, flies mount a cellular immune response culminating in the cellular encapsulation of the wasp egg. The mechanistic basis of this response is largely unknown, but wasps use a mixture of virulence proteins derived from the venom gland to suppress cellular encapsulation. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying wasp virulence and fly cellular immunity, we used a joint transcriptomic/proteomic approach to identify venom genes from Ganaspis sp.1 (G1), a previously uncharacterized Drosophila parasitoid species, and found that G1 venom contains a highly abundant sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) pump. Accordingly, we found that fly immune cells termed plasmatocytes normally undergo a cytoplasmic calcium burst following infection, and that this calcium burst is required for activation of the cellular immune response. We further found that the plasmatocyte calcium burst is suppressed by G1 venom in a SERCA-dependent manner, leading to the failure of plasmatocytes to become activated and migrate toward G1 eggs. Finally, by genetically manipulating plasmatocyte calcium levels, we were able to alter fly immune success against G1 and other parasitoid species. Our characterization of parasitoid wasp venom proteins led us to identify plasmatocyte cytoplasmic calcium bursts as an important aspect of fly cellular immunity. PMID:23690612

  13. The Tumorigenic Roles of the Cellular REDOX Regulatory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Castaldo, Stéphanie Anaís; Freitas, Joana Raquel; Conchinha, Nadine Vasconcelos; Madureira, Patrícia Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The cellular REDOX regulatory systems play a central role in maintaining REDOX homeostasis that is crucial for cell integrity, survival, and proliferation. To date, a substantial amount of data has demonstrated that cancer cells typically undergo increasing oxidative stress as the tumor develops, upregulating these important antioxidant systems in order to survive, proliferate, and metastasize under these extreme oxidative stress conditions. Since a large number of chemotherapeutic agents currently used in the clinic rely on the induction of ROS overload or change of ROS quality to kill the tumor, the cancer cell REDOX adaptation represents a significant obstacle to conventional chemotherapy. In this review we will first examine the different factors that contribute to the enhanced oxidative stress generally observed within the tumor microenvironment. We will then make a comprehensive assessment of the current literature regarding the main antioxidant proteins and systems that have been shown to be positively associated with tumor progression and chemoresistance. Finally we will make an analysis of commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs that induce ROS. The current knowledge of cancer cell REDOX adaptation raises the issue of developing novel and more effective therapies for these tumors that are usually resistant to conventional ROS inducing chemotherapy. PMID:26682014

  14. The Tumorigenic Roles of the Cellular REDOX Regulatory Systems.

    PubMed

    Castaldo, Stéphanie Anaís; Freitas, Joana Raquel; Conchinha, Nadine Vasconcelos; Madureira, Patrícia Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The cellular REDOX regulatory systems play a central role in maintaining REDOX homeostasis that is crucial for cell integrity, survival, and proliferation. To date, a substantial amount of data has demonstrated that cancer cells typically undergo increasing oxidative stress as the tumor develops, upregulating these important antioxidant systems in order to survive, proliferate, and metastasize under these extreme oxidative stress conditions. Since a large number of chemotherapeutic agents currently used in the clinic rely on the induction of ROS overload or change of ROS quality to kill the tumor, the cancer cell REDOX adaptation represents a significant obstacle to conventional chemotherapy. In this review we will first examine the different factors that contribute to the enhanced oxidative stress generally observed within the tumor microenvironment. We will then make a comprehensive assessment of the current literature regarding the main antioxidant proteins and systems that have been shown to be positively associated with tumor progression and chemoresistance. Finally we will make an analysis of commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs that induce ROS. The current knowledge of cancer cell REDOX adaptation raises the issue of developing novel and more effective therapies for these tumors that are usually resistant to conventional ROS inducing chemotherapy. PMID:26682014

  15. Cellular Mechanisms of Calcium-Mediated Triggered Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhen

    Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias continue to pose a major health problem. Ventricular fibrillation, which is a complex form of electrical wave turbulence in the lower chambers of the heart, stops the heart from pumping and is the largest cause of natural death in the United States. Atrial fibrillation, a related form of wave turbulence in the upper heart chambers, is in turn the most common arrhythmia diagnosed in clinical practice. Despite extensive research to date, mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias remain poorly understood. It is well established that both spatial disorder of the refractory period of heart cells and triggered activity (TA) jointly contribute to the initiation and maintenance of arrhythmias. TA broadly refers to the abnormal generation of a single or a sequence of abnormal excitation waves from a small submillimeter region of the heart in the interval of time between two normal waves generated by the heart's natural pacemaker (the sinoatrial node). TA has been widely investigated experimentally and occurs in several pathological conditions where the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ions in heart cells becomes elevated. Under such conditions, Ca2+ can be spontaneously released from intracellular stores, thereby driving an electrogenic current that exchanges 3Na+ ions for one Ca2+ ion across the cell membrane. This current in turn depolarizes the membrane of heart cells after a normal excitation. If this calcium-mediated "delayed after depolarization'' (DAD) is sufficiently large, it can generate an action potential. While the arrhythmogenic importance of spontaneous Ca2+ release and DADs is well appreciated, the conditions under which they occur in heart pathologies remain poorly understood. Calcium overload is only one factor among several other factors that can promote DADs, including sympathetic nerve stimulation, different expression levels of membrane ion channels and calcium handling proteins, and different mutations of those

  16. Cellular Mechanisms of Calcium-Mediated Triggered Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhen

    Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias continue to pose a major health problem. Ventricular fibrillation, which is a complex form of electrical wave turbulence in the lower chambers of the heart, stops the heart from pumping and is the largest cause of natural death in the United States. Atrial fibrillation, a related form of wave turbulence in the upper heart chambers, is in turn the most common arrhythmia diagnosed in clinical practice. Despite extensive research to date, mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias remain poorly understood. It is well established that both spatial disorder of the refractory period of heart cells and triggered activity (TA) jointly contribute to the initiation and maintenance of arrhythmias. TA broadly refers to the abnormal generation of a single or a sequence of abnormal excitation waves from a small submillimeter region of the heart in the interval of time between two normal waves generated by the heart's natural pacemaker (the sinoatrial node). TA has been widely investigated experimentally and occurs in several pathological conditions where the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ions in heart cells becomes elevated. Under such conditions, Ca2+ can be spontaneously released from intracellular stores, thereby driving an electrogenic current that exchanges 3Na+ ions for one Ca2+ ion across the cell membrane. This current in turn depolarizes the membrane of heart cells after a normal excitation. If this calcium-mediated "delayed after depolarization'' (DAD) is sufficiently large, it can generate an action potential. While the arrhythmogenic importance of spontaneous Ca2+ release and DADs is well appreciated, the conditions under which they occur in heart pathologies remain poorly understood. Calcium overload is only one factor among several other factors that can promote DADs, including sympathetic nerve stimulation, different expression levels of membrane ion channels and calcium handling proteins, and different mutations of those

  17. The Regulatory Functions of Calcium and the Potential Role of Calcium in Mediating Gravitational Responses in Cells and Tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    The hypothesis that calcium plays an important part in regulating cellular response to gravity and to other environmental stimuli is explored. Topics covered include the role of calmodulin and other proteins, gravitropic responses, bone demineralization during space flight, and intracellular communication.

  18. Molecular and cellular aspects of calcium action in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    Calcium is known to be a second messenger in many developmental processes in animal systems, but it has only recently become evident that Ca is an important intracellular messenger in plants as well. The level of free Ca concentration in the cytoplasm is extremely low, and it is influenced by extracellular signals such as light, gravity, and hormones. Investigations from our laboratory indicated that Ca and its binding protein, calmodulin, play an important role in stimulus-response coupling by regulating enzyme activities, especially through protein phosphorylation. In vivo and in vitro protein phosphorylation studies have revealed Ca-dependent changes in various plant tissues. We have also been able to influence various physiological processes such as cell elongation, abscission, senescence, and tuberization by altering extracellular and intracellular Ca levels. Other examples of Ca-mediated processes in plants are as follows: a) cell division, b) geotropism, c) protoplasmic streaming, d) stomatal control, e) chloroplast movement, f) secretion, g) hormone-dependent changes, h) enzyme activation, and i) protein phosphorylation.

  19. Vascular and Cellular Calcium in Normal and Hypertensive Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Adamova, Zuzana; Ozkan, Sifa; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    Normal pregnancy is associated with significant hemodynamic changes in the cardiovascular system in order to meet the metabolic demands of mother and fetus. These changes include increased cardiac output, decreased vascular resistance, and vascular remodeling in the uterine and systemic circulation. Preeclampsia (PE) is a major complication of pregnancy characterized by proteinuria and hypertension. Several risk factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PE including genetic and dietary factors. Ca2+ is an essential dietary element and an important regulator of many cellular processes including vascular function. The importance of adequate dietary Ca2+ intake during pregnancy is supported by many studies. Pregnancy-associated changes in Ca2+ metabolism and plasma Ca2+ have been observed. During pregnancy, changes in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) have been described in red blood cells, platelets and immune cells. Also, during pregnancy, an increase in [Ca2+]i in endothelial cells (EC) stimulates the production of vasodilator substances such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin. Normal pregnancy is also associated with decreased vascular smooth muscle (VSM) [Ca2+]i and possibly the Ca2+-sensitization pathways of VSM contraction including protein kinase C, Rho-kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Ca2+-dependent matrix metalloproteinases could also promote extracellular matrix degradation and vascular remodeling during pregnancy. Disruption in the balance between dietary, plasma and vascular cell Ca2+ may be responsible for some of the manifestation of PE including procoagulation, decreased vasodilation, and increased vasoconstriction and vascular resistance. The potential benefits of Ca2+ supplements during pregnancy, and the use of modulators of vascular Ca2+ to reduce the manifestations of PE in susceptible women remain an important area for experimental and clinical research. PMID:19500073

  20. C. elegans Metabolic Gene Regulatory Networks Govern the Cellular Economy

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Emma; Walhout, Albertha J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Diet greatly impacts metabolism in health and disease. In response to the presence or absence of specific nutrients, metabolic gene regulatory networks sense the metabolic state of the cell and regulate metabolic flux accordingly, for instance by the transcriptional control of metabolic enzymes. Here we discuss recent insights regarding metazoan metabolic regulatory networks using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, including the modular organization of metabolic gene regulatory networks, the prominent impact of diet on the transcriptome and metabolome, specialized roles of nuclear hormone receptors in responding to dietary conditions, regulation of metabolic genes and metabolic regulators by microRNAs, and feedback between metabolic genes and their regulators. PMID:24731597

  1. Increases in cellular calcium concentration stimulate pepsinogen secretion from dispersed chief cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raufman, J.P.; Berger, S.; Cosowsky, L.; Straus, E.

    1986-05-29

    Intracellular calcium concentration ((Ca)i) and pepsinogen secretion from dispersed chief cells from guinea pig stomach were determined before and after stimulation with calcium ionophores. (Ca)i was measured using the fluorescent probe quin2. Basal (Ca)i was 105 +/- 4 nM. Pepsinogen secretion was measured with a new assay using /sup 125/I-albumin substrate. This assay is 1000-fold more sensitive than the widely-used spectrophotometric assay, technically easy to perform, rapid, and relatively inexpensive. The kinetics and stoichiometry of ionophore-induced changes in (Ca)i and pepsinogen secretion were similar. These data support a role for calcium as a cellular mediator of pepsinogen secretion.

  2. The calcium-sensing receptor as a regulator of cellular fate in normal and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Diez-Fraile, A; Lammens, T; Benoit, Y; D'Herde, K G M A

    2013-02-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) belongs to the evolutionarily conserved family of plasma membrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Early studies identified an essential role for the CaSR in systemic calcium homeostasis through its ability to sense small changes in circulating calcium concentration and to couple this information to intracellular signaling pathways that influence parathyroid hormone secretion. However, the presence of CaSR protein in tissues is not directly involved in regulating mineral ion homeostasis points to a role for the CaSR in other cellular functions including the control of cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. This position at the crossroads of cellular fate designates the CaSR as an interesting study subject is likely to be involved in a variety of previously unconsidered human pathologies, including cancer, atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Here, we will review the recent discoveries regarding the relevance of CaSR signaling in development and disease. Furthermore, we will discuss the rational for developing and using CaSR-based therapeutics. PMID:23228129

  3. Role of calcium channels in cellular antituberculosis effects: Potential of voltage-gated calcium-channel blockers in tuberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Lele; Cui, Ruina; Yang, Yourong; Wu, Xueqiong

    2015-10-01

    The immunity of human immune cells and their ability to inhibit Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are key factors in the anti-MTB effect. However, MTB modulates the levels and activity of key intracellular second messengers, such as calcium, to evade protective immune responses. Recent studies suggest that inhibiting L-type calcium channel in immune cells using either antibodies or small interfering RNA increases calcium influx, upregulates the expression of proinflammation genes, and reduces MTB burden. First, we will review the key factors in calcium-signaling pathway that may affect the immunity of immune cells to MTB infection. Second, we will focus on the role of calcium channels in regulating cellular immunity to MTB. Finally, we will discuss the possibility of using calcium-channel blockers as anti-MTB chemotherapy drugs to enhance chemotherapy effects, shorten treatment period, and overcome drug resistance. PMID:25442874

  4. Dynamical modeling and analysis of large cellular regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérenguier, D.; Chaouiya, C.; Monteiro, P. T.; Naldi, A.; Remy, E.; Thieffry, D.; Tichit, L.

    2013-06-01

    The dynamical analysis of large biological regulatory networks requires the development of scalable methods for mathematical modeling. Following the approach initially introduced by Thomas, we formalize the interactions between the components of a network in terms of discrete variables, functions, and parameters. Model simulations result in directed graphs, called state transition graphs. We are particularly interested in reachability properties and asymptotic behaviors, which correspond to terminal strongly connected components (or "attractors") in the state transition graph. A well-known problem is the exponential increase of the size of state transition graphs with the number of network components, in particular when using the biologically realistic asynchronous updating assumption. To address this problem, we have developed several complementary methods enabling the analysis of the behavior of large and complex logical models: (i) the definition of transition priority classes to simplify the dynamics; (ii) a model reduction method preserving essential dynamical properties, (iii) a novel algorithm to compact state transition graphs and directly generate compressed representations, emphasizing relevant transient and asymptotic dynamical properties. The power of an approach combining these different methods is demonstrated by applying them to a recent multilevel logical model for the network controlling CD4+ T helper cell response to antigen presentation and to a dozen cytokines. This model accounts for the differentiation of canonical Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes, as well as of inflammatory Th17 and regulatory T cells, along with many hybrid subtypes. All these methods have been implemented into the software GINsim, which enables the definition, the analysis, and the simulation of logical regulatory graphs.

  5. The Calcium-Sensing Receptor and Integrins in Cellular Differentiation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Hampson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a widely expressed homodimeric G-protein coupled receptor structurally related to the metabotropic glutamate receptors and GPRC6A. In addition to its well characterized role in maintaining calcium homeostasis and regulating parathyroid hormone release, evidence has accumulated linking the CaSR with cellular differentiation and migration, brain development, stem cell engraftment, wound healing, and tumor growth and metastasis. Elevated expression of the CaSR in aggressive metastatic tumors has been suggested as a potential novel prognostic marker for predicting metastasis, especially to bone tissue where extracellular calcium concentrations may be sufficiently high to activate the receptor. Recent evidence supports a model whereby CaSR-mediated activation of integrins promotes cellular migration. Integrins are single transmembrane spanning heterodimeric adhesion receptors that mediate cell migration by binding to extracellular matrix proteins. The CaSR has been shown to form signaling complexes with the integrins to facilitate both the movement and differentiation of cells, such as neurons during normal brain development and tumor cells under pathological circumstances. Thus, CaSR/integrin complexes may function as a universal cell migration or homing complex. Manipulation of this complex may be of potential interest for treating metastatic cancers, and for developmental disorders pertaining to aberrant neuronal migration. PMID:27303307

  6. Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jeffrey P; Shipley, Frederick B; Linder, Ashley N; Plummer, George S; Liu, Mochi; Setru, Sagar U; Shaevitz, Joshua W; Leifer, Andrew M

    2016-02-23

    The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals is needed to provide new insights into how populations of neurons generate animal behavior. We present an instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from the majority of neurons in the head of a freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal's position, posture, and locomotion. This instrument provides whole-brain imaging with cellular resolution in an unrestrained and behaving animal. We use spinning-disk confocal microscopy to capture 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s at 6 head-volumes/s. A suite of three cameras monitor neuronal fluorescence and the animal's position and orientation. Custom software tracks the 3D position of the animal's head in real time and two feedback loops adjust a motorized stage and objective to keep the animal's head within the field of view as the animal roams freely. We observe calcium transients from up to 77 neurons for over 4 min and correlate this activity with the animal's behavior. We characterize noise in the system due to animal motion and show that, across worms, multiple neurons show significant correlations with modes of behavior corresponding to forward, backward, and turning locomotion. PMID:26712014

  7. Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jeffrey P.; Shipley, Frederick B.; Linder, Ashley N.; Plummer, George S.; Liu, Mochi; Setru, Sagar U.; Shaevitz, Joshua W.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals is needed to provide new insights into how populations of neurons generate animal behavior. We present an instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from the majority of neurons in the head of a freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal’s position, posture, and locomotion. This instrument provides whole-brain imaging with cellular resolution in an unrestrained and behaving animal. We use spinning-disk confocal microscopy to capture 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s at 6 head-volumes/s. A suite of three cameras monitor neuronal fluorescence and the animal’s position and orientation. Custom software tracks the 3D position of the animal’s head in real time and two feedback loops adjust a motorized stage and objective to keep the animal’s head within the field of view as the animal roams freely. We observe calcium transients from up to 77 neurons for over 4 min and correlate this activity with the animal’s behavior. We characterize noise in the system due to animal motion and show that, across worms, multiple neurons show significant correlations with modes of behavior corresponding to forward, backward, and turning locomotion. PMID:26712014

  8. Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Precipitation by Cellular Biomineralization in Mantle Cell Cultures of Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Liang; Kong, Wei; Su, Jingtan; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    The growth of molluscan shell crystals is generally thought to be initiated from the extrapallial fluid by matrix proteins, however, the cellular mechanisms of shell formation pathway remain unknown. Here, we first report amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precipitation by cellular biomineralization in primary mantle cell cultures of Pinctada fucata. Through real-time PCR and western blot analyses, we demonstrate that mantle cells retain the ability to synthesize and secrete ACCBP, Pif80 and nacrein in vitro. In addition, the cells also maintained high levels of alkaline phosphatase and carbonic anhydrase activity, enzymes responsible for shell formation. On the basis of polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we observed intracellular crystals production by mantle cells in vitro. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed the crystals to be ACC, and de novo biomineralization was confirmed by following the incorporation of Sr into calcium carbonate. Our results demonstrate the ability of mantle cells to perform fundamental biomineralization processes via amorphous calcium carbonate, and these cells may be directly involved in pearl oyster shell formation. PMID:25405357

  9. The Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Immuno-Suppression by Human Type 1 Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gregori, Silvia; Goudy, Kevin S.; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia

    2011-01-01

    The immuno-regulatory mechanisms of IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells have been widely studied over the years. However, several recent discoveries have shed new light on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that human Tr1 cells use to control immune responses and induce tolerance. In this review we outline the well known and newly discovered regulatory properties of human Tr1 cells and provide an in-depth comparison of the known suppressor mechanisms of Tr1 cells with FOXP3+ Treg. We also highlight the role that Tr1 cells play in promoting and maintaining tolerance in autoimmunity, allergy, and transplantation. PMID:22566914

  10. Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Jeffrey; Shipley, Frederick; Linder, Ashley; Plummer, George; Liu, Mochi; Setru, Sagar; Shaevitz, Joshua; Leifer, Andrew

    The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals is needed to provide new insights into how populations of neurons generate animal behavior. Acquiring this data, however, is challenging because it is difficult to track and image individual neurons as an animal deforms its posture and moves many body lengths. Here, we present an instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from the majority of neurons in the head of a freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal's position, posture, and locomotion. 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s are recorded at 6 head-volumes/s using spinning disk confocal microscopy. At the same time, we record low magnification images of the animal to measure the animals behavior and track its head as it moves. We develop a time independent neuronal matching algorithm that uses non-rigid point set registration and machine learning to correctly match neurons across time. Using this method, we are able to observe calcium transients from up to 90 neurons for over 4 min and correlate the neural activity with the animal's behavior.

  11. IMPACT OF CELLULAR MICROENVIRONMENT AND MECHANICAL PERTURBATION ON CALCIUM SIGNALLING IN MENISCUS FIBROCHONDROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Han, W.M.; Heo, S-J.; Driscoll, T.P.; Boggs, M.E.; Duncan, R.L.; Mauck, R.L.; Elliott, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical signals regulate a multitude of cell functions and ultimately govern fibrous tissue growth, maintenance and repair. Such mechanotransduction processes often involve modulation of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). However, most studies interrogate these responses in cells in simplified culture systems, thereby removing potentially important inputs from the native extracellular microenvironment. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the intracellular calcium response of meniscus fibrochondrocytes (MFCs) is dependent on both the microenvironmental context in which this perturbation is applied and on the tensile deformation. Using a custom micro-mechanical tester mounted on a confocal microscope, intracellular calcium activity in MFCs in response to incremental tissue strains (0, 3, 6 and 9 %) was monitored in situ (i.e., in the native tissues) on MFC-seeded aligned scaffolds and MFC-seeded silicone membranes. The [Ca2+]i regulation by MFCs within the native meniscus tissue microenvironment was considerably different from [Ca2+]i regulation by MFCs on either aligned nanofibrous scaffolds or flat silicone membranes. Additionally, increasing levels of tensile deformation resulted in a greater number of responding cells, both in situ and in vitro, while having no effects on temporal characteristics of [Ca2+]i signalling. Collectively, these findings have significant implications for mechanobiology of load-bearing fibrous tissues and their responses to injury and degeneration. In addition, from a tissue engineering perspective, the findings establish cellular benchmarks for maturing engineered constructs, where native tissue-like calcium mechano-regulation may be an important outcome parameter to achieve mechanical functionality comparable to native tissue. PMID:24908425

  12. Calcium and ascorbic acid affect cellular structure and water mobility in apple tissue during osmotic dehydration in sucrose solutions.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Maria A; Dellarosa, Nicolò; Tylewicz, Urszula; Tappi, Silvia; Laghi, Luca; Rocculi, Pietro; Rosa, Marco Dalla

    2016-03-15

    The effects of the addition of calcium lactate and ascorbic acid to sucrose osmotic solutions on cell viability and microstructure of apple tissue were studied. In addition, water distribution and mobility modification of the different cellular compartments were observed. Fluorescence microscopy, light microscopy and time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) were respectively used to evaluate cell viability and microstructural changes during osmotic dehydration. Tissues treated in a sucrose-calcium lactate-ascorbic acid solution did not show viability. Calcium lactate had some effects on cell walls and membranes. Sucrose solution visibly preserved the protoplast viability and slightly influenced the water distribution within the apple tissue, as highlighted by TD-NMR, which showed higher proton intensity in the vacuoles and lower intensity in cytoplasm-free spaces compared to other treatments. The presence of ascorbic acid enhanced calcium impregnation, which was associated with permeability changes of the cellular wall and membranes. PMID:26575708

  13. Raised intracellular free calcium within the lens causes opacification and cellular uncoupling in the frog.

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, T J

    1983-01-01

    Ion-sensitive micro-electrodes were used to measure the levels of intracellular free Ca2+ within the intact amphibian lens. The free [Ca2+] was found to constitute 0.4% of the total lens calcium. The pCa measured at the anterior lens surface was found to 6.59, while that at the posterior was 5.70. An 8-fold anterior/posterior Ca2+ gradient thus exists along the optical axis. The intracellular free Ca2+ could be manipulated by incubating the lens in high-Ca2+ or cA2+-free EGTA Ringer solutions. Raising the intracellular free Ca2+ to 0.22 mM caused lens opacification and cellular uncoupling; the coupling ratio was reduced from 1 in control to 0.41 in high Ca2+. Images Fig. 3 PMID:6604808

  14. Continuous cellularization of calcium phosphate hybrid scaffolds induced by plasma polymer activation.

    PubMed

    Bergemann, Claudia; Cornelsen, Matthias; Quade, Antje; Laube, Thorsten; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Rebl, Henrike; Weißmann, Volker; Seitz, Hermann; Nebe, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    The generation of hybrid materials based on β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and various biodegradable polymers like poly(l-lactide-co-d,l-lactide) (PLA) represents a common approach to overcoming the disadvantages of pure TCP devices. These disadvantages lie in TCP's mechanical properties, such as brittleness. The positive characteristic of PLA - improvement of compressive strength of calcium phosphate scaffolds - is diametrically opposed to its cell attractiveness. Therefore, the objective of this work was to optimize osteoblast migration and cellularization inside a three-dimensionally (3D) printed, PLA polymer stabilized TCP hybrid scaffold by a plasma polymer process depositing amino groups via allylamine. MG-63 osteoblastic cells inside the 10mm hybrid scaffold were dynamically cultivated for 14days in a 3D model system integrated in a perfusion reactor. The whole TCP/PLA hybrid scaffold was continuously colonized due to plasma polymerized allylamine activation inducing the migration potential of osteoblasts. PMID:26652403

  15. Identification and cellular localisation of voltage-operated calcium channels in immature rat testis.

    PubMed

    Fragale, A; Aguanno, S; Kemp, M; Reeves, M; Price, K; Beattie, R; Craig, P; Volsen, S; Sher, E; D'Agostino, A

    2000-04-25

    Sertoli cells regulate the spermatogenic process mainly through the secretion of a complex fluid into the lumen of the seminiferous tubules behind the blood-testis barrier, containing many of the essential proteins necessary for maintenance and maturation of male germ cells. Thus, the study of Sertoli cell secretory processes is strictly correlated with the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of spermatogenesis. In this work the authors have explored the voltage-sensitive calcium channel variety in the immature rat testis, their localisation and distribution within the seminiferous epithelium and peritubular and interstitial tissues as well as the possible role in the control of Sertoli cell secretion. The results reported in this paper, obtained by in situ hybridisation, immunohistology of rat testicular sections and Western blot analysis of Sertoli cell plasma membranes, show that mammalian Sertoli cells express mRNA encoding for several voltage-operated calcium channel subunits and express such proteins on their surface. Experiments performed on Sertoli cell monolayers cultured in the presence of specific toxins indicate that both N and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels are involved in the regulation of protein secretion. PMID:10854695

  16. Protein partners of the calcium channel β subunit highlight new cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Rima, Mohamad; Daghsni, Marwa; Fajloun, Ziad; M'rad, Ridha; Brusés, Juan L; Ronjat, Michel; De Waard, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Calcium plays a key role in cell signalling by its intervention in a wide range of physiological processes. Its entry into cells occurs mainly via voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC), which are found not only in the plasma membrane of excitable cells but also in cells insensitive to electrical signals. VGCC are composed of different subunits, α1, β, α2δ and γ, among which the cytosolic β subunit (Cavβ) controls the trafficking of the channel to the plasma membrane, its regulation and its gating properties. For many years, these were the main functions associated with Cavβ. However, a growing number of proteins have been found to interact with Cavβ, emphasizing the multifunctional role of this versatile protein. Interestingly, some of the newly assigned functions of Cavβ are independent of its role in the regulation of VGCC, and thus further increase its functional roles. Based on the identity of Cavβ protein partners, this review emphasizes the diverse cellular functions of Cavβ and summarizes both past findings as well as recent progress in the understanding of VGCC. PMID:27354560

  17. The Major Cellular Sterol Regulatory Pathway Is Required for Andes Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Riblett, Amber M.; Didigu, Chukwuka A.; Wilen, Craig B.; Malani, Nirav; Male, Frances; Lee, Fang-Hua; Bushman, Frederic D.; Cherry, Sara; Doms, Robert W.; Bates, Paul; Briley, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae comprise a large family of RNA viruses with worldwide distribution and includes the pathogenic New World hantavirus, Andes virus (ANDV). Host factors needed for hantavirus entry remain largely enigmatic and therapeutics are unavailable. To identify cellular requirements for ANDV infection, we performed two parallel genetic screens. Analysis of a large library of insertionally mutagenized human haploid cells and a siRNA genomic screen converged on components (SREBP-2, SCAP, S1P and S2P) of the sterol regulatory pathway as critically important for infection by ANDV. The significance of this pathway was confirmed using functionally deficient cells, TALEN-mediated gene disruption, RNA interference and pharmacologic inhibition. Disruption of sterol regulatory complex function impaired ANDV internalization without affecting virus binding. Pharmacologic manipulation of cholesterol levels demonstrated that ANDV entry is sensitive to changes in cellular cholesterol and raises the possibility that clinically approved regulators of sterol synthesis may prove useful for combating ANDV infection. PMID:24516383

  18. Array of amorphous calcium phosphate particles improves cellular activity on a hydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Kim, InAe; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2010-04-01

    Poor interaction between cells and surfaces, especially hydrophobic surfaces, results in delayed proliferation and increased apoptosis due to low cell adhesion signaling. To improve cell adhesion, hydrophilic array of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) was fabricated on a surface. A phosphate-buffered solution containing calcium ions was prepared at low temperature to prevent spontaneous precipitation. Then, the ion solution was heated to generate nuclei of ACP nanoparticles. The ACP nanoparticles adhered to the hydrophobic polystyrene surface forming an array composed of ACP particles. Multiple treatments of these nuclei with fresh CaP ion solutions increased the diameter and decreased the solubility of ACP particles enough to mediate cellular adhesion. The particle density in the array was dependent on the ion concentration of the CaP ion solutions. The ACP array improved a wide variety of activities when osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on the ACP array fabricated on a hydrophobic bacteriological dish surface, compared to those cultured without the ACP array in vitro. The use of ACP array resulted in a lower apoptosis and also increased the spreading of cells to form stress fibers and focal contacts. Cells cultured on the ACP array proliferated more than cells cultured on a hydrophobic surface without the ACP array. The ACP array increased the expression of markers of differentiation in osteoblast. These results indicate that an array of ACP can be used as a coating material for enhancing biocompatibility in tissue engineering or biomaterials rather than modifying the surface with organic molecules. PMID:20119940

  19. A novel calcium-independent cellular PLA2 acts in insect immunity and larval growth.

    PubMed

    Park, Youngjin; Kumar, Sunil; Kanumuri, Rahul; Stanley, David; Kim, Yonggyun

    2015-11-01

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) catalyzes the position-specific hydrolysis of fatty acids linked to the sn-2 position of phospholipids (PLs). PLA2s make up a very large superfamily, with more than known 15 groups, classified into secretory PLA2 (sPLA2), Ca(2+)-dependent cellular PLA2 (sPLA2) and Ca(2+)-independent cellular PLA2 (iPLA2). Only a few insect sPLA2s, expressed in venom glands and immune tissues, have been characterized at the molecular level. This study aimed to test our hypothesis that insects express iPLA2, using the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, our model insect. Substantial PLA2 activities under calcium-free condition were recorded in several larval tissue preparations. The PLA2 activity was significantly reduced in reactions conducted in the presence of a specific iPLA2 inhibitor, bromoenol lactone (BEL). Analysis of a S. exigua hemocyte transcriptome identified a candidate iPLA2 gene (SeiPLA2-A). The open reading frame encoded 816 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 90.5 kDa and 6.15 pI value. Our phylogenetic analysis clustered SeiPLA2-A with the other vertebrate iPLA2s. SeiPLA2-A was expressed in all tissues we examined, including hemocytes, fat body, midgut, salivary glands, Malpighian tubules and epidermis. Heterologous expression in Sf9 cells indicated that SeiPLA2-A was localized in cytoplasm and exhibited significant PLA2 activity, which was independent of Ca(2+) and inhibited by BEL. RNA interference (RNAi) of SeiPLA2-A using its specific dsRNA in the fifth instar larvae significantly suppressed iPLA2 expression and enzyme activity. dsSeiPLA2-A-treated larvae exhibited significant loss of cellular immune response, measured as nodule formation in response to bacterial challenge, and extended larval-to-pupal developmental time. These results support our hypothesis, showing that SeiPLA2-A predicted from the transcriptome analysis catalyzes hydrolysis of fatty acids from cellular PLs and plays crucial physiological roles in

  20. USP1 deubiquitinase: cellular functions, regulatory mechanisms and emerging potential as target in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Reversible protein ubiquitination is emerging as a key process for maintaining cell homeostasis, and the enzymes that participate in this process, in particular E3 ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases (DUBs), are increasingly being regarded as candidates for drug discovery. Human DUBs are a group of approximately 100 proteins, whose cellular functions and regulatory mechanisms remain, with some exceptions, poorly characterized. One of the best-characterized human DUBs is ubiquitin-specific protease 1 (USP1), which plays an important role in the cellular response to DNA damage. USP1 levels, localization and activity are modulated through several mechanisms, including protein-protein interactions, autocleavage/degradation and phosphorylation, ensuring that USP1 function is carried out in a properly regulated spatio-temporal manner. Importantly, USP1 expression is deregulated in certain types of human cancer, suggesting that USP1 could represent a valid target in cancer therapy. This view has gained recent support with the finding that USP1 inhibition may contribute to revert cisplatin resistance in an in vitro model of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we describe the current knowledge on the cellular functions and regulatory mechanisms of USP1. We also summarize USP1 alterations found in cancer, combining data from the literature and public databases with our own data. Finally, we discuss the emerging potential of USP1 as a target, integrating published data with our novel findings on the effects of the USP1 inhibitor pimozide in combination with cisplatin in NSCLC cells. PMID:23937906

  1. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and calcium-regulatory hormones.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, A; Brown, J M; Williams, J S

    2015-09-01

    There is increasing evidence of a clinically relevant interplay between the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and calcium-regulatory systems. Classically, the former is considered a key regulator of sodium and volume homeostasis, while the latter is most often associated with skeletal health. However, emerging evidence suggests an overlap in regulatory control. Hyperaldosteronism and hyperparathyroidism represent pathophysiologic conditions that may contribute to or perpetuate each other; aldosterone regulates parathyroid hormone and associates with adverse skeletal complications, and parathyroid hormone regulates aldosterone and associates with adverse cardiovascular complications. As dysregulation in both systems is linked to poor cardiovascular and skeletal health, it is increasingly important to fully characterize how they interact to more precisely understand their impact on human health and potential therapies to modulate these interactions. This review describes the known clinical interactions between these two systems including observational and interventional studies. Specifically, we review studies describing the inhibition of renin activity by calcium and vitamin D, and a potentially bidirectional and stimulatory relationship between aldosterone and parathyroid hormone. Deciphering these relationships might clarify variability in outcomes research, inform the design of future intervention studies and provide insight into the results of prior and ongoing intervention studies. However, before these opportunities can be addressed, more effort must be placed on shifting observational data to the proof of concept phase. This will require reallocation of resources to conduct interventional studies and secure the necessary talent. PMID:25631218

  2. Cilioplasm is a cellular compartment for calcium signaling in response to mechanical and chemical stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xingjian; Mohieldin, Ashraf M.; Muntean, Brian S.; Green, Jill A.; Shah, Jagesh V.; Mykytyn, Kirk; Nauli, Surya M.

    2013-01-01

    Primary cilia with a diameter of ~200 nm have been implicated in development and disease. Calcium signaling within a primary cilium has never been directly visualized and has therefore remained a speculation. Fluid-shear stress and dopamine receptor type-5 (DR5) agonist are among the few stimuli that require cilia for intracellular calcium signal transduction. However, it is not known if these stimuli initiate calcium signaling within the cilium, or if the calcium signal originates in the cytoplasm. Using an integrated single-cell imaging technique, we demonstrate for the first time that calcium signaling triggered by fluid-shear stress initiates in the primary cilium and can be distinguished from the subsequent cytosolic calcium response through the ryanodine receptor. Importantly, this flow-induced calcium signaling depends on the ciliary polycystin-2 calcium channel. While DR5-specific agonist induces calcium signaling mainly in the cilioplasm via ciliary CaV1.2, thrombin specifically induces cytosolic calcium signaling through the IP3 receptor. Furthermore, a non-specific calcium ionophore triggers both ciliary and cytosolic calcium responses. We suggest that cilia not only act as sensory organelles but also function as calcium signaling compartments. Cilium-dependent signaling can spread to the cytoplasm or be contained within the cilioplasm. Our study also provides the first model to understand signaling within the cilioplasm of a living cell. PMID:24104765

  3. Cellular lightweight concrete containing high-calcium fly ash and natural zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jitchaiyaphum, Khamphee; Sinsiri, Theerawat; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    2013-05-01

    Cellular lightweight concrete (CLC) with the controlled density of approximately 800 kg/m3 was made from a preformed foam, Type-I Portland cement (OPC), fly ash (FA), or natural zeolite (NZ), and its compressive strength, setting time, water absorption, and microstructure of were tested. High-calcium FA and NZ with the median particle sizes of 14.52 and 7.72 μm, respectively, were used to partially replace OPC at 0, 10wt%, 20wt%, and 30wt% of the binder (OPC and pozzolan admixture). A water-to-binder mass ratio (W/B) of 0.5 was used for all mixes. The testing results indicated that CLC containing 10wt% NZ had the highest compressive strength. The replacement of OPC with NZ decreased the total porosity and air void size but increased the capillary porosity of the CLC. The incorporation of a suitable amount of NZ decreased the setting time, total porosity, and pore size of the paste compared with the findings with the same amount of FA. The total porosity and cumulative pore volume decreased, whereas the gel and capillary pores increased as a result of adding both pozzolans at all replacement levels. The water absorption increased as the capillary porosity increased; this effect depended on the volume of air entrained and the type or amount of pozzolan.

  4. ER-Mitochondria contact sites: A new regulator of cellular calcium flux comes into play.

    PubMed

    Krols, Michiel; Bultynck, Geert; Janssens, Sophie

    2016-08-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria membrane contacts are hotspots for calcium signaling. In this issue, Raturi et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201512077) show that the thioredoxin TMX1 inhibits the calcium pump SERCA2b at ER-mitochondria contact sites, thereby affecting ER-mitochondrial calcium transfer and mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:27528654

  5. Calcium-induced conformational changes in the regulatory domain of the human mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier.

    PubMed

    Harborne, Steven P D; Ruprecht, Jonathan J; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2015-10-01

    The mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier imports adenine nucleotides from the cytosol into the mitochondrial matrix and exports phosphate. The carrier is regulated by the concentration of cytosolic calcium, altering the size of the adenine nucleotide pool in the mitochondrial matrix in response to energetic demands. The protein consists of three domains; (i) the N-terminal regulatory domain, which is formed of two pairs of fused calcium-binding EF-hands, (ii) the C-terminal mitochondrial carrier domain, which is involved in transport, and (iii) a linker region with an amphipathic α-helix of unknown function. The mechanism by which calcium binding to the regulatory domain modulates substrate transport in the carrier domain has not been resolved. Here, we present two new crystal structures of the regulatory domain of the human isoform 1. Careful analysis by SEC confirmed that although the regulatory domain crystallised as dimers, full-length ATP-Mg/Pi carrier is monomeric. Therefore, the ATP-Mg/Pi carrier must have a different mechanism of calcium regulation than the architecturally related aspartate/glutamate carrier, which is dimeric. The structure showed that an amphipathic α-helix is bound to the regulatory domain in a hydrophobic cleft of EF-hand 3/4. Detailed bioinformatics analyses of different EF-hand states indicate that upon release of calcium, EF-hands close, meaning that the regulatory domain would release the amphipathic α-helix. We propose a mechanism for ATP-Mg/Pi carriers in which the amphipathic α-helix becomes mobile upon release of calcium and could block the transport of substrates across the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:26164100

  6. Calcium-induced conformational changes in the regulatory domain of the human mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier

    PubMed Central

    Harborne, Steven P.D.; Ruprecht, Jonathan J.; Kunji, Edmund R.S.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier imports adenine nucleotides from the cytosol into the mitochondrial matrix and exports phosphate. The carrier is regulated by the concentration of cytosolic calcium, altering the size of the adenine nucleotide pool in the mitochondrial matrix in response to energetic demands. The protein consists of three domains; (i) the N-terminal regulatory domain, which is formed of two pairs of fused calcium-binding EF-hands, (ii) the C-terminal mitochondrial carrier domain, which is involved in transport, and (iii) a linker region with an amphipathic α-helix of unknown function. The mechanism by which calcium binding to the regulatory domain modulates substrate transport in the carrier domain has not been resolved. Here, we present two new crystal structures of the regulatory domain of the human isoform 1. Careful analysis by SEC confirmed that although the regulatory domain crystallised as dimers, full-length ATP-Mg/Pi carrier is monomeric. Therefore, the ATP-Mg/Pi carrier must have a different mechanism of calcium regulation than the architecturally related aspartate/glutamate carrier, which is dimeric. The structure showed that an amphipathic α-helix is bound to the regulatory domain in a hydrophobic cleft of EF-hand 3/4. Detailed bioinformatics analyses of different EF-hand states indicate that upon release of calcium, EF-hands close, meaning that the regulatory domain would release the amphipathic α-helix. We propose a mechanism for ATP-Mg/Pi carriers in which the amphipathic α-helix becomes mobile upon release of calcium and could block the transport of substrates across the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:26164100

  7. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements are carbonate and citrate. Calcium carbonate is inexpensive, but is absorbed best when taken ... antacid products, such as Tums® and Rolaids®, contain calcium carbonate. Each pill or chew provides 200–400 mg ...

  8. Mobilization of cellular calcium-45 and lead-210: effect of physiological stimuli

    SciTech Connect

    Pounds, J.G.; Mittelstaedt, R.A.

    1983-04-15

    Isolated rat hepatocytes in primary culture were used as a model system to evaluate the effects of selected hormones and culture conditions on the efflux of calcium-45 and lead-210 from cells labeled with these isotopes. Alpha-adrenergic stimuli, angiotensin, vasopressin, dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate, and reduced phosphate concentrations in the medium increased the efflux of calcium-45 and lead-210. Glucagon and insulin had no effect, but increased phosphate concentrations decreased the efflux of both isotopes. Experiments with hepatocytes cultured in a medium free of calcium and lead demonstrated that the increased efflux of calcium-45 and lead-210 induced by hormones was the result of mobilization of the ions from intracellular stores. The data indicate that the physiological stimuli that mobilized calcium ions also mobilized lead ions, and that the mobilized lead would be available to interact with calcium-mediated cell functions.

  9. Re-evaluation of the Role of Calcium Homeostasis Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein (CHERP) in Cellular Calcium Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Lin-Moshier, Yaping; Sebastian, Peter J.; Higgins, LeeAnn; Sampson, Natalie D.; Hewitt, Jane E.; Marchant, Jonathan S.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, resulting from activation of intracellular Ca2+ channels within the endoplasmic reticulum, regulate several aspects of cellular growth and differentiation. Ca2+ homeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein (CHERP) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that has been proposed as a regulator of both major families of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ channels, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs), with resulting effects on mitotic cycling. However, the manner by which CHERP regulates intracellular Ca2+ channels to impact cellular growth is unknown. Here, we challenge previous findings that CHERP acts as a direct cytoplasmic regulator of IP3Rs and RyRs and propose that CHERP acts in the nucleus to impact cellular proliferation by regulating the function of the U2 snRNA spliceosomal complex. The previously reported effects of CHERP on cellular growth therefore are likely indirect effects of altered spliceosomal function, consistent with prior data showing that loss of function of U2 snRNP components can interfere with cell growth and induce cell cycle arrest. PMID:23148228

  10. Regulation of Cellular Calcium in Vestibular Supporting Cells by Otopetrin 1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Euysoo; Hyrc, Krzysztof L.; Speck, Judith; Lundberg, Yunxia W.; Salles, Felipe T.; Kachar, Bechara; Goldberg, Mark P.; Warchol, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Otopetrin 1 (OTOP1) is a multitransmembrane domain protein, which is essential for mineralization of otoconia, the calcium carbonate biominerals required for vestibular function, and the normal sensation of gravity. The mechanism driving mineralization of otoconia is poorly understood, but it has been proposed that supporting cells and a mechanism to maintain high concentrations of calcium are critical. Using Otop1 knockout mice and a utricular epithelial organ culture system, we show that OTOP1 is expressed at the apex of supporting cells and functions to increase cytosolic calcium in response to purinergic agonists, such as adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP). This is achieved by blocking mobilization of calcium from intracellular stores in an extracellular calcium-dependent manner and by mediating influx of extracellular calcium. These data support a model in which OTOP1 acts as a sensor of the extracellular calcium concentration near supporting cells and responds to ATP in the endolymph to increase intracellular calcium levels during otoconia mineralization. PMID:20554841

  11. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them ... in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with soft bones that you eat, such as canned sardines and ...

  12. Regulatory Nexus of Synthesis and Degradation Deciphers Cellular Nrf2 Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takafumi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Takaya, Kai; Shiraishi, Kouya; Kohno, Takashi; Kunitoh, Hideo; Tsuta, Koji; Furuta, Koh; Goto, Koichi; Hosoda, Fumie; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Motohashi, Hozumi

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factor Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is essential for oxidative and electrophilic stress responses. While it has been well characterized that Nrf2 activity is tightly regulated at the protein level through proteasomal degradation via Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1)-mediated ubiquitination, not much attention has been paid to the supply side of Nrf2, especially regulation of Nrf2 gene transcription. Here we report that manipulation of Nrf2 transcription is effective in changing the final Nrf2 protein level and activity of cellular defense against oxidative stress even in the presence of Keap1 and under efficient Nrf2 degradation, determined using genetically engineered mouse models. In excellent agreement with this finding, we found that minor A/A homozygotes of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human NRF2 upstream promoter region (rs6721961) exhibited significantly diminished NRF2 gene expression and, consequently, an increased risk of lung cancer, especially those who had ever smoked. Our results support the notion that in addition to control over proteasomal degradation and derepression from degradation/repression, the transcriptional level of the Nrf2 gene acts as another important regulatory point to define cellular Nrf2 levels. These results thus verify the critical importance of human SNPs that influence the levels of transcription of the NRF2 gene for future personalized medicine. PMID:23572560

  13. Regulatory nexus of synthesis and degradation deciphers cellular Nrf2 expression levels.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takafumi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Takaya, Kai; Shiraishi, Kouya; Kohno, Takashi; Kunitoh, Hideo; Tsuta, Koji; Furuta, Koh; Goto, Koichi; Hosoda, Fumie; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2013-06-01

    Transcription factor Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is essential for oxidative and electrophilic stress responses. While it has been well characterized that Nrf2 activity is tightly regulated at the protein level through proteasomal degradation via Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1)-mediated ubiquitination, not much attention has been paid to the supply side of Nrf2, especially regulation of Nrf2 gene transcription. Here we report that manipulation of Nrf2 transcription is effective in changing the final Nrf2 protein level and activity of cellular defense against oxidative stress even in the presence of Keap1 and under efficient Nrf2 degradation, determined using genetically engineered mouse models. In excellent agreement with this finding, we found that minor A/A homozygotes of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human NRF2 upstream promoter region (rs6721961) exhibited significantly diminished NRF2 gene expression and, consequently, an increased risk of lung cancer, especially those who had ever smoked. Our results support the notion that in addition to control over proteasomal degradation and derepression from degradation/repression, the transcriptional level of the Nrf2 gene acts as another important regulatory point to define cellular Nrf2 levels. These results thus verify the critical importance of human SNPs that influence the levels of transcription of the NRF2 gene for future personalized medicine. PMID:23572560

  14. Cellular and subcellular localization of the neuron-specific plasma membrane calcium ATPase PMCA1a in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Katharine A.; Bushong, Eric A; Mauer, Amy S.; Strehler, Emanuel E.; Weinberg, Richard J.; Burette, Alain C.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of intracellular calcium is crucial both for proper neuronal function and survival. By coupling ATP hydrolysis with Ca2+ extrusion from the cell, the plasma membrane calcium-dependent ATPases (PMCAs) play an essential role in controlling intracellular calcium levels in neurons. In contrast to PMCA2 and PMCA3, which are expressed in significant levels only in the brain and a few other tissues, PMCA1 is ubiquitously distributed, and is thus widely believed to play a “housekeeping” function in mammalian cells. Whereas the PMCA1b splice variant is predominant in most tissues, an alternative variant, PMCA1a, is the major form of PMCA1 in the adult brain. Here, we use immunohistochemistry to analyze the cellular and subcellular distribution of PMCA1a in the brain. We show that PMCA1a is not ubiquitously expressed, but rather is confined to neurons, where it concentrates in the plasma membrane of somata, dendrites and spines. Thus, rather than serving a general “housekeeping” function, our data suggest that PMCA1a is a calcium pump specialized for neurons, where it may contribute to the modulation of somatic and dendritic Ca2+ transients. PMID:20575074

  15. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  16. Dual functions of a small regulatory subunit in the mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Phillips, Charles B; Ranaghan, Matthew; Tsai, Chen-Wei; Wu, Yujiao; Williams, Carole; Miller, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, a process crucial for bioenergetics and Ca2+ signaling, is catalyzed by the mitochondrial calcium uniporter. The uniporter is a multi-subunit Ca2+-activated Ca2+ channel, with the Ca2+ pore formed by the MCU protein and Ca2+-dependent activation mediated by MICU subunits. Recently, a mitochondrial inner membrane protein EMRE was identified as a uniporter subunit absolutely required for Ca2+ permeation. However, the molecular mechanism and regulatory purpose of EMRE remain largely unexplored. Here, we determine the transmembrane orientation of EMRE, and show that its known MCU-activating function is mediated by the interaction of transmembrane helices from both proteins. We also reveal a second function of EMRE: to maintain tight MICU regulation of the MCU pore, a role that requires EMRE to bind MICU1 using its conserved C-terminal polyaspartate tail. This dual functionality of EMRE ensures that all transport-competent uniporters are tightly regulated, responding appropriately to a dynamic intracellular Ca2+ landscape. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15545.001 PMID:27099988

  17. Regulatory inhibition of biological tissue mineralization by calcium phosphate through post-nucleation shielding by fetuin-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Joshua C.; Miura, Robert M.

    2016-04-01

    In vertebrates, insufficient availability of calcium and inorganic phosphate ions in extracellular fluids leads to loss of bone density and neuronal hyper-excitability. To counteract this problem, calcium ions are usually present at high concentrations throughout bodily fluids—at concentrations exceeding the saturation point. This condition leads to the opposite situation where unwanted mineral sedimentation may occur. Remarkably, ectopic or out-of-place sedimentation into soft tissues is rare, in spite of the thermodynamic driving factors. This fortunate fact is due to the presence of auto-regulatory proteins that are found in abundance in bodily fluids. Yet, many important inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis are associated with this undesired calcification. Hence, it is important to gain an understanding of the regulatory process and the conditions under which it can go awry. In this manuscript, we extend mean-field continuum classical nucleation theory of the growth of clusters to encompass surface shielding. We use this formulation to study the regulation of sedimentation of calcium phosphate salts in biological tissues through the mechanism of post-nuclear shielding of nascent mineral particles by binding proteins. We develop a mathematical description of this phenomenon using a countable system of hyperbolic partial differential equations. A critical concentration of regulatory protein is identified as a function of the physical parameters that describe the system.

  18. Regulatory inhibition of biological tissue mineralization by calcium phosphate through post-nucleation shielding by fetuin-A.

    PubMed

    Chang, Joshua C; Miura, Robert M

    2016-04-21

    In vertebrates, insufficient availability of calcium and inorganic phosphate ions in extracellular fluids leads to loss of bone density and neuronal hyper-excitability. To counteract this problem, calcium ions are usually present at high concentrations throughout bodily fluids-at concentrations exceeding the saturation point. This condition leads to the opposite situation where unwanted mineral sedimentation may occur. Remarkably, ectopic or out-of-place sedimentation into soft tissues is rare, in spite of the thermodynamic driving factors. This fortunate fact is due to the presence of auto-regulatory proteins that are found in abundance in bodily fluids. Yet, many important inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis are associated with this undesired calcification. Hence, it is important to gain an understanding of the regulatory process and the conditions under which it can go awry. In this manuscript, we extend mean-field continuum classical nucleationtheory of the growth of clusters to encompass surface shielding. We use this formulation to study the regulation of sedimentation of calcium phosphate salts in biological tissues through the mechanism of post-nuclear shielding of nascent mineral particles by binding proteins. We develop a mathematical description of this phenomenon using a countable system of hyperbolic partial differential equations. A critical concentration of regulatory protein is identified as a function of the physical parameters that describe the system. PMID:27389239

  19. Astrocyte glycogenolysis is triggered by store-operated calcium entry and provides metabolic energy for cellular calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Müller, Margit S; Fox, Rebecca; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Bak, Lasse K

    2014-04-01

    Astrocytic glycogen, the only storage form of glucose in the brain, has been shown to play a fundamental role in supporting learning and memory, an effect achieved by providing metabolic support for neurons. We have examined the interplay between glycogenolysis and the bioenergetics of astrocytic Ca(2+) homeostasis, by analyzing interdependency of glycogen and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), a mechanism in cellular signaling that maintains high endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) concentration and thus provides the basis for store-dependent Ca(2+) signaling. We stimulated SOCE in primary cultures of murine cerebellar and cortical astrocytes, and determined glycogen content to investigate the effects of SOCE on glycogen metabolism. By blocking glycogenolysis, we tested energetic dependency of SOCE-related Ca(2+) dynamics on glycogenolytic ATP. Our results show that SOCE triggers astrocytic glycogenolysis. Upon inhibition of adenylate cyclase with 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, glycogen content was no longer significantly different from that in unstimulated control cells, indicating that SOCE triggers astrocytic glycogenolysis in a cAMP-dependent manner. When glycogenolysis was inhibited in cortical astrocytes by 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol, the amount of Ca(2+) loaded into ER via sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2)-ATPase (SERCA) was reduced, which suggests that SERCA pumps preferentially metabolize glycogenolytic ATP. Our study demonstrates SOCE as a novel pathway in stimulating astrocytic glycogenolysis. We also provide first evidence for a new functional role of brain glycogen, in providing local ATP to SERCA, thus establishing the bioenergetic basis for astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling. This mechanism could offer a novel explanation for the impact of glycogen on learning and memory. PMID:24464850

  20. Phase transitions in the multi-cellular regulatory behavior of pancreatic islet excitability.

    PubMed

    Hraha, Thomas H; Westacott, Matthew J; Pozzoli, Marina; Notary, Aleena M; McClatchey, P Mason; Benninger, Richard K P

    2014-09-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans are multicellular micro-organs integral to maintaining glucose homeostasis through secretion of the hormone insulin. β-cells within the islet exist as a highly coupled electrical network which coordinates electrical activity and insulin release at high glucose, but leads to global suppression at basal glucose. Despite its importance, how network dynamics generate this emergent binary on/off behavior remains to be elucidated. Previous work has suggested that a small threshold of quiescent cells is able to suppress the entire network. By modeling the islet as a Boolean network, we predicted a phase-transition between globally active and inactive states would emerge near this threshold number of cells, indicative of critical behavior. This was tested using islets with an inducible-expression mutation which renders defined numbers of cells electrically inactive, together with pharmacological modulation of electrical activity. This was combined with real-time imaging of intracellular free-calcium activity [Ca2+]i and measurement of physiological parameters in mice. As the number of inexcitable cells was increased beyond ∼15%, a phase-transition in islet activity occurred, switching from globally active wild-type behavior to global quiescence. This phase-transition was also seen in insulin secretion and blood glucose, indicating physiological impact. This behavior was reproduced in a multicellular dynamical model suggesting critical behavior in the islet may obey general properties of coupled heterogeneous networks. This study represents the first detailed explanation for how the islet facilitates inhibitory activity in spite of a heterogeneous cell population, as well as the role this plays in diabetes and its reversal. We further explain how islets utilize this critical behavior to leverage cellular heterogeneity and coordinate a robust insulin response with high dynamic range. These findings also give new insight into emergent

  1. Differential expression of calcium-related genes in gastric cancer cells transfected with cellular prion protein.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jie; Luo, Guanhong; Ning, Xiaoxuan; Shi, Yongquan; Zhai, Huihong; Sun, Shiren; Jin, Haifeng; Liu, Zhenxiong; Zhang, Faming; Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Yunping; Chen, Xiong; Zhang, Hongbo; Guo, Xuegang; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming

    2007-06-01

    The prion protein (PrPC) has a primary role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, which causes prion disorders partially due to Ca2+ dysregulation. In our previous work, we found that overexpressed PrPC in gastric cancer was involved in apoptosis, cell proliferation, and metastasis of gastric cancer. To better understand how PrPC acts in gastric cancer, a human microarray was performed to select differentially regulated genes that correlate with the biological function of PrPC. The microarray data were analyzed and revealed 3798 genes whose expression increased at least 2-fold in gastric cancer cells transfected with PrPC. These genes encode proteins involved in several aspects of cell biology, among which, we specially detected molecules related to calcium, especially the S100 calcium-binding proteins, and found that PrPC upregulates S100A1, S100A6, S100B, and S100P but downregulates CacyBP in gastric cancer cells. We also found that intracellular Ca2+ levels in cells transfected with PrPC increased, whereas these levels decreased in knockdowns of these cells. Taken together, PrPC might increase intracellular Ca2+, partially through calcium-binding proteins, or PrPC might upregulate the expression of S100 proteins, partially through stimulating the intracellular calcium level in gastric cancer. Though the underlying mechanisms need further exploration, this study provides a new insight into the role of PrPC in gastric cancer and enriches our knowledge of prion protein. PMID:17612632

  2. Cellular Performance Comparison of Biomimetic Calcium Phosphate Coating and Alkaline-Treated Titanium Surface

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Mei

    2013-01-01

    The influence of biomimetic calcium phosphate coating on osteoblasts behavior in vitro is not well established yet. In this study, we investigated the behavior of osteoblastic rat osteosarcoma 17/2.8 cells (ROS17/2.8) on two groups of biomaterial surfaces: alkaline-treated titanium surface (ATT) and biomimetic calcium phosphate coated ATT (CaP). The cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and morphology on these surfaces were extensively evaluated to reveal the impact of substrate surface on osteoblastic cell responses. It was found that the ROS17/2.8 cells cultured on the ATT surface had higher attachment and proliferation rates compared to those on the CaP surface. Our results also showed that the calcium phosphate coatings generated in this work have an inhibiting effect on osteoblast adhesion and further influenced the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast compared to the ATT surface in vitro. Cells on the ATT surface also exhibited a higher alkaline phosphatase activity than on the CaP surface after two weeks of culture. Immunofluorescence staining and scanning electron microscopy results showed that the cells adhered and spread faster on the ATT surface than on the CaP surface. These results collectively suggested that substrate surface properties directly influence cell adhesion on different biomaterials, which would result in further influence on the cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:24455730

  3. Competing feedback loops shape IL-2 signaling between helper and regulatory T lymphocytes in cellular microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Dorothea; de la Rosa, Maurus; Hobiger, Kirstin; Thurley, Kevin; Flossdorf, Michael; Scheffold, Alexander; Höfer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Cytokines are pleiotropic and readily diffusible messenger molecules, raising the question of how their action can be confined to specific target cells. The T cell cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) is essential for the homeostasis of regulatory T (Treg) cells that suppress (auto)immunity and stimulates immune responses mediated by conventional T cells. We combined mathematical modeling and experiments to dissect the dynamics of the IL-2 signaling network that links the prototypical IL-2 producers, conventional T helper (Th) cells, and Treg cells. We show how the IL-2-induced upregulation of high-affinity IL-2 receptors (IL-2R) establishes a positive feedback loop of IL-2 signaling. This feedback mediates a digital switch for the proliferation of Th cells and functions as an analog amplifier for the IL-2 uptake capacity of Treg cells. Unlike other positive feedbacks in cell signaling that augment signal propagation, the IL-2/IL-2R loop enhances the capture of the signal molecule and its degradation. Thus Treg and Th cells can compete for IL-2 and restrict its range of action through efficient cellular uptake. Depending on activation status and spatial localization of the cells, IL-2 may be consumed exclusively by Treg or Th cells, or be shared between them. In particular, a Treg cell can deprive a stimulated Th cell of its IL-2, but only when the cells are located in close proximity, within a few tens of micrometers. The present findings explain how IL-2 can play two disctinct roles in immune regulation and point to a hitherto largely unexplored spatiotemporal complexity of cytokine signaling. PMID:20133667

  4. A novel calcium-independent cellular PLA2 acts in insect immunity and larval growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) catalyzes the position-specific hydrolysis of fatty acids linked to the sn-2 position of phospholipids (PLs). PLA2s make up a very large superfamily, with more than known 15 groups, classified into secretory PLA2 (sPLA2), Ca2+-dependent cellular PLA2 (sPLA2), and Ca2+-indepen...

  5. A novel calcium-independent cellular PLA2 acts in insect immunity and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) catalyzes the position-specific hydrolysis of fatty acids linked to the sn-2 position of phospholipids (PLs). PLA2s make up a very large superfamily, with more than known 15 groups, classified into secretory PLA2 (sPLA2), Ca2+-dependent cellular PLA2 (sPLA2), and Ca2+-indepen...

  6. Cellular localization and biochemical characterization of a novel calcium-dependent protein kinase from tobacco.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Zhang, Mei; Ke, Ke; Lu, Ying Tang

    2005-08-01

    By screening tobacco cDNA library with MCK1 as a probe, we isolated a cDNA clone NtCPK5 (accession number AY971376), which encodes a typical calcium-dependent protein kinase. Sequence analyses indicated that NtCPK5 is related to both CPKs and CRKs superfamilies and has all of the three conserved domains of CPKs. The biochemical activity of NtCPK5 was calcium-dependent. NtCPK5 had Vmax and Km of 526 nmol/min/mg and 210 microg/ml respectively with calf thymus histone (fraction III, abbreviated to histone IIIs) as substrate. For substrate syntide-2, NtCPK5 showed a higher Vmax of 2008 nmol/min/mg and a lower Km of 30 microM. The K0.5 of calcium activation was 0.04 microM or 0.06 microM for histone IIIs or syntide-2 respectively. The putative myristoylation and palmitoylation consensus sequence of NtCPK5 suggests that it could be a membrane-anchoring protein. Indeed, our transient expression experiments with wild type and mutant forms of NtCPK5/GFP fusion proteins showed that NtCPK5 was localized to the plasma membrane of onion epidermal cells and that the localization required the N-terminal acylation sites of NtCPK5/GFP. Taking together, our data have demonstrated the biochemical characteristics of a novel protein NtCPK5 and its subcellular localization as a membrane-anchoring protein. PMID:16117850

  7. Antioxidant activity, cellular bioavailability, and iron and calcium management of neuroprotective and nonneuroprotective flavones.

    PubMed

    Echeverry, Carolina; Arredondo, Florencia; Martínez, Marcela; Abin-Carriquiry, Juan Andrés; Midiwo, Jacob; Dajas, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have been undertaken on the relationship of the structure of flavones and neuroprotection. Previously, we described the structural determinants of the neuroprotective activity of some natural flavones in cerebellar granule neurons in culture against an oxidative insult (H2O2). In the present work, we analyzed anti-oxidant activity, cellular iron, and Ca(2+) levels and cellular bioavailability of neuroprotective and nonneuroprotective flavones in the same experimental paradigm. Oxidative cellular damage produced by H2O2 was prevented by all of the studied flavones with rather similar potency for all of them. Labile Iron Pool was neither affected by protective nor nonprotective flavones. Intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis was not affected by protective flavones either. Nonetheless, fisetin, the nonprotective flavone, decreased Ca(2+) levels modifying Ca(2+) homeostasis. Methylation of the catechol group, although weakens anti-oxidant capacity, keeps the neuroprotective capacity with less degradation and lower toxicity, constituting promising structural alternatives as leads for the design of neuroprotective molecules. PMID:24972590

  8. Cellular calcium dynamics in lactation and breast cancer: from physiology to pathology

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Brandie M.; Breitwieser, Gerda E.; Reinhardt, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in women, estimated at nearly 40,000 deaths and more than 230,000 new cases diagnosed in the U.S. this year alone. One of the defining characteristics of breast cancer is the radiographic presence of microcalcifications. These palpable mineral precipitates are commonly found in the breast after formation of a tumor. Since free Ca2+ plays a crucial role as a second messenger inside cells, we hypothesize that these chelated precipitates may be a result of dysregulated Ca2+ secretion associated with tumorigenesis. Transient and sustained elevations of intracellular Ca2+ regulate cell proliferation, apoptosis and cell migration, and offer numerous therapeutic possibilities in controlling tumor growth and metastasis. During lactation, a developmentally determined program of gene expression controls the massive transcellular mobilization of Ca2+ from the blood into milk by the coordinated action of calcium transporters, including pumps, channels, sensors and buffers, in a functional module that we term CALTRANS. Here we assess the evidence implicating genes that regulate free and buffered Ca2+ in normal breast epithelium and cancer cells and discuss mechanisms that are likely to contribute to the pathological characteristics of breast cancer. PMID:24225884

  9. Role of Junctin Protein Interactions in Cellular Dynamics of Calsequestrin Polymer upon Calcium Perturbation*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Keun Woo; Maeng, Jin-Soo; Choi, Jeong Yi; Lee, Yu Ran; Hwang, Chae Young; Park, Sung Sup; Park, Hyun Kyu; Chung, Bong Hyun; Lee, Seung-Goo; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Jeon, Hyesung; Eom, Soo Hyun; Kang, ChulHee; Kim, Do Han; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Calsequestrin (CSQ), the major intrasarcoplasmic reticulum calcium storage protein, undergoes dynamic polymerization and depolymerization in a Ca2+-dependent manner. However, no direct evidence of CSQ depolymerization in vivo with physiological relevance has been obtained. In the present study, live cell imaging analysis facilitated characterization of the in vivo dynamics of the macromolecular CSQ structure. CSQ2 appeared as speckles in the presence of normal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ that were decondensed upon Ca2+ depletion. Moreover, CSQ2 decondensation occurred only in the stoichiometric presence of junctin (JNT). When expressed alone, CSQ2 speckles remained unchanged, even after Ca2+ depletion. FRET analysis revealed constant interactions between CSQ2 and JNT, regardless of the SR Ca2+ concentration, implying that JNT is an essential component of the CSQ scaffold. In vitro solubility assay, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy studies using purified recombinant proteins confirmed Ca2+ and JNT-dependent disassembly of the CSQ2 polymer. Accordingly, we conclude that reversible polymerization and depolymerization of CSQ are critical in SR Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:22123818

  10. The BK channel: a vital link between cellular calcium and electrical signaling.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, Brad S

    2012-12-01

    Large-conductance Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channels (BK channels) constitute an key physiological link between cellular Ca²⁺ signaling and electrical signaling at the plasma membrane. Thus these channels are critical to the control of action potential firing and neurotransmitter release in several types of neurons, as well as the dynamic control of smooth muscle tone in resistance arteries, airway, and bladder. Recent advances in our understanding of K⁺ channel structure and function have led to new insight toward the molecular mechanisms of opening and closing (gating) of these channels. Here we will focus on mechanisms of BK channel gating by Ca²⁺, transmembrane voltage, and auxiliary subunit proteins. PMID:22996175

  11. Computational models of atrial cellular electrophysiology and calcium handling, and their role in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Heijman, Jordi; Erfanian Abdoust, Pegah; Voigt, Niels; Nattel, Stanley; Dobrev, Dobromir

    2016-02-01

    The complexity of the heart makes an intuitive understanding of the relative contribution of ion channels, transporters and signalling pathways to cardiac electrophysiology challenging. Computational modelling of cardiac cellular electrophysiology has proven useful to integrate experimental findings, extrapolate results obtained in expression systems or animal models to other systems, test quantitatively ideas based on experimental data and provide novel hypotheses that are experimentally testable. While the bulk of computational modelling has traditionally been directed towards ventricular bioelectricity, increasing recognition of the clinical importance of atrial arrhythmias, particularly atrial fibrillation, has led to widespread efforts to apply computational approaches to understanding atrial electrical function. The increasing availability of detailed, atrial-specific experimental data has stimulated the development of novel computational models of atrial-cellular electrophysiology and Ca(2+) handling. To date, more than 300 studies have employed mathematical simulations to enhance our understanding of atrial electrophysiology, arrhythmogenesis and therapeutic responses. Future modelling studies are likely to move beyond current whole-cell models by incorporating new data on subcellular architecture, macromolecular protein complexes, and localized ion-channel regulation by signalling pathways. At the same time, more integrative multicellular models that take into account regional electrophysiological and Ca(2+) handling properties, mechano-electrical feedback and/or autonomic regulation will be needed to investigate the mechanisms governing atrial arrhythmias. A combined experimental and computational approach is expected to provide the more comprehensive understanding of atrial arrhythmogenesis that is required to develop improved diagnostic and therapeutic options. Here, we review this rapidly expanding area, with a particular focus on Ca(2+) handling, and

  12. Calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis: effect of renal crystal deposition on the cellular composition of the renal interstitium.

    PubMed

    de Water, R; Noordermeer, C; van der Kwast, T H; Nizze, H; Boevé, E R; Kok, D J; Schröder, F H

    1999-04-01

    Urinary calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals and crystal agglomerates are normally harmlessly excreted, but in nephrolithiasis they are retained by tubular epithelial cells and shifted into the renal interstitium. This crystalline material induces an inflammatory response consisting of an increase in the number of interstitial cells and an expansion of the extracellular matrix. The newly arrived cells either derive from the blood or the connective tissue or they are formed by local proliferation. Identification of the cells that surround the interstitial crystals is a first step in investigating the question of whether the interstitial cells could remove the crystalline material. Therefore, we performed an immunohistochemical study on the kidneys of rats made hyperoxaluric by ethylene glycol (EG) and ammonium chloride (AC). Attention was paid to expression of the leukocyte common antigen (LCA), which identifies all types of leukocytes, the ED1 antigen, which is specific for monocytes and macrophages, and the major histocompatibility class II antigen (MHC II), which is present on dendritic cells, B lymphocytes, and activated macrophages. The results obtained were compared with those seen in two human kidney specimens with acute and chronic oxalosis. In both rat and humans, macrophages and multinucleated giant cells are the major cells that encapsulate the interstitial crystals. This similarity in response underlines the relevance of the rat nephrolithiasis model. The rat experiments showed, furthermore, that the number of interstitial crystals and the amount of biochemically measured kidney-associated oxalate both decrease with time, if the nephrolithiatic agents EG and AC are omitted from the drinking water. Further studies must clarify whether macrophages and multinucleated giant cells are able to remove the interstitial crystals and how these cells are recruited at the inflammatory site. PMID:10196021

  13. Physical properties and cellular responses to calcium phosphate coating produced by laser rapid forming on titanium.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y; Hu, J; Guan, T H; Wu, J; Zhang, C B; Gao, B

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the surface bioactivity of titanium implants, CaCO₃ and CaHPO₄·2H₂O powder was used to fabricate a calcium phosphate (CaP) coating using laser rapid forming (LRF) technology. The surface characterization showed that a porous and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) layer with small amount of alpha-TCP was formed on commercial pure titanium (Ti). The bonding strength between the coating and the Ti substrate was above 40.17 MPa measured by the means of pull-off test. The elastic modulus and the average microhardness of the coating were 117.61 GPa and 431.2 HV₀.₁, respectively. Through the static immersion test, it was proved that the coating could not only prevent the corrosion of Ti but also promote the redeposition of beta-TCP in artificial saliva. Osteoblasts possessed good attachment performance and strong proliferation ability on the surface of LRF coating (p < 0.05) in our cell experiments. This result demonstrated that the LRF coating could improve the surface cytocompatibility of titanium. Using scanning electron microscopy observation, it was found that osteoblasts grown on LRF coating formed multiple layers in pours. The result of reverse transcription PCR analysis demonstrated that the expressions of ITGβ1 and BMP-2 were significantly (p < 0.05) upregulated on the LRF coating in a time-dependent manner, compared with uncoated Ti. These findings suggested that the LRF technology might be a promising potential treatment for fabricating CaP coatings on titanium implants. PMID:23139072

  14. Calcium dependency of arachidonic acid incorporation into cellular phospholipids of different cell types.

    PubMed

    Daniele, J J; Fidelio, G D; Bianco, I D

    1999-07-01

    Ca2+ -independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) is involved in the incorporation of arachidonic acid (AA) into resting macrophages by the generation of the lysophospholipid acceptor. The role of iPLA2 in AA remodeling in different cells was evaluated by studying the Ca2+ dependency of AA uptake from the medium, the incorporation into cellular phospholipids, and the effect of the iPLA2 inhibitor bromoenol lactone on these events. Uptake and esterification of AA into phospholipids were not affected by Ca2+ depletion in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and rat fibroblasts. The uptake was Ca2+ independent in chick embryo glial cells, but the incorporation into phospholipids was partially dependent on extracellular Ca2+. Both events were fully dependent on extra and intracellular Ca2+ in human platelets. In human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, the kinetics of incorporation in several isospecies of phospholipids was not affected by the absence of Ca2+ at short times (<30 min). The involvement of iPLA2 in the incorporation of AA from the medium was confirmed by the selective inhibition of this enzyme with bromoenol lactone, which reduced < or =50% of the incorporation of AA into phospholipids of human neutrophils. These data provide evidence that suggests iPLA2 plays a major role in regulating AA turnover in different cell types. PMID:10480488

  15. Expression of mRNA Encoding Mcu and Other Mitochondrial Calcium Regulatory Genes Depends on Cell Type, Neuronal Subtype, and Ca2+ Signaling.

    PubMed

    Márkus, Nóra M; Hasel, Philip; Qiu, Jing; Bell, Karen F S; Heron, Samuel; Kind, Peter C; Dando, Owen; Simpson, T Ian; Hardingham, Giles E

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of Ca2+ into the mitochondrial matrix controls cellular metabolism and survival-death pathways. Several genes are implicated in controlling mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake (mitochondrial calcium regulatory genes, MCRGs), however, less is known about the factors which influence their expression level. Here we have compared MCRG mRNA expression, in neural cells of differing type (cortical neurons vs. astrocytes), differing neuronal subtype (CA3 vs. CA1 hippocampus) and in response to Ca2+ influx, using a combination of qPCR and RNA-seq analysis. Of note, we find that the Mcu-regulating Micu gene family profile differs substantially between neurons and astrocytes, while expression of Mcu itself is markedly different between CA3 and CA1 regions in the adult hippocampus. Moreover, dynamic control of MCRG mRNA expression in response to membrane depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx is also apparent, resulting in repression of Letm1, as well as Mcu. Thus, the mRNA expression profile of MCRGs is not fixed, which may cause differences in the coupling between cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca2+, as well as diversity of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake mechanisms. PMID:26828201

  16. Expression of mRNA Encoding Mcu and Other Mitochondrial Calcium Regulatory Genes Depends on Cell Type, Neuronal Subtype, and Ca2+ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Márkus, Nóra M.; Hasel, Philip; Qiu, Jing; Bell, Karen F. S.; Heron, Samuel; Kind, Peter C.; Dando, Owen; Simpson, T. Ian; Hardingham, Giles E.

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of Ca2+ into the mitochondrial matrix controls cellular metabolism and survival-death pathways. Several genes are implicated in controlling mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake (mitochondrial calcium regulatory genes, MCRGs), however, less is known about the factors which influence their expression level. Here we have compared MCRG mRNA expression, in neural cells of differing type (cortical neurons vs. astrocytes), differing neuronal subtype (CA3 vs. CA1 hippocampus) and in response to Ca2+ influx, using a combination of qPCR and RNA-seq analysis. Of note, we find that the Mcu-regulating Micu gene family profile differs substantially between neurons and astrocytes, while expression of Mcu itself is markedly different between CA3 and CA1 regions in the adult hippocampus. Moreover, dynamic control of MCRG mRNA expression in response to membrane depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx is also apparent, resulting in repression of Letm1, as well as Mcu. Thus, the mRNA expression profile of MCRGs is not fixed, which may cause differences in the coupling between cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca2+, as well as diversity of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake mechanisms. PMID:26828201

  17. Cellular uptake and metabolism of curcuminoids in monocytes/macrophages: regulatory effects on lipid accumulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously showed that curcumin (CUR) may increase lipid accumulation in cultured THP-1 monocytes/macrophages, but tetrahydrocurcumin (THC), an in vivo metabolite of CUR, had no such effect. In the present study, we have hypothesized that different cellular uptake and/or metabolism of CUR and THC...

  18. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant. PMID:25279857

  19. Involvement of the Iron Regulatory Protein from Eisenia andrei Earthworms in the Regulation of Cellular Iron Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5′- or 3′-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5′-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant. PMID:25279857

  20. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J.; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the genome-wide GadEWX transcriptional regulatory network and RpoS involvement in E. coli K-12 MG1655 under acidic stress. Integrative data analysis reveals that GadEWX regulons consist of 45 genes in 31 transcription units and 28 of these genes were associated with RpoS-binding sites. We demonstrate that GadEWX directly and coherently regulate several proton-generating/consuming enzymes with pairs of negative-feedback loops for pH homeostasis. In addition, GadEWX regulate genes with assorted functions, including molecular chaperones, acid resistance, stress response and other regulatory activities. These results show how GadEWX simultaneously coordinate many cellular processes to produce the overall response of E. coli to acid stress. PMID:26258987

  1. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the genome-wide GadEWX transcriptional regulatory network and RpoS involvement in E. coli K-12 MG1655 under acidic stress. Integrative data analysis reveals that GadEWX regulons consist of 45 genes in 31 transcription units and 28 of these genes were associated with RpoS-binding sites. We demonstrate that GadEWX directly and coherently regulate several proton-generating/consuming enzymes with pairs of negative-feedback loops for pH homeostasis. In addition, GadEWX regulate genes with assorted functions, including molecular chaperones, acid resistance, stress response and other regulatory activities. These results show how GadEWX simultaneously coordinate many cellular processes to produce the overall response of E. coli to acid stress. PMID:26258987

  2. Re-engineering cellular physiology by rewiring high-level global regulatory genes

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Stephen; Dillon, Shane C.; Chao, Tzu-Chiao; Wiencko, Heather L.; Hokamp, Karsten; Cameron, Andrew D. S.; Dorman, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of global regulatory networks has been exploited to rewire the gene control programmes of the model bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The product is an organism with competitive fitness that is superior to that of the wild type but tuneable under specific growth conditions. The paralogous hns and stpA global regulatory genes are located in distinct regions of the chromosome and control hundreds of target genes, many of which contribute to stress resistance. The locations of the hns and stpA open reading frames were exchanged reciprocally, each acquiring the transcription control signals of the other. The new strain had none of the compensatory mutations normally associated with alterations to hns expression in Salmonella; instead it displayed rescheduled expression of the stress and stationary phase sigma factor RpoS and its regulon. Thus the expression patterns of global regulators can be adjusted artificially to manipulate microbial physiology, creating a new and resilient organism. PMID:26631971

  3. Re-engineering cellular physiology by rewiring high-level global regulatory genes.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Stephen; Dillon, Shane C; Chao, Tzu-Chiao; Wiencko, Heather L; Hokamp, Karsten; Cameron, Andrew D S; Dorman, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of global regulatory networks has been exploited to rewire the gene control programmes of the model bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The product is an organism with competitive fitness that is superior to that of the wild type but tuneable under specific growth conditions. The paralogous hns and stpA global regulatory genes are located in distinct regions of the chromosome and control hundreds of target genes, many of which contribute to stress resistance. The locations of the hns and stpA open reading frames were exchanged reciprocally, each acquiring the transcription control signals of the other. The new strain had none of the compensatory mutations normally associated with alterations to hns expression in Salmonella; instead it displayed rescheduled expression of the stress and stationary phase sigma factor RpoS and its regulon. Thus the expression patterns of global regulators can be adjusted artificially to manipulate microbial physiology, creating a new and resilient organism. PMID:26631971

  4. Thermodynamic-based computational profiling of cellular regulatory control in hepatocyte metabolism.

    PubMed

    Beard, Daniel A; Qian, Hong

    2005-03-01

    Thermodynamic-based constraints on biochemical fluxes and concentrations are applied in concert with mass balance of fluxes in glycogenesis and glycogenolysis in a model of hepatic cell metabolism. Constraint-based modeling methods that facilitate predictions of reactant concentrations, reaction potentials, and enzyme activities are introduced to identify putative regulatory and control sites in biological networks by computing the minimal control scheme necessary to switch between metabolic modes. Computational predictions of control sites in glycogenic and glycogenolytic operational modes in the hepatocyte network compare favorably with known regulatory mechanisms. The developed hepatic metabolic model is used to computationally analyze the impairment of glucose production in von Gierke's and Hers' diseases, two metabolic diseases impacting glycogen metabolism. The computational methodology introduced here can be generalized to identify downstream targets of agonists, to systematically probe possible drug targets, and to predict the effects of specific inhibitors (or activators) on integrated network function. PMID:15507536

  5. [Translational/regulatory science researches of NIHS for regenerative medicine and cellular therapy products].

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the Japanese Diet passed the Regenerative Medicine Promotion Act and the revisions to the Pharmaceutical Affairs Act, which was also renamed as the Therapeutic Products Act (TPA). One of the aims of the new/revised Acts is to promote the development and translation of and access to regenerative/cellular therapies. In the TPA, a product derived from processing cells is categorized as a subgroup of "regenerative medicine, cellular therapy and gene therapy products" (RCGPs), products distinct from pharmaceuticals and medical devices, allowing RCGPs to obtain a conditional and time- limited marketing authorization much earlier than that under the conventional system. To foster not only RCGPs, but also innovative pharmaceuticals and medical devices, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare recently launched Translational Research Program for Innovative Pharmaceuticals, Medical Devices and RCGPs. This mini-review introduces contributions of the National Institute of Health Sciences (NIHS) to research projects on RCGPs in the Program. PMID:25707195

  6. Short-term effects of mineral particle sizes on cellular degradation activity after implantation of injectable calcium phosphate biomaterials and the consequences for bone substitution.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, O; Bouler, J M; Weiss, P; Bosco, J; Aguado, E; Daculsi, G

    1999-08-01

    This in vivo study investigated the influence of two calcium phosphate particle sizes (40-80 microm and 200-500 microm) on the cellular degradation activity associated with the bone substitution process of two injectable bone substitutes (IBS). The tested biomaterials were obtained by associating a biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramic mineral phase and a 3% aqueous solution of a cellulosic polymer (hydroxypropylmethylcellulose). Both were injected into osseous defects at the distal end of rabbit femurs for 2- and 3-week periods. Quantitative results for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) cellular activity, new bone formation, and ceramic resorption were studied for statistical purposes. Positive TRAP-stained degradation cells were significantly more numerous for IBS 40-80 than IBS 200-500, regardless of implantation time. BCP degradation was quite marked during the first 2 weeks for IBS 40-80, and bone colonization occurred more extensively for IBS 40-80 than for IBS 200-500. The resorption-bone substitution process occurred earlier and faster for IBS 40-80 than IBS 200-500. Both tested IBS displayed similar biological efficiency, with conserved in vivo bioactivity and bone-filling ability. Differences in calcium phosphate particle sizes influenced cellular degradation activity and ceramic resorption but were compatible with efficient bone substitution. PMID:10458280

  7. Interactions Between Adrenal and Calcium-Regulatory Hormones in Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jenifer M.; Vaidya, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review To summarize evidence characterizing the interactions between adrenal- and calcium-regulating hormones, and the relevance of these interactions to human cardiovascular and skeletal health. Recent Findings Human studies support the regulation of parathyroid hormone (PTH) by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS): angiotensin II may stimulate PTH secretion via an acute and direct mechanism, whereas aldosterone may exert a chronic stimulation of PTH secretion. Studies in primary aldosteronism, congestive heart failure, and chronic kidney disease have identified associations between hyperaldosteronism, hyperparathyroidism, and bone loss, which appear to improve when inhibiting the RAAS. Conversely, elevated PTH and insufficient vitamin D status have been associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes, which may be mediated by the RAAS. Studies of primary hyperparathyroidism implicate PTH-mediated stimulation of the RAAS, and recent evidence shows that the vitamin D-vitamin D receptor (VDR) complex may negatively regulate renin expression and RAAS activity. Ongoing human interventional studies are evaluating the influence of RAAS inhibition on PTH and the influence of VDR agonists on RAAS activity. Summary While previously considered independent endocrine systems, emerging evidence supports a complex web of interactions between adrenal and calcium-regulating hormones, with implications for human cardiovascular and skeletal health. PMID:24694551

  8. Arginine vasopressin increases cellular free calcium concentration and adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate production in rat renal papillary collecting tubule cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, S.; Okada, K.; Saito, T.

    1988-09-01

    The role of calcium (Ca) in the cellular action of arginine vasopressin (AVP) was examined in rat renal papillary collecting tubule cells in culture. AVP increased both the cellular free Ca concentration ((Ca2+)i) using fura-2, and cAMP production in a dose-dependent manner. AVP-induced cellular Ca mobilization was totally blocked by the antagonist to the antidiuretic action of AVP, and somewhat weakened by the antagonist to the vascular action of AVP. 1-Deamino-8-D-AVP (dDAVP). an antidiuretic analog of AVP, also increased (Ca2+) significantly. Cellular Ca mobilization was not obtained with cAMP, forskolin (a diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase), or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. The early phase of (Ca2+)i depended on the intracellular Ca pool, since an AVP-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was obtained in cells pretreated with Ca-free medium containing 1 mM EGTA, verapamil, or cobalt, which blocked cellular Ca uptake. Also, AVP increased /sup 45/Ca2+ influx during the initial 10 min, which initiated the sustained phase of cellular Ca mobilization. However, cellular cAMP production induced by AVP during the 10-min observation period was diminished in the cells pretreated with Ca-free medium, verapamil, or cobalt, but was still significantly higher than the basal level. This was also diminished by a high Ca concentration in medium. These results indicate that 1) AVP concomitantly regulates cellular free Ca as well as its second messenger cAMP production; 2) AVP-induced elevation of cellular free Ca is dependent on both the cellular Ca pool and extracellular Ca; and 3) there is an optimal level of extracellular Ca to modulate the AVP action in renal papillary collecting tubule cells.

  9. Cellular calcium mobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    In vascular and other smooth muscles, occurrence of intracellular Ca stores which can be mobilized to support contraction may be a general phenomenon. The Ca stores are characterized by the requirement for release by high concentrations of agonists acting on plasma membrane receptors, by the failure of the released Ca2+ to recycle to the store, by the occurrence of rapid refilling of the store from the extracellular space, and by disappearance of the store when the plasma membrane is made leaky by saponin. In contrast to agonist-released Ca stores, those released by caffeine to support contraction in Ca2+-free solutions are more slowly lost and refilled, are not always emptied when the agonist-related store is emptied, and do not disappear after saponin treatment. Stores released by agonists have been suggested to be in the endoplasmic reticulum near the plasma membrane or at the inner aspect of the plasma membrane related to high affinity, pH-dependent Ca-binding sites. Caffeine-released stores are assumed to be in endoplasmic reticulum. Continued exposure of some tissues to Ca2+-free solutions unmasks what is considered to be a recycling Ca store releasable by agonists. Release of Ca2+ and its reaccumulation in this store appear to be slower than at the nonrecycling store. The contractions which persist for many hours in Ca2+-free solution are inhibited temporarily by Ca2+ restoration. Existence of a recycling store of releasable Ca2+ requires occurrence of mechanisms to abolish Ca2+ extrusion or leak-out of the cell and to ensure recycling to the same store.

  10. A cellular and regulatory map of the cholinergic nervous system of C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Laura; Kratsios, Paschalis; Serrano-Saiz, Esther; Sheftel, Hila; Mayo, Avi E; Hall, David H; White, John G; LeBoeuf, Brigitte; Garcia, L Rene; Alon, Uri; Hobert, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Nervous system maps are of critical importance for understanding how nervous systems develop and function. We systematically map here all cholinergic neuron types in the male and hermaphrodite C. elegans nervous system. We find that acetylcholine (ACh) is the most broadly used neurotransmitter and we analyze its usage relative to other neurotransmitters within the context of the entire connectome and within specific network motifs embedded in the connectome. We reveal several dynamic aspects of cholinergic neurotransmitter identity, including a sexually dimorphic glutamatergic to cholinergic neurotransmitter switch in a sex-shared interneuron. An expression pattern analysis of ACh-gated anion channels furthermore suggests that ACh may also operate very broadly as an inhibitory neurotransmitter. As a first application of this comprehensive neurotransmitter map, we identify transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control cholinergic neurotransmitter identity and cholinergic circuit assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12432.001 PMID:26705699

  11. STIM1 Protein Activates Store-Operated Calcium Channels in Cellular Model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vigont, V. A.; Zimina, O. A.; Glushankova, L. N.; Kolobkova, J. A.; Ryazantseva, M. A.; Mozhayeva, G. N.; Kaznacheyeva, E. V.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that the expression of full-length mutated huntingtin in human neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) leads to an abnormal increase in calcium entry through store-operated channels. In this paper, the expression of the N-terminal fragment of mutated huntingtin (Htt138Q-1exon) is shown to be enough to provide an actual model for Huntington’s disease. We have shown that Htt138Q-1exon expression causes increased store-operated calcium entry, which is mediated by at least two types of channels in SK-N-SH cells with different reversal potentials. Calcium sensor, STIM1, is required for activation of store-operated calcium entry in these cells. The results provide grounds for considering the proteins responsible for the activation and maintenance of the store-operated calcium entry as promising targets for developing novel therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25558393

  12. Role of diacylglycerol kinase in cellular regulatory processes: a new regulator for cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Yasuchika; Goto, Kaoru; Kubota, Isao

    2007-09-01

    Diacylglycerol (DAG) kinase (DGK) phosphorylates and converts DAG to phosphatidic acid. DGK regulates cellular DAG levels and attenuates DAG signaling. The 10 mammalian DGK isoforms have been identified to date. In cardiac myocytes, DGKalpha, epsilon, and zeta are expressed, and DGKzeta is the predominant isoform. DGKzeta inhibits protein kinase C (PKC) activation and subsequent hypertrophic programs in response to endothelin-1 (ET-1) in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. DGKzeta blocks cardiac hypertrophy induced by G protein-coupled receptor agonists and pressure overload in vivo. DGKzeta attenuates ventricular remodeling and improves survival after myocardial infarction. These data provide a novel insight for subcellular mechanisms of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, and DGKzeta may be a new therapeutic target to prevent cardiac hypertrophy and progression to heart failure. PMID:17659347

  13. Cellular Interrogation: Exploiting Cell-to-Cell Variability to Discriminate Regulatory Mechanisms in Oscillatory Signalling.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Javier; Andrew, Natalie; Gibson, Daniel; Chang, Frederick; Gnad, Florian; Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2016-07-01

    The molecular complexity within a cell may be seen as an evolutionary response to the external complexity of the cell's environment. This suggests that the external environment may be harnessed to interrogate the cell's internal molecular architecture. Cells, however, are not only nonlinear and non-stationary, but also exhibit heterogeneous responses within a clonal, isogenic population. In effect, each cell undertakes its own experiment. Here, we develop a method of cellular interrogation using programmable microfluidic devices which exploits the additional information present in cell-to-cell variation, without requiring model parameters to be fitted to data. We focussed on Ca2+ signalling in response to hormone stimulation, which exhibits oscillatory spiking in many cell types and chose eight models of Ca2+ signalling networks which exhibit similar behaviour in simulation. We developed a nonlinear frequency analysis for non-stationary responses, which could classify models into groups under parameter variation, but found that this question alone was unable to distinguish critical feedback loops. We further developed a nonlinear amplitude analysis and found that the combination of both questions ruled out six of the models as inconsistent with the experimentally-observed dynamics and heterogeneity. The two models that survived the double interrogation were mathematically different but schematically identical and yielded the same unexpected predictions that we confirmed experimentally. Further analysis showed that subtle mathematical details can markedly influence non-stationary responses under parameter variation, emphasising the difficulty of finding a "correct" model. By developing questions for the pathway being studied, and designing more versatile microfluidics, cellular interrogation holds promise as a systematic strategy that can complement direct intervention by genetics or pharmacology. PMID:27367445

  14. Cellular Interrogation: Exploiting Cell-to-Cell Variability to Discriminate Regulatory Mechanisms in Oscillatory Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Daniel; Chang, Frederick; Gnad, Florian; Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    The molecular complexity within a cell may be seen as an evolutionary response to the external complexity of the cell’s environment. This suggests that the external environment may be harnessed to interrogate the cell’s internal molecular architecture. Cells, however, are not only nonlinear and non-stationary, but also exhibit heterogeneous responses within a clonal, isogenic population. In effect, each cell undertakes its own experiment. Here, we develop a method of cellular interrogation using programmable microfluidic devices which exploits the additional information present in cell-to-cell variation, without requiring model parameters to be fitted to data. We focussed on Ca2+ signalling in response to hormone stimulation, which exhibits oscillatory spiking in many cell types and chose eight models of Ca2+ signalling networks which exhibit similar behaviour in simulation. We developed a nonlinear frequency analysis for non-stationary responses, which could classify models into groups under parameter variation, but found that this question alone was unable to distinguish critical feedback loops. We further developed a nonlinear amplitude analysis and found that the combination of both questions ruled out six of the models as inconsistent with the experimentally-observed dynamics and heterogeneity. The two models that survived the double interrogation were mathematically different but schematically identical and yielded the same unexpected predictions that we confirmed experimentally. Further analysis showed that subtle mathematical details can markedly influence non-stationary responses under parameter variation, emphasising the difficulty of finding a “correct” model. By developing questions for the pathway being studied, and designing more versatile microfluidics, cellular interrogation holds promise as a systematic strategy that can complement direct intervention by genetics or pharmacology. PMID:27367445

  15. Endocytosis and trafficking of BMP receptors: Regulatory mechanisms for fine-tuning the signaling response in different cellular contexts.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2016-02-01

    Signaling by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors is regulated at multiple levels in order to ensure proper interpretation of BMP stimuli in different cellular settings. As with other signaling receptors, regulation of the amount of exposed and signaling-competent BMP receptors at the plasma-membrane is predicted to be a key mechanism in governing their signaling output. Currently, the endocytosis of BMP receptors is thought to resemble that of the structurally related transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) receptors, as BMP receptors are constitutively internalized (independently of ligand binding), with moderate kinetics, and mostly via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Also similar to TGF-β receptors, BMP receptors are able to signal from the plasma membrane, while internalization to endosomes may have a signal modulating effect. When at the plasma membrane, BMP receptors localize to different membrane domains including cholesterol rich domains and caveolae, suggesting a complex interplay between membrane distribution and internalization. An additional layer of complexity stems from the putative regulatory influence on the signaling and trafficking of BMP receptors exerted by ligand traps and/or co-receptors. Furthermore, the trafficking and signaling of BMP receptors are subject to alterations in cellular context. For example, genetic diseases involving changes in the expression of auxiliary factors of endocytic pathways hamper retrograde BMP signals in neurons, and perturb the regulation of synapse formation. This review summarizes current understanding of the trafficking of BMP receptors and discusses the role of trafficking in regulation of BMP signals. PMID:26776724

  16. The herpes simplex virus regulatory protein ICP27 contributes to the decrease in cellular mRNA levels during infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hardwicke, M A; Sandri-Goldin, R M

    1994-01-01

    We have previously shown that the herpes simplex virus immediate-early regulatory protein ICP27 acts posttranscriptionally to affect mRNA processing (R. M. Sandri-Goldin and G. E. Mendoza, Genes Dev. 6:848-863, 1992). Specifically, in the presence of ICP27, spliced target mRNAs were decreased 5- to 10-fold in transfections with target genes containing a 5' or 3' intron. Here, we have investigated the effect of ICP27 during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection on accumulation of spliced cellular mRNAs. ICP27 viral mutants have been shown to be defective in host shutoff (W. R. Sacks, C. C. Greene, D. P. Aschman, and P. A. Schaffer, J. Virol. 55:796-805, 1985). Therefore, we examined whether ICP27 could contribute to this complex process by decreasing cellular mRNA levels through its effects on host cell splicing. It was found that in infections with viral mutants defective in ICP27, the accumulated levels of three spliced host mRNAs were higher than those seen with wild-type HSV-1. The differences occurred posttranscriptionally as shown by nuclear runoff transcription assays. The stabilities of the spliced products during infection with wild-type or ICP27 mutant viruses were similar, and unspliced precursor mRNA for a viral spliced gene was detected in infections with wild-type HSV-1 but not in infections in which ICP27 was not expressed. These results suggest that the reduction in cellular mRNA levels and the accumulation of pre-mRNA are related and may be caused by an impairment in host cell splicing. These data further show that ICP27 is required for these effects to occur. Images PMID:8035480

  17. Regulatory mechanisms and the role of calcium and potassium channels controlling supercontractile crop muscles in adult Phormia regina.

    PubMed

    Solari, Paolo; Stoffolano, John G; Fitzpatrick, Joanna; Gelperin, Alan; Thomson, Alan; Talani, Giuseppe; Sanna, Enrico; Liscia, Anna

    2013-09-01

    Bioassays and electrophysiological recordings were conducted in the adult blowfly Phormia regina to provide new insights into the regulatory mechanisms governing the crop filling and emptying processes of the supercontractile crop muscles. The cibarial pump drives ingestion. Simultaneous multisite extracellular recordings show that crop lobe (P5) distension during ingestion of a 4.7 μl sugar meal does not require muscle activity by any of the other pumps of the system. Conversely, pumping of fluids toward the anterior of the crop system during crop emptying is brought about by active muscle contraction, in the form of a highly coordinated peristaltic wave starting from P5 and progressively propagating to P6, P4 and P3 pumps, with P5 contracting with a frequency about 3.4 times higher than the other pumps. The crop contraction rate is also modulated by hemolymph-borne factors such as sugars, through ligand recognition at a presumptive receptor site rather than by an osmotic effect, as assessed by both behavioural and electrophysiological experiments. In this respect, sugars of equal osmolarity produce different effects, glucose being inhibitory and mannose ineffective for crop muscles, while trehalose enhances crop activity. Finally, voltage and current clamp experiments show that the muscle action potentials (mAPs) at the P4 pump are sustained by a serotonin-sensitive calcium conductance. Serotonin enhances calcium entry into the muscle cells and this could lead, as an indirect modulatory effect, to activation of a Ca(2+)-activated K(+) conductance (IK(Ca)), which sustains the following mAP repolarization phase in such a way that further mAPs can be generated early and the frequency consequently increased. PMID:23834826

  18. Regulatory aspects of cellular therapy product in Europe: JACIE accreditation in a processing facility.

    PubMed

    Caunday, Olivia; Bensoussan, Danièle; Decot, Véronique; Bordigoni, Pierre; Stoltz, Jean François

    2009-01-01

    In 1997, the Joint Accreditation Committee ISCT & EBMT (JACIE) was created. The following year, it approved the first edition of standards for haemopoietic progenitor cell collection, processing and transplantation. The purpose of the standards is to ensure a minimal level of quality, alertness and homogeneity in the implementation of autologous and allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) programme in onco-hematology. The acquisition of accreditation is based upon the system of examination by trained medical professionals according to countries endorsements with the national regulation obligations applicable to HSCT. In 2008, the fourth edition has been launched. The range of application of the standards comprises both donors and recipients, and all phases of collection, processing, storage and administration of haemopoietic progenitor cells. Among the accredited processing facilities, a few have been integrated JACIE standards into their existing management quality system which is inspected by national health authority. In France, the comparison between JACIE standards and the good manufacturing practices of cellular therapy product reveals some common points and some differences to apply. PMID:20042804

  19. Extracellular Calcium Has Multiple Targets to Control Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Capiod, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Calcium channels and the two G-protein coupled receptors sensing extracellular calcium, calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and GPRC6a, are the two main means by which extracellular calcium can signal to cells and regulate many cellular processes including cell proliferation, migration and invasion of tumoral cells. Many intracellular signaling pathways are sensitive to cytosolic calcium rises and conversely intracellular signaling pathways can modulate calcium channel expression and activity. Calcium channels are undoubtedly involved in the former while the CaSR and GPRC6a are most likely to interfere with the latter. As for neurotransmitters, calcium ions use plasma membrane channels and GPCR to trigger cytosolic free calcium concentration rises and intracellular signaling and regulatory pathways activation. Calcium sensing GPCR, CaSR and GPRC6a, allow a supplemental degree of control and as for metabotropic receptors, they not only modulate calcium channel expression but they may also control calcium-dependent K+ channels. The multiplicity of intracellular signaling pathways involved, their sensitivity to local and global intracellular calcium increase and to CaSR and GPRC6a stimulation, the presence of membrane signalplex, all this confers the cells the plasticity they need to convert the effects of extracellular calcium into complex physiological responses and therefore determine their fate. PMID:27161228

  20. Role of calcium-dependent protein kinases in chronic myeloid leukemia: combined effects of PKC and BCR-ABL signaling on cellular alterations during leukemia development

    PubMed Central

    Mencalha, André L; Corrêa, Stephany; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (PKCs) function in a myriad of cellular processes, including cell-cycle regulation, proliferation, hematopoietic stem cell differentiation, apoptosis, and malignant transformation. PKC inhibitors, when targeted to these pathways, have demonstrated efficacy against several types of solid tumors as well as leukemia. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) represents 20% of all adult leukemia. The aberrant Philadelphia chromosome has been reported as the main cause of CML development in hematopoietic stem cells, due to the formation of the BCR-ABL oncogene. PKCs and BCR-ABL coordinate several signaling pathways that are crucial to cellular malignant transformation. Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that pharmacological approaches using PKC inhibitors may be effective in the treatment of CML. This mini review summarizes articles from the National Center for Biotechnology Information website that have shown evidence of the involvement of PKC in CML. PMID:25045273

  1. Effects of sodium gradient manipulation upon cellular calcium 45Ca fluxes and cellular sodium in the guinea-pig taenia coli

    PubMed Central

    Aaronson, P.; van Breemen, C.

    1981-01-01

    1. Sucrose and choline were utilized as NaCl substitutes in order to investigate Na—Ca interactions in the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig taenia coli. 2. Progressive substitution of NaCl by sucrose caused a progressive increase in cellular exchangeable Ca. This uptake, which amounted to about 300 μmole Ca/kg tissue upon total Na replacement, reached a plateau within 20 min. Complete substitution of NaCl by choline chloride caused cellular Ca to increase rapidly to an initial peak, and then decrease to a stable plateau which was also about 300 μmole/kg above control. 3. Replacement of NaCl by either sucrose or choline chloride caused a transient increase in the Ca influx rate, which was measured using a 3 min pulse labelling with 45Ca. This increase was more pronounced in choline chloride. 4. NaCl substitution by either sucrose or choline chloride caused a decrease in the 45Ca efflux rate. Two exponential components of transmembrane 45Ca efflux were found in control and Na-free media. 5. Treatment of tissues with 3 × 10-5 m-ouabain did not significantly affect the cellular Ca content after 80 min, at which time the Na and K gradients were largely dissipated. 6. Removal of medium K caused a slower dissipation of the Na and K gradients. This treatment decreased cellular Ca, did not affect the Ca influx rate, and increased the 45Ca efflux rate. 7. Tissues were incubated in depolarizing media containing 10-4 m-ouabain in order to remove the Na gradient. Subsequent measurement of cellular Na indicated the absence of a significant fraction of bound Na. 8. The ratio [Na]o/[Na]i had a value of 6.3 in control medium, and decreased as [Na]o was progressively lowered by sucrose substitution, reaching a value of < 1 in a medium containing 5 mm-Na. 9. These experiments provide evidence that a Na—Ca exchange carrier does not play an important role in regulation of tension in this muscle, and also indicate that the Ca gradient is not solely dependent on the Na gradient in

  2. Identification of Cellular Calcium Binding Protein Calmodulin as a Regulator of Rotavirus A Infection during Comparative Proteomic Study

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Shiladitya; Basak, Trayambak; Nayak, Mukti Kant; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Mukherjee, Anupam; Bhowmick, Rahul; Sengupta, Shantanu; Chakrabarti, Oishee; Chatterjee, Nabendu S.; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) being the major diarrhoegenic virus causes around 527000 children death (<5years age) worldwide. In cellular environment, viruses constantly adapt and modulate to survive and replicate while the host cell also responds to combat the situation and this results in the differential regulation of cellular proteins. To identify the virus induced differential expression of proteins, 2D-DIGE (Two-dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis) based proteomics was used. For this, HT-29 cells were infected with RV strain SA11 for 0 hours, 3 hours and 9 hours post infection (hpi), differentially expressed spots were excised from the gel and identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. 2D-DIGE based proteomics study identified 32 differentially modulated proteins, of which 22 were unique. Some of these were validated in HT-29 cell line and in BALB/c mice model. One of the modulated cellular proteins, calmodulin (CaM) was found to directly interact with RV protein VP6 in the presence of Ca2+. Ca2+-CaM/VP6 interaction positively regulates RV propagation since both CaM inhibitor (W-7) and Ca2+ chelator (BAPTA-AM) resulted in decreased viral titers. This study not only identifies differentially modulated cellular proteins upon infection with rotavirus in 2D-DIGE but also confirmed positive engagement of cellular Ca2+/CaM during viral pathogenesis. PMID:23437200

  3. Effects of whole flaxseed, raw soybeans, and calcium salts of fatty acids on measures of cellular immune function of transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Gandra, J R; Barletta, R V; Mingoti, R D; Verdurico, L C; Freitas, J E; Oliveira, L J; Takiya, C S; Kfoury, J R; Wiltbank, M C; Renno, F P

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of supplemental n-3 and n-6 fatty acid (FA) sources on cellular immune function of transition dairy cows. Animals were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 diets: control (n=11); whole flaxseed (n-3 FA source; n=11), 60 and 80g/kg of whole flaxseed [diet dry matter (DM) basis] during pre- and postpartum, respectively; whole raw soybeans (n-6 FA source; n=10), 120 and 160g/kg of whole raw soybeans (diet DM basis) during pre- and postpartum, respectively; and calcium salts of unsaturated FA (Megalac-E, n-6 FA source; n=10), 24 and 32g/kg of calcium salts of unsaturated FA (diet DM basis) during pre- and postpartum, respectively. Supplemental FA did not alter DM intake and milk yield but increased energy balance during the postpartum period. Diets containing n-3 and n-6 FA sources increased phagocytosis capacity of leukocytes and monocytes and phagocytosis activity of monocytes. Furthermore, n-3 FA source increased phagocytic capacity of leukocytes and neutrophils and increased phagocytic activity in monocytes and neutrophils when compared with n-6 FA sources. Supplemental FA effects on adaptive immune system included increased percentage of T-helper cells, T-cytotoxic cells, cells that expressed IL-2 receptors, and CD62 adhesion molecules. The results of this study suggest that unsaturated FA can modulate innate and adaptive cellular immunity and trigger a proinflammatory response. The n-3 FA seems to have a greater effect on phagocytic capacity and activity of leukocytes when compared with n-6 FA. PMID:27060809

  4. Selective targeting of the α5-subunit of GABAA receptors relaxes airway smooth muscle and inhibits cellular calcium handling

    PubMed Central

    Yocum, Gene T.; Siviski, Matthew E.; Yim, Peter D.; Fu, Xiao Wen; Poe, Michael M.; Cook, James M.; Harrison, Neil; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose; Emala, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical need for novel bronchodilators for the treatment of bronchoconstrictive diseases remains a major medical issue. Modulation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) chloride via GABAA receptor activation to achieve relaxation of precontracted ASM represents a potentially beneficial therapeutic option. Since human ASM GABAA receptors express only the α4- and α5-subunits, there is an opportunity to selectively target ASM GABAA receptors to improve drug efficacy and minimize side effects. Recently, a novel compound (R)-ethyl8-ethynyl-6-(2-fluorophenyl)-4-methyl-4H-benzo[f]imidazo[1,5-a][1,4] diazepine-3-carboxylate (SH-053-2′F-R-CH3) with allosteric selectivity for α5-subunit containing GABAA receptors has become available. We questioned whether this novel GABAA α5-selective ligand relaxes ASM and affects intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) regulation. Immunohistochemical staining localized the GABAA α5-subunit to human ASM. The selective GABAA α5 ligand SH-053-2′F-R-CH3 relaxes precontracted intact ASM; increases GABA-activated chloride currents in human ASM cells in voltage-clamp electrophysiology studies; and attenuates bradykinin-induced increases in [Ca2+]i, store-operated Ca2+ entry, and methacholine-induced Ca2+ oscillations in peripheral murine lung slices. In conclusion, selective subunit targeting of endogenous α5-subunit containing GABAA receptors on ASM may represent a novel therapeutic option to treat severe bronchospasm. PMID:25659897

  5. Selective targeting of the α5-subunit of GABAA receptors relaxes airway smooth muscle and inhibits cellular calcium handling.

    PubMed

    Gallos, George; Yocum, Gene T; Siviski, Matthew E; Yim, Peter D; Fu, Xiao Wen; Poe, Michael M; Cook, James M; Harrison, Neil; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose; Emala, Charles W

    2015-05-01

    The clinical need for novel bronchodilators for the treatment of bronchoconstrictive diseases remains a major medical issue. Modulation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) chloride via GABAA receptor activation to achieve relaxation of precontracted ASM represents a potentially beneficial therapeutic option. Since human ASM GABAA receptors express only the α4- and α5-subunits, there is an opportunity to selectively target ASM GABAA receptors to improve drug efficacy and minimize side effects. Recently, a novel compound (R)-ethyl8-ethynyl-6-(2-fluorophenyl)-4-methyl-4H-benzo[f]imidazo[1,5-a][1,4] diazepine-3-carboxylate (SH-053-2'F-R-CH3) with allosteric selectivity for α5-subunit containing GABAA receptors has become available. We questioned whether this novel GABAA α5-selective ligand relaxes ASM and affects intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) regulation. Immunohistochemical staining localized the GABAA α5-subunit to human ASM. The selective GABAA α5 ligand SH-053-2'F-R-CH3 relaxes precontracted intact ASM; increases GABA-activated chloride currents in human ASM cells in voltage-clamp electrophysiology studies; and attenuates bradykinin-induced increases in [Ca(2+)]i, store-operated Ca(2+) entry, and methacholine-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in peripheral murine lung slices. In conclusion, selective subunit targeting of endogenous α5-subunit containing GABAA receptors on ASM may represent a novel therapeutic option to treat severe bronchospasm. PMID:25659897

  6. The influence of cellular source on periodontal regeneration using calcium phosphate coated polycaprolactone scaffold supported cell sheets.

    PubMed

    Dan, Hongxia; Vaquette, Cédryck; Fisher, Anthony G; Hamlet, Stephen M; Xiao, Yin; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Ivanovski, Saso

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is considered a promising approach to achieving predictable periodontal regeneration. In this study, the regenerative potential of cell sheets derived from different parts of the periodontium (gingival connective tissue, alveolar bone and periodontal ligament) were investigated in an athymic rat periodontal defect model. Periodontal ligament (PDLC), alveolar bone (ABC) and gingival margin-derived cells (GMC) were obtained from human donors. The osteogenic potential of the primary cultures was demonstrated in vitro. Cell sheets supported by a calcium phosphate coated melt electrospun polycaprolactone (CaP-PCL) scaffold were transplanted to denuded root surfaces in surgically created periodontal defects, and allowed to heal for 1 and 4 weeks. The CaP-PCL scaffold alone was able to promote alveolar bone formation within the defect after 4 weeks. The addition of ABC and PDLC sheets resulted in significant periodontal attachment formation. The GMC sheets did not promote periodontal regeneration on the root surface and inhibited bone formation within the CaP-PCL scaffold. In conclusion, the combination of either PDLC or ABC sheets with a CaP-PCL scaffold could promote periodontal regeneration, but ABC sheets were not as effective as PDLC sheets in promoting new attachment formation. PMID:24120045

  7. Enhancement of metallothionein gene expression in male Wistar (WF/NCr) rats by treatment with calmodulin inhibitors: potential role of calcium regulatory pathways in metallothionein induction.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, N; Waalkes, M P

    1994-03-01

    Recent reports indicate that calmodulin inhibitors (CIs) can modify cadmium toxicity in rodents. For instance, pretreatment with CIs prevents cadmium-induced testicular damage in mice and substantially reduces such damage in rats, the latter effect coinciding with significant alterations in cadmium distribution. Although the basis of these effects is unclear, it is frequently observed that metal-binding proteins such as metallothionein (MT) are involved in acquired tolerance to cadmium and this could be true of tolerance induced by CIs. Thus, we examined the effects of various CIs on MT gene expression. Treatment of WF/NCr rats with known CIs, including trifluoperazine (TPZ), N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W7), calmidazolium (CMZ), chlorpromazine (CPZ), and the calcium ionophore, A23187, increased hepatic MT gene expression, as assessed by mRNA levels, in all cases. Furthermore, hepatic MT protein levels were 40 to 180 micrograms MT/g wet wt (g ww) in rats treated with CIs or A23187 compared to control levels of 10 micrograms MT/g ww. Treatment with CPZ and CMZ did not increase renal MT protein after exposure, although increases in renal MT mRNA were observed. However, the CIs TPZ and W7 and the calcium ionophore increased both renal MT protein and MT mRNA levels. In contrast, no increases in testicular MT mRNA or the testicular cadmium binding protein (TCBP) levels were seen with any of the treatments. Treatment with CIs or A23187 produced increases in zinc levels in the liver, but not in the kidneys or testes. These results indicate that CIs, such as TPZ, W7, CMZ, and CPZ, as well as the calcium ionophore A23187, have a marked stimulatory effect on hepatic and renal MT gene expression and that calcium regulatory pathways may play an important role in this induction of MT. PMID:8128501

  8. Competitive Effects of Calcium and Magnesium Ions on the Photochemical Transformation and Associated Cellular Uptake of Iron by the Freshwater Cyanobacterial Phytoplankton Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Manabu; Yeung, Anna C Y; Waite, T David

    2015-08-01

    Photochemical reduction of iron and iron uptake by Microcystis were investigated in a freshwater medium (pH 8) containing a range of calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) ion concentrations (0.002-20 mM). In a medium containing the chelator ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), 50-fold increases in net photochemical formation rates of unchelated ferrous iron (Fe(II)') were observed as the concentration of calcium or magnesium metal (Me) was increased to exceed the concentration of EDTA. Kinetic modeling of iron transformation processes indicated that the facilitated Fe(II)' formation is attributed to Me-promoted photoreductive dissociation of the ferric iron-EDTA complex. In the medium containing Suwanee River fulvic acid, in contrast, the competitive effect of Me on photochemical Fe(II)' formation appears to be negligible due to the weak binding affinities of fulvic acid to Me. The cellular iron uptake rate in the EDTA-buffered system increased by ∼3-fold in the excess Me condition where the increased rate of photochemical Fe(II)' formation was observed, whereas the presence of Me resulted in a decrease in iron uptake rate in the fulvic acid system (by up to 5-fold). The decrease in iron uptake is likely caused by Me binding to iron transporters and other entities involved in intracellular iron transport. The findings of this study indicate a significant effect of Ca and Mg concentrations in natural waters on iron uptake by Microcystis, with the magnitude of effect depending strongly on ligand type. PMID:26132788

  9. Influence of Estrogen Therapy on Calcium, Phosphorus, and Other Regulatory Hormones in Postmenopausal Women: The MESA Study

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Ronit; de Boer, Ian H.; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Siscovick, David S.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Tracy, Russell; Laughlin, Gail A.; Criqui, Michael H.; Budoff, Mathew J.; Li, Dong; Ix, Joachim H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Estrogen therapy (ET) is associated with lower serum calcium and phosphorus concentrations and is known to increase bone mineral density (BMD). Other biomarkers of mineral metabolism may help understand the biological basis of these actions. Methods: We studied 2767 postmenopausal women in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, 862 (31%) of whom were using ET. We measured serum concentrations of calcium, phosphorus, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 24,25-dihydoxyvitamin D, and fibroblast growth factor-23 and urinary fractional excretion of calcium (FEca) and phosphorus (FEphos). We examined the associations of ET with each biomarker. In addition, we tested whether the adjustment for biomarkers attenuated the association of ET with lumbar BMD measured by abdominal computed tomography in a subset of 810 women. Results: In adjusted models, women who used ET were younger in age [62 (SD 8) vs 66 (9) y, P < .001], had lower mean serum calcium [−13 mg/dL (95% confidence interval [CI] −0.17, −0.10), P < .001] and lower FEca [−0.15% (95% CI −0.21, −0.09), P < .001]. Mean serum phosphorus was lower [−0.19 mg/dL (95% CI −0.23, −0.15), P < .001] and FEphos [0.56% (95% CI 0.16, 0.96), P = .007] was higher in women on ET. Mean 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were higher [1.52 ng/dL (95% CI 0.57, 2.47), P = .002, and 0.26 ng/mL (95% CI 0.03, 0.48), P = .03, respectively] in women who used ET. Mean PTH and fibroblast growth factor-23 did not differ significantly by the use of ET. ET use was strongly associated with higher lumbar BMD [12.75 mg/cm3 (95% CI 7.77–17.73), P < .001]; however, mineral metabolism measures did not meaningfully alter this association. Conclusions: In a multiethnic cohort of postmenopausal women, ET use was associated with lower serum calcium, lower FEca, lower serum phosphorus, and higher FEphos, suggesting these associations are attributable to increased calcium intake into bone and increased urinary phosphorus

  10. Cellular Hypertrophy and Increased Susceptibility to Spontaneous Calcium-Release of Rat Left Atrial Myocytes Due to Elevated Afterload

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haifei; Cannell, Mark B.; Kim, Shang Jin; Watson, Judy J.; Norman, Ruth; Calaghan, Sarah C.; Orchard, Clive H.; James, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial remodeling due to elevated arterial pressure predisposes the heart to atrial fibrillation (AF). Although abnormal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function has been associated with AF, there is little information on the effects of elevated afterload on atrial Ca2+-handling. We investigated the effects of ascending aortic banding (AoB) on Ca2+-handling in rat isolated atrial myocytes in comparison to age-matched sham-operated animals (Sham). Myocytes were either labelled for ryanodine receptor (RyR) or loaded with fluo-3-AM and imaged by confocal microscopy. AoB myocytes were hypertrophied in comparison to Sham controls (P<0.0001). RyR labeling was localized to the z-lines and to the cell edge. There were no differences between AoB and Sham in the intensity or pattern of RyR-staining. In both AoB and Sham, electrical stimulation evoked robust SR Ca2+-release at the cell edge whereas Ca2+ transients at the cell center were much smaller. Western blotting showed a decreased L-type Ca channel expression but no significant changes in RyR or RyR phosphorylation or in expression of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, SR Ca2+ ATPase or phospholamban. Mathematical modeling indicated that [Ca2+]i transients at the cell center were accounted for by simple centripetal diffusion of Ca2+ released at the cell edge. In contrast, caffeine (10 mM) induced Ca2+ release was uniform across the cell. The caffeine-induced transient was smaller in AoB than in Sham, suggesting a reduced SR Ca2+-load in hypertrophied cells. There were no significant differences between AoB and Sham cells in the rate of Ca2+ extrusion during recovery of electrically-stimulated or caffeine-induced transients. The incidence and frequency of spontaneous Ca2+-transients following rapid-pacing (4 Hz) was greater in AoB than in Sham myocytes. In conclusion, elevated afterload causes cellular hypertrophy and remodeling of atrial SR Ca2+-release. PMID:26713852

  11. Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G; Sinclair, Alison J

    2015-04-20

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  12. SNARE and regulatory proteins induce local membrane protrusions to prime docked vesicles for fast calcium-triggered fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Malsam, Jörg; Hagen, Wim J H; Scheutzow, Andrea; Söllner, Thomas H; Briggs, John A G

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane in response to Ca2+ influx, thereby releasing neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft. The protein machinery that mediates this process, consisting of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) and regulatory proteins, is well known, but the mechanisms by which these proteins prime synaptic membranes for fusion are debated. In this study, we applied large-scale, automated cryo-electron tomography to image an in vitro system that reconstitutes synaptic fusion. Our findings suggest that upon docking and priming of vesicles for fast Ca2+-triggered fusion, SNARE proteins act in concert with regulatory proteins to induce a local protrusion in the plasma membrane, directed towards the primed vesicle. The SNAREs and regulatory proteins thereby stabilize the membrane in a high-energy state from which the activation energy for fusion is profoundly reduced, allowing synchronous and instantaneous fusion upon release of the complexin clamp. PMID:24493260

  13. Cellular localization of the embryo-specific hybrid PRP from Zea mays, and characterization of promoter regulatory elements of its gene.

    PubMed

    Jose-Estanyol, M; Puigdomènech, P

    2012-10-01

    The expression, regulation and cellular localization of ZmHyPRP, a gene marker of embryo differentiation whose expression declines after ABA induction, was studied. ZmHyPRP is a proline-rich protein with a C-terminal domain having eight cysteines in a CM8 pattern. Transient expression in onion epidermal cells, transformed with a 2x35S::ZmHyPRP-GFP construction, indicated the protein is present in vesicles lining the membrane of the cell. The ZmHyPRP gene expression is under the control of classic promoter seed-specific regulatory elements such as Sph/RY and G-boxes, suggesting regulation by B3 and b-ZIP transcription factors. Promoter deletion analysis, by particle-bombardment transient transformation of maize immature embryos with serial deletions of the promoter fused to GUS, showed the presence of two negative regulatory elements, NE1 (-2070 to -1280) and NE2 (-232 to -178), in the ZmHyPRP promoter. By selective deletion or mutation of ZmHyPRP regulatory promoter elements we conclude that the promoter expression is attenuated by the NE2 element as well as by the G-box2 and the Sph1-2 box together with the G-box2. PMID:22915319

  14. Mechano-regulatory cellular behaviors of NIH/3T3 in response to the storage modulus of liquid crystalline substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Wang, Lei; Huang, Hao; Tan, Ruizhe; Zhao, Jupeng; Yang, Shenyu; Zeng, Rong; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Jiaqing; Yu, Bin; Tu, Mei

    2016-04-01

    The extent of substrate stiffness has been shown to be predominant in regulating cellular behaviors. Previous studies have used matrices such as elastomers or hydrogels to understand cell behavior. Herein, liquid crystalline matrices that resemble movable morphology of biomembrane and viscoelasticity were fabricated with tunable storage modulus for the evaluation of the modulus-driven cell behaviors. Our results demonstrated that NIH/3T3 cells showed a hypersensitive response to the storage modulus of liquid crystalline substrates by the alteration in attachment, spreading, proliferation and viability, polarization, cell cycle and apoptosis, and activity of mechano-transduction-related signal molecules including FAK, paxillin and ERK. The octyl hydroxypropyl cellulose substrates (OPC-1-5) with intermediate storage modulus of 12,312Pa and 7228Pa (OPC-2 and OPC-3 respectively) could provide more beneficial adhesion conditions leading to a larger spreading area, more elongated morphology and higher proliferation rates possibly through paxillin-ERK pathway, whereas the substrates with the highest or lowest storage modulus (16,723Pa, OPC-1; and 41Pa, OPC-5, respectively) appeared unfavorable for cell growth. Our study provides insights into the mechanism of modulus-driven cellular behaviors for better design of bioengineered cell substrates. PMID:26703364

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 protects regulatory T cells from hypoxia-induced cellular stress in an experimental mouse brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan L; Wainwright, Derek A; Ahmed, Atique U; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2014-01-15

    Two characteristic features of malignant gliomas (MG) are the presence of hypoxia and accumulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO1) is a cytoprotective enzyme expressed in high level by Tregs in glioma. In this study, we show that higher HO1 expression in Tregs is associated with increased survival under hypoxic conditions and that HO1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), abrogates the survival benefits. Moreover, SnPP preferentially eliminates Tregs and treatment with SnPP of tumor bearing mice significantly increases survival (23 to 31days (p<0.05)). Thus HO1 inhibition provides another alternative way of therapeutically targeting Tregs in MG. PMID:24268287

  16. Heme oxygenase-1 protects regulatory T cells from hypoxia-induced cellular stress in an experimental mouse brain tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan L.; Wainwright, Derek A.; Ahmed, Atique U.; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2013-01-01

    Two characteristic features of malignant gliomas (MG) are the presence of hypoxia and accumulation of regulatory T cells (Treg). Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO1) is a cytoprotective enzyme expressed in high level by Tregs in glioma. In this study, we show that higher HO1 expression in Treg is associated with increased survival under hypoxic conditions and that HO1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), abrogate the survival benefits. Moreover, SnPP preferentially eliminates Tregs and treatment of tumor bearing mice with SnPP significantly increases survival (23 to 31 days (p < 0.05)). Thus HO1 inhibition provides another alternative way of therapeutically targeting Tregs in MG. PMID:24268287

  17. Membrane associated complexes in calcium dynamics modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, Piotr; Dyzma, Michał; Kaźmierczak, Bogdan

    2013-06-01

    Mitochondria not only govern energy production, but are also involved in crucial cellular signalling processes. They are one of the most important organelles determining the Ca2+ regulatory pathway in the cell. Several mathematical models explaining these mechanisms were constructed, but only few of them describe interplay between calcium concentrations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cytoplasm and mitochondria. Experiments measuring calcium concentrations in mitochondria and ER suggested the existence of cytosolic microdomains with locally elevated calcium concentration in the nearest vicinity of the outer mitochondrial membrane. These intermediate physical connections between ER and mitochondria are called MAM (mitochondria-associated ER membrane) complexes. We propose a model with a direct calcium flow from ER to mitochondria, which may be justified by the existence of MAMs, and perform detailed numerical analysis of the effect of this flow on the type and shape of calcium oscillations. The model is partially based on the Marhl et al model. We have numerically found that the stable oscillations exist for a considerable set of parameter values. However, for some parameter sets the oscillations disappear and the trajectories of the model tend to a steady state with very high calcium level in mitochondria. This can be interpreted as an early step in an apoptotic pathway.

  18. Controlled Measurement and Comparative Analysis of Cellular Components in E. coli Reveals Broad Regulatory Changes in Response to Glucose Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Houser, John R.; Barnhart, Craig; Boutz, Daniel R.; Carroll, Sean M.; Dasgupta, Aurko; Michener, Joshua K.; Needham, Brittany D.; Papoulas, Ophelia; Sridhara, Viswanadham; Sydykova, Dariya K.; Marx, Christopher J.; Trent, M. Stephen; Barrick, Jeffrey E.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Wilke, Claus O.

    2015-01-01

    How do bacteria regulate their cellular physiology in response to starvation? Here, we present a detailed characterization of Escherichia coli growth and starvation over a time-course lasting two weeks. We have measured multiple cellular components, including RNA and proteins at deep genomic coverage, as well as lipid modifications and flux through central metabolism. Our study focuses on the physiological response of E. coli in stationary phase as a result of being starved for glucose, not on the genetic adaptation of E. coli to utilize alternative nutrients. In our analysis, we have taken advantage of the temporal correlations within and among RNA and protein abundances to identify systematic trends in gene regulation. Specifically, we have developed a general computational strategy for classifying expression-profile time courses into distinct categories in an unbiased manner. We have also developed, from dynamic models of gene expression, a framework to characterize protein degradation patterns based on the observed temporal relationships between mRNA and protein abundances. By comparing and contrasting our transcriptomic and proteomic data, we have identified several broad physiological trends in the E. coli starvation response. Strikingly, mRNAs are widely down-regulated in response to glucose starvation, presumably as a strategy for reducing new protein synthesis. By contrast, protein abundances display more varied responses. The abundances of many proteins involved in energy-intensive processes mirror the corresponding mRNA profiles while proteins involved in nutrient metabolism remain abundant even though their corresponding mRNAs are down-regulated. PMID:26275208

  19. Do calcium-mediated cellular signalling pathways, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), estrogen or progesterone receptor antagonists, or bacterial endotoxins affect bovine placental function in vitro?

    PubMed

    Weems, Y S; Randel, R D; Carstens, G E; Welsh, T H; Weems, C W

    2004-04-01

    media treated with RU-486 increased (P < or = 0.05) at 4 and 8 h compared to vehicle controls and was not affected by other treatments (P > or = 0.05). Concentrations of PGE2 in media at 4 and 8 h were lower (P < or = 0.05) when compared to controls except treatment with PGE2 at 4 and 8h and RU-486 at 8h (P > or = 0.05). PGF2alpha was increased (P < or = 0.05) by RU-486 at 8h and no other treatment affected PGF2alpha at 4 or 8 h (P < or = 0.05). In conclusion, modulators of cellular calcium signalling pathways given alone do not affect bovine placental progesterone secretion at the days studied and progesterone receptor-mediated events appear to suppress placental progesterone, PGF2alpha, and PGE2 secretion in cattle. In addition, PGE2 does not appear to regulate bovine placental progesterone secretion when the corpus luteum is functional and bacterial endotoxin does not appear to affect bovine placental secretion of PGF2alpha or PGE2. PMID:15287156

  20. The effect of cellular isolation and cryopreservation on the expression of markers identifying subsets of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiying; Nilles, Tricia L.; Johnson, Jacquett R.; Margolick, Joseph B.

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and their subsets during HIV infection is controversial. Cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are an important source for assessing number and function of Tregs. However, it is unknown if PBMC isolation and cryopreservation affect the expression of CD120b and CD39, markers that identify specific subsets of Tregs. Methods HIV-uninfected (HIV−) and -infected (HIV+) men were randomly selected from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS). Percentages of CD120b+ and CD39+ Tregs measured by flow cytometry in whole blood and in corresponding fresh and cryopreserved PBMC were compared. Results Percentages of CD120b+ Tregs were significantly lower in a) fresh PBMC relative to whole blood, and b) freshly thawed frozen PBMC relative to fresh PBMC when the recovery of viable cryopreserved cells was low. When present, low expression of CD120b in frozen PBMC was reversible by 4 hours of in vitro culture. In contrast, expression of CD39 on Tregs was not affected by isolation and/or cryopreservation of PBMC, or by relative recovery of cryopreserved PBMC. These findings were unaffected by the HIV status of the donor. Conclusion The data suggest that percentages of CD120b+ Tregs and CD39+ Tregs can be validly measured in either whole blood or PBMC (fresh and frozen) in HIV− and HIV+ men. However, for measurement of CD120b+ Tregs one type of sample should be used consistently within a given study, and thawed frozen cells may require in vitro culture if recovery of viable cells is low. PMID:26855370

  1. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  2. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  3. Characterization of a Novel Human Herpesvirus 8-Encoded Protein, vIRF-3, That Shows Homology to Viral and Cellular Interferon Regulatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lubyova, Barbora; Pitha, Paula M.

    2000-01-01

    The genome of the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) contains a cluster of open reading frames (ORFs) encoding proteins with homology to the cellular transcription factors of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family. Two of these homologues, vIRF-1 and vIRF-2, were previously identified and functionally analyzed. In this study, we have characterized a novel gene, designated vIRF-3, encoded within the previously predicted ORF K10.5 and our newly identified ORF K10.6. Northern blotting of RNA extracted from BCBL-1 cells with a vIRF-3-specific probe and reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed a single transcript of 2.2 kb with a splice present in the coding region. The vIRF-3 mRNA levels in BCBL-1 cells were increased upon 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment, with kinetics of expression similar to those of the early immediate genes. The vIRF-3 ORF encodes a 73-kDa protein with homology to cellular IRF-4 and HHV-8-encoded vIRF-2 and K11. In transient transfection assays with the IFNACAT reporter, vIRF-3 functioned as a dominant-negative mutant of both IRF-3 and IRF-7 and inhibited virus-mediated transcriptional activity of the IFNA promoter. Similarly, the overexpression of vIRF-3 in mouse L929 cells resulted in inhibition of virus-mediated synthesis of biologically active interferons. These results suggest that by targeting IRF-3 and IRF-7, which play a critical role in the activation of alpha/beta interferon (IFN) genes, HHV-8 has evolved a mechanism by which it directly subverts the functions of IRFs and down-regulates the induction of the IFN genes that are important components of the innate immunity. PMID:10933732

  4. Regulatory and effector functions of gamma-delta (γδ) T cells and their therapeutic potential in adoptive cellular therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sourav; Lal, Girdhari

    2016-09-01

    γδ T cells are an important innate immune component of the tumor microenvironment and are known to affect the immune response in a wide variety of tumors. Unlike αβ T cells, γδ T cells are capable of spontaneous secretion of IL-17A and IFN-γ without undergoing clonal expansion. Although γδ T cells do not require self-MHC-restricted priming, they can distinguish "foreign" or transformed cells from healthy self-cells by using activating and inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors. γδ T cells were used in several clinical trials to treat cancer patient due to their MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity, ability to distinguish transformed cells from normal cells, the capacity to secrete inflammatory cytokines and also their ability to enhance the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell response. In this review, we discuss the effector and regulatory function of γδ T cells in the tumor microenvironment with special emphasis on the potential for their use in adoptive cellular immunotherapy. PMID:27012367

  5. The Impact of Vitamin D3 Supplementation on Mechanisms of Cell Calcium Signaling in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lajdova, Ingrid; Spustova, Viera; Oksa, Adrian; Kaderjakova, Zuzana; Chorvat, Dusan; Morvova, Marcela; Sikurova, Libusa; Marcek Chorvatova, Alzbeta

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular calcium concentration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is significantly increased, and the regulatory mechanisms maintaining cellular calcium homeostasis are impaired. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of vitamin D3 on predominant regulatory mechanisms of cell calcium homeostasis. The study involved 16 CKD stages 2-3 patients with vitamin D deficiency treated with cholecalciferol 7000–14000 IU/week for 6 months. The regulatory mechanisms of calcium signaling were studied in PBMCs and red blood cells. After vitamin D3 supplementation, serum concentration of 25(OH)D3 increased (P < 0.001) and [Ca2+]i decreased (P < 0.001). The differences in [Ca2+]i were inversely related to differences in 25(OH)D3 concentration (P < 0.01). Vitamin D3 supplementation decreased the calcium entry through calcium release activated calcium (CRAC) channels and purinergic P2X7 channels. The function of P2X7 receptors was changed in comparison with their baseline status, and the expression of these receptors was reduced. There was no effect of vitamin D3 on P2X7 pores and activity of plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPases. Vitamin D3 supplementation had a beneficial effect on [Ca2+]i decreasing calcium entry via CRAC and P2X7 channels and reducing P2X7 receptors expression. PMID:26064953

  6. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... at both ionized calcium and calcium attached to proteins. You may need to have a separate ionized calcium test if you have factors that increase or decrease total calcium levels. These may include abnormal blood levels ...

  7. Two Dimensional Finite Element Model to Study Calcium Distribution in Oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Parvaiz Ahmad; Pardasani, Kamal Raj

    2015-06-01

    Cytosolic free calcium concentration is a key regulatory factor and perhaps the most widely used means of controlling cellular function. Calcium can enter cells through different pathways which are activated by specific stimuli including membrane depolarization, chemical signals and calcium depletion of intracellular stores. One of the important components of oocyte maturation is differentiation of the Ca2+ signaling machinery which is essential for egg activation after fertilization. Eggs acquire the ability to produce the fertilization-specific calcium signal during oocyte maturation. The calcium concentration patterns required during different stages of oocyte maturation are still not completely known. Also the mechanisms involved in calcium dynamics in oocyte cell are still not well understood. In view of above a two dimensional FEM model has been proposed to study calcium distribution in an oocyte cell. The parameters such as buffers, ryanodine receptor, SERCA pump and voltage gated calcium channel are incorporated in the model. Based on the biophysical conditions the initial and boundary conditions have been framed. The model is transformed into variational form and Ritz finite element method has been employed to obtain the solution. A program has been developed in MATLAB 7.10 for the entire problem and executed to obtain numerical results. The numerical results have been used to study the effect of buffers, RyR, SERCA pump and VGCC on calcium distribution in an oocyte cell.

  8. Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium signaling results from a complex interplay between activation and inactivation of intracellular and extracellular calcium permeable channels. This complexity is obvious from the pattern of calcium signals observed with modest, physiological concentrations of calcium-mobilizing agonists, which typically present as sequential regenerative discharges of stored calcium, a process referred to as calcium oscillations. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the underlying mechanism of calcium oscillations through the power of mathematical modeling. We also summarize recent findings on the role of calcium entry through store-operated channels in sustaining calcium oscillations and in the mechanism by which calcium oscillations couple to downstream effectors. PMID:21421924

  9. Mechanical properties and in vitro cellular behavior of zinc-containing nano-bioactive glass doped biphasic calcium phosphate bone substitutes.

    PubMed

    Badr-Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Hesaraki, Saeed; Zamanian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, different amounts (0.5-5 wt%) of a sol gel-derived zinc-containing nano-bioactive glass (NBG-Zn) powder were added to biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP). The mixtures were sintered at 1,100-1,300 °C and physical characteristics, mechanical properties, phase composition and morphology of them were studied. The samples were also soaked in human blood plasma for 15 days to evaluate variations in their surface morphologies. Rat calvarium-derived osteoblastic cells were seeded on tops of various samples and cell adhesion, proliferation, and alkaline phosphatase activity were evaluated at different culturing periods. The maximum bending strength (62 MPa) was obtained for BCP containing 0.5 wt% NBG-Zn at temperature 1,200 °C. This value was approximately 80% higher than that of pure BCP. The bending strength failed when both sintering temperature and amount of added NBG-Zn increased. At 1,100 °C, NBG-Zn additive did not change the phase composition of BCP. At temperatures 1,200 and 1,300 °C, both alpha-tricalcium calcium phosphate (α-TCP) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP and) phases were detected. However, adding higher amount of NBG-Zn to BCP resulted in elevation of β-TCP at 1,200 °C and progression of α-TCP at 1,300 °C. Based on the microscopic observations, adding 0.5 wt% NBG-Zn to BCP led to disappearance of grain boundaries, reduction of micropores and formation of a monolithic microstructure. No calcium phosphate precipitation was observed on sample surfaces after soaking in blood plasma, but some pores were produced by phase dissolution. The size and volume of these pores were directly proportional to NBG-Zn content. Based on the cell studies, both BCP and NBG-Zn-added BCP samples supported attachment and proliferation of osteoblasts, but higher alkaline phosphatase enzyme was synthesized within the cells cultured on NBG-Zn-added BCP. Overall, biphasic calcium phosphate materials with improved mechanical and biological properties

  10. Effects of electromagnetic field stimulation on cellular signal transduction mechanisms: Analyses of the effects of low frequency electromagnetic fields on calcium spiking in ROS 17/2.8 cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sisken, B.F.; Sisken, J.E.

    1997-12-01

    The general goals of this work were to determine whether resting levels of cellular second messengers, especially calcium, are affected by low-level electromagnetic fields and the mechanisms that could lead to such changes. The work performed was directed at (1) verifying the report of McLeod et al (1990) that low frequency sinusoidal EMF can alter basal calcium fluctuations in cultured ROS 17/2.8 osteoblast-like cells and (2) reproducing the findings of Luben et al (1982) that pulsed electromagnetic fields can affect PTH-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in osteoblasts. Initially a system was constructed so that cells could be exposed to sinusoidal electric fields using platinum electrodes. In this system, the electrodes were separated from the cells and culture medium by agar barriers. A series of experiments indicated that this system was subject to a significant, though little-known artifact in which a not well understood interaction between the electrodes and sodium ions in the medium or in plain salt solutions led to frequency and amplitude dependent emission of photons that are recorded by the detection system. They therefore designed and constructed an air gap reactor system that utilizes a ferromagnetic core to direct the magnetic flux generated by a sinusoidal coil. Studies on the effects of a 15 Hz pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on cyclic AMP metabolism were performed on ROS 17/2.8 and MC3T3 cells.

  11. Calcium-Dependent Energetics of Calmodulin Domain Interactions with Regulatory Regions of the Ryanodine Receptor Type 1 (RyR1)

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Rhonda A.; Sorensen, Brenda R.; Kilpatrick, Adina M.; Shea, Madeline A.

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) plays a vital role in calcium homeostasis by allosterically modulating intracellular calcium channels including the homo-tetrameric human Ryanodine Receptor Type 1 (hRyR1). Apo (calcium-free) CaM activates hRyR1 while calcium-saturated CaM inhibits it. Two CaM-binding regions (residues 1975–1999 and 3614–3643) identified in each RyR1 monomer were proposed to allow CaM to bridge adjacent RyR1 subunits. We explored the distinct roles of CaM domains by using fluorescence anisotropy to determine the affinity of CaM1–148 (full-length), CaM1–80 (N-domain) and CaM76–148 (C-domain) for peptides encompassing hRyR1 residues 1975–1999 or 3614–3643. Both CaM1–148 and CaM76–148 associated in a calcium-independent manner with similar affinities for hRyR1(3614–3643)p while CaM1–80 required calcium and bound ~250-fold more weakly. Association of CaM1–148, CaM1–80 and CaM76–148 with hRyR1(1975–1999)p was much less favorable than with hRyR1(3614–3643)p; differences between the two CaM domains were smaller. Equilibrium calcium titrations monitored by steady-state fluorescence demonstrated that both hRyR1 peptides increased the calcium-binding affinity of both CaM domains. These thermodynamic properties support a prior model in which the CaM C-domain associates with RyR1(3614–3643) at low levels of calcium, positioning CaM to rapidly respond to calcium efflux. However, the affinity of the N-domain of CaM for hRyR1(1975–1999)p is insufficient to explain a model in which CaM bridges adjacent RyR1 subunits within the tetramer. This indicates that other protein factors or properties of the tertiary or quaternary structure of hRyR1 contribute to the energetics of CaM-mediated regulation. PMID:25145833

  12. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... best treatment for the most common type of kidney stone , which is made of calcium. This type of ... the kidneys into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production ...

  13. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  14. Investigation of a Calcium-Responsive Contrast Agent in Cellular Model Systems: Feasibility for Use as a Smart Molecular Probe in Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Responsive or smart contrast agents (SCAs) represent a promising direction for development of novel functional MRI (fMRI) methods for the eventual noninvasive assessment of brain function. In particular, SCAs that respond to Ca2+ may allow tracking neuronal activity independent of brain vasculature, thus avoiding the characteristic limitations of current fMRI techniques. Here we report an in vitro proof-of-principle study with a Ca2+-sensitive, Gd3+-based SCA in an attempt to validate its potential use as a functional in vivo marker. First, we quantified its relaxometric response in a complex 3D cell culture model. Subsequently, we examined potential changes in the functionality of primary glial cells following administration of this SCA. Monitoring intracellular Ca2+ showed that, despite a reduction in the Ca2+ level, transport of Ca2+ through the plasma membrane remained unaffected, while stimulation with ATP induced Ca2+-transients suggested normal cellular signaling in the presence of low millimolar SCA concentrations. SCAs merely lowered the intracellular Ca2+ level. Finally, we estimated the longitudinal relaxation times (T1) for an idealized in vivo fMRI experiment with SCA, for extracellular Ca2+ concentration level changes expected during intense neuronal activity which takes place upon repetitive stimulation. The values we obtained indicate changes in T1 of around 1–6%, sufficient to be robustly detectable using modern MRI methods in high field scanners. Our results encourage further attempts to develop even more potent SCAs and appropriate fMRI protocols. This would result in novel methods that allow monitoring of essential physiological processes at the cellular and molecular level. PMID:24712900

  15. Plant calcium content: Ready to remodel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By identifying the relationship between calcium location in the plant cell and nutrient bioavailability, the plant characteristics leading to maximal calcium absorption by humans can be identified. Knowledge of plant cellular and molecular targets controlling calcium location in plants is emerging. ...

  16. The calcium paradox - what should we have to fear?

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza de; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; Dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseni; Cortez, José Luís Lasso; Goissis, Gilberto; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    The calcium paradox was first mentioned in 1966 by Zimmerman et al. Thereafter gained great interest from the scientific community due to the fact of the absence of calcium ions in heart muscle cells produce damage similar to ischemia-reperfusion. Although not all known mechanisms involved in cellular injury in the calcium paradox intercellular connection maintained only by nexus seems to have a key role in cellular fragmentation. The addition of small concentrations of calcium, calcium channel blockers, and hyponatraemia hypothermia are important to prevent any cellular damage during reperfusion solutions with physiological concentration of calcium. PMID:25140476

  17. Multiple cellular roles of Neurospora crassa plc-1, splA2, and cpe-1 in regulation of cytosolic free calcium, carotenoid accumulation, stress responses, and acquisition of thermotolerance.

    PubMed

    Barman, Ananya; Tamuli, Ranjan

    2015-04-01

    Phospholipase C1 (PLC1), secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) and Ca(2+)/H(+) exchanger proteins regulate calcium signaling and homeostasis in eukaryotes. In this study, we investigate functions for phospholipase C1 (plc-1), sPLA2 (splA2) and a Ca(2+)/H(+) exchanger (cpe-1) in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. The Δplc-1, ΔsplA2, and Δcpe-1 mutants exhibited a growth defect on medium supplemented with the divalent ionophore A23187, suggesting that these genes might play a role in regulation of cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) in N. crassa. The strains lacking plc-1, splA2, and cpe-1 possessed higher carotenoid content than wild type at 8°C, 22°C, and 30°C, and showed increased ultraviolet (UV)-survival under conditions that induced carotenoid accumulation. Moreover, Δplc-1, ΔsplA2, and Δcpe-1 mutants showed reduced survival rate under hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress and induced thermotolerance after exposure to heat shock temperatures. Thus, this study revealed multiple cellular roles for plc-1, splA2, and cpe-1 genes in regulation of [Ca(2+)](c), carotenoid accumulation, survival under stress conditions, and acquisition of thermotolerance induced by heat shock. PMID:25636422

  18. Regulatory effect of chrysin on expression of lenticular calcium transporters, calpains, and apoptotic-cascade components in selenite-induced cataract

    PubMed Central

    Sundararajan, Mahalingam; Thomas, Philip A.; Teresa, P. Archana; Anbukkarasi, Muniyandi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Selenite-induced cataract is associated with oxidative stress, loss of calcium homeostasis, activation of calpain enzymes, and apoptotic cell death in the lens. An evaluation of naturally occurring antioxidants that also restrict calcium influx into the lens and calpain activation and thus prevent lenticular cell death may lead to the development of safe and effective anticataractogenic drugs. This study focuses on a naturally occurring flavone, chrysin, and its efficacy in preventing cataractogenic changes in in vitro cultured Wistar rat lenses. Methods Lenses from Wistar rats incubated for 24 h at 37 °C in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM) were categorized into four main groups: Group I (control, incubated in DMEM alone); Group II (selenite-challenged and untreated, incubated in DMEM that contained 100 µM/ml of sodium selenite only); Group III (selenite-challenged and chrysin-treated, incubated in DMEM that contained sodium selenite [100 µM/ml of DMEM] and chrysin [200 µM/ml of DMEM]); and Group IV (chrysin-treated, incubated in DMEM that contained chrysin [200 µM/ml of DMEM] only). The Group III (selenite-challenged and chrysin-treated) lenses were further categorized into five sub-groups: Group IIIa (incubated for 24 h in DMEM that contained sodium selenite and chrysin added simultaneously), Group IIIb (first incubated for 2 h in DMEM that contained chrysin only and then for up to 24 h in fresh DMEM that contained sodium selenite only), Group IIIc (first incubated for 30 min in DMEM that contained sodium selenite only and subsequently for up to 24 h in DMEM that contained chrysin only), and Groups IIId and IIIe (first incubated for 1 h and 2 h, respectively, in DMEM that contained sodium selenite only and subsequently for up to 24 h in DMEM that contained chrysin only). Results Gross morphological assessment revealed dense opacification (Grade +++) in the selenite-challenged, untreated lenses (Group II); however, seven of the eight

  19. CaMKII associates with CaV1.2 L-type calcium channels via selected β subunits to enhance regulatory phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Abiria, Sunday A.; Colbran, Roger J.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) facilitates L-type Calcium Channel (LTCC) activity physiologically, but may exacerbate LTCC-dependent pathophysiology. We previously showed that CaMKII forms stable complexes with voltage-gated calcium channel β1b or β2a subunits, but not with the β3 or β4 subunits (Grueter et al 2008, Biochemistry, 47:1760–1767). CaMKII-dependent facilitation of CaV1.2 LTCCs requires Thr498 phosphorylation in the β2a subunit (Grueter et al, 2006, Mol Cell, 23:641–650), but the relationship of this modulation to CaMKII interactions with LTCC subunits is unknown. Here we show that CaMKII co-immunoprecipitates with forebrain LTCCs that contain CaV1.2α1 and β1 or β2 subunits, but is not detected in LTCC complexes containing β4 subunits.4 CaMKIIα can be specifically tethered to the I/II linker of CaV1.2α1 subunits in vitro by the β1b or β2a subunits. Efficient targeting of CaMKIIα to the full-length CaV1.2α1 subunit in transfected HEK293 cells requires CaMKII binding to the β2a subunit. Moreover, disruption of CaMKII binding substantially reduced phosphorylation of β2a at Thr498 within the LTCC complex, without altering overall phosphorylation of Cav1.2α1 and β subunits. These findings demonstrate a biochemical mechanism underlying LTCC facilitation by CaMKII. PMID:19840220

  20. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production of ... Milk-alkali syndrome Proximal renal tubular acidosis Rickets Sarcoidosis Vitamin D Update Date 5/3/2015 Updated ...

  1. Transport of Calcium Ions into Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaolong; Zhang, Dayong; He, Xiaolan; Huang, Yihong; Shao, Hongbo

    2016-06-01

    To uptake calcium ions of mitochondria is of significant functional connotation for cells, because calcium ions in mitochondria are involved in energy production, regulatory signals transfer, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and even programmed cell death of apoptosis, further playing more roles in plant productivity and quality. Cytoplasmic calcium ions access into outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) from voltage dependent anion-selective channel (VDAC) and were absorbed into inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) by mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU), rapid mitochondrial calcium uptake (RaM) or mitochondrial ryanodine receptor (mRyR). Although both mitochondria and the mechanisms of calcium transport have been extensively studied, but there are still long-standing or even new challenges. Here we review the history and recent discoveries of the mitochondria calcium ions channel complex involved calcium assimilation, and discuss the role of calcium ions into mitochondria. PMID:27252588

  2. Aging and calcium as an environmental factor.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T

    1985-12-01

    Calcium deficiency is a constant menace to land-abiding animals, including mammals. Humans enjoying exceptional longevity on earth are especially susceptible to calcium deficiency in old age. Low calcium and vitamin D intake, short solar exposure, decreased intestinal absorption, and falling renal function with insufficient 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D biosynthesis all contribute to calcium deficiency, secondary hyperparathyroidism, bone loss and possibly calcium shift from the bone to soft tissue, and from the extracellular to the intracellular compartment, blunting the sharp concentration gap between these compartments. The consequences of calcium deficiency might thus include not only osteoporosis, but also arteriosclerosis and hypertension due to the increase of calcium in the vascular wall, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and senile dementia due to calcium deposition in the central nervous system, and a decrease in cellular function, because of blunting of the difference in extracellular-intracellular calcium, leading to diabetes mellitus, immune deficiency and others (Fig. 6). PMID:2943880

  3. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the human body. It helps build and protect your teeth ... absorb calcium. You can get vitamin D from sunlight exposure to your skin and from your diet. Ask your provider whether ...

  4. [Biophysical aspects of biological activity structure--strain calcium carbonat in micellar form].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V I; Stekhin, A A; Iakovleva, G V; Savostikova, O N; Alekseeva, A V; P'ianzina, I P

    2013-01-01

    Results of the study of electrochemical and structural state of phase of associated water in the solutions of structurally stressed calcium carbonate in the micellar form are reported. On the base on the comparison of structural--physical changes of activated water with the data on the activity of bioluminiscentic "Ecolyum" microorganisms in their noncontact activation the electronic mechanism of the effect of activated water on cellular metabolism is substantiated The use of "Micellate of calcium" possessing non-contact electron-donor action on cellular structures was shown to permit to compensate the deficit of electrons and thereby to restore the activities of reductases and iron-containing peptides required for the production of regulatory ROS and alteration in redox state of the intracellular environment. PMID:24624817

  5. The role of calcium stores in apoptosis and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Smaili, S S; Pereira, G J S; Costa, M M; Rocha, K K; Rodrigues, L; do Carmo, L G; Hirata, H; Hsu, Y-T

    2013-02-01

    The mechanisms that regulate programmed cell death, such as apoptosis, and the cellular "self-eating" phenomenon of autophagy, share many regulatory systems and common pathways. These mechanisms have been extensively investigated over the last few years. Some intracellular structures may determine and control the autophagic fate of the cell such as the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and lysosomes. The coordination and interrelation of these organelles are crucial in maintaining calcium levels and general cellular homeostasis, as well as in regulating cell life and death under physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer, neurodegeneration, and aging. In this review, we discuss the crosstalk between the aforementioned organelles and their influence in apoptotic and autophagic processes. PMID:23228221

  6. Both short intense and prolonged moderate in vitro stimulation reduce the mRNA expression of calcium-regulatory proteins in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Mänttäri, Satu; Ørtenblad, Niels; Madsen, Klavs; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic and t-tubule membrane proteins regulating sarcoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration exhibit fibre-type-dependent isoform expression, and play central roles in muscle contraction and relaxation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of in vitro electrical stimulation on the mRNA expression of components involved in Ca(2+) regulation in oxidative and glycolytic skeletal muscle. The mRNA level of Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA1, 2), calsequestrin (CASQ1, 2), ryanodine receptor (RyR1), and dihydropyridine receptor (Cacna1) was assessed in rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) muscles at 4 h of recovery following in vitro stimulations (either short intensive (SHO) 60 Hz, 5 min, or prolonged moderate (PRO) 20 Hz, 40 min). Stimulation induced acute regulation of the mRNA level of Ca(2+)-regulating proteins in a manner that does not follow typical fibre-type-specific transitions. In general, stimulation decreased mRNA content of all proteins studied. Most prominent down-regulation was observed for Cacna1 (26 and 32 % after SHO and PRO, respectively, in SOL; 19 % after SHO in EDL). SERCA1, SERCA2, CASQ1, CASQ2, and RyR1 mRNA content also decreased significantly in both muscles relative to resting control. Of notice is that hexokinase II mRNA content was increased in EDL and unchanged in SOL underlining the specificity of the down-regulation of mRNA of Ca(2+) regulatory proteins. The results demonstrate contraction-induced down-regulation of mRNAs for the main components of Ca(2+)-regulating system in skeletal muscle. The down-regulation of both isoforms of SERCA and CASQ after a single electrical stimulation session suggests that adaptations to repeated stimulation involve further regulatory mechanisms in addition to acute mRNA responses. PMID:23111891

  7. Mucosal Immunization with the Live Attenuated Vaccine SPY1 Induces Humoral and Th2-Th17-Regulatory T Cell Cellular Immunity and Protects against Pneumococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiuyu; Wang, Hong; Liu, Yusi; Wang, Yiping; Zeng, Lingbing; Wu, Kaifeng; Wang, Jianmin; Ma, Feng; Xu, Wenchun; Yin, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal immunization with attenuated vaccine can protect against pneumococcal invasion infection, but the mechanism was unknown. Our study found that mucosal delivery with the live attenuated SPY1 vaccine strain can confer T cell- and B cell-dependent protection against pneumococcal colonization and invasive infection; yet it is still unclear which cell subsets contribute to the protection, and their roles in pneumococcal colonization and invasion remain elusive. Adoptive transfer of anti-SPY1 antibody conferred protection to naive μMT mice, and immune T cells were indispensable to protection examined in nude mice. A critical role of interleukin 17A (IL-17A) in colonization was demonstrated in mice lacking IL-17A, and a vaccine-specific Th2 immune subset was necessary for systemic protection. Of note, we found that SPY1 could stimulate an immunoregulatory response and that SPY1-elicited regulatory T cells participated in protection against colonization and lethal infection. The data presented here aid our understanding of how live attenuated strains are able to function as effective vaccines and may contribute to a more comprehensive evaluation of live vaccines and other mucosal vaccines. PMID:25312946

  8. The Cellular Level of PR500, a Protein Complex Related to the 19S Regulatory Particle of the Proteasome, Is Regulated in Response to Stresses in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhaohua; Staub, Jeffrey M.; Serino, Giovanna; Kwok, Shing F.; Kurepa, Jasmina; Bruce, Barry D.; Vierstra, Richard D.; Wei, Ning; Deng, Xing-Wang

    2001-01-01

    In Arabidopsis seedlings and cauliflower florets, Rpn6 (a proteasome non-ATPase regulatory subunit) was found in two distinct protein complexes of ∼800 and 500 kDa, respectively. The large complex likely represents the proteasome 19S regulator particle (RP) because it displays the expected subunit composition and all characteristics. The small complex, designated PR500, shares at least three subunits with the “lid” subcomplex of 19S RP and is loosely associated with an hsp70 protein. In Arabidopsis COP9 signalosome mutants, PR500 was specifically absent or reduced to an extent that correlates with the severity of the mutations. Furthermore, PR500 was also diminished in response to potential protein-misfolding stresses caused by the heat shock and canavanine treatment. Immunofluorescence studies suggest that PR500 has a distinct localization pattern and is enriched in specific nuclear foci. We propose that PR500 may be evolved in higher plants to cope with the frequently encountered environmental stresses. PMID:11179422

  9. “Velcro” Engineering of High Affinity CD47 Ectodomain as Signal Regulatory Protein α (SIRPα) Antagonists That Enhance Antibody-dependent Cellular Phagocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chia Chi M.; Guo, Nan; Sockolosky, Jonathan T.; Ring, Aaron M.; Weiskopf, Kipp; Özkan, Engin; Mori, Yasuo; Weissman, Irving L.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    CD47 is a cell surface protein that transmits an anti-phagocytic signal, known as the “don't-eat-me” signal, to macrophages upon engaging its receptor signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα). Molecules that antagonize the CD47-SIRPα interaction by binding to CD47, such as anti-CD47 antibodies and the engineered SIRPα variant CV1, have been shown to facilitate macrophage-mediated anti-tumor responses. However, these strategies targeting CD47 are handicapped by large antigen sinks in vivo and indiscriminate cell binding due to ubiquitous expression of CD47. These factors reduce bioavailability and increase the risk of toxicity. Here, we present an alternative strategy to antagonize the CD47-SIRPα pathway by engineering high affinity CD47 variants that target SIRPα, which has restricted tissue expression. CD47 proved to be refractive to conventional affinity maturation techniques targeting its binding interface with SIRPα. Therefore, we developed a novel engineering approach, whereby we augmented the existing contact interface via N-terminal peptide extension, coined “Velcro” engineering. The high affinity variant (Velcro-CD47) bound to the two most prominent human SIRPα alleles with greatly increased affinity relative to wild-type CD47 and potently antagonized CD47 binding to SIRPα on human macrophages. Velcro-CD47 synergizes with tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies to enhance macrophage phagocytosis of tumor cells in vitro, with similar potency as CV1. Finally, Velcro-CD47 interacts specifically with a subset of myeloid-derived cells in human blood, whereas CV1 binds all myeloid, lymphoid, and erythroid populations interrogated. This is consistent with the restricted expression of SIRPα compared with CD47. Herein, we have demonstrated that “Velcro” engineering is a powerful protein-engineering tool with potential applications to other systems and that Velcro-CD47 could be an alternative adjuvant to CD47-targeting agents for cancer immunotherapy

  10. Cellular location and age-dependent changes of the regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in rat testis.

    PubMed

    Landmark, B F; Oyen, O; Skålhegg, B S; Fauske, B; Jahnsen, T; Hansson, V

    1993-11-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the expression and cellular location of the various cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) subunits in different testicular cell types, using cDNA probes, isoenzyme-specific antibodies and activity measurements. Amounts of mRNA and protein were examined in cultured Sertoli cells, cultured peritubular cells, germ cells (pachytene spermatocytes, round spermatids), Leydig cell tumours as well as whole testes from rats of various ages. In Sertoli cells, there was a good correlation between the amount of mRNA and the respective immunoreactive proteins. In other types of cell, such as germ cells and Leydig tumour cells, this was not always the case. Large amounts of RII beta mRNA were found in Leydig tumour cells, whereas the amount of immunoreactive protein was low. Furthermore, large amounts of small-sized, germ cell-specific mRNAs for RI alpha (1.7 kb) and RII alpha (2.2 kb) were also found in the developing rat testis after 30 to 40 days of age, but the large amounts of mRNA were only partially reflected at the protein level. Pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids were practically devoid of both RII alpha and RII beta protein. During spermatid differentiation, there was a decrease in RI alpha and an increase in RII alpha protein. Cell specific distribution of the various PKA subunits in testicular cell types is described. In some types of cell, discrepancies between mRNA and protein were demonstrated, which clearly suggest cell specific differences in translational efficiencies for some of these mRNAs, particularly the small-sized mRNAs for RI alpha and RII alpha in meiotic and post-meiotic germ cells. PMID:8107013

  11. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, Sten

    2014-01-01

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels-one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms-feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction-diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker-Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed.

  12. [Mitochondria, calcium homeostasis and calcium signaling].

    PubMed

    Zavodnik, I B

    2016-03-01

    Са2+ is a very important and versatile intracellular signal which controls numerous biochemical and physiological (pathophysiological) processes in the cell. Good evidence exists that mitochondria are sensors, decoders and regulators of calcium signaling. Precise regulation of calcium signaling in the cell involves numerous molecular targets, which induce and decode changes of Са2+ concentrations in the cell (pumps, channels, Са2+-binding proteins, Са2+-dependent enzymes, localized in the cytoplasm and organelles). Mitochondrial Са2+ uniporter accumulates excess of Са2+ in mitochondria, while Na+/Са2+- and H+/Са2+-antiporters extrude Са2+ in the cytoplasm. Mitochondrial Са2+ overloading results in formation of mitochondria permeability transition pores which play an important role in cell death under many pathological conditions. Mitochondria regulate Са2+ homeostasis and control important cellular functions such as metabolism, proliferation, survival. Identification of cellular and mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters and understanding their functional mechanisms open up new prospects for their using as therapeutic targets. PMID:27420625

  13. Calcium antagonists.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Ehud; Messerli, Franz H

    2004-01-01

    Calcium antagonists were introduced for the treatment of hypertension in the 1980s. Their use was subsequently expanded to additional disorders, such as angina pectoris, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Raynaud phenomenon, pulmonary hypertension, diffuse esophageal spasms, and migraine. Calcium antagonists as a group are heterogeneous and include 3 main classes--phenylalkylamines, benzothiazepines, and dihydropyridines--that differ in their molecular structure, sites and modes of action, and effects on various other cardiovascular functions. Calcium antagonists lower blood pressure mainly through vasodilation and reduction of peripheral resistance. They maintain blood flow to vital organs, and are safe in patients with renal impairment. Unlike diuretics and beta-blockers, calcium antagonists do not impair glucose metabolism or lipid profile and may even attenuate the development of arteriosclerotic lesions. In long-term follow-up, patients treated with calcium antagonists had development of less overt diabetes mellitus than those who were treated with diuretics and beta-blockers. Moreover, calcium antagonists are able to reduce left ventricular mass and are effective in improving anginal pain. Recent prospective randomized studies attested to the beneficial effects of calcium antagonists in hypertensive patients. In comparison with placebo, calcium antagonist-based therapy reduced major cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death significantly in elderly hypertensive patients and in diabetic patients. In several comparative studies in hypertensive patients, treatment with calcium antagonists was equally effective as treatment with diuretics, beta-blockers, or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. From these studies, it seems that a calcium antagonist-based regimen is superior to other regimens in preventing stroke, equivalent in preventing ischemic heart disease, and inferior in preventing congestive heart failure

  14. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements include calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate is the more expensive form of ... the body on a full or empty stomach. Calcium carbonate is less expensive. It is absorbed better by ...

  15. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... levels. These may include abnormal blood levels of albumin or immunoglobulins. Normal Results Children: 4.8 to ... 2016:chap 245. Read More Acute kidney failure Albumin - blood (serum) test Bone tumor Calcium blood test ...

  16. Calcium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... as thyroid disease , parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , cancer, or malnutrition An ionized calcium test may be ordered when ... albumin , which can result from liver disease or malnutrition , both of which may result from alcoholism or ...

  17. Calcium Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Sarcopenia Skeletal Rare Disorders Data & Publications Facts and Statistics Vitamin D map Fracture Risk Map Hip Fracture ... Training Courses Working Groups Regional Audits Reports Facts and Statistics Popular content Calcium content of common foods What ...

  18. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables. PMID:26940168

  19. Calcium binding domains and calcium-induced conformational transition of SPARC/BM-40/osteonectin, an extracellular glycoprotein expressed in mineralized and nonmineralized tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Taylor, W.; Paulsson, M.; Sage, H.; Hogan, B.

    1987-11-03

    PSARC, BM-40, and osteonectin are identical or very closely related extracellular proteins of apparent M/sub r/ 43,000 (M/sub r/ 33,000 predicted from sequence). They were originally isolated from parietal endoderm cells, basement membrane producing tumors, and bone, respectively, but are rather widely distributed in various tissues. In view of the calcium binding activity reported for osteonectin, the authors analyzed the SPARC sequence and found two putative calcium binding domains. One is an N-terminal acid region with clusters of glutamic acid residues. This region, although neither ..gamma..-carboxylated nor homologous, resembles the ..gamma..-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of vitamin K dependent proteins of the blood clotting system in charge density, size of negatively charged clusters, and linkage to the rest of the molecule by a cysteine-rich domain. The other region is an EF-hand calcium binding domain located near the C-terminus. A disulfide bond between the E and F helix is predicted from modeling the EF-hand structure with the known coordinates of intestinal calcium binding protein. The disulfide bridge apparently serves to stabilize the isolated calcium loop in the extracellular protein. As observed for cytoplasmic EF-hand-containing proteins and for Gla domain containing proteins, a major conformational transition is induced in BM-40 upon binding of several Ca/sup 2 +/ ions. This is accompanied by a 35% increase in ..cap alpha..-helicity. A pronounced sigmoidicity of the dependence of the circular dichroism signal at 220 nm on calcium concentration indicates that the process is cooperative. In view of its properties, abundance, and wide distribution, it is proposed that SPARC/BM-40/osteonectin has a rather general regulatory function in calcium-dependent processes of the extra-cellular matrix.

  20. Calcium orthophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2011-01-01

    The present overview is intended to point the readers’ attention to the important subject of calcium orthophosphates. This type of materials is of special significance for human beings, because they represent the inorganic part of major normal (bones, teeth and antlers) and pathological (i.e., those appearing due to various diseases) calcified tissues of mammals. For example, atherosclerosis results in blood vessel blockage caused by a solid composite of cholesterol with calcium orthophosphates, while dental caries and osteoporosis mean a partial decalcification of teeth and bones, respectively, that results in replacement of a less soluble and harder biological apatite by more soluble and softer calcium hydrogenphosphates. Therefore, the processes of both normal and pathological calcifications are just an in vivo crystallization of calcium orthophosphates. Similarly, dental caries and osteoporosis might be considered an in vivo dissolution of calcium orthophosphates. Thus, calcium orthophosphates hold a great significance for humankind, and in this paper, an overview on the current knowledge on this subject is provided. PMID:23507744

  1. Calcium Hydroxylapatite

    PubMed Central

    Yutskovskaya, Yana Alexandrovna; Philip Werschler, WM.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calcium hydroxylapatite is one of the most well-studied dermal fillers worldwide and has been extensively used for the correction of moderate-to-severe facial lines and folds and to replenish lost volume. Objectives: To mark the milestone of 10 years of use in the aesthetic field, this review will consider the evolution of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine, provide a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach, and examine how the unique properties of calcium hydroxylapatite provide it with an important place in today’s market. Methods: This article is an up-to-date review of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine along with procedures for its use, including a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach by three expert injectors. Conclusion: Calcium hydroxylapatite is a very effective agent for many areas of facial soft tissue augmentation and is associated with a high and well-established safety profile. Calcium hydroxylapatite combines high elasticity and viscosity with an ability to induce long-term collagen formation making it an ideal agent for a global facial approach. PMID:25610523

  2. Redox control of brain calcium in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Cecilia; Carrasco, M Angélica

    2011-04-01

    Calcium ion is a highly versatile cellular messenger. Calcium signals-defined as transient increments in intracellular-free calcium concentration-elicit a multiplicity of responses that depend on cell type and signal properties such as their intensity, duration, cellular localization, and frequency. The vast literature available on the role of calcium signals in brain cells, chiefly centered on neuronal cells, indicates that calcium signals regulate essential neuronal functions, including synaptic transmission, gene expression, synaptic plasticity processes underlying learning and memory, and survival or death. The eight articles comprising this forum issue address different and novel aspects of calcium signaling in normal neuronal function, including how calcium signals interact with the generation of reactive species of oxygen/nitrogen with various functional consequences, and focus also on how abnormal calcium homeostasis and signaling, plus oxidative stress, affect overall brain physiology during aging and in neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. PMID:21050143

  3. Cellular therapy for haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Roddie, P H; Turner, M L

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize the recent progress made in the field of cellular therapeutics in haematological malignancy. The review also examined the role that the National Transfusion Services might play in the manufacture of new cellular therapeutic agents, given both their expertise in the safe provision of blood products and their possession of accredited cell manipulation facilities. Cellular therapy is entering an era in which novel cellular products will find increasing clinical use, particularly in the areas of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and immunotherapy. The production of novel cell-based therapies, both in Europe and North America, is now under strict regulatory control and therefore collaboration with the National Transfusion Services in the manufacture of these agents may well be beneficial if the production standards demanded by the regulatory authorities are to be fulfilled. PMID:12437515

  4. Calcium in Plants

    PubMed Central

    WHITE, PHILIP J.; BROADLEY, MARTIN R.

    2003-01-01

    Calcium is an essential plant nutrient. It is required for various structural roles in the cell wall and membranes, it is a counter‐cation for inorganic and organic anions in the vacuole, and the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) is an obligate intracellular messenger coordinating responses to numerous developmental cues and environmental challenges. This article provides an overview of the nutritional requirements of different plants for Ca, and how this impacts on natural flora and the Ca content of crops. It also reviews recent work on (a) the mechanisms of Ca2+ transport across cellular membranes, (b) understanding the origins and specificity of [Ca2+]cyt signals and (c) characterizing the cellular [Ca2+]cyt‐sensors (such as calmodulin, calcineurin B‐like proteins and calcium‐dependent protein kinases) that allow plant cells to respond appropriately to [Ca2+]cyt signals. PMID:12933363

  5. Competitive potential of cellular mobile telecommunications

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, H.

    1983-02-03

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has recently issued rules for the commercial operation of a telecommunications technology not previously in commercial use: the cellular mobile radio. The author has carefully considered the potential for competition between cellular systems and for competition between cellular radio and alternative communications technologies under the regulatory scheme which has been adopted by the FCC. He finds that competition between cellular and wire-line services can be viable if cellular cost and demand data are carefully tracked to avoid market congestion and if cellular or other techniques are not allowed to undercut selected local exchange rates.

  6. Calcium-Sensing Receptor: A Key Target for Extracellular Calcium Signaling in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Brian L.; Smith, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Though both clinicians and scientists have long recognized the influence of extracellular calcium on the function of muscle and nervous tissue, recent insights reveal that the mechanisms allowing changes in extracellular calcium to alter cellular excitability have been incompletely understood. For many years the effects of calcium on neuronal signaling were explained only in terms of calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels and biophysical charge screening. More recently however, it has been recognized that the calcium-sensing receptor is prevalent in the nervous system and regulates synaptic transmission and neuronal activity via multiple signaling pathways. Here we review the multiplicity of mechanisms by which changes in extracellular calcium alter neuronal signaling and propose that multiple mechanisms are required to describe the full range of experimental observations. PMID:27065884

  7. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  8. Get Enough Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of calcium ...

  9. Calcium carbonate overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  10. Prebiotics and calcium bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Kevin

    2003-03-01

    A prebiotic substance has been defined as a non-digestible food ingredient that beneficially affects the host by selectively stimulating the growth and/or activity of one or a limited number of bacteria in the colon. Therefore, compared to probiotics, which introduce exogenous bacteria into the colonic microflora, a prebiotic aims at stimulating the growth of one or a limited number of the potentially health-promoting indigenous micro-organisms, thus modulating the composition of the natural ecosystem. In recent years, increasing attention has been focussed on the possible beneficial effects of prebiotics, such as enhanced resistance to invading pathogens, improved bowel function, anti-colon cancer properties, lipid lowering action, improved calcium bioavailability, amongst others. The objective of this review is to critically assess the available data on the effects of prebiotics on calcium bioavailability, and place it in the context of human physiology and, when possible, explain the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. The review will also try to highlight future areas of research that may help in the evaluation of prebiotics as potential ingredients for functional foods aimed at enhancing calcium bioavailability and protecting against osteoporosis. PMID:12691259

  11. Calcium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for calcium cyanide is included in th

  12. Calcium signals and calcium channels in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.; Akanbi, K. A.; Farach-Carson, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) channels are present in non-excitable as well as in excitable cells. In bone cells of the osteoblast lineage, Ca2+ channels play fundamental roles in cellular responses to external stimuli including both mechanical forces and hormonal signals. They are also proposed to modulate paracrine signaling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts at local sites of bone remodeling. Calcium signals are characterized by transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels that are associated with activation of intracellular signaling pathways that control cell behavior and phenotype, including patterns of gene expression. Development of Ca2+ signals is a tightly regulated cellular process that involves the concerted actions of plasma membrane and intracellular Ca2+ channels, along with Ca2+ pumps and exchangers. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge concerning the structure, function, and role of Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ signals in bone cells, focusing on the osteoblast.

  13. Inulin and fructooligosaccharide affect in vitro calcium uptake and absorption from calcium-enriched gluten-free bread.

    PubMed

    Krupa-Kozak, U; Swiątecka, D; Bączek, N; Brzóska, M M

    2016-04-01

    Compromised intestinal calcium absorption affecting a deterioration of bone state is a sign of coeliac disease. Experimental calcium-fortified gluten-free bread (GFB) of improved calcium bioavailability could increase calcium content in the diets of coeliac disease patients, allowing them to obtain the amount of calcium they need for therapeutic use. Prebiotics, including inulin-type fructans (IFs) have a beneficial effect on calcium bioavailability. In the present study, the in vitro model composed of the intestinal-like Caco-2 cells and the human intestinal bacteria (Lactobacillus, Enterococcus and Enterobacteriaceae) were used to analyse the effect of inulin and fructooligosaccharide (FOS) of different chain lengths, on calcium uptake and absorption from experimental GFB. Analysed IFs, especially short-chain FOS, significantly (p < 0.05) increased cellular calcium uptake from GFB digest and stimulated the intestinal bacteria applied in the cultures to the intensive synthesis of organic acids. In particular, the concentration of butyric, valeric and lactic acids increased significantly. Similarly, in the calcium absorption experiment, IFs increased the cellular calcium retention but concomitantly reduced its content in basolateral filtrates. The results obtained suggest that the applied IFs affected differentially calcium uptake and absorption from the experimental calcium-enriched GFB, therefore a further study is needed to assess whether these observations made in vitro contribute to IF effects on calcium absorption from experimental GFB in vivo. PMID:26965706

  14. Acidic calcium stores open for business: expanding the potential for intracellular Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sandip; Docampo, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Changes in cytosolic calcium concentration are crucial for a variety of cellular processes in all cells. It has long been appreciated that calcium is stored and released from intracellular calcium stores such as the endoplasmic reticulum. However, emerging evidence indicates that calcium is also dynamically regulated by a seemingly disparate collection of acidic organelles. Here, we review the defining features of these acidic calcium stores and highlight recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of uptake and release of calcium from these stores. We also examine the nature of calcium buffering within the stores and summarize the physiological and patho-physiological significance of these ubiquitous organelles in calcium signaling. PMID:20303271

  15. A calcium- and calpain-dependent pathway determines the response to lenalidomide in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jing; Liu, Xiaona; Bolanos, Lyndsey; Barker, Brenden; Rigolino, Carmela; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Oliva, Esther N; Cuzzola, Maria; Grimes, H Leighton; Fontanillo, Celia; Komurov, Kakajan; MacBeth, Kyle; Starczynowski, Daniel T

    2016-07-01

    Despite the high response rates of individuals with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with deletion of chromosome 5q (del(5q)) to treatment with lenalidomide (LEN) and the recent identification of cereblon (CRBN) as the molecular target of LEN, the cellular mechanism by which LEN eliminates MDS clones remains elusive. Here we performed an RNA interference screen to delineate gene regulatory networks that mediate LEN responsiveness in an MDS cell line, MDSL. We identified GPR68, which encodes a G-protein-coupled receptor that has been implicated in calcium metabolism, as the top candidate gene for modulating sensitivity to LEN. LEN induced GPR68 expression via IKAROS family zinc finger 1 (IKZF1), resulting in increased cytosolic calcium levels and activation of a calcium-dependent calpain, CAPN1, which were requisite steps for induction of apoptosis in MDS cells and in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. In contrast, deletion of GPR68 or inhibition of calcium and calpain activation suppressed LEN-induced cytotoxicity. Moreover, expression of calpastatin (CAST), an endogenous CAPN1 inhibitor that is encoded by a gene (CAST) deleted in del(5q) MDS, correlated with LEN responsiveness in patients with del(5q) MDS. Depletion of CAST restored responsiveness of LEN-resistant non-del(5q) MDS cells and AML cells, providing an explanation for the superior responses of patients with del(5q) MDS to LEN treatment. Our study describes a cellular mechanism by which LEN, acting through CRBN and IKZF1, has cytotoxic effects in MDS and AML that depend on a calcium- and calpain-dependent pathway. PMID:27294874

  16. Regulation of calcium and phosphoinositides at endoplasmic reticulum-membrane junctions.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Eamonn J; Jensen, Jill B; Hille, Bertil

    2016-04-15

    Effective cellular function requires both compartmentalization of tasks in space and time, and coordination of those efforts. The endoplasmic reticulum's (ER) expansive and ramifying structure makes it ideally suited to serve as a regulatory platform for organelle-organelle communication through membrane contacts. These contact sites consist of two membranes juxtaposed at a distance less than 30 nm that mediate the exchange of lipids and ions without the need for membrane fission or fusion, a process distinct from classical vesicular transport. Membrane contact sites are positioned by organelle-specific membrane-membrane tethering proteins and contain a growing number of additional proteins that organize information transfer to shape membrane identity. Here we briefly review the role of ER-containing membrane junctions in two important cellular functions: calcium signalling and phosphoinositide processing. PMID:27068956

  17. Calcium signaling and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Mauro Cunha Xavier; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Goulart, Vânia A M; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2015-11-01

    Cell proliferation is orchestrated through diverse proteins related to calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling inside the cell. Cellular Ca(2+) influx that occurs first by various mechanisms at the plasma membrane, is then followed by absorption of Ca(2+) ions by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and, finally, there is a connection of calcium stores to the nucleus. Experimental evidence indicates that the fluctuation of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum provides a pivotal and physiological role for cell proliferation. Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmatic reticulum triggers Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane in an phenomenon called store-operated calcium entries (SOCEs). SOCE is activated through a complex interplay between a Ca(2+) sensor, denominated STIM, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and a Ca(2+) channel at the cell membrane, denominated Orai. The interplay between STIM and Orai proteins with cell membrane receptors and their role in cell proliferation is discussed in this review. PMID:26275497

  18. Plant organellar calcium signalling: an emerging field.

    PubMed

    Stael, Simon; Wurzinger, Bernhard; Mair, Andrea; Mehlmer, Norbert; Vothknecht, Ute C; Teige, Markus

    2012-02-01

    This review provides a comprehensive overview of the established and emerging roles that organelles play in calcium signalling. The function of calcium as a secondary messenger in signal transduction networks is well documented in all eukaryotic organisms, but so far existing reviews have hardly addressed the role of organelles in calcium signalling, except for the nucleus. Therefore, a brief overview on the main calcium stores in plants-the vacuole, the endoplasmic reticulum, and the apoplast-is provided and knowledge on the regulation of calcium concentrations in different cellular compartments is summarized. The main focus of the review will be the calcium handling properties of chloroplasts, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. Recently, it became clear that these organelles not only undergo calcium regulation themselves, but are able to influence the Ca(2+) signalling pathways of the cytoplasm and the entire cell. Furthermore, the relevance of recent discoveries in the animal field for the regulation of organellar calcium signals will be discussed and conclusions will be drawn regarding potential homologous mechanisms in plant cells. Finally, a short overview on bacterial calcium signalling is included to provide some ideas on the question where this typically eukaryotic signalling mechanism could have originated from during evolution. PMID:22200666

  19. Plant organellar calcium signalling: an emerging field

    PubMed Central

    Stael, Simon; Wurzinger, Bernhard; Mair, Andrea; Mehlmer, Norbert; Vothknecht, Ute C.; Teige, Markus

    2014-01-01

    This review provides a comprehensive overview of the established and emerging roles that organelles play in calcium signalling. The function of calcium as a secondary messenger in signal transduction networks is well documented in all eukaryotic organisms, but so far existing reviews have hardly addressed the role of organelles in calcium signalling, except for the nucleus. Therefore, a brief overview on the main calcium stores in plants—the vacuole, the endoplasmic reticulum, and the apoplast—is provided and knowledge on the regulation of calcium concentrations in different cellular compartments is summarized. The main focus of the review will be the calcium handling properties of chloroplasts, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. Recently, it became clear that these organelles not only undergo calcium regulation themselves, but are able to influence the Ca2+ signalling pathways of the cytoplasm and the entire cell. Furthermore, the relevance of recent discoveries in the animal field for the regulation of organellar calcium signals will be discussed and conclusions will be drawn regarding potential homologous mechanisms in plant cells. Finally, a short overview on bacterial calcium signalling is included to provide some ideas on the question where this typically eukaryotic signalling mechanism could have originated from during evolution. PMID:22200666

  20. Continuous Modeling of Calcium Transport Through Biological Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasielec, J. J.; Filipek, R.; Szyszkiewicz, K.; Sokalski, T.; Lewenstam, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work an approach to the modeling of the biological membranes where a membrane is treated as a continuous medium is presented. The Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including Poisson equation for electric potential is used to describe transport of ions in the mitochondrial membrane—the interface which joins mitochondrial matrix with cellular cytosis. The transport of calcium ions is considered. Concentration of calcium inside the mitochondrion is not known accurately because different analytical methods give dramatically different results. We explain mathematically these differences assuming the complexing reaction inside mitochondrion and the existence of the calcium set-point (concentration of calcium in cytosis below which calcium stops entering the mitochondrion).

  1. Plant Calcium Content: Ready to Remodel

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Punshon, Tracy; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Hirschi, Kendal D.

    2012-01-01

    By identifying the relationship between calcium location in the plant cell and nutrient bioavailability, the plant characteristics leading to maximal calcium absorption by humans can be identified. Knowledge of plant cellular and molecular targets controlling calcium location in plants is emerging. These insights should allow for better strategies for increasing the nutritional content of foods. In particular, the use of preparation-free elemental imaging technologies such as synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microscopy in plant biology may allow researchers to understand the relationship between subcellular location and nutrient bioavailability. These approaches may lead to better strategies for altering the location of calcium within the plant to maximize its absorption from fruits and vegetables. These modified foods could be part of a diet for children and adults identified as at-risk for low calcium intake or absorption with the ultimate goal of decreasing the incidence and severity of inadequate bone mineralization. PMID:23016135

  2. US Food and Drug Administration international collaborations for cellular therapy product regulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cellular therapy products are an emerging medical product class undergoing rapid scientific and clinical innovation worldwide. These products pose unique regulatory challenges both for countries with existing regulatory frameworks and for countries where regulatory frameworks for cellular therapy products are under development. The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) has a history of productive working relationships with international regulatory authorities, and seeks to extend this to the cellular therapy field. The US FDA and its global regulatory counterparts are engaged in collaborations focused on the convergence of scientific and regulatory approaches, and the education of scientists, clinicians, regulators, and the public at large on the development of cellular therapies. PMID:23021082

  3. Sal1p, a calcium-dependent carrier protein that suppresses an essential cellular function associated With the Aac2 isoform of ADP/ATP translocase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin Jie

    2004-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (Ant) catalyzes ADP/ATP exchange between the cytosol and the mitochondrial matrix. It is also proposed to form or regulate the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, a megachannel of high conductancy on the mitochondrial membranes. Eukaryotic genomes generally contain multiple isoforms of Ant. In this study, it is shown that the Ant isoforms are functionally differentiated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although the three yeast Ant proteins can equally support respiration (the R function), Aac2p and Aac3p, but not Aac1p, have an additional physiological function essential for cell viability (the V function). The loss of V function in aac2 mutants leads to a lethal phenotype under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The lethality is suppressed by a strain-polymorphic locus, named SAL1 (for Suppressor of aac2 lethality). SAL1 was identified to encode an evolutionarily conserved protein of the mitochondrial carrier family. Notably, the Sal1 protein was shown to bind calcium through two EF-hand motifs located on its amino terminus. Calcium binding is essential for the suppressor activity. Finally, Sal1p is not required for oxidative phosphorylation and its overexpression does not complement the R(-) phenotype of aac2 mutants. On the basis of these observations, it is proposed that Aac2p and Sal1p may define two parallel pathways that transport a nucleotide substrate in an operational mode distinct from ADP/ATP exchange. PMID:15238515

  4. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium is required for the bone formation phase of bone remodeling. Typically about 5 nmol (200 mg) of calcium is removed from the adult skeleton and replaced each day. To supply this amount, one would need to consume about 600 mg of calcium, since calcium is not very efficiently absorbed. Calcium ...

  5. Calcium signaling in plant cells in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, E.

    Changes in the intracellular Ca 2 + concentration in altered gravity (microgravity and clinostating) evidence that Ca2 + signaling can play a fundamental role in biological effects of microgravity. Calcium as a second messenger is known to play a crucial role in stimulus - response coupling for many plant cellular signaling pathways. Its messenger functions are realized by transient changes in the cytosolic ion concentration induced by a variety of internal and external stimuli such as light, hormones, temperature, anoxia, salinity, and gravity. Although the first data on the changes in the calcium balance in plant cells under the influence of altered gravity have appeared in eighties, a review highlighting the performed research and the possible significance of such Ca 2 + changes in the structural and metabolic rearrangements of plant cells in altered gravity is still lacking. In this paper, an attempt was made to summarize the available experimental results and to consider some hypotheses in this field of research. It is proposed to distinguish between cell gravisensing and cell graviperception; the former is related to cell structure and metabolism stability in the gravitational field and their changes in microgravity (cells not specialized to gravity perception), the latter is related to active use of a gravitational stimulus by cells presumably specialized to gravity perception for realization of normal space orientation, growth, and vital activity (gravitropism, gravitaxis) in plants. The main experimental data concerning both redistribution of free Ca 2 + ions in plant cell organelles and the cell wall, and an increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration under the influence of altered gravity are presented. Based on the gravitational decompensation hypothesis, the consequence of events occurring in gravis ensing cells not specialized to gravity perception under altered gravity are considered in the following order: changes in the cytoplasmic membrane

  6. The influence of environmental calcium concentrations on calcium flux, compensatory drinking and epithelial calcium channel expression in a freshwater cartilaginous fish.

    PubMed

    Allen, Peter J; Weihrauch, Dirk; Grandmaison, Vanessa; Dasiewicz, Patricia; Peake, Stephan J; Anderson, W Gary

    2011-03-15

    Calcium metabolism and mRNA levels of the epithelial calcium channel (ECaC) were examined in a freshwater cartilaginous fish, the lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens. Lake sturgeon were acclimated for ≥2 weeks to 0.1 (low), 0.4 (normal) or 3.3 (high) mmol l(-1) environmental calcium. Whole-body calcium flux was examined using (45)Ca as a radioactive marker. Net calcium flux was inward in all treatment groups; however, calcium influx was greatest in the low calcium environment and lowest in the high calcium environment, whereas efflux had the opposite relationship. A significant difference in the concentration of (45)Ca in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of fish in the low calcium environment led to the examination of drinking rate and calcium flux across the anterior-middle (mid) intestine. Drinking rate was not different between treatments; however, calcium influx across the mid-intestine in the low calcium treatment was significantly greater than that in both the normal and high calcium treatments. The lake sturgeon ECaC was 2831 bp in length, with a predicted protein sequence of 683 amino acids that shared a 66% identity with the closest sequenced ECaCs from the vertebrate phyla. ECaC mRNA levels were examined in the gills, kidney, pyloric caeca, mid-intestine and spiral intestine. Expression levels were highest in the gills, then the kidneys, and were orders of magnitude lower in the GIT. Contrary to existing models for calcium uptake in the teleost gill, ECaC expression was greatest in high calcium conditions and kidney ECaC expression was lowest in low calcium conditions, suggesting that cellular transport mechanisms for calcium may be distinctly different in these freshwater cartilaginous fishes. PMID:21346128

  7. Cellular resilience.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Lena; Harris, Georgina; Leist, Marcel; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resilience describes the ability of a cell to cope with environmental changes such as toxicant exposure. If cellular metabolism does not collapse directly after the hit or end in programmed cell death, the ensuing stress responses promote a new homeostasis under stress. The processes of reverting "back to normal" and reversal of apoptosis ("anastasis") have been studied little at the cellular level. Cell types show astonishingly similar vulnerability to most toxicants, except for those that require a very specific target, metabolism or mechanism present only in specific cell types. The majority of chemicals triggers "general cytotoxicity" in any cell at similar concentrations. We hypothesize that cells differ less in their vulnerability to a given toxicant than in their resilience (coping with the "hit"). In many cases, cells do not return to the naive state after a toxic insult. The phenomena of "pre-conditioning", "tolerance" and "hormesis" describe this for low-dose exposures to toxicants that render the cell more resistant to subsequent hits. The defense and resilience programs include epigenetic changes that leave a "memory/scar" - an alteration as a consequence of the stress the cell has experienced. These memories might have long-term consequences, both positive (resistance) and negative, that contribute to chronic and delayed manifestations of hazard and, ultimately, disease. This article calls for more systematic analyses of how cells cope with toxic perturbations in the long-term after stressor withdrawal. A technical prerequisite for these are stable (organotypic) cultures and a characterization of stress response molecular networks. PMID:26536287

  8. Calcium and bones (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  9. Calcium source (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  10. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  11. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  12. Two distinct upstream regulatory domains containing multicopy cellular transcription factor binding sites provide basal repression and inducible enhancer characteristics to the immediate-early IES (US3) promoter from human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Chan, Y J; Tseng, W P; Hayward, G S

    1996-08-01

    The US3 gene of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is expressed at immediate-early (IE) times in permissive HF cells, but not in nonpermissive rodent cells, and encodes several proteins that have been reported to have regulatory characteristics, although they are dispensable for growth in cell culture. Both spliced and unspliced forms of US3 IE transcripts are associated with the second of only two known large and complex upstream enhancer domains within the 229-kb HCMV genome, which we refer to as the IES cis-acting control region. Only the 260-bp proximal segment (from -313 to -55) of the 600-bp IES control domain, which contains multicopy NF-kappaB binding sites, proved to be necessary to transfer both high basal expression plus phorbol ester- and okadaic acid-inducible characteristics to heterologous promoters in transient assays in U-937 and K-562 cells. However, the IES control region contains a distinctive 280-bp distal domain, characterized by the presence of seven interspersed repeats of a 10-bp TGTCGCGACA palindromic consensus motif that encompasses a NruI site. This far upstream Nru repeat region (from -596 to -314) imparted up to 20-fold down-regulation effects onto strong basal heterologous promoters as well as onto the IES enhancer plus minimal promoter region in both U-937 and K-562 cells. Functional Nru repressor elements (NREs) could not be generated by multimerizing either the palindromic (P) Nru motifs alone or adjacent degenerate interrupted (I Nru motifs alone. However, multimerized forms of the combined P plus I elements reconstituted the full 20-fold cis-acting down-regulation phenotype of the intact NRE domain. The P and I forms of the Nru elements each bound independently and specifically to related cellular DNA-binding factors to form differently migrating A or B complexes, respectively, whereas the combined P plus I elements bound cooperatively to both the A and B complexes with high affinity. Interestingly, nuclear extracts from U-937, K-562

  13. Calcium homeostasis in human placenta: role of calcium-handling proteins.

    PubMed

    Lafond, Julie; Simoneau, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    The human placenta is a transitory organ, representing during pregnancy the unique connection between the mother and her fetus. The syncytiotrophoblast represents the specialized unit in the placenta that is directly involved in fetal nutrition, mainly involving essential nutrients, such as lipids, amino acids, and calcium. This ion is of particular interest since it is actively transported by the placenta throughout pregnancy and is associated with many roles during intrauterine life. At term, the human fetus has accumulated about 25-30 g of calcium. This transfer allows adequate fetal growth and development, since calcium is vital for fetal skeleton mineralization and many cellular functions, such as signal transduction, neurotransmitter release, and cellular growth. Thus, there are many proteins involved in calcium homeostasis in the human placenta. PMID:16861065

  14. Crystal structure of calcium dodecin (Rv0379), from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with a unique calcium-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Arockiasamy, Arulandu; Aggarwal, Anup; Savva, Christos G.; Holzenburg, Andreas; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-09-28

    In eukaryotes, calcium-binding proteins play a pivotal role in diverse cellular processes, and recent findings suggest similar roles for bacterial proteins at different stages in their life cycle. Here, we report the crystal structure of calcium dodecin, Rv0379, from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with a dodecameric oligomeric assembly and a unique calcium-binding motif. Structure and sequence analysis were used to identify orthologs of Rv0379 with different ligand-binding specificity

  15. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    , localized changes in Ca(o)(2+) within the ECF can originate from several mechanisms, including fluxes of calcium ions into or out of cellular or extracellular stores or across epithelium that absorb or secrete Ca(2+). In any event, the CaR and other receptors/sensors for Ca(o)(2+) and probably for other extracellular ions represent versatile regulators of numerous cellular functions and may serve as important therapeutic targets.

  16. Demonstration of Binding of Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 to the Cav2.1 P/Q-Type Calcium Channel

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In neurons, entry of extracellular calcium (Ca2+) into synaptic terminals through Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) Ca2+ channels is the driving force for exocytosis of neurotransmitter-containing synaptic vesicles. This class of Ca2+ channel is, therefore, pivotal during normal neurotransmission in higher organisms. In response to channel opening and Ca2+ influx, specific Ca2+-binding proteins associate with cytoplasmic regulatory domains of the P/Q channel to modulate subsequent channel opening. Channel modulation in this way influences synaptic plasticity with consequences for higher-level processes such as learning and memory acquisition. The ubiquitous Ca2+-sensing protein calmodulin (CaM) regulates the activity of all types of mammalian voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, including the P/Q class, by direct binding to specific regulatory motifs. More recently, experimental evidence has highlighted a role for additional Ca2+-binding proteins, particularly of the CaBP and NCS families in the regulation of P/Q channels. NCS-1 is a protein found from yeast to humans and that regulates a diverse number of cellular functions. Physiological and genetic evidence indicates that NCS-1 regulates P/Q channel activity, including calcium-dependent facilitation, although a direct physical association between the proteins has yet to be demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to determine if there is a direct interaction between NCS-1 and the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of the Cav2.1 α-subunit. Using distinct but complementary approaches, including in vitro binding of bacterially expressed recombinant proteins, fluorescence spectrophotometry, isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and expression of fluorescently tagged proteins in mammalian cells, we show direct binding and demonstrate that CaM can compete for it. We speculate about how NCS-1/Cav2.1 association might add to the complexity of calcium channel regulation mediated by other known calcium-sensing proteins and how

  17. Gene regulatory networks and the underlying biology of developmental toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Embryonic cells are specified by large-scale networks of functionally linked regulatory genes. Knowledge of the relevant gene regulatory networks is essential for understanding phenotypic heterogeneity that emerges from disruption of molecular functions, cellular processes or sig...

  18. Calcium and Arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ter Keurs, Henk E. D. J.; Boyden, Penelope A.

    2010-01-01

    Triggered activity in cardiac muscle and intracellular Ca2+ have been linked in the past. However, today not only are there a number of cellular proteins that show clear Ca2+ dependence but also there are a number of arrhythmias whose mechanism appears to be linked to Ca2+-dependent processes. Thus we present a systematic review of the mechanisms of Ca2+ transport (forward excitation-contraction coupling) in the ventricular cell as well as what is known for other cardiac cell types. Second, we review the molecular nature of the proteins that are involved in this process as well as the functional consequences of both normal and abnormal Ca2+ cycling (e.g., Ca2+ waves). Finally, we review what we understand to be the role of Ca2+ cycling in various forms of arrhythmias, that is, those associated with inherited mutations and those that are acquired and resulting from reentrant excitation and/or abnormal impulse generation (e.g., triggered activity). Further solving the nature of these intricate and dynamic interactions promises to be an important area of research for a better recognition and understanding of the nature of Ca2+ and arrhythmias. Our solutions will provide a more complete understanding of the molecular basis for the targeted control of cellular calcium in the treatment and prevention of such. PMID:17429038

  19. Redox modulation of cellular metabolism through targeted degradation of signaling proteins by the proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-02-01

    Under conditions of oxidative stress, the 20S proteasome plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis through the selective degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins. This adaptive stress response is distinct from ubiquitin-dependent pathways in that oxidized proteins are recognized and degraded in an ATP-independent mechanism, which can involve the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Like the regulatory complexes 19S and 11S REG, Hsp90 tightly associates with the 20S proteasome to mediate the recognition of aberrant proteins for degradation. In the case of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin, proteasomal degradation results from the oxidation of a single surface exposed methionine (i.e., Met145); oxidation of the other eight methionines has a minimal effect on the recognition and degradation of calmodulin by the proteasome. Since cellular concentrations of calmodulin are limiting, the targeted degradation of this critical signaling protein under conditions of oxidative stress will result in the downregulation of cellular metabolism, serving as a feedback regulation to diminish the generation of reactive oxygen species. The targeted degradation of critical signaling proteins, such as calmodulin, can function as sensors of oxidative stress to downregulate global rates of metabolism and enhance cellular survival.

  20. Calcium Spikes in Epithelium: study on Drosophila early embryos.

    PubMed

    Markova, Olga; Sénatore, Sébastien; Chardès, Claire; Lenne, Pierre-François

    2015-01-01

    Calcium ion acts in nearly every aspect of cellular life. The versatility and specificity required for such a ubiquitous role is ensured by the spatio-temporal dynamics of calcium concentration variations. While calcium signal dynamics has been extensively studied in cell cultures and adult tissues, little is known about calcium activity during early tissue morphogenesis. We monitored intracellular calcium concentration in Drosophila gastrula and revealed single cell calcium spikes that were short-lived, rare and showed strong variability among embryos. We quantitatively described the spatio-temporal dynamics of these spikes and analyzed their potential origins and nature by introducing physical and chemical perturbations. Our data highlight the inter- and intra-tissue variability of calcium activity during tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26198871

  1. Calcium Spikes in Epithelium: study on Drosophila early embryos

    PubMed Central

    Markova, Olga; Sénatore, Sébastien; Chardès, Claire; Lenne, Pierre-François

    2015-01-01

    Calcium ion acts in nearly every aspect of cellular life. The versatility and specificity required for such a ubiquitous role is ensured by the spatio-temporal dynamics of calcium concentration variations. While calcium signal dynamics has been extensively studied in cell cultures and adult tissues, little is known about calcium activity during early tissue morphogenesis. We monitored intracellular calcium concentration in Drosophila gastrula and revealed single cell calcium spikes that were short-lived, rare and showed strong variability among embryos. We quantitatively described the spatio-temporal dynamics of these spikes and analyzed their potential origins and nature by introducing physical and chemical perturbations. Our data highlight the inter- and intra-tissue variability of calcium activity during tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26198871

  2. Structure-function of proteins interacting with the α1 pore-forming subunit of high-voltage-activated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Alan; Hidalgo, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Openings of high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium channels lead to a transient increase in calcium concentration that in turn activate a plethora of cellular functions, including muscle contraction, secretion and gene transcription. To coordinate all these responses calcium channels form supramolecular assemblies containing effectors and regulatory proteins that couple calcium influx to the downstream signal cascades and to feedback elements. According to the original biochemical characterization of skeletal muscle Dihydropyridine receptors, HVA calcium channels are multi-subunit protein complexes consisting of a pore-forming subunit (α1) associated with four additional polypeptide chains β, α2, δ, and γ, often referred to as accessory subunits. Twenty-five years after the first purification of a high-voltage calcium channel, the concept of a flexible stoichiometry to expand the repertoire of mechanisms that regulate calcium channel influx has emerged. Several other proteins have been identified that associate directly with the α1-subunit, including calmodulin and multiple members of the small and large GTPase family. Some of these proteins only interact with a subset of α1-subunits and during specific stages of biogenesis. More strikingly, most of the α1-subunit interacting proteins, such as the β-subunit and small GTPases, regulate both gating and trafficking through a variety of mechanisms. Modulation of channel activity covers almost all biophysical properties of the channel. Likewise, regulation of the number of channels in the plasma membrane is performed by altering the release of the α1-subunit from the endoplasmic reticulum, by reducing its degradation or enhancing its recycling back to the cell surface. In this review, we discuss the structural basis, interplay and functional role of selected proteins that interact with the central pore-forming subunit of HVA calcium channels. PMID:24917826

  3. Decoding of intracellular calcium spike trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prank, K.; Läer, L.; von zur Mühlen, A.; Brabant, G.; Schöfl, C.

    1998-04-01

    Cells respond to external signals, such as hormonal stimuli, by generating repetitive spikes in the intracellular free-calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). These [Ca2+]i spikes, which can be modulated in their frequency and amplitude, regulate diverse cellular processes. Experimentally, [Ca2+]i can be assessed continuously in contrast to cellular responses represented by the activation of proteins. We propose a mathematical model that allows for the on-line decoding of [Ca2+]i spike trains into cellular responses represented by the activation of proteins.

  4. Calcium Imaging of Sonoporation of Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabens, David; Aehle, Matthew; Steyer, Grant; Kourennyi, Dmitri; Deng, Cheri X.

    2006-05-01

    Ultrasound mediated delivery of compounds is a relatively recent development in drug delivery and gene transfection techniques. Due to the lack of methods for real-time monitoring of sonoporation at the cellular level, the efficiency of drug/gene delivery and sonoporation associated side effects, such as the loss of cell viability and enhanced apoptosis, have been studied only through post US exposure analyses, requiring days for cell incubation. Furthermore, because microporation appears to be transient in nature, it was not possible to correlate transfection with microporation on an individual cellular basis. By studying the role of calcium in the cell and using fluorescent calcium imaging to study sonoporation it is possible to quantify both cell porosity and sonoporation side effects. Since both post sonoporation cell survival and delivery efficiency are related to the dynamic process of the cell membrane poration, calcium imaging of sonoporation will provide important knowledge to obtain improved understanding of sonoporation mechanism. Our experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of calcium imaging of sonoporation in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. We have measured the changes in the intracellular calcium concentration using Fura-2, a fluorescent probe, which indicate influx or flow of Calcium across the cell membrane. Analysis of data identified key aspects in the dynamic sonoporation process including the formation of pores in the cell membrane, and the relative temporal duration of the pores and their resealing. These observations are obtained through the analysis of the rate the calcium concentration changes within the cells, making it possible to visualize membrane opening and repair in real-time through such changes in the intracellular calcium concentration.

  5. Multiscale Modeling of Cardiac Cellular Energetics

    PubMed Central

    BASSINGTHWAIGHTE, JAMES B.; CHIZECK, HOWARD J.; ATLAS, LES E.; QIAN, HONG

    2010-01-01

    Multiscale modeling is essential to integrating knowledge of human physiology starting from genomics, molecular biology, and the environment through the levels of cells, tissues, and organs all the way to integrated systems behavior. The lowest levels concern biophysical and biochemical events. The higher levels of organization in tissues, organs, and organism are complex, representing the dynamically varying behavior of billions of cells interacting together. Models integrating cellular events into tissue and organ behavior are forced to resort to simplifications to minimize computational complexity, thus reducing the model’s ability to respond correctly to dynamic changes in external conditions. Adjustments at protein and gene regulatory levels shortchange the simplified higher-level representations. Our cell primitive is composed of a set of subcellular modules, each defining an intracellular function (action potential, tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis, calcium cycling, contraction, etc.), composing what we call the “eternal cell,” which assumes that there is neither proteolysis nor protein synthesis. Within the modules are elements describing each particular component (i.e., enzymatic reactions of assorted types, transporters, ionic channels, binding sites, etc.). Cell subregions are stirred tanks, linked by diffusional or transporter-mediated exchange. The modeling uses ordinary differential equations rather than stochastic or partial differential equations. This basic model is regarded as a primitive upon which to build models encompassing gene regulation, signaling, and long-term adaptations in structure and function. During simulation, simpler forms of the model are used, when possible, to reduce computation. However, when this results in error, the more complex and detailed modules and elements need to be employed to improve model realism. The processes of error recognition and of mapping between different levels of

  6. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  7. T-T cellular interaction between CD4-CD8- regulatory T cells and T cell clones presenting TCR peptide. Its implication for TCR vaccination against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Kozovska, M F; Yamamura, T; Tabira, T

    1996-08-15

    Regulatory T cells recognizing TCR determinants presumably play a critical role in the control of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a prototype tissue-specific autoimmune disease. This study was initiated to determine whether regulatory T cells can be induced against a V beta 17a CDR2 peptide (residues 50-68) in SJL/J mice. Although the TCR peptide showed regulatory effects in vivo, the presence of T cells specific for the peptide could not be proven with conventional proliferation assays. Unexpectedly, in the presence of myelin basic protein-specific T clone cells (Tcc), the sensitized spleen cells vigorously proliferated in response to the TCR peptide. The subsequent experiment showed that this was due to the outstanding capability of the Tcc as APC for the exogenous TCR peptide. Using the Tcc as APC, we were able to establish V beta 17a50-68-specific T cell lines from in vivo primed spleen cells. The line cells were MHC class I restricted and dominated by T cells with a distinct surface phenotype (CD4-CD8-V beta 17a+). Presentation of the peptide by the Tcc was inhibited by treatment with gelonin that could block a MHC class I presentation pathway. The ability of T cells to present the TCR peptide was not related to their Ag specificity, but correlated with the expression levels of MHC class I molecules and adhesion molecules such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and B7-1 on their surface. The TCR peptide-specific T cells produced a soluble mediator(s) that is inhibitory for T cell activation and were protective against actively induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These results show that V beta 17a50-68 vaccination induces regulatory CD4-CD8- T cells that could interact with T cells presenting relevant TCR fragments. PMID:8759768

  8. Live Imaging of Calcium Dynamics during Axon Degeneration Reveals Two Functionally Distinct Phases of Calcium Influx

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Yuya; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is a key regulator of axon degeneration caused by trauma and disease, but its specific spatial and temporal dynamics in injured axons remain unclear. To clarify the function of calcium in axon degeneration, we observed calcium dynamics in single injured neurons in live zebrafish larvae and tested the temporal requirement for calcium in zebrafish neurons and cultured mouse DRG neurons. Using laser axotomy to induce Wallerian degeneration (WD) in zebrafish peripheral sensory axons, we monitored calcium dynamics from injury to fragmentation, revealing two stereotyped phases of axonal calcium influx. First, axotomy triggered a transient local calcium wave originating at the injury site. This initial calcium wave only disrupted mitochondria near the injury site and was not altered by expression of the protective WD slow (WldS) protein. Inducing multiple waves with additional axotomies did not change the kinetics of degeneration. In contrast, a second phase of calcium influx occurring minutes before fragmentation spread as a wave throughout the axon, entered mitochondria, and was abolished by WldS expression. In live zebrafish, chelating calcium after the first wave, but before the second wave, delayed the progress of fragmentation. In cultured DRG neurons, chelating calcium early in the process of WD did not alter degeneration, but chelating calcium late in WD delayed fragmentation. We propose that a terminal calcium wave is a key instructive component of the axon degeneration program. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Axon degeneration resulting from trauma or neurodegenerative disease can cause devastating deficits in neural function. Understanding the molecular and cellular events that execute axon degeneration is essential for developing treatments to address these conditions. Calcium is known to contribute to axon degeneration, but its temporal requirements in this process have been unclear. Live calcium imaging in severed zebrafish neurons and temporally controlled

  9. Intracellular Calcium Dysregulation: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magi, Simona; Castaldo, Pasqualina; Macrì, Maria Loredana; Maiolino, Marta; Matteucci, Alessandra; Bastioli, Guendalina; Gratteri, Santo; Lariccia, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive neuronal loss. AD is associated with aberrant processing of the amyloid precursor protein, which leads to the deposition of amyloid-β plaques within the brain. Together with plaques deposition, the hyperphosphorylation of the microtubules associated protein tau and the formation of intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles are a typical neuropathological feature in AD brains. Cellular dysfunctions involving specific subcellular compartments, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), are emerging as crucial players in the pathogenesis of AD, as well as increased oxidative stress and dysregulation of calcium homeostasis. Specifically, dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis has been suggested as a common proximal cause of neural dysfunction in AD. Aberrant calcium signaling has been considered a phenomenon mainly related to the dysfunction of intracellular calcium stores, which can occur in both neuronal and nonneuronal cells. This review reports the most recent findings on cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AD, with main focus on the control of calcium homeostasis at both cytosolic and mitochondrial level. PMID:27340665

  10. Steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone promotes higher calcium mobilization to induce apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Pei, Xu-Yang; Zhao, Wen-Li; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2016-07-01

    Calcium ions are essential secondary messengers that regulate diverse cellular processes including gene transcription, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. The steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) promotes programmed cell death during insect metamorphosis, whereas juvenile hormone (JH) counteracts 20E activity to prevent metamorphosis. Both 20E and JH can induce cellular calcium increase; however, the mechanisms and physiological consequences resulting from calcium increase caused by the two counteracting hormones are unclear. Here, using Helicoverpa armigera epidermal cell line, we show that 20E via a G-protein-coupled receptor induced a major calcium rise in the cells, whereas JH via receptor tyrosine kinase induced a minor calcium increase. The calcium release-activated calcium modulator 1 (Orai1) and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels were necessary for 20E-induced rapid calcium influx. A higher calcium level was maintained in a long time and more genes including Orai1 and TRP channels showed elevated expression after the treatment of 20E than did after JH treatment. Caspase3/7 activation, cell death and pro-apoptotic gene expression were elicited by 20E induction, but not by JH. JH could repress 20E-induced calcium influx, caspase3/7 activation and gene expression. Higher calcium levels induced apoptosis. These results suggest that 20E and JH via different pathways regulate calcium mobilization and homeostasis at different levels, thus inform different gene expression and cellular responses. PMID:27209368

  11. Calcium signaling and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Kass, G E; Orrenius, S

    1999-01-01

    The divalent calcium cation Ca(2+) is used as a major signaling molecule during cell signal transduction to regulate energy output, cellular metabolism, and phenotype. The basis to the signaling role of Ca(2+) is an intricate network of cellular channels and transporters that allow a low resting concentration of Ca(2+) in the cytosol of the cell ([Ca(2+)]i) but that are also coupled to major dynamic and rapidly exchanging stores. This enables extracellular signals from hormones and growth factors to be transduced as [Ca(2+)]i spikes that are amplitude and frequency encoded. There is considerable evidence that a number of toxic environmental chemicals target these Ca(2+) signaling processes, alter them, and induce cell death by apoptosis. Two major pathways for apoptosis will be considered. The first one involves Ca(2+)-mediated expression of ligands that bind to and activate death receptors such as CD95 (Fas, APO-1). In the second pathway, Ca(2+) has a direct toxic effect and its primary targets include the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Mitochondria may respond to an apoptotic Ca(2+) signal by the selective release of cytochrome c or through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and opening of an inner mitochondrial membrane pore. Toxic agents such as the environmental pollutant tributyltin or the natural plant product thapsigargin, which deplete the ER Ca(2+) stores, will induce as a direct result of this effect the opening of plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels and an ER stress response. In contrast, under some conditions, Ca(2+) signals may be cytoprotective and antagonize the apoptotic machinery. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10229704

  12. [Do cows drink calcium?].

    PubMed

    Geishauser, T; Lechner, S; Plate, I; Heidemann, B

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how well cows drink the Propeller calcium drink, and it's effect on blood calcium concentration. Drinking was tested in 120 cows right after calving, before cows drank anything else. 60 cows each were offered 20 liters of Propeller calcium drink or 20 liters of water. Cows drank the Propeller as good as water. 72% of all cows drank all 20 liters, 18% drank on average 8.2 liters and 10% drank less than 1 liter. Blood calcium concentration was studied in 16 cows right after calving. Eight cows each were offered 20 liters of Propeller calcium drink or no calcium drink. Blood calcium significantly increased ten minutes after Propeller intake and stayed significantly elevated for 24 hours. Without calcium drink blood calcium levels decreased significantly. Advantages of the new Propeller calcium drink over calcium gels or boli could be that cows now drink calcium themselves and that the Propeller increases blood calcium concentration rapidly and long lasting. PMID:18429501

  13. Calcium and ROS: A mutual interplay

    PubMed Central

    Görlach, Agnes; Bertram, Katharina; Hudecova, Sona; Krizanova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is an important second messenger involved in intra- and extracellular signaling cascades and plays an essential role in cell life and death decisions. The Ca2+ signaling network works in many different ways to regulate cellular processes that function over a wide dynamic range due to the action of buffers, pumps and exchangers on the plasma membrane as well as in internal stores. Calcium signaling pathways interact with other cellular signaling systems such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although initially considered to be potentially detrimental byproducts of aerobic metabolism, it is now clear that ROS generated in sub-toxic levels by different intracellular systems act as signaling molecules involved in various cellular processes including growth and cell death. Increasing evidence suggests a mutual interplay between calcium and ROS signaling systems which seems to have important implications for fine tuning cellular signaling networks. However, dysfunction in either of the systems might affect the other system thus potentiating harmful effects which might contribute to the pathogenesis of various disorders. PMID:26296072

  14. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  15. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  16. Calcium and Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your weekly shopping list. Produce Serving Size Estimated Calcium* Collard greens, frozen 8 oz 360 mg ... Oranges 1 whole 55 mg Seafood Serving Size Estimated Calcium* Sardines, canned with bones 3 oz 325 ...

  17. Calcium and bones (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human body. Bones, like other tissues in the body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their ...

  18. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. It is a prescription pain medicine used to relieve symptoms of arthritis . Fenoprofen calcium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  19. Calcium and magnesium disorders.

    PubMed

    Goff, Jesse P

    2014-07-01

    Hypocalcemia is a clinical disorder that can be life threatening to the cow (milk fever) and predisposes the animal to various other metabolic and infectious disorders. Calcium homeostasis is mediated primarily by parathyroid hormone, which stimulates bone calcium resorption and renal calcium reabsorption. Parathyroid hormone stimulates the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to enhance diet calcium absorption. High dietary cation-anion difference interferes with tissue sensitivity to parathyroid hormone. Hypomagnesemia reduces tissue response to parathyroid hormone. PMID:24980727

  20. Calcium and Mitosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  1. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter describes the roles of calcium and vitamin D in bone health. Calcium is required for the bone formation phase of bone remodeling and it also affects bone mass through its impact on the remodeling rate. Typically, about 5 nmol (200 mg) of calcium is removed from the adult skeleton and ...

  2. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    Bone strength and calcium ... or if your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ... injury. As you age, your body still needs calcium to keep your bones dense and strong. Most experts recommend at least ...

  3. Isolation of regulatory-competent, phosphorylated cytochrome C oxidase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Icksoo; Salomon, Arthur R; Yu, Kebing; Samavati, Lobelia; Pecina, Petr; Pecinova, Alena; Hüttemann, Maik

    2009-01-01

    The role of posttranslational modifications, specifically reversible phosphorylation as a regulatory mechanism operating in the mitochondria, is a novel research direction. The mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system is a particularly interesting unit because it is responsible for the production of the vast majority of cellular energy in addition to free radicals, two factors that are aberrant in numerous human diseases and that may be influenced by reversible phosphorylation of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes. We here describe a detailed protocol for the isolation of mammalian liver and heart mitochondria and subsequently cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) under conditions maintaining the physiological phosphorylation state. The protocol employs the use of activated vanadate, an unspecific tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, fluoride, an unspecific serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor, and EGTA, a calcium chelator to prevent the activation of calcium-dependent protein phosphatases. CcO purified without manipulation of signaling pathways shows strong tyrosine phosphorylation on subunits II and IV, whereas tyrosine phosphorylation of subunit I can be induced by the cAMP- and TNFalpha-dependent pathways in liver. Using our protocol on cow liver tissue we further show the identification of a new phosphorylation site on CcO subunit IV tyrosine 11 of the mature protein (corresponding to tyrosine 33 of the precursor peptide) via immobilized metal affinity chromatography/nano-liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (IMAC/nano-LC/ESI-MS). This phosphorylation site is located close to the ATP and ADP binding site, which adjusts CcO activity to cellular energy demand, and we propose that phosphorylation of tyrosine 11 enables allosteric regulation. PMID:19426869

  4. Simulations of intracellular calcium release dynamics in response to a high-intensity, ultrashort electric pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, R. P.; Nguyen, A.; Sridhara, V.; Hu, Q.; Nuccitelli, R.; Beebe, S. J.; Kolb, J.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2007-04-01

    Numerical simulations for electrically induced, intracellular calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum are reported. A two-step model is used for self-consistency. Distributed electrical circuit representation coupled with the Smoluchowski equation yields the ER membrane nanoporation for calcium outflow based on a numerical simulation. This is combined with the continuum Li-Rinzel model and drift diffusion for calcium dynamics. Our results are shown to be in agreement with reported calcium release data. A modest increase (rough doubling) of the cellular calcium is predicted in the absence of extra-cellular calcium. In particular, the applied field of 15kV/cm with 60ns pulse duration makes for a strong comparison. No oscillations are predicted and the net recovery period of about 5min are both in agreement with published experimental results. A quantitative explanation for the lack of such oscillatory behavior, based on the density dependent calcium fluxes, is also provided.

  5. Calmodulin-dependent activation and inactivation of anoctamin calcium-gated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Vocke, Kerstin; Dauner, Kristin; Hahn, Anne; Ulbrich, Anne; Broecker, Jana; Keller, Sandro; Frings, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent chloride channels serve critical functions in diverse biological systems. Driven by cellular calcium signals, the channels codetermine excitatory processes and promote solute transport. The anoctamin (ANO) family of membrane proteins encodes three calcium-activated chloride channels, named ANO 1 (also TMEM16A), ANO 2 (also TMEM16B), and ANO 6 (also TMEM16F). Here we examined how ANO 1 and ANO 2 interact with Ca2+/calmodulin using nonstationary current analysis during channel activation. We identified a putative calmodulin-binding domain in the N-terminal region of the channel proteins that is involved in channel activation. Binding studies with peptides indicated that this domain, a regulatory calmodulin-binding motif (RCBM), provides two distinct modes of interaction with Ca2+/calmodulin, one at submicromolar Ca2+ concentrations and one in the micromolar Ca2+ range. Functional, structural, and pharmacological data support the concept that calmodulin serves as a calcium sensor that is stably associated with the RCBM domain and regulates the activation of ANO 1 and ANO 2 channels. Moreover, the predominant splice variant of ANO 2 in the brain exhibits Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent inactivation, a loss of channel activity within 30 s. This property may curtail ANO 2 activity during persistent Ca2+ signals in neurons. Mutagenesis data indicated that the RCBM domain is also involved in ANO 2 inactivation, and that inactivation is suppressed in the retinal ANO 2 splice variant. These results advance the understanding of Ca2+ regulation in anoctamin Cl− channels and its significance for the physiological function that anoctamin channels subserve in neurons and other cell types. PMID:24081981

  6. Calcium modulation of doxorubicin cytotoxicity in yeast and human cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Thuy Trang; Lim, Ying Jun; Fan, Melanie Hui Min; Jackson, Rebecca A; Lim, Kim Kiat; Ang, Wee Han; Ban, Kenneth Hon Kim; Chen, Ee Sin

    2016-03-01

    Doxorubicin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, but its utility is limited by cellular resistance and off-target effects. To understand the molecular mechanisms regulating chemotherapeutic responses to doxorubicin, we previously carried out a genomewide search of doxorubicin-resistance genes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe fission yeast and showed that these genes are organized into networks that counteract doxorubicin cytotoxicity. Here, we describe the identification of a subgroup of doxorubicin-resistance genes that, when disrupted, leads to reduced tolerance to exogenous calcium. Unexpectedly, we observed a suppressive effect of calcium on doxorubicin cytotoxicity, where concurrent calcium and doxorubicin treatment resulted in significantly higher cell survival compared with cells treated with doxorubicin alone. Conversely, inhibitors of voltage-gated calcium channels enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxicity in the mutants. Consistent with these observations in fission yeast, calcium also suppressed doxorubicin cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells. Further epistasis analyses in yeast showed that this suppression of doxorubicin toxicity by calcium was synergistically dependent on Rav1 and Vph2, two regulators of vacuolar-ATPase assembly; this suggests potential modulation of the calcium-doxorubicin interaction by fluctuating proton concentrations within the cellular environment. Thus, the modulatory effects of drugs or diet on calcium concentrations should be considered in doxorubicin treatment regimes. PMID:26891792

  7. Calcium bioavailability from calcium fortified food products.

    PubMed

    Kohls, K

    1991-08-01

    The calcium balance of 12 presumed healthy human young adult subjects was assessed. Subjects consumed a constant laboratory-controlled diet supplemented with one of four calcium-fortified food products: orange juice (OJ), milk (M), experimental pasteurized processed cheese (T), soda (S), or a calcium carbonate plus vitamin D tablet (CC). Study length was 6 weeks with seven-day experimental periods (2-days allowed for adjustment with 5-days combined for purposes of analysis). All urine and fecal samples were collected by the subjects for the duration of the study. Blood samples were drawn at the end of each experimental period. Urine and fecal calcium contents were determined. Blood samples were analyzed for alkaline phosphatase. Results of this study indicate a higher fecal calcium content (mg/day) when subjects consumed CC and T, and when subjects consumed self-selected diets, than when given S, M, or OJ. Urinary calcium excretion was significantly lower when subjects consumed OJ than when they consumed M, T, or their self-selected diets. A significantly larger positive calcium balance was demonstrated when subjects consumed OJ as compared to T. Fecal transmit time did not vary significantly. Serum alkaline phosphatase was significantly lower when subjects consumed T than when they consumed self-selected diets. PMID:1765836

  8. Effects of lanthanum in cellular systems. A review.

    PubMed

    Das, T; Sharma, A; Talukder, G

    1988-12-01

    Lanthanum belongs to the group of elements known as "lanthanons," which also includes cerium, europium, promethium, and thulium. It is the most electropositive element of the rare earth group, is uniformly trivalent, and is similar in its chemical properties to the alkaline earth elements. The effects of this element and its compounds on cellular systems are of considerable interest because of their increasing use in industry and as a substitute or antagonist for calcium in a variety of cellular reactions. Lanthanum is also being employed extensively in studying anatomical barriers, membrane structure, and subcellular transport systems, particularly the calcium pathway. PMID:2484565

  9. TMEM203 Is a Novel Regulator of Intracellular Calcium Homeostasis and Is Required for Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shambharkar, Prashant B.; Bittinger, Mark; Latario, Brian; Xiong, ZhaoHui; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Davis, Vanessa; Lin, Victor; Yang, Yi; Valdez, Reginald; Labow, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular calcium signaling is critical for initiating and sustaining diverse cellular functions including transcription, synaptic signaling, muscle contraction, apoptosis and fertilization. Trans-membrane 203 (TMEM203) was identified here in cDNA overexpression screens for proteins capable of modulating intracellular calcium levels using activation of a calcium/calcineurin regulated transcription factor as an indicator. Overexpression of TMEM203 resulted in a reduction of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) calcium stores and elevation in basal cytoplasmic calcium levels. TMEM203 protein was localized to the ER and found associated with a number of ER proteins which regulate ER calcium entry and efflux. Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from Tmem203 deficient mice had reduced ER calcium stores and altered calcium homeostasis. Tmem203 deficient mice were viable though male knockout mice were infertile and exhibited a severe block in spermiogenesis and spermiation. Expression profiling studies showed significant alternations in expression of calcium channels and pumps in testes and concurrently Tmem203 deficient spermatocytes demonstrated significantly altered calcium handling. Thus Tmem203 is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of cellular calcium homeostasis, is required for spermatogenesis and provides a causal link between intracellular calcium regulation and spermiogenesis. PMID:25996873

  10. STaRRRT: a table of short tandem repeats in regulatory regions of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tandem repeats (TRs) are unstable regions commonly found within genomes that have consequences for evolution and disease. In humans, polymorphic TRs are known to cause neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders as well as being associated with complex diseases such as diabetes and cancer. If present in upstream regulatory regions, TRs can modify chromatin structure and affect transcription; resulting in altered gene expression and protein abundance. The most common TRs are short tandem repeats (STRs), or microsatellites. Promoter located STRs are considerably more polymorphic than coding region STRs. As such, they may be a common driver of phenotypic variation. To study STRs located in regulatory regions, we have performed genome-wide analysis to identify all STRs present in a region that is 2 kilobases upstream and 1 kilobase downstream of the transcription start sites of genes. Results The Short Tandem Repeats in Regulatory Regions Table, STaRRRT, contains the results of the genome-wide analysis, outlining the characteristics of 5,264 STRs present in the upstream regulatory region of 4,441 human genes. Gene set enrichment analysis has revealed significant enrichment for STRs in cellular, transcriptional and neurological system gene promoters and genes important in ion and calcium homeostasis. The set of enriched terms has broad similarity to that seen in coding regions, suggesting that regulatory region STRs are subject to similar evolutionary pressures as STRs in coding regions and may, like coding region STRs, have an important role in controlling gene expression. Conclusions STaRRRT is a readily-searchable resource for investigating potentially polymorphic STRs that could influence the expression of any gene of interest. The processes and genes enriched for regulatory region STRs provide potential novel targets for diagnosing and treating disease, and support a role for these STRs in the evolution of the human genome. PMID:24228761

  11. CELLULAR MECHANISMS OF CALCIUM TRANSPORT IN CRUSTACEANS. (R823068)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  12. Two-pore channels: Regulation by NAADP and customized roles in triggering calcium signals.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandip; Marchant, Jonathan S; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2010-06-01

    NAADP is a potent regulator of cytosolic calcium levels. Much evidence suggests that NAADP activates a novel channel located on an acidic (lysosomal-like) calcium store, the mobilisation of which results in further calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we discuss the recent identification of a family of poorly characterized ion channels (the two-pore channels) as endo-lysosomal NAADP receptors. The generation of calcium signals by these channels is likened to those evoked by depolarisation during excitation-contraction coupling in muscle. We discuss the idea that two-pore channels can mediate a trigger release of calcium which is then amplified by calcium-induced calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. This is similar to the activation of voltage-sensitive calcium channels and subsequent mobilisation of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in cardiac tissue. We suggest that two-pore channels may physically interact with ryanodine receptors to account for more direct release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum in analogy with the conformational coupling of voltage-sensitive calcium channels and ryanodine receptors in skeletal muscle. Interaction of two-pore channels with other calcium release channels likely occurs between stores "trans-chatter" and possibly within the same store "cis-chatter". We also speculate that trafficking of two-pore channels through the endo-lysosomal system facilitates interactions with calcium entry channels. Strategic placing of two-pore channels thus provides a versatile means of generating spatiotemporally complex cellular calcium signals. PMID:20621760

  13. Calcium signaling as a mediator of cell energy demand and a trigger to cell death

    PubMed Central

    Bhosale, Gauri; Sharpe, Jenny A.; Sundier, Stephanie Y.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium signaling is pivotal to a host of physiological pathways. A rise in calcium concentration almost invariably signals an increased cellular energy demand. Consistent with this, calcium signals mediate a number of pathways that together serve to balance energy supply and demand. In pathological states, calcium signals can precipitate mitochondrial injury and cell death, especially when coupled to energy depletion and oxidative or nitrosative stress. This review explores the mechanisms that couple cell signaling pathways to metabolic regulation or to cell death. The significance of these pathways is exemplified by pathological case studies, such as those showing loss of mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 in patients and ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:26375864

  14. Calcium signaling as a mediator of cell energy demand and a trigger to cell death.

    PubMed

    Bhosale, Gauri; Sharpe, Jenny A; Sundier, Stephanie Y; Duchen, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Calcium signaling is pivotal to a host of physiological pathways. A rise in calcium concentration almost invariably signals an increased cellular energy demand. Consistent with this, calcium signals mediate a number of pathways that together serve to balance energy supply and demand. In pathological states, calcium signals can precipitate mitochondrial injury and cell death, especially when coupled to energy depletion and oxidative or nitrosative stress. This review explores the mechanisms that couple cell signaling pathways to metabolic regulation or to cell death. The significance of these pathways is exemplified by pathological case studies, such as those showing loss of mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 in patients and ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:26375864

  15. High proportions of regulatory B and T cells are associated with decreased cellular responses to pH1N1 influenza vaccine in HIV-infected children and youth (IMPAACT P1088).

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Adriana; Muresan, Petronella; Fenton, Terence; Richardson, Kelly; Dominguez, Teresa; Bloom, Anthony; Petzold, Elizabeth; Anthony, Patricia; Cunningham, Coleen K; Spector, Stephen A; Nachman, Sharon; Siberry, George K; Handelsman, Edward; Flynn, Patricia M

    2013-05-01

    HIV-infected individuals have poor responses to inactivated influenza vaccines. To evaluate the potential role of regulatory T (Treg) and B cells (Breg), we analyzed their correlation with humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to pandemic influenza (pH1N1) monovalent vaccine in HIV-infected children and youth. Seventy-four HIV-infected, 4- to 25-y old participants in a 2-dose pH1N1 vaccine study had circulating and pH1N1-stimulated Treg and Breg measured by flow cytometry at baseline, post-dose 1 and post-dose 2. Concomitantly, CMI was measured by ELISPOT and flow cytometry; and antibodies by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI). At baseline, most of the participants had pH1N1-specific IFNγ ELISPOT responses, whose magnitude positively correlated with the baseline pH1N1, but not with seasonal H1N1 HAI titers. pH1N1-specific IFNγ ELISPOT responses did not change post-dose 1 and significantly decreased post-dose 2. In contrast, circulating CD4+CD25+% and CD4+FOXP3+% Treg increased after vaccination. The decrease in IFNγ ELISPOT results was marginally associated with higher pH1N1-specific CD19+FOXP3+ and CD4+TGFβ+% Breg and Treg, respectively. In contrast, increases in HAI titers post-dose 1 were associated with significantly higher circulating CD19+CD25+% post-dose 1, whereas increases in IFNγ ELISPOT results post-dose 1 were associated with higher circulating CD4+/C8+CD25+FOXP3+%. In conclusion, in HIV-infected children and youth, influenza-specific Treg and Breg may contribute to poor responses to vaccination. However, robust humoral and CMI responses to vaccination may result in increased circulating Treg and/or Breg, establishing a feed-back mechanism. PMID:23370281

  16. High proportions of regulatory B and T cells are associated with decreased cellular responses to pH1N1 influenza vaccine in HIV-infected children and youth (IMPAACT P1088)

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Adriana; Muresan, Petronella; Fenton, Terence; Richardson, Kelly; Dominguez, Teresa; Bloom, Anthony; Petzold, Elizabeth; Anthony, Patricia; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Spector, Stephen A.; Nachman, Sharon; Siberry, George K.; Handelsman, Edward; Flynn, Patricia M.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals have poor responses to inactivated influenza vaccines. To evaluate the potential role of regulatory T (Treg) and B cells (Breg), we analyzed their correlation with humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to pandemic influenza (pH1N1) monovalent vaccine in HIV-infected children and youth. Seventy-four HIV-infected, 4- to 25-y old participants in a 2-dose pH1N1 vaccine study had circulating and pH1N1-stimulated Treg and Breg measured by flow cytometry at baseline, post-dose 1 and post-dose 2. Concomitantly, CMI was measured by ELISPOT and flow cytometry; and antibodies by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI). At baseline, most of the participants had pH1N1-specific IFNγ ELISPOT responses, whose magnitude positively correlated with the baseline pH1N1, but not with seasonal H1N1 HAI titers. pH1N1-specific IFNγ ELISPOT responses did not change post-dose 1 and significantly decreased post-dose 2. In contrast, circulating CD4+CD25+% and CD4+FOXP3+% Treg increased after vaccination. The decrease in IFNγ ELISPOT results was marginally associated with higher pH1N1-specific CD19+FOXP3+ and CD4+TGFβ+% Breg and Treg, respectively. In contrast, increases in HAI titers post-dose 1 were associated with significantly higher circulating CD19+CD25+% post-dose 1, whereas increases in IFNγ ELISPOT results post-dose 1 were associated with higher circulating CD4+/C8+CD25+FOXP3+%. In conclusion, in HIV-infected children and youth, influenza-specific Treg and Breg may contribute to poor responses to vaccination. However, robust humoral and CMI responses to vaccination may result in increased circulating Treg and/or Breg, establishing a feed-back mechanism. PMID:23370281

  17. Analysis of Intracellular Calcium Signaling in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Péntek, Adrienn; Pászty, Katalin; Apáti, Ágota

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of changes in intracellular calcium concentration is one of the most common and useful tools for studying signal transduction pathways or cellular responses in basic research and drug screening purposes as well. Increasing number of such applications using human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives requires development of calcium signal measurements for this special cell type. Here we describe a modified protocol for analysis of calcium signaling events in human embryonic stem cells, which can be used for other pluripotent cell types (such as iPSC) or their differentiated offspring as well. PMID:24482125

  18. Inhibition of gravitropism in oat coleoptiles by calcium chelation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    Some cellular event necessary for gravitropism is inhibited by EGTA without interferring with the overall growth. Calcium relieves this inhibition and demonstrates both that inhibition is reversible and was probably due to a reduction in the ability to free calcium required for one or more at the transduction steps of gravitropism. At the near neutral pH used, EGTA is charged and would not be expected to readily cross the membrane. One of its primary effects, then, is probably the bringing of free calcium in the apoplastic space exterior to the cell membranes.

  19. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Nociception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Takahiro; Adams, David J.

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are a large and functionally diverse group of membrane ion channels ubiquitously expressed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. VGCCs contribute to various physiological processes and transduce electrical activity into other cellular functions. This chapter provides an overview of biophysical properties of VGCCs, including regulation by auxiliary subunits, and their physiological role in neuronal functions. Subsequently, then we focus on N-type calcium (Cav2.2) channels, in particular their diversity and specific antagonists. We also discuss the role of N-type calcium channels in nociception and pain transmission through primary sensory dorsal root ganglion neurons (nociceptors). It has been shown that these channels are expressed predominantly in nerve terminals of the nociceptors and that they control neurotransmitter release. To date, important roles of N-type calcium channels in pain sensation have been elucidated genetically and pharmacologically, indicating that specific N-type calcium channel antagonists or modulators are particularly useful as therapeutic drugs targeting chronic and neuropathic pain.

  20. Calcium's role in mechanotransduction during muscle development.

    PubMed

    Benavides Damm, Tatiana; Egli, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Mechanotransduction is a process where cells sense their surroundings and convert the physical forces in their environment into an appropriate response. Calcium plays a crucial role in the translation of such forces to biochemical signals that control various biological processes fundamental in muscle development. The mechanical stimulation of muscle cells may for example result from stretch, electric and magnetic stimulation, shear stress, and altered gravity exposure. The response, mainly involving changes in intracellular calcium concentration then leads to a cascade of events by the activation of downstream signaling pathways. The key calcium-dependent pathways described here include the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. The subsequent effects in cellular homeostasis consist of cytoskeletal remodeling, cell cycle progression, growth, differentiation, and apoptosis, all necessary for healthy muscle development, repair, and regeneration. A deregulation from the normal process due to disuse, trauma, or disease can result in a clinical condition such as muscle atrophy, which entails a significant loss of muscle mass. In order to develop therapies against such diseased states, we need to better understand the relevance of calcium signaling and the downstream responses to mechanical forces in skeletal muscle. The purpose of this review is to discuss in detail how diverse mechanical stimuli cause changes in calcium homeostasis by affecting membrane channels and the intracellular stores, which in turn regulate multiple pathways that impart these effects and control the fate of muscle tissue. PMID:24525559

  1. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  2. Cadherin Mechanics and Complexation: The Importance of Calcium Binding

    PubMed Central

    Cailliez, Fabien; Lavery, Richard

    2005-01-01

    E-cadherins belong to a family of membrane-bound, cellular adhesion proteins. Their adhesive properties mainly involve the two N-terminal extracellular domains (EC1 and EC2). The junctions between these domains are characterized by calcium ion binding sites, and calcium ions are essential for the correct functioning of E-cadherins. Calcium is believed to rigidify the extracellular portion of the protein, which, when complexed, adopts a rod-like conformation. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the dynamics of the EC1-2 portion of E-cadherin in the presence and in the absence of calcium ions. These simulations confirm that apo-cadherin shows much higher conformational flexibility on a nanosecond timescale than the calcium-bound form. It is also shown that although the apo-cadherin fragment can spontaneously complex potassium, these monovalent ions are incapable of rigidifying the interdomain junctions. In contrast, removal of the most solvent-exposed calcium ion at the EC1-2 junction does not significantly perturb the dynamical behavior of the fragment. We have also extended this study to the cis-dimer formed from two EC1-2 fragments, potentially involved in cellular adhesion. Here again, it is shown that the presence of calcium is an important factor in both rigidifying and stabilizing the complex. PMID:16183887

  3. Activation of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Sensor STIM1 and Store-Operated Calcium Entry by Rotavirus Requires NSP4 Viroporin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hyser, Joseph M.; Utama, Budi; Crawford, Sue E.; Broughman, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) induces dramatic changes in cellular calcium homeostasis. These include increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) permeability, resulting in decreased ER calcium stores and activation of plasma membrane (PM) calcium influx channels, ultimately causing a 2- to 4-fold elevation in cytoplasmic calcium. Elevated cytoplasmic calcium is absolutely required for virus replication, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for calcium influx remain poorly understood. NSP4 is an ER-localized viroporin, whose activity depletes ER calcium, which ultimately leads to calcium influx. We hypothesized that NSP4-mediated depletion of ER calcium activates store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) through activation of the ER calcium sensor stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1). We established and used a stable yellow fluorescent protein-expressing STIM1 cell line (YFP-STIM1) as a biosensor to assess STIM1 activation (puncta formation) by rotavirus infection and NSP4 expression. We found that STIM1 is constitutively active in rotavirus-infected cells and that STIM1 puncta colocalize with the PM-localized Orai1 SOCE calcium channel. Expression of wild-type NSP4 activated STIM1, resulting in PM calcium influx, but an NSP4 viroporin mutant failed to induce STIM1 activation and did not activate the PM calcium entry pathway. Finally, knockdown of STIM1 significantly reduced rotavirus yield, indicating STIM1 plays a critical role in virus replication. These data demonstrate that while rotavirus may ultimately activate multiple calcium channels in the PM, calcium influx is predicated on NSP4 viroporin-mediated activation of STIM1 in the ER. This is the first report of viroporin-mediated activation of SOCE, reinforcing NSP4 as a robust model to understand dysregulation of calcium homeostasis during virus infections. PMID:24109210

  4. Cellular Stress Responses and Monitored Cellular Activities.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Naito, Yoshifumi; Kato, Hideya; Amaya, Fumimasa

    2016-08-01

    To survive, organisms require mechanisms that enable them to sense changes in the outside environment, introduce necessary responses, and resist unfavorable distortion. Consequently, through evolutionary adaptation, cells have become equipped with the apparatus required to monitor their fundamental intracellular processes and the mechanisms needed to try to offset malfunction without receiving any direct signals from the outside environment. It has been shown recently that eukaryotic cells are equipped with a special mechanism that monitors their fundamental cellular functions and that some pathogenic proteobacteria can override this monitoring mechanism to cause harm. The monitored cellular activities involved in the stressed intracellular response have been researched extensively in Caenorhabditis elegans, where discovery of an association between key mitochondrial activities and innate immune responses was named "cellular associated detoxification and defenses (cSADD)." This cellular surveillance pathway (cSADD) oversees core cellular activities such as mitochondrial respiration and protein transport into mitochondria, detects xenobiotics and invading pathogens, and activates the endocrine pathways controlling behavior, detoxification, and immunity. The cSADD pathway is probably associated with cellular responses to stress in human inflammatory diseases. In the critical care field, the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes (e.g., respiratory distress syndromes and sepsis) involves the disturbance of mitochondrial respiration leading to cell death. Up-to-date knowledge about monitored cellular activities and cSADD, especially focusing on mitochondrial involvement, can probably help fill a knowledge gap regarding the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes in the critical care field. PMID:26954943

  5. Structural transition in Bcl-xL and its potential association with mitochondrial calcium ion transport

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sreekanth; Choi, Minjoo; Nguyen, Quoc Toan; Ye, Hong; Liu, Wei; Toh, Hui Ting; Kang, CongBao; Kamariah, Neelagandan; Li, Chi; Huang, Huiya; White, Carl; Baek, Kwanghee; Grüber, Gerhard; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2015-01-01

    Bcl-2 family proteins are key regulators for cellular homeostasis in response to apoptotic stimuli. Bcl-xL, an antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family member, undergoes conformational transitions, which leads to two conformational states: the cytoplasmic and membrane-bound. Here we present the crystal and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) structures of Bcl-xL treated with the mild detergent n-Octyl β-D-Maltoside (OM). The detergent-treated Bcl-xL forms a dimer through three-dimensional domain swapping (3DDS) by swapping helices α6-α8 between two monomers. Unlike Bax, a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, Bcl-xL is not converted to 3DDS homodimer upon binding BH3 peptides and ABT-737, a BH3 mimetic drug. We also designed Bcl-xL mutants which cannot dimerize and show that these mutants reduced mitochondrial calcium uptake in MEF cells. This illustrates the structural plasticity in Bcl-xL providing hints toward the probable molecular mechanism for Bcl-xL to play a regulatory role in mitochondrial calcium ion transport. PMID:26023881

  6. Calcium signaling in plant cells in altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, E. L.

    2003-10-01

    Changes in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration in altered gravity (microgravity and clinostating) evidence that Ca 2+ signaling can play a fundamental role in biological effects of microgravity. Calcium as a second messenger is known to play a crucial role in stimulus - response coupling for many plant cellular signaling pathways. Its messenger functions are realized by transient changes in the cytosolic ion concentration induced by a variety of internal and external stimuli such as light, hormones, temperature, anoxia, salinity, and gravity. Although the first data on the changes in the calcium balance in plant cells under the influence of altered gravity have appeared in 80 th, a review highlighting the performed research and the possible significance of such Ca 2+ changes in the structural and metabolic rearrangements of plant cells in altered gravity is still lacking. In this paper, an attempt was made to summarize the available experimental results and to consider some hypotheses in this field of research. It is proposed to distinguish between cell gravisensing and cell graviperception; the former is related to cell structure and metabolism stability in the gravitational field and their changes in microgravity (cells not specialized to gravity perception), the latter is related to active use of a gravitational stimulus by cells presumebly specialized to gravity perception for realization of normal space orientation, growth, and vital activity (gravitropism, gravitaxis) in plants. The main experimental data concerning both redistribution of free Ca 2+ ions in plant cell organelles and the cell wall, and an increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration under the influence of altered gravity are presented. Based on the gravitational decompensation hypothesis, the consequence of events occurring in gravisensing cells not specialized to gravity perception under altered gravity are considered in the following order: changes in the cytoplasmic membrane surface

  7. Cellular Phone Towers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the call. How are people exposed to the energy from cellular phone towers? As people use cell ... where people can be exposed to them. The energy from a cellular phone tower antenna, like that ...

  8. Potential etiologic role of brushite in the formation of calcium (renal) stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Charles Y. C.

    1981-05-01

    Brushite may play an important regulatory role in the formation of calcium -containing renal stones. The urinary environment from patients with hypercalciuric nephrolithiasis is typically supersaturated and shows an increased propensity for the spontaneous nucleation of brushite. Brushite has been identified in "stone-forming" urine and in stones. This crystalline phase may undergo phase transformation to hydroxyapatite or cause heterogeneous nucleation or epitaxial growth of calcium oxalate. Thus, brushite may also participate in the formation of stones of hydroxypatite or calcium oxalate.

  9. Global Summit on Regulatory Science 2013.

    PubMed

    Howard, Paul C; Tong, Weida; Weichold, Frank; Healy, Marion; Slikker, William

    2014-12-01

    Regulatory science has been defined as the science that is used to develop regulatory decisions by government bodies. Regulatory science encompasses many scientific disciplines that oversee many studies producing a wide array of data. These may include fundamental research into the cellular interaction or response to a particular chemical or substance, hazard-assessment and dose-response studies in animal species, neurophysiological or neurobehavioral studies, best practices for the generation and analysis of genomics data, bioinformatics approaches, and mathematical modeling of risk. The Global Summit on Regulatory Science is an international conference with a mission to explore emerging and innovative technologies, and provide a platform to enhance translation of basic science into regulatory applications. The Third Global Summit on Regulatory Science which focused on nanotechnology is discussed. PMID:25128336

  10. ISOLATED MEDICAGO TRUNCATULA MUTANTS WITH INCREASED CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTAL ACCUMULATION HAVE DECREASED ASCORBIC ACID LEVELS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms controlling oxalate biosynthesis and calcium oxalate formation in plants remains largely unknown. As an initial step toward gaining insight into these regulatory mechanisms we initiated a mutant screen to identify plants that over-accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Four new mut...