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Sample records for cellular factors required

  1. Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 Is a Cellular Factor Required for Hepatitis C Virus Propagation▿

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yun-Sook; Tran, Huong T. L.; Park, Soo-Je; Yim, Seung-Ae; Hwang, Soon B.

    2011-01-01

    The life cycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly dependent on cellular factors. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) library screening, we identified peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 1 (Pin1) as a host factor involved in HCV propagation. Here we demonstrated that silencing of Pin1 expression resulted in decreases in HCV replication in both HCV replicon cells and cell culture-grown HCV (HCVcc)-infected cells, whereas overexpression of Pin1 increased HCV replication. Pin1 interacted with both the NS5A and NS5B proteins. However, Pin1 expression was increased only by the NS5B protein. Both the protein binding and isomerase activities of Pin1 were required for HCV replication. Juglone, a natural inhibitor of Pin1, inhibited HCV propagation by inhibiting the interplay between the Pin1 and HCV NS5A/NS5B proteins. These data indicate that Pin1 modulates HCV propagation and may contribute to HCV-induced liver pathogenesis. PMID:21680504

  2. The cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factors requires co-ordinated signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gina A.; Fearnley, Gareth W.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Harrison, Michael A.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-01-01

    VEGFs (vascular endothelial growth factors) are a family of conserved disulfide-linked soluble secretory glycoproteins found in higher eukaryotes. VEGFs mediate a wide range of responses in different tissues including metabolic homoeostasis, cell proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis. Such responses are initiated by VEGF binding to soluble and membrane-bound VEGFRs (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases) and co-receptors. VEGF and receptor splice isoform diversity further enhances complexity of membrane protein assembly and function in signal transduction pathways that control multiple cellular responses. Different signal transduction pathways are simultaneously activated by VEGFR–VEGF complexes with membrane trafficking along the endosome–lysosome network further modulating signal output from multiple enzymatic events associated with such pathways. Balancing VEGFR–VEGF signal transduction with trafficking and proteolysis is essential in controlling the intensity and duration of different intracellular signalling events. Dysfunction in VEGF-regulated signal transduction is important in chronic disease states including cancer, atherosclerosis and blindness. This family of growth factors and receptors is an important model system for understanding human disease pathology and developing new therapeutics for treating such ailments. PMID:26285805

  3. trans activation of the simian virus 40 late promoter by large T antigen requires binding sites for the cellular transcription factor TEF-1.

    PubMed Central

    Casaz, P; Sundseth, R; Hansen, U

    1991-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen stimulates the level of transcription from several RNA polymerase II promoters, including the SV40 late promoter. The mechanism of trans activation appears to be indirect since binding of T antigen to specific DNA sequences is not required. However, specific promoter elements that respond to T antigen have not previously been defined. We identified DNA sequences from the SV40 late promoter whose ability to stimulate transcription is induced by the expression of T antigen. In particular, the Sph I + II motifs of the SV40 enhancer can confer T-antigen inducibility to the normally uninducible herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene promoter when multiple copies of the sequence are inserted 5' of the transcription initiation site and TATA sequence. Binding sites for the cellular transcription factor TEF-1 and octamer binding proteins are contained within the Sph I + II motifs, as well as at other positions in the SV40 promoter. To study the role of individual protein-binding sites in trans activation by T antigen, mutations were constructed in various TEF-1 and octamer protein-binding sites of the SV40 late promoter. These mutations did not significantly affect basal promoter activity. However, mutation of all three TEF-1 sites prevented detectable activation by T antigen. DNase I footprinting of the mutated promoters with purified proteins demonstrated that inducibility by T antigen correlated with binding affinity of TEF-1 for the DNA and not with binding affinity of an octamer binding protein. Images PMID:1658359

  4. Interactome Analysis of the Influenza A Virus Transcription/Replication Machinery Identifies Protein Phosphatase 6 as a Cellular Factor Required for Efficient Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    York, Ashley; Hutchinson, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The negative-sense RNA genome of influenza A virus is transcribed and replicated by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). The viral RdRP is an important host range determinant, indicating that its function is affected by interactions with cellular factors. However, the identities and the roles of most of these factors remain unknown. Here, we employed affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry to identify cellular proteins that interact with the influenza A virus RdRP in infected human cells. We purified RdRPs using a recombinant influenza virus in which the PB2 subunit of the RdRP is fused to a Strep-tag. When this tagged subunit was purified from infected cells, copurifying proteins included the other RdRP subunits (PB1 and PA) and the viral nucleoprotein and neuraminidase, as well as 171 cellular proteins. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry revealed that the most abundant of these host proteins were chaperones, cytoskeletal proteins, importins, proteins involved in ubiquitination, kinases and phosphatases, and mitochondrial and ribosomal proteins. Among the phosphatases, we identified three subunits of the cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase 6 (PP6), including the catalytic subunit PPP6C and regulatory subunits PPP6R1 and PPP6R3. PP6 was found to interact directly with the PB1 and PB2 subunits of the viral RdRP, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of the catalytic subunit of PP6 in infected cells resulted in the reduction of viral RNA accumulation and the attenuation of virus growth. These results suggest that PP6 interacts with and positively regulates the activity of the influenza virus RdRP. IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses are serious clinical and veterinary pathogens, causing substantial health and economic impacts. In addition to annual seasonal epidemics, occasional global pandemics occur when viral strains adapt to humans from other species. To replicate efficiently and cause disease, influenza

  5. Cellular Restriction Factors of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zielonka, Jörg; Münk, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Lentiviruses are known for their narrow cell- and species-tropisms, which are determined by cellular proteins whose absence or presence either support viral replication (dependency factors, cofactors) or inhibit viral replication (restriction factors). Similar to Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the cat lentivirus Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is sensitive to recently discovered cellular restriction factors from non-host species that are able to stop viruses from replicating. Of particular importance are the cellular proteins APOBEC3, TRIM5α and tetherin/BST-2. In general, lentiviruses counteract or escape their species’ own variant of the restriction factor, but are targeted by the orthologous proteins of distantly related species. Most of the knowledge regarding lentiviral restriction factors has been obtained in the HIV-1 system; however, much less is known about their effects on other lentiviruses. We describe here the molecular mechanisms that explain how FIV maintains its replication in feline cells, but is largely prevented from cross-species infections by cellular restriction factors. PMID:22069525

  6. Material and mechanical factors: new strategy in cellular neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Hillary; Kwon, Il Keun; Lim, Jung Yul

    2014-01-01

    Since damaged neural circuits are not generally self-recovered, developing methods to stimulate neurogenesis is critically required. Most studies have examined the effects of soluble pharmacological factors on the cellular neurogenesis. On the other hand, it is now recognized that the other extracellular factors, including material and mechanical cues, also have a strong potential to induce cellular neurogenesis. This article will review recent data on the material (chemical patterning, micro/nano-topography, carbon nanotube, graphene) and mechanical (static cue from substrate stiffness, dynamic cue from stretch and flow shear) stimulations of cellular neurogenesis. These approaches may provide new neural regenerative medicine protocols. Scaffolding material templates capable of triggering cellular neurogenesis can be explored in the presence of neurogenesis-stimulatory mechanical environments, and also with conventional soluble factors, to enhance axonal growth and neural network formation in neural tissue engineering. PMID:25422642

  7. 47 CFR 22.901 - Cellular service requirements and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cellular service requirements and limitations. 22.901 Section 22.901 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.901 Cellular service requirements and limitations. The licensee of each...

  8. 47 CFR 22.901 - Cellular service requirements and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of the standard may be purchased from Global... SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.901 Cellular service requirements and... operates in compliance with this section. (a) Each cellular system must provide either mobile...

  9. Cellular factors implicated in filovirus entry.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Suchita; Hope, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Although filoviral infections are still occurring in different parts of the world, there are no effective preventive or treatment strategies currently available against them. Not only do filoviruses cause a deadly infection, but they also have the potential of being used as biological weapons. This makes it imperative to comprehensively study these viruses in order to devise effective strategies to prevent the occurrence of these infections. Entry is the foremost step in the filoviral replication cycle and different studies have reported the involvement of a myriad of cellular factors including plasma membrane components, cytoskeletal proteins, endosomal components, and cytosolic factors in this process. Signaling molecules such as the TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases comprising of Tyro3, Axl, and Mer have also been implicated as putative entry factors. Additionally, filoviruses are suggested to bind to a common receptor and recent studies have proposed T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) and Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) as potential receptor candidates. This paper summarizes the existing literature on filoviral entry with a special focus on cellular factors involved in this process and also highlights some fundamental questions. Future research aimed at answering these questions could be very useful in designing novel antiviral therapeutics. PMID:23365575

  10. Identification of cellular factors binding to acetylated HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Allouch, Awatef; Cereseto, Anna

    2011-11-01

    The viral protein integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of the HIV-1 cDNA into the host cellular genome. We have recently demonstrated that IN is acetylated by a cellular histone acetyltransferase, p300, which modifies three lysines located in the C-terminus of the viral factor (Cereseto et al. in EMBO J 24:3070-3081, 2005). This modification enhances IN catalytic activity, as demonstrated by in vitro assays. Consistently, mutations introduced in the targeted lysines greatly decrease the efficiency of HIV-1 integration. Acetylation was proven to regulate protein functions by modulating protein-protein interactions. HIV-1 to efficiently complete its replication steps, including the integration reaction, requires interacting with numerous cellular factors. Therefore, we sought to investigate whether acetylation might modulate the interaction between IN and the cellular factors. To this aim we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening that differs from the screenings so far performed (Rain et al. in Methods 47:291-297, 2009; Studamire and Goff in Retrovirology 5:48, 2008) for using as bait IN constitutively acetylated. From this analysis we have identified thirteen cellular factors involved in transcription, chromatin remodeling, nuclear transport, RNA binding, protein synthesis regulation and microtubule organization. To validate these interactions, binding assays were performed showing that acetylation increases the affinity of IN with specific factors. Nevertheless, few two-hybrid hits bind with the same affinity the acetylated and the unmodified IN. These results further underlie the relevance of IN post-translational modification by acetylation in HIV-1 replication cycle. PMID:20016921

  11. Drak Is Required for Actomyosin Organization During Drosophila Cellularization

    PubMed Central

    Chougule, Ashish B.; Hastert, Mary C.; Thomas, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of force by actomyosin contraction is critical for a variety of cellular and developmental processes. Nonmuscle myosin II is the motor that drives actomyosin contraction, and its activity is largely regulated by phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain. During the formation of the Drosophila cellular blastoderm, actomyosin contraction drives constriction of microfilament rings, modified cytokinesis rings. Here, we find that Drak is necessary for most of the phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain during cellularization. We show that Drak is required for organization of myosin II within the microfilament rings. Proper actomyosin contraction of the microfilament rings during cellularization also requires Drak activity. Constitutive activation of myosin regulatory light chain bypasses the requirement for Drak, suggesting that actomyosin organization and contraction are mediated through Drak’s regulation of myosin activity. Drak is also involved in the maintenance of furrow canal structure and lateral plasma membrane integrity during cellularization. Together, our observations suggest that Drak is the primary regulator of actomyosin dynamics during cellularization. PMID:26818071

  12. Translation Factors Specify Cellular Metabolic State.

    PubMed

    Mata, Juan

    2016-08-16

    In this issue of Cell Reports, Shah et al. present evidence that a subcomplex of the eIF3 translation initiation factor regulates translation of mRNAs encoding components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and glycolytic enzymes, thus linking translational control with energy metabolism. PMID:27533178

  13. Cellular integrity is required for inhibition of initiation of cellular DNA synthesis by reovirus type 3.

    PubMed Central

    Roner, M R; Cox, D C

    1985-01-01

    Synchronized HeLa cells, primed for entry into the synthesis phase by amethopterin, were prevented from initiating DNA synthesis 9 h after infection with reovirus type 3. However, nuclei isolated from synchronized cells infected with reovirus for 9 or 16 h demonstrated a restored ability to synthesize DNA. The addition of enucleated cytoplasmic extracts from infected or uninfected cells did not affect this restored capacity for synthesis. The addition of ribonucleotide triphosphates to nuclei isolated from infected cells stimulated additional DNA synthesis, suggesting that these nuclei were competent to initiate new rounds of DNA replication. Permeabilization of infected cells did not restore the ability of these cells to synthesize DNA. Nucleoids isolated from intact or permeabilized cells, infected for 9 or 16 h displayed an increased rate of sedimentation when compared with nucleoids isolated from uninfected cells. Nucleoids isolated from the nuclei of infected cells demonstrated a rate of sedimentation similar to that of nucleoids isolated from the nuclei of uninfected cells. The inhibition of initiation of cellular DNA synthesis by reovirus type 3 appears not to have been due to a permanent alteration of the replication complex, but this inhibition could be reversed by the removal of that complex from factors unique to the structural or metabolic integrity of the infected cell. Images PMID:3968718

  14. Cellular monitoring systems for the assessment of space environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, C. E.; Arenz, A.; Meier, M. M.; Baumstark-Khan, C.

    Harmful environmental factors - namely ionizing radiation - will continue to influence future manned space missions. The Cellular Biodiagnostic group at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) develops cellular monitoring systems, which include bacterial and mammalian cell systems capable of recognizing DNA damage as a consequence of the presence of genotoxic conditions. Such bioassay or biosensor systems will complement the physical detector systems used in space, insofar as they yield intrinsically biologically weighted measures of cellular responses. Furthermore, synergistic mutagenic and cancerogenic impacts of the radiation environment together with other potentially genotoxic constituents of the space habitat can be quantified using such systems, whose signals are especially relevant for the molecular damage to the DNA or the chromosomes. The experiment Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CERASP) has been selected by NASA to be performed on the International Space Station. It will supply basic information on the cellular response to radiation applied in microgravity. One of the biological end-points under investigation will be survival reflected by radiation-dependent reduction of constitutive expression of the enhanced variant of green fluorescent protein (EGFP), originally isolated from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea victoria. A second end-point will be gene activation by space flight conditions in mammalian cells, based on fluorescent promoter reporter systems using the destabilized EGFP variant (d2EGFP). The promoter element to be investigated will reflect the activity of the NF-kB stress response pathway as an anti-apoptotic radiation response. DNA damage will be measured by fluorescent analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU). The systems have worked properly for terrestrial applications during the first experiments. Experiments using accelerated particles produced at the French heavy ion accelerator GANIL have given insights into cellular mechanisms

  15. Cellular Reprogramming Using Defined Factors and MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Takanori; Kuboki, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    Development of human bodies, organs, and tissues contains numerous steps of cellular differentiation including an initial zygote, embryonic stem (ES) cells, three germ layers, and multiple expertized lineages of cells. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been recently developed using defined reprogramming factors such as Nanog, Klf5, Oct3/4 (Pou5f1), Sox2, and Myc. This outstanding innovation is largely changing life science and medicine. Methods of direct reprogramming of cells into myocytes, neurons, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts have been further developed using modified combination of factors such as N-myc, L-myc, Sox9, and microRNAs in defined cell/tissue culture conditions. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are also emerging multipotent stem cells with particular microRNA expression signatures. It was shown that miRNA-720 had a role in cellular reprogramming through targeting the pluripotency factor Nanog and induction of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). This review reports histories, topics, and idea of cellular reprogramming. PMID:27382371

  16. Cellular Factors Targeting APCs to Modulate Adaptive T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Do, Jeongsu; Min, Booki

    2014-01-01

    The fate of adaptive T cell immunity is determined by multiple cellular and molecular factors, among which the cytokine milieu plays the most important role in this process. Depending on the cytokines present during the initial T cell activation, T cells become effector cells that produce different effector molecules and execute adaptive immune functions. Studies thus far have primarily focused on defining how these factors control T cell differentiation by targeting T cells themselves. However, other non-T cells, particularly APCs, also express receptors for the factors and are capable of responding to them. In this review, we will discuss how APCs, by responding to those cytokines, influence T cell differentiation and adaptive immunity. PMID:25126585

  17. Cellular factors modulating the mechanism of tau protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Sarah N; Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Baker, Jeremy; Martinez-Licha, Carlos R; Darling, April; Dickey, Chad A

    2015-05-01

    Pathological accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, in the form of neurofibrillary tangles, is a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent neurodegenerative condition worldwide. In addition to Alzheimer's disease, a number of neurodegenerative diseases, called tauopathies, are characterized by the accumulation of aggregated tau in a variety of brain regions. While tau normally plays an important role in stabilizing the microtubule network of the cytoskeleton, its dissociation from microtubules and eventual aggregation into pathological deposits is an area of intense focus for therapeutic development. Here we discuss the known cellular factors that affect tau aggregation, from post-translational modifications to molecular chaperones. PMID:25666877

  18. Cellular factors modulating the mechanism of tau protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Sarah N.; Sabbagh, Jonathan J.; Baker, Jeremy; Martinez-Licha, Carlos R.; Darling, April

    2015-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, in the form of neurofibrillary tangles, is a major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, the most prevalent neurodegenerative condition worldwide. In addition to Alzheimer’s disease, a number of neurodegenerative diseases, called tauopathies, are characterized by the accumulation of aggregated tau in a variety of brain regions. While tau normally plays an important role in stabilizing the microtubule network of the cytoskeleton, its dissociation from microtubules and eventual aggregation into pathological deposits is an area of intense focus for therapeutic development. Here we discuss the known cellular factors that affect tau aggregation, from post-translational modifications to molecular chaperones. PMID:25666877

  19. The Major Cellular Sterol Regulatory Pathway Is Required for Andes Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Riblett, Amber M.; Didigu, Chukwuka A.; Wilen, Craig B.; Malani, Nirav; Male, Frances; Lee, Fang-Hua; Bushman, Frederic D.; Cherry, Sara; Doms, Robert W.; Bates, Paul; Briley, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae comprise a large family of RNA viruses with worldwide distribution and includes the pathogenic New World hantavirus, Andes virus (ANDV). Host factors needed for hantavirus entry remain largely enigmatic and therapeutics are unavailable. To identify cellular requirements for ANDV infection, we performed two parallel genetic screens. Analysis of a large library of insertionally mutagenized human haploid cells and a siRNA genomic screen converged on components (SREBP-2, SCAP, S1P and S2P) of the sterol regulatory pathway as critically important for infection by ANDV. The significance of this pathway was confirmed using functionally deficient cells, TALEN-mediated gene disruption, RNA interference and pharmacologic inhibition. Disruption of sterol regulatory complex function impaired ANDV internalization without affecting virus binding. Pharmacologic manipulation of cholesterol levels demonstrated that ANDV entry is sensitive to changes in cellular cholesterol and raises the possibility that clinically approved regulators of sterol synthesis may prove useful for combating ANDV infection. PMID:24516383

  20. Cellular monitoring systems for the assessment of space environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Arenz, Andrea; Meier, Matthias M.; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    Detrimental environmental factors - namely ionizing radiation - will continue to affect future manned space missions. The Cellular Biodiagnostics group at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) develops cellular monitoring systems, which include bacterial and mammalian cell systems capable of responding to DNA damage as a consequence of the presence of genotoxic conditions. Such bioassays will complement the physical detector systems used in space, insofar as they yield intrinsically biologically weighted measures of cellular responses. Furthermore, synergistic toxic impacts of the radiation environment together with other potentially genotoxic constituents of the space habitat can be quantified using such systems. The biological end-point under investigation in this work is the gene activation by radiation in mammalian cells, based on fluorescent promoter reporter systems using the destabilized enhanced green fluorescent protein variant (d2EGFP). The promoter element to be investigated reflects the activity of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway. The NF-κB family of proteins plays a major role in the inflammatory and immune response, cell proliferation and differentiation, apoptosis and tumorigenesis. After exposure to X-rays, an increase in NF-κB activation was seen only with high doses. Experiments using accelerated argon ions (95 MeV/u, LET ˜230 keV/μm) produced at the French heavy ion accelerator GANIL have shown activation of the NF-κB pathway with doses greater than 1 × 10 6 particles cm -2 (P cm -2), reaching its maximal activation at 2 × 10 7 P cm -2. These results suggest that the exceptional radiation field in space may activate the NF-κB pathway in human cells.

  1. Cellular Actions of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, R. J.; Katz, L. E. L.; Grimberg, Adda; Cohen, P.; Weinzimer, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs), and the IGFBP proteases are involved in the regulation of somatic growth and cellular proliferation both in vivo and in vitro. IGFs are potent mitogenic agents whose actions are determined by the availability of free IGFs to interact with the IGF receptors. IGFBPs comprise a family of proteins that bind IGFs with high affinity and specificity and thereby regulate IGF-dependent actions. IGFBPs have recently emerged as IGF-independent regulators of cell growth. Various IGFBP association proteins as well as cleavage of IGFBPs by specific proteases modulate levels of free IGFs and IGFBPs. The ubiquity and complexity of the IGF axis promise exciting discoveries and applications for the future. PMID:10226802

  2. Viral and cellular requirements for the budding of Feline Endogenous Retrovirus RD-114

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background RD-114 virus is a feline endogenous retrovirus and produced as infectious viruses in some feline cell lines. Recently, we reported the contamination of an infectious RD-114 virus in a proportion of live attenuated vaccines for dogs and cats. It is very difficult to completely knock out the RD-114 proviruses from cells, as endogenous retroviruses are usually integrated multiply into the host genome. However, it may be possible to reduce the risk of contamination of RD-114 virus by regulating the viral release from cells. Results In this study, to understand the molecular mechanism of RD-114 virus budding, we attempted to identify the viral and cellular requirements for RD-114 virus budding. Analyses of RD-114 L-domain mutants showed that the PPPY sequence in the pp15 region of Gag plays a critical role in RD-114 virus release as viral L-domain. Furthermore, we investigated the cellular factors required for RD-114 virus budding. We demonstrated that RD-114 virus release was inhibited by overexpression of dominant negative mutants of Vps4A, Vps4B, and WWP2. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that RD-114 budding utilizes the cellular multivesicular body sorting pathway similar to many other retroviruses. PMID:22168342

  3. Transcription Factors in the Cellular Response to Charged Particle Exposure.

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Christine E; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles, such as carbon ions, bear the promise of a more effective cancer therapy. In human spaceflight, exposure to charged particles represents an important risk factor for chronic and late effects such as cancer. Biological effects elicited by charged particle exposure depend on their characteristics, e.g., on linear energy transfer (LET). For diverse outcomes (cell death, mutation, transformation, and cell-cycle arrest), an LET dependency of the effect size was observed. These outcomes result from activation of a complex network of signaling pathways in the DNA damage response, which result in cell-protective (DNA repair and cell-cycle arrest) or cell-destructive (cell death) reactions. Triggering of these pathways converges among others in the activation of transcription factors, such as p53, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), activated protein 1 (AP-1), nuclear erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Depending on dose, radiation quality, and tissue, p53 induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. In low LET radiation therapy, p53 mutations are often associated with therapy resistance, while the outcome of carbon ion therapy seems to be independent of the tumor's p53 status. NF-κB is a central transcription factor in the immune system and exhibits pro-survival effects. Both p53 and NF-κB are activated after ionizing radiation exposure in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner. The NF-κB activation was shown to strongly depend on charged particles' LET, with a maximal activation in the LET range of 90-300 keV/μm. AP-1 controls proliferation, senescence, differentiation, and apoptosis. Nrf2 can induce cellular antioxidant defense systems, CREB might also be involved in survival responses. The extent of activation of these transcription factors by charged particles and their interaction in the cellular radiation response greatly influences the destiny of the irradiated and also

  4. Transcription Factors in the Cellular Response to Charged Particle Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles, such as carbon ions, bear the promise of a more effective cancer therapy. In human spaceflight, exposure to charged particles represents an important risk factor for chronic and late effects such as cancer. Biological effects elicited by charged particle exposure depend on their characteristics, e.g., on linear energy transfer (LET). For diverse outcomes (cell death, mutation, transformation, and cell-cycle arrest), an LET dependency of the effect size was observed. These outcomes result from activation of a complex network of signaling pathways in the DNA damage response, which result in cell-protective (DNA repair and cell-cycle arrest) or cell-destructive (cell death) reactions. Triggering of these pathways converges among others in the activation of transcription factors, such as p53, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), activated protein 1 (AP-1), nuclear erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Depending on dose, radiation quality, and tissue, p53 induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. In low LET radiation therapy, p53 mutations are often associated with therapy resistance, while the outcome of carbon ion therapy seems to be independent of the tumor’s p53 status. NF-κB is a central transcription factor in the immune system and exhibits pro-survival effects. Both p53 and NF-κB are activated after ionizing radiation exposure in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner. The NF-κB activation was shown to strongly depend on charged particles’ LET, with a maximal activation in the LET range of 90–300 keV/μm. AP-1 controls proliferation, senescence, differentiation, and apoptosis. Nrf2 can induce cellular antioxidant defense systems, CREB might also be involved in survival responses. The extent of activation of these transcription factors by charged particles and their interaction in the cellular radiation response greatly influences the destiny of the irradiated and also

  5. The adenovirus E1A protein overrides the requirement for cellular ras in initiating DNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, D W; Dobrowolski, S F; Piotrkowski, A; Harter, M L

    1994-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A protein can induce cellular DNA synthesis in growth-arrested cells by interacting with the cellular protein p300 or pRb. In addition, serum- and growth factor-dependent cells require ras activity to initiate DNA synthesis and recently we have shown that Balb/c 3T3 cells can be blocked in either early or late G1 following microinjection of an anti-ras antibody. In this study, the E1A 243 amino acid protein is shown through microinjection not only to shorten the G0 to S phase interval but, what is more important, to override the inhibitory effects exerted by the anti-ras antibody in either early or late G1. Specifically, whether E1A is co-injected with anti-ras into quiescent cells or injected 18 h following a separate injection of anti-ras after serum stimulation, it efficiently induces cellular DNA synthesis in cells that would otherwise be blocked in G0/G1. Moreover, injection of a mutant form of E1A that can no longer associate with p300 is just as efficient as wild-type E1A in stimulating DNA synthesis in cells whose ras activity has been neutralized by anti-ras. The results presented here show that E1A is capable of overriding the requirement of cellular ras activity in promoting the entry of cells into S phase. Moreover, the results suggest the possibility that pRb and/or pRb-related proteins may function in a ras-dependent pathway that enables E1A to achieve this activity. Images PMID:7813447

  6. Serum factors in older individuals change cellular clock properties

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Lucia; Schmitt, Karen; Meier, Fides; Izakovic, Jan; Roemer, Konstanze; Viola, Antoine; Cajochen, Christian; Wirz-Justice, Anna; Brown, Steven A.; Eckert, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Human aging is accompanied by dramatic changes in daily sleep–wake behavior: Activity shifts to an earlier phase, and the consolidation of sleep and wake is disturbed. Although this daily circadian rhythm is brain-controlled, its mechanism is encoded by cell-autonomous circadian clocks functioning in nearly every cell of the body. In fact, human clock properties measured in peripheral cells such as fibroblasts closely mimic those measured physiologically and behaviorally in the same subjects. To understand better the molecular mechanisms by which human aging affects circadian clocks, we characterized the clock properties of fibroblasts cultivated from dermal biopsies of young and older subjects. Fibroblast period length, amplitude, and phase were identical in the two groups even though behavior was not, thereby suggesting that basic clock properties of peripheral cells do not change during aging. Interestingly, measurement of the same cells in the presence of human serum from older donors shortened period length and advanced the phase of cellular circadian rhythms compared with treatment with serum from young subjects, indicating that a circulating factor might alter human chronotype. Further experiments demonstrated that this effect is caused by a thermolabile factor present in serum of older individuals. Thus, even though the molecular machinery of peripheral circadian clocks does not change with age, some age-related circadian dysfunction observed in vivo might be of hormonal origin and therefore might be pharmacologically remediable. PMID:21482780

  7. The GARP complex is required for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Florian; Petit, Constance; Kory, Nora; Christiano, Romain; Hannibal-Bach, Hans-Kristian; Graham, Morven; Liu, Xinran; Ejsing, Christer S; Farese, Robert V; Walther, Tobias C

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are abundant membrane components and important signaling molecules in eukaryotic cells. Their levels and localization are tightly regulated. However, the mechanisms underlying this regulation remain largely unknown. In this study, we identify the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex, which functions in endosome-to-Golgi retrograde vesicular transport, as a critical player in sphingolipid homeostasis. GARP deficiency leads to accumulation of sphingolipid synthesis intermediates, changes in sterol distribution, and lysosomal dysfunction. A GARP complex mutation analogous to a VPS53 allele causing progressive cerebello-cerebral atrophy type 2 (PCCA2) in humans exhibits similar, albeit weaker, phenotypes in yeast, providing mechanistic insights into disease pathogenesis. Inhibition of the first step of de novo sphingolipid synthesis is sufficient to mitigate many of the phenotypes of GARP-deficient yeast or mammalian cells. Together, these data show that GARP is essential for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis and suggest a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PCCA2. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08712.001 PMID:26357016

  8. 47 CFR 22.929 - Application requirements for the Cellular Radiotelephone Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.929 Application... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application requirements for the Cellular... radiated power in each of the cardinal radial directions. (b) If the application involves a service...

  9. Feline Leukemia Virus Infection Requires a Post-Receptor Binding Envelope-Dependent Cellular Component▿

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Naveen; Thickett, Kelly R.; Na, Hong; Leung, Cherry; Tailor, Chetankumar S.

    2011-01-01

    Gammaretrovirus receptors have been suggested to contain the necessary determinants to mediate virus binding and entry. Here, we show that murine NIH 3T3 and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing receptors for subgroup A, B, and C feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) are weakly susceptible (101 to 102 CFU/ml) to FeLV pseudotype viruses containing murine leukemia virus (MLV) core (Gag-Pol) proteins, whereas FeLV receptor-expressing murine Mus dunni tail fibroblast (MDTF) cells are highly susceptible (104 to 106 CFU/ml). However, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the FeLV subgroup B receptor PiT1 are highly susceptible to gibbon ape leukemia virus pseudotype virus, which differs from the FeLV pseudotype viruses only in the envelope protein. FeLV resistance is not caused by a defect in envelope binding, low receptor expression levels, or N-linked glycosylation. Resistance is not alleviated by substitution of the MLV core in the FeLV pseudotype virus with FeLV core proteins. Interestingly, FeLV resistance is alleviated by fusion of receptor-expressing NIH 3T3 and BHK cells with MDTF or human TE671 cells, suggesting the absence of an additional cellular component in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells that is required for FeLV infection. The putative FeLV-specific cellular component is not a secreted factor, as MDTF conditioned medium does not alleviate the block to FeLV infection. Together, our findings suggest that FeLV infection requires an additional envelope-dependent cellular component that is absent in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells but that is present in MDTF and TE671 cells. PMID:21917946

  10. Humoral and cellular factors of maternal immunity in swine.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Henri; Berri, Mustapha; Gerdts, Volker; Meurens, François

    2009-03-01

    Immunoglobulins cannot cross the placenta in pregnant sows. Neonatal pigs are therefore agammaglobulinemic at birth and, although immunocompetent, they cannot mount rapid immune responses at systemic and mucosal sites. Their survival depends directly on the acquisition of maternal immunity via colostrum and milk. Protection by maternal immunity is mediated by a number of factors, including specific systemic humoral immunity, involving mostly maternal IgG transferred from blood to colostrum and typically absorbed within the first 36 h of life. Passive mucosal immunity involves local humoral immunity, including the production of secretory IgA (sIgA), which is transferred principally via milk until weaning. The mammary gland (MG) produces sIgA, which is, then secreted into the milk via the poly-Ig receptor (pIgR) of epithelial cells. These antibodies are produced in response to intestinal and respiratory antigens, including pathogens and commensal organisms. Protection is also mediated by cellular immunity, which is transferred via maternal cells present in mammary secretions. The mechanisms underlying the various immunological links between MG and the mucosal surfaces involve hormonally regulated addressins and chemokines specific to these compartments. The enhancement of colostrogenic immunity depends on the stimulation of systemic immunity, whereas the enhancement of lactogenic immunity depends on appropriate stimulation at induction sites, an increase in cell trafficking from the gut and upper respiratory tract to the MG and, possibly, enhanced immunoglobulin production at the effector site and secretion in milk. In addition, mammary secretions provide factors other than immunoglobulins that protect the neonate and regulate the development of mucosal immunity--a key element of postnatal adaptation to environmental antigens. PMID:18761034

  11. E2F transcription factor 1 regulates cellular and organismal senescence by inhibiting Forkhead box O transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Peng, Shengyi; Tao, Li; Ruan, Haihe; Yang, Yanglu; Li, Tie-Mei; Adams, Ursula; Meng, Songshu; Bi, Xiaolin; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2014-12-01

    E2F1 and FOXO3 are two transcription factors that have been shown to participate in cellular senescence. Previous report reveals that E2F1 enhanced cellular senescence in human fibroblast cells, while FOXO transcription factors play against senescence by regulation reactive oxygen species scavenging proteins. However, their functional interplay has been unclear. Here we use E2F1 knock-out murine Embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), knockdown RNAi constructs, and ectopic expression of E2F1 to show that it functions by negatively regulating FOXO3. E2F1 attenuates FOXO3-mediated expression of MnSOD and Catalase without affecting FOXO3 protein stability, subcellular localization, or phosphorylation by Akt. We mapped the interaction between E2F1 and FOXO3 to a region including the DNA binding domain of E2F1 and the C-terminal transcription-activation domain of FOXO3. We propose that E2F1 inhibits FOXO3-dependent transcription by directly binding FOXO3 in the nucleus and preventing activation of its target genes. Moreover, knockdown of the Caenorhabditis elegans E2F1 ortholog efl-1 significantly extends lifespan in a manner that requires the activity of the C. elegans FOXO gene daf-16. We conclude that there is an evolutionarily conserved signaling connection between E2F1 and FOXO3, which regulates cellular senescence and aging by regulating the activity of FOXO3. We speculate that drugs and/or therapies that inhibit this physical interaction might be good candidates for reducing cellular senescence and increasing longevity. PMID:25344604

  12. Cellular Defense and Sensory Cell Survival Require Distinct Functions of ebi in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Young-Mi; Yagi, Yoshimasa; Tsuda, Leo

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune response and stress-induced apoptosis are well-established signaling pathways related to cellular defense. NF-κB and AP-1 are redox-sensitive transcription factors that play important roles in those pathways. Here we show that Ebi, a Drosophila homolog of the mammalian co-repressor molecule transducin β-like 1 (TBL1), variously regulates the expression of specific genes that are targets of redox-sensitive transcription factors. In response to different stimuli, Ebi activated gene expression to support the acute immune response in fat bodies, whereas Ebi repressed genes that are involved in apoptosis in photoreceptor cells. Thus, Ebi seems to act as a regulatory switch for genes that are activated or repressed in response to different external stimuli. Our results offer clear in vivo evidence that the Ebi-containing co-repressor complex acts in a distinct manner to regulate transcription that is required for modulating the output of various processes during Drosophila development. PMID:26524764

  13. Mechanically Induced Chromatin Condensation Requires Cellular Contractility in Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Su-Jin; Han, Woojin M; Szczesny, Spencer E; Cosgrove, Brian D; Elliott, Dawn M; Lee, David A; Duncan, Randall L; Mauck, Robert L

    2016-08-23

    Mechanical cues play important roles in directing the lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms by which dynamic tensile loading (DL) regulates chromatin organization in this cell type. Our previous findings indicated that the application of DL elicited a rapid increase in chromatin condensation through purinergic signaling mediated by ATP. Here, we show that the rate and degree of condensation depends on the frequency and duration of mechanical loading, and that ATP release requires actomyosin-based cellular contractility. Increases in baseline cellular contractility via the addition of an activator of G-protein coupled receptors (lysophosphatidic acid) induced rapid ATP release, resulting in chromatin condensation independent of loading. Conversely, inhibition of contractility through pretreatment with either a RhoA/Rock inhibitor (Y27632) or MLCK inhibitor (ML7) abrogated ATP release in response to DL, blocking load-induced chromatin condensation. With loading, ATP release occurred very rapidly (within the first 10-20 s), whereas changes in chromatin occurred at a later time point (∼10 min), suggesting a downstream biochemical pathway mediating this process. When cells were pretreated with blockers of the transforming growth factor (TGF) superfamily, purinergic signaling in response to DL was also eliminated. Further analysis showed that this pretreatment decreased contractility, implicating activity in the TGF pathway in the establishment of the baseline contractile state of MSCs (in the absence of exogenous ligands). These data indicate that chromatin condensation in response to DL is regulated through the interplay between purinergic and RhoA/Rock signaling, and that ligandless activity in the TGF/bone morphogenetic proteins signaling pathway contributes to the establishment of baseline contractility in MSCs. PMID:27558729

  14. 47 CFR 1.20007 - Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications carriers. 1.20007 Section 1.20007 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection...

  15. 47 CFR 1.20007 - Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications carriers. 1.20007 Section 1.20007 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Communications Assistance for...

  16. 47 CFR 1.20007 - Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications carriers. 1.20007 Section 1.20007 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act § 1.20007 Additional...

  17. 47 CFR 1.20007 - Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications carriers. 1.20007 Section 1.20007 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection...

  18. 47 CFR 1.20007 - Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications carriers. 1.20007 Section 1.20007 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection...

  19. Cellular Factors Involved in HTLV-1 Entry and Pathogenicit

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Hiroo

    2012-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1 – associated myelopathy and tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HTLV-1 has a preferential tropism for CD4 T cells in healthy carriers and ATL patients, while both CD4 and CD8 T cells serve as viral reservoirs in HAM/TSP patients. HTLV-1 has also been detected other cell types, including monocytes, endothelial cells, and dendritic cells. In contrast to the limited cell tropism of HTLV-1 in vivo, the HTLV receptor appears to be expressed in almost all human or animal cell lines. It remains to be examined whether this cell tropism is determined by host factors or by HTLV-1 heterogeneity. Unlike most retroviruses, cell-free virions of HTLV-1 are very poorly infectious. The lack of completely HTLV-1-resistant cells and the low infectivity of HTLV-1 have hampered research on the HTLV entry receptor. Entry of HTLV-1 into target cells is thought to involve interactions between the env (Env) glycoproteins, a surface glycoprotein (surface unit), and a transmembrane glycoprotein. Recent studies have shown that glucose transporter GLUT1, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) are the three proteins important for the entry of HTLV-1. Studies using adherent cell lines have shown that GLUT1 can function as a receptor for HTLV. HSPGs are required for efficient entry of HTLV-1 into primary CD4 T cells. NRP-1 is expressed in most established cell lines. Further studies have shown that these three molecules work together to promote HTLV-1 binding to cells and fusion of viral and cell membranes. The virus could first contact with HSPGs and then form complexes with NRP-1, followed by association with GLUT1. It remains to be determined whether these three molecules can explain HTLV-1 cell tropism. It also remains to be more definitively proven that these molecules are sufficient to permit HTLV-1 entry into completely HTLV-1-resistant cells. PMID

  20. Organic growth factor requirements of some yeasts.

    PubMed

    Madan, M; Gulati, N

    1980-01-01

    Some sporogenous yeasts (Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Debaryomyces hansenii, Hansenula ciferrii, Hansenula polymorpha, Pichia polymorpha, Saccharomycopsis guttulata, and Saccharomyces chevalieri), isolated from various fruits have been examined for their organic growth factor requisites. H. ciferrii was completely deficient in thiamine, biotin, inositol, riboflavin, niacin, and partially deficient in pantothenic acid. It required an external supply of 0.1-1.0 ppm thiamine, 0.01-0.1 ppm biotin, 10.0 ppm inositol, 0.10 ppm niacin and riboflavin for its optimum growth. H. polymorpha showed partial deficiency only in xanthine. P. polymorpha gave indications of partial deficiencies in thiamine and biotin. S. guttulata was completely deficient in biotin, and partially deficient in adenine sulphate. It required 0.01 ppm biotin for optimum growth. S chevalieri was completely deficient in pyridoxine and partially deficient in thiamine. It required 0.1 ppm pyridoxine for maximum growth. D. hansenii and B bruxellensis were auxoautotrophic for the various growth factors studied. PMID:7242379

  1. Cellular Oxygen Sensing: Crystal Structure of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylase (PHD2)

    SciTech Connect

    McDonough,M.; Li, V.; Flashman, E.; Chowdhury, R.; Mohr, C.; Lienard, B.; Zondlo, J.; Oldham, N.; Clifton, I.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Cellular and physiological responses to changes in dioxygen levels in metazoans are mediated via the posttranslational oxidation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF). Hydroxylation of conserved prolyl residues in the HIF-{alpha} subunit, catalyzed by HIF prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs), signals for its proteasomal degradation. The requirement of the PHDs for dioxygen links changes in dioxygen levels with the transcriptional regulation of the gene array that enables the cellular response to chronic hypoxia; the PHDs thus act as an oxygen-sensing component of the HIF system, and their inhibition mimics the hypoxic response. We describe crystal structures of the catalytic domain of human PHD2, an important prolyl-4-hydroxylase in the human hypoxic response in normal cells, in complex with Fe(II) and an inhibitor to 1.7 Angstroms resolution. PHD2 crystallizes as a homotrimer and contains a double-stranded {beta}-helix core fold common to the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependant dioxygenase family, the residues of which are well conserved in the three human PHD enzymes (PHD 1-3). The structure provides insights into the hypoxic response, helps to rationalize a clinically observed mutation leading to familial erythrocytosis, and will aid in the design of PHD selective inhibitors for the treatment of anemia and ischemic disease.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa RhlR is required to neutralize the cellular immune response in a Drosophila melanogaster oral infection model

    PubMed Central

    Limmer, Stefanie; Haller, Samantha; Drenkard, Eliana; Lee, Janice; Yu, Shen; Kocks, Christine; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    An in-depth mechanistic understanding of microbial infection necessitates a molecular dissection of host–pathogen relationships. Both Drosophila melanogaster and Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been intensively studied. Here, we analyze the infection of D. melanogaster by P. aeruginosa by using mutants in both host and pathogen. We show that orally ingested P. aeruginosa crosses the intestinal barrier and then proliferates in the hemolymph, thereby causing the infected flies to die of bacteremia. Host defenses against ingested P. aeruginosa included an immune deficiency (IMD) response in the intestinal epithelium, systemic Toll and IMD pathway responses, and a cellular immune response controlling bacteria in the hemocoel. Although the observed cellular and intestinal immune responses appeared to act throughout the course of the infection, there was a late onset of the systemic IMD and Toll responses. In this oral infection model, P. aeruginosa PA14 did not require its type III secretion system or other well-studied virulence factors such as the two-component response regulator GacA or the protease AprA for virulence. In contrast, the quorum-sensing transcription factor RhlR, but surprisingly not LasR, played a key role in counteracting the cellular immune response against PA14, possibly at an early stage when only a few bacteria are present in the hemocoel. These results illustrate the power of studying infection from the dual perspective of host and pathogen by revealing that RhlR plays a more complex role during pathogenesis than previously appreciated. PMID:21987808

  3. Analysis of murine cellular receptors for tumor-killing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, F.; Natori, S.

    1987-01-01

    Receptors for tumor-killing factor (TKF) on the surface of murine cells were analyzed using radioiodinated TKF. Not only sensitive cells but also insensitive cells were found to have specific receptors. Among the sensitive cells, no clear relation was observed between the number of receptors on the cell surface and sensitivity to TKF. Compounds affecting microfilaments (cytochalasin B and D) and microtubules (colchicine and Colcemid) significantly inhibited cytolysis of sensitive cells induced by receptor-bound TKF. It is concluded that internalization of receptor-bound TKF is a prerequisite for triggering cytolysis.

  4. Selective transcription and cellular proliferation induced by PDGF require histone deacetylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Catania, Annunziata; Iavarone, Carlo; Carlomagno, Stella M.; Chiariello, Mario . E-mail: chiariel@unina.it

    2006-05-05

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are key regulatory enzymes involved in the control of gene expression and their inhibition by specific drugs has been widely correlated to cell cycle arrest, terminal differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated whether HDAC activity was required for PDGF-dependent signal transduction and cellular proliferation. Exposure of PDGF-stimulated NIH3T3 fibroblasts to the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) potently repressed the expression of a group of genes correlated to PDGF-dependent cellular growth and pro-survival activity. Moreover, we show that TSA interfered with STAT3-dependent transcriptional activity induced by PDGF. Still, neither phosphorylation nor nuclear translocation and DNA-binding in vitro and in vivo of STAT3 were affected by using TSA to interfere with PDGF stimulation. Finally, TSA treatment resulted in the suppression of PDGF-dependent cellular proliferation without affecting cellular survival of NIH3T3 cells. Our data indicate that inhibition of HDAC activity antagonizes the mitogenic effect of PDGF, suggesting that these drugs may specifically act on the expression of STAT-dependent, PDGF-responsive genes.

  5. Cellular responses to implant materials: biological, physical and chemical factors.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, H

    1983-12-01

    excellent adhesion to tissue. Single crystal sapphire ceramics with high mechanical strength permit the delicate designs required for implants. Success with dental implants may depend upon combining the rigid retention of porous stable alloys or ceramics of suitable Young's modulus with a stress absorbing superstructure. A further development to be expected is the appearance of composite and polyphase materials which have tissue adhesiveness, stability in living tissues and various degrees of Young's modulus. PMID:6581129

  6. Resources required for topological quantum factoring

    SciTech Connect

    Baraban, M.; Bonesteel, N. E.; Simon, S. H.

    2010-06-15

    We consider a hypothetical topological quantum computer composed of either Ising or Fibonacci anyons. For each case, we calculate the time and number of qubits (space) necessary to execute the most computationally expensive step of Shor's algorithm, modular exponentiation. For Ising anyons, we apply Bravyi's distillation method [S. Bravyi, Phys. Rev. A 73, 042313 (2006)] which combines topological and nontopological operations to allow for universal quantum computation. With reasonable restrictions on the physical parameters we find that factoring a 128-bit number requires approximately 10{sup 3} Fibonacci anyons versus at least 3x10{sup 9} Ising anyons. Other distillation algorithms could reduce the resources for Ising anyons substantially.

  7. Repression of the human papillomavirus type 18 enhancer by the cellular transcription factor Oct-1.

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe-Seyler, F; Butz, K; zur Hausen, H

    1991-01-01

    The role of cellular factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of the cancer-associated human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) is yet poorly understood. The presence of an Oct-1-binding site within the HPV18 upstream regulatory region led us to investigate the influence of Oct-1 on viral transcription. Cotransfection of Oct-1 expression plasmids together with luciferase reporter constructs containing HPV18 regulatory sequences indicated that Oct-1 can transcriptionally repress the HPV18 upstream regulatory region. In contrast, heterologous control regions were not affected by Oct-1. HPV18 cis elements that can be repressed by Oct-1 mapped to a 135-bp subregion of the viral constitutive enhancer. Analysis of an Oct-1 mutant defective in DNA binding suggested that HPV18 down-modulation does not require direct binding of Oct-1 to DNA. These results make Oct-1 a candidate factor involved in the intracellular surveillance of HPV18 transcription and support the notion of a host cell mechanism that can specifically repress HPV E6-E7 transforming gene expression. Images PMID:1654457

  8. 47 CFR 22.939 - Site availability requirements for applications competing with cellular renewal applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22... application competing against a cellular renewal application must contain, when initially filed,...

  9. 47 CFR 22.939 - Site availability requirements for applications competing with cellular renewal applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22... application competing against a cellular renewal application must contain, when initially filed,...

  10. 47 CFR 22.939 - Site availability requirements for applications competing with cellular renewal applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22... application competing against a cellular renewal application must contain, when initially filed,...

  11. 47 CFR 22.939 - Site availability requirements for applications competing with cellular renewal applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22... application competing against a cellular renewal application must contain, when initially filed,...

  12. 47 CFR 22.939 - Site availability requirements for applications competing with cellular renewal applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22... application competing against a cellular renewal application must contain, when initially filed,...

  13. Extreme cellular adaptations and cell differentiation required by a cyanobacterium for carbonate excavation

    PubMed Central

    Guida, Brandon Scott; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Some cyanobacteria, known as euendoliths, excavate and grow into calcium carbonates, with their activity leading to significant marine and terrestrial carbonate erosion and to deleterious effects on coral reef and bivalve ecology. Despite their environmental relevance, the mechanisms by which they can bore have remained elusive and paradoxical, in that, as oxygenic phototrophs, cyanobacteria tend to alkalinize their surroundings, which will encourage carbonate precipitation, not dissolution. Therefore, cyanobacteria must rely on unique adaptations to bore. Studies with the filamentous euendolith, Mastigocoleus testarum, indicated that excavation requires both cellular energy and transcellular calcium transport, mediated by P-type ATPases, but the cellular basis for this phenomenon remains obscure. We present evidence that excavation in M. testarum involves two unique cellular adaptations. Long-range calcium transport is based on active pumping at multiple cells along boring filaments, orchestrated by the preferential localization of calcium ATPases at one cell pole, in a ring pattern, facing the cross-walls, and by repeating this placement and polarity, a pattern that breaks at branching and apical cells. In addition, M. testarum differentiates specialized cells we call calcicytes, that which accumulate calcium at concentrations more than 500-fold those found in other cyanobacteria, concomitantly and drastically lowering photosynthetic pigments and enduring severe cytoplasmatic alkalinization. Calcicytes occur commonly, but not exclusively, in apical parts of the filaments distal to the excavation front. We suggest that calcicytes allow for fast calcium flow at low, nontoxic concentrations through undifferentiated cells by providing buffering storage for excess calcium before final excretion to the outside medium. PMID:27140633

  14. Extreme cellular adaptations and cell differentiation required by a cyanobacterium for carbonate excavation.

    PubMed

    Guida, Brandon Scott; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-05-17

    Some cyanobacteria, known as euendoliths, excavate and grow into calcium carbonates, with their activity leading to significant marine and terrestrial carbonate erosion and to deleterious effects on coral reef and bivalve ecology. Despite their environmental relevance, the mechanisms by which they can bore have remained elusive and paradoxical, in that, as oxygenic phototrophs, cyanobacteria tend to alkalinize their surroundings, which will encourage carbonate precipitation, not dissolution. Therefore, cyanobacteria must rely on unique adaptations to bore. Studies with the filamentous euendolith, Mastigocoleus testarum, indicated that excavation requires both cellular energy and transcellular calcium transport, mediated by P-type ATPases, but the cellular basis for this phenomenon remains obscure. We present evidence that excavation in M. testarum involves two unique cellular adaptations. Long-range calcium transport is based on active pumping at multiple cells along boring filaments, orchestrated by the preferential localization of calcium ATPases at one cell pole, in a ring pattern, facing the cross-walls, and by repeating this placement and polarity, a pattern that breaks at branching and apical cells. In addition, M. testarum differentiates specialized cells we call calcicytes, that which accumulate calcium at concentrations more than 500-fold those found in other cyanobacteria, concomitantly and drastically lowering photosynthetic pigments and enduring severe cytoplasmatic alkalinization. Calcicytes occur commonly, but not exclusively, in apical parts of the filaments distal to the excavation front. We suggest that calcicytes allow for fast calcium flow at low, nontoxic concentrations through undifferentiated cells by providing buffering storage for excess calcium before final excretion to the outside medium. PMID:27140633

  15. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2: Its Contribution to Acute Cellular Rejection and Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Al-Lamki, Rafia S.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein and one of the two receptors that orchestrate the complex biological functions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF, also designed TNF-α). Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that TNFR2 plays an important role in renal disorders associated with acute cellular rejection and clear cell renal carcinoma but its exact role in these settings is still not completely understood. This papers reviews the factors that may mediate TNFR2 induction in acute cellular rejection and clear cell renal carcinoma and its contribution to these conditions and discusses its therapeutic implications. A greater understanding of the function of TNFR2 may lead to the development of new anti-TNF drugs. PMID:24350291

  16. Coordinated Destruction of Cellular Messages in Translation Complexes by the Gammaherpesvirus Host Shutoff Factor and the Mammalian Exonuclease Xrn1

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, G. Renuka; Wong, Wesley; Jackson, Andrew O.; Glaunsinger, Britt A.

    2011-01-01

    Several viruses encode factors that promote host mRNA degradation to silence gene expression. It is unclear, however, whether cellular mRNA turnover pathways are engaged to assist in this process. In Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus this phenotype is enacted by the host shutoff factor SOX. Here we show that SOX-induced mRNA turnover is a two-step process, in which mRNAs are first cleaved internally by SOX itself then degraded by the cellular exonuclease Xrn1. SOX therefore bypasses the regulatory steps of deadenylation and decapping normally required for Xrn1 activation. SOX is likely recruited to translating mRNAs, as it cosediments with translation initiation complexes and depletes polysomes. Cleaved mRNA intermediates accumulate in the 40S fraction, indicating that recognition occurs at an early stage of translation. This is the first example of a viral protein commandeering cellular mRNA turnover pathways to destroy host mRNAs, and suggests that Xrn1 is poised to deplete messages undergoing translation in mammalian cells. PMID:22046136

  17. Global analysis of bacterial transcription factors to predict cellular target processes.

    PubMed

    Doerks, Tobias; Andrade, Miguel A; Lathe, Warren; von Mering, Christian; Bork, Peer

    2004-03-01

    Whole-genome sequences are now available for >100 bacterial species, giving unprecedented power to comparative genomics approaches. We have applied genome-context methods to predict target processes that are regulated by transcription factors (TFs). Of 128 orthologous groups of proteins annotated as TFs, to date, 36 are functionally uncharacterized; in our analysis we predict a probable cellular target process or biochemical pathway for half of these functionally uncharacterized TFs. PMID:15049306

  18. Heat induction of heat shock protein 25 requires cellular glutamine in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Phanvijhitsiri, Kittiporn; Musch, Mark W; Ropeleski, Mark J; Chang, Eugene B

    2006-08-01

    Glutamine is considered a nonessential amino acid; however, it becomes conditionally essential during critical illness when consumption exceeds production. Glutamine may modulate the heat shock/stress response, an important adaptive cellular response for survival. Glutamine increases heat induction of heat shock protein (Hsp) 25 in both intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-18) and mesenchymal NIH/3T3 cells, an effect that is neither glucose nor serum dependent. Neither arginine, histidine, proline, leucine, asparagine, nor tyrosine acts as physiological substitutes for glutamine for heat induction of Hsp25. The lack of effect of these amino acids was not caused by deficient transport, although some amino acids, including glutamate (a major direct metabolite of glutamine), were transported poorly by IEC-18 cells. Glutamate uptake could be augmented in a concentration- and time-dependent manner by increasing either media concentration and/or duration of exposure. Under these conditions, glutamate promoted heat induction of Hsp25, albeit not as efficiently as glutamine. Further evidence for the role of glutamine conversion to glutamate was obtained with the glutaminase inhibitor 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine (DON), which inhibited the effect of glutamine on heat-induced Hsp25. DON inhibited phosphate-dependent glutaminase by 75% after 3 h, decreasing cell glutamate. Increased glutamine/glutamate conversion to glutathione was not involved, since the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, buthionine sulfoximine, did not block glutamine's effect on heat induction of Hsp25. A large drop in ATP levels did not appear to account for the diminished Hsp25 induction during glutamine deficiency. In summary, glutamine is an important amino acid, and its requirement for heat-induced Hsp25 supports a role for glutamine supplementation to optimize cellular responses to pathophysiological stress. PMID:16554407

  19. Transforming growth factor-beta1 mediates cellular response to DNA damage in situ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewan, Kenneth B.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Arteaga, Carlos; Warters, Ray; Akhurst, Rosemary J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 is rapidly activated after ionizing radiation, but its specific role in cellular responses to DNA damage is not known. Here we use Tgfbeta1 knockout mice to show that radiation-induced apoptotic response is TGF-beta1 dependent in the mammary epithelium, and that both apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in response to DNA damage decrease as a function of TGF-beta1 gene dose in embryonic epithelial tissues. Because apoptosis in these tissues has been shown previously to be p53 dependent, we then examined p53 protein activation. TGF-beta1 depletion, by either gene knockout or by using TGF-beta neutralizing antibodies, resulted in decreased p53 Ser-18 phosphorylation in irradiated mammary gland. These data indicate that TGF-beta1 is essential for rapid p53-mediated cellular responses that mediate cell fate decisions in situ.

  20. Post-Transcriptional Control of LINE-1 Retrotransposition by Cellular Host Factors in Somatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Javier G.; Cristofari, Gaël

    2016-01-01

    Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposons form the only autonomously active family of transposable elements in humans. They are expressed and mobile in the germline, in embryonic stem cells and in the early embryo, but are silenced in most somatic tissues. Consistently, they play an important role in individual genome variations through insertional mutagenesis and sequence transduction, which occasionally lead to novel genetic diseases. In addition, they are reactivated in nearly half of the human epithelial cancers, contributing to tumor genome dynamics. The L1 element codes for two proteins, ORF1p and ORF2p, which are essential for its mobility. ORF1p is an RNA-binding protein with nucleic acid chaperone activity and ORF2p possesses endonuclease and reverse transcriptase activities. These proteins and the L1 RNA assemble into a ribonucleoprotein particle (L1 RNP), considered as the core of the retrotransposition machinery. The L1 RNP mediates the synthesis of new L1 copies upon cleavage of the target DNA and reverse transcription of the L1 RNA at the target site. The L1 element takes benefit of cellular host factors to complete its life cycle, however several cellular pathways also limit the cellular accumulation of L1 RNPs and their deleterious activities. Here, we review the known cellular host factors and pathways that regulate positively or negatively L1 retrotransposition at post-transcriptional level, in particular by interacting with the L1 machinery or L1 replication intermediates; and how they contribute to control L1 activity in somatic cells. PMID:27014690

  1. Flow-dependent myosin recruitment during Drosophila cellularization requires zygotic dunk activity.

    PubMed

    He, Bing; Martin, Adam; Wieschaus, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Actomyosin contractility underlies force generation in morphogenesis ranging from cytokinesis to epithelial extension or invagination. In Drosophila, the cleavage of the syncytial blastoderm is initiated by an actomyosin network at the base of membrane furrows that invaginate from the surface of the embryo. It remains unclear how this network forms and how it affects tissue mechanics. Here, we show that during Drosophila cleavage, myosin recruitment to the cleavage furrows proceeds in temporally distinct phases of tension-driven cortical flow and direct recruitment, regulated by different zygotic genes. We identify the gene dunk, which we show is transiently transcribed when cellularization starts and functions to maintain cortical myosin during the flow phase. The subsequent direct myosin recruitment, however, is Dunk-independent but requires Slam. The Slam-dependent direct recruitment of myosin is sufficient to drive cleavage in the dunk mutant, and the subsequent development of the mutant is normal. In the dunk mutant, cortical myosin loss triggers misdirected flow and disrupts the hexagonal packing of the ingressing furrows. Computer simulation coupled with laser ablation suggests that Dunk-dependent maintenance of cortical myosin enables mechanical tension build-up, thereby providing a mechanism to guide myosin flow and define the hexagonal symmetry of the furrows. PMID:27226317

  2. Flow-dependent myosin recruitment during Drosophila cellularization requires zygotic dunk activity

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Adam; Wieschaus, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Actomyosin contractility underlies force generation in morphogenesis ranging from cytokinesis to epithelial extension or invagination. In Drosophila, the cleavage of the syncytial blastoderm is initiated by an actomyosin network at the base of membrane furrows that invaginate from the surface of the embryo. It remains unclear how this network forms and how it affects tissue mechanics. Here, we show that during Drosophila cleavage, myosin recruitment to the cleavage furrows proceeds in temporally distinct phases of tension-driven cortical flow and direct recruitment, regulated by different zygotic genes. We identify the gene dunk, which we show is transiently transcribed when cellularization starts and functions to maintain cortical myosin during the flow phase. The subsequent direct myosin recruitment, however, is Dunk-independent but requires Slam. The Slam-dependent direct recruitment of myosin is sufficient to drive cleavage in the dunk mutant, and the subsequent development of the mutant is normal. In the dunk mutant, cortical myosin loss triggers misdirected flow and disrupts the hexagonal packing of the ingressing furrows. Computer simulation coupled with laser ablation suggests that Dunk-dependent maintenance of cortical myosin enables mechanical tension build-up, thereby providing a mechanism to guide myosin flow and define the hexagonal symmetry of the furrows. PMID:27226317

  3. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhaohua; Luca, Maria; Taggart-Murphy, Laura; Portillio, Jessica; Chang, Cathey; Guven, Ayse; Lin, Ren-Jang; Murray, Johanne; Carr, Antony

    2012-10-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A){sup +} RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G{sub 2} phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  4. p19(Arf) is required for the cellular response to chronic DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bieging-Rolett, K T; Johnson, T M; Brady, C A; Beaudry, V G; Pathak, N; Han, S; Attardi, L D

    2016-08-18

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a stress sensor, driving cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in response to DNA damage or oncogenic signals. p53 activation by oncogenic signals relies on the p19(Arf) tumor suppressor, while p53 activation downstream of acute DNA damage is reported to be p19(Arf)-independent. Accordingly, p19(Arf)-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) arrest in response to acute DNA damage. However, p19(Arf) is required for replicative senescence, a condition associated with an activated DNA damage response, as p19(Arf)-/- MEFs do not senesce after serial passage. A possible explanation for these seemingly disparate roles for p19(Arf) is that acute and chronic DNA damage responses are mechanistically distinct. Replicative senescence may result from chronic, low-dose DNA damage responses in which p19(Arf) has a specific role. We therefore examined the role of p19(Arf) in cellular responses to chronic, low-dose DNA-damaging agent treatment by maintaining MEFs in low oxygen and administering 0.5 G y γ-irradiation daily or 150 μM hydroxyurea, a replication stress inducer. In contrast to their response to acute DNA damage, p19(Arf)-/- MEFs exposed to chronic DNA damage do not senesce, revealing a selective role for p19(Arf) in senescence upon low-level, chronic DNA damage. We show further that p53 pathway activation in p19(Arf)-/- MEFs exposed to chronic DNA damage is attenuated relative to wild-type MEFs, suggesting a role for p19(Arf) in fine-tuning p53 activity. However, combined Nutlin3a and chronic DNA-damaging agent treatment is insufficient to promote senescence in p19(Arf)-/- MEFs, suggesting that the role of p19(Arf) in the chronic DNA damage response may be partially p53-independent. These data suggest the importance of p19(Arf) for the cellular response to the low-level DNA damage incurred in culture or upon oncogene expression, providing new insight into how p19(Arf) serves as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our study helps reconcile reports

  5. p19Arf is required for the cellular response to chronic DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Bieging-Rolett, Kathryn T.; Johnson, Thomas M.; Brady, Colleen A.; Beaudry, Veronica G.; Pathak, Navneeta; Han, Shuo; Attardi, Laura D.

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a stress sensor, driving cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis in response to DNA damage or oncogenic signals. p53 activation by oncogenic signals relies on the p19Arf tumor suppressor, while p53 activation downstream of acute DNA damage is reported to be p19Arf-independent. Accordingly, p19Arf-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) arrest in response to acute DNA damage. However, p19Arf is required for replicative senescence, a condition associated with an activated DNA damage response, as p19Arf−/− MEFs do not senesce after serial passage. A possible explanation for these seemingly disparate roles for p19Arf is that acute and chronic DNA damage responses are mechanistically distinct. Replicative senescence may result from chronic, low-dose DNA damage responses in which p19Arf has a specific role. We therefore examined the role of p19Arf in cellular responses to chronic, low-dose DNA damaging agent treatment by maintaining MEFs in low oxygen and administering 0.5 Gy γ-irradiation daily or 150μM hydroxyurea, a replication stress-inducer. In contrast to their response to acute DNA damage, p19Arf−/− MEFs exposed to chronic DNA damage do not senesce, revealing a selective role for p19Arf in senescence upon low-level, chronic DNA damage. We show further that p53 pathway activation in p19Arf−/− MEFs exposed to chronic DNA damage is attenuated relative to wild-type MEFs, suggesting a role for p19Arf in fine-tuning p53 activity. However, combined Nutlin3a and chronic DNA damaging agent treatment is insufficient to promote senescence in p19Arf−/− MEFs, suggesting that the role of p19Arf in the chronic DNA damage response may be partially p53-independent. These data suggest the importance of p19Arf for the cellular response to the low-level DNA damage incurred in culture or upon oncogene expression, providing new insight into how p19Arf serves as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our study helps reconcile reports suggesting crucial

  6. Cellular Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein Is an Important Dengue Virus Restriction Factor

    PubMed Central

    Giovannoni, Federico; Damonte, Elsa B.; García, Cybele C.

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic antiviral defense is based on cellular restriction factors that are constitutively expressed and, thus, active even before a pathogen enters the cell. The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) are discrete nuclear foci that contain several cellular proteins involved in intrinsic antiviral responses against a number of viruses. Accumulating reports have shown the importance of PML as a DNA virus restriction factor and how these pathogens evade this antiviral activity. However, very little information is available regarding the antiviral role of PML against RNA viruses. Dengue virus (DENV) is an RNA emerging mosquito-borne human pathogen affecting millions of individuals each year by causing severe and potentially fatal syndromes. Since no licensed antiviral drug against DENV infection is currently available, it is of great importance to understand the factors mediating intrinsic immunity that may lead to the development of new pharmacological agents that can boost their potency and thereby lead to treatments for this viral disease. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antiviral role of PML in DENV-2 A549 infected cells. PMID:25962098

  7. Cognitive effects of cellular phones: a possible role of non-radiofrequency radiation factors.

    PubMed

    Hareuveny, Ronen; Eliyahu, Ilan; Luria, Roy; Meiran, Nachshon; Margaliot, Menachem

    2011-10-01

    Some studies found that cognitive functions of human beings may be altered while exposed to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) emitted by cellular phones. In two recent studies, we have found that experiment duration and exposure side (i.e., phone's location--right or left) may have a major influence on the detection of such effects. In this brief follow-up experiment, 29 right-handed male subjects were divided into two groups. Each subject had two standard cellular phones attached to both sides of his head. The subjects performed a spatial working memory task that required either a left-hand or a right-hand response under one of the two exposure conditions: left side of the head or right side. Contrary to our previous studies, in this work external antennas located far away from the subjects were connected to the cellular phones. This setup prevents any emission of RFR from the internal antenna, thus drastically reducing RFR exposure. Despite that, the results remain similar to those obtained in our previous work. These results indicate that some of the effects previously attributed to RFR can be the result of some confounders. PMID:21488064

  8. N-Terminal signal sequence is required for cellular trafficking and hyaluronan-depolymerization of KIAA1199.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Nagaoka, Aya; Nakamura, Sachiko; Tobiishi, Megumi; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Inoue, Shintaro

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we disclosed that KIAA1199-mediated hyaluronan (HA) depolymerization requires an acidic cellular microenvironment (e.g. clathrin-coated vesicles or early endosomes), but no information about the structural basis underlying the cellular targeting and functional modification of KIAA1199 was available. Here, we show that the cleavage of N-terminal 30 amino acids occurs in functionally matured KIAA1199, and the deletion of the N-terminal portion results in altered intracellular trafficking of the molecule and loss of cellular HA depolymerization. These results suggest that the N-terminal portion of KIAA1199 functions as a cleavable signal sequence required for proper KIAA1199 translocation and KIAA1199-mediated HA depolymerization. PMID:24269685

  9. 14 CFR 121.647 - Factors for computing fuel required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Factors for computing fuel required. 121.647 Section 121.647 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 121.647 Factors for computing fuel required. Each person computing fuel required for the purposes...

  10. 14 CFR 121.647 - Factors for computing fuel required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Factors for computing fuel required. 121.647 Section 121.647 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 121.647 Factors for computing fuel required. Each person computing fuel required for the purposes...

  11. 14 CFR 121.647 - Factors for computing fuel required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Factors for computing fuel required. 121.647 Section 121.647 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 121.647 Factors for computing fuel required. Each person computing fuel required for the purposes...

  12. 14 CFR 121.647 - Factors for computing fuel required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Factors for computing fuel required. 121.647 Section 121.647 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 121.647 Factors for computing fuel required. Each person computing fuel required for the purposes...

  13. 14 CFR 121.647 - Factors for computing fuel required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Factors for computing fuel required. 121.647 Section 121.647 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 121.647 Factors for computing fuel required. Each person computing fuel required for the purposes...

  14. Embryonic MicroRNA-369 Controls Metabolic Splicing Factors and Urges Cellular Reprograming

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Masamitsu; Koseki, Jun; Kawamoto, Koichi; Nishida, Naohiro; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Dewi, Dyah Laksmi; Ozaki, Miyuki; Noguchi, Yuko; Mimori, Koshi; Gotoh, Noriko; Tanuma, Nobuhiro; Shima, Hiroshi; Doki, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Noncoding microRNAs inhibit translation and lower the transcript stability of coding mRNA, however miR-369 s, in aberrant silencing genomic regions, stabilizes target proteins under cellular stress. We found that in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells led to chromatin methylation of histone H3K4 at the miR-369 region on chromosome 12qF in mice, which is expressed in embryonic cells and is critical for pluripotency. Proteomic analyses revealed that miR-369 stabilized translation of pyruvate kinase (Pkm2) splicing factors such as HNRNPA2B1. Overexpression of miR-369 stimulated Pkm2 splicing and enhanced induction of cellular reprogramming by induced pluripotent stem cell factors, whereas miR-369 knockdown resulted in suppression. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation analysis showed that the Argonaute complex contained the fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 and HNRNPA2B1 in a miR-369-depedent manner. Our findings demonstrate a unique role of the embryonic miR-369-HNRNPA2B1 axis in controlling metabolic enzyme function, and suggest a novel pathway linking epigenetic, transcriptional, and metabolic control in cell reprogramming. PMID:26176628

  15. Viral and Cellular Factors Involved in Phloem Transport of Plant Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hipper, Clémence; Brault, Véronique; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Revers, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Phloem transport of plant viruses is an essential step in the setting-up of a complete infection of a host plant. After an initial replication step in the first cells, viruses spread from cell-to-cell through mesophyll cells, until they reach the vasculature where they rapidly move to distant sites in order to establish the infection of the whole plant. This last step is referred to as systemic transport, or long-distance movement, and involves virus crossings through several cellular barriers: bundle sheath, vascular parenchyma, and companion cells for virus loading into sieve elements (SE). Viruses are then passively transported within the source-to-sink flow of photoassimilates and are unloaded from SE into sink tissues. However, the molecular mechanisms governing virus long-distance movement are far from being understood. While most viruses seem to move systemically as virus particles, some viruses are transported in SE as viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNP). The nature of the cellular and viral factors constituting these RNPs is still poorly known. The topic of this review will mainly focus on the host and viral factors that facilitate or restrict virus long-distance movement. PMID:23745125

  16. Krüppel-like factor 4 negatively regulates cellular antiviral immune response

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei-Wei; Lian, Huan; Zhong, Bo; Shu, Hong-Bing; Li, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection triggers activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and IRF3, which collaborate to induce the expression of type I interferons (IFNs) and elicit innate antiviral response. In this report, we identified Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) as a negative regulator of virus-triggered signaling. Overexpression of KLF4 inhibited virus-induced activation of ISRE and IFN-β promoter in various types of cells, while knockdown of KLF4 potentiated viral infection-triggered induction of IFNB1 and downstream genes and attenuated viral replication. In addition, KLF4 was found to be localized in the cytosol and nucleus, and viral infection promoted the translocation of KLF4 from cytosol to nucleus. Upon virus infection, KLF4 was bound to the promoter of IFNB gene and inhibited the recruitment of IRF3 to the IFNB promoter. Our study thus suggests that KLF4 negatively regulates cellular antiviral response. PMID:25531393

  17. A threshold of endogenous stress is required to engage cellular response to protect against mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Saintigny, Yannick; Chevalier, François; Bravard, Anne; Dardillac, Elodie; Laurent, David; Hem, Sonia; Dépagne, Jordane; Radicella, J. Pablo; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous stress represents a major source of genome instability, but is in essence difficult to apprehend. Incorporation of labeled radionuclides into DNA constitutes a tractable model to analyze cellular responses to endogenous attacks. Here we show that incorporation of [3H]thymidine into CHO cells generates oxidative-induced mutagenesis, but, with a peak at low doses. Proteomic analysis showed that the cellular response differs between low and high levels of endogenous stress. In particular, these results confirmed the involvement of proteins implicated in redox homeostasis and DNA damage signaling pathways. Induced-mutagenesis was abolished by the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine and plateaued, at high doses, upon exposure to L-buthionine sulfoximine, which represses cellular detoxification. The [3H]thymidine-induced mutation spectrum revealed mostly base substitutions, exhibiting a signature specific for low doses (GC > CG and AT > CG). Consistently, the enzymatic activity of the base excision repair protein APE-1 is induced at only medium or high doses. Collectively, the data reveal that a threshold of endogenous stress must be reached to trigger cellular detoxification and DNA repair programs; below this threshold, the consequences of endogenous stress escape cellular surveillance, leading to high levels of mutagenesis. Therefore, low doses of endogenous local stress can jeopardize genome integrity more efficiently than higher doses. PMID:27406380

  18. A threshold of endogenous stress is required to engage cellular response to protect against mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Saintigny, Yannick; Chevalier, François; Bravard, Anne; Dardillac, Elodie; Laurent, David; Hem, Sonia; Dépagne, Jordane; Radicella, J Pablo; Lopez, Bernard S

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous stress represents a major source of genome instability, but is in essence difficult to apprehend. Incorporation of labeled radionuclides into DNA constitutes a tractable model to analyze cellular responses to endogenous attacks. Here we show that incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine into CHO cells generates oxidative-induced mutagenesis, but, with a peak at low doses. Proteomic analysis showed that the cellular response differs between low and high levels of endogenous stress. In particular, these results confirmed the involvement of proteins implicated in redox homeostasis and DNA damage signaling pathways. Induced-mutagenesis was abolished by the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine and plateaued, at high doses, upon exposure to L-buthionine sulfoximine, which represses cellular detoxification. The [(3)H]thymidine-induced mutation spectrum revealed mostly base substitutions, exhibiting a signature specific for low doses (GC > CG and AT > CG). Consistently, the enzymatic activity of the base excision repair protein APE-1 is induced at only medium or high doses. Collectively, the data reveal that a threshold of endogenous stress must be reached to trigger cellular detoxification and DNA repair programs; below this threshold, the consequences of endogenous stress escape cellular surveillance, leading to high levels of mutagenesis. Therefore, low doses of endogenous local stress can jeopardize genome integrity more efficiently than higher doses. PMID:27406380

  19. Aiolos transcription factor controls cell death in T cells by regulating Bcl-2 expression and its cellular localization.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, F; Martínez-A, C; Camonis, J; Rebollo, A

    1999-01-01

    We searched for proteins that interact with Ras in interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated or IL-2-deprived cells, and found that the transcription factor Aiolos interacts with Ras. The Ras-Aiolos interaction was confirmed in vitro and in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation. Indirect immunofluorescence shows that IL-2 controls the cellular distribution of Aiolos and induces its tyrosine phosphorylation, required for dissociation from Ras. We also identified functional Aiolos-binding sites in the Bcl-2 promoter, which are able to activate the luciferase reporter gene. Mutation of Aiolos-binding sites within the Bcl-2 promoter inhibits transactivation of the reporter gene luciferase, suggesting direct control of Bcl-2 expression by Aiolos. Co-transfection experiments confirm that Aiolos induces Bcl-2 expression and prevents apoptosis in IL-2-deprived cells. We propose a model for the regulation of Bcl-2 expression via Aiolos. PMID:10369681

  20. Cellular transcription factors enhance herpes simplex virus type 1 oriS-dependent DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Huynh, A T; Schaffer, P A

    1998-05-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) origin of DNA replication, oriS, contains three binding sites for the viral origin binding protein (OBP) flanked by transcriptional regulatory elements of the immediate-early genes encoding ICP4 and ICP22/47. To assess the role of flanking sequences in oriS function, plasmids containing oriS and either wild-type or mutant flanking sequences were tested in transient DNA replication assays. Although the ICP4 and ICP22/47 regulatory regions were shown to enhance oriS function, most individual elements in these regions, including the VP16-responsive TAATGARAT elements, were found to be dispensable for oriS function. In contrast, two oriS core-adjacent regulatory (Oscar) elements, OscarL and OscarR, at the base of the oriS palindrome were shown to enhance oriS function significantly and additively. Specifically, mutational disruption of either element reduced oriS-dependent DNA replication by 60 to 70%, and disruption of both elements reduced replication by 90%. The properties of protein-DNA complexes formed in gel mobility shift assays using uninfected and HSV-1-infected Vero cell nuclear extracts demonstrated that both OscarL and OscarR are binding sites for cellular proteins. Whereas OscarR does not correspond to the consensus binding site of any known transcription factor, OscarL contains a consensus binding site for the transcription factor Sp1. Gel mobility shift and supershift experiments using antibodies directed against members of the Sp1 family of transcription factors demonstrated the presence of Sp1 and Sp3, but not Sp2 or Sp4, in the protein-DNA complexes formed at OscarL. The abilities of OscarL and OscarR to bind their respective cellular proteins correlated directly with the efficiency of oriS-dependent DNA replication. Cooperative interactions between the Oscar-binding factors and proteins binding to adjacent OBP binding sites were not observed. Notably, Oscar element mutations that impaired oriS-dependent DNA

  1. Detyrosinated Glu-tubulin is a substrate for cellular Factor XIIIA transglutaminase in differentiating osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Cui, Cui; Hitomi, Kiyotaka; Kaartinen, Mari T

    2014-06-01

    Microtubule components α- and β-tubulin undergo a number of posttranslational modifications that modulate their dynamics and cellular functions. These modifications include polyamination and covalent crosslinking by transglutaminase enzymes. We have demonstrated previously that the less dynamic and more stable tubulin form-detyrosinated Glu-tubulin-is found in high molecular weight, oligomeric complexes in bone-forming osteoblasts during differentiation and along with deposition of collagenous extracellular matrix. In this study, we report that oligomeric Glu-tubulin has high nocodazole tolerance, indicating further increased stability. We show that α-tubulin, which gives rise to Glu-tubulin, is a transglutaminase substrate in in vitro assays and that it is crosslinked into oligomers (dimers, trimers and tetramers) by transglutaminase 2 and Factor XIIIA; β-tubulin was not crosslinked by transglutaminase activity. The oligomeric Glu-tubulin was specifically localized to the plasma membrane of osteoblasts as analyzed by subcellular fractionation, cell surface biotinylation experiments and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. Glu- and α-tubulin co-localized with cellular Factor XIIIA as analyzed by conventional and TIRF microscopy. The Factor XIIIA-specific substrate peptide bF11 co-localized with α-tubulin and acted as a competitive inhibitor to oligomerization of Glu-tubulin, attenuating its formation in cells. This was associated with significantly decreased type I collagen deposition and decreased secretory activity as measured by synaptotagmin VII levels on the osteoblast plasma membrane. Our results suggest that Glu-tubulin may exist as covalently stabilized form which may be linked to the secretion and elaboration of collagenous extracellular matrix. PMID:24643364

  2. Quantifying colocalization of a conditionally active transcription factor FOXP3 in three-dimensional cellular space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Thomas; Allan, Sarah E.; Levings, Megan K.

    2009-02-01

    Biological macromolecular interactions between proteins, transcription factors, DNA and other types of biomolecules, are fundamentally important to several cellular and biological processes. 3D Multi-channel confocal microscopy and colocalization analysis of fluorescent signals have proven to be invaluable tools for detecting such molecular interactions. The aim of this work was to quantify colocalization of the FOXP3 transcription factor in 3D cellular space generated from the confocal 3D image sets. 293T cells transfected with a conditionally active form of FOXP3 were stained for nuclei with Hoechst, for FOXP3 with anti-FOXP3 conjugated to PE, and 4-hydroxytamoxifen used as protein translocation and activation agent. Since the protein signal was weak and nonspecific intensity contributions were strong, it was difficult to perform colocalization analysis and estimate colocalization quantities. We performed 3D restoration by deconvolution method on the confocal images using experimentally measured point spread functions (PSFs) and subsequently a color shift correction. The deconvolution method eliminated nonspecific intensity contributions originating from PSF imposed by optical microscopy diffraction resolution limits and noise since these factors significantly affected colocalization analysis and quantification. Visual inspection of the deconvolved 3D image suggested that the FOXP3 molecules are predominantly colocalized within the nuclei although the fluorescent signals from FOXP3 molecules were also present in the cytoplasm. A close inspection of the scatter plot (colocalization map) and correlation quantities such as the Pearsons and colocalization coefficients showed that the fluorescent signals from the FOXP3 molecules and DNA are strongly correlated. In conclusion, our colocalization quantification approach confirms the preferential association of the FOXP3 molecules with the DNA despite the presence of fluorescent signals from the former one both in the

  3. The Nutrient-Responsive Transcription Factor TFE3, Promotes Autophagy, Lysosomal Biogenesis, and Clearance of Cellular Debris

    PubMed Central

    Martina, José A.; Diab, Heba I.; Lishu, Li; Jeong-A, Lim; Patange, Simona; Raben, Nina; Puertollano, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a gene network regulating lysosomal biogenesis and its transcriptional regulator TFEB revealed that cells monitor lysosomal function and respond to degradation requirements and environmental cues. Here, we report the identification of transcription factor E3 (TFE3) as another regulator of lysosomal homeostasis that induced expression of genes encoding proteins involved in autophagy and lysosomal biogenesis in ARPE-19 cells in response to starvation and lysosomal stress. We found that in nutrient-replete cells, TFE3 was recruited to lysosomes through interaction with active Rag GTPases and exhibited mTORC1-dependent phosphorylation. Phosphorylated TFE3 was retained in the cytosol through its interaction with the cytosolic chaperone 14-3-3. Following starvation, TFE3 rapidly translocated to the nucleus and bound to the CLEAR elements present in the promoter region of many lysosomal genes, thereby inducing lysosomal biogenesis. Depletion of endogenous TFE3 entirely abolished the response of ARPE-19 cells to starvation, suggesting that TFE3 plays a critical role in nutrient sensing and regulation of energy metabolism. Furthermore, overexpression of TFE3 triggered lysosomal exocytosis and resulted in efficient cellular clearance in a cellular model of a lysosomal storage disorder, Pompe disease, thus identifying TFE3 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of lysosomal disorders. PMID:24448649

  4. hCLE/C14orf166, a cellular protein required for viral replication, is incorporated into influenza virus particles

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Frandsen, Ariel; de Lucas, Susana; Pérez-González, Alicia; Pérez-Cidoncha, Maite; Roldan-Gomendio, Alejandro; Pazo, Alejandra; Marcos-Villar, Laura; Landeras-Bueno, Sara; Ortín, Juan; Nieto, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    The influenza A virus polymerase associates with a number of cellular transcription-related factors, including the RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). We previously described that the cellular protein hCLE/C14orf166 interacts with and stimulates influenza virus polymerase as well as RNAP II activities. Here we show that, despite the considerable cellular shut-off observed in infected cells, which includes RNAP II degradation, hCLE protein levels increase throughout infection in a virus replication-dependent manner. Human and avian influenza viruses of various subtypes increase hCLE levels, but other RNA or DNA viruses do not. hCLE colocalises and interacts with viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNP) in the nucleus, as well as in the cytoplasm late in infection. Furthermore, biochemical analysis of purified virus particles and immunoelectron microscopy of infected cells show hCLE in virions, in close association with viral vRNP. These findings indicate that hCLE, a cellular protein important for viral replication, is one of the very few examples of transcription factors that are incorporated into particles of an RNA-containing virus. PMID:26864902

  5. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 in experimental autoimmune neuritis. Cellular localization and time course.

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, R.; Funa, K.; Schweitzer, T.; Jung, S.; Bourde, O.; Toyka, K. V.; Hartung, H. P.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) is a monophasic inflammatory disorder of the peripheral nervous system that resolves spontaneously by molecular mechanisms as yet unknown. We have investigated whether the immunosuppressive cytokine transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) might be endogenously expressed in the peripheral nervous system of Lewis rats with actively induced and adoptive transfer EAN. TGF-beta 1 mRNA was upregulated to high levels in sensory and motor roots, spinal ganglia, and sciatic nerve as revealed by quantitative Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization histochemistry, with peak levels just preceding the first signs of clinical recovery. TGF-beta 1 mRNA was localized to scattered round cells and dense cellular infiltrates, but only rarely to Schwann cell profiles. Double labeling studies revealed macrophages and subpopulations of T cells as the major cellular source of TGF-beta 1 mRNA. TGF-beta 1 protein was visualized immunocytochemically and localized to infiltrating mononuclear cells with peak expression around the same time as mRNA, in addition to some constitutive expression in axons and Schwann cells. Our studies suggest that the spontaneous recovery observed in Lewis rat EAN might be mediated by the endogenous elaboration of TGF-beta 1 within the peripheral nerve, and that macrophages might control their own cytotoxicity by expressing TGF-beta 1. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8546208

  6. Viral Replication Protein Inhibits Cellular Cofilin Actin Depolymerization Factor to Regulate the Actin Network and Promote Viral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Barajas, Daniel; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses exploit host cells by co-opting host factors and lipids and escaping host antiviral responses. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in the model host yeast have identified 18 cellular genes that are part of the actin network. In this paper, we show that the p33 viral replication factor interacts with the cellular cofilin (Cof1p), which is an actin depolymerization factor. Using temperature-sensitive (ts) Cof1p or actin (Act1p) mutants at a semi-permissive temperature, we find an increased level of TBSV RNA accumulation in yeast cells and elevated in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase. We show that the large p33 containing replication organelle-like structures are located in the close vicinity of actin patches in yeast cells or around actin cable hubs in infected plant cells. Therefore, the actin filaments could be involved in VRC assembly and the formation of large viral replication compartments containing many individual VRCs. Moreover, we show that the actin network affects the recruitment of viral and cellular components, including oxysterol binding proteins and VAP proteins to form membrane contact sites for efficient transfer of sterols to the sites of replication. Altogether, the emerging picture is that TBSV, via direct interaction between the p33 replication protein and Cof1p, controls cofilin activities to obstruct the dynamic actin network that leads to efficient subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. In summary, the discovery that TBSV interacts with cellular cofilin and blocks the severing of existing filaments and the formation of new actin filaments in infected cells opens a new window to unravel the way by which viruses could subvert/co-opt cellular proteins and lipids. By regulating the functions of cofilin and the actin network, which are central nodes in cellular pathways, viruses could gain supremacy in subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. PMID:26863541

  7. Newborn human skin fibroblasts senesce in vitro without acquiring adult growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cultures of human fibroblasts were prepared from chest skin obtained either from newborns (less than 3 months old) or adults (more than 35 years old) and maintained in vitro until they senesced. Adult cells grew logarithmically in medium supplemented with whole blood serum but not with platelet-poor plasma. Early passage cells obtained from newborns grew equally well in either plasma- or serum-supplemented medium. The difference in growth factor requirements between adult and newborn cells persisted through the lifespan of the cells; i.e., newborn cells did not develop adult hormonal requirements when maintained in culture. Thus, in vitro cellular aging can be distinguished from some types of differentiation.

  8. Downregulation of Cellular Protective Factors of Rumen Epithelium in Goats Fed High Energy Diet

    PubMed Central

    Hollmann, Manfred; Miller, Ingrid; Hummel, Karin; Sabitzer, Sonja; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U.; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2013-01-01

    Energy-rich diets can challenge metabolic and protective functions of the rumen epithelial cells, but the underlying factors are unclear. This study sought to evaluate proteomic changes of the rumen epithelium in goats fed a low, medium, or high energy diet. Expression of protein changes were compared by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis followed by protein identification with matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of about 2,000 spots commonly detected in all gels, 64 spots were significantly regulated, which were traced back to 24 unique proteins. Interestingly, the expression profiles of several chaperone proteins with important cellular protective functions such as heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein, peroxiredoxin-6, serpin H1, protein disulfide-isomerase, and selenium-binding protein were collectively downregulated in response to high dietary energy supply. Similar regulation patterns were obtained for some other proteins involved in transport or metabolic functions. In contrast, metabolic enzymes like retinal dehydrogenase 1 and ATP synthase subunit beta, mitochondrial precursor were upregulated in response to high energy diet. Lower expressions of chaperone proteins in the rumen epithelial cells in response to high energy supply may suggest that these cells were less protected against the potentially harmful rumen toxic compounds, which might have consequences for rumen and systemic health. Our findings also suggest that energy-rich diets and the resulting acidotic insult may render rumen epithelial cells more vulnerable to cellular damage by attenuating their cell defense system, hence facilitating the impairment of rumen barrier function, typically observed in energy-rich fed ruminants. PMID:24349094

  9. Graphene Enhances Cellular Proliferation through Activating the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Sun, Cheng; Liao, Chunyang; Cui, Lin; Li, Haishan; Qu, Guangbo; Yu, Wenlian; Song, Naining; Cui, Yuan; Wang, Zheng; Xie, Wenping; Chen, Huiming; Zhou, Qunfang

    2016-07-27

    Graphene has promising applications in food packaging, water purification, and detective sensors for contamination monitoring. However, the biological effects of graphene are not fully understood. It is necessary to clarify the potential risks of graphene exposure to humans through diverse routes, such as foods. In the present study, graphene, as the model nanomaterial, was used to test its potential effects on the cell proliferation based on multiple representative cell lines, including HepG2, A549, MCF-7, and HeLa cells. Graphene was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, particle size analysis, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The cellular responses to graphene exposure were evaluated using flow cytometry, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, and alamarBlue assays. Rat cerebral astrocyte cultures, as the non-cancer cells, were used to assess the potential cytotoxicity of graphene as well. The results showed that graphene stimulation enhanced cell proliferation in all tested cell cultures and the highest elevation in cell growth was up to 60%. A western blot assay showed that the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) was upregulated upon graphene treatment. The phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) and the downstream proteins, ShC and extracellular regulating kinase (ERK), were remarkably induced, indicating that the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK signaling pathway was triggered. The activation of PI3 kinase p85 and AKT showed that the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway was also involved in graphene-induced cell proliferation, causing the increase of cell ratios in the G2/M phase. No influences on cell apoptosis were observed in graphene-treated cells when compared to the negative controls, proving the low cytotoxicity of this emerging nanomaterial. The findings in this study revealed the potential cellular biological effect of graphene, which may give useful hints on its biosafety

  10. Cellular Requirements for Bovine Immunodeficiency Virus Vif-Mediated Inactivation of Bovine APOBEC3 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenyan; Wang, Hong; Li, Zhaolong; Liu, Xin; Liu, Guanchen; Harris, Reuben S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) viral infectivity factor (Vif) form a CRL5 E3 ubiquitin ligase complex to suppress virus restriction by host APOBEC3 (A3) proteins. The primate lentiviral Vif complex is composed of the unique cofactor core binding factor β (CBF-β) and canonical ligase components Cullin 5 (CUL5), Elongin B/C (ELOB/C), and RBX2. However, the mechanism by which the Vif protein of the related lentivirus bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) overcomes its host A3 proteins is less clear. In this study, we show that BIV Vif interacts with Cullin 2 (CUL2), ELOB/C, and RBX1, but not with CBF-β or CUL5, to form a CRL2 E3 ubiquitin ligase and degrade the restrictive bovine A3 proteins (A3Z2Z3 and A3Z3). RNA interference-mediated knockdown of ELOB or CUL2 inhibited BIV Vif-mediated degradation of these A3 proteins, whereas knockdown of CUL5 or CBF-β did not. BIV Vif with mutations in the BC box (Vif SLQ-AAA) or putative VHL box (Vif YI-AA), which cannot interact with ELOB/C or CUL2, respectively, lost the ability to counteract bovine A3 proteins. Moreover, CUL2 and UBE2M dominant negative mutants competitively inhibited the BIV Vif-mediated degradation mechanism. Thus, although the general strategy for inhibiting A3 proteins is conserved between HIV-1/SIV and BIV, the precise mechanisms can differ substantially, with only the HIV-1/SIV Vif proteins requiring CBF-β as a cofactor, HIV-1/SIV Vif using CUL5-RBX2, and BIV Vif using CUL2-RBX1. IMPORTANCE Primate lentivirus HIV-1 and SIV Vif proteins form a ubiquitin ligase complex to target host antiviral APOBEC3 proteins for degradation. However, the mechanism by which the nonprimate lentivirus BIV Vif inhibits bovine APOBEC3 proteins is unclear. In the present study, we determined the mechanism for BIV Vif-mediated degradation of bovine APOBEC3 proteins and found that it differs from the mechanism of HIV-1/SIV Vif by being CBF-β independent and

  11. Cellular and biochemical mechanisms, risk factors and management of preterm birth: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Vitale, S G; Marilli, I; Rapisarda, A M; Rossetti, D; Belluomo, G; Iapichino, V; Stancanelli, F; Cianci, A

    2014-12-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is usually defined as a delivery before 37 completed weeks or 259 days of gestation. World Health Organization estimates a worldwide incidence of PTB of 9.6%. Infants born preterm are at higher risks than infants born at term for mortality, and acute and chronic morbidity. Major causes of PTB are the following: spontaneous preterm labor with intact membranes (50%), labor induction or caesarean delivery for maternal or fetal indications (30%), and preterm premature rupture of membranes or PPROM (20%). The aim of this review is to analyze this medical condition, focusing on cellular and biochemical mechanisms, maternal risk factors and role of inflammation and infections in preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) and PTB. Moreover we will discuss about the proper therapeutic strategies for its management. Although different methods have been introduced to predict the advent of preterm labour in asymptomatic women, possibilities for real primary prevention are rare. An early estimation of potential risk factors is pivotal in the secondary prevention of PTB. Finally most efforts so far have been tertiary interventions. These measures have reduced perinatal morbidity and mortality. Advances in primary and secondary care will be needed to prevent prematurity-related illness in infants and children. PMID:25373016

  12. Metabolism of platelet activating factor at the whole organ and cellular level

    SciTech Connect

    Haroldsen, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-3-glycerophosphocholine) has been characterized as a phospholipid possessing a myriad of effects from the cellular to whole organism levels. Analytical methods and procedures were developed in order to measure and identify PAF precursors and metabolites. Two quantitative physicochemical methods based on isotope dilution mass spectrometry (MS) were developed to measure lyso-PAF and applied to the calcium ionophore stimulated human neutrophil. Levels of lyso-PAF were found to be significantly increased, 2-3 fold, upon cell activation with a stimulus that concomitantly elicits the production of PAF. Investigation into the metabolism of PAF by the isolated perfused rat lung by intratracheal instillation revealed (/sup 3/H)-PAF to be extensively metabolized over a 15 minute time course. Greater than 96% of the administered dose was retained by the lung and was distributed as: lyso-PAF (3.3%), phosphatidylcholine (GPC, 82.3%), phosphatidylethanolamine (2.5%), and neutral lipid (2.5%), the remainder was intact PAF.

  13. Cellular Signaling by Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs) and Their Receptors (FGFRs) in Male Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Leanne M.; O’Bryan, Moira K.; Hinton, Barry T.

    2008-01-01

    The major function of the reproductive system is to ensure the survival of the species by passing on hereditary traits from one generation to the next. This is accomplished through the production of gametes and the generation of hormones that function in the maturation and regulation of the reproductive system. It is well established that normal development and function of the male reproductive system is mediated by endocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), their receptors (FGFRs), and signaling cascades have been implicated in a diverse range of cellular processes including: proliferation, apoptosis, cell survival, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, motility, and differentiation. The maintenance and regulation of correct FGF signaling is evident from human and mouse genetic studies which demonstrate that mutations leading to disruption of FGF signaling cause a variety of developmental disorders including dominant skeletal diseases, infertility, and cancer. Over the course of this review, we will provide evidence for differential expression of FGFs/FGFRs in the testis, male germ cells, the epididymis, the seminal vesicle, and the prostate. We will show that this signaling cascade has an important role in sperm development and maturation. Furthermore, we will demonstrate that FGF/FGFR signaling is essential for normal epididymal function and prostate development. To this end, we will provide evidence for the involvement of the FGF signaling system in the regulation and maintenance of the male reproductive system. PMID:18216218

  14. Intracellular Localization and Cellular Factors Interaction of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 Tax Proteins: Similarities and Functional Differences

    PubMed Central

    Bertazzoni, Umberto; Turci, Marco; Avesani, Francesca; Di Gennaro, Gianfranco; Bidoia, Carlo; Romanelli, Maria Grazia

    2011-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic viruses type 1 (HTLV-1) and type 2 (HTLV-2) present very similar genomic structures but HTLV-1 is more pathogenic than HTLV-2. Is this difference due to their transactivating Tax proteins, Tax-1 and Tax-2, which are responsible for viral and cellular gene activation? Do Tax-1 and Tax-2 differ in their cellular localization and in their interaction pattern with cellular factors? In this review, we summarize Tax-1 and Tax-2 structural and phenotypic properties, their interaction with factors involved in signal transduction and their localization-related behavior within the cell. Special attention will be given to the distinctions between Tax-1 and Tax-2 that likely play an important role in their transactivation activity. PMID:21994745

  15. Administrative and research policies required to bring cellular therapies from the research laboratory to the patient's bedside.

    PubMed

    Yim, Robyn

    2005-10-01

    presidential administrations on cellular therapy, variations in individual state laws, and states becoming involved in research funding, such as California's Proposition 71. Legal concerns include expanding private litigation with diversity of lawsuits, expanding lists of defendants, and the use of class-action lawsuits in research cases. Ownership issues also arise in terms of intellectual property, patents, and ownership of stem cells collected from minors, as in umbilical cord blood donations. Situations that challenge the regulatory processes established to ensure participant safety include differences in reporting requirements for private- and public-funded research and the lack of adequate funding and resources to implement and support the institutional review board (IRB) process. Financial considerations influence the development of clinical protocols, because funding is often limited. Financial incentives, personal investment in companies funding research activities, and fundraising pressures may present potential conflicts. In addition, the increasing role of emerging biotechnology start-up companies and pharmaceutical companies in clinical research introduces additional financial considerations. Administrative policies are needed to address these possible conflicts and ensure research participant safety as cellular therapies progress from the research laboratories to the patient's bedside. Administrative policies to ensure minimum standards of quality for emerging products before human clinical trials, policies to enforce consistent reporting requirements for private and public cellular research, policies to minimize financial conflicts of interest, policies to strengthen implementation of the existing IRB process and to structure into the process a consistent, systematic review of these identified conflicts, and policies to limit private litigation will help to preserve the objectivity of the review process and ultimately increase participant safety. PMID:16181400

  16. De novo fatty acid synthesis at the mitotic exit is required to complete cellular division

    PubMed Central

    Scaglia, Natalia; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Zadra, Giorgia; Photopoulos, Cornelia; Loda, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Although the regulation of the cell cycle has been extensively studied, much less is known about its coordination with the cellular metabolism. Using mass spectrometry we found that lysophospholipid levels decreased drastically from G2/M to G1 phase, while de novo phosphatidylcholine synthesis, the main phospholipid in mammalian cells, increased, suggesting that enhanced membrane production was concomitant to a decrease in its turnover. In addition, fatty acid synthesis and incorporation into membranes was increased upon cell division. The rate-limiting reaction for de novo fatty acid synthesis is catalyzed by acetyl-CoA carboxylase. As expected, its inhibiting phosphorylation decreased prior to cytokinesis initiation. Importantly, the inhibition of fatty acid synthesis arrested the cells at G2/M despite the presence of abundant fatty acids in the media. Our results suggest that de novo lipogenesis is essential for cell cycle completion. This “lipogenic checkpoint” at G2/M may be therapeutically exploited for hyperproliferative diseases such as cancer. PMID:24418822

  17. Transcriptional control of fungal cell cycle and cellular events by Fkh2, a forkhead transcription factor in an insect pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan-Juan; Qiu, Lei; Cai, Qing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional control of the cell cycle by forkhead (Fkh) transcription factors is likely associated with fungal adaptation to host and environment. Here we show that Fkh2, an ortholog of yeast Fkh1/2, orchestrates cell cycle and many cellular events of Beauveria bassiana, a filamentous fungal insect pathogen. Deletion of Fkh2 in B. bassiana resulted in dramatic down-regulation of the cyclin-B gene cluster and hence altered cell cycle (longer G2/M and S, but shorter G0/G1, phases) in unicellular blastospores. Consequently, ΔFkh2 produced twice as many, but smaller, blastospores than wild-type under submerged conditions, and formed denser septa and shorter/broader cells in aberrantly branched hyphae. In these hyphae, clustered genes required for septation and conidiation were remarkedly up-regulated, followed by higher yield and slower germination of aerial conidia. Moreover, ΔFkh2 displayed attenuated virulence and decreased tolerance to chemical and environmental stresses, accompanied with altered transcripts and activities of phenotype-influencing proteins or enzymes. All the changes in ΔFkh2 were restored by Fkh2 complementation. All together, Fkh2-dependent transcriptional control is vital for the adaptation of B. bassiana to diverse habitats of host insects and hence contributes to its biological control potential against arthropod pests. PMID:25955538

  18. Transcriptional control of fungal cell cycle and cellular events by Fkh2, a forkhead transcription factor in an insect pathogen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan-Juan; Qiu, Lei; Cai, Qing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional control of the cell cycle by forkhead (Fkh) transcription factors is likely associated with fungal adaptation to host and environment. Here we show that Fkh2, an ortholog of yeast Fkh1/2, orchestrates cell cycle and many cellular events of Beauveria bassiana, a filamentous fungal insect pathogen. Deletion of Fkh2 in B. bassiana resulted in dramatic down-regulation of the cyclin-B gene cluster and hence altered cell cycle (longer G2/M and S, but shorter G0/G1, phases) in unicellular blastospores. Consequently, ΔFkh2 produced twice as many, but smaller, blastospores than wild-type under submerged conditions, and formed denser septa and shorter/broader cells in aberrantly branched hyphae. In these hyphae, clustered genes required for septation and conidiation were remarkedly up-regulated, followed by higher yield and slower germination of aerial conidia. Moreover, ΔFkh2 displayed attenuated virulence and decreased tolerance to chemical and environmental stresses, accompanied with altered transcripts and activities of phenotype-influencing proteins or enzymes. All the changes in ΔFkh2 were restored by Fkh2 complementation. All together, Fkh2-dependent transcriptional control is vital for the adaptation of B. bassiana to diverse habitats of host insects and hence contributes to its biological control potential against arthropod pests. PMID:25955538

  19. Cellular localization of transforming growth factor-beta expression in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, K.; Flanders, K. C.; Phan, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    Bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis is associated with increased lung transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) gene expression, but cellular localization of the source of this expression has not been unequivocally established. In this study, lung fibrosis was induced in rats by endotracheal bleomycin injection on day 0 and, on selected days afterwards, lungs were harvested for in situ hybridization, immunohistochemical and histochemical analyses for TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein expression, and cell identification. The results show that control lungs express essentially no detectable TGF-beta 1 mRNA or protein in the parenchyma. Before day 3 after bleomycin treatment, scattered bronchiolar epithelial cells, mononuclear cells, and eosinophils expressed elevated levels of TGF-beta 1. Between days 3 and 14, there was a major increase in the number of eosinophils, myofibroblasts, and fibroblasts strongly expressing TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein. TGF-beta 1-producing cells were predominantly localized within areas of injury and active fibrosis. After day 14, the intensity and number of TGF-beta 1-expressing cells significantly declined and were predominantly found in fibroblasts in fibrotic areas. The expression of TGF-beta 1 protein was generally coincident with that for mRNA with the exception of bronchiolar epithelial cells in which strong protein expression was unaccompanied by a commensurate increase in mRNA. The study demonstrates that myofibroblasts, fibroblasts, and eosinophils represent the major sources of increased lung TGF-beta 1 expression in this model of pulmonary fibrosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7543734

  20. Internalization and cellular pools of never growth factor in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neet, K.E.; Kasaian, M.

    1987-05-01

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) binds to a cell surface receptor on responsive neuronal cells to initiate cell maintenance and/or differentiation regimes. The purpose of these studies was to define quantitatively the fate of NGF in PC12 cells with respect to various cellular compartments in a single series of biochemical experiments. Different binding methodologies were evaluated in suspension and on plates. 50 pM SVI-NGF was bound to rat PC12 cells in suspension for 30 min at 37, followed by various methods and combinations of methods to remove subsets of bound ligand. Distinction could be made between NGF bound to fast vs. slow cell surface receptors, NGF bound to slow receptors at the cell surface vs. cell interior, and detergent-soluble vs. cytoskeletally-attached NGF. These treatments defined the relative size of five pools, including the fast receptor (65%), two intracellular compartments (12% and 3%) susceptible to nonionic detergent, and a detergent-stable intracellular pool of ligand (16%). At 37 the cold chase stable and the acid stable pools were about the same size because of rapid internalization, but the slow receptor was measurable at 4. Inhibitors were used to define the route of NGF through the cell from the plasma membrane to degradation. Chloroquine caused accumulation of NGF only in pools that were not associated with the cytoskeleton, implicating this compartment in supplying ligand to the lysosome. Results with cytochalasin B and colchicine and suggested both microfilament and microtubule pathways in NGF degradation. A model for the movement of NGF through the cell was developed based on these observations.

  1. Regulation of cellular diacylglycerol through lipid phosphate phosphatases is required for pathogenesis of the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Md Abu; Jeon, Junhyun; Mir, Albely Afifa; Choi, Jaeyoung; Choi, Jaehyuk; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Considering implication of diacylglycerol in both metabolism and signaling pathways, maintaining proper levels of diacylglycerol (DAG) is critical to cellular homeostasis and development. Except the PIP2-PLC mediated pathway, metabolic pathways leading to generation of DAG converge on dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid catalyzed by lipid phosphate phosphatases. Here we report the role of such enzymes in a model plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. We identified five genes encoding putative lipid phosphate phosphatases (MoLPP1 to MoLPP5). Targeted disruption of four genes (except MoLPP4) showed that MoLPP3 and MoLPP5 are required for normal progression of infection-specific development and proliferation within host plants, whereas MoLPP1 and MoLPP2 are indispensable for fungal pathogenicity. Reintroduction of MoLPP3 and MoLPP5 into individual deletion mutants restored all the defects. Furthermore, exogenous addition of saturated DAG not only restored defect in appressorium formation but also complemented reduced virulence in both mutants. Taken together, our data indicate differential roles of lipid phosphate phosphatase genes and requirement of proper regulation of cellular DAGs for fungal development and pathogenesis. PMID:24959955

  2. Cell reprogramming. Histone chaperone ASF1A is required for maintenance of pluripotency and cellular reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Muñoz, Elena; Arboleda-Estudillo, Yohanna; Otu, Hasan H; Cibelli, Jose B

    2014-08-15

    Unfertilized oocytes have the intrinsic capacity to remodel sperm and the nuclei of somatic cells. The discoveries that cells can change their phenotype from differentiated to embryonic state using oocytes or specific transcription factors have been recognized as two major breakthroughs in the biomedical field. Here, we show that ASF1A, a histone-remodeling chaperone specifically enriched in the metaphase II human oocyte, is necessary for reprogramming of human adult dermal fibroblasts (hADFs) into undifferentiated induced pluripotent stem cell. We also show that overexpression of just ASF1A and OCT4 in hADFs exposed to the oocyte-specific paracrine growth factor GDF9 can reprogram hADFs into pluripotent cells. Our Report underscores the importance of studying the unfertilized MII oocyte as a means to understand the molecular pathways governing somatic cell reprogramming. PMID:25035411

  3. Enamel matrix proteins exhibit growth factor activity: A review of evidence at the cellular and molecular levels

    PubMed Central

    WYGANOWSKA-ŚWIĄTKOWSKA, MARZENA; URBANIAK, PAULINA; NOHAWICA, MICHAŁ MAREK; KOTWICKA, MAŁGORZATA; JANKUN, JERZY

    2015-01-01

    Enamel matrix derivative (EMD) is a commercially available protein extract, mainly comprising amelogenins. A number of other polypeptides have been identified in EMD, mostly growth factors, which promote cementogenesis and osteogenesis during the regeneration processes through the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation and activity; however, not all of their functions are clear. Enamel extracts have been proposed to have numerous activities such as bone morphogenetic protein- and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-like activity, and activities similar to those of insulin-like growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor. These activities have been observed at the molecular and cellular levels and in numerous animal models. Furthermore, it has been suggested that EMD contains an unidentified biologically active factor that acts in combination with TGF-β1, and several studies have reported functional similarities between growth factors and TGF-β in cellular processes. The effects of enamel extracts on the cell cycle and biology are summarized and discussed in this review. PMID:26161150

  4. Voltage-gated Nav channel targeting in the heart requires an ankyrin-G–dependent cellular pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, John S.; Palygin, Oleg; Bhasin, Naina; Hund, Thomas J.; Boyden, Penelope A.; Shibata, Erwin; Anderson, Mark E.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-gated Nav channels are required for normal electrical activity in neurons, skeletal muscle, and cardiomyocytes. In the heart, Nav1.5 is the predominant Nav channel, and Nav1.5-dependent activity regulates rapid upstroke of the cardiac action potential. Nav1.5 activity requires precise localization at specialized cardiomyocyte membrane domains. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Nav channel trafficking in the heart are unknown. In this paper, we demonstrate that ankyrin-G is required for Nav1.5 targeting in the heart. Cardiomyocytes with reduced ankyrin-G display reduced Nav1.5 expression, abnormal Nav1.5 membrane targeting, and reduced Na+ channel current density. We define the structural requirements on ankyrin-G for Nav1.5 interactions and demonstrate that loss of Nav1.5 targeting is caused by the loss of direct Nav1.5–ankyrin-G interaction. These data are the first report of a cellular pathway required for Nav channel trafficking in the heart and suggest that ankyrin-G is critical for cardiac depolarization and Nav channel organization in multiple excitable tissues. PMID:18180363

  5. ROLE OF CELLULAR BIOENERGETICS IN SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL PROLIFERATION INDUCED BY PLATELET-DERIVED GROWTH FACTOR

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jessica; Hill, Bradford G.; Benavides, Gloria A.; Dranka, Brian P.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Abnormal smooth muscle cell proliferation is a hallmark of vascular disease. Although growth factors are known to contribute to cell hyperplasia, the changes in metabolism associated with this response, particularly mitochondrial respiration, remain unclear. Given the increased energy requirements for proliferation, we hypothesized that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) would stimulate glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration and that this elevated bioenergetic capacity is required for smooth muscle cell hyperplasia. To test this hypothesis, cell proliferation, glycolytic flux, and mitochondrial oxygen consumption were measured after treatment of primary rat aortic smooth muscle cells with PDGF. PDGF increased basal and maximal rates of glycolytic flux and mitochondrial oxygen consumption; enhancement of these bioenergetic pathways led to a substantial increase in the mitochondrial reserve capacity. Interventions with the PI3K inhibitor LY-294002 or the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose abrogated PDGF-stimulated proliferation and prevented augmentation of glycolysis and mitochondrial reserve capacity. Similarly, when L-glucose was substituted for D-glucose, PDGF-dependent proliferation was abolished, as were changes in glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. Interestingly, lactate dehydrogenase protein levels and activity were significantly increased after PDGF treatment. Moreover, L-lactate substitution for D-glucose was sufficient for increasing the mitochondrial reserve capacity and cell proliferation after treatment with PDGF; these effects were inhibited by the lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor, oxamate. These data suggest that glycolysis, by providing substrates that enhance the mitochondrial reserve capacity, plays an essential role in PDGF-induced cell proliferation, underscoring the integrated metabolic response required for proliferation of VSMC in the diseased vasculature. PMID:20331438

  6. Cellular Requirements for Systemic Control of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Infections in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bedoui, Sammy

    2014-01-01

    The rational design of vaccines requires an understanding of the contributions of individual immune cell subsets to immunity. With this understanding, targeted vaccine delivery approaches and adjuvants can be developed to maximize vaccine efficiency and to minimize side effects (S. H. E. Kaufmann et al., Immunity 33:555–577, 2010; T. Ben-Yedidia and R. Arnon, Hum. Vaccines 1:95–101, 2005). We have addressed the contributions of different immune cell subsets and their ability to contribute to the control and clearance of the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in a murine model. Using a systematic and reproducible model of experimental attenuated S. Typhimurium infection, we show that distinct lymphocyte deficiencies lead to one of four different infection outcomes: clearance, chronic infection, early death, or late death. Our study demonstrates a high level of functional redundancy in the ability of different lymphocyte subsets to provide interferon gamma (IFN-γ), a critical cytokine in Salmonella immunity. Whereas early control of the infection was entirely dependent on IFN-γ but not on any particular lymphocyte subset, clearance of the infection critically required CD4+ T cells but appeared to be independent of IFN-γ. These data reinforce the idea of a bimodal immune response against Salmonella: an early T cell-independent but IFN-γ-dependent phase and a late T cell-dependent phase that may be IFN-γ independent. PMID:25225248

  7. Cellular requirements for systemic control of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Kupz, Andreas; Bedoui, Sammy; Strugnell, Richard A

    2014-12-01

    The rational design of vaccines requires an understanding of the contributions of individual immune cell subsets to immunity. With this understanding, targeted vaccine delivery approaches and adjuvants can be developed to maximize vaccine efficiency and to minimize side effects (S. H. E. Kaufmann et al., Immunity 33:555-577, 2010; T. Ben-Yedidia and R. Arnon, Hum. Vaccines 1:95-101, 2005). We have addressed the contributions of different immune cell subsets and their ability to contribute to the control and clearance of the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in a murine model. Using a systematic and reproducible model of experimental attenuated S. Typhimurium infection, we show that distinct lymphocyte deficiencies lead to one of four different infection outcomes: clearance, chronic infection, early death, or late death. Our study demonstrates a high level of functional redundancy in the ability of different lymphocyte subsets to provide interferon gamma (IFN-γ), a critical cytokine in Salmonella immunity. Whereas early control of the infection was entirely dependent on IFN-γ but not on any particular lymphocyte subset, clearance of the infection critically required CD4(+) T cells but appeared to be independent of IFN-γ. These data reinforce the idea of a bimodal immune response against Salmonella: an early T cell-independent but IFN-γ-dependent phase and a late T cell-dependent phase that may be IFN-γ independent. PMID:25225248

  8. Cellular factors associated with latency and spontaneous Epstein-Barr virus reactivation in B-lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael L; Xu, Shushen; Lyons-Weiler, James; Rosendorff, Adam; Webber, Steven A; Wasil, Laura R; Metes, Diana; Rowe, David T

    2010-04-25

    EBV-immortalized B-lymphoblastoid cell lines are used as models for cellular transformation and as antigen-presenting cells in immunological assays. LCLs vary in surface markers and other phenotypic properties, but it is not known how this heterogeneity relates to the EBV life cycle. To explore correlations, we examined 62 LCLs for cellular and viral phenotypes. LCLs generated from pediatric and adult donors could similarly be categorized as either low in EBV copy number or fluctuating within a high range. High-copy status accompanied higher lytic viral gene expression and lower latent gene expression. Inhibiting lytic EBV replication did not affect cellular phenotype or lytic switch protein expression, indicating that an LCL's lytic permissivity was a stable property. Among the cellular genes overexpressed in permissive LCLs were unfolded protein response genes and plasma cell markers. Among genes overexpressed in non-permissive LCLs were transcription factors involved in maintaining B cell lineage, in particular EBF1. This study suggests previously undetected mechanisms by which cellular pathways influence the lytic reactivation of EBV. PMID:20153012

  9. Glutamate Dehydrogenase Is Required by Mycobacterium bovis BCG for Resistance to Cellular Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gallant, James L.; Viljoen, Albertus J.; van Helden, Paul D.; Wiid, Ian J. F.

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported on our success to generate deletion mutants of the genes encoding glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase (GOGAT) in M. bovis BCG, despite their in vitro essentiality in M. tuberculosis. We could use these mutants to delineate the roles of GDH and GOGAT in mycobacterial nitrogen metabolism by using M. bovis BCG as a model for M. tuberculosis specifically. Here, we extended our investigation towards the involvement of GDH and GOGAT in other aspects of M. bovis BCG physiology, including the use of glutamate as a carbon source and resistance to known phagosomal stresses, as well as in survival inside macrophages. We find that gdh is indispensable for the utilization of glutamate as a major carbon source, in low pH environments and when challenged with nitric oxide. On the other hand, the gltBD mutant had increased viability under low pH conditions and was unaffected by a challenge with nitric oxide. Strikingly, GDH was required to sustain M. bovis BCG during infection of both murine RAW 264.7 and bone-marrow derived and macrophages, while GOGAT was not. We conclude that the catabolism of glutamate in slow growing mycobacteria may be a crucial function during infection of macrophage cells and demonstrate a novel requirement for M. bovis BCG GDH in the protection against acidic and nitrosative stress. These results provide strong clues on the role of GDH in intracellular survival of M. tuberculosis, in which the essentiality of the gdh gene complicates knock out studies making the study of the role of this enzyme in pathogenesis difficult. PMID:26824899

  10. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of HIV-1 gene expression: role of cellular factors for Tat and Rev.

    PubMed

    Nekhai, Sergei; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2006-12-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant HIV-1 strains presents a challenge for the design of new therapy. Targeting host cell factors that regulate HIV-1 replication might be one way to overcome the propensity for HIV-1 to mutate in order to develop resistance to antivirals. This article reviews the interplay between viral proteins Tat and Rev and their cellular cofactors in the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of HIV-1 gene expression. HIV-1 Tat regulates viral transcription by recruiting cellular factors to the HIV promoter. Tat interacts with protein kinase complexes Cdk9/cyclin T1 and Cdk2/cyclin E; acetyltransferases p300/CBP, p300/CBP-associated factor and hGCN5; protein phosphatases and other factors. HIV-1 Rev regulates post-transcriptional processing of viral mRNAs. Rev primarily functions to export unspliced and partially spliced viral RNAs from the nucleus into the cytoplasm. For this activity, Rev cooperates with cellular transport protein CRM1 and RNA helicases DDX1 and DDX3, amongst others. PMID:17661632

  11. Cellular transformation and malignancy induced by ras require c-jun.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R; Spiegelman, B; Hanahan, D; Wisdom, R

    1996-01-01

    ras is an important oncogene in experimental animals and humans. In addition, activated ras proteins are potent inducers of the transcription factor AP-1, which is composed of heterodimeric complexes of Fos and Jun proteins. Together with the fact that deregulated expression of some AP-1 proteins can cause neoplastic transformation, this finding suggests that AP-1 may function as a critical ras effector. We have tested this hypothesis directly by analyzing the response to activated ras in cells that harbor a null mutation in the c-jun gene. The transcriptional response of AP-1-responsive genes to activated ras is severely impaired in c-jun null fibroblasts. Compared with wild-type cells, the c-jun null cells lack many characteristics of ras transformation, including loss of contact inhibition, anchorage independence, and tumorigenicity in nude mice; these properties are restored by forced expression of c-jun. Rare tumorigenic variants of ras-expressing c-jun null fibroblasts do arise. Analysis of these variants reveals a consistent restoration of AP-1 activity. The results provide genetic evidence that c-jun is a crucial effector for transformation by activated ras proteins. PMID:8754851

  12. Potency assay development for cellular therapy products: an ISCT review of the requirements and experiences in the industry.

    PubMed

    Bravery, Christopher A; Carmen, Jessica; Fong, Timothy; Oprea, Wanda; Hoogendoorn, Karin H; Woda, Juliana; Burger, Scott R; Rowley, Jon A; Bonyhadi, Mark L; Van't Hof, Wouter

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of potency plays a key role in defining the quality of cellular therapy products (CTPs). Potency can be defined as a quantitative measure of relevant biologic function based on the attributes that are linked to relevant biologic properties. To achieve an adequate assessment of CTP potency, appropriate in vitro or in vivo laboratory assays and properly controlled clinical data need to be created. The primary objective of a potency assay is to provide a mechanism by which the manufacturing process and the final product for batch release are scrutinized for quality, consistency and stability. A potency assay also provides the basis for comparability assessment after process changes, such as scale-up, site transfer and new starting materials (e.g., a new donor). Potency assays should be in place for early clinical development, and validated assays are required for pivotal clinical trials. Potency is based on the individual characteristics of each individual CTP, and the adequacy of potency assays will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis by regulatory agencies. We provide an overview of the expectations and challenges in development of potency assays specific for CTPs; several real-life experiences from the cellular therapy industry are presented as illustrations. The key observation and message is that aggressive early investment in a solid potency evaluation strategy can greatly enhance eventual CTP deployment because it can mitigate the risk of costly product failure in late-stage development. PMID:23260082

  13. Essential requirement of cytochrome c release for caspase activation by procaspase-activating compound defined by cellular models

    PubMed Central

    Seervi, M; Joseph, J; Sobhan, P K; Bhavya, B C; Santhoshkumar, T R

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c (cyt. c) release and caspase activation are often impaired in tumors with Bcl-2 overexpression or Bax and Bak-defective status. Direct triggering of cell death downstream of Bax and Bak is an attractive strategy to kill such cancers. Small molecule compounds capable of direct caspase activation appear to be the best mode for killing such tumors. However, there is no precise model to screen such compounds. The currently employed cell-free systems possess the inherent drawback of lacking cellular contents and organelles that operate in integrating cell death signaling. We have developed highly refined cell-based approaches to validate direct caspase activation in cancer cells. Using this approach, we show that PAC-1 (first procaspase-activating compound), the first direct activator of procaspases identified in a cell-free system, in fact requires mitochondrial cyt. c release for triggering caspase activation similar to other antitumor agents. It can induce significant caspase activation and cell death in the absence of Bax and Bak, and in cells overexpressing Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. This study for the first time defines precise criteria for the validation of direct caspase-activating compounds using specialized cellular models that is expected to accelerate the discovery of potential direct caspase activators. PMID:21900958

  14. Protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection after nasopharyngeal colonization requires both humoral and cellular immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, R; Cohen, J M; Jose, R J; de Vogel, C; Baxendale, H; Brown, J S

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of pneumonia and infective exacerbations of chronic lung disease, yet there are few data on how adaptive immunity can specifically prevent S. pneumoniae lung infection. We have used a murine model of nasopharyngeal colonization by the serotype 19F S. pneumoniae strain EF3030 followed by lung infection to investigate whether colonization protects against subsequent lung infection and the mechanisms involved. EF3030 colonization induced systemic and local immunoglobulin G against a limited number of S. pneumoniae protein antigens rather than capsular polysaccharide. During lung infection, previously colonized mice had increased early cytokine responses and neutrophil recruitment and reduced bacterial colony-forming units in the lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with control mice. Colonization-induced protection was lost when experiments were repeated in B-cell- or neutrophil-deficient mice. Furthermore, the improved interleukin (IL)-17 response to infection in previously colonized mice was abolished by depletion of CD4+ cells, and prior colonization did not protect against lung infection in mice depleted of CD4+ cells or IL17. Together these data show that naturally acquired protective immunity to S. pneumoniae lung infection requires both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, providing a template for the design of improved vaccines that can specifically prevent pneumonia or acute bronchitis. PMID:25354319

  15. Compartmentalized signaling by GPI-anchored ephrin-A5 requires the Fyn tyrosine kinase to regulate cellular adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Davy, Alice; Gale, Nicholas W.; Murray, Elizabeth W.; Klinghoffer, Richard A.; Soriano, Philippe; Feuerstein, Claude; Robbins, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their corresponding surface-bound ligands, the ephrins, provide cues to the migration of cells and growth cones during embryonic development. Here we show that ephrin-A5, which is attached to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchor, induces compartmentalized signaling within a caveolae-like membrane microdomain when bound to the extracellular domain of its cognate Eph receptor. The physiological response induced by this signaling event is concomitant with a change in the cellular architecture and adhesion of the ephrin-A5-expressing cells and requires the activity of the Fyn protein tyrosine kinase. This study stresses the relevance of bidirectional signaling involving the ephrins and Eph receptors during brain development. PMID:10601038

  16. The Effects of Imatinib Mesylate on Cellular Viability, Platelet Derived Growth Factor and Stem Cell Factor in Mouse Testicular Normal Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kheradmand, Fatemeh; Hashemnia, Seyyed Mohammad Reza; Valizadeh, Nasim; Roshan-Milani, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Background: Growth factors play an essential role in the development of tumor and normal cells like testicular leydig cells. Treatment of cancer with anti-cancer agents like imatinib mesylate may interfere with normal leydig cell activity, growth and fertility through failure in growth factors’ production or their signaling pathways. The purpose of the study was to determine cellular viability and the levels of, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) in normal mouse leydig cells exposed to imatinib, and addressing the effect of imatinib on fertility potential. Methods: The mouse TM3 leydig cells were treated with 0 (control), 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 μM imatinib for 2, 4 and 6 days. Each experiment was repeated three times (15 experiments in each day).The cellular viability and growth factors levels were assessed by MTT and ELISA methods, respectively. For statistical analysis, one-way ANOVA with Tukey’s post hoc and Kruskal-Wallis test were performed. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: With increasing drug concentration, cellular viability decreased significantly (p<0.05) and in contrast, PDGF levels increased (p<0.05). Different imatinib concentrations had no significant effect on SCF level. Increasing the duration of treatment from 2 to 6 days had no obvious effect on cellular viability, PDGF and SCF levels. Conclusion: Imatinib may reduce fertility potential especially at higher concentrations in patients treated with this drug by decreasing cellular viability. The effect of imatinib on leydig cells is associated with PDGF stimulation. Of course future studies can be helpful in exploring the long term effects of this drug. PMID:27141462

  17. Decoding Cellular Dynamics in Epidermal Growth Factor Signaling Using a New Pathway-Based Integration Approach for Proteomics and Transcriptomics Data

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, Astrid; Beißbarth, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Identification of dynamic signaling mechanisms on different cellular layers is now facilitated as the increased usage of various high-throughput techniques goes along with decreasing costs for individual experiments. A lot of these signaling mechanisms are known to be coordinated by their dynamics, turning time-course data sets into valuable information sources for inference of regulatory mechanisms. However, the combined analysis of parallel time-course measurements from different high-throughput platforms still constitutes a major challenge requiring sophisticated bioinformatic tools in order to ease biological interpretation. We developed a new pathway-based integration approach for the analysis of coupled omics time-series data, which we implemented in the R package pwOmics. Unlike many other approaches, our approach acknowledges the role of the different cellular layers of measurement and infers consensus profiles and time profile clusters for further biological interpretation. We investigated a time-course data set on epidermal growth factor stimulation of human mammary epithelial cells generated on the two layers of RNA and proteins. The data was analyzed using our new approach with a focus on feedback signaling and pathway crosstalk. We could confirm known regulatory patterns relevant in the physiological cellular response to epidermal growth factor stimulation as well as identify interesting new interactions in this signaling context, such as the regulatory influence of the connective tissue growth factor on transferrin receptor or the influence of growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible alpha on the connective tissue growth factor. Thus, we show that integrated cross-platform analysis provides a deeper understanding of regulatory signaling mechanisms. Combined with time-course information it enables the characterization of dynamic signaling processes and leads to the identification of important regulatory interactions which might be dysregulated in disease

  18. MicroRNA-mediated regulation of p21 and TASK1 cellular restriction factors enhances HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Farberov, Luba; Herzig, Eytan; Modai, Shira; Isakov, Ofer; Hizi, Amnon; Shomron, Noam

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that play a central role in the regulation of gene expression by binding to target mRNAs. Several studies have revealed alterations in cellular miRNA profiles following HIV-1 infection, mostly for miRNAs involved in inhibiting viral infection. These miRNA expression modifications might also serve to block the innate HIV-1 inhibition mechanism. As a result, it is expected that during HIV-1 infection miRNAs target genes that hinder or prevent the progression of the HIV-1 replication cycle. One of the major sets of genes known to inhibit the progression of HIV-1 infection are cellular restriction factors. In this study, we identified a direct miRNA target gene that modulates viral spread in T-lymphocytes and HeLa-CCR5 cell lines. Following infection, let-7c, miR-34a or miR-124a were upregulated, and they targeted and downregulated p21 and TASK1 (also known as CDKN1A and KCNK3, respectively) cellular proteins. This eventually led to increased virion release and higher copy number of viral genome transcripts in infected cells. Conversely, by downregulating these miRNAs, we could suppress viral replication and spread. Our data suggest that HIV-1 exploits the host miRNA cellular systems in order to block the innate inhibition mechanism, allowing a more efficient infection process. PMID:25717002

  19. Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G; Sinclair, Alison J

    2015-04-20

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  20. Induction of Specific Cellular and Humoral Responses against Renal Cell Carcinoma after Combination Therapy with Cryoablation and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Archana; Littrup, Peter; Paul, Elyse N.; Adam, Barbara; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2013-01-01

    Cryotherapy offers a minimally invasive treatment option for the management of both irresectable and localized prostate, liver, pulmonary and renal tumors. The anti-neoplastic effects of cryotherapy are mediated by direct tumor lysis and by indirect effects such as intracellular dehydration, pH changes, and microvascular damage resulting in ischemic necrosis. In this study, we investigated whether percutaneous cryoablation of lung metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in combination with aerosolized granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can induce systemic cellular and humoral immune responses in 6 RCC patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were sequentially studied up to 63 days post cryoimmunotherapy (CI). PBMC from pre and post CI were phenotyped for lymphocyte subsets and tested for cytotoxicity and IFNγ Elispots directed at RCC cells. Humoral responses were measured by in vitro antibody synthesis assay directed at RCC cells. The immune monitoring data showed that CI induced tumor specific CTL, specific in vitro anti-tumor antibody responses, and enhanced Th1 cytokine production in 4 out of 6 patients. More importantly, the magnitude of cellular and humoral anti-tumor response appears to be associated with clinical responses. These pilot data show that CI can induce robust and brisk cellular and humoral immune responses in metastatic RCC patients, but requires further evaluation in optimized protocols. PMID:21577139

  1. Identification of RNA Binding Proteins Associated with Dengue Virus RNA in Infected Cells Reveals Temporally Distinct Host Factor Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Viktorovskaya, Olga V.; Greco, Todd M.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Thompson, Sunnie R.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are currently no vaccines or antivirals available for dengue virus infection, which can cause dengue hemorrhagic fever and death. A better understanding of the host pathogen interaction is required to develop effective therapies to treat DENV. In particular, very little is known about how cellular RNA binding proteins interact with viral RNAs. RNAs within cells are not naked; rather they are coated with proteins that affect localization, stability, translation and (for viruses) replication. Methodology/Principal Findings Seventy-nine novel RNA binding proteins for dengue virus (DENV) were identified by cross-linking proteins to dengue viral RNA during a live infection in human cells. These cellular proteins were specific and distinct from those previously identified for poliovirus, suggesting a specialized role for these factors in DENV amplification. Knockdown of these proteins demonstrated their function as viral host factors, with evidence for some factors acting early, while others late in infection. Their requirement by DENV for efficient amplification is likely specific, since protein knockdown did not impair the cell fitness for viral amplification of an unrelated virus. The protein abundances of these host factors were not significantly altered during DENV infection, suggesting their interaction with DENV RNA was due to specific recruitment mechanisms. However, at the global proteome level, DENV altered the abundances of proteins in particular classes, including transporter proteins, which were down regulated, and proteins in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which were up regulated. Conclusions/Significance The method for identification of host factors described here is robust and broadly applicable to all RNA viruses, providing an avenue to determine the conserved or distinct mechanisms through which diverse viruses manage the viral RNA within cells. This study significantly increases the number of cellular factors known to interact with

  2. Human Cortical Neural Stem Cells Expressing Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I: A Novel Cellular Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Lisa M; Sims, Erika; Lunn, J Simon; Kashlan, Osama N; Chen, Kevin S; Bruno, Elizabeth S; Pacut, Crystal M; Hazel, Tom; Johe, Karl; Sakowski, Stacey A; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorder and a leading cause of dementia. Current treatment fails to modify underlying disease pathologies and very little progress has been made to develop effective drug treatments. Cellular therapies impact disease by multiple mechanisms, providing increased efficacy compared with traditional single-target approaches. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, we have shown that transplanted spinal neural stem cells (NSCs) integrate into the spinal cord, form synapses with the host, improve inflammation, and reduce disease-associated pathologies. Our current goal is to develop a similar "best in class" cellular therapy for AD. Here, we characterize a novel human cortex-derived NSC line modified to express insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), HK532-IGF-I. Because IGF-I promotes neurogenesis and synaptogenesis in vivo, this enhanced NSC line offers additional environmental enrichment, enhanced neuroprotection, and a multifaceted approach to treating complex AD pathologies. We show that autocrine IGF-I production does not impact the cell secretome or normal cellular functions, including proliferation, migration, or maintenance of progenitor status. However, HK532-IGF-I cells preferentially differentiate into gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic neurons, a subtype dysregulated in AD; produce increased vascular endothelial growth factor levels; and display an increased neuroprotective capacity in vitro. We also demonstrate that HK532-IGF-I cells survive peri-hippocampal transplantation in a murine AD model and exhibit long-term persistence in targeted brain areas. In conclusion, we believe that harnessing the benefits of cellular and IGF-I therapies together will provide the optimal therapeutic benefit to patients, and our findings support further preclinical development of HK532-IGF-I cells into a disease-modifying intervention for AD. PMID:26744412

  3. Chemical structure requirements and cellular targeting of microRNA-122 by peptide nucleic acids anti-miRs

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Adrian G.; Fabani, Martin M.; Vigorito, Elena; Williams, Donna; Al-Obaidi, Naowras; Wojciechowski, Filip; Hudson, Robert H. E.; Seitz, Oliver; Gait, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Anti-miRs are oligonucleotide inhibitors complementary to miRNAs that have been used extensively as tools to gain understanding of specific miRNA functions and as potential therapeutics. We showed previously that peptide nucleic acid (PNA) anti-miRs containing a few attached Lys residues were potent miRNA inhibitors. Using miR-122 as an example, we report here the PNA sequence and attached amino acid requirements for efficient miRNA targeting and show that anti-miR activity is enhanced substantially by the presence of a terminal-free thiol group, such as a Cys residue, primarily due to better cellular uptake. We show that anti-miR activity of a Cys-containing PNA is achieved by cell uptake through both clathrin-dependent and independent routes. With the aid of two PNA analogues having intrinsic fluorescence, thiazole orange (TO)-PNA and [bis-o-(aminoethoxy)phenyl]pyrrolocytosine (BoPhpC)-PNA, we explored the subcellular localization of PNA anti-miRs and our data suggest that anti-miR targeting of miR-122 may take place in or associated with endosomal compartments. Our findings are valuable for further design of PNAs and other oligonucleotides as potent anti-miR agents. PMID:22070883

  4. The maize pentatricopeptide repeat gene empty pericarp4 (emp4) is required for proper cellular development in vegetative tissues.

    PubMed

    Gabotti, Damiano; Caporali, Elisabetta; Manzotti, Priscilla; Persico, Martina; Vigani, Gianpiero; Consonni, Gabriella

    2014-06-01

    The empty pericarp4 (emp4) gene encodes a mitochondrion-targeted pentatricopeptide repeat (ppr) protein that is involved in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression and is required for seed development. In homozygous mutant emp4-1 kernels the endosperm is drastically reduced and the embryo is retarded in its development and unable to germinate. With the aim of investigating the role of emp4 during post-germinative development, homozygous mutant seedlings were obtained by cultivation of excised immature embryos on a synthetic medium. In the mutants both germination frequency as well as the proportion of seedlings reaching the first and second leaf stages were reduced. The anatomy of the leaf blades and the root cortex was not affected by the mutation, however severe alterations such as the presence of empty cells or cells containing poorly organized organelles, were observed. Moreover both mitochondria and chloroplast functionality was impaired in the mutants. Our hypothesis is that mitochondrial impairment, the primary effect of the mutation, causes secondary effects on the development of other cellular organelles. Ultra-structural features of mutant leaf blade mesophyll cells are reminiscent of cells undergoing senescence. Interestingly, both structural and functional damage was less severe in seedlings grown in total darkness compared with those exposed to light, thus suggesting that the effects of the mutation are enhanced by the presence of light. PMID:24767112

  5. Risk factors for endophthalmitis requiring evisceration or enucleation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xuehui; Ng, Danny Siu-Chun; Zheng, Kangkeng; Peng, Kun; Jin, Chuang; Xia, Honghe; Chen, Weiqi; Chen, Haoyu

    2016-01-01

    Endophthalmitis has devastating sequelae resulting in blindness and even loss of eyeball. Although the prognosis of endophthalmitis has much improved with the advances of antibiotics and vitreoretinal surgery, of the number of patients that required evisceration or enucleation is still significant. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 210 eyes of 210 patients with endophthalmitis andcompared the group that required evisceration or enucleation with those that received salvaging therapies. Regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors for evisceration or enucleation. Thirty eyes (14.3%) underwent enucleation or evisceration. The group of eviscerated or enucleated eyes were older (58.7 vs. 42.2 years, p < 0.001), had more women (56.7% vs. 22.2%, p = 0.003), had poorer initial visual acuity (2.79 vs. 2.10 LogMAR, p < 0.001), and had longer duration before intervention (18.03 vs. 5.74 days, p = 0.031). The most common primary indications for endophthalmitis were infections from corneal ulcer (50.0% vs. 4.4%, p < 0.001) andfrom endogenous source (23.3% vs. 5.6%, p < 0.001). Less common indications were trauma (26.7% vs. 67.8%, p < 0.001) and postoperative (6.7% vs. 22.2%, p = 0.049) endophthalmitis. After adjusting for confounding factors, corneal ulcer-related endophthalmitis, endogenous endophthalmitis and initial visual acuity were the independent risk factors for evisceration or enucleation. PMID:27302573

  6. Matrix Metalloproteinase 3 Promotes Cellular Anti-Dengue Virus Response via Interaction with Transcription Factor NFκB in Cell Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Xiangyang; Pan, Wen; Feng, Tingting; Shi, Xiaohong; Dai, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), the causative agent of human Dengue hemorrhagic fever, is a mosquito-borne virus of immense global health importance. Characterization of cellular factors promoting or inhibiting DENV infection is important for understanding the mechanism of DENV infection. In this report, MMP3 (stromelysin-1), a secretory endopeptidase that degrades extracellular matrices, has been shown promoting cellular antiviral response against DENV infection. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western Blot showed that the expression of MMP3 was upregulated in DENV-infected RAW264.7 cells. The intracellular viral loads were significantly higher in MMP3 silenced cells compared with controls. The expression level of selective anti-viral cytokines were decreased in MMP3 siRNA treated cells, and the transcription factor activity of NFκB was significantly impaired upon MMP3 silencing during DENV infection. Further, we found that MMP3 moved to cell nucleus upon DENV infection and colocalized with NFκB P65 in nucleus. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis suggested that MMP3 directly interacted with NFκB in nucleus during DENV infection and the C-terminal hemopexin-like domain of MMP3 was required for the interaction. This study suggested a novel role of MMP3 in nucleus during viral infection and provided new evidence for MMPs in immunomodulation. PMID:24416274

  7. Low neural exosomal levels of cellular survival factors in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Goetzl, Edward J; Boxer, Adam; Schwartz, Janice B; Abner, Erin L; Petersen, Ronald C; Miller, Bruce L; Carlson, Olga D; Mustapic, Maja; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors that mediate neuronal defenses against diverse stresses were quantified in plasma neural-derived exosomes of Alzheimer’s disease or frontotemporal dementia patients and matched controls. Exosomal levels of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6, heat-shock factor-1, and repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor all were significantly lower in Alzheimer’s disease patients than controls (P < 0.0001). In frontotemporal dementia, the only significant difference was higher levels of repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor than in controls. Exosomal transcription factors were diminished 2–10 years before clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Low exosomal levels of survival proteins may explain decreased neuronal resistance to Alzheimer’s disease neurotoxic proteins. PMID:26273689

  8. Biomimetic hybrid porous scaffolds immobilized with platelet derived growth factor-BB promote cellularization and vascularization in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Murali, Ragothaman; Ponrasu, Thangavel; Cheirmadurai, Kalirajan; Thanikaivelan, Palanisamy

    2016-02-01

    Development of hybrid scaffolds with synergistic combination of growth factor is a promising approach to promote early in vivo wound repair and tissue regeneration. Here, we show the rapid wound healing in Wistar albino rats using biomimetic collagen-poly(dialdehyde) guar gum based hybrid porous scaffolds covalently immobilized with platelet derived growth factor-BB. The immobilized platelet derived growth factor in the hybrid scaffolds not only enhance the total protein, collagen, hexosamine, and uronic acid contents in the granulation tissue but also provide stronger tissues. The wound closure analysis reveal that the complete epithelialization period is 15.4 ± 0.9 days for collagen-poly(dialdehyde) guar gum-platelet derived growth factor hybrid scaffolds, whereas it is significantly higher for control, collagen, collagen- poly(dialdehyde) guar gum and povidine-iodine treated groups. Further, the histological evaluation shows that the immobilized platelet derived growth factor in the hybrid scaffolds induced a more robust cellular and vascular response in the implanted site. Hence, we demonstrate that the collagen-poly(dialdehyde) guar gum hybrid scaffolds loaded with platelet derived growth factor stimulates chemotactic effects in the implanted site to promote rapid tissue regeneration and wound repair without the assistance of antibacterial agents. PMID:26414915

  9. Epstein-Barr virus induces cellular transcription factors to allow active expression of EBER genes by RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed

    Felton-Edkins, Zoë A; Kondrashov, Alexander; Karali, Dimitra; Fairley, Jennifer A; Dawson, Christopher W; Arrand, John R; Young, Lawrence S; White, Robert J

    2006-11-10

    The EBER genes of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are transcribed by RNA polymerase (pol) III to produce untranslated RNAs that are implicated in oncogenesis. These EBER transcripts are the most highly expressed viral gene products in EBV-transformed cells. We have identified changes to the cellular transcription machinery that may contribute to the high levels of EBER RNA. These include phosphorylation of ATF2, which interacts with EBER promoters. A second is induction of TFIIIC, a pol III-specific factor that activates EBER genes; all five subunits of TFIIIC are overexpressed in EBV-positive cells. In addition, EBV induces BDP1, a subunit of the pol III-specific factor TFIIIB. Although BDP1 is the only TFIIIB subunit induced by EBV, its induction is sufficient to stimulate EBER expression in vivo, implying a limiting function. The elevated levels of BDP1 and TFIIIC in EBV-positive cells stimulate production of tRNA, 7SL, and 5S rRNA. Abnormally high expression of these cellular pol III products may contribute to the ability of EBV to enhance growth potential. PMID:16956891

  10. Risk factors for hemorrhage requiring embolization after percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Un, Sitki; Cakir, Volkan; Kara, Cengiz; Turk, Hakan; Kose, Osman; Balli, Omur; Yilmaz, Yuksel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is the primary surgical intervention in kidney stone management. Even though it is performed quite often, the complication rates are also high. Arteriovenous fistulas following extended hemorrhages after PCNL are one of the most serious complications of this operation. Our main objective was to review the data of patients who required angiography and embolization. Methods: In total, we included 1405 patients who underwent PCNL between 2007 and 2014. All patient data were retrospectively reviewed. All patients went under PCNL using fluoroscopy. Following informed consent, all hemorrhagic patients underwent angiography in the interventional radiology department and embolization was performed in patients with a hemorrhage focus point. Results: A total of 147 patients (10.4%) required transfusion for post-PCNL hemorrhages. Of them, 14 (0.99%) underwent angiography and embolization (9 [64.2%] were male and 5 [35.8%] were female, with a mean age of 39.4 ± 10.2). The remaining 133 patients were conservatively managed (81 [60.9%] males and 52 [39.1%] females, with a mean age of 42.3 ± 12.4). When the predicting factors for angiography and embolization were reviewed, renal abnormalities and the mean size of stones were significant in both univariate and multivariate analysis (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Patients with extended and intermittent hematuria should be monitored closely for hemodynamics; if there is an ongoing necessity for transfusion, angiography should be considered. PMID:26425220

  11. CRISPR Immunological Memory Requires a Host Factor for Specificity.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, James K; Bai, Lawrence; Harrington, Lucas B; Hinder, Tracey L; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-06-16

    Bacteria and archaea employ adaptive immunity against foreign genetic elements using CRISPR-Cas systems. To generate immunological memory, the Cas1-Cas2 protein complex captures 30-40 base pair segments of foreign DNA and catalyzes their integration into the host genome as unique spacer sequences. Although spacers are inserted strictly at the A-T-rich leader end of CRISPR loci in vivo, the molecular mechanism of leader-specific spacer integration remains poorly understood. Here we show that the E. coli integration host factor (IHF) protein is required for spacer acquisition in vivo and for integration into linear DNA in vitro. IHF binds to the leader sequence and induces a sharp DNA bend, allowing the Cas1-Cas2 integrase to catalyze the first integration reaction at the leader-repeat border. Together, these results reveal that Cas1-Cas2-mediated spacer integration requires IHF-induced target DNA bending and explain the elusive role of CRISPR leader sequences during spacer acquisition. PMID:27211867

  12. Canonical Initiation Factor Requirements of the Myc Family of Internal Ribosome Entry Segments▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Spriggs, Keith A.; Cobbold, Laura C.; Jopling, Catherine L.; Cooper, Rebecca E.; Wilson, Lindsay A.; Stoneley, Mark; Coldwell, Mark J.; Poncet, Didier; Shen, Ya-Ching; Morley, Simon J.; Bushell, Martin; Willis, Anne E.

    2009-01-01

    Initiation of protein synthesis in eukaryotes requires recruitment of the ribosome to the mRNA and its translocation to the start codon. There are at least two distinct mechanisms by which this process can be achieved; the ribosome can be recruited either to the cap structure at the 5′ end of the message or to an internal ribosome entry segment (IRES), a complex RNA structural element located in the 5′ untranslated region (5′-UTR) of the mRNA. However, it is not well understood how cellular IRESs function to recruit the ribosome or how the 40S ribosomal subunits translocate from the initial recruitment site on the mRNA to the AUG initiation codon. We have investigated the canonical factors that are required by the IRESs found in the 5′-UTRs of c-, L-, and N-myc, using specific inhibitors and a tissue culture-based assay system, and have shown that they differ considerably in their requirements. The L-myc IRES requires the eIF4F complex and the association of PABP and eIF3 with eIF4G for activity. The minimum requirements of the N- and c-myc IRESs are the C-terminal domain of eIF4G to which eIF4A is bound and eIF3, although interestingly this protein does not appear to be recruited to the IRES RNA via eIF4G. Finally, our data show that all three IRESs require a ternary complex, although in contrast to c- and L-myc IRESs, the N-myc IRES has a lesser requirement for a ternary complex. PMID:19124605

  13. Off the shelf cellular therapeutics: Factors to consider during cryopreservation and storage of human cells for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Woods, Erik J; Thirumala, Sreedhar; Badhe-Buchanan, Sandhya S; Clarke, Dominic; Mathew, Aby J

    2016-06-01

    The field of cellular therapeutics has immense potential, affording an exciting array of applications in unmet medical needs. One of several key issues is an emphasis on getting these therapies from bench to bedside without compromising safety and efficacy. The successful commercialization of cellular therapeutics will require many to extend the shelf-life of these therapies beyond shipping "fresh" at ambient or chilled temperatures for "just in time" infusion. Cryopreservation is an attractive option and offers potential advantages, such as storing and retaining patient samples in case of a relapse, banking large quantities of allogeneic cells for broader distribution and use and retaining testing samples for leukocyte antigen typing and matching. However, cryopreservation is only useful if cells can be reanimated to physiological life with negligible loss of viability and functionality. Also critical is the logistics of storing, processing and transporting cells in clinically appropriate packaging systems and storage devices consistent with quality and regulatory standards. Rationalized approaches to develop commercial-scale cell therapies require an efficient cryopreservation system that provides the ability to inventory standardized products with maximized shelf life for later on-demand distribution and use, as well as a method that is scientifically sound and optimized for the cell of interest. The objective of this review is to bridge this gap between the basic science of cryobiology and its application in this context by identifying several key aspects of cryopreservation science in a format that may be easily integrated into mainstream cell therapy manufacture. PMID:27173747

  14. Modulation of Enhancer Looping and Differential Gene Targeting by Epstein-Barr Virus Transcription Factors Directs Cellular Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, Michael J.; Wood, C. David; Ojeniyi, Opeoluwa; Cooper, Tim J.; Kanhere, Aditi; Arvey, Aaron; Webb, Helen M.; Palermo, Richard D.; Harth-Hertle, Marie L.; Kempkes, Bettina; Jenner, Richard G.; West, Michelle J.

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) epigenetically reprogrammes B-lymphocytes to drive immortalization and facilitate viral persistence. Host-cell transcription is perturbed principally through the actions of EBV EBNA 2, 3A, 3B and 3C, with cellular genes deregulated by specific combinations of these EBNAs through unknown mechanisms. Comparing human genome binding by these viral transcription factors, we discovered that 25% of binding sites were shared by EBNA 2 and the EBNA 3s and were located predominantly in enhancers. Moreover, 80% of potential EBNA 3A, 3B or 3C target genes were also targeted by EBNA 2, implicating extensive interplay between EBNA 2 and 3 proteins in cellular reprogramming. Investigating shared enhancer sites neighbouring two new targets (WEE1 and CTBP2) we discovered that EBNA 3 proteins repress transcription by modulating enhancer-promoter loop formation to establish repressive chromatin hubs or prevent assembly of active hubs. Re-ChIP analysis revealed that EBNA 2 and 3 proteins do not bind simultaneously at shared sites but compete for binding thereby modulating enhancer-promoter interactions. At an EBNA 3-only intergenic enhancer site between ADAM28 and ADAMDEC1 EBNA 3C was also able to independently direct epigenetic repression of both genes through enhancer-promoter looping. Significantly, studying shared or unique EBNA 3 binding sites at WEE1, CTBP2, ITGAL (LFA-1 alpha chain), BCL2L11 (Bim) and the ADAMs, we also discovered that different sets of EBNA 3 proteins bind regulatory elements in a gene and cell-type specific manner. Binding profiles correlated with the effects of individual EBNA 3 proteins on the expression of these genes, providing a molecular basis for the targeting of different sets of cellular genes by the EBNA 3s. Our results therefore highlight the influence of the genomic and cellular context in determining the specificity of gene deregulation by EBV and provide a paradigm for host-cell reprogramming through modulation of

  15. Cellular factors promoting resistance to effective treatment of glioma with oncolytic Myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Zemp, Franz J.; McKenzie, Brienne A.; Lun, Xueqing; Reilly, Karlyne M.; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V. Wee; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic virus therapy is being evaluated in clinical trials for human glioma. While it is widely assumed that the patient's immune response to the virus infection limits the therapy's utility, investigations into the specific cell type(s) involved in this response have been performed using non-specific pharmacological inhibitors or allogeneic models with compromised immunity. To identify the immune cells that participate in clearing an oncolytic infection in glioma, we used flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry to immunophenotype an orthotopic glioma model in immunocompetent mice after Myxoma virus (MYXV) administration. These studies revealed a large resident microglia and macrophage population in untreated tumours, and robust monocyte, T and NK cell infiltration 3 days following MYXV infection. To determine the role on the clinical utility of MYXV therapy for glioma, we used a combination of knockout mouse strains and specific immunocyte ablation techniques. Collectively, our experiments identify an important role for tumour-resident myeloid cells and overlapping roles for recruited NK and T cells in the clearance and efficacy of oncolytic MYXV from gliomas. Using a cyclophosphamide regimen to achieve lymphoablation prior and during MYXV treatment, we prevented treatment-induced peripheral immunocyte recruitment and, surprisingly, largely ablated the tumour-resident macrophage population. Virotherapy of CPA-treated animals resulted in sustained viral infection within the glioma as well as a substantial survival advantage. This study demonstrates that resistance to MYXV virotherapy in syngeneic glioma models involves a multi-faceted cellular immune response that can be overcome with CPA-mediated lymphoablation. PMID:25336188

  16. Differential expression of growth factors at the cellular level in virus-infected brain.

    PubMed

    Prosniak, Mikhail; Zborek, Anna; Scott, Gwen S; Roy, Anirban; Phares, Timothy W; Koprowski, Hilary; Hooper, D Craig

    2003-05-27

    The contribution of host factors to rabies virus (RV) transcription/replication and axonal/transsynaptic spread is largely unknown. We previously identified several host genes that are up-regulated in the mouse brain during RV infection, including neuroleukin, which is involved in neuronal growth and survival, cell motility, and differentiation, and fibroblast growth factor homologous factor 4 (FHF4), which has been implicated in limb and nervous system development. In this study, we used real-time quantitative RT-PCR to assess the expression of mRNAs specific for neuroleukin, the two isoforms of FHF4 (FHF4-1a and -1b) encoded by the FHF4 gene, and N protein of RV in neurons and astrocytes isolated by laser capture microdissection from mouse brains infected with the laboratory-adapted RV strain CVS-N2c or with a street RV of silver-haired bat origin. Differences in the gene expression patterns suggest that the capacity of RV strains to infect nonneuronal cells and differentially modulate host gene expression may be important in virus replication and spread in the CNS. PMID:12736376

  17. Differential expression of growth factors at the cellular level in virus-infected brain

    PubMed Central

    Prosniak, Mikhail; Zborek, Anna; Scott, Gwen S.; Roy, Anirban; Phares, Timothy W.; Koprowski, Hilary; Hooper, D. Craig

    2003-01-01

    The contribution of host factors to rabies virus (RV) transcription/replication and axonal/transsynaptic spread is largely unknown. We previously identified several host genes that are up-regulated in the mouse brain during RV infection, including neuroleukin, which is involved in neuronal growth and survival, cell motility, and differentiation, and fibroblast growth factor homologous factor 4 (FHF4), which has been implicated in limb and nervous system development. In this study, we used real-time quantitative RT-PCR to assess the expression of mRNAs specific for neuroleukin, the two isoforms of FHF4 (FHF4-1a and -1b) encoded by the FHF4 gene, and N protein of RV in neurons and astrocytes isolated by laser capture microdissection from mouse brains infected with the laboratory-adapted RV strain CVS-N2c or with a street RV of silver-haired bat origin. Differences in the gene expression patterns suggest that the capacity of RV strains to infect nonneuronal cells and differentially modulate host gene expression may be important in virus replication and spread in the CNS. PMID:12736376

  18. Identification of TRAPPC8 as a Host Factor Required for Human Papillomavirus Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Nakahara, Tomomi; Kataoka, Michiyo; Kusumoto-Matsuo, Rika; Mori, Seiichiro; Takeuchi, Takamasa; Kukimoto, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a non-enveloped virus composed of a circular DNA genome and two capsid proteins, L1 and L2. Multiple interactions between its capsid proteins and host cellular proteins are required for infectious HPV entry, including cell attachment and internalization, intracellular trafficking and viral genome transfer into the nucleus. Using two variants of HPV type 51, the Ma and Nu strains, we have previously reported that MaL2 is required for efficient pseudovirus (PsV) transduction. However, the cellular factors that confer this L2 dependency have not yet been identified. Here we report that the transport protein particle complex subunit 8 (TRAPPC8) specifically interacts with MaL2. TRAPPC8 knockdown in HeLa cells yielded reduced levels of reporter gene expression when inoculated with HPV51Ma, HPV16, and HPV31 PsVs. TRAPPC8 knockdown in HaCaT cells also showed reduced susceptibility to infection with authentic HPV31 virions, indicating that TRAPPC8 plays a crucial role in native HPV infection. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the central region of TRAPPC8 was exposed on the cell surface and colocalized with inoculated PsVs. The entry of Ma, Nu, and L2-lacking PsVs into cells was equally impaired in TRAPPC8 knockdown HeLa cells, suggesting that TRAPPC8-dependent endocytosis plays an important role in HPV entry that is independent of L2 interaction. Finally, expression of GFP-fused L2 that can also interact with TRAPPC8 induced dispersal of the Golgi stack structure in HeLa cells, a phenotype also observed by TRAPPC8 knockdown. These results suggest that during viral intracellular trafficking, binding of L2 to TRAPPC8 inhibits its function resulting in Golgi destabilization, a process that may assist HPV genome escape from the trans-Golgi network. PMID:24244674

  19. Functional interaction between the human cytomegalovirus 86-kilodalton IE2 protein and the cellular transcription factor CREB.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, D; Gebert, S; Arlt, H; Stamminger, T

    1995-01-01

    The 86-kDa IE2 protein (IE86) of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has been described as a promiscuous transactivator of viral, as well as cellular, gene expression. Investigation of the mechanism used by IE86 to activate gene expression from the early UL112/113 promoter of HCMV revealed the existence of three binding sites for IE86 located between nucleotides -290 and -120 relative to the transcriptional start site (H. Arlt, D. Lang, S. Gebert, and T. Stamminger, J. Virol. 68:4117-4125, 1994). As shown previously, deletion of these target sites resulted in a reduction of IE86-mediated transactivation by approximately 70%. The remaining promoter, however, could still be stimulated about 40-fold, indicating the presence of an additional responsive element within these sequences. Here, we provide evidence that a binding site for the cellular transcription factor CREB can also act as a target for IE86 transactivation. By DNase I protection analysis, a binding sequence for CREB could be detected between nucleotides -78 and -56 within the respective promoter region. After in vitro mutagenesis of this CREB-binding site within the context of the entire UL112/113 promoter, a marked reduction in transactivation levels was evident. Moreover, when individual CREB-binding sites were positioned upstream of a minimal, TATA box-containing UL112/113 promoter, they were able to confer strong IE86 responsiveness, whereas a mutated sequence did not exert any effect. In far Western blot and pull-down experiments, a direct interaction of IE86 with the cellular transcription factor CREB could be observed. The in vivo relevance of this in vitro interaction was confirmed by using various GAL4 fusion proteins in the presence or absence of IE86 which revealed a strong activation only in the presence of both a GAL4-CREB fusion and IE86. This shows that at least one specific member of the ATF/CREB family of transcription factors is involved in mediating transactivation by the HCMV IE86 protein

  20. Glutathione and the rate of cellular proliferation determine tumour cell sensitivity to tumour necrosis factor in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Obrador, E; Navarro, J; Mompo, J; Asensi, M; Pellicer, J A; Estrela, J M

    1997-01-01

    Low rates of cellular proliferation are associated with low GSH content and enhanced sensitivity of Ehrlich ascites-tumour (EAT) cells to the cytotoxic effects of recombinant human tumour necrosis factor (rhTNF-alpha). Buthionine sulphoximine, a selective inhibitor of GSH synthesis, inhibited tumour growth and increased rhTNF-alpha cytoxicity in vitro. Administration of sublethal doses (10(6)units/kg per day) of rhTNF-alpha to EAT-bearing mice promoted oxidative stress (as measured by increases in intracellular peroxide levels, O2(-); generation and mitochondrial GSSG) and resulted in a slight reduction (19%) in tumour cell number when controls showed the highest rate of cellular proliferation. ATP (1mmol/kg per day)-induced selective GSH depletion, when combined with rhTNF-alpha administration, afforded a 61% inhibition of tumour growth and resulted in a significant extension of host survival. Administration of N-acetylcysteine (1mmol/kg per day) or GSH ester (5mmol/kg per day) abolished the rhTNF-alpha- and ATP-induced effects on tumour growth by maintaining high GSH levels in the cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity of tumour cells to rhTNF-alpha in vivo depends on their GSH content and their rate of proliferation. PMID:9224645

  1. Direct cellular effects of some mediators, hormones and growth factor-like agents on denervated (isolated) rat gastric mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Bódis, B; Karádi, O; Nagy, L; Dohoczky, C; Kolega, M; Mózsik, G

    1997-01-01

    The brain-gut axis has an important role in the mechanism of gastric cytoprotection in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effect of protective agents without any central and peripheral innervation. A mixed population of rat gastric mucosal cells was isolated by the method of Nagy et al (Gastroenterology (1994) 77, 433-443). Cells were incubated for 60 min with cytoprotective drugs such as prostacyclin, histamine, pentagastrin and PL-10 substances (synthesized parts of BPC). At the end of this incubation cells were treated by 15% ethanol for 5 min. Cell viability was tested by trypan blue exclusion test and succinic dehydrogenase activity. The following results were obtained: 1) prostacyclin, histamine and pentagastrin had no direct cytoprotective effect on isolated cells; and 2) PL-10 substances significantly protected the cells against ethanol-induced cellular damage. This led to the following conclusions: 1) in the phenomenon of gastric cytoprotection only the growth factor-like agents have a direct cellular effect; and 2) the intact peripheral innervation is basically necessary for the development of mediators and hormone-induced gastric cytoprotection. PMID:9403792

  2. Drosophila translational elongation factor-1gamma is modified in response to DOA kinase activity and is essential for cellular viability.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yujie; Schlierf, Michael; Gaspar, Ana Cuervo; Dreux, Catherine; Kpebe, Arlette; Chaney, Linda; Mathieu, Aurelie; Hitte, Christophe; Grémy, Olivier; Sarot, Emeline; Horn, Mark; Zhao, Yunlong; Kinzy, Terri Goss; Rabinow, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila translational elongation factor-1gamma (EF1gamma) interacts in the yeast two-hybrid system with DOA, the LAMMER protein kinase of Drosophila. Analysis of mutant EF1gamma alleles reveals that the locus encodes a structurally conserved protein essential for both organismal and cellular survival. Although no genetic interactions were detected in combinations with mutations in EF1alpha, an EF1gamma allele enhanced mutant phenotypes of Doa alleles. A predicted LAMMER kinase phosphorylation site conserved near the C terminus of all EF1gamma orthologs is a phosphorylation site in vitro for both Drosophila DOA and tobacco PK12 LAMMER kinases. EF1gamma protein derived from Doa mutant flies migrates with altered mobility on SDS gels, consistent with it being an in vivo substrate of DOA kinase. However, the aberrant mobility appears to be due to a secondary protein modification, since the mobility of EF1gamma protein obtained from wild-type Drosophila is unaltered following treatment with several nonspecific phosphatases. Expression of a construct expressing a serine-to-alanine substitution in the LAMMER kinase phosphorylation site into the fly germline rescued null EF1gamma alleles but at reduced efficiency compared to a wild-type construct. Our data suggest that EF1gamma functions in vital cellular processes in addition to translational elongation and is a LAMMER kinase substrate in vivo. PMID:19841092

  3. Nuclear transcription factors: a new approach to enhancing cellular responses to ALA-mediated photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay; Sato, Nobuyuki; Moore, Brian; Mack, Judith; Gasbarre, Christopher; Keevey, Samantha; Ortel, Bernhard; Sinha, Alok; Khachemoune, Amor

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using aminolevulinic acid (ALA) relies upon the uptake of ALA into cancer cells, where it is converted into a porphyrin intermediate, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) that is highly photosensitizing. For large or resistant tumors, however, ALA/PDT is often not completely effective due to inadequate PpIX levels. Therefore, new approaches to enhance the intracellular production of PpIX are sought. Here, we describe a general approach to improve intracellular PpIX accumulation via manipulations that increase the expression of an enzyme, coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO), that is rate-determining for PpIX production. We show that nuclear hormones that promote terminal differentiation, e.g. vitamin D or androgens, can also increase the accumulation of PpIX and the amount of killing of the target cells upon exposure to light. These hormones bind to intracellular hormone receptors that translocate to the nucleus, where they act as transcription factors to increase the expression of target genes. We have found that several other transcription factors associated with terminal differentiation, including members of the CCAAT enhancer binding (C/EBP) family, and a homeobox protein named Hoxb13, are also capable of enhancing PpIX accumulation. These latter transcription factors appear to interact directly with the CPO gene promoter, resulting in enhanced CPO transcriptional activity. Our data in several different cell systems, including epithelial cells of the skin and prostate cancer cells, indicate that enhancement of CPO expression and PpIX accumulation represents a viable new approach toward improving the efficacy of ALA/PDT.

  4. The Grp170 nucleotide exchange factor executes a key role during ERAD of cellular misfolded clients

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takamasa; Tsai, Billy

    2016-01-01

    When a protein misfolds in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), it retrotranslocates to the cytosol and is degraded by the proteasome via a pathway called ER-associated degradation (ERAD). To initiate ERAD, ADP-BiP is often recruited to the misfolded client, rendering it soluble and translocation competent. How the misfolded client is subsequently released from BiP so that it undergoes retrotranslocation, however, remains enigmatic. Here we demonstrate that the ER-resident nucleotide exchange factor (NEF) Grp170 plays an important role during ERAD of the misfolded glycosylated client null Hong Kong (NHK). As a NEF, Grp170 triggers nucleotide exchange of BiP to generate ATP-BiP. ATP-BiP disengages from NHK, enabling it to retrotranslocate to the cytosol. We demonstrate that Grp170 binds to Sel1L, an adapter of the transmembrane Hrd1 E3 ubiquitin ligase postulated to be the retrotranslocon, and links this interaction to Grp170’s function during ERAD. More broadly, Grp170 also promotes degradation of the nonglycosylated transthyretin (TTR) D18G misfolded client. Our findings thus establish a general function of Grp170 during ERAD and suggest that positioning this client-release factor at the retrotranslocation site may afford a mechanism to couple client release from BiP and retrotranslocation. PMID:27030672

  5. Cytoplasmic domains determine signal specificity, cellular routing characteristics and influence ligand binding of epidermal growth factor and insulin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, H; Dull, T J; Honegger, A M; Schlessinger, J; Ullrich, A

    1989-01-01

    The cell surface receptors for insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF) both employ a tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity to fulfil their distinct biological roles. To identify the structural domains responsible for various receptor activities, we have generated chimeric receptor polypeptides consisting of major EGF and insulin receptor structural domains and examined their biochemical properties and cellular signalling activities. The EGF-insulin receptor hybrids are properly synthesized and transported to the cell surface, where they form binding competent structures that are defined by the origin of their extracellular domains. While their ligand binding affinities are altered, we find that these chimeric receptors are fully functional in transmitting signals across the plasma membrane and into the cell. Thus, EGF receptor and insulin receptor cytoplasmic domain signalling capabilities are independent of their new heterotetrameric or monomeric environments respectively. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic domains carry the structural determinants that define kinase specificity, mitogenic and transforming potential, and receptor routing. Images PMID:2583088

  6. Cellular Effects of Pyocyanin, a Secreted Virulence Factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Susan; McDermott, Catherine; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; McFarland, Amelia J.; Forbes, Amanda; Perkins, Anthony V.; Davey, Andrew K.; Chess-Williams, Russ; Kiefel, Milton J.; Arora, Devinder; Grant, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Pyocyanin has recently emerged as an important virulence factor produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The redox-active tricyclic zwitterion has been shown to have a number of potential effects on various organ systems in vitro, including the respiratory, cardiovascular, urological, and central nervous systems. It has been shown that a large number of the effects to these systems are via the formation of reactive oxygen species. The limitations of studies are, to date, focused on the localized effect of the release of pyocyanin (PCN). It has been postulated that, given its chemical properties, PCN is able to readily cross biological membranes, however studies have yet to be undertaken to evaluate this effect. This review highlights the possible manifestations of PCN exposure; however, most studies to date are in vitro. Further high quality in vivo studies are needed to fully assess the physiological manifestations of PCN exposure on the various body systems. PMID:27517959

  7. Cellular Effects of Pyocyanin, a Secreted Virulence Factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hall, Susan; McDermott, Catherine; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; McFarland, Amelia J; Forbes, Amanda; Perkins, Anthony V; Davey, Andrew K; Chess-Williams, Russ; Kiefel, Milton J; Arora, Devinder; Grant, Gary D

    2016-01-01

    Pyocyanin has recently emerged as an important virulence factor produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The redox-active tricyclic zwitterion has been shown to have a number of potential effects on various organ systems in vitro, including the respiratory, cardiovascular, urological, and central nervous systems. It has been shown that a large number of the effects to these systems are via the formation of reactive oxygen species. The limitations of studies are, to date, focused on the localized effect of the release of pyocyanin (PCN). It has been postulated that, given its chemical properties, PCN is able to readily cross biological membranes, however studies have yet to be undertaken to evaluate this effect. This review highlights the possible manifestations of PCN exposure; however, most studies to date are in vitro. Further high quality in vivo studies are needed to fully assess the physiological manifestations of PCN exposure on the various body systems. PMID:27517959

  8. GABP Transcription Factor (Nuclear Respiratory Factor 2) Is Required for Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhong-Fa; Drumea, Karen; Mott, Stephanie; Wang, Junling

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are membrane-bound cytoplasmic organelles that serve as the major source of ATP production in eukaryotic cells. GABP (also known as nuclear respiratory factor 2) is a nuclear E26 transformation-specific transcription factor (ETS) that binds and activates mitochondrial genes that are required for electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation. We conditionally deleted Gabpa, the DNA-binding component of this transcription factor complex, from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to examine the role of Gabp in mitochondrial biogenesis, function, and gene expression. Gabpα loss modestly reduced mitochondrial mass, ATP production, oxygen consumption, and mitochondrial protein synthesis but did not alter mitochondrial morphology, membrane potential, apoptosis, or the expression of several genes that were previously reported to be GABP targets. However, the expression of Tfb1m, a methyltransferase that modifies ribosomal rRNA and is required for mitochondrial protein translation, was markedly reduced in Gabpα-null MEFs. We conclude that Gabp regulates Tfb1m expression and plays an essential, nonredundant role in mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:24958105

  9. Effect of photo-immobilization of epidermal growth factor on the cellular behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Ogiwara, Kazutaka; Nagaoka, Masato; Cho, Chong-Su; Akaike, Toshihiro . E-mail: takaike@bio.titech.ac.jp

    2006-06-23

    We constructed photo-reactive epidermal growth factor (EGF) bearing p-azido phenylalanine at the C-terminal (HEGFP) by genetic engineering to investigate the possibility of immobilized EGF as a novel artificial extracellular matrix (ECM). The constructed recombinant protein was immobilized to glass surface by ultraviolet irradiation. A431 cells adhered both to HEGFP-immobilized and collagen-coated surfaces. Interaction between immobilized HEGFP and EGF receptors in the A431 cells was independent of Mg{sup 2+} although integrin-mediated cell adhesion to natural ECMs is dependent on Mg{sup 2+}. Phosphorylation of EGF receptors in A431 cells was induced by immobilized HEGFP as same as soluble EGF. DNA uptake of hepatocytes decreased by immobilized HEGFP whereas it increased by soluble EGF. Liver-specific functions of hepatocytes were maintained for 3 days by immobilized HEGFP whereas they were not maintained by soluble EGF, indicating that immobilized HEGFP follows different signal transduction pathway from soluble EGF.

  10. Sleep Loss as a Factor to Induce Cellular and Molecular Inflammatory Variations

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Castillo-García, Stephanie Ariadne; Hernández, María Eugenia; Domínguez-Salazar, Emilio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier; Gómez-González, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    A reduction in the amount of time spent sleeping occurs chronically in modern society. Clinical and experimental studies in humans and animal models have shown that immune function is impaired when sleep loss is experienced. Sleep loss exerts a strong regulatory influence on peripheral levels of inflammatory mediators of the immune response. An increasing number of research projects support the existence of reciprocal regulation between sleep and low-intensity inflammatory response. Recent studies show that sleep deficient humans and rodents exhibit a proinflammatory component; therefore, sleep loss is considered as a risk factor for developing cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and multiple sclerosis). Circulating levels of proinflammatory mediators depend on the intensity and duration of the method employed to induce sleep loss. Recognizing the fact that the concentration of proinflammatory mediators is different between acute and chronic sleep-loss may expand the understanding of the relationship between sleep and the immune response. The aim of this review is to integrate data from recent published reports (2002–2013) on the effects of sleep loss on the immune response. This review may allow readers to have an integrated view of the mechanisms involved in central and peripheral deficits induced by sleep loss. PMID:24367384

  11. Early nucleosome deposition on, and replication of, HSV DNA requires cell factor PCNA

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Iryna; Boyer, Mark; Fraser, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) is a double stranded DNA virus that can cause lytic infections in epithelial cells of the skin and latent infections in neuronal cells of the peripheral nervous system. After virion attachment to the cell membrane, the capsid enters the cytoplasm and is transported to the nucleus. Following docking at the nuclear pore, the HSV DNA, and contents of the virion, are injected into the nucleus. The viral DNA that enters the nucleus is devoid of histones, but begins to be covered with them soon after entry. The covering of histones, in the form of nucleosomes, reaches a maximum during the early stages of infection and drops off during late infection (after DNA replication). However during latency the genome is saturated with nucleosomes. In this study, we examine the role of cell Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) a cellular DNA polymerase accessory protein (processivity factor), and cell DNA polymerases in histone deposition during the early stages of HSV infection. Using SiRNA knockdown, and a cytosine arabinoside (araC) chemical inhibitor, we conclude that PCNA is important for viral replication and histone deposition. However, cell DNA polymerases that bind PCNA do not appear to be required for these processes and PCNA does not appear to bind to the viral DNA polymerase (which has its own viral processivity factor). PMID:25672886

  12. RNA export factor Ddx19 is required for nuclear import of the SRF coactivator MKL1

    PubMed Central

    Rajakylä, Eeva Kaisa; Viita, Tiina; Kyheröinen, Salla; Huet, Guillaume; Treisman, Richard; Vartiainen, Maria K.

    2015-01-01

    Controlled transport of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and nucleus is essential for homeostatic regulation of cellular functions. For instance, gene expression entails coordinated nuclear import of transcriptional regulators to activate transcription and nuclear export of the resulting messenger RNAs for cytoplasmic translation. Here we link these two processes by reporting a novel role for the mRNA export factor Ddx19/Dbp5 in nuclear import of MKL1, the signal-responsive transcriptional activator of SRF. We show that Ddx19 is not a general nuclear import factor, and that its specific effect on MKL1 nuclear import is separate from its role in mRNA export. Both helicase and nuclear pore-binding activities of Ddx19 are dispensable for MKL1 nuclear import, but RNA binding is required. Mechanistically, Ddx19 operates by modulating the conformation of MKL1, which affects its interaction with Importin-β for efficient nuclear import. Thus, Ddx19 participates in mRNA export, translation and nuclear import of a key transcriptional regulator. PMID:25585691

  13. RNA export factor Ddx19 is required for nuclear import of the SRF coactivator MKL1.

    PubMed

    Rajakylä, Eeva Kaisa; Viita, Tiina; Kyheröinen, Salla; Huet, Guillaume; Treisman, Richard; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2015-01-01

    Controlled transport of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and nucleus is essential for homeostatic regulation of cellular functions. For instance, gene expression entails coordinated nuclear import of transcriptional regulators to activate transcription and nuclear export of the resulting messenger RNAs for cytoplasmic translation. Here we link these two processes by reporting a novel role for the mRNA export factor Ddx19/Dbp5 in nuclear import of MKL1, the signal-responsive transcriptional activator of SRF. We show that Ddx19 is not a general nuclear import factor, and that its specific effect on MKL1 nuclear import is separate from its role in mRNA export. Both helicase and nuclear pore-binding activities of Ddx19 are dispensable for MKL1 nuclear import, but RNA binding is required. Mechanistically, Ddx19 operates by modulating the conformation of MKL1, which affects its interaction with Importin-β for efficient nuclear import. Thus, Ddx19 participates in mRNA export, translation and nuclear import of a key transcriptional regulator. PMID:25585691

  14. Mosquito Cellular Factors and Functions in Mediating the Infectious entry of Chikungunya Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige Chanditha; Chen, Karen Caiyun; Hussain, Khairunnisa' Mohamed; Chen, Huixin; Low, Swee Ling; Ng, Lee Ching; Lin, Raymond; Ng, Mary Mah-Lee; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2013-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus responsible for recent epidemics in the Asia Pacific regions. A customized gene expression microarray of 18,760 transcripts known to target Aedes mosquito genome was used to identify host genes that are differentially regulated during the infectious entry process of CHIKV infection on C6/36 mosquito cells. Several genes such as epsin I (EPN1), epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 15 (EPS15) and Huntingtin interacting protein I (HIP1) were identified to be differentially expressed during CHIKV infection and known to be involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Transmission electron microscopy analyses further revealed the presence of CHIKV particles within invaginations of the plasma membrane, resembling clathrin-coated pits. Characterization of vesicles involved in the endocytic trafficking processes of CHIKV revealed the translocation of the virus particles to the early endosomes and subsequently to the late endosomes and lysosomes. Treatment with receptor-mediated endocytosis inhibitor, monodansylcadaverine and clathrin-associated drug inhibitors, chlorpromazine and dynasore inhibited CHIKV entry, whereas no inhibition was observed with caveolin-related drug inhibitors. Inhibition of CHIKV entry upon treatment with low-endosomal pH inhibitors indicated that low pH is essential for viral entry processes. CHIKV entry by clathrin-mediated endocytosis was validated via overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of Eps15, in which infectious entry was reduced, while siRNA-based knockdown of genes associated with CME, low endosomal pH and RAB trafficking proteins exhibited significant levels of CHIKV inhibition. This study revealed, for the first time, that the infectious entry of CHIKV into mosquito cells is mediated by the clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway. PMID:23409203

  15. Cellular and extracellular factors in early root resorption repair in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Andreas; Kunert, Dominique; Friesen, Therese; Zhang, Dongliang; Lossdörfer, Stefan; Götz, Werner

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of extracellular matrix components, such as collagen type I, fibronectin, and osteopontin (OPN) during cementum repair following experimentally induced tooth movement, and to characterize the cells taking part in the regenerative process. The upper right first molars were moved mesially in 21 three-month-old male Wistar rats using a coil spring with a force of 0.5 N. After 9 days, the appliance was removed and the animals were killed in groups of three immediately after withdrawal of the force and 5, 7, 10, 12, 14, and 17 days later. Three rats served as non-experimental control animals. The maxillae were prepared and processed for histological analysis. Together with the disappearance of the multinucleated odontoclasts from the resorption lacunae, signs of repair were visible 5 days after the release of the orthodontic force. The first signs of cementum repair were seen on day 10. The newly produced cementum was of the acellular extrinsic fibre type (AEFC) and reattachment was achieved with the principal periodontal ligament (PDL) fibres orientated almost perpendicular to the root surface. The initial interface formed between the old and new cementum, as well as the new AEFC, was characterized by a strong immunoreaction with OPN and collagen I antibody, but only a weak immunoreaction with the fibronectin antibody. Only a small number of mononuclear cells, which were involved in the repair process, showed a positive immunoreaction with the osteoblastic lineage markers runt-related transcription factor 2 and osteocalcin. These same cells stained sparsely with muscle segment homeobox homologue 2, but not with the E11 antibody. Thus, most of the cells associated with this reparative activity on the surface of the lacunae were differentiated PDL cells of the fibroblastic phenotype. Cells with a defined osteoblastic phenotype seemed to be of minor importance in this repair process. PMID:18632841

  16. Fibrillarin, a nucleolar protein, is required for normal nuclear morphology and cellular growth in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, Mohammed Abdullahel; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Ma, Nan; Takata, Hideaki; Yokoyama, Masami; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi . E-mail: kfukui@bio.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    Fibrillarin is a key small nucleolar protein in eukaryotes, which has an important role in pre-rRNA processing during ribosomal biogenesis. Though several functions of fibrillarin are known, its function during the cell cycle is still unknown. In this study, we confirmed the dynamic localization of fibrillarin during the cell cycle of HeLa cells and also performed functional studies by using a combination of immunofluorescence microscopy and RNAi technique. We observed that depletion of fibrillarin has almost no effect on the nucleolar structure. However, fibrillarin-depleted cells showed abnormal nuclear morphology. Moreover, fibrillarin depletion resulted in the reduction of the cellular growth and modest accumulation of cells with 4n DNA content. Our data suggest that fibrillarin would play a critical role in the maintenance of nuclear shape and cellular growth.

  17. A biphasic endothelial stress-survival mechanism regulates the cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factor A

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, Antony M.; Odell, Adam F.; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Issitt, Theo; Ulyatt, Clare; Walker, John H.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2012-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is an essential cytokine that regulates endothelial function and angiogenesis. VEGF-A binding to endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases such as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 triggers cellular responses including survival, proliferation and new blood vessel sprouting. Increased levels of a soluble VEGFR1 splice variant (sFlt-1) correlate with endothelial dysfunction in pathologies such as pre-eclampsia; however the cellular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation and function of sFlt-1 are unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a biphasic stress response in endothelial cells, using serum deprivation as a model of endothelial dysfunction. The early phase is characterized by a high VEGFR2:sFlt-1 ratio, which is reversed in the late phase. A functional consequence is a short-term increase in VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling. In the late phase, sFlt-1 is secreted and deposited at the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that under stress, increased endothelial sFlt-1 levels reduce VEGF-A bioavailability: VEGF-A treatment induces sFlt-1 expression at the cell surface and VEGF-A silencing inhibits sFlt-1 anchorage to the extracellular matrix. Treatment with recombinant sFlt-1 inhibits VEGF-A-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and sFlt-1 silencing enhances this process. In this response, increased VEGFR2 levels are regulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and PKB/Akt signaling pathways and increased sFlt-1 levels by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We conclude that during serum withdrawal, cellular sensing of environmental stress modulates sFlt-1 and VEGFR2 levels, regulating VEGF-A bioavailability and ensuring cell survival takes precedence over cell proliferation and migration. These findings may underpin an important mechanism contributing to endothelial dysfunction in pathological states. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cells mount a stress response under conditions of low serum. Black

  18. Identification of multiple cellular uptake pathways of polystyrene nanoparticles and factors affecting the uptake: relevance for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Firdessa, Rebuma; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A; Moll, Heidrun

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles may address challenges by human diseases through improving diagnosis, vaccination and treatment. The uptake mechanism regulates the type of threat a particle poses on the host cells and how a cell responds to it. Hence, understanding the uptake mechanisms and cellular interactions of nanoparticles at the cellular and subcellular level is a prerequisite for their effective biomedical applications. The present study shows the uptake mechanisms of polystyrene nanoparticles and factors affecting their uptake in bone marrow-derived macrophages, 293T kidney epithelial cells and L929 fibroblasts. Labeling with the endocytic marker FM4-64 and transmission electron microscopy studies show that the nanoparticles were internalized rapidly via endocytosis and accumulated in intracellular vesicles. Soon after their internalizations, nanoparticles trafficked to organelles with acidic pH. Analysis of the ultrastructural morphology of the plasma membrane invaginations or extravasations provides clear evidence for the involvement of several uptake routes in parallel to internalize a given type of nanoparticles by mammalian cells, highlighting the complexity of the nanoparticle-cell interactions. Blocking the specific endocytic pathways by different pharmacological inhibitors shows similar outcomes. The potential to take up nanoparticles varies highly among different cell types in a particle sizes-, time- and energy-dependent manner. Furthermore, infection and the activation status of bone marrow-derived macrophages significantly affect the uptake potential of the cells, indicating the need to understand the diseases' pathogenesis to establish effective and rational drug-delivery systems. This study enhances our understanding of the application of nanotechnology in biomedical sciences. PMID:25224362

  19. Role of Viral RNA and Co-opted Cellular ESCRT-I and ESCRT-III Factors in Formation of Tombusvirus Spherules Harboring the Tombusvirus Replicase

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Pogany, Judit; Barajas, Daniel; Pathak, Kunj; Risco, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plus-stranded RNA viruses induce membrane deformations in infected cells in order to build viral replication complexes (VRCs). Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) co-opts cellular ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) proteins to induce the formation of vesicle (spherule)-like structures in the peroxisomal membrane with tight openings toward the cytosol. In this study, using a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) vps23Δ bro1Δ double-deletion mutant, we showed that the Vps23p ESCRT-I protein (Tsg101 in mammals) and Bro1p (ALIX) ESCRT-associated protein, both of which bind to the viral p33 replication protein, play partially complementary roles in TBSV replication in cells and in cell extracts. Dual expression of dominant-negative versions of Arabidopsis homologs of Vps23p and Bro1p inhibited tombusvirus replication to greater extent than individual expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. We also demonstrated the critical role of Snf7p (CHMP4), Vps20p, and Vps24p ESCRT-III proteins in tombusvirus replication in yeast and in vitro. Electron microscopic imaging of vps23Δ yeast revealed the lack of tombusvirus-induced spherule-like structures, while crescent-like structures are formed in ESCRT-III deletion yeasts replicating TBSV RNA. In addition, we also showed that the length of the viral RNA affects the sizes of spherules formed in N. benthamiana cells. The 4.8-kb genomic RNA is needed for the formation of spherules 66 nm in diameter, while spherules formed during the replication of the ∼600-nucleotide (nt)-long defective interfering RNA in the presence of p33 and p92 replication proteins are 42 nm. We propose that the viral RNA serves as a “measuring string” during VRC assembly and spherule formation. IMPORTANCE Plant positive-strand RNA viruses, similarly to animal positive-strand RNA viruses, replicate in membrane-bound viral replicase complexes in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Identification of cellular and viral factors

  20. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress independent of DNA double strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengxia; Lin, Yu-Fen; Palchik, Guillermo; Matsunaga, Shinji; Wang, Dong; Chen, Benjamin P.C.

    2014-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) are the two major kinases involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and are required for cellular resistance to ionizing radiation. While ATM is the key upstream kinase for DSB signaling, DNA-PKcs is primarily involved in DSB repair through the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) mechanism. In addition to DSB repair, ATM has been shown to be involved in oxidative stress response and could be activated directly in vitro upon hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment. However, the role of DNA-PKcs in cellular response to oxidative stress is not clear. We hypothesize that DNA-PKcs may participate in the regulation of ATM activation in response to oxidative stress, and that this regulatory role is independent of its role in DNA double strand break repair. Our findings reveal that H2O2 induces hyperactivation of ATM signaling in DNA-PKcs deficient, but not Ligase 4 deficient cells, suggesting an NHEJ-independent role for DNA-PKcs. Furthermore, DNA-PKcs deficiency leads to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and to a decrease in cellular survival against H2O2. For the first time, our results reveal that DNA-PKcs plays a non-canonical role in the cellular response to oxidative stress, which is independent from its role in NHEJ. In addition, DNA-PKcs is a critical regulator of the oxidative stress response and contributes to the maintenance of redox homeostasis. Our findings reveal that DNA-PKcs is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress and suppression of ROS build-up independently to its function in DSB repair. PMID:25224041

  1. Differential effects of carboxy-terminal sequence deletions on platelet-derived growth factor receptor signaling activities and interactions with cellular substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Seedorf, K; Millauer, B; Kostka, G; Schlessinger, J; Ullrich, A

    1992-01-01

    Chimeric receptors composed of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) extracellular domain fused to wild-type and truncated platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGF-R) intracellular sequences were stably expressed in NIH 3T3 cells devoid of endogenous EGF-Rs. This experimental system allowed us to investigate the biological activity of PDGF-R cytoplasmic-domain mutants in PDGF-R-responsive NIH 3T3 cells by activating PDGF-specific signaling pathways with EGF. Deletion of 74 carboxy-terminal amino acids severely impaired the ability of the PDGF-R cytoplasmic domain to associate with cellular substrates in vitro. This deletion also inhibited receptor and substrate phosphorylation, reduced the receptor's mitogenic activity, and completely abolished its oncogenic signaling potential. Surprisingly, removal of only six additional amino acids, including Tyr-989, restored substantial receptor and substrate phosphorylation capacity as well as transforming potential and yielded a receptor with wild-type levels of ligand-induced mitogenic activity. However, the ability of this chimera to bind phospholipase C gamma was severely impaired in comparison with the ability of the wild-type receptor, while the association with other cellular proteins was not affected. Further deletion of 35 residues, including Tyr-977, nearly abolished all PDGF-R cytoplasmic-domain biological signaling activities. None of the three C-terminal truncations completely abolished the mitogenic potential of the receptors or had any influence on ligand binding or receptor down regulation. Together, these data implicate the 80 C-terminal-most residues of the PDGF-R, and possibly Tyr-989, in phospholipase C gamma binding, while receptor sequences upstream from Asp-988 appear to be essential for specific interactions with other cellular polypeptides such as ras GTPase-activating protein and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Thus, the mutants described here allow the separation of distinct PDGF

  2. Auxin and Cellular Elongation.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Silvia Melina; Barbez, Elke; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Estevez, José M

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is a crucial growth regulator in plants. However, a comprehensive understanding of how auxin induces cell expansion is perplexing, because auxin acts in a concentration- and cell type-dependent manner. Consequently, it is desirable to focus on certain cell types to exemplify the underlying growth mechanisms. On the other hand, plant tissues display supracellular growth (beyond the level of single cells); hence, other cell types might compromise the growth of a certain tissue. Tip-growing cells do not display neighbor-induced growth constraints and, therefore, are a valuable source of information for growth-controlling mechanisms. Here, we focus on auxin-induced cellular elongation in root hairs, exposing a mechanistic view of plant growth regulation. We highlight a complex interplay between auxin metabolism and transport, steering root hair development in response to internal and external triggers. Auxin signaling modules and downstream cascades of transcription factors define a developmental program that appears rate limiting for cellular growth. With this knowledge in mind, the root hair cell is a very suitable model system in which to dissect cellular effectors required for cellular expansion. PMID:26787325

  3. Cleavage of the HPV16 Minor Capsid Protein L2 during Virion Morphogenesis Ablates the Requirement for Cellular Furin during De Novo Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Linda; Biryukov, Jennifer; Conway, Michael J.; Meyers, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Infections by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the causative agents for the development of cervical cancer. As with other non-enveloped viruses, HPVs are taken up by the cell through endocytosis following primary attachment to the host cell. Through studies using recombinant pseudovirus particles (PsV), many host cellular proteins have been implicated in the process. The proprotein convertase furin has been demonstrated to cleave the minor capsid protein, L2, post-attachment to host cells and is required for infectious entry by HPV16 PsV. In contrast, using biochemical inhibition by a furin inhibitor and furin-negative cells, we show that tissue-derived HPV16 native virus (NV) initiates infection independent of cellular furin. We show that HPV16 L2 is cleaved during virion morphogenesis in differentiated tissue. In addition, HPV45 is also not dependent on cellular furin, but two other alpha papillomaviruses, HPV18 and HPV31, are dependent on the activity of cellular furin for infection. PMID:26569287

  4. Stereospecific Inhibitory Effects of CCG-1423 on the Cellular Events Mediated by Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor A

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Bunta; Minami, Saki; Ishida, Hideaki; Yoshioka, Ryuzo; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Morita, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Ken’ichiro

    2015-01-01

    CCG-1423 suppresses several pathological processes including cancer cell migration, tissue fibrosis, and the development of atherosclerotic lesions. These suppressions are caused by inhibition of myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A), which is a critical factor for epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). CCG-1423 can therefore be a potent inhibitor for EMT. CCG-1423 and related compounds, CCG-100602 and CCG-203971 possess similar biological activities. Although these compounds are comprised of two stereoisomers, the differences in their biological activities remain to be assessed. To address this issue, we stereoselectively synthesized optically pure isomers of these compounds and validated their biological activities. The S-isomer of CCG-1423 rather than the R-isomer exhibited modestly but significantly higher inhibitory effects on the cellular events triggered by MRTF-A activation including serum response factor-mediated gene expression and cell migration of fibroblasts and B16F10 melanoma cells. Accordingly, the S-isomer of CCG-1423 more potently blocked the serum-induced nuclear import of MRTF-A than the R-isomer. No such difference was observed in cells treated with each of two stereoisomers of CCG-100602 or CCG-203971. We previously reported that the N-terminal basic domain (NB), which functions as a nuclear localization signal of MRTF-A, is a binding site for CCG-1423. Consistent with the biological activities of two stereoisomers of CCG-1423, docking simulation demonstrated that the S-isomer of CCG-1423 was more likely to bind to NB than the R-isomer. This is a first report demonstrating the stereospecific biological activities of CCG-1423. PMID:26295164

  5. Information System Requirements Determination: Factors Impeding Stakeholders from Reaching Common Understandings and Agreements on Requirements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gissel, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Information system implementations require developers to first know what they must create and then determine how best to create it. The requirements determination phase of the system development life cycle typically determines what functions a system must perform and how well it must accomplish required functions. Implementation success depends on…

  6. Stemness factor Sall4 is required for DNA damage response in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jianhua; Todorova, Dilyana; Su, Ning-Yuan; Kim, Jinchul; Lee, Pei-Jen; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are genetically more stable than somatic cells, thereby preventing the passage of genomic abnormalities to their derivatives including germ cells. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain largely unclear. In this paper, we show that the stemness factor Sall4 is required for activating the critical Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM)–dependent cellular responses to DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) in mouse ESCs and confer their resistance to DSB-induced cytotoxicity. Sall4 is rapidly mobilized to the sites of DSBs after DNA damage. Furthermore, Sall4 interacts with Rad50 and stabilizes the Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 complex for the efficient recruitment and activation of ATM. Sall4 also interacts with Baf60a, a member of the SWI/SNF (switch/sucrose nonfermentable) ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, which is responsible for recruiting Sall4 to the site of DNA DSB damage. Our findings provide novel mechanisms to coordinate stemness of ESCs with DNA damage response, ensuring genomic stability during the expansion of ESCs. PMID:25733712

  7. Activation and Cellular Localization of the Cyclosporine A-sensitive Transcription Factor NF-AT in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Karen L.; Friday, Bret B.; Thaloor, Deepa; Murphy, T.J.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    1998-01-01

    The widely used immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CSA) blocks nuclear translocation of the transcription factor, NF-AT (nuclear factor of activated T cells), preventing its activity. mRNA for several NF-AT isoforms has been shown to exist in cells outside of the immune system, suggesting a possible mechanism for side effects associated with CSA treatment. In this study, we demonstrate that CSA inhibits biochemical and morphological differentiation of skeletal muscle cells while having a minimal effect on proliferation. Furthermore, in vivo treatment with CSA inhibits muscle regeneration after induced trauma in mice. These results suggest a role for NF-AT–mediated transcription outside of the immune system. In subsequent experiments, we examined the activation and cellular localization of NF-AT in skeletal muscle cells in vitro. Known pharmacological inducers of NF-AT in lymphoid cells also stimulate transcription from an NF-AT–responsive reporter gene in muscle cells. Three isoforms of NF-AT (NF-ATp, c, and 4/x/c3) are present in the cytoplasm of muscle cells at all stages of myogenesis tested. However, each isoform undergoes calcium-induced nuclear translocation from the cytoplasm at specific stages of muscle differentiation, suggesting specificity among NF-AT isoforms in gene regulation. Strikingly, one isoform (NF-ATc) can preferentially translocate to a subset of nuclei within a single multinucleated myotube. These results demonstrate that skeletal muscle cells express functionally active NF-AT proteins and that the nuclear translocation of individual NF-AT isoforms, which is essential for the ability to coordinate gene expression, is influenced markedly by the differentiation state of the muscle cell. PMID:9763451

  8. Cellular Internalization of Fibroblast Growth Factor-12 Exerts Radioprotective Effects on Intestinal Radiation Damage Independently of FGFR Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Fumiaki; Umeda, Sachiko; Yasuda, Takeshi; Fujita, Mayumi; Asada, Masahiro; Meineke, Viktor; Imamura, Toru; Imai, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Several fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) were shown to inhibit radiation-induced tissue damage through FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling; however, this signaling was also found to be involved in the pathogenesis of several malignant tumors. In contrast, FGF12 cannot activate any FGFRs. Instead, FGF12 can be internalized readily into cells using 2 cell-penetrating peptide domains (CPP-M, CPP-C). Therefore, this study focused on clarifying the role of FGF12 internalization in protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: Each FGF or peptide was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 hours before or after total body irradiation with γ rays at 9 to 12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Administration of FGF12 after radiation exposure was as effective as pretreatment in significantly promoting intestinal regeneration, proliferation of crypt cells, and epithelial differentiation. Two domains, comprising amino acid residues 80 to 109 and 140 to 169 of FGF12B, were identified as being responsible for the radioprotective activity, so that deletion of both domains from FGF12B resulted in a reduction in activity. Interestingly, these regions included the CPP-M and CPP-C domains, respectively; however, CPP-C by itself did not show an antiapoptotic effect. In addition, FGF1, prototypic FGF, possesses a domain corresponding to CPP-M, whereas it lacks CPP-C, so the fusion of FGF1 with CPP-C (FGF1/CPP-C) enhanced cellular internalization and increased radioprotective activity. However, FGF1/CPP-C reduced in vitro mitogenic activity through FGFRs compared with FGF1, implying that FGFR signaling might not be essential for promoting the radioprotective effect of FGF1/CPP-C. In addition, internalized FGF12 suppressed the activation of p38α after irradiation, resulting in reduced radiation-induced apoptosis. Conclusions: These findings indicate that FGF12 can protect the

  9. The S2 Cu(I) site in CupA from Streptococcus pneumoniae is required for cellular copper resistance†

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yue; Bruce, Kevin E.; Wu, Hongwei; Giedroc, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have evolved copper homeostasis and resistance systems for fighting copper toxicity imposed by the human immune system. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a respiratory pathogen that encodes an obligatorily membrane-anchored Cu(I) binding protein, CupA, and a P1B-type ATPase efflux transporter, CopA. The soluble, cytoplasmic domain of CupA (sCupA) contains a binuclear Cu(I) cluster consisting of S1 and S2 Cu(I) ions. The NMR solution structure of apo-sCupA reveals the same cupredoxin fold of Cu2-sCupA, except that the Cu(I) binding loop (residues 112–116, harboring S2 Cu ligands M113 and M115) is highly dynamic as documented by both backbone and side chain methionine methyl order parameters. In contrast to the more solvent exposed, lower affinity S2 Cu site, the high affinity S1 Cu-coordinating cysteines (C74, C111) are pre-organized in the apo-sCupA structure. Biological experiments reveal that the S1 site is largely dispensable for cellular Cu resistance and may be involved in buffering low cytoplasmic Cu(I). In contrast, the S2 site is essential for Cu resistance. Expression of a chimeric CopZ chaperone fused to the CupA transmembrane helix does not protect S. pneumoniae from copper toxicity and substitution of a predicted cytoplasm-facing Cu(I) entry metal-binding site (MBS) on CopA also gives rise to a Cu-sensitivity phenotype. These findings suggest that CupA and CopA may interact and filling of the CupA S2 site with Cu(I) results in stimulation of cellular copper efflux by CopA. PMID:26346139

  10. A heteromeric transcription factor required for mammalian RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, S; Tanaka, Y; Kawaguchi, T; Nagaoka, T; Weissman, S M; Yasukochi, Y

    1990-01-01

    A general transcription factor, FC, essential for specific initiation of in vitro transcription by mammalian RNA polymerase II was identified and a procedure developed to purify it to near homogeneity from HeLa cell nuclei. Purified FC is composed of two polypeptides of apparent molecular masses 80 kDa and 30 kDa, on SDS-PAGE, and has a native size of 280 kDa estimated by gel filtration column. Both polypeptides were shown to be essential for reconstituting in vitro transcription activity. Biochemical analysis showed that the 80 kDa and 30 kDa components were present in a 1:1 molar ratio. FC was also demonstrated to interact directly or indirectly with purified RNA polymerase II. Similarities between FC and transcription factors reported by others from human, rat or Drosophila cells are discussed. Images PMID:2395645

  11. A human factors analysis of EVA time requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pate, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering (HFE), also known as Ergonomics, is a discipline whose goal is to engineer a safer, more efficient interface between humans and machines. HFE makes use of a wide range of tools and techniques to fulfill this goal. One of these tools is known as motion and time study, a technique used to develop time standards for given tasks. A human factors motion and time study was initiated with the goal of developing a database of EVA task times and a method of utilizing the database to predict how long an ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) should take. Initial development relied on the EVA activities performed during the STS-61 mission (Hubble repair). The first step of the analysis was to become familiar with EVAs and with the previous studies and documents produced on EVAs. After reviewing these documents, an initial set of task primitives and task time modifiers was developed. Videotaped footage of STS-61 EVAs were analyzed using these primitives and task time modifiers. Data for two entire EVA missions and portions of several others, each with two EVA astronauts, was collected for analysis. Feedback from the analysis of the data will be used to further refine the primitives and task time modifiers used. Analysis of variance techniques for categorical data will be used to determine which factors may, individually or by interactions, effect the primitive times and how much of an effect they have.

  12. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional requirements for two-factor... Additional requirements for two-factor authentication. (a) To sign a controlled substance prescription, the... authentication protocol that uses two of the following three factors: (1) Something only the practitioner...

  13. A Human Factors Analysis of EVA Time Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pate, Dennis W.

    1997-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering (HFE) is a discipline whose goal is to engineer a safer, more efficient interface between humans and machines. HFE makes use of a wide range of tools and techniques to fulfill this goal. One of these tools is known as motion and time study, a technique used to develop time standards for given tasks. During the summer of 1995, a human factors motion and time study was initiated with the goals of developing a database of EVA task times and developing a method of utilizing the database to predict how long an EVA should take. Initial development relied on the EVA activities performed during the STS-61 (Hubble) mission. The first step of the study was to become familiar with EVA's, the previous task-time studies, and documents produced on EVA's. After reviewing these documents, an initial set of task primitives and task-time modifiers was developed. Data was collected from videotaped footage of two entire STS-61 EVA missions and portions of several others, each with two EVA astronauts. Feedback from the analysis of the data was used to further refine the primitives and modifiers used. The project was continued during the summer of 1996, during which data on human errors was also collected and analyzed. Additional data from the STS-71 mission was also collected. Analysis of variance techniques for categorical data was used to determine which factors may affect the primitive times and how much of an effect they have. Probability distributions for the various task were also generated. Further analysis of the modifiers and interactions is planned.

  14. Transcription factor motif quality assessment requires systematic comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kibet, Caleb Kipkurui; Machanick, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site prediction remains a challenge in gene regulatory research due to degeneracy and potential variability in binding sites in the genome. Dozens of algorithms designed to learn binding models (motifs) have generated many motifs available in research papers with a subset making it to databases like JASPAR, UniPROBE and Transfac. The presence of many versions of motifs from the various databases for a single TF and the lack of a standardized assessment technique makes it difficult for biologists to make an appropriate choice of binding model and for algorithm developers to benchmark, test and improve on their models. In this study, we review and evaluate the approaches in use, highlight differences and demonstrate the difficulty of defining a standardized motif assessment approach. We review scoring functions, motif length, test data and the type of performance metrics used in prior studies as some of the factors that influence the outcome of a motif assessment. We show that the scoring functions and statistics used in motif assessment influence ranking of motifs in a TF-specific manner. We also show that TF binding specificity can vary by source of genomic binding data. We also demonstrate that information content of a motif is not in isolation a measure of motif quality but is influenced by TF binding behaviour. We conclude that there is a need for an easy-to-use tool that presents all available evidence for a comparative analysis. PMID:27092243

  15. F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5) is required for maintenance of cellular and systemic iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Julio C; Walker, Scott D; Anderson, Sheila A; Eisenstein, Richard S; Bruick, Richard K

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis requires post-transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism genes by iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2). The hemerythrin-like domain of F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5), an E3 ubiquitin ligase subunit, senses iron and oxygen availability and facilitates IRP2 degradation in iron replete cells. Disruption of the ubiquitously expressed murine Fbxl5 gene results in a failure to sense increased cellular iron availability, accompanied by constitutive IRP2 accumulation and misexpression of IRP2 target genes. FBXL5-null mice die during embryogenesis, although viability is restored by simultaneous deletion of the IRP2, but not IRP1, gene. Mice containing a single functional Fbxl5 allele behave like their wild type littermates when fed an iron-sufficient diet. However, unlike wild type mice that manifest decreased hematocrit and hemoglobin levels when fed a low-iron diet, Fbxl5 heterozygotes maintain normal hematologic values due to increased iron absorption. The responsiveness of IRP2 to low iron is specifically enhanced in the duodena of the heterozygotes and is accompanied by increased expression of the divalent metal transporter-1. These results confirm the role of FBXL5 in the in vivo maintenance of cellular and systemic iron homeostasis and reveal a privileged role for the intestine in their regulation by virtue of its unique FBXL5 iron sensitivity. PMID:23135277

  16. F-box and Leucine-rich Repeat Protein 5 (FBXL5) Is Required for Maintenance of Cellular and Systemic Iron Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Julio C.; Walker, Scott D.; Anderson, Sheila A.; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Bruick, Richard K.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis requires post-transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism genes by iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2). The hemerythrin-like domain of F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5), an E3 ubiquitin ligase subunit, senses iron and oxygen availability and facilitates IRP2 degradation in iron replete cells. Disruption of the ubiquitously expressed murine Fbxl5 gene results in a failure to sense increased cellular iron availability, accompanied by constitutive IRP2 accumulation and misexpression of IRP2 target genes. FBXL5-null mice die during embryogenesis, although viability is restored by simultaneous deletion of the IRP2, but not IRP1, gene. Mice containing a single functional Fbxl5 allele behave like their wild type littermates when fed an iron-sufficient diet. However, unlike wild type mice that manifest decreased hematocrit and hemoglobin levels when fed a low-iron diet, Fbxl5 heterozygotes maintain normal hematologic values due to increased iron absorption. The responsiveness of IRP2 to low iron is specifically enhanced in the duodena of the heterozygotes and is accompanied by increased expression of the divalent metal transporter-1. These results confirm the role of FBXL5 in the in vivo maintenance of cellular and systemic iron homeostasis and reveal a privileged role for the intestine in their regulation by virtue of its unique FBXL5 iron sensitivity. PMID:23135277

  17. A new role for the cellular PABP repressor Paip2 as an innate restriction factor capable of limiting productive cytomegalovirus replication.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Caleb; Yu, Dong; Mohr, Ian

    2013-08-15

    The capacity of polyadenylate-binding protein PABPC1 (PABP1) to stimulate translation is regulated by its repressor, Paip2. Paradoxically, while PABP accumulation promotes human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) protein synthesis, we show that this is accompanied by an analogous increase in the abundance of Paip2 and EDD1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that destabilizes Paip2. Coordinate control of PABP1, Paip2, and EDD1 required the virus-encoded UL38 mTORC1 activator and resulted in augmented Paip2 synthesis, stability, and association with PABP1. Paip2 synthesis also increased following serum stimulation of uninfected normal fibroblasts, suggesting that this coregulation may play a role in how uninfected cells respond to stress. Significantly, Paip2 accumulation was dependent on PABP accrual, as preventing PABP1 accumulation suppressed viral replication and inhibited the corresponding Paip2 increase. Furthermore, depleting Paip2 restored the ability of infected cells to assemble the translation initiation factor eIF4F, promoting viral protein synthesis and replication without increasing PABP1. This establishes a new role for the cellular PABP1 inhibitor Paip2 as an innate defense that restricts viral protein synthesis and replication. Moreover, it illustrates how a stress-induced rise in PABP1 triggered by virus infection can counter and surpass a corresponding increase in Paip2 abundance and stability. PMID:23964095

  18. Mammalian MagT1 and TUSC3 are required for cellular magnesium uptake and vertebrate embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Clapham, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+) is the second most abundant cation in cells, yet relatively few mechanisms have been identified that regulate cellular levels of this ion. The most clearly identified Mg2+ transporters are in bacteria and yeast. Here, we use a yeast complementary screen to identify two mammalian genes, MagT1 and TUSC3, as major mechanisms of Mg2+ influx. MagT1 is universally expressed in all human tissues and its expression level is up-regulated in low extracellular Mg2+. Knockdown of either MagT1 or TUSC3 protein significantly lowers the total and free intracellular Mg2+ concentrations in mammalian cell lines. Morpholino knockdown of MagT1 and TUSC3 protein expression in zebrafish embryos results in early developmental arrest; excess Mg2+ or supplementation with mammalian mRNAs can rescue the effects. We conclude that MagT1 and TUSC3 are indispensable members of the vertebrate plasma membrane Mg2+ transport system. PMID:19717468

  19. Regulation of Ras Exchange Factors and Cellular Localization of Ras Activation by Lipid Messengers in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jesse E.; Rubio, Ignacio; Roose, Jeroen P.

    2013-01-01

    The Ras-MAPK signaling pathway is highly conserved throughout evolution and is activated downstream of a wide range of receptor stimuli. Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs) catalyze GTP loading of Ras and play a pivotal role in regulating receptor-ligand induced Ras activity. In T cells, three families of functionally important RasGEFs are expressed: RasGRF, RasGRP, and Son of Sevenless (SOS)-family GEFs. Early on it was recognized that Ras activation is critical for T cell development and that the RasGEFs play an important role herein. More recent work has revealed that nuances in Ras activation appear to significantly impact T cell development and selection. These nuances include distinct biochemical patterns of analog versus digital Ras activation, differences in cellular localization of Ras activation, and intricate interplays between the RasGEFs during distinct T cell developmental stages as revealed by various new mouse models. In many instances, the exact nature of these nuances in Ras activation or how these may result from fine-tuning of the RasGEFs is not understood. One large group of biomolecules critically involved in the control of RasGEFs functions are lipid second messengers. Multiple, yet distinct lipid products are generated following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and bind to different domains in the RasGRP and SOS RasGEFs to facilitate the activation of the membrane-anchored Ras GTPases. In this review we highlight how different lipid-based elements are generated by various enzymes downstream of the TCR and other receptors and how these dynamic and interrelated lipid products may fine-tune Ras activation by RasGEFs in developing T cells. PMID:24027568

  20. Expression and cellular localization of the transcription factor NeuroD1 in the developing and adult rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Castro, Analía E; Benitez, Sergio G; Farias Altamirano, Luz E; Savastano, Luis E; Patterson, Sean I; Muñoz, Estela M

    2015-05-01

    Circadian rhythms govern many aspects of mammalian physiology. The daily pattern of melatonin synthesis and secretion is one of the classic examples of circadian oscillations. It is mediated by a class of neuroendocrine cells known as pinealocytes which are not yet fully defined. An established method to evaluate functional and cytological characters is through the expression of lineage-specific transcriptional regulators. NeuroD1 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor involved in the specification and maintenance of both endocrine and neuronal phenotypes. We have previously described developmental and adult regulation of NeuroD1 mRNA in the rodent pineal gland. However, the transcript levels were not influenced by the elimination of sympathetic input, suggesting that any rhythmicity of NeuroD1 might be found downstream of transcription. Here, we describe NeuroD1 protein expression and cellular localization in the rat pineal gland during development and the daily cycle. In embryonic and perinatal stages, protein expression follows the mRNA pattern and is predominantly nuclear. Thereafter, NeuroD1 is mostly found in pinealocyte nuclei in the early part of the night and in cytoplasm during the day, a rhythm maintained into adulthood. Additionally, nocturnal nuclear NeuroD1 levels are reduced after sympathetic disruption, an effect mimicked by the in vivo administration of α- and β-adrenoceptor blockers. NeuroD1 phosphorylation at two sites, Ser(274) and Ser(336) , associates with nuclear localization in pinealocytes. These data suggest that NeuroD1 influences pineal phenotype both during development and adulthood, in an autonomic and phosphorylation-dependent manner. PMID:25752781

  1. CELLULAR BIOAVAILABILITY OF NATURAL HORMONES AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS AS A FUNCTION OF SERUM AND CYTOSOLIC BINDING FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental contaminants have been reported to function as hormone mimics in various wildlife species. To investigate a potential mechanism for the interaction of contaminants with the endocrine system, we evaluated the cellular bioavailability of numerous chemicals. Hormone bi...

  2. Human factor requirements of helmet trackers for HMDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsen, Gary L.; Havig, Paul R.; Post, David L.; Reis, George A.; Simpson, Matthew A.

    2003-09-01

    A helmet tracker is a critical element in the path that delivers targeting and other sensor data to the user of a helmet-mounted display (HMD) in a military aircraft. The original purpose of an HMD was to serve as a helmet-mounted sight and provide a means to fully utilize the capabilities of off-boresight munitions. Recently, the role of the HMD has evolved from being strictly a targeting tool to providing detailed flight path and situation awareness information. These changes, however, have placed even greater value on the visual information that is transferred through the helmet tracker to the HMD. Specifically, the timeliness and accuracy of the information, which is of critical importance when the HMD is used as a targeting aid, is of even greater importance when the HMD is used to display flight reference information. This is especially relevant since it has been proposed to build new military aircraft without a physical head-up display (HUD) and display HUD information virtually with an HMD. In this paper, we review the current state of helmet tracker technology with respect to use in military aviation. We also identify the parameters of helmet trackers that offer the greatest risk when using an HMD to provide information beyond targeting data to the user. Finally, we discuss the human factors limitations of helmet tracker systems for delivering both targeting and flight reference information to a military pilot.

  3. Making Bunyaviruses Talk: Interrogation Tactics to Identify Host Factors Required for Infection

    PubMed Central

    Riblett, Amber M.; Doms, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    The identification of host cellular genes that act as either proviral or antiviral factors has been aided by the development of an increasingly large number of high-throughput screening approaches. Here, we review recent advances in which these new technologies have been used to interrogate host genes for the ability to impact bunyavirus infection, both in terms of technical advances as well as a summary of biological insights gained from these studies. PMID:27187446

  4. Cellular resilience.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Lena; Harris, Georgina; Leist, Marcel; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resilience describes the ability of a cell to cope with environmental changes such as toxicant exposure. If cellular metabolism does not collapse directly after the hit or end in programmed cell death, the ensuing stress responses promote a new homeostasis under stress. The processes of reverting "back to normal" and reversal of apoptosis ("anastasis") have been studied little at the cellular level. Cell types show astonishingly similar vulnerability to most toxicants, except for those that require a very specific target, metabolism or mechanism present only in specific cell types. The majority of chemicals triggers "general cytotoxicity" in any cell at similar concentrations. We hypothesize that cells differ less in their vulnerability to a given toxicant than in their resilience (coping with the "hit"). In many cases, cells do not return to the naive state after a toxic insult. The phenomena of "pre-conditioning", "tolerance" and "hormesis" describe this for low-dose exposures to toxicants that render the cell more resistant to subsequent hits. The defense and resilience programs include epigenetic changes that leave a "memory/scar" - an alteration as a consequence of the stress the cell has experienced. These memories might have long-term consequences, both positive (resistance) and negative, that contribute to chronic and delayed manifestations of hazard and, ultimately, disease. This article calls for more systematic analyses of how cells cope with toxic perturbations in the long-term after stressor withdrawal. A technical prerequisite for these are stable (organotypic) cultures and a characterization of stress response molecular networks. PMID:26536287

  5. Are cellular polarisation and mitotic frequency prognostic factors for local recurrence in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast?

    PubMed

    Idvall, I; Anderson, H; Ringberg, A; Fernö, M

    2003-08-01

    There is still no generally accepted histopathological classification system for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Nuclear grade, with or without other histopathological parameters (i.e. comedo-type necrosis and cellular polarisation), has been demonstrated to yield prognostic information. A detailed method for the evaluation of the mitotic frequency in DCIS, based on an approach by Contesso, was used in this study. We also investigated if cellular polarisation and mitotic frequency were important for the ipsilateral local recurrence-free interval (IL-RFI) in 121 DCIS patients who had been operated upon with breast-conserving treatment (BCT) without radiotherapy. Both cellular polarisation and the mitotic frequency were associated with histopathological and cellular biological factors (in previous evaluations), and were of borderline significance for IL-RFI in the univariate analyses. However, when nuclear grade was included in the multivariate analyses (with or without the growth pattern), neither cellular polarisation nor the mitotic frequency were of any independent prognostic value. PMID:12888365

  6. A Mechanism to Enhance Cellular Responsivity to Hormone Action: Krüppel-Like Factor 9 Promotes Thyroid Hormone Receptor-β Autoinduction During Postembryonic Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fang; Knoedler, Joseph R; Denver, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR)-β (trb) is induced by TH (autoinduced) in Xenopus tadpoles during metamorphosis. We previously showed that Krüppel-like factor 9 (Klf9) is rapidly induced by TH in the tadpole brain, associates in chromatin with the trb upstream region in a developmental stage and TH-dependent manner, and forced expression of Klf9 in the Xenopus laevis cell line XTC-2 accelerates and enhances trb autoinduction. Here we investigated whether Klf9 can promote trb autoinduction in tadpole brain in vivo. Using electroporation-mediated gene transfer, we transfected plasmids into premetamorphic tadpole brain to express wild-type or mutant forms of Klf9. Forced expression of Klf9 increased baseline trb mRNA levels in thyroid-intact but not in goitrogen-treated tadpoles, supporting that Klf9 enhances liganded TR action. As in XTC-2 cells, forced expression of Klf9 enhanced trb autoinduction in tadpole brain in vivo and also increased TH-dependent induction of the TR target genes klf9 and thbzip. Consistent with our previous mutagenesis experiments conducted in XTC-2 cells, the actions of Klf9 in vivo required an intact N-terminal region but not a functional DNA binding domain. Forced expression of TRβ in tadpole brain by electroporation-mediated gene transfer increased baseline and TH-induced TR target gene transcription, supporting a role for trb autoinduction during metamorphosis. Our findings support that Klf9 acts as an accessory transcription factor for TR at the trb locus during tadpole metamorphosis, enhancing trb autoinduction and transcription of other TR target genes, which increases cellular responsivity to further TH action on developmental gene regulation programs. PMID:26886257

  7. Cellular and humoral immune effector mechanisms required for sterile protection against sporozoite challenge induced with the novel malaria vaccine candidate CelTOS.

    PubMed

    Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S; Legler, Patricia M; Savranskaya, Tatyana; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Angov, Evelina

    2011-08-11

    The malarial protein CelTOS, for cell-traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites, from Plasmodium berghei has been shown to mediate malarial invasion of both vertebrate and insect host cells and is required for establishing their successful infections. In the vertebrate host, Plasmodium sporozoites traverse via a complex passage through cellular barriers in the skin and the liver sinusoid to infect hepatocytes. Induction of immunity targeted to molecules involved in sporozoite motility and migration into hepatocytes may lead to abrogation of hepatocyte infection. We have previously demonstrated the potential of CelTOS as a target antigen for a pre-erythrocytic vaccine. The objective of the current study was to determine the potency of different vaccine platforms to induce protective immunity and determine the mode of action in protective immune responses. To this end, inbred Balb/c and outbred ICR mice were immunized with either the recombinant protein adjuvanted with Montanide ISA-720 or with a pCI-TPA plasmid encoding the P. berghei CelTOS (epidermal delivery by gene-gun) and assessed for the induction of protective responses against a homologous P. berghei challenge. Humoral and cellular immune responses induced by the various immunization regimens were evaluated in an effort to establish immune correlates. The results confirm that the CelTOS antigen is a potentially interesting pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidate and demonstrate that both arms of the adaptive immune system are required to mediate complete sterile protection against sporozoite challenge. PMID:21722682

  8. Requirements for the production of high-titre C3 nephritic factor (NEF) antibody in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Marín, M A; Fontán, G; López-Trascasa, M

    1992-01-01

    C3 nephritic factor (NEF) is an IgG autoantibody directed against neoantigenic determinants of the alternative C3 convertase (C3b.Bb). Structural and functional studies require important amounts of this antibody, which are difficult to obtain from patients' sera. We have developed a method for increasing NEF production in vitro. Epstein-Barr virus is a herpes virus which transforms B lymphocytes. Some authors were able to induce the production of NEF in vitro after infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). These works were preformed without any previous cellular selection of B cells. We have performed a method of preselecting antigen-binding cells prior to EBV transformation. Non-preselected cells yielded 0.16 U/million cells in culture (U/M) of NEF antibody, whereas enriched cells for NEF antibody in eliminated 8 U/M (sheep erythrocytes coated with anti-IgG, A, M). Specific NEF synthesis can be increased, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients by in vitro stimulation with the antigens recognized by NEF [C3b.Bb, 21,000 MW protein from patients' E membranes and 26,000 MW protein from sheep E membranes (ShE)]. The highest stimulation is induced by the C3b.Bb and by 26,000 MW protein, 21,000 MW protein had lowest stimulatory effect. In this work also we have shown that patients having NEF antibody in sera have an increase of the CD5-CD19 subset, when compared with the controls. Images Figure 2 PMID:1321794

  9. Use of a generalized additive model to investigate key abiotic factors affecting microcystin cellular quotas in heavy bloom areas of Lake Taihu.

    PubMed

    Tao, Min; Xie, Ping; Chen, Jun; Qin, Boqiang; Zhang, Dawen; Niu, Yuan; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Qing; Wu, Laiyan

    2012-01-01

    Lake Taihu is the third largest freshwater lake in China and is suffering from serious cyanobacterial blooms with the associated drinking water contamination by microcystin (MC) for millions of citizens. So far, most studies on MCs have been limited to two small bays, while systematic research on the whole lake is lacking. To explain the variations in MC concentrations during cyanobacterial bloom, a large-scale survey at 30 sites across the lake was conducted monthly in 2008. The health risks of MC exposure were high, especially in the northern area. Both Microcystis abundance and MC cellular quotas presented positive correlations with MC concentration in the bloom seasons, suggesting that the toxic risks during Microcystis proliferations were affected by variations in both Microcystis density and MC production per Microcystis cell. Use of a powerful predictive modeling tool named generalized additive model (GAM) helped visualize significant effects of abiotic factors related to carbon fixation and proliferation of Microcystis (conductivity, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), water temperature and pH) on MC cellular quotas from recruitment period of Microcystis to the bloom seasons, suggesting the possible use of these factors, in addition to Microcystis abundance, as warning signs to predict toxic events in the future. The interesting relationship between macrophytes and MC cellular quotas of Microcystis (i.e., high MC cellular quotas in the presence of macrophytes) needs further investigation. PMID:22384128

  10. Use of a Generalized Additive Model to Investigate Key Abiotic Factors Affecting Microcystin Cellular Quotas in Heavy Bloom Areas of Lake Taihu

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Min; Xie, Ping; Chen, Jun; Qin, Boqiang; Zhang, Dawen; Niu, Yuan; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Qing; Wu, Laiyan

    2012-01-01

    Lake Taihu is the third largest freshwater lake in China and is suffering from serious cyanobacterial blooms with the associated drinking water contamination by microcystin (MC) for millions of citizens. So far, most studies on MCs have been limited to two small bays, while systematic research on the whole lake is lacking. To explain the variations in MC concentrations during cyanobacterial bloom, a large-scale survey at 30 sites across the lake was conducted monthly in 2008. The health risks of MC exposure were high, especially in the northern area. Both Microcystis abundance and MC cellular quotas presented positive correlations with MC concentration in the bloom seasons, suggesting that the toxic risks during Microcystis proliferations were affected by variations in both Microcystis density and MC production per Microcystis cell. Use of a powerful predictive modeling tool named generalized additive model (GAM) helped visualize significant effects of abiotic factors related to carbon fixation and proliferation of Microcystis (conductivity, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), water temperature and pH) on MC cellular quotas from recruitment period of Microcystis to the bloom seasons, suggesting the possible use of these factors, in addition to Microcystis abundance, as warning signs to predict toxic events in the future. The interesting relationship between macrophytes and MC cellular quotas of Microcystis (i.e., high MC cellular quotas in the presence of macrophytes) needs further investigation. PMID:22384128

  11. 40 CFR 63.1431 - Process vent annual epoxides emission factor plan requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... factor plan requirements. 63.1431 Section 63.1431 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... group determination procedures in the NESHAP for Group I Polymers and Resins (40 CFR part 63, subpart U... Production § 63.1431 Process vent annual epoxides emission factor plan requirements. (a) Applicability...

  12. Specific requirement of the chromatin modifier mSin3B in cell cycle exit and cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    David, Gregory; Grandinetti, Kathryn B; Finnerty, Patricia M; Simpson, Natalie; Chu, Gerald C; Depinho, Ronald A

    2008-03-18

    The Sin3-histone deacetylase (HDAC) corepressor complex is conserved from yeast to humans. Mammals possess two highly related Sin3 proteins, mSin3A and mSin3B, which serve as scaffolds tethering HDAC enzymatic activity, and numerous sequence-specific transcription factors to enable local chromatin regulation at specific gene targets. Despite broad overlapping expression of mSin3A and mSin3B, mSin3A is cell-essential and vital for early embryonic development. Here, genetic disruption of mSin3B reveals a very different phenotype characterized by the survival of cultured cells and lethality at late stages of embryonic development with defective differentiation of multiple lineages-phenotypes that are strikingly reminiscent of those associated with loss of retinoblastoma family members or E2F transcriptional repressors. Additionally, we observe that, whereas mSin3B(-/-) cells cycle normally under standard growth conditions, they show an impaired ability to exit the cell cycle with limiting growth factors. Correspondingly, mSin3B interacts physically with the promoters of known E2F target genes, and its deficiency is associated with derepression of these gene targets in vivo. Together, these results reveal a critical role for mSin3B in the control of cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation in mammals and establish contrasting roles for the mSin3 proteins in the growth and development of specific lineages. PMID:18332431

  13. Timed interactions between viral and cellular replication factors during the initiation of SV40 in vitro DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Poonam; Nasheuer, Heinz-Peter; Hartmann, Hella; Grosse, Frank; Fanning, Ellen; Weisshart, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    The initiation of SV40 (simian virus 40) DNA replication requires the co-operative interactions between the viral Tag (large T-antigen), RPA (replication protein A) and Pol (DNA polymerase α-primase) on the template DNA. Binding interfaces mapped on these enzymes and expressed as peptides competed with the mutual interactions of the native proteins. Prevention of the genuine interactions was accomplished only prior to the primer synthesis step and blocked the assembly of a productive initiation complex. Once the complex was engaged in the synthesis of an RNA primer and its extension, the interfering effects of the peptides ceased, suggesting a stable association of the replication factors during the initiation phase. Specific antibodies were still able to disrupt preformed interactions and inhibited primer synthesis and extension activities, underlining the crucial role of specific protein–protein contacts during the entire initiation process. PMID:17666013

  14. Epithelial Adhesion Mediated by Pilin SpaC Is Required for Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-Induced Cellular Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ardita, Courtney S.; Mercante, Jeffrey W.; Kwon, Young Man; Luo, Liping; Crawford, Madelyn E.; Powell, Domonica N.; Jones, Rheinallt M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is a widely used probiotic, and the strain's salutary effects on the intestine have been extensively documented. We previously reported that strain GG can modulate inflammatory signaling, as well as epithelial migration and proliferation, by activating NADPH oxidase 1-catalyzed generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, how strain GG induces these responses is unknown. Here, we report that strain GG's probiotic benefits are dependent on the bacterial-epithelial interaction mediated by the SpaC pilin subunit. By comparing strain GG to an isogenic mutant that lacks SpaC (strain GGΩspaC), we establish that SpaC is necessary for strain GG to adhere to gut mucosa, that SpaC contributes to strain GG-induced epithelial generation of ROS, and that SpaC plays a role in strain GG's capacity to stimulate extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) signaling in enterocytes. In addition, we show that SpaC is required for strain GG-mediated stimulation of cell proliferation and protection against radiologically inflicted intestinal injury. The identification of a critical surface protein required for strain GG to mediate its probiotic influence advances our understanding of the molecular basis for the symbiotic relationship between some commensal bacteria of the gut lumen and enterocytes. Further insights into this relationship are critical for the development of novel approaches to treat intestinal diseases. PMID:24928883

  15. GAP Activity, but Not Subcellular Targeting, Is Required for Arabidopsis RanGAP Cellular and Developmental Functions[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Boruc, Joanna; Griffis, Anna H.N.; Rodrigo-Peiris, Thushani; Zhou, Xiao; Tilford, Bailey; Van Damme, Daniël; Meier, Iris

    2015-01-01

    The Ran GTPase activating protein (RanGAP) is important to Ran signaling involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport, spindle organization, and postmitotic nuclear assembly. Unlike vertebrate and yeast RanGAP, plant RanGAP has an N-terminal WPP domain, required for nuclear envelope association and several mitotic locations of Arabidopsis thaliana RanGAP1. A double null mutant of the two Arabidopsis RanGAP homologs is gametophyte lethal. Here, we created a series of mutants with various reductions in RanGAP levels by combining a RanGAP1 null allele with different RanGAP2 alleles. As RanGAP level decreases, the severity of developmental phenotypes increases, but nuclear import is unaffected. To dissect whether the GAP activity and/or the subcellular localization of RanGAP are responsible for the observed phenotypes, this series of rangap mutants were transformed with RanGAP1 variants carrying point mutations abolishing the GAP activity and/or the WPP-dependent subcellular localization. The data show that plant development is differentially affected by RanGAP mutant allele combinations of increasing severity and requires the GAP activity of RanGAP, while the subcellular positioning of RanGAP is dispensable. In addition, our results indicate that nucleocytoplasmic trafficking can tolerate both partial depletion of RanGAP and delocalization of RanGAP from the nuclear envelope. PMID:26091693

  16. Cellular Stress Responses and Monitored Cellular Activities.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Naito, Yoshifumi; Kato, Hideya; Amaya, Fumimasa

    2016-08-01

    To survive, organisms require mechanisms that enable them to sense changes in the outside environment, introduce necessary responses, and resist unfavorable distortion. Consequently, through evolutionary adaptation, cells have become equipped with the apparatus required to monitor their fundamental intracellular processes and the mechanisms needed to try to offset malfunction without receiving any direct signals from the outside environment. It has been shown recently that eukaryotic cells are equipped with a special mechanism that monitors their fundamental cellular functions and that some pathogenic proteobacteria can override this monitoring mechanism to cause harm. The monitored cellular activities involved in the stressed intracellular response have been researched extensively in Caenorhabditis elegans, where discovery of an association between key mitochondrial activities and innate immune responses was named "cellular associated detoxification and defenses (cSADD)." This cellular surveillance pathway (cSADD) oversees core cellular activities such as mitochondrial respiration and protein transport into mitochondria, detects xenobiotics and invading pathogens, and activates the endocrine pathways controlling behavior, detoxification, and immunity. The cSADD pathway is probably associated with cellular responses to stress in human inflammatory diseases. In the critical care field, the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes (e.g., respiratory distress syndromes and sepsis) involves the disturbance of mitochondrial respiration leading to cell death. Up-to-date knowledge about monitored cellular activities and cSADD, especially focusing on mitochondrial involvement, can probably help fill a knowledge gap regarding the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes in the critical care field. PMID:26954943

  17. Cellular entry via an actin and clathrin-dependent route is required for Lv2 restriction of HIV-2

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, I.P.; McKnight, A.

    2011-06-20

    Lv2 is a human factor that restricts infection of some HIV-2 viruses after entry into particular target cells. HIV-2 MCR is highly susceptible to Lv2 whereas HIV-2 MCN is not. The block is after reverse transcription but prior to nuclear entry. The viral determinants for this restriction have been mapped to the HIV-2 envelope and the capsid genes. Our model of Lv2 restriction suggests that the route taken into a cell is important in determining whether a productive infection occurs. Here we characterised the infectious routes used by MCN and MCR using chemical compounds and molecular techniques to distinguish between potential pathways. Our results suggest that susceptible MCR can enter restrictive HeLa{sup CD4} cells via two pathways; a clathrin/AP2 mediated endocytic route that is sensitive to Lv2 restriction and an alternative, non-clathrin mediated route, which results in more efficient infection.

  18. Transglutaminase activity arising from Factor XIIIA is required for stabilization and conversion of plasma fibronectin into matrix in osteoblast cultures.

    PubMed

    Cui, Cui; Wang, Shuai; Myneni, Vamsee D; Hitomi, Kiyotaka; Kaartinen, Mari T

    2014-02-01

    Circulating plasma fibronectin (pFN), produced by hepatocytes, is a major component of the noncollagenous bone matrix where it was recently shown in vivo in mice to control the biomechanical quality as well as the mineral-to-matrix ratio in bone. FN fibrillogenesis is a process generally requiring FN binding to cellular integrins, and cellular tension to elongate and assemble the molecule. Whether soluble pFN undergoes cell-mediated assembly in bone is not fully established. FN is a well-known substrate for transglutaminases (TGs), which are protein-crosslinking enzymes capable of stabilizing macromolecular structures. The role of this modification regarding the function of FN in bone matrix has remained unknown. Osteoblasts express two TGs-transglutaminase 2 and Factor XIIIA-and we have shown that Factor XIIIA is the main TG active during osteoblast differentiation. In the present study, conducted using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cultures and bone marrow stromal cells, we demonstrate that pFN requires a TG-mediated crosslinking step to form osteoblast matrix in vitro. This modification step is specific for pFN; cellular FN (EDA-FN) does not serve as a TG substrate. Inhibition of pFN assembly using a TG inhibitor, or depletion of pFN from cell culture serum, dramatically decreased total FN matrix assembly in the osteoblast cultures and affected both the quantity and quality of the type I collagen matrix, and decreased lysyl oxidase and alkaline phosphatase levels, resulting in decreased mineralization. Experiments with isozyme-specific substrate peptides showed that FXIIIA is responsible for the crosslinking of pFN. Addition of exogenous preactivated FXIIIA to osteoblast cultures promoted pFN assembly from the media into matrix. Exogenous TG2 had no effect. Analysis of pFN and EDA-FN fibrils by immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that they form distinct matrix network, albeit with minor overlap, suggesting different functions for the two FN forms. Further analysis

  19. Glucose-dependent anaplerosis in cancer cells is required for cellular redox balance in the absence of glutamine.

    PubMed

    Cetinbas, Naniye Mallı; Sudderth, Jessica; Harris, Robert C; Cebeci, Aysun; Negri, Gian L; Yılmaz, Ömer H; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Sorensen, Poul H

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells have altered metabolism compared to normal cells, including dependence on glutamine (GLN) for survival, known as GLN addiction. However, some cancer cell lines do not require GLN for survival and the basis for this discrepancy is not well understood. GLN is a precursor for antioxidants such as glutathione (GSH) and NADPH, and GLN deprivation is therefore predicted to deplete antioxidants and increase reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using diverse human cancer cell lines we show that this occurs only in cells that rely on GLN for survival. Thus, the preference for GLN as a dominant antioxidant source defines GLN addiction. We show that despite increased glucose uptake, GLN addicted cells do not metabolize glucose via the TCA cycle when GLN is depleted, as revealed by (13)C-glucose labeling. In contrast, GLN independent cells can compensate by diverting glucose-derived pyruvate into the TCA cycle. GLN addicted cells exhibit reduced PDH activity, increased PDK1 expression, and PDK inhibition partially rescues GLN starvation-induced ROS and cell death. Finally, we show that combining GLN starvation with pro-oxidants selectively kills GLN addicted cells. These data highlight a major role for GLN in maintaining redox balance in cancer cells that lack glucose-dependent anaplerosis. PMID:27605385

  20. Glucose-dependent anaplerosis in cancer cells is required for cellular redox balance in the absence of glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Cetinbas, Naniye Mallı; Sudderth, Jessica; Harris, Robert C.; Cebeci, Aysun; Negri, Gian L.; Yılmaz, Ömer H.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Sorensen, Poul H.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells have altered metabolism compared to normal cells, including dependence on glutamine (GLN) for survival, known as GLN addiction. However, some cancer cell lines do not require GLN for survival and the basis for this discrepancy is not well understood. GLN is a precursor for antioxidants such as glutathione (GSH) and NADPH, and GLN deprivation is therefore predicted to deplete antioxidants and increase reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using diverse human cancer cell lines we show that this occurs only in cells that rely on GLN for survival. Thus, the preference for GLN as a dominant antioxidant source defines GLN addiction. We show that despite increased glucose uptake, GLN addicted cells do not metabolize glucose via the TCA cycle when GLN is depleted, as revealed by 13C-glucose labeling. In contrast, GLN independent cells can compensate by diverting glucose-derived pyruvate into the TCA cycle. GLN addicted cells exhibit reduced PDH activity, increased PDK1 expression, and PDK inhibition partially rescues GLN starvation-induced ROS and cell death. Finally, we show that combining GLN starvation with pro-oxidants selectively kills GLN addicted cells. These data highlight a major role for GLN in maintaining redox balance in cancer cells that lack glucose-dependent anaplerosis. PMID:27605385

  1. HTLV-1 Rex is required for viral spread and persistence in vivo but is dispensable for cellular immortalization in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jianxin; Silverman, Lee; Lairmore, Michael D.; Green, Patrick L.

    2010-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is associated with leukemia/lymphoma and neurologic disorders. Although the viral transcriptional activator Tax is the critical viral oncoprotein, Rex, which regulates the expression of the viral structural and enzymatic genes, is essential for efficient viral replication. Herein, we investigate the contribution of Rex in HTLV-1 immortalization of primary T cells in vitro and viral survival in an infectious rabbit animal model. A Rex-deficient HTLV-1 (HTLVRex−) was constructed and characterized for viral gene expression, protein production, and immortalization capacity. Cells transiently transfected with the HTLVRex− proviral clone produced low detectable levels of p19 Gag. 729HTLVRex− stable transfectants produced functional Tax, but undetectable levels of Rex or p19 Gag. Coculture of irradiated 729HTLVRex− cells with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) resulted in sustained interleukin-2 (IL-2)–dependent growth of primary T lymphocytes. These cells carried the HTLVRex− genome and expressed tax/rex mRNA but produced no detectable Rex or p19 Gag. Rabbits inoculated with irradiated 729HTLVRex− cells or 729HTLVRex− cells transiently transfected with a Rex cDNA expression plasmid failed to become persistently infected or mount a detectable antibody response to the viral gene products. Together, our results provide the first direct evidence that Rex and its function to modulate viral gene expression and virion production is not required for in vitro immortalization by HTLV-1. However, Rex is critical for efficient infection of cells and persistence in vivo. PMID:12907436

  2. The LIM domain-containing Dbm1 GTPase-activating protein is required for normal cellular morphogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G C; Zheng, L; Chan, C S

    1996-01-01

    Normal cell growth in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves the selection of genetically determined bud sites where most growth is localized. Previous studies have shown that BEM2, which encodes a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) that is specific for the Rho-type GTPase Rho1p in vitro, is required for proper bud site selection and bud emergence. We show here that DBM1, which encodes another putative Rho-type GAP with two tandemly arranged cysteine-rich LIM domains, also is needed for proper bud site selection, as haploid cells lacking Dbm1p bud predominantly in a bipolar, rather than the normal axial, manner. Furthermore, yeast cells lacking both Bem2p and Dbm1p are inviable. The nonaxial budding defect of dbm1 mutants can be rescued partially by overproduction of Bem3p and is exacerbated by its absence. Since Bem3p has previously been shown to function as a GAP for Cdc42p, and also less efficiently for Rho1p, our results suggest that Dbm1p, like Bem2p and Bem3p, may function in vivo as a GAP for Cdc42p and/or Rho1p. Both LIM domains of Dbm1p are essential for its normal function. Point mutations that alter single conserved cysteine residues within either LIM domain result in mutant forms of Dbm1p that can no longer function in bud site selection but instead are capable of rescuing the inviability of bem2 mutants at 35 degrees C. PMID:8657111

  3. Cellular zinc is required for intestinal epithelial barrier maintenance via the regulation of claudin-3 and occludin expression.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Yuka; Tanabe, Soichi; Suzuki, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    Intracellular zinc is required for a variety of cell functions, but its precise roles in the maintenance of the intestinal tight junction (TJ) barrier remain unclear. The present study investigated the essential roles of intracellular zinc in the preservation of intestinal TJ integrity and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Depletion of intracellular zinc in both intestinal Caco-2 cells and mouse colons through the application of a cell-permeable zinc chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) induced a disruption of the TJ barrier, as indicated by increased FITC-labeled dextran flux and decreased transepithelial electrical resistance. The TPEN-induced TJ disruption is associated with downregulation of two TJ proteins, occludin and claudin-3. Biotinylation of cell surface proteins revealed that the zinc depletion induced the proteolysis of occludin but not claudin-3. Occludin proteolysis was sensitive to the inhibition of calpain activity, and increased calpain activity was observed in the zinc-depleted cells. Although quantitative PCR analysis and promoter reporter assay have demonstrated that the zinc depletion-induced claudin-3 downregulation occurred at transcriptional levels, a site-directed mutation in the egr1 binding site in the claudin-3 promoter sequence induced loss of both the basal promoter activity and the TPEN-induced decreases. Reduced egr1 expression by a specific siRNA also inhibited claudin-3 expression and transepithelial electrical resistance maintenance in cells. This study shows that intracellular zinc has an essential role in the maintenance of the intestinal epithelial TJ barrier through regulation of occludin proteolysis and claudin-3 transcription. PMID:27151944

  4. Protective effects of a Modified Vaccinia Ankara-based vaccine candidate against Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever virus require both cellular and humoral responses

    PubMed Central

    Dowall, Stuart D.; Graham, Victoria A.; Rayner, Emma; Hunter, Laura; Watson, Robert; Taylor, Irene; Rule, Antony; Carroll, Miles W.; Hewson, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is a severe tick-borne disease, endemic in many countries in Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe and Asia. There is no approved vaccine currently available against CCHF. The most promising candidate, which has previously been shown to confer protection in the small animal model, is a modified Vaccinia Ankara virus vector expressing the CCHF viral glycoprotein (MVA-GP). It has been shown that MVA-GP induces both humoral and cellular immunogenicity. In the present study, sera and T-lymphocytes were passively and adoptively transferred into recipient mice prior to challenge with CCHF virus. Results demonstrated that mediators from both arms of the immune system were required to demonstrate protective effects against lethal challenge. PMID:27272940

  5. Transcription factors of Lotus: regulation of isoflavonoid biosynthesis requires coordinated changes in transcription factor activity.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Dale; Stranne, Maria; Mikkelsen, Lisbeth; Pakseresht, Nima; Welham, Tracey; Hiraka, Hideki; Tabata, Satoshi; Sato, Shusei; Paquette, Suzanne; Wang, Trevor L; Martin, Cathie; Bailey, Paul

    2012-06-01

    Isoflavonoids are a class of phenylpropanoids made by legumes, and consumption of dietary isoflavonoids confers benefits to human health. Our aim is to understand the regulation of isoflavonoid biosynthesis. Many studies have shown the importance of transcription factors in regulating the transcription of one or more genes encoding enzymes in phenylpropanoid metabolism. In this study, we coupled bioinformatics and coexpression analysis to identify candidate genes encoding transcription factors involved in regulating isoflavonoid biosynthesis in Lotus (Lotus japonicus). Genes encoding proteins belonging to 39 of the main transcription factor families were examined by microarray analysis of RNA from leaf tissue that had been elicited with glutathione. Phylogenetic analyses of each transcription factor family were used to identify subgroups of proteins that were specific to L. japonicus or closely related to known regulators of the phenylpropanoid pathway in other species. R2R3MYB subgroup 2 genes showed increased expression after treatment with glutathione. One member of this subgroup, LjMYB14, was constitutively overexpressed in L. japonicus and induced the expression of at least 12 genes that encoded enzymes in the general phenylpropanoid and isoflavonoid pathways. A distinct set of six R2R3MYB subgroup 2-like genes was identified. We suggest that these subgroup 2 sister group proteins and those belonging to the main subgroup 2 have roles in inducing isoflavonoid biosynthesis. The induction of isoflavonoid production in L. japonicus also involves the coordinated down-regulation of competing biosynthetic pathways by changing the expression of other transcription factors. PMID:22529285

  6. Human Cortical Neural Stem Cells Expressing Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I: A Novel Cellular Therapy for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    McGinley, Lisa M.; Sims, Erika; Lunn, J. Simon; Kashlan, Osama N.; Chen, Kevin S.; Bruno, Elizabeth S.; Pacut, Crystal M.; Hazel, Tom; Johe, Karl; Sakowski, Stacey A.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorder and a leading cause of dementia. Current treatment fails to modify underlying disease pathologies and very little progress has been made to develop effective drug treatments. Cellular therapies impact disease by multiple mechanisms, providing increased efficacy compared with traditional single-target approaches. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, we have shown that transplanted spinal neural stem cells (NSCs) integrate into the spinal cord, form synapses with the host, improve inflammation, and reduce disease-associated pathologies. Our current goal is to develop a similar “best in class” cellular therapy for AD. Here, we characterize a novel human cortex-derived NSC line modified to express insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), HK532-IGF-I. Because IGF-I promotes neurogenesis and synaptogenesis in vivo, this enhanced NSC line offers additional environmental enrichment, enhanced neuroprotection, and a multifaceted approach to treating complex AD pathologies. We show that autocrine IGF-I production does not impact the cell secretome or normal cellular functions, including proliferation, migration, or maintenance of progenitor status. However, HK532-IGF-I cells preferentially differentiate into gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic neurons, a subtype dysregulated in AD; produce increased vascular endothelial growth factor levels; and display an increased neuroprotective capacity in vitro. We also demonstrate that HK532-IGF-I cells survive peri-hippocampal transplantation in a murine AD model and exhibit long-term persistence in targeted brain areas. In conclusion, we believe that harnessing the benefits of cellular and IGF-I therapies together will provide the optimal therapeutic benefit to patients, and our findings support further preclinical development of HK532-IGF-I cells into a disease-modifying intervention for AD. Significance There is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and

  7. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 Is Required for Epithelial Recovery, but Not for Pulmonary Fibrosis, in Response to Bleomycin

    PubMed Central

    Guzy, Robert D.; Stoilov, Ivan; Elton, Timothy J.; Mecham, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis involves lung epithelial injury and aberrant proliferation of fibroblasts, and results in progressive pulmonary scarring and declining lung function. In vitro, fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2 promotes myofibroblast differentiation and proliferation in cooperation with the profibrotic growth factor, transforming growth factor-β1, but the in vivo requirement for FGF2 in the development of pulmonary fibrosis is not known. The bleomycin model of lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis was applied to Fgf2 knockout (Fgf2−/−) and littermate control mice. Weight loss, mortality, pulmonary fibrosis, and histology were analyzed after a single intranasal dose of bleomycin. Inflammation was evaluated in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and epithelial barrier integrity was assessed by measuring BAL protein and Evans Blue dye permeability. Fgf2 is expressed in mouse and human lung epithelial and inflammatory cells, and, in response to bleomycin, Fgf2−/− mice have significantly increased mortality and weight loss. Analysis of BAL fluid and histology show that pulmonary fibrosis is unaltered, but Fgf2−/− mice fail to efficiently resolve inflammation, have increased BAL cellularity, and, importantly, deficient recovery of epithelial integrity. Fgf2−/− mice similarly have deficient recovery of club cell secretory protein+ bronchial epithelium in response to naphthalene. We conclude that FGF2 is not required for bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, but rather is essential for epithelial repair and maintaining epithelial integrity after bleomycin-induced lung injury in mice. These data identify that FGF2 acts as a protective growth factor after lung epithelial injury, and call into question the role of FGF2 as a profibrotic growth factor in vivo. PMID:24988442

  8. No Effect of the Transforming Growth Factor {beta}1 Promoter Polymorphism C-509T on TGFB1 Gene Expression, Protein Secretion, or Cellular Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Reuther, Sebastian; Metzke, Elisabeth; Bonin, Michael; Petersen, Cordula; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Raabe, Annette

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To study whether the promoter polymorphism (C-509T) affects transforming growth factor {beta}1 gene (TGFB1) expression, protein secretion, and/or cellular radiosensitivity for both human lymphocytes and fibroblasts. Methods and Materials: Experiments were performed with lymphocytes taken either from 124 breast cancer patients or 59 pairs of normal monozygotic twins. We used 15 normal human primary fibroblast strains as controls. The C-509T genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism or TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay. The cellular radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was measured by G0/1 assay and that of fibroblasts by colony assay. The amount of extracellular TGFB1 protein was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and TGFB1 expression was assessed via microarray analysis or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: The C-509T genotype was found not to be associated with cellular radiosensitivity, neither for lymphocytes (breast cancer patients, P=.811; healthy donors, P=.181) nor for fibroblasts (P=.589). Both TGFB1 expression and TGFB1 protein secretion showed considerable variation, which, however, did not depend on the C-509T genotype (protein secretion: P=.879; gene expression: lymphocytes, P=.134, fibroblasts, P=.605). There was also no general correlation between TGFB1 expression and cellular radiosensitivity (lymphocytes, P=.632; fibroblasts, P=.573). Conclusion: Our data indicate that any association between the SNP C-509T of TGFB1 and risk of normal tissue toxicity cannot be ascribed to a functional consequence of this SNP, either on the level of gene expression, protein secretion, or cellular radiosensitivity.

  9. Stem cell-dependent formation of a functional anterior regeneration pole in planarians requires Zic and Forkhead transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Vogg, Matthias C; Owlarn, Suthira; Pérez Rico, Yuvia A; Xie, Jianlei; Suzuki, Yoko; Gentile, Luca; Wu, Wei; Bartscherer, Kerstin

    2014-06-15

    Planarians can regenerate their head within days. This process depends on the direction of adult stem cells to wound sites and the orchestration of their progenitors to commit to appropriate lineages and to arrange into patterned tissues. We identified a zinc finger transcription factor, Smed-ZicA, as a downstream target of Smed-FoxD, a Forkhead transcription factor required for head regeneration. Smed-zicA and Smed-FoxD are co-expressed with the Wnt inhibitor notum and the Activin inhibitor follistatin in a cluster of cells at the anterior-most tip of the regenerating head - the anterior regeneration pole - and in surrounding stem cell progeny. Depletion of Smed-zicA and Smed-FoxD by RNAi abolishes notum and follistatin expression at the pole and inhibits head formation downstream of initial polarity decisions. We suggest a model in which ZicA and FoxD transcription factors synergize to control the formation of Notum- and Follistatin-producing anterior pole cells. Pole formation might constitute an early step in regeneration, resulting in a signaling center that orchestrates cellular events in the growing tissue. PMID:24704339

  10. Long-term channel block is required to inhibit cellular transformation by human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG1) potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Pier, David M; Shehatou, George S G; Giblett, Susan; Pullar, Christine E; Trezise, Derek J; Pritchard, Catrin A; Challiss, R A John; Mitcheson, John S

    2014-08-01

    Both human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG1) and the closely related human ether-à-go-go (hEAG1) channel are aberrantly expressed in a large proportion of human cancers. In the present study, we demonstrate that transfection of hERG1 into mouse fibroblasts is sufficient to induce many features characteristic of malignant transformation. An important finding of this work is that this transformation could be reversed by chronic incubation (for 2-3 weeks) with the hERG channel blocker dofetilide (100 nM), whereas more acute applications (for 1-2 days) were ineffective. The hERG1 expression resulted in a profound loss of cell contact inhibition, multiple layers of overgrowing cells, and high saturation densities. Cells also changed from fibroblast-like to a more spindle-shaped morphology, which was associated with a smaller cell size, a dramatic increase in cell polarization, a reduction in the number of actin stress fibers, and less punctate labeling of focal adhesions. Analysis of single-cell migration and scratch-wound closure clearly demonstrated that hERG1-expressing cells migrated more rapidly than vector-transfected control cells. In contrast to previous studies on hEAG1, there were no increases in rates of proliferation, or loss of growth factor dependency; however, hERG1-expressing cells were capable of substrate-independent growth. Allogeneic transplantation of hERG1-expressing cells into nude mice resulted in an increased incidence of tumors. In contrast to hEAG1, the mechanism of cellular transformation is dependent on ion conduction. Trafficking-deficient and conduction-deficient hERG1 mutants also prevented cellular transformation. These results provide evidence that hERG1 expression is sufficient to induce cellular transformation by a mechanism distinct from hEAG1. The most important conclusion of this study is that selective hERG1 channel blockers have therapeutic potential in the treatment of hERG1-expressing cancers. PMID:24830940

  11. Cellular mechanisms regulating activity-dependent release of native brain-derived neurotrophic factor from hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Balkowiec, Agnieszka; Katz, David M

    2002-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in activity-dependent modifications of neuronal connectivity and synaptic strength, including establishment of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). To shed light on mechanisms underlying BDNF-dependent synaptic plasticity, the present study was undertaken to characterize release of native BDNF from newborn rat hippocampal neurons in response to physiologically relevant patterns of electrical field stimulation in culture, including tonic stimulation at 5 Hz, bursting stimulation at 25 and 100 Hz, and theta-burst stimulation (TBS). Release was measured using the ELISA in situ technique, developed in our laboratory to quantify secretion of native BDNF without the need to first overexpress the protein to nonphysiological levels. Each stimulation protocol resulted in a significant increase in BDNF release that was tetrodotoxin sensitive and occurred in the absence of glutamate receptor activation. However, 100 Hz tetanus and TBS, stimulus patterns that are most effective in inducing hippocampal LTP, were significantly more effective in releasing native BDNF than lower-frequency stimulation. For all stimulation protocols tested, removal of extracellular calcium, or blockade of N-type calcium channels, prevented BDNF release. Similarly, depletion of intracellular calcium stores with thapsigargin and treatment with dantrolene, an inhibitor of calcium release from caffeine-ryanodine-sensitive stores, markedly inhibited activity-dependent BDNF release. Our results indicate that BDNF release can encode temporal features of hippocampal neuronal activity. The dual requirement for calcium influx through N-type calcium channels and calcium mobilization from intracellular stores strongly implicates a role for calcium-induced calcium release in activity-dependent BDNF secretion. PMID:12451139

  12. Cholangiocyte Myosin IIB Is Required for Localized Aggregation of Sodium Glucose Cotransporter 1 to Sites of Cryptosporidium parvum Cellular Invasion and Facilitates Parasite Internalization ▿

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Steven P.; Gajdos, Gabriella B.; Trussoni, Christy E.; Splinter, Patrick L.; LaRusso, Nicholas F.

    2010-01-01

    Internalization of the obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum, results in the formation of a unique intramembranous yet extracytoplasmic niche on the apical surfaces of host epithelial cells, a process that depends on host cell membrane extension. We previously demonstrated that efficient C. parvum invasion of biliary epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) requires host cell actin polymerization and localized membrane translocation/insertion of Na+/glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) and of aquaporin 1 (Aqp1), a water channel, at the attachment site. The resultant localized water influx facilitates parasite cellular invasion by promoting host-cell membrane protrusion. However, the molecular mechanisms by which C. parvum induces membrane translocation/insertion of SGLT1/Aqp1 are obscure. We report here that cultured human cholangiocytes express several nonmuscle myosins, including myosins IIA and IIB. Moreover, C. parvum infection of cultured cholangiocytes results in the localized selective aggregation of myosin IIB but not myosin IIA at the region of parasite attachment, as assessed by dual-label immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Concordantly, treatment of cells with the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor ML-7 or the myosin II-specific inhibitor blebbistatin or selective RNA-mediated repression of myosin IIB significantly inhibits (P < 0.05) C. parvum cellular invasion (by 60 to 80%). Furthermore ML-7 and blebbistatin significantly decrease (P < 0.02) C. parvum-induced accumulation of SGLT1 at infection sites (by approximately 80%). Thus, localized actomyosin-dependent membrane translocation of transporters/channels initiated by C. parvum is essential for membrane extension and parasite internalization, a phenomenon that may also be relevant to the mechanisms of cell membrane protrusion in general. PMID:20457792

  13. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... authentication. 1311.115 Section 1311.115 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... requirements for two-factor authentication. (a) To sign a controlled substance prescription, the electronic... authentication protocol that uses two of the following three factors: (1) Something only the practitioner...

  14. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... authentication. 1311.115 Section 1311.115 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... requirements for two-factor authentication. (a) To sign a controlled substance prescription, the electronic... authentication protocol that uses two of the following three factors: (1) Something only the practitioner...

  15. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... authentication. 1311.115 Section 1311.115 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... requirements for two-factor authentication. (a) To sign a controlled substance prescription, the electronic... authentication protocol that uses two of the following three factors: (1) Something only the practitioner...

  16. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... authentication. 1311.115 Section 1311.115 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... requirements for two-factor authentication. (a) To sign a controlled substance prescription, the electronic... authentication protocol that uses two of the following three factors: (1) Something only the practitioner...

  17. Girdin/GIV is upregulated by cyclic tension, propagates mechanical signal transduction, and is required for the cellular proliferation and migration of MG-63 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jiang-Tian; Li, Yan; Yu, Bing; Gao, Guo-Jie; Zhou, Ting; Li, Song

    2015-08-21

    To explore how Girdin/GIV is regulated by cyclic tension and propagates downstream signals to affect cell proliferation and migration. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were exposed to cyclic tension force at 4000 μstrain and 0.5 Hz for 6 h, produced by a four-point bending system. Cyclic tension force upregulated Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation in cultured MG-63 cells. Girdin and Akt each promoted the phosphorylation of the other under stimulated tension. In vitro MTT and transwell assays showed that Girdin and Akt are required for cell proliferation and migration during cellular quiescence. Moreover, STAT3 was determined to be essential for Girdin expression under stimulated tension force in the physiological condition, as well as for osteoblast proliferation and migration during quiescence. These findings suggest that the STAT3/Girdin/Akt pathway activates in osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and may play a significant role in triggering osteoblast proliferation and migration during orthodontic treatment. - Highlights: • Tension force upregulates Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation. • Girdin and Akt promotes the phosphorylation of each other under tension stimulation. • Girdin and Akt are required for MG-63 cell proliferation and migration. • STAT3 is essential for Girdin expression after application of the tension forces.

  18. Postures and Motions Library Development for Verification of Ground Crew Human Factors Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena; Jackson, Mariea Dunn; Dischinger, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft and launch vehicle ground processing activities require a variety of unique human activities. These activities are being documented in a primitive motion capture library. The library will be used by human factors engineering analysts to infuse real to life human activities into the CAD models to verify ground systems human factors requirements. As the primitive models are being developed for the library, the project has selected several current human factors issues to be addressed for the Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion launch systems. This paper explains how the motion capture of unique ground systems activities is being used to verify the human factors engineering requirements for ground systems used to process the SLS and Orion vehicles, and how the primitive models will be applied to future spacecraft and launch vehicle processing.

  19. USP17 is required for clathrin mediated endocytosis of epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Jakub; de la Vega, Michelle; Fletcher, Sarah J.; McFarlane, Cheryl; Greene, Michelle K.; Smyth, Andrew W.; Van Schaeybroeck, Sandra; Johnston, James A.; Scott, Christopher J.; Rappoport, Joshua Z.; Burrows, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we have shown that expression of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP17 is required for cell proliferation and motility. More recently we reported that USP17 deubiquitinates RCE1 isoform 2 and thus regulates the processing of ‘CaaX’ motif proteins. Here we now show that USP17 expression is induced by epidermal growth factor and that USP17 expression is required for clathrin mediated endocytosis of epidermal growth factor receptor. In addition, we show that USP17 is required for the endocytosis of transferrin, an archetypal substrate for clathrin mediated endocytosis, and that USP17 depletion impedes plasma membrane recruitment of the machinery required for clathrin mediated endocytosis. Thus, our data reveal that USP17 is necessary for epidermal growth factor receptor and transferrin endocytosis via clathrin coated pits, indicate this is mediated via the regulation of the recruitment of the components of the endocytosis machinery and suggest USP17 may play a general role in receptor endocytosis. PMID:25026282

  20. Structural studies on the RNA-recognition motif of NELF E, a cellular negative transcription elongation factor involved in the regulation of HIV transcription

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Jampani N.; Neumann, Liane; Wenzel, Sabine; Schweimer, Kristian; Rösch, Paul; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.

    2006-01-01

    The elongation of transcription of HIV RNA at the TAR (transactivation-response element) is highly regulated by positive and negative factors. The cellular negative transcription elongation factor NELF (negative elongation factor) was suggested to be involved in transcriptional regulation of HIV-1 (HIV type 1) by binding to the stem of the viral TAR RNA which is synthesized by cellular RNA polymerase II at the viral long terminal repeat. NELF is a heterotetrameric protein consisting of NELF A, B, C or the splice variant D, and E. In the present study, we determined the solution structure of the RRM (RNA-recognition motif) of the RNA-binding subunit NELF E and studied its interaction with the viral TAR RNA. Our results show that the separately expressed recombinant NELF E RRM has α-helical and β-strand elements adopting a βαββαβ fold and is able to bind to TAR RNA. Fluorescence equilibrium titrations with fluorescently labelled double- and single-stranded oligoribonucleotides representing the TAR RNA stem imply that NELF E RRM binds to the single-stranded TAR RNAs with Kd values in the low-micromolar range. PMID:16898873

  1. Purification of a cellular, double-stranded DNA-binding protein required for initiation of adenovirus DNA replication by using a rapid filter-binding assay.

    PubMed Central

    Diffley, J F; Stillman, B

    1986-01-01

    A rapid and quantitative nitrocellulose filter-binding assay is described for the detection of nuclear factor I, a HeLa cell sequence-specific DNA-binding protein required for the initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. In this assay, the abundant nonspecific DNA-binding activity present in unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts was greatly reduced by preincubation of these extracts with a homopolymeric competitor DNA. Subsequently, specific DNA-binding activity was detected as the preferential retention of a labeled 48-base-pair DNA fragment containing a functional nuclear factor I binding site compared with a control DNA fragment to which nuclear factor I did not bind specifically. This specific DNA-binding activity was shown to be both quantitative and time dependent. Furthermore, the conditions of this assay allowed footprinting of nuclear factor I in unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts and quantitative detection of the protein during purification. Using unfrozen HeLa cells and reagents known to limit endogenous proteolysis, nuclear factor I was purified to near homogeneity from HeLa nuclear extracts by a combination of standard chromatography and specific DNA affinity chromatography. Over a 400-fold purification of nuclear factor I, on the basis of the specific activity of both sequence-specific DNA binding and complementation of adenovirus DNA replication in vitro, was affected by this purification. The most highly purified fraction was greatly enriched for a polypeptide of 160 kilodaltons on silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Furthermore, this protein cosedimented with specific DNA-binding activity on glycerol gradients. That this fraction indeed contained nuclear factor I was demonstrated by both DNase I footprinting and its function in the initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. Finally, the stoichiometry of specific DNA binding by nuclear factor I is shown to be most consistent with 2 mol of the 160-kilodalton polypeptide

  2. ERp57 as a novel cellular factor controlling prion protein biosynthesis: Therapeutic potential of protein disulfide isomerases.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Martin; Rozas, Pablo; Hetz, Claudio; Medinas, Danilo B

    2016-01-01

    Disturbance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis is observed in Prion-related disorders (PrDs). The protein disulfide isomerase ERp57 is a stress-responsive ER chaperone up-regulated in the brain of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients. However, the actual role of ERp57 in prion protein (PrP) biogenesis and the ER stress response remained poorly defined. We have recently addressed this question using gain- and loss-of-function approaches in vitro and animal models, observing that ERp57 regulates steady-state levels of PrP. Our results revealed that ERp57 modulates the biosynthesis and maturation of PrP but, surprisingly, does not contribute to the global cellular reaction against ER stress in neurons. Here we discuss the relevance of ERp57 as a possible therapeutic target in PrDs and other protein misfolding disorders. PMID:26864548

  3. The ROP vesicle release factor is required in adult Drosophila glia for normal circadian behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Fanny S.; Jackson, F. Rob

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that endocytosis and/or vesicle recycling mechanisms are essential in adult Drosophila glial cells for the neuronal control of circadian locomotor activity. In this study, our goal was to identify specific glial vesicle trafficking, recycling, or release factors that are required for rhythmic behavior. From a glia-specific, RNAi-based genetic screen, we identified eight glial factors that are required for normally robust circadian rhythms in either a light-dark cycle or in constant dark conditions. In particular, we show that conditional knockdown of the ROP vesicle release factor in adult glial cells results in arrhythmic behavior. Immunostaining for ROP reveals reduced protein in glial cell processes and an accumulation of the Par Domain Protein 1ε (PDP1ε) clock output protein in the small lateral clock neurons. These results suggest that glia modulate rhythmic circadian behavior by secretion of factors that act on clock neurons to regulate a clock output factor. PMID:26190976

  4. Factors determining insulin requirements in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus during pregnancy: a review

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Harold David; Callaway, Leonie

    2014-01-01

    Most women with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have increased insulin requirements during pregnancy. However, a minority of women have a fall in insulin requirements. When this occurs in late gestation, it often provokes concern regarding possible compromise of the feto-placental unit. In some centres, this is considered as an indication for delivery, including premature delivery. There are, however, many other factors that affect insulin requirements in pregnancy in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus and the decline in insulin requirements may represent a variant of normal pregnancy. If there is no underlying pathological process, expedited delivery in these women is not warranted and confers increased risks to the newborn. We will explore the factors affecting insulin requirements in gestation in this review. We will also discuss some novel concepts regarding beta-cell function in pregnancy.

  5. Cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CAS) is linked to integrin β1 and required for tumor cell migration and invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Juliane; Roessler, Stephanie; Sticht, Carsten; DiGuilio, Amanda L.; Drucker, Elisabeth; Holzer, Kerstin; Eiteneuer, Eva; Herpel, Esther; Breuhahn, Kai; Gretz, Norbert; Schirmacher, Peter; Ori, Alessandro; Singer, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Importins and exportins represent an integral part of the nucleocytoplasmic transport machinery with fundamental importance for eukaryotic cell function. A variety of malignancies including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) show de-regulation of nuclear transport factors such as overexpression of the exportin Cellular Apoptosis Susceptibility (CAS). The functional implications of CAS in hepatocarcinogenesis remain, however, poorly understood. Here we integrated proteomics, transcriptomics and functional assays with patient data to further characterize the role of CAS in HCC. By analyzing ∼ 1700 proteins using quantitative mass spectrometry in HCC cells we found that CAS depletion by RNAi leads to de-regulation of integrins, particularly down-regulation of integrin β1. Consistent with this finding, CAS knockdown resulted in substantially reduced migration and invasion of HCC cell lines as analyzed by 2D ‘scratch’ and invasion chamber assays, respectively. Supporting the potential in vivo relevance, high expression levels of CAS in HCC tissue samples were associated with macroangioinvasion and poorer patient outcome. Our data suggest a previously unanticipated link between CAS and integrin signaling which correlates with an aggressive HCC phenotype. PMID:27015362

  6. The transcription factor VpCRZ1 is required for fruiting body formation and pathogenicity in Valsa pyri.

    PubMed

    He, Feng; Zhang, Xiong; Mafurah, Joseph Juma; Zhang, Meixiang; Qian, Guoliang; Wang, Rongbo; Safdar, Asma; Yang, Xiaolei; Liu, Fengquan; Dou, Daolong

    2016-06-01

    Valsa pyri is a fatal pathogenic fungus that causes pear and apple canker disease. To date, its cellular development and pathogenicity have been poorly understood. In this study, a V. pyri Ca(2+)/calcineurin-dependent transcription factor CRZ1 (VpCRZ1) is identified and functionally characterized. The △VpCRZ1 mutant exhibits impaired pathogenicity and is no longer able to form fruiting body. Interestingly, this mutant also exhibits enhanced pigment deposition and increased resistance to cell wall perturbing agents including SDS, Congo red and calcofluor white (CFW). The expression levels of Congo red resistance genes (VpRCR1 and VpRCR2) and chitin synthetase genes (VpCHS2 and VpCHS6) are upregulated in the △VpCRZ1 mutant compared to the wild type. Furthermore, We show that a VpCRZ1: eGFP fusion protein localizes to the nucleus in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner similar to its homologs in other fungi, and that the VpFKS1, VpPMC1, VpPMC2, VpPMR1, and VpPMA1 genes are regulated by VpCRZ1 in response to Ca(2+) levels. Together, these results suggest that VpCRZ1 is a Ca(2+)-dependent transcription factor and required for regulating mycelial morphology, fruiting body formation, and virulence of this important pear and apple pathogen. PMID:26970115

  7. Tumor Cellular Proteasome Inhibition and Growth Suppression by 8-Hydroxyquinoline and Clioquinol Requires Their Capabilities to Bind Copper and Transport Copper into Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Shumei; Yang, Lei; Cui, Qiuzhi Cindy; Sun, Ying; Dou, Q. Ping; Yan, Bing

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported that when mixed with copper, 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-OHQ) and its analog clioquinol (CQ) inhibited the proteasomal activity and proliferation in cultured human cancer cells. CQ treatment of high copper-containing human tumor xenografts also caused cancer suppression, associated with proteasome inhibition in vivo. However, the nature of copper dependence of these events has not been elucidated experimentally. In the current study, by using chemical probe molecules that mimic structures of 8-OHQ and CQ, but have no copper binding capability, we dissected the complex cellular processes elicited by 8-OHQ-Cu or CQ-Cu mixture and revealed that copper-binding to 8-OHQ or CQ is required for transportation of copper complex into human breast cancer cells and the consequent proteasome-inhibitory, growth-suppressive and apoptosis-inducing activities. In contrast, the non-copper-binding analogs of 8-OHQ or CQ blocked the very first step – copper binding in this chain of events mediated by 8-OHQ-Cu or CQ-Cu. PMID:19809836

  8. Time course of increased cellular proliferation in collateral arteries after administration of vascular endothelial growth factor in a rabbit model of lower limb vascular insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, S.; Rossow, S. T.; Kearney, M.; Zheng, L. P.; Bauters, C.; Bunting, S.; Ferrara, N.; Symes, J. F.; Isner, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Proliferation of vascular cells has been previously shown to contribute to spontaneous development of coronary collaterals. Recent studies from several laboratories have established that collateral artery growth in both the heart and limb can be enhanced by administration of angiogenic growth factors, or therapeutic angiogenesis. In this study, we sought (1) to define the extent and time course of endothelial cell (EC) and smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation accompanying spontaneous collateral development during limb ischemia and (2) to determine the extent to which proliferative activity of ECs and SMCs is augmented during therapeutic angiogenesis with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a heparin-binding EC-specific mitogen. Ten days after induction of limb ischemia by surgically excising the femoral artery of rabbits, either VEGF (500 to 1000 micrograms) or saline was administered as a bolus into the iliac artery of the ischemic limb. Cellular proliferation was evaluated by bromodeoxyuridine labeling for 24 hours at day 0 (immediately before VEGF administration) and at days 3, 5, and 7 after VEGF, EC proliferation in the midzone collaterals of VEGF-treated animals increased 2.8-fold at day 5 (P < 0.05 versus control), and returned to baseline levels by day 7. SMC proliferation in midzone collaterals also increased 2.7-fold in response to VEGF (P < 0.05). No significant increase in EC or SMC proliferation was observed in either the stem or re-entry collaterals of VEGF-treated animals compared with untreated ischemic control animals. Reduction of hemodynamic deficit in the ischemic limb measured by lower limb blood pressure was documented at day 7 after VEGF (P < 0.01 versus untreated, ischemic control). These data thus (1) establish the contribution of cellular proliferation to collateral vessel development in limb ischemia and (2) support the concept that augmented cellular proliferation contributes to the enhanced formation of collateral vessels after

  9. Factors influencing the transfection efficiency and cellular uptake mechanisms of Pluronic P123-modified polypropyleneimine/pDNA polyplexes in multidrug resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jijin; Hao, Junguo; Fang, Xiaoling; Sha, Xianyi

    2016-04-01

    Generally, the major obstacles for efficient gene delivery are cellular internalization and endosomal escape of nucleic acid such as plasmid DNA (pDNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA). We previously developed Pluronic P123 modified polypropyleneimine (PPI)/pDNA (P123-PPI/pDNA) polyplexes as a gene delivery system. The results showed that P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes revealed higher transfection efficiency than PPI/pDNA polyplexes in multidrug resistant breast cancer cells. As a continued effort, the present investigation on the factors influencing the transfection efficiency, cellular uptake mechanisms, and intracellular fate of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes is reported. The presence of P123 was the main factor influencing the transfection efficiency of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes in MCF-7/ADR cells, but other parameters, such as N/P ratio, FBS concentration, incubation time and temperature were important as well. The endocytic inhibitors against clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), caveolae-mediated endocytosis (CvME), and macropinocytosis were involved in the internalization to investigate their effects on the cellular uptake and transfection efficiency of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes in vitro. The data showed that the internalization of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes was obtained from both CME and CvME. Colocalization experiments with TRITC-transferrin (CME indicator), Alexa Fluor 555-CTB (CvME indicator), monoclonal anti-α-tubulin (microtubule indicator), and LysoTracker Green (Endosome/lysosome indicator) were carried out to confirm the internalization routes. The results showed that both CME and CvME played vital roles in the effective transfection of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes. Endosome/lysosome system and skeleton, including actin filament and microtubule, were necessary for the transportation after internalization. PMID:26741268

  10. The coordinate cellular response to insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) is regulated through vimentin binding to receptor tyrosine phosphatase β (RPTPβ).

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinchun; Xi, Gang; Wai, Christine; Clemmons, David R

    2015-05-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) functions coordinately with IGF-I to stimulate cellular proliferation and differentiation. IGFBP-2 binds to receptor tyrosine phosphatase β (RPTPβ), and this binding in conjunction with IGF-I receptor stimulation induces RPTPβ polymerization leading to phosphatase and tensin homolog inactivation, AKT stimulation, and enhanced cell proliferation. To determine the mechanism by which RPTPβ polymerization is regulated, we analyzed the protein(s) that associated with RPTPβ in response to IGF-I and IGFBP-2 in vascular smooth muscle cells. Proteomic experiments revealed that IGF-I stimulated the intermediate filament protein vimentin to bind to RPTPβ, and knockdown of vimentin resulted in failure of IGFBP-2 and IGF-I to stimulate RPTPβ polymerization. Knockdown of IGFBP-2 or inhibition of IGF-IR tyrosine kinase disrupted vimentin/RPTPβ association. Vimentin binding to RPTPβ was mediated through vimentin serine phosphorylation. The serine threonine kinase PKCζ was recruited to vimentin in response to IGF-I and inhibition of PKCζ activation blocked these signaling events. A cell-permeable peptide that contained the vimentin phosphorylation site disrupted vimentin/RPTPβ association, and IGF-I stimulated RPTPβ polymerization and AKT activation. Integrin-linked kinase recruited PKCζ to SHPS-1-associated vimentin in response to IGF-I and inhibition of integrin-linked kinase/PKCζ association reduced vimentin serine phosphorylation. PKCζ stimulation of vimentin phosphorylation required high glucose and vimentin/RPTPβ-association occurred only during hyperglycemia. Disruption of vimetin/RPTPβ in diabetic mice inhibited RPTPβ polymerization, vimentin serine phosphorylation, and AKT activation in response to IGF-I, whereas nondiabetic mice showed no difference. The induction of vimentin phosphorylation is important for IGFBP-2-mediated enhancement of IGF-I-stimulated proliferation during hyperglycemia, and it

  11. Hepatic nuclear factor 3 is an accessory factor required for the stimulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene transcription by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, J C; Strömstedt, P E; O'Brien, R M; Granner, D K

    1996-07-01

    Transcription of the hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene is stimulated by glucocorticoids and inhibited by insulin. The glucocorticoid response is mediated by a complex glucocorticoid response unit that consists of two glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-binding sites (GR1 and GR2) and two accessory factor-binding sites (AF1 and AF2). The complete unit is required for the full glucocorticoid response. The dominant insulin effect is mediated in part through an insulin response sequence that is coincident with the AF2 element. Members of the hepatic nuclear factor 3 (HNF3) and CCAAT enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) families bind to the AF2 element; however, there is no correlation between binding of these factors and the ability of the AF2 element to mediate an insulin response. We show here that binding of HNF3 does correlate with the stimulation of the glucocorticoid response by the AF2 element and that C/EBP is apparently not involved in this effect. This requirement for HNF3 is quite specific since the substitution of elements known to enhance the action of the GR in other promoters fails to recapitulate AF2 accessory factor activity. By contrast, an HNF3-binding site from the transthyretin gene is able to substitute for the wild type AF2 sequence and elicit a maximal glucocorticoid response. Based on current and previous observations, the glucocorticoid response unit consists of four DNA elements that bind four different proteins. These are: AF1 (hepatic nuclear factor 4/chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor), AF2 (HNF3), GR1 (GR), and GR2 (GR). PMID:8813720

  12. Fat-specific protein 27 modulates nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 and the cellular response to stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27), a member of the cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor a-like effector (Cide) family, is highly expressed in adipose tissues and is a lipid droplet (LD)-associated protein that induces the accumulation of LDs. Using a yeast two-hybrid system to examine potentia...

  13. Motif affinity and mass spectrometry proteomic approach for the discovery of cellular AMPK targets: identification of mitochondrial fission factor as a new AMPK substrate.

    PubMed

    Ducommun, Serge; Deak, Maria; Sumpton, David; Ford, Rebecca J; Núñez Galindo, Antonio; Kussmann, Martin; Viollet, Benoit; Steinberg, Gregory R; Foretz, Marc; Dayon, Loïc; Morrice, Nicholas A; Sakamoto, Kei

    2015-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key cellular energy sensor and regulator of metabolic homeostasis. Although it is best known for its effects on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, AMPK is implicated in diverse cellular processes, including mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy, and cell growth and proliferation. To further our understanding of energy homeostasis through AMPK-dependent processes, the design and application of approaches to identify and characterise novel AMPK substrates are invaluable. Here, we report an affinity proteomicstrategy for the discovery and validation of AMPK targets using an antibody to isolate proteins containing the phospho-AMPK substrate recognition motif from hepatocytes that had been treated with pharmacological AMPK activators. We identified 57 proteins that were uniquely enriched in the activator-treated hepatocytes, but were absent in hepatocytes lacking AMPK. We focused on two candidates, cingulin and mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), and further characterised/validated them as AMPK-dependent targets by immunoblotting with phosphorylation site-specific antibodies. A small-molecule AMPK activator caused transient phosphorylation of endogenous cingulin at S137 in intestinal Caco2 cells. Multiple splice-variants of MFF appear to express in hepatocytes and we identified a common AMPK-dependent phospho-site (S129) in all the 3 predominant variants spanning the mass range and a short variant-specific site (S146). Collectively, our proteomic-based approach using a phospho-AMPK substrate antibody in combination with genetic models and selective AMPK activators will provide a powerful and reliable platform for identifying novel AMPK-dependent cellular targets. PMID:25683918

  14. Inhibition of cellular proliferation and modulation of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins by retinoids in a bovine mammary epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Woodward, T L; Turner, J D; Hung, H T; Zhao, X

    1996-06-01

    Retinoids are potent inhibitors of growth and tumor progression in many mammary carcinoma cell lines, though regulation of growth in nontumorigenic mammary epithelial cells by retinoids is less clear. Here, we have characterized the inhibition of MAC-T (a nontransformed bovine mammary epithelial cell line) cellular proliferation by retinoids and their role in regulating insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs). Retinoic acid (RA) (100 nM) was a potent inhibitor of MAC-T cell proliferation. Retinol was 10-100 times less effective. Neither retinoid could completely arrest growth at noncytotoxic concentrations. Retinoic acid inhibited cellular proliferation by 1 h (P < .05), but inhibition was fivefold greater by 24 h (P < .01). This second stage of growth inhibition (after 12 h) was dependent upon protein synthesis. However, RA-induced inhibition of cellular proliferation did not persist, with thymidine incorporation increasing toward control levels by 4 days in culture. Retinoic acid was less effective in inhibiting thymidine incorporation when cells were stimulated with insulin, des(1-3) IGF-I, or Long(R3) IGF-I when compared to cells stimulated with native IGF-I or serum. Inhibition of proliferation by RA was associated with increased levels of IGFBP-2 in conditioned media and in plasma membrane preparations. Treatment with insulin or des(1-3) IGF-I resulted in the appearance of IGFBP-3 in conditioned media and on the cell surface. However, RA significantly reduced IGFBP-3 levels in conditioned media and eliminated IGFBP-3 associated with the plasma membrane. Thus, RA is a potent but transient inhibitor of bovine mammary epithelial cell proliferation, and this growth inhibition is correlated with increased IGFBP-2 accumulation and inhibition of IGF-I stimulated IGFBP-3 protein secretion. PMID:8655603

  15. 34 CFR 373.6 - What are the priorities and other factors and requirements for competitions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the priorities and other factors and requirements for competitions? 373.6 Section 373.6 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...

  16. Inhibition of cellular proliferation by the Wilms' tumor suppressor WT1 is associated with suppression of insulin-like growth factor I receptor gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, H; Shen-Orr, Z; Rauscher, F J; Morris, J F; Roberts, C T; LeRoith, D

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-I-R) gene promoter by the Wilms' tumor suppressor WT1 in intact cells. The levels of endogenous IGF-I-R mRNA and the activity of IGF-I-R gene promoter fragments in luciferase reporter constructs were found to be significantly higher in G401 cells (a Wilms' tumor-derived cell line lacking detectable WT1 mRNA) than in 293 cells (a human embryonic kidney cell line which expresses significant levels of WT1 mRNA). To study whether WT1 could suppress the expression of the endogenous IGF-I-R gene, WT1-negative G401 cells were stably transfected with a WT1 expression vector. Expression of WT1 mRNA in G401 cells resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of cellular proliferation, which was associated with a reduction in the levels of IGF-I-R mRNA, promoter activity, and ligand binding and with a reduction in IGF-I-stimulated cellular proliferation, thymidine incorporation, and anchorage-independent growth. These data suggest that a major aspect of the action of the WT1 tumor suppressor is the repression of IGF-I-R gene expression. PMID:7791758

  17. Cellular Factor XIIIA Transglutaminase Localizes in Caveolae and Regulates Caveolin-1 Phosphorylation, Homo-oligomerization and c-Src Signaling in Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Kaartinen, Mari T

    2015-11-01

    Transglutaminases (TGs) are a family of widely distributed enzymes that catalyze protein crosslinking by forming a covalent isopeptide bond between the substrate proteins. We have shown that MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts express Factor XIII-A (FXIII-A), and that the extracellular crosslinking activity of FXIII-A is involved in regulating matrix secretion and deposition. In this study, we have investigated the localization and potential role of intracellular FXIII-A. Conventional immunofluorescence microscopy and TIRF microscopy analyses showed that FXIII-A co-localizes with caveolin-1 in specialized membrane structures, caveolae, in differentiating osteoblasts. The caveolae-disrupting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin abolished FXIII-A staining and co-localization with caveolin-1 from the osteoblast plasma membrane. The presence of FXIII-A in caveolae was confirmed by preparing caveolae-enriched cellular fractions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation followed by western blotting. Despite this association of FXIII-A with caveolae, there was no detectable transglutaminase activity in caveolae, as measured by monodansylcadaverine incorporation. TG inhibitor NC9--which can alter TG enzyme conformation--localized to caveolae and displaced FXIII-A from these structures when added to the osteoblast cultures. The decreased FXIII-A levels in caveolae after NC9 treatment increased c-Src activation, which resulted in caveolin-1 phosphorylation, homo-oligomerization and Akt phosphorylation, suggesting cellular FXIII-A has a role in regulating c-Src signaling in osteoblasts. PMID:26231113

  18. The HCMV gH/gL/UL128-131 Complex Triggers the Specific Cellular Activation Required for Efficient Viral Internalization into Target Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nogalski, Maciej T.; Chan, Gary C. T.; Stevenson, Emily V.; Collins-McMillen, Donna K.; Yurochko, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    We have established that HCMV acts as a specific ligand engaging and activating cellular integrins on monocytes. As a result, integrin signaling via Src activation leads to the functional activation of paxillin required for efficient viral entry and for the biological changes in monocytes needed for viral dissemination. These biological/molecular changes allow HCMV to use monocytes as “vehicles” for systemic spread and the establishment of lifelong persistence. However, it remains unresolved how HCMV specifically induces this observed monocyte activation. It was previously demonstrated that the HCMV gH/gL/UL128-131 glycoprotein complex facilitates viral entry into biologically relevant cell types. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which the gH/gL/UL128-131 complex promotes this process is unknown. We now show that only HCMV virions possessing the gH/gL/UL128-131 complex are capable of activating integrin/Src/paxillin-signaling in monocytes. In fibroblasts, this signaling is reversed, such that virus lacking the gH/gL/UL128-131 complex is the only virus able to induce the paxillin activation cascade. The presence of the gH/gL/UL128-131 complex also may have an inhibitory effect on integrin-mediated signaling pathway in fibroblasts. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the presence of the gH/gL/UL128-131 complex on the viral envelope, through its activation of the integrin/Src/paxillin pathway, is necessary for efficient HCMV internalization into monocytes and that appropriate actin and dynamin regulation is critical for this entry process. Importantly, productive infection in monocyte-derived macrophages was seen only in cells exposed to HCMV expressing the gH/gL/UL128-131 complex. From our data, the HCMV gH/gL/U128-131 complex emerges as the specific ligand driving the activation of the receptor-mediated signaling required for the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and, consequently, for efficient and productive internalization of HCMV into monocytes. To our

  19. Activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and not activator protein-1 in cellular response to nickel compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi; Davidson, Gerard; Li, Jingxia; Yan, Yan; Chen, Fei; Costa, Max; Chen, Lung Chi; Huang, Chuanshu

    2002-01-01

    The predominant exposure route for nickel compounds is by inhalation, and several studies have indicated the correlation between nickel exposure and respiratory cancers. The tumor-promoting effects of nickel compounds are thought to be associated with their transactivation of transcription factors. We have investigated the possible activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor KB (NF-kappaB) in mouse C141 epidermal cells and fibroblasts 3T3 and B82, and human bronchoepithelial BEAS-2B cells in response to nickel compound exposure. Our results show that NF-kappaB activity is induced by nickel exposure in 3T3 and BEAS-2B cells. Conversely, similar nickel treatment of these cells did not induce AP-1 activity, suggesting that nickel tumorigenesis occurs through NF-kappaB and not AP-1. We also investigated the role of NF-kappaB in the induction of Cap43 by nickel compounds using dominant negative mutant Ikappabeta kinase b-KM BEAS-2B transfectants. PMID:12426142

  20. BAX is required for neuronal death after trophic factor deprivation and during development.

    PubMed

    Deckwerth, T L; Elliott, J L; Knudson, C M; Johnson, E M; Snider, W D; Korsmeyer, S J

    1996-09-01

    Members of the BCL2-related family of proteins either promote or repress programmed cell death. BAX, a death-promoting member, heterodimerizes with multiple death-repressing molecules, suggesting that it could prove critical to cell death. We tested whether Bax is required for neuronal death by trophic factor deprivation and during development. Neonatal sympathetic neurons and facial motor neurons from Bax-deficient mice survived nerve growth factor deprivation and disconnection from their targets by axotomy, respectively. These salvaged neurons displayed remarkable soma atrophy and reduced elaboration of neurities; yet they responded to readdition of trophic factor with soma hypertrophy and enhanced neurite outgrowth. Bax-deficient superior cervical ganglia and facial nuclei possessed increased numbers of neurons. Our observations demonstrate that trophic factor deprivation-induced death of sympathetic and motor neurons depends on Bax. PMID:8816704

  1. Expression of the Human Endogenous Retrovirus HTDV/HERV-K Is Enhanced by Cellular Transcription Factor YY1

    PubMed Central

    Knössl, Michael; Löwer, Roswitha; Löwer, Johannes

    1999-01-01

    The human endogenous retrovirus HTDV/HERV-K, which resides in moderate copy numbers in the human genome, is expressed in a cell-type-specific manner, predominantly in teratocarcinoma cells. We have analyzed the regulatory potential of the 5′ enhancer of the HERV-K long terminal repeat. Protein extracts of HERV-K-expressing teratocarcinoma cell lines (GH and Tera2) and nonexpressing HeLa and HepG2 cells form different protein complexes on the enhancer sequence as detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Using competition EMSAs, DNase I footprinting, and supershift experiments, we localized the binding site of these complexes to a 20-bp sequence within the enhancer and showed that the transcription factor YY1 is one component of the HERV-K enhancer complex. Replacement of the YY1 binding site with unrelated sequences reduced expression of the luciferase gene as a reporter in transient-transfection assays. PMID:9882329

  2. Human Factors Engineering Requirements for the International Space Station - Successes and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, M.; Blume, J.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced technology coupled with the desire to explore space has resulted in increasingly longer human space missions. Indeed, any exploration mission outside of Earth's neighborhood, in other words, beyond the moon, will necessarily be several months or even years. The International Space Station (ISS) serves as an important advancement toward executing a successful human space mission that is longer than a standard trip around the world or to the moon. The ISS, which is a permanently occupied microgravity research facility orbiting the earth, will support missions four to six months in duration. In planning for the ISS, the NASA developed an agency-wide set of human factors standards for the first time in a space exploration program. The Man-Systems Integration Standard (MSIS), NASA-STD-3000, a multi-volume set of guidelines for human-centered design in microgravity, was developed with the cooperation of human factors experts from various NASA centers, industry, academia, and other government agencies. The ISS program formed a human factors team analogous to any major engineering subsystem. This team develops and maintains the human factors requirements regarding end-to-end architecture design and performance, hardware and software design requirements, and test and verification requirements. It is also responsible for providing program integration across all of the larger scale elements, smaller scale hardware, and international partners.

  3. Comprehensive Identification of Krüppel-Like Factor Family Members Contributing to the Self-Renewal of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells and Cellular Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyojung; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Azami, Takuya; Khoa, Le Tran Phuc; Yanagisawa, Jun; Takahashi, Satoru; Ema, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotency is maintained in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and is induced from somatic cells by the activation of appropriate transcriptional regulatory networks. Krüppel-like factor gene family members, such as Klf2, Klf4 and Klf5, have important roles in maintaining the undifferentiated state of mouse ES cells as well as in cellular reprogramming, yet it is not known whether other Klf family members exert self-renewal and reprogramming functions when overexpressed. In this study, we examined whether overexpression of any representative Klf family member, such as Klf1-Klf10, would be sufficient for the self-renewal of mouse ES cells. We found that only Klf2, Klf4, and Klf5 produced leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-independent self-renewal, although most KLF proteins, if not all, have the ability to occupy the regulatory regions of Nanog, a critical Klf target gene. We also examined whether overexpression of any of Klf1-Klf10 would be sufficient to convert epiblast stem cells into a naïve pluripotent state and found that Klf5 had such reprogramming ability, in addition to Klf2 and Klf4. We also delineated the functional domains of the Klf2 protein for LIF-independent self-renewal and reprogramming. Interestingly, we found that both the N-terminal transcriptional activation and C-terminal zinc finger domains were indispensable for this activity. Taken together, our comprehensive analysis provides new insight into the contribution of Klf family members to mouse ES self-renewal and cellular reprogramming. PMID:26943822

  4. The SEB-1 Transcription Factor Binds to the STRE Motif in Neurospora crassa and Regulates a Variety of Cellular Processes Including the Stress Response and Reserve Carbohydrate Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Kowbel, David John; Fioramonte, Mariana; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Glass, N Louise; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress conditions, all cells induce mechanisms resulting in an attempt to adapt to stress that involve proteins which, once activated, trigger cell responses by modulating specific signaling pathways. In this work, using a combination of pulldown assays and mass spectrometry analyses, we identified the Neurospora crassa SEB-1 transcription factor that binds to the Stress Response Element (STRE) under heat stress. Orthologs of SEB-1 have been functionally characterized in a few filamentous fungi as being involved in stress responses; however, the molecular mechanisms mediated by this transcription factor may not be conserved. Here, we provide evidences for the involvement of N. crassa SEB-1 in multiple cellular processes, including response to heat, as well as osmotic and oxidative stress. The Δseb-1 strain displayed reduced growth under these conditions, and genes encoding stress-responsive proteins were differentially regulated in the Δseb-1 strain grown under the same conditions. In addition, the SEB-1-GFP protein translocated from the cytosol to the nucleus under heat, osmotic, and oxidative stress conditions. SEB-1 also regulates the metabolism of the reserve carbohydrates glycogen and trehalose under heat stress, suggesting an interconnection between metabolism control and this environmental condition. We demonstrated that SEB-1 binds in vivo to the promoters of genes encoding glycogen metabolism enzymes and regulates their expression. A genome-wide transcriptional profile of the Δseb-1 strain under heat stress was determined by RNA-seq, and a broad range of cellular processes was identified that suggests a role for SEB-1 as a protein interconnecting these mechanisms. PMID:26994287

  5. Cellular transcription factor Oct-1 interacts with the Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 protein to promote disruption of viral latency.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Amanda R; Kwek, Swee Sen; Hagemeier, Stacy R; Wille, Coral K; Kenney, Shannon C

    2011-09-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent-to-lytic switch is an essential part of the viral life cycle, but the cellular factors that promote viral reactivation are not well defined. In this report, we demonstrate that the cellular transcription factor Oct-1 cooperates with the EBV immediate-early protein BRLF1 (R, Rta) to induce lytic viral reactivation. We show that cotransfected Oct-1 enhances the ability of BRLF1 to activate lytic gene expression in 293 cells stably infected with a BRLF1-defective EBV mutant (BRLF1-stop) and that Oct-1 increases BRLF1-mediated activation of lytic EBV promoters in reporter gene assays. We find that Oct-1 interacts directly with BRLF1 in vitro and that a mutant BRLF1 protein (the M140A mutant) attenuated for the ability to interact with Oct-1 in vitro is also resistant to Oct-1-mediated transcriptional enhancement in 293 BRLF1-stop cells. Furthermore, we show that cotransfected Oct-1 augments BRLF1 binding to a variety of lytic EBV promoters in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays (including the BZLF1, BMRF1, and SM promoters) and that BRLF1 tethers Oct-1 to lytic EBV promoters. In addition, we demonstrate that an Oct-1 mutant defective in DNA binding (the S335D mutant) still retains the ability to enhance BRLF1 transcriptional effects. Finally, we show that knockdown of endogenous Oct-1 expression reduces the level of constitutive lytic EBV gene expression in both EBV-positive B-cell and EBV-positive epithelial cell lines. These results suggest that Oct-1 acts as a positive regulator of EBV lytic gene expression and that this effect is at least partially mediated through its interaction with the viral protein BRLF1. PMID:21697476

  6. The SEB-1 Transcription Factor Binds to the STRE Motif in Neurospora crassa and Regulates a Variety of Cellular Processes Including the Stress Response and Reserve Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Kowbel, David John; Fioramonte, Mariana; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Glass, N. Louise; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress conditions, all cells induce mechanisms resulting in an attempt to adapt to stress that involve proteins which, once activated, trigger cell responses by modulating specific signaling pathways. In this work, using a combination of pulldown assays and mass spectrometry analyses, we identified the Neurospora crassa SEB-1 transcription factor that binds to the Stress Response Element (STRE) under heat stress. Orthologs of SEB-1 have been functionally characterized in a few filamentous fungi as being involved in stress responses; however, the molecular mechanisms mediated by this transcription factor may not be conserved. Here, we provide evidences for the involvement of N. crassa SEB-1 in multiple cellular processes, including response to heat, as well as osmotic and oxidative stress. The Δseb-1 strain displayed reduced growth under these conditions, and genes encoding stress-responsive proteins were differentially regulated in the Δseb-1 strain grown under the same conditions. In addition, the SEB-1-GFP protein translocated from the cytosol to the nucleus under heat, osmotic, and oxidative stress conditions. SEB-1 also regulates the metabolism of the reserve carbohydrates glycogen and trehalose under heat stress, suggesting an interconnection between metabolism control and this environmental condition. We demonstrated that SEB-1 binds in vivo to the promoters of genes encoding glycogen metabolism enzymes and regulates their expression. A genome-wide transcriptional profile of the Δseb-1 strain under heat stress was determined by RNA-seq, and a broad range of cellular processes was identified that suggests a role for SEB-1 as a protein interconnecting these mechanisms. PMID:26994287

  7. Characterization of a Novel Human Herpesvirus 8-Encoded Protein, vIRF-3, That Shows Homology to Viral and Cellular Interferon Regulatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lubyova, Barbora; Pitha, Paula M.

    2000-01-01

    The genome of the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) contains a cluster of open reading frames (ORFs) encoding proteins with homology to the cellular transcription factors of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family. Two of these homologues, vIRF-1 and vIRF-2, were previously identified and functionally analyzed. In this study, we have characterized a novel gene, designated vIRF-3, encoded within the previously predicted ORF K10.5 and our newly identified ORF K10.6. Northern blotting of RNA extracted from BCBL-1 cells with a vIRF-3-specific probe and reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed a single transcript of 2.2 kb with a splice present in the coding region. The vIRF-3 mRNA levels in BCBL-1 cells were increased upon 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment, with kinetics of expression similar to those of the early immediate genes. The vIRF-3 ORF encodes a 73-kDa protein with homology to cellular IRF-4 and HHV-8-encoded vIRF-2 and K11. In transient transfection assays with the IFNACAT reporter, vIRF-3 functioned as a dominant-negative mutant of both IRF-3 and IRF-7 and inhibited virus-mediated transcriptional activity of the IFNA promoter. Similarly, the overexpression of vIRF-3 in mouse L929 cells resulted in inhibition of virus-mediated synthesis of biologically active interferons. These results suggest that by targeting IRF-3 and IRF-7, which play a critical role in the activation of alpha/beta interferon (IFN) genes, HHV-8 has evolved a mechanism by which it directly subverts the functions of IRFs and down-regulates the induction of the IFN genes that are important components of the innate immunity. PMID:10933732

  8. Krüppel-like Factor 3 (KLF3/BKLF) Is Required for Widespread Repression of the Inflammatory Modulator Galectin-3 (Lgals3).

    PubMed

    Knights, Alexander J; Yik, Jinfen J; Mat Jusoh, Hanapi; Norton, Laura J; Funnell, Alister P W; Pearson, Richard C M; Bell-Anderson, Kim S; Crossley, Merlin; Quinlan, Kate G R

    2016-07-29

    The Lgals3 gene encodes a multifunctional β-galactoside-binding protein, galectin-3. Galectin-3 has been implicated in a broad range of biological processes from chemotaxis and inflammation to fibrosis and apoptosis. The role of galectin-3 as a modulator of inflammation has been studied intensively, and recent evidence suggests that it may serve as a protective factor in obesity and other metabolic disorders. Despite considerable interest in galectin-3, little is known about its physiological regulation at the transcriptional level. Here, using knockout mice, chromatin immunoprecipitations, and cellular and molecular analyses, we show that the zinc finger transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 3 (KLF3) directly represses galectin-3 transcription. We find that galectin-3 is broadly up-regulated in KLF3-deficient mouse tissues, that KLF3 occupies regulatory regions of the Lgals3 gene, and that KLF3 directly binds its cognate elements (CACCC boxes) in the galectin-3 promoter and represses its activation in cellular assays. We also provide mechanistic insights into the regulation of Lgals3, demonstrating that C-terminal binding protein (CtBP) is required to drive optimal KLF3-mediated silencing. These findings help to enhance our understanding of how expression of the inflammatory modulator galectin-3 is controlled, opening up avenues for potential therapeutic interventions in the future. PMID:27226561

  9. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor mediated cellular and subcellular targeted delivery of Iron oxide core-Titanium dioxide shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ye

    TiO2 nanomaterials can carry a multitude of therapeutic and diagnostic agents and the semiconductor properties of TiO2 allow for the production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species following photoactivation. However, the delivery of these nanomaterials to specific cancer cells and specific subcellular organelles within these cells can have a substantial impact on the efficacy and safety of TiO2 nanoparticle therapeutics. Targeting cell surface receptors that are overexpressed by cancer cells is one strategy to improve the specificity of nanoparticle delivery. Therefore we decided to target the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) because ligand- binding induces rapid receptor endocytosis and ligand-bound EGFR can translocate to the nucleus of cancer cells. To create NPs that can bind EGFR, we identified a peptide derived from the B-loop of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) that has been shown to bind and activate EGFR and conjugated it to the surface of Fe3O4 core-TiO2 shell NPs to produce B-loop NCs. We then devised a pulldown assay to show that B-loop NCs, but not bare NPs or NCs carrying a scrambled B-loop peptide, can bind and extract EGFR from HeLa cell protein extracts. Interestingly, B-loop NCs can also pulldown importin-beta, a protein that can transport EGFR to the nucleus. Furthermore, we used flow cytometry and fluorescently labeled NPs to show that B-loop peptides can significantly improve the internalization of NPs by EGFR-expressing HeLa cells. We determined that B-loop NCs can bind EGFR on the membrane of HeLa cells and that these NCs can be transported to the nucleus, by using a combination of confocal microscopy and X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy (XFM) to indirectly and directly track the subcellular distribution of NCs. Finally, we demonstrate how the Bionanoprobe, a novel high-resolution XFM apparatus that can scan whole-mounted, frozen-hydrated cells at multiple angles can be used to verify the subcellular distribution of B-loop NCs.

  10. Meeting Human Reliability Requirements through Human Factors Design, Testing, and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. Boring

    2007-06-01

    In the design of novel systems, it is important for the human factors engineer to work in parallel with the human reliability analyst to arrive at the safest achievable design that meets design team safety goals and certification or regulatory requirements. This paper introduces the System Development Safety Triptych, a checklist of considerations for the interplay of human factors and human reliability through design, testing, and modeling in product development. This paper also explores three phases of safe system development, corresponding to the conception, design, and implementation of a system.