Sample records for cement production process

  1. Identifying improvement potentials in cement production with life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Michael Elias; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2010-12-01

    Cement production is an environmentally relevant process responsible for 5% of total anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions and 7% of industrial fuel use. In this study, life cycle assessment is used to evaluate improvement potentials in the cement production process in Europe and the USA. With a current fuel substitution rate of 18% in Europe and 11% in the USA, both regions have a substantial potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and save virgin resources by further increasing the coprocessing of waste fuels. Upgrading production technology would be particularly effective in the USA where many kiln systems with very low energy efficiency are still in operation. Using best available technology and a thermal substitution rate of 50% for fuels, greenhouse gas emissions could be reduced by 9% for Europe and 18% for the USA per tonne of cement. Since clinker production is the dominant pollution producing step in cement production, the substitution of clinker with mineral components such as ground granulated blast furnace slag or fly ash is an efficient measure to reduce the environmental impact. Blended cements exhibit substantially lower environmental footprints than Portland cement, even if the substitutes feature lower grindability and require additional drying and large transport distances. The highest savings in CO(2) emissions and resource consumption are achieved with a combination of measures in clinker production and cement blending. PMID:21047057

  2. Energy audit and conservation opportunities for pyroprocessing unit of a typical dry process cement plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Kabir; A. I. Abubakar; U. A. El-Nafaty

    2010-01-01

    Cement production process has been highly energy and cost intensive. The cement plant requires 8784 h per year of the total operating hours to produce 640,809 tonnes of clinker. To achieve effective and efficient energy management scheme, thermal energy audit analysis was employed on the pyroprocessing unit of the cement plant. Fuel combustion generates the bulk of the thermal energy for the

  3. Mercury species, mass flows and processes in a cement plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tanja Ljubi? Mlakar; Milena Horvat; Tomaž Vuk; Andrej Stergaršek; Jože Kotnik; Janja Tratnik; Vesna Fajon

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the behaviour of mercury in the cement clinker production process. Simultaneous measurements of mercury in all important materials and gas streams were performed in three sampling periods on about 300 solid samples and about 80 samples taken from gas streams. Mercury species in flue gases at characteristic parts of the process were

  4. Halting the calcium aluminate cement hydration process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. P. Luz; V. C. Pandolfelli

    2011-01-01

    Calcium aluminate cement reactions with water result in anhydrous phases dissolution, followed by nucleation and crystal growth of hydrate compounds. Due to the dynamic characteristics of this process and in order to evaluate the phase transformation kinetics of such materials, suitable methods to halt hydration are required. In this work, the use of acetone and microwave drying, aiming to withdraw

  5. Microscale investigation of arsenic distribution and species in cement product from cement kiln coprocessing wastes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yufei; Xue, Jingchuan; Huang, Qifei

    2013-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the immobilization mechanism and the leaching risk of Arsenic (As) in the cement product from coprocessing wastes using cement kiln, distribution and species of As in cement product were determined by microscale investigation methods, including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this study, sodium arsenate crystals (Na3AsO412H2O) were mixed with cement production raw materials and calcined to produce cement clinker. Then, clinker was mixed water to prepare cement paste. EPMA results showed that As was generally distributed throughout the cement paste. As content in calcium silicate hydrates gel (C-S-H) was in low level, but higher than that in other cement mineral phases. This means that most of As is expected to form some compounds that disperse on the surfaces of cement mineral phases. Linear combination fitting (LCF) of the X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra revealed that As in the cement paste was predominantly As(V) and mainly existed as Mg3(AsO4)2, Ca3(AsO4)2, and Na2HAsO4. PMID:24223030

  6. Utilization of steel slag for Portland cement clinker production.

    PubMed

    Tsakiridis, P E; Papadimitriou, G D; Tsivilis, S; Koroneos, C

    2008-04-01

    The aim of the present research work is to investigate the possibility of adding steel slag, a by-product of the conversion of iron to steel process, in the raw meal for the production of Portland cement clinker. Two samples of raw meals were prepared, one with ordinary raw materials, as a reference sample ((PC)(Ref)), and another with 10.5% steel slag ((PC)(S/S)). Both raw meals were sintered at 1450 degrees C. The results of chemical and mineralogical analyses as well as the microscopic examination showed that the use of the steel slag did not affect the mineralogical characteristics of the so produced Portland cement clinker. Furthermore, both clinkers were tested by determining the grindability, setting times, compressive strengths and soundness. The hydration products were examined by XRD analysis at 2, 7, 28 and 90 days. The results of the physico-mechanical tests showed that the addition of the steel slag did not negatively affect the quality of the produced cement. PMID:17869414

  7. Full density processing of complex WC-based cemented carbides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. K. Bhaumik; G. S. Upadhyaya; M. L. Vaidya

    1996-01-01

    The present investigation was a study of the densification behaviour of some complex WC-based cemented carbides containing TiC\\/TiN. Sintering experiments showed that a fully dense product can be obtained from cemented carbides containing TiC by liquid phase sintering, but TiC addition to WC-10 Co-cemented carbide necessitated modification of the binder phase cobalt by incorporating nickel and molybdenum in order to

  8. The use of raw and calcined diatomite in cement production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bülent Y?lmaz; Nezahat Ediz

    2008-01-01

    In this research, the use of raw and calcined diatomite which is in amorphous and porous nature was investigated in cement production. The physical, chemical, mineralogical, micro-structural and mechanical tests of the mortars, prepared by mixing Portland cement clinkers with 5%, 10% and 20% raw and calcined diatomite (w\\/w) and gypsum were carried out. According to the test results, raw

  9. The nature of the hydration products in hardened cement pastes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. G Richardson

    2000-01-01

    An understanding of the performance of portland cement-based materials requires knowledge at the microstructural level. Developments in the instrumentation of several techniques have led to improved understanding of the composition, morphology, and spatial distribution of the various products of cement hydration. In particular, our understanding of the nature of the nearly amorphous calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) phases – which are

  10. Utilization of flotation wastes of copper slag as raw material in cement production.

    PubMed

    Alp, I; Deveci, H; Süngün, H

    2008-11-30

    Copper slag wastes, even if treated via processes such as flotation for metal recovery, still contain heavy metals with hazardous properties posing environmental risks for disposal. This study reports the potential use of flotation waste of a copper slag (FWCS) as iron source in the production of Portland cement clinker. The FWCS appears a suitable raw material as iron source containing >59% Fe(2)O(3) mainly in the form of fayalite (Fe(2)SiO(4)) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). The clinker products obtained using the FWCS from the industrial scale trial operations over a 4-month period were characterised for the conformity of its chemical composition and the physico-mechanical performance of the resultant cement products was evaluated. The data collected for the clinker products produced using an iron ore, which is currently used as the cement raw material were also included for comparison. The results have shown that the chemical compositions of all the clinker products including those of FWCS are typical of a Portland cement clinker. The mechanical performance of the standard mortars prepared from the FWCS clinkers were found to be similar to those from the iron ore clinkers with the desired specifications for the industrial cements e.g. CEM I type cements. Furthermore, the leachability tests (TCLP and SPLP) have revealed that the mortar samples obtained from the FWCS clinkers present no environmental problems while the FWCS could act as the potential source of heavy metal contamination. These findings suggest that flotation wastes of copper slag (FWCS) can be readily utilised as cement raw material due to its availability in large quantities at low cost with the further significant benefits for waste management/environmental practices of the FWCS and the reduced production and processing costs for cement raw materials. PMID:18384950

  11. Follow up study of workers manufacturing chrysotile asbestos cement products.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, M J; Winter, P D; Pannett, B; Powell, C A

    1986-01-01

    A cohort study has been carried out of 2167 subjects employed between 1941 and 1983 at an asbestos cement factory in England. The production process incorporated the use of chrysotile asbestos fibre only, except for a small amount of amosite during four months in 1976. Measured airborne fibre concentrations available since 1970 from personal samplers showed mean levels below 1 fibre/ml, although higher levels had probably occurred previously in certain areas of the factory. No excess of lung cancer was observed in the mortality follow up by comparison with either national or local death rates, and analyses of subgroups of the workforce by job, exposure level, duration of employment, duration since entry, or calendar years of employment gave no real suggestion of an asbestos related excess for this cause of death. There was one death from pleural mesothelioma and one with asbestosis mentioned as an associated cause on the death certificate, but neither is thought to be linked to asbestos exposure at this factory. Other suggested asbestos related cancers, such as laryngeal and gastrointestinal, did not show raised risks. Although the durations of exposure were short in this study, the findings are consistent with two other studies of workers exposed to low concentrations of chrysotile fibre in the manufacture of asbestos cement products which reported no excess mortality. PMID:3024695

  12. Characterization of vapor phase mercury released from concrete processing with baghouse filter dust added cement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Hayes, Josh; Wu, Chang-Yu; Townsend, Timothy; Schert, John; Vinson, Tim; Deliz, Katherine; Bonzongo, Jean-Claude

    2014-02-18

    The fate of mercury (Hg) in cement processing and products has drawn intense attention due to its contribution to the ambient emission inventory. Feeding Hg-loaded coal fly ash to the cement kiln introduces additional Hg into the kiln's baghouse filter dust (BFD), and the practice of replacing 5% of cement with the Hg-loaded BFD by cement plants has recently raised environmental and occupational health concerns. The objective of this study was to determine Hg concentration and speciation in BFD as well as to investigate the release of vapor phase Hg from storing and processing BFD-added cement. The results showed that Hg content in the BFD from different seasons ranged from 0.91-1.44 mg/kg (ppm), with 62-73% as soluble inorganic Hg, while Hg in the other concrete constituents were 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than the BFD. Up to 21% of Hg loss was observed in the time-series study while storing the BFD in the open environment by the end of the seventh day. Real-time monitoring in the bench system indicated that high temperature and moisture can facilitate Hg release at the early stage. Ontario Hydro (OH) traps showed that total Hg emission from BFD is dictated by the air exchange surface area. In the bench simulation of concrete processing, only 0.4-0.5% of Hg escaped from mixing and curing BFD-added cement. A follow-up headspace study did not detect Hg release in the following 7 days. In summary, replacing 5% of cement with the BFD investigated in this study has minimal occupational health concerns for concrete workers, and proper storing and mixing of BFD with cement can minimize Hg emission burden for the cement plant. PMID:24444016

  13. Carbon dioxide capture from a cement manufacturing process

    DOEpatents

    Blount, Gerald C. (North Augusta, SC); Falta, Ronald W. (Seneca, SC); Siddall, Alvin A. (Aiken, SC)

    2011-07-12

    A process of manufacturing cement clinker is provided in which a clean supply of CO.sub.2 gas may be captured. The process also involves using an open loop conversion of CaO/MgO from a calciner to capture CO.sub.2 from combustion flue gases thereby forming CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2. The CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2 is then returned to the calciner where CO.sub.2 gas is evolved. The evolved CO.sub.2 gas, along with other evolved CO.sub.2 gases from the calciner are removed from the calciner. The reactants (CaO/MgO) are feed to a high temperature calciner for control of the clinker production composition.

  14. Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Technical report, September 1, 1995--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bhatty, J.I.; Mishulovich, A. [Construction Technology Labs., Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. Currently only about 30% of the 5 million tons of these coal combustion residues generated in Illinois each year are utilized, mainly as aggregate. These residues are composed largely Of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. The process being developed in this program will use the residues directly in the manufacture of cement products. Therefore, a much larger amount of residues can be utilized. To achieve the above objective, in the first phase (current year) samples of coal combustion residues will be blended and mixed, as needed, with a lime or cement kiln dust (CKD) to adjust the CaO composition. Six mixtures will be melted in a laboratory-scale furnace at CTL. The resulting products will then be tested for cementitious properties. Two preliminary blends have been tested. One blend used fly ash with limestone, while the other used fly ash with CKD. Each blend was melted and then quenched, and the resulting product samples were ground to a specific surface area similar to portland cement. Cementitious properties of these product samples were evaluated by compression testing of 1-inch cube specimens. The specimens were formed out of cement paste where a certain percentage of the cement paste is displaced by one of the sample products. The specimens were cured for 24 hours at 55{degrees}C and 100% relative humidity. The specimens made with the product samples obtained 84 and 89% of the strength of a pure portland cement control cube. For comparison, similar (pozzolanic) materials in standard concrete practice are required to have a compressive strength of at least 75% of that of the control.

  15. Energy, environmental and greenhouse gas effects of using alternative fuels in cement production

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    1 Energy, environmental and greenhouse gas effects of using alternative fuels in cement to an increase of AF use from 8.7% to 20.9% of the total energy consumption. 2. One of the alternative fuels used cement industry produces about 3.3 billion tonnes of cement annually. Cement production is energy

  16. Formulation of criteria for pollution control on cement products produced from solid wastes in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yufei; Huang, Qifei; Yang, Yu; Huang, Zechun; Wang, Qi

    2011-08-01

    The process of producing cement products from solid waste can increase the level of pollutants in the cement products. Therefore, it is very important to establish a pollution control standard for cement products to protect the environment and human health. This paper presents acceptance limits for the availability of heavy metals in cement products which have been produced from solid wastes and explains how the limits have been calculated. The approach and method used to formulate these criteria were based on EN 12920. The typical exposure scenarios used in this paper involve concrete being used for drinking water supply pipelines and concrete pavements and are based on an analysis of typical applications of cement in China, and the potential for contact with water. The parameters of a tank test which was based on NEN 7375 were set in accordance with the environmental conditions of typical scenarios in China. Mechanisms controlling the release of heavy metals in concrete and a model for that release were obtained using the leaching test. Finally, based on acceptance criteria for drinking water and groundwater quality in China, limit values for the availability of heavy metals in concrete were calculated. PMID:21514989

  17. Glass recycling in cement production--an innovative approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guohua; Lee, Harry; Young, King Lun; Yue, Po Lock; Wong, Adolf; Tao, Thomas; Choi, Ka Keung

    2002-01-01

    An innovative approach of using waste glass in cement production was proposed and tested in a laboratory and cement production plant. The laboratory characterization of 32 types of glass show that the chemical composition of glass does not vary significantly with its color or origin but depends on its application. The alkali content of glass, a major concern for cement production varies from 0 to 22%. For the glass bottles mainly found in Hong Kong waste glasses, the alkali content (Na2O) ranges from 10 to 19% with an average around 15%. There is no significant change of the SO2 content in the gas exhaust of the rotary kiln when about 1.8 t/h of glass bottles were loaded along with the 280-290 t/h raw materials. The content of NOx, mainly depends on the temperature of the kiln, does not show significant change either. The SO3 content of the clinker is comparable with that obtained without the loading of glass. The alkaline content shows a slight increase but still within three times the standard deviation obtained from the statistical data of the past year. The detailed analysis of the quality of the cement product shows that there is not any significant impact of glass for the feeding rate tested. PMID:12365777

  18. Influence of the processed sunflower oil on the cement properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleysher, A. U.; Tokarchuk, V. V.; Sviderskiy, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    Used oils (vegetable oil, animal oil, engine oil, etc.), which are essentially industrial wastes, have found application as secondary raw materials in some braches of industry. In particular, the only well-known and commonly-used way of utilizing wastes of vegetable oils is to apply them as raw materials in the production of biodiesel. The goal of the present study is to develop a conceptually new way of vegetable oil wastes utilization in the building industry. The test admixture D-148 was obtained from the processing of wastes of sunflower oil and it mainly consists of fatty acid diethanolamide. The test admixture was added to the cement system for the purpose of studying its influence on water demand, flowability, setting times, compressive strength and moisture adsorption. The test admixture D-148 at the optimal content 0. 2 weight % causes 10% decrease in water demand, 1.7 time increase in flowability (namely spread diameter), 23% increase in grade strength and 34% decrease in moisture adsorption. The results of the present investigation make it possible to consider the final product of the waste sunflower oil processing as multifunctional plasticizing-waterproofing admixture.

  19. Effect of microwave processing on aluminate cement clinkering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dong Jianmiao; Long Shizong

    2005-01-01

    When raw materials were preheated to 1000–1300°C by electricity and microwave was inputted for 1 min 5 s-4 mins, then alunminate\\u000a clinkers were obtained. The f-CaO contents, XRD patterns and lithofacies analysis show that the microwave processing accelerates\\u000a the clinkering reaction, and Fe2O3 is contributed to the aluminate cement clinkering. The appearance of liquid phase in process of microwave heating

  20. Production of cement clinkers from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Nabajyoti; Kato, Shigeru; Kojima, Toshinori

    2007-01-01

    This communication reports the laboratory scale study on the production of cement clinkers from two types of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (MSW ash) samples. XRD technique was used to monitor the phase formation during the burning of the raw mixes. The amount of trace elements volatilized during clinkerization and hydration, as well as leaching behaviours of the clinkers obtained from optimum compositions, were also evaluated. From the results it is observed that all of the major components of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) clinkers are present in the produced clinkers. Results also show the volatilization of considerable amounts of Na, K, Pb, Zn and Cd during the production of clinkers. However, major parts of the toxic elements remaining in the clinkers appear to be immobilized in the clinkers phases. Hydration studies of the clinkers obtained from optimum compositions show that the clinkers prepared from raw MSW ash are more reactive than the washed MSW ash based clinkers. TG/DTA analyses of the hydrated pastes show the formation of hydration products, which are generally found in OPC and OPC derived cements. The initial study, therefore, shows that more than 44% of MSW ash with the addition of very small amounts of silica and iron oxide can be used to produce cement clinkers. The amount of CaCO3 necessary to produce clinkers (approximately 50%) is also smaller than the same required for the conventional process (more than 70%). PMID:16920348

  1. ASBESTOS-CEMENT PRODUCTS IN CONTACT WITH DRINKING WATER: SEM OBSERVATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In studying the health effects of asbestos fibers ingested in drinking water it is important to know whether water can corrode the surface of asbestos-cement products to facilitate the release of the fibers to the water. Also, in the case of asbestos-cement pipe, it is important ...

  2. Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; Bhatty, J.L.; Mishulovich, A.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. These residues are composed largely of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. Since the residues are used as an integral component of the cement and not just as additives to concrete, larger amounts of the residues can be utilized. The process uses submerged combustion to melt blends of coal combustion residues with lime, clay, and/or sand. The submerged combustion melter utilizes natural gas-oxidant firing directly into a molten bath to provide efficient melting of mineral-like materials. Use of this melter for cement production has many advantages over rotary kilns including very little, if any, grinding of the feed material, very low emissions, and compact size. During the first year of the program, samples of coal combustion residues were blended and mixed, as needed; with lime, clay, and/or sand to adjust the composition. Six mixtures, three with fly ash and three with bottom ash, were melted in a laboratory-scale furnace. The resultant products were used in mortar cubes and bars which were subjected to ASTM standard tests of cementitious properties. In the hydraulic activity test, mortar cubes were found to have a strength comparable to standard mortar cements. In the compressive strength test, mortar cubes were found to have strengths that exceeded ASTM blended cement performance specifications. In the ASR expansion test, mortar bars were subjected to alkali-silica reaction-induced expansion, which is a problem for siliceous aggregate-based concretes that are exposed to moisture. The mortar bars made with the products inhibited 85 to 97% of this expansion. These results show that residue-based products have an excellent potential as ASR-preventing additions in concretes.

  3. Sialite technology—sustainable alternative to portland cement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henghu Sun; Ravi Jain; Kennedy Nguyen; John Zuckerman

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article is to describe the current state of the cement industry, its sustainability, and how it compares\\u000a to alternative cement technologies—specifically Sialite technology. The process for creating the most widely used cement,\\u000a portland cement, is an energy intensive process, which consumes considerable natural resources, such as limestone. In addition,\\u000a portland cement production releases harmful air pollutants,

  4. Manufacture and properties of fluoride cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malata-Chirwa, Charles David

    This research work aimed at characterising composition, hydration and physical properties of fluoride cement, by studying samples of the cement obtained from Malawi, and comparing them to ordinary Portland cement. By confirming the suitable characteristics of fluoride cement through this work, the results of the research work provide a good basis for the wider adoption of fluoride cement as an alternative to ordinary Portland cement, especially in developing economies. Numerous accounts have been cited regarding the production and use of fluoride cement. Since there have not been conclusive agreement as to its properties, this study was limited to the theories of successful incorporation of fluoride compounds in the manufacture of fluoride cement. Hence, the properties and characteristics reported in this study relate to the cement currently manufactured in Malawi, and, on a comparative basis only, to that manufactured in other parts of the world. Samples of the fluoride cement used in the study were obtained by synthetic manufacture of the cement using common raw materials for the manufacture of fluoride cement that is limestone, silica sand, and fluorspar. These samples were subjected to several comparative tests used to characterise cements including examination under x-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy and tests for setting time and compressive strength. Under similar laboratory conditions, it was possible to prove that fluoride cement hardens more rapidly than ordinary Portland cement. Also observed during the experimental work is that fluoride cement develops higher compressive strengths than ordinary Portland cement. The hardening and setting times are significantly different between the two cements. Also the nature of the hydration products, that is the microstructural development is significantly different in the two cements. The differences brought about between the two cements are because of the presence of fluorine during the clinkering process. It was observed in the laboratory simulated production of fluoride cement, that the clinkering temperature is much lower (around 1 170 °C) compared to that for the production of ordinary Portland cement. The other observed differences were attributed to the different mineralogical composition as a result of fluoride incorporation into the cement. While fluorine content is very minimal in fluoride cement, not more than 2 %, the resulting cementitious products are altered significantly as was observed from the study. Part of the experimental results has been used as reference material in the preparation of a draft Malawi Standard on fluoride cement. This draft standard will be submitted to the Malawi Bureau of Standards for further processing before it can be officially endorsed as a Malawi Standard.

  5. Heuristic economic assessment of the Afghanistan construction materials sector: cement and dimension stone production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossotti, Victor G.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the U.S. Government has invested more than $106 billion for physical, societal, and governmental reconstruction assistance to Afghanistan (Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, 2012a). This funding, along with private investment, has stimulated a growing demand for particular industrial minerals and construction materials. In support of this effort, the U.S. Geological Survey released a preliminary mineral assessment in 2007 on selected Afghan nonfuel minerals (Peters and others, 2007). More recently, the 2007 mineral assessment was updated with the inclusion of a more extensive array of Afghan nonfuel minerals (Peters and others, 2011). As a follow-up on the 2011 assessment, this report provides an analysis of the current use and prospects of the following Afghan industrial minerals required to manufacture construction materials: clays of various types, bauxite, gypsum, cement-grade limestone, aggregate (sand and gravel), and dimension stone (sandstone, quartzite, granite, slate, limestone, travertine, marble). The intention of this paper is to assess the: Use of Afghan industrial minerals to manufacture construction materials, Prospects for growth in domestic construction materials production sectors, Factors controlling the competitiveness of domestic production relative to foreign imports of construction materials, and Feasibility of using natural gas as the prime source of thermal energy and for generating electrical energy for cement production. The discussion here is based on classical principles of supply and demand. Imbedded in these principles is an understanding that the attributes of supply and demand are highly variable. For construction materials, demand for a given product may depend on seasons of the year, location of construction sites, product delivery time, political factors, governmental regulations, cultural issues, price, and how essential a given product might be to the buyer. Moreover, failure on the supply side to mirror such attributes can be deal-breakers in a transaction. For qualitative interpretation of the findings in this report, the value chain was used to conceptualize the relation between supply and demand. Although quantitative data on the Afghan construction materials sector have been hard to come by, the premise herein was that qualitative aspects of supply and demand are revealed by following the flow of funding through projects of varying sizes. It was found that the spectrum of attributes on the demand side of large multimillion dollar reconstruction projects is generally high dimensional, distributed over a broad line of construction materials at diverse locations, and in varying quantities. As interpreted herein, project funds dispensed at the higher hierarchical levels of a project are often concentrated on procurement of construction materials and services at the upper end of the value chain. In contrast, project funds dispensed at the lower hierarchical levels are disseminated across a multiplicity of subprojects, thus restricting project acquisitions to the lower end of the value chain. Evidence suggests that under the current conditions in Afghanistan producers of construction materials at the lower end of the value chain (adobe brick, aggregate, low-end marble products) can successfully compete in local markets and turn a profit. In contrast, producers of energy-intensive products such as cement will continue to face intense competition from imports, at least in the near-term. In the long-term, as infrastructure issues are resolved, and as business conditions in Afghanistan improve, domestic producers will have a locational advantage in establishing a solid niche in their respective home markets. In the process of tendering properties for cement production, the pivotal issues of abundant, reliable, and cost-effective thermal and electrical energy sources for cement production have become prominent. Over the past 50 years, powdered coal and natural gas have been proven to be excellent fuels for firing kilns at cement plants, and bot

  6. Asbestos fibre release by corroded and weathered asbestos-cement products.

    PubMed

    Spurny, K R

    1989-01-01

    A description is given of portable equipment and a method of sampling and measuring asbestos fibre emissions from solid plane surfaces of asbestos-cement products (roofs and facades). Asbestos-cement products, e.g., roof tiles, contain as much as 11-12% of chrysotile asbestos. As a result of continuing exposure to the weather and to acid rain, the surface of asbestos-cement products becomes corroded and weathered. Cement particles, asbestos fibres and agglomerates of particles and fibres are therefore released from the surface and dispersed in air and water. The method described has been used to measure asbestos fibre emissions and ambient air concentrations in the Federal Republic of Germany over the period 1984-1986. PMID:2744837

  7. Processing of Sugarcane Bagasse ash and Reactivity of Ash-blended Cement Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajay, Goyal; Hattori, Kunio; Ogata, Hidehiko; Ashraf, Muhammad

    Sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA), a sugar-mill waste, has the potential of a partial cement replacement material if processed and obtained under controlled conditions. This paper discusses the reactivity of SCBA obtained by control burning of sugarcane bagasse procured from Punjab province of India. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were employed to ascertain the amorphousness and morphology of the minerals ash particles. Destructive and non-destructive tests were conducted on SCBA-blended mortar specimens. Ash-blended cement paste specimens were analyzed by XRD, thermal analysis, and SEM methods to evaluate the hydration reaction of SCBA with cement. Results showed that the SCBA processed at 600°C for 5 hours was reactive as ash-blended mortar specimens with up to 15% substitution of cement gave better strength than control specimens.

  8. CSER 96-013: Cementation Process, glovebox HA-20MB at PFP

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, A.L.

    1996-09-01

    This evaluation provides criticality safety controls for the cementation processing in Glovebox HA-2OMB at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Slag and crucible residues from Pu button making will be blended with Portland cement in 5k-in. diam. x 7-in. tall cans, for eventual disposition in special DOT 17C drums. A maximum of 180 g Pu is allowed per liquid-bearing container (mixing bowl, filter funnel, or cement can). In this SD revision, three separate areas with 500 g Pu limits each are established; the airlock cell for input S&C cans, the reaction- and mixing-process area, and a cemented-can storage area. Number and spacing of containers within an area is not restricted, for areas spaced 6 inches apart. Acid addition in the reaction stage is allowed to the extent that plutonium dissolution will not occur.

  9. Mechanical properties of WC–10Co cemented carbides sintered from nanocrystalline spray conversion processed powders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seung I. Cha; Soon H. Hong; Gook H. Ha; Byung K. Kim

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical properties and microstructures of nanocrystalline WC–10Co cemented carbides were investigated. The nanocrystalline WC–10Co cemented carbide powders were manufactured by reduction and carbonization of the nanocrystalline precursor powders which were prepared by spray drying process of solution containing ammonia meta-tungstate (AMT) and cobalt nitrate. The WC powders were about 100 nm in diameter mixed homogeneously with Co binder phase and

  10. HAZARDOUS WASTE COMBUSTION IN INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES: CEMENT AND LIME KILNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the results of several studies relating to hazardous waste combustion in cement and lime kilns. The tests included in the study are four kilns tested by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, four kilns tested by State agencies or the kiln operator, two C...

  11. Strength optimization of “tailor-made cement” with limestone filler and blast furnace slag

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. F. Carrasco; G. Menéndez; V. Bonavetti; E. F. Irassar

    2005-01-01

    The use of cements made with portland clinker and two or three additions has grown because they present several advantages over binary cements. Production of composite cements has produced a necessary shift in the manufacture process used in the cement industry. Now, it is known that the separate grinding and mixing technology is more convenient in order to produce these

  12. Cemented carbide cutting tool: Laser processing and thermal stress analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. S. Yilbas; A. F. M. Arif; C. Karatas; M. Ahsan

    2007-01-01

    Laser treatment of cemented carbide tool surface consisting of W, C, TiC, TaC is examined and thermal stress developed due to temperature gradients in the laser treated region is predicted numerically. Temperature rise in the substrate material is computed numerically using the Fourier heating model. Experiment is carried out to treat the tool surfaces using a CO2 laser while SEM,

  13. Investigation of the energy-saving process of cement dispersion in a helium atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyavin, O. V.; Aruev, N. N.; Chernov, Yu. M.; Drinberg, A. S.; Fedorov, V. Yu.; Shpeizman, V. V.

    2014-06-01

    The process of commercial cement grinding in a helium atmosphere has been investigated in comparison with the process in an air atmosphere. Raw material particles have been sorted by sizes. Curves of helium release from the raw material after its grinding in air and in helium in the temperature range T = 20-1200°C have been constructed and analyzed. The influence of the character of water molecule adsorption on raw material cement particles before and after grinding in air and in helium and on the shape of helium release curves has been revealed.

  14. Production of cement clinkers from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nabajyoti Saikia; Shigeru Kato; Toshinori Kojima

    2007-01-01

    This communication reports the laboratory scale study on the production of cement clinkers from two types of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (MSW ash) samples. XRD technique was used to monitor the phase formation during the burning of the raw mixes. The amount of trace elements volatilized during clinkerization and hydration, as well as leaching behaviours of the clinkers

  15. Biphasic products of dicalcium phosphate-rich cement with injectability and nondispersibility.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chia-Ling; Chen, Jian-Chih; Hung, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Jen-Chyan; Tien, Yin-Chun; Chen, Wen-Cheng

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a calcium phosphate cement was developed using tetracalcium phosphate and surface-modified dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA). This developed injectable bone graft substitute can be molded to the shape of the bone cavity and set in situ through the piping system that has an adequate mechanical strength, non-dispersibility, and biocompatibility. The materials were based on the modified DCPA compositions of calcium phosphate cement (CPC), where the phase ratio of the surface-modified DCPA is higher than that of the conventional CPC for forming dicalcium phosphate (DCP)-rich cement. The composition and morphology of several calcium phosphate cement specimens during setting were analyzed via X-ray diffractometry and transmission electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectroscopy system. The compressive strength of DCP-rich CPCs was greater than 30MPa after 24h of immersion in vitro. The reaction of the CPCs produced steady final biphasic products of DCPs with apatite. The composites of calcium phosphate cements derived from tetracalcium phosphate mixed with surface-modified DCPA exhibited excellent mechanical properties, injectability, and interlocking forces between particles, and they also featured nondispersive behavior when immersed in a physiological solution. PMID:24863195

  16. Characteristics of dusts encountered during the production of cemented tungsten carbides.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Day, Gregory A; Harvey, Christopher J; Leonard, Stephen S; Schwegler-Berry, Diane E; Chipera, Steve J; Sahakian, Nancy M; Chisholm, William P

    2007-12-01

    Inhalation of cobalt (Co) and tungsten carbide (WC) particles, but not Co or WC alone, may cause hard metal disease, risk of which does not appear to be uniform across cemented tungsten carbide (CTC) production processes. Inhalation of Co alone or in the presence of WC may cause asthma. Hypothesizing that aerosol size, chemical content, heterogeneity, and constituent compaction may be important exposure factors, we characterized aerosols from representative CTC manufacturing processes. Six work areas were sampled to characterize aerosol size distributions (dust, Co) and 12 work areas were sampled to characterize physicochemical properties (using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry [SEM-EDX]). Bulk feedstock and process-generated powders were characterized with SEM-EDX and x-ray diffraction. The dust mass median diameter was respirable and the cobalt respirable mass fraction was highest (37%) in grinding. Morphology of particles changed with processing: individual, agglomerate, or aggregates (pre-sintered materials), then mostly compacted particles (subsequent to sintering). Elemental composition of particles became increasingly heterogeneous: mostly discrete Co or W particles (prior to spray drying), then heterogeneous W/Co particles (subsequent work areas). Variability in aerosol respirability and chemical heterogeneity could translate into differences in toxicity and support detailed characterization of physicochemical properties during exposure assessments. PMID:18212475

  17. Crystal chemistry of the high temperature product of transformation of cement-asbestos.

    PubMed

    Viani, Alberto; Gualtieri, Alessandro F; Pollastri, Simone; Rinaudo, Caterina; Croce, Alessandro; Urso, Giancarlo

    2013-03-15

    In this work, the high-temperature inertization product of a representative batch of samples of cement-asbestos (CA) from different localities in Italy have been characterized with a multidisciplinary approach. All the raw CA samples were heated at 1200°C for 15 min. After firing, they underwent a series of solid state reactions leading to global structural changes of the matrix. Effects of annealing time and temperature on the crystallization kinetics were thoroughly investigated. Both factors acted in favour of equilibrium. Three classes of CA were identified with the aid of phase diagrams and of specific plots relating chemical and mineralogical parameters. This result was considered of importance in view of the potential use of transformed cement-asbestos as a secondary raw material. In principle, the content of CA packages removed from the environment and their corresponding heat-treated products can be classified simply using XRF. This method allows for the selection of appropriate fractions in function of the most suitable recycling solution adopted. Samples belonging to the class called larnite-rich, turned out to be of great interest as possible candidate for substituting a fraction of cement in many building materials and innovative green cement productions. PMID:23380447

  18. Influence of mixture ratio and pH to solidification/stabilization process of hospital solid waste incineration ash in Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Sobiecka, Elzbieta; Obraniak, Andrzej; Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca

    2014-09-01

    Solidification/stabilization (S/S) is an established utilization technology to treat hazardous wastes. This research explored the influence of pH (3-12) on the immobilization of heavy metals present in five mixtures of hospital solid waste incinerator ash and Portland cement, following two different processes of waste solidification/stabilization (cement hydration and granulation). In general, cement hydration process resulted in more stable products than granulation process. A high ash content in the mixture with Portland cement (60wt%) resulted in the highest immobilization of Pb(2+) and Cu(2+), while a low ash content in the mixture (10wt%) resulted in the lowest leachability of Zn(2+). When ash and Portland cement was mixed in equal proportions (50wt%) the highest encapsulation was observed for Ni(2+), Cd(2+) and Cr(3+). Neutral and weak alkaline pH values within the range pH=7-8 resulted in the lowest leachability of the monitored heavy metals. PMID:24997895

  19. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 21. THE CEMENT INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The cement indus...

  20. Sintering features of cemented carbides WC–Co processed from fine powders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. H. Allibert

    2001-01-01

    Since the last 30 years, the cemented carbides WC–Co are processed from finer and finer powders. Both densification behaviour and microstructure evolution along the liquid-phase sintering (LPS) are different for materials prepared from powders of micronic or submicronic size. The typical features induced by the use of submicronic particles – large contribution of the solid-state densification, abnormal growth – are

  1. Clean burning process which converts pollutants into value added product

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Xuefang

    1999-07-01

    By adding a multiple composite admixture in coal-fired boilers, the new technology turns ash and the sulfur in coal into cement clinker materials, deepens and stabilizes combustion process, decreases mechanical and chemical instabilities during combustion, and eliminates the production of NO{sub x}. While generating heat and power, the technology produces cement clinkers, and gets rid of the soot type of air pollution caused by cement kilns, thus effects a radical cure for the two pollution sources in coal-fired power plants and cement kilns. The new technology makes use of coal ashes as renewable resources, saves energy resources and the land needed to discard the ashes. Therefore, it benefits for ecological balance and economics.

  2. Formation of the Thermoelectric Candidate Chromium Silicide by Use of a Pack-Cementation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stathokostopoulos, D.; Chaliampalias, D.; Tarani, E.; Theodorakakos, A.; Giannoulatou, V.; Polymeris, G. S.; Pavlidou, E.; Chrissafis, K.; Hatzikraniotis, E.; Paraskevopoulos, K. M.; Vourlias, G.

    2014-10-01

    Transition-metal silicides are reported to be good candidates for thermoelectric applications because of their thermal and structural stability, high electrical conductivity, and generation of thermoelectric power at elevated temperatures. Chromium disilicide (CrSi2) is a narrow-gap semiconductor and a potential p-type thermoelectric material up to 973 K with a band gap of 0.30 eV. In this work, CrSi2 was formed from Si wafers by use of a two-step, pack-cementation, chemical diffusion method. Several deposition conditions were used to investigate the effect of temperature and donor concentration on the structure of the final products. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis were performed for phase identification, and thermal stability was evaluated by means of thermogravimetric measurements. The results showed that after the first step, chromizing, the structure of the products was a mixture of several Cr-Si phases, depending on the donor (Cr) concentration during the deposition process. After the second step, siliconizing, the pure CrSi2 phase was formed as a result of Si enrichment of the initial Cr-Si phases. It was also revealed that this compound has thermoelectric properties similar to those reported elsewhere. Moreover, it was found to have exceptional chemical stability even at temperatures up to 1273 K.

  3. Recycling of the product of thermal inertization of cement-asbestos for various industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gualtieri, Alessandro F., E-mail: alessandro.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Modena e R.E., Via S. Eufemia 19, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Giacobbe, Carlotta; Sardisco, Lorenza; Saraceno, Michele [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Modena e R.E., Via S. Eufemia 19, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena [Dipartimento Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell'Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Lusvardi, Gigliola [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via G. Campi 183, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Cavenati, Cinzia; Zanatto, Ivano [ZETADI S.r.l., Via dell'Artigianato 10, Ferno (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    Recycling of secondary raw materials is a priority of waste handling in the countries of the European community. A potentially important secondary raw material is the product of the thermal transformation of cement-asbestos, produced by prolonged annealing at 1200-1300 {sup o}C. The product is chemically comparable to a Mg-rich clinker. Previous work has assured the reliability of the transformation process. The current challenge is to find potential applications as secondary raw material. Recycling of thermally treated asbestos-containing material (named KRY.AS) in traditional ceramics has already been studied with successful results. The results presented here are the outcome of a long termed project started in 2005 and devoted to the recycling of this secondary raw materials in various industrial applications. KRY.AS can be added in medium-high percentages (10-40 wt%) to commercial mixtures for the production of clay bricks, rock-wool glasses for insulation as well as Ca-based frits and glass-ceramics for the production of ceramic tiles. The secondary raw material was also used for the synthesis of two ceramic pigments; a green uvarovite-based pigment [Ca{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3}] and a pink malayaite-based pigment [Ca(Sn,Cr)SiO{sub 5}]. The latter is especially interesting as a substitute for cadmium-based pigments. This work also shows that KRY.AS can replace standard fillers in polypropylene plastics without altering the properties of the final product. For each application, a description and relevant results are presented and discussed.

  4. Recycling of the product of thermal inertization of cement-asbestos for various industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, Alessandro F; Giacobbe, Carlotta; Sardisco, Lorenza; Saraceno, Michele; Gualtieri, Magdalena Lassinantti; Lusvardi, Gigliola; Cavenati, Cinzia; Zanatto, Ivano

    2011-01-01

    Recycling of secondary raw materials is a priority of waste handling in the countries of the European community. A potentially important secondary raw material is the product of the thermal transformation of cement-asbestos, produced by prolonged annealing at 1200-1300 °C. The product is chemically comparable to a Mg-rich clinker. Previous work has assured the reliability of the transformation process. The current challenge is to find potential applications as secondary raw material. Recycling of thermally treated asbestos-containing material (named KRY·AS) in traditional ceramics has already been studied with successful results. The results presented here are the outcome of a long termed project started in 2005 and devoted to the recycling of this secondary raw materials in various industrial applications. KRY·AS can be added in medium-high percentages (10-40 wt%) to commercial mixtures for the production of clay bricks, rock-wool glasses for insulation as well as Ca-based frits and glass-ceramics for the production of ceramic tiles. The secondary raw material was also used for the synthesis of two ceramic pigments; a green uvarovite-based pigment [Ca(3)Cr(2)(SiO(4))(3)] and a pink malayaite-based pigment [Ca(Sn,Cr)SiO(5)]. The latter is especially interesting as a substitute for cadmium-based pigments. This work also shows that KRY·AS can replace standard fillers in polypropylene plastics without altering the properties of the final product. For each application, a description and relevant results are presented and discussed. PMID:20708915

  5. 75 FR 453 - FLSMidth, Inc., Cement Division, Product Engineering, Including On-Site Leased Workers of Aerotek...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ...TA-W-72,048] FLSMidth, Inc., Cement Division, Product Engineering, Including On-Site Leased Workers of Aerotek Contract Engineering, Allied Personnel Services, Eastern Engineering, Hobbie Professional Services, Mccallion Staffing...

  6. Research on drilling fluids and cement slurries at Standard Oil Production Company: an internship report 

    E-print Network

    Flipse, Eugene Charles, 1956-

    2013-03-13

    1986 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering Research on Drilling Fluids and Cement Slurries at Standard Oil Production Company An Internship Report by EUGENE CHARLES FLIPSE Dr. K. R. Hall Chairman, Advisory Committee Dr. A Juazis Internship... was assigned to the SOPC Drilling Fluids Laboratory during his internship. Dr. W. C. McMordie, Jr. was his direct supervisor. The technical and administrative duties of this internship fell into six categories: orientation, laboratory build-out, office...

  7. The Impact of Thermocycling Process on the Dislodgement Force of Different Endodontic Cements

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Asatourian, Armen; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Gutmann, James L.; Sheibani, Nader

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of thermocycling (500 cycles, 5°C/55°C) on the push-out bond strength of calcium silicate based cements including WMTA, Nano-WMTA, and Bioaggregate to root dentin. Forty-eight dentin slices were prepared and divided into 3 groups (n = 16) and filled with Angelus WMTA, Nano-WMTA, or Bioaggregate. After incubation, half of the samples were thermocycled while the other half remained untreated. Push-out bond strength was calculated, and the modes of the bond failures were determined by SEM. The highest bond strength was seen in nonthermocycled Nano-WMTA samples and the lowest in thermocycled Bioaggregate samples. The significant differences between nonthermocycled and thermocycled samples were only noticed in WMTA and Nano-WMTA groups (P < 0.001). The mode of failure for thermocycled samples of all three cements was mostly cohesive. Thermocycling process can drastically affect the push-out bond strength of calcium silicate based cements. The intrastructural damages occurred due to the thermal stresses, causing cohesive failures in set materials. Sealing property of endodontic cements which have experienced the thermal stresses can be jeopardized due to occlusal forces happening in furcation cites. PMID:24063004

  8. Mechanical properties of WC10Co cemented carbides sintered from nanocrystalline spray conversion processed powders

    E-print Network

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    Mechanical properties of WC±10Co cemented carbides sintered from nanocrystalline spray conversion properties and microstructures of nanocrystalline WC±10Co cemented carbides were investigated. The nanocrys- talline WC±10Co cemented carbide powders were manufactured by reduction and carbonization

  9. Support vector machine model based predictive pid control system for cement rotary kiln

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zheng Li

    2010-01-01

    The rotary kiln calcination is the most important part of cement production including complicated physical and chemical reaction processes with large inertia, pure hysteresis, nonlinearity and strong coupling characteristics. Considering the need of advanced process control in cement industry, this paper presents the application of support vector machine modeling and generalized predictive control PID control algorithm to the conventional cement

  10. Technology of the fabrication and launching the production of large-size cemented carbide products for the metallurgy industry of Ukraine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. F. Lisovskii; E. O. Tskitishvili; A. I. Kulik; O. F. Kurochkin; V. G. Lyasov; V. V. Pashins’kii; A. D. Ryabtsev; D. G. Sidorenko; A. V. Feofilaktov

    2010-01-01

    Scientific research, on the basis of which a technology of manufacture large-size cemented carbide products has been developed,\\u000a and special features of the fabrication of cemented carbide rolls to be used in the metallurgy industry have been considered.

  11. Investigative and management techniques for cement kiln dust and pulp and paper process wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, C.S. [RMT, Inc., Okemos, MI (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Knowledge of the characteristics of industrial process wastes allows for some innovative and cost savings techniques for investigating and managing these wastes over conventional methods. This paper explores examples of some of these techniques employed on cement kiln dust (CKD) and pulp and paper mill process waste. Similar to Portland Cement, unleached CKD contains free lime and sources of reactive silica and/or alumina. Thus, it can set up in the presence of water. Properly moisture-conditioned CKD has been successfully used in Michigan as a landfill liner and cover material on closures of old CKD piles and newly permitted fills. However, CKD also contains high concentrations of soluble salts and when improperly managed can generate a leachate with high total dissolved solid concentrations. Surface and downhole geophysical methods employing electromagnetic conductivity have proven effective in delineating the horizontal and vertical extent of groundwater plumes caused by releases of CKD leachate.

  12. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Chemical engineering analyses involving the preliminary process design of a plant (1,000 metric tons/year capacity) to produce silicon via the technology under consideration were accomplished. Major activities in the chemical engineering analyses included base case conditions, reaction chemistry, process flowsheet, material balance, energy balance, property data, equipment design, major equipment list, production labor and forward for economic analysis. The process design package provided detailed data for raw materials, utilities, major process equipment and production labor requirements necessary for polysilicon production in each process.

  13. Cement particles containing radio-opacifiers stimulate pro-osteolytic cytokine production from a human monocytic cell line.

    PubMed

    Shardlow, David L; Stone, Martin H; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John

    2003-08-01

    Proponents of the biological theory of aseptic loosening have in recent years tended to concentrate on the production and distribution of particulate ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) debris around the potential joint space. However, mechanical loading of cemented implants with the differing elastic moduli of metal stems, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement and bone can result in relative micromotion, implying the potential for production of metal and PMMA particles from the stem-cement interface by fretting wear. In order to investigate the production and biological reactivity of debris from this interface, PMMA and metal particulate debris was produced by sliding wear of PMMA pins containing barium sulphate and zirconium dioxide against a Vaquasheened stainless steel counterface. This debris was characterised by SEM, energy-dispersive analysis by X-ray (EDAX) and image analysis, then added to cell cultures of a human monocytic cell line, U937, and stimulation of proosteolytic cytokines measured by ELISA. Large quantities of PMMA cement debris were generated by the sliding wear of PMMA pins against Vaquasheened stainless steel plates in the method developed for this study. Both cements stimulated the release of pro-osteolytic TNFalpha from the U937 monocytic cell line, in a dose-dependent fashion. There was a trend towards greater TNFalpha release with Palacos cement than CMW cement at the same dose. Palacos particles also caused significant release of IL-6, another pro-osteolytic cytokine, while CMW did not. The particulate cement debris produced did not stimulate the release of GM-CSF or IL1beta from the U937 cells. These results may explain the cytokine pathway responsible for bone resorption caused by particulate PMMA debris. Radio-opaque additives are of value in surgical practice and clinical studies to quantify the relevance of these in vitro findings are required before the use of cement containing radio-opacifier is constrained. PMID:12931816

  14. Techno-economic study of the calcium looping process for CO2 capture from cement and biomass power plants 

    E-print Network

    Ozcan, Dursun Can

    2014-11-27

    The first detailed systematic investigation of a cement plant with various carbon capture technologies has been performed. The calcium looping (Ca-looping) process has emerged as a leading option for this purpose, since ...

  15. New magnesia-polyphosphate cement composites: Synthesis and processing under MDF-like conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dimotakis, E.D.; Klemperer, W.G.; Young, J.F. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Macro-Defect-Free (MDF) cements represent a major breakthrough in processing advanced cement-based materials. When a mixture of CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}/PVA (PVA = polyvinyl alcohol acetate) is processed under high shear mixing conditions, it transform into a high-strength material. The authors` current efforts have been focused on producing similar materials in a purely inorganic system. Thus MgO has been reacted at room temperature with sodium polyphosphates of the general formula Na{sub n}H{sub 2}P{sub n}O{sub 3n+1}{center_dot}xH{sub 2}O n = 6,15,70 and crystalline sodium Kurrol salts (NaPO{sub 3}){sub n}, n>1000, where n is the average degree of polymerization. Processing of all these sodium polyphosphates with MgO under MDF-like conditions gave cement pastes that had compressive strengths ranging from 130 MPa to 140 MPa at 10-12% porosties.

  16. Energy Efficient Microwave Hybrid Processing of Lime for Cement, Steel, and Glass Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Fall, Morgana L; Yakovlev, Vadim; Sahi, Catherine; Baranova, Inessa; Bowers, Johnney G; Esquenazi\t, Gibran L

    2012-02-10

    In this study, the microwave materials interactions were studied through dielectric property measurements, process modeling, and lab scale microwave hybrid calcination tests. Characterization and analysis were performed to evaluate material reactions and energy usage. Processing parameters for laboratory scale and larger scale calcining experiments were developed for MAT limestone calcination. Early stage equipment design concepts were developed, with a focus on microwave post heating treatment. The retrofitting of existing rotary calcine equipment in the lime industry was assessed and found to be feasible. Ceralink sought to address some of the major barriers to the uptake of MAT identified as the need for (1) team approach with end users, technology partners, and equipment manufacturers, (2) modeling that incorporates kiln materials and variations to the design of industrial microwave equipment. This project has furthered the commercialization effort of MAT by working closely with an industrial lime manufacturer to educate them regarding MAT, identifying equipment manufacturer to supply microwave equipment, and developing a sophisticated MAT modeling with WPI, the university partner. MAT was shown to enhance calcining through lower energy consumption and faster reaction rates compared to conventional processing. Laboratory testing concluded that a 23% reduction in energy was possible for calcining small batches (5kg). Scale-up testing indicated that the energy savings increased as a function of load size and 36% energy savings was demonstrated (22 kg). A sophisticated model was developed which combines simultaneous microwave and conventional heating. Continued development of this modeling software could be used for larger scale calcining simulations, which would be a beneficial low-cost tool for exploring equipment design prior to actual building. Based on these findings, estimates for production scale MAT calcining benefits were calculated, assuming uptake of MAT in the US lime industry. This estimate showed that 7.3 TBTU/year could be saved, with reduction of 270 MMlbs of CO2 emissions, and $29 MM/year in economic savings. Taking into account estimates for MAT implementation in the US cement industry, an additional 39 TBTU/year, 3 Blbs of CO2 and $155 MM/year could be saved. One of the main remaining barriers to commercialization of MAT for the lime and cement industries is the sheer size of production. Through this project, it was realized that a production size MAT rotary calciner was not feasible, and a different approach was adapted. The concept of a microwave post heat section located in the upper portion of the cooler was devised and appears to be a more realistic approach for MAT implementation. Commercialization of this technology will require (1) continued pilot scale calcining demonstrations, (2) involvement of lime kiln companies, and (3) involvement of an industrial microwave equipment provider. An initial design concept for a MAT post-heat treatment section was conceived as a retrofit into the cooler sections of existing lime rotary calciners with a 1.4 year payback. Retrofitting will help spur implementation of this technology, as the capital investment will be minimal for enhancing the efficiency of current rotary lime kilns. Retrofits would likely be attractive to lime manufacturers, as the purchase of a new lime kiln is on the order of a $30 million dollar investment, where as a MAT retrofit is estimated on the order of $1 million. The path for commercialization lies in partnering with existing lime kiln companies, who will be able to implement the microwave post heat sections in existing and new build kilns. A microwave equipment provider has been identified, who would make up part of the continued development and commercialization team.

  17. Process, Product, and Playmaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maisha T.; Purcell, Susie Spear; May, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This article examines relationships among process, product, and playmaking in a southeastern playwriting and performance program for teen girls, Playmaking for Girls (PFG). The authors have chosen to focus on tensions between process and product. Such tensions are present in the challenges teachers experience when privileging student-centered…

  18. Recycling the product of thermal transformation of cement-asbestos for the preparation of calcium sulfoaluminate clinker.

    PubMed

    Viani, Alberto; Gualtieri, Alessandro F

    2013-09-15

    According to recent resolutions of the European Parliament (2012/2065(INI)), the need for environmentally friendly alternative solutions to landfill disposal of hazardous wastes, such as asbestos-containing materials, prompts their recycling as secondary raw materials (end of waste concept). In this respect, for the first time, we report the recycling of the high temperature product of cement-asbestos, in the formulation of calcium sulfoaluminate cement clinkers (novel cementitious binders designed to reduce CO? emissions), as a continuation of a previous work on their systematic characterization. Up to 29 wt% of the secondary raw material was successfully introduced into the raw mix. Different clinker samples were obtained at 1250 °C and 1300 °C, reproducing the phase composition of industrial analogues. As an alternative source of Ca and Si, this secondary raw material allows for a reduction of the CO? emissions in cement production, mitigating the ecological impact of cement manufacturing, and reducing the need for natural resources. PMID:23856311

  19. “Green” PCB production processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sven Lamprecht; Günter Heinz; Neil Patton; Stephen Kenny; Patrick Brooks

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to show production process developments and innovations that resolve many of the issues faced with certain process steps for printed circuit board (PCB) manufacturing following “green” practices. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Several key PCB manufacturing processes have been developed or studied with respect to new environmental legislations and practises. Findings – The introduction of

  20. Cement plant CKD recovery system

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.M.; Prokesch, M.E. [Fuller Co., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A fluid bed system has been developed to produce a low alkali cement clinker from cement plant kiln ducts (CKD). The system is comprised of three main components: feed preparation system, fluid bed reactor and process gas handling system. Cement kiln dust is first pelletized and dried, then processed at 1,300--1,320 C in the fluid bed reactor. The combination of excellent thermal transfer and extended retention time at reaction temperatures provides typical volatilization rates on the order of 90% K{sub 2}O, 70% Na{sub 2}O, 90% SO{sub 3}, and 95% Cl. High concentrations of volatilized alkali compounds in the process off gas stream are cooled and condensed in a specially designed heat exchange system while providing preheated process air for the fluid bed reactor. Condensed alkali compounds are collected at the dust collector in the form of a fine, white powder. This co-product may offer marketable value due to its high concentration of potassium sulfates. The system offers the potential for a 100% recovery of cement kiln dusts to produce cement clinker and an alkali co-product.

  1. In vitro biodurability of the product of thermal transformation of cement-asbestos.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, Alessandro F; Viani, Alberto; Sgarbi, Giulia; Lusvardi, Gigliola

    2012-02-29

    To safely recycle the product of the thermal transformation of cement-asbestos as secondary raw material, its toxicity potential should be assessed by in vitro biodurability tests. In this work, the acellular in vitro biodurability of the products of transformation of cement-asbestos at 1200 °C (named KRY·AS) was tested using both inorganic and organic simulated lung fluids at pH 4.5. The dissolution kinetics were followed using chemical, mineralogical and microstructural analyses. The total dissolution time estimated from the experiments with inorganic HCl diluted solution is one order of magnitude higher than that determined from the experiments with buffered Gamble solution (253 days vs. 20 days). The key parameter determining the difference in dissolution rate turns out to be the solidus/liquidus ratio which prompts a fast saturation of the solution with monosilicic acid. The calculated dissolution rate constants showed that the biodurability in vitro of KRY·AS is much lower with respect to that of standard chrysotile asbestos (total estimated dissolution time of 20 days vs. 298 days, respectively). This proves a low potential toxicity of this secondary raw material. PMID:22257569

  2. The hydration products of Portland cement in the presence of tin(II) chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.; Sharp, J.H

    2003-01-01

    The hydration products of Portland cement pastes cured using water containing tin(II) chloride have been compared with those using distilled water. In the latter case, the expected products - portlandite, ettringite and calcite - were observed. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the cement pastes cured in the presence of tin(II) chloride showed several additional peaks that have been attributed to the formation of calcium hydroxo-stannate, CaSn(OH){sub 6}, and Friedel's salt (tetracalcium aluminate dichloride-10-hydrate), Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6}{center_dot}CaCl{sub 2}{center_dot}10H{sub 2}O. The amount of portlandite formed was reduced in the presence of tin(II) chloride. Calcium hydroxo-stannate contains tin in the +IV oxidation state and equations are presented to account for the oxidation of Sn(II) to Sn(IV) preceding the formation of CaSn(OH){sub 6} and Friedel's salt.

  3. Assessment of the self-desiccation process in cemented mine backfills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew Helinski; M. Fahey; A. Fourie; Mostafa Ismail

    2007-01-01

    During the placement of fine-grained cemented mine backfill, the high placement rates and low permeability often result in undrained self-weight loading conditions, when assessed in the conventional manner. However, hydration of the cement in the backfill results in a net volume reduction—the volume of the hydrated cement is less than the combined volume of the cement and water prior to

  4. Use of zeolite, coal bottom ash and fly ash as replacement materials in cement production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F Canpolat; K Y?lmaz; M. M Köse; M Sümer; M. A Yurdusev

    2004-01-01

    In this research, the effects of zeolite, coal bottom ash and fly ash as Portland cement replacement materials on the properties of cement are investigated through three different combinations of tests. These materials are substituted for Portland cement in different proportions, and physical properties such as setting time, volume expansion, compressive strength and water consistency of the mortar are determined.

  5. Effects of test sample shape and surface production method on the fatigue behaviour of PMMA bone cement.

    PubMed

    Sheafi, E M; Tanner, K E

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus over the optimal criterion to define the fatigue life of bone cement in vitro. Fatigue testing samples have been made into various shapes using different surface preparation techniques with little attention being paid to the importance of these variations on the fatigue results. The present study focuses on the effect of test sample shape and surface production method on the fatigue results. The samples were manufactured with two cross sectional shapes: rectangular according to ISO 527 and circular according to ASTM F2118. Each shape was produced using two methods: direct moulding of the cement dough and machining from oversized rods. Testing was performed using two different bone cements: SmartSet GHV and DePuy CMW1. At least 10 samples of each category were tested, under fully reversed tension-compression fatigue stress at ±20MPa, to allow for Weibull analysis to compare results. The growth of fatigue cracks was observed by means of the changes in the absorbed energy and apparent modulus. It was found that fatigue crack growth can be altered by the sample shape and production method; however it is also dependent on the chemical composition of the cement. The results revealed that moulded samples, particularly those based on the ASTM F2118 standard, can lead to up to 5.5 times greater fatigue lives compared to the machined samples of the same cement. It is thus essential, when comparing the fatigue results of bone cement, to consider the effect of production method along with the shape of the test sample. PMID:24070780

  6. The Kalina cycle for cement kiln waste heat recovery power plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark D. Mirolli

    2005-01-01

    Cement production is one of the most energy intensive industrial processes in the world. In many world regions, energy cost is 50% to 60% of the direct production cost of cement. Energy cost is incurred due to the need for large quantities of thermal heat for the kiln, calcination and drying processes and electrical energy for operation of motors for

  7. Metallic aluminum in MSWI fly ash: quantification and influence on the properties of cement-based products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E Aubert; B Husson; A Vaquier

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on the effects of metallic aluminum contained in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ashes on cement-based materials in which they are added. The ash under study was treated by an industrial physicochemical process of neutralization. The paper also presents a method to quantify the metallic aluminum content of ash: it consists in measuring the amount of

  8. Investigative and management techniques for cement kiln dust and pulp and paper mill process wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, C.S. [RMT, Inc., Okemos, MI (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Knowledge of the characteristics of industrial process wastes allows for some innovative and cost savings techniques for investigating and managing these wastes over conventional methods. This paper explores examples of some of these techniques employed on cement kiln dust (CKD) and pulp and paper mill process waste. Similar to Portland Cement, unleached CKD contains free lime and sources of reactive silica and/or alumina. Thus, it can set up in the presence of water. Properly moisture conditioned CKD has been successfully used in Michigan as a landfill liner and cover material on closures of old CKD piles and newly permitted fills. In addition to its pozzolanic properties, CKD contains high concentrations of soluble salts, generating a leachate with high total dissolved solids concentrations. Surface and downhole geophysical methods employing electromagnetic conductivity have proven effective in delineating the horizontal and vertical extent of groundwater plumes. At one paper mill in Alabama where dewatered filter cake had been placed in a lined solid waste facility, liquids that had migrated to the surface due to excessive gas pressures caused unstable working conditions at the surface. Large, vertical french drains and a horizontal drainage blanket consisting of geogrid and sand constructed over the existing waste resulted in dewatering and a substantial increase in waste stability, allowing a vertical expansion to proceed. At a kraft mill in the southeastern US, a geotechnical investigation of a lime mud pond revealed that the stability of the unit would increase by construction of an overlying dike, thereby allowing a vertical expansion to proceed. Finally, laboratory testing and modeling of the behavior of paper mill sludges indicates that they can be used as a landfill cover with permeabilities equivalent to or better than compacted clay.

  9. Effect of different inorganic salts\\/alkali on conversion-prevention in high alumina cement products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jian Ding; Yan Fu; J. J. Beaudoint

    1996-01-01

    The hydration characteristics and strength development of a high alumina cement (HAC)\\/zeolite blended cement in combination with an inorganic salt or alkali, selected from a suite of compounds including sodium sulfate, sodium carbonate, sodium nitrate, sodium chloride, sodium bromide, sodium metaphosphate, sodium metasilicate, sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, potassium carbonate, lithium chloride, copper sulfate, and aluminum sulfate, were studied. HAC\\/zeolite mortars

  10. Assessment of ferrous chloride and Portland cement for the remediation of chromite ore processing residue.

    PubMed

    Jagupilla, Santhi C; Wazne, Mahmoud; Moon, Deok Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Chromite Ore Processing Residue (COPR) is an industrial waste containing up to 7% chromium (Cr) including up to 5% hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)]. The remediation of COPR has been challenging due to the slow release of Cr(VI) from a clinker like material and thereby the incomplete detoxification of Cr(VI) by chemical reagents. The use of sulfur based reagents such as ferrous sulfate and calcium polysulfide to detoxify Cr(VI) has exasperated the swell potential of COPR upon treatment. This study investigated the use of ferrous chloride alone and in combination with Portland cement to address the detoxification of Cr(VI) in COPR and the potential swell of COPR. Chromium regulatory tests, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analyses and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses were used to assess the treatment results. The treatment results indicated that Cr(VI) concentrations for the acid pretreated micronized COPR as measured by XANES analyses were below the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) standard of 20mgkg(-1). The Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) Cr concentrations for all acid pretreated samples also were reduced below the TCLP regulatory limit of 5mgL(-1). Moreover, the TCLP Cr concentration for the acid pretreated COPR with particle size ?0.010mm were less than the universal treatment standard (UTS) of 0.6mgL(-1). The treatment appears to have destabilized all COPR potential swell causing minerals. The unconfined compressive strength (UCS) for the treated samples increased significantly upon treatment with Portland cement. PMID:25966327

  11. Characterization of U(VI)-phases in corroded cement products by micro(?)-spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, J.; Brendebach, B.; Bube, C.; Dardenne, K.; Denecke, M. A.; Kienzler, B.; Metz, V.; Prüßmann, T.; Rickers-Appel, K.; Schild, D.; Soballa, E.; Vitova, T.

    2013-04-01

    Cementation is an industrial scale conditioning method applied to fix and solidify liquid low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (LLW/ILW) prior to underground disposal in geological formations.To assist prognosis of the long-term safety of cemented waste, alteration of uranium doped cement productswas studied in chloride-rich solutions relevant for final LLW/ILW disposal in rock salt. After long-time exposure of the full-scale LLW/ILW simulates to concentrated NaCl and MgCl2 brines, solid samples were retrieved for chemical and mineralogical analysis with an emphasis on uranium speciation in the corroded cement matrix.Bulk and recent spatially resolved micro(?) U L3-XAFS measurements point to the occurrence of a diuranate type U(VI) phase forming throughout the corroded cement monoliths. U-enriched hot spots with dimensions up to several tens of ?m turn out to be generally X-ray amorphous.

  12. Neutron Scattering Studies of Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Andrew

    2010-03-01

    Despite more than a century of research, basic questions remain regarding both the internal structure and the role of water in Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete, the world's most widely used manufactured material. Most such questions concern the primary hydration product and strength-building phase of OPC paste, the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. When cement and water are mixed, this phase precipitates as clusters of nanoscale (nearly amorphous) colloidal particles with an associated water-filled inter-particle pore system. Most attempts to characterize the C-S-H gel and the behavior of the associated water involve drying or other processes that, themselves, change the bound water content within and around the gel. Neutron scattering methods do not suffer from this disadvantage. Furthermore, the neutron isotope effect and the neutron's sensitivity to molecular motion have enabled considerable progress to be made in recent years by: (i) determining the C-S-H composition, density and gel structure in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) H/D contrast variation studies; (ii) elucidating the changing state of water within cement as hydration progresses using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS); and (iii) measuring the production and consumption of nanoscale calcium hydroxide (CH), a by-product of cement hydration that co-exists with the C-S-H gel, using inelastic neutron scattering (INS). These experiments have provided new insights into the physics and chemistry of cement hydration, and have implications for the design of new concretes with pozzolanic cement additions that are intended to address environmental concerns and sustainability issues.

  13. A thermodynamic model for blended cements. II: Cement hydrate phases; thermodynamic values and modelling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, D. G.; Read, D.; Atkins, M.; Glasser, F. P.

    1992-08-01

    Blended Portland cements are likely to form a substantial proportion of repository materials for the disposal of radioactive waste in the UK. A thermodynamic model has been developed therefore in order to predict the composition of the solid and aqueous phases in blended cements as a function of the bulk cement composition. The model is based on simplifying cement to the system CaO sbnd SiO 2sbnd Al 2O 3sbnd SO 4sbnd MgO sbnd H 2O, which constitutes 95% of most cement formulations. Solubility data for hydrogarnet and ettringite suggest that they dissolve congruently and that conventional solubility products can be used to model their dissolution. A solubility model for the siliceous hydrogarnet series, based on ideal solid solution on either side of an immiscibility gap, closely matches experimental solubility data. Solubility data for hydrotalcite and gehlenite hydrate are less consistent and indicative of more complex dissolution processes. On the basis of earlier work, an accurate solubility model is described for hydrated calcium silicate gels in the CaO sbnd SiO 2sbnd H 2O system. Together, these solubility models form a relatively complete thermodynamic model for blended cements. Model predictions for fully matured cement blends are compared to the compositions of pore fluids extracted from aged cement blends. Departures from expected behaviour occur in alkali-bearing systems and are discussed.

  14. The surface state of copper-nickel cement catalysts in the process of heavy residue cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Dulov, A.A.; Stasenko, E.M.; Abramova, L.A.; Akhverdiev, R.B.; Ashavskaya, G.A.; Golosman, E.Z.; Yakerson, V.I. [Zelinskii Institute of Organic Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    It was shown using XRD and thermovacuum electroconductivity (TVE) techniques that CuO-NiO cement (talume) catalysts undergo an irreversible transformation in the course of cracking of heavy oil residue. After regeneration, the active oxides at the surface are shown to be less dispersed than in the starting catalysts. The coke formed during the catalytic reaction, can be removed easily from the surface of the catalyst with a high cement content (65%). On the other hand, at a low cement content (20%), the coke is held strongly by the surface and remains in the catalyst even after regeneration.

  15. Pore-filling cements in turbidites; Southern California: Products of early diagenesis and dewatering of shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krystinik, L. F.

    Cementation of deep sea fan deposits which begins at the sediment water interface and continues progressively to the maximum depths was studied. The type and intensity of cementation is determined, in part, by the labile components within the system. Authigenic iron-rich smectite (AIRS) is the earliest cement in deep sea sediment. Formation of AIRS begins with the dissolution of biogenic silica. The Stevens sand provides insight into the early stages of graywacke formation. A significant volume of nondetrital, nonpseudomatrix clay is generated by precipitation of dissolved species carried into a sandstone body by waters expelled from adjacent shale. The Stevens also provides insight into turbidite sedimentation within a restricted basin supplied by several sediment sources. Most Cenozoic turbidities from southern California contain either calcite cement which occludes porosity and preserves the initial character of the sediment, or a silica clay cement which reduces porosity slightly, but occludes permeability. Cementation of sandstones by clays precipitated from pore fluids generated in adjacent shales may be a first step toward the genesis of graywacke.

  16. Acrylamide in processed potato products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trace amounts of acrylamide are found in many foods cooked at high temperatures. Acrylamide in processed potato products is formed from reducing sugars and asparagine and is a product of the Maillard reaction. Processed potato products including fries and chips are relatively high in acrylamide comp...

  17. Control system design of cement rotary kiln based on PID neuron networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zengtao Xue; Zheng Li

    2009-01-01

    In the process of cement production, the rotary kiln calcination is the most important technology link which includes complicated physical and chemical reaction process with large inertia, pure hysteresis, nonlinearity and strong coupling characteristics. It is hard to derive the exact mathematical model and can not reach satisfied results with conventional control algorithms. Now, the cement rotary kilns are mainly

  18. Utilization of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash for sulfoaluminate cement clinker production

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Kai [Key Laboratory of Advanced Civil Engineering Materials, Tongji University, Ministry of Education, 4800 Caoan Road, Shanghai 201804 (China); Magnel Laboratory for Concrete Research, Department of Structure Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark-Zwijinaarde 904, Ghent 9052 (Belgium); Shi Huisheng, E-mail: shs@tongji.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Civil Engineering Materials, Tongji University, Ministry of Education, 4800 Caoan Road, Shanghai 201804 (China); Guo Xiaolu [Key Laboratory of Advanced Civil Engineering Materials, Tongji University, Ministry of Education, 4800 Caoan Road, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > The replacement can be taken up to 30% of MSWI fly ash in the raw mix. > The novelty compositional parameters were defined, their optimum values were determined. > Expansive property of SAC is strongly depended on gypsum content. > Three leaching test methods are used to assess the environmental impact. - Abstract: The feasibility of partially substituting raw materials with municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash in sulfoaluminate cement (SAC) clinker production was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), compressive strength and free expansion ratio testing. Three different leaching tests were used to assess the environmental impact of the produced material. Experimental results show that the replacement of MSWI fly ash could be taken up to 30% in the raw mixes. The good quality SAC clinkers are obtained by controlling the compositional parameters at alkalinity modulus (C{sub m}) around 1.05, alumina-sulfur ratio (P) around 2.5, alumina-silica ratio (N) around 2.0{approx}3.0 and firing the raw mixes at 1250 deg. C for 2 h. The compressive strengths of SAC are high in early age while that develop slowly in later age. Results also show that the expansive properties of SAC are strongly depended on the gypsum content. Leaching studies of toxic elements in the hydrated SAC-based system reveal that all the investigated elements are well bounded in the clinker minerals or immobilized by the hydration products. Although some limited positive results indicate that the SAC prepared from MSWI fly ash would present no immediate thread to the environment, the long-term toxicity leaching behavior needs to be further studied.

  19. Retention of crowns cemented on implant abutments with temporary cements.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yuko; Hibino, Yasushi; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    This study was to examine the retentive force of crowns to implant abutments with commercial temporary cements. Six different temporary cements were investigated. Cast crowns were cemented to the abutments using each cement and their retentive forces to abutments were determined 7 or 28 days after cementing (n=10). The retentive force of the cements to abutments varied widely among the products [27-109 N (7-day), 18-80 N (28-days)]. The retentive force of all the cements was not reduced as the time elapsed, except for two products tested. The polycarboxylate cements and paste-mixing type eugenol-free cements revealed comparable retentive force after 28 days of storage. The powder-liquid type cements showed a positive correlation (p<0.05) between the retentive force and the shear strength, while a negative correlation (p<0.05) was obtained for paste-mixing type cement between the retentive force and compressive strength. Mechanical strength of temporary cements could not be a prominent predicting factor for retention of the crowns on the abutments. PMID:25483383

  20. Simultaneous chromizing — Aluminizing coating of low-alloy steels by a halide-activated, pack-cementation process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frederick D. Geib; Robert A. Rapp

    1993-01-01

    The simultaneous chromizing — aluminizing of low-alloy steels has achieved Kanthal-like surface compositions of 16–21Cr and 5–8 wt.% Al by the use of cementation packs with a Cr-Al masteralloy and an NH4Cl activator salt. An initial preferential deposition of Al into the alloy induces the phase transformation from austenite to ferrite at the 1150°C process temperature. The low solubility of

  1. Use of silicon and ferrosilicon industry by-products (silica fume) in cement paste and mortar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rafat Siddique; Navneet Chahal

    2011-01-01

    With increased environmental awareness, recycling\\/utilization of industrial byproducts is gaining ground. One such by-product is silica fume (SF), which is byproduct of the smelting process in the silicon and ferrosilicon industry. By-products of the production of silicon metal and the ferrosilicon alloys having silicon contents of 75% or more contain 85–95% non crystalline silica. Silica fume is very useful in

  2. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The chemical engineering analysis of the preliminary process design of a process for producing solar cell grade silicon from dichlorosilane is presented. A plant to produce 1,000 MT/yr of silicon is analyzed. Progress and status for the plant design are reported for the primary activities of base case conditions (60 percent), reaction chemistry (50 percent), process flow diagram (35 percent), energy balance (10 percent), property data (10 percent) and equipment design (5 percent).

  3. NASA Product Peer Review Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenks, Ken

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASA's product peer review process. The contents include: 1) Inspection/Peer Review at NASA; 2) Reasons for product peer reviews; 3) Different types of peer reviews; and 4) NASA requirements for peer reviews. This presentation also includes a demonstration of an actual product peer review.

  4. Influence of cement kiln dust substitution on the mechanical properties of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Shoaib, M.M.; Balaha, M.M.; Abdel-Rahman, A.G.

    2000-03-01

    Large quantities of cement kiln dust (CKD) are produced during the manufacture of cement clinker by the dry process. The technical and economical problems that arise for the semi-manufacture of raw materials used, energy and transportation of dust from the plant to outside, as well as the severe pollution to the surrounding atmosphere show the necessity of utilizing cement dust as one of the main objectives of the investigation. The cement dust contains a mixture of raw feed as well as calcined materials with some volatile salts. The aim of the present work is to study the effect of cement dust substitution instead of ordinary Portland cement (OPC), blast furnace slag cement (BFSC), and sulfate resistance cement (SRC) on the mechanical properties of some concrete mixes containing them, and also, to determine the optimum quantity of CKD which could be recycled in the manufacture of these types of cements. Useful conclusions and recommendations concerning the use of different amounts of CKD in the production of some blended cements as a partial substitution from different types of cements were obtained.

  5. Environmental issues associated with the permitting process for TXI's modernization of their Midlothian, Texas cement plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Hill

    2000-01-01

    An important step in any expansion project is obtaining an air permit. Obviously, it is quicker to obtain an air permit via the replacement of existing equipment with new modern equipment versus the building of a green-field plant. The shorter permit attainment time is generally linked to the ability to “net out” in emissions. With respect to cement plants, the

  6. The surface state of copper-nickel cement catalysts in the process of heavy residue cracking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Dulov; E. M. Stasenko; L. A. Abramova; R. B. Akhverdiev; G. A. Ashavskaya; E. Z. Golosman; V. I. Yakerson

    1995-01-01

    It was shown using XRD and thermovacuum electroconductivity (TVE) techniques that CuO-NiO cement (talume) catalysts undergo an irreversible transformation in the course of cracking of heavy oil residue. After regeneration, the active oxides at the surface are shown to be less dispersed than in the starting catalysts. The coke formed during the catalytic reaction, can be removed easily from the

  7. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank; Faulkner, David; McKane, Aimee

    2010-12-22

    This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

  8. The use of by-products from metallurgical and mineral industries as filler in cement-based materials.

    PubMed

    Moosberg, Helena; Lagerblad, Björn; Forssberg, Eric

    2003-02-01

    This investigation has been made in order to make it possible to increase the use of by-products in cement-based materials. Use of by-products requires a screening procedure that will reliably determine their impact on concrete. A test procedure was developed. The most important properties were considered to be strength development, shrinkage, expansion and workability. The methods used were calorimetry, flow table tests, F-shape measurements, measurements of compressive and flexural strength and shrinkage/expansion measurements. Scanning electron microscopy was used to verify some results. Twelve by-products were collected from Swedish metallurgical and mineral industries and classified according to the test procedure. The investigation showed that the test procedure clearly screened out the materials that can be used in the production of concrete from the unsuitable ones. PMID:12667016

  9. Tertiary oil production process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Pusch

    1977-01-01

    The status quo in the field of in situ combustion processes in crude oil reservoirs is demonstrated. Special emphasis is laid on the importance of the combination of water and oxygen injection. A step which points to the future of in situ coal gasification. Initial solutions to the safety problem concerning the use of oxygen or oxygen enriched air in

  10. Commissioning a 2.2 mt\\/y cement plant in Midlothian, Texas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Wurman; W. Brown

    2002-01-01

    TXI operates and maintains a cement plant in Midlothian, Texas. The original plant consisted of four wet process lines with a yearly clinker production of about 1088400 mtpy (1200000 stpy). The fuels utilized are natural gas and coal along with waste fuels. With the increasing demand for cement in the Texas market, TXI decided to expand the plant capacity by

  11. Products and Processes: Synergistic Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Virginia; Husid, Whitney

    2013-01-01

    Most people agree that products are the culmination of what students have studied. For this article, "product" will refer to students' abilities to create outcomes and design artifacts. Those abilities are guided by four processes: inquiry-based learning, use of a research model, use of Web 2.0 tools, and appropriate assessments.…

  12. Change in pore structure and composition of hardened cement paste during the process of dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Haga, Kazuko; Shibata, Masahito; Hironaga, Michihiko; Tanaka, Satoru; Nagasaki, Shinya

    2005-05-01

    An understanding about the dissolution phenomena of cement hydrates is important to assess changes in the long-term performance of radioactive waste disposal facilities. To investigate the alteration associated with dissolution, dissolution tests of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydrates were performed. Through observation of the samples after leaching, it was confirmed that ettringite precipitation increased as the dissolution of the portlandite and the C-S-H gel progressed. EPMA performed on cross-sections of the solid phase showed a clear difference between the altered and unaltered parts. The boundary between the two parts was termed the portlandite (CH) dissolution front. As the leaching period became longer, the CH dissolution front shifted toward the inner part of the sample. A linear relationship was derived by plotting the distance moved by the CH dissolution front against the square root of the leaching time. This indicated Ca ion movement by diffusion.

  13. Predicting the Impact of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Cement Hydration Products and Durability of Cementitious Matrix Using Artificial Neural Network Modeling Technique

    PubMed Central

    Fakhim, Babak; Hassani, Abolfazl; Rashidi, Alimorad; Ghodousi, Parviz

    2013-01-01

    In this study the feasibility of using the artificial neural networks modeling in predicting the effect of MWCNT on amount of cement hydration products and improving the quality of cement hydration products microstructures of cement paste was investigated. To determine the amount of cement hydration products thermogravimetric analysis was used. Two critical parameters of TGA test are PHPloss and CHloss. In order to model the TGA test results, the ANN modeling was performed on these parameters separately. In this study, 60% of data are used for model calibration and the remaining 40% are used for model verification. Based on the highest efficiency coefficient and the lowest root mean square error, the best ANN model was chosen. The results of TGA test implied that the cement hydration is enhanced in the presence of the optimum percentage (0.3?wt%) of MWCNT. Moreover, since the efficiency coefficient of the modeling results of CH and PHP loss in both the calibration and verification stages was more than 0.96, it was concluded that the ANN could be used as an accurate tool for modeling the TGA results. Another finding of this study was that the ANN prediction in higher ages was more precise. PMID:24489487

  14. TESOL's Process Versus Product Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, John

    The controversy over two approaches to writing instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL), product and process orientations, is reviewed based on articles appearing in the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages' quarterly professional journal from 1982-1991. In the process-oriented approach, instructional practices emphasize the…

  15. CO 2 Capture in the Cement Industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Barker; S. A. Turner; P. A. Napier-Moore; M. Clark; J. E. Davison

    2009-01-01

    Modern cement plants have high energy efficiencies and the scope to reduce CO2 emissions by further efficiency improvements is small. One of the few ways of greatly reducing CO2 production from cement production is CO2 capture and storage (CCS). This paper summarises a study which assessed the technologies that could be used for CO2 capture in cement plants, their costs,

  16. Environmentally compatible spray cement

    SciTech Connect

    Loeschnig, P. [Heidelberger Baustofftechnik GmbH, Leimen (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    Within the framework of a European research project, Heidelberger Zement developed a quickly setting and hardening binder for shotcrete, called Chronolith S, which avoids the application of setting accelerators. Density and strength of the shotcrete produced with this spray cement correspond to those of an unaccelerated shotcrete. An increased hazard for the heading team and for the environment, which may occur when applying setting accelerators, can be excluded here. Owing to the special setting properties of a spray cement, the process engineering for its manufacturing is of great importance. The treatment of a spray cement as a dry concrete with kiln-dried aggregates is possible without any problems. The use of a naturally damp pre-batched mixture is possible with Chronolith S but requires special process engineering; spray cement and damp aggregate are mixed with one another immediately before entering the spraying machinery.

  17. Recycling of municipal solid waste for cement production: pilot-scale test for transforming incineration ash of solid waste into cement clinker

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryunosuke Kikuchi

    2001-01-01

    Incineration ash of municipal solid waste accounts for a great portion of the matter in landfills, and minimization of resource consumption and recycling of waste are important factors for ensuring the future welfare of humankind. The study presented in this paper reports a technology for producing cement from incineration ash of municipal solid waste, incineration ash of sewage sludge and

  18. Production of TNF-alpha and bone resorbing activity by macrophages in response to different types of bone cement particles.

    PubMed

    Ingham, E; Green, T R; Stone, M H; Kowalski, R; Watkins, N; Fisher, J

    2000-05-01

    We have compared the capacity of clinically relevant wear debris from seven different cement types to activate macrophages to produce TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and bone resorbing activity in vitro. The bone cements were: CMW 1 original (PMMA only); CMW 1RO (1 microm BaSO4; 9.2%); CMW copolymer bone cement 1 (10 microm BaSO4; 10%); CMW copolymer bone cement 2 (1 microm BaSO4; 10%); Palacos R (10 microm ZrO2; 15.6%); CMW Calcium phosphate cement 20% (10 microm tri-calcium phosphate; 20%) and CMW calcium phosphate cement 30% (10 microm tri-calcium phosphate; 30%). Cement debris was produced aseptically using a simple configuration wear test. The majority of particles were in the size range 0.1-0.5 microm for each cement type. The cement particles were co-cultured with the U937 macrophage cell line at ratios of 10 and 100 microm3 particle volumes to macrophage cell numbers for 24 h. At the 10:1 ratio the particles had no effect on the cells. At the 100:1 ratio, the major cytokine produced was TNF-alpha and there were no statistical differences between the different types of cement debris. The bone resorption activity of the co-culture supernatants was significantly greater than the control (U937 cells without particles) for particles of CMW 1RO, CMW copolymer bone cement 1, CMW copolymer bone cement 2 and Palacos R (P < 0.05, ANOVA). However there were no statistical differences between the levels of bone resoprtion evoked by these four cement types. The CMW1 original and CMW calcium phosphate containing cements failed to induce the macrophages to elaborate bone resorption activity at the 100:1 ratio. These data suggest that the addition of radio-opaque additives to bone cement may increase the capacity of the debris to induce osteolysis. PMID:10768752

  19. Utilization of industrial waste products as pozzolanic material in cemented paste backfill of high sulphide mill tailings.

    PubMed

    Ercikdi, Bayram; Cihangir, Ferdi; Kesimal, Ayhan; Deveci, Haci; Alp, Ibrahim

    2009-09-15

    In this study, the potential use of the industrial waste products including waste glass (WG), fly ash (FA), granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS) and silica fume (SF) as pozzolanic additive for the partial replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in cemented paste backfill (CPB) of sulphide-rich mill tailings was investigated. The influence of these industrial waste products on the short- and long-term mechanical performance of CPB was demonstrated. The rate of development of strength of CPB samples tended to slow down when the pozzolanic wastes were incorporated or increased in dosage in the binder phase. Severe losses (by 26%) in the strength of CPB samples produced from exclusively OPC occurred after an initial curing period of 56 days. The addition of WG (10-30 wt%) as a partial replacement of OPC was observed to aggravate further the strength losses of CPB samples. GBFS, FA and SF appeared to improve the long-term performance of CPB samples; albeit, only GBFS and SF could be incorporated into the binder phase only at certain levels i.e. up to 20 wt% GBFS and 15wt% SF in order to maintain a threshold strength level of 0.7MPa over 360 days. SEM studies have provided further insight into the microstucture of CPB and confirmed the formation of deleterious gypsum as the expansive phase. These findings have demonstrated that the industrial waste products including GBFS and SF can be suitably used as mineral additives to improve the long-term mechanical performance of CPB produced from sulphide-rich tailings as well as to reduce the binder costs in a CPB plant. PMID:19299080

  20. Research of magnesium phosphosilicate cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhu

    Magnesium phosphosilicate cement (MPSC) is a novel phosphate bonded cement, which consists mainly of magnesia, phosphate and silicate minerals. The traditional magnesium phosphate cements (MPCs) usually composed by ammonium phosphate, and gaseous ammonia will emit during mixing and in service. There is no noxious ammonia released from MPSC, furthermore, it can recycle a large volume of the non-hazardous waste. The goal of this research is to investigate the composition, reaction products, reaction mechanism, microstructure, properties, durability and applications of the MPSC. MPSC sets rapidly and has high early strength. It reacts better with solid industrial waste when compared to Portland cement. Many solid industrial wastes, such as fly ash, steel slag, coal gangue, red coal gangue, red mud, barium-bearing slag, copper slag, silica fume, and ground granulated blast furnace slag, have been used as the main component (40% by weight) in MPSC. The research has found that these aluminosilicate (or ironsilicate, or calciumsilicate) minerals with an amorphous or glass structure can enhance the performance of MPSC. The disorganized internal structure of amorphous materials may make it possess higher reactivity compared to the crystalline phases. Chemical reaction between phosphate and these minerals may form an amorphous gel, which is favorable to the cementing. Borax, boric acid and sodium tripolyphosphate have been used as retardants in the MPSC system. It is found that boric acid has a higher retarding effect on the setting of cement, than borax does. However, sodium polyphosphate accelerates the reaction of MPSC. The hydration of MPSC is exothermic reaction. The heat evolution may prompt hydrates formation, and shorten the setting process. Modern materials characterization techniques, XRD, DSC, TG-DTA FTIR, XPS, MAS-NMR, SEM, TEM, MIP, etc. were used to analyze the phase composition, micro morphology, and microstructure of hardened MPSC. The main hydration product in MPSC is MgKPO4·6H2O (MKP), which has both crystalline and amorphous phases. There are many unreacted magnesia grains in the hardened MPSC paste. They act as nucleus of the hardened framework. The hydrates grow around the magnesia grains rims, fill in the voids among the magnesia grains and bond unreacted magnesia part into a solid continuum. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  1. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

  2. Fundamental study of clay-cement kiln dust (CKD) interaction to determine the effectiveness of CKD as a potential clay soil stabilizer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sulapha Peethamparan

    2006-01-01

    Cement kiln dusts (CKDs) are by-products of the cement manufacturing process that are removed from the stream of kiln gases as they pass through the kiln’s dust collection system during clinker production. The feasibility of using cement kiln dusts (CKDs) as potential stabilizing agents for kaolinite, Na-montmorillonite and Ca-montmorillonite clay was investigated in this research. A suite of four CKDs

  3. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J F; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri; Agarwal, Anand K; Goel, Vijay K; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2015-05-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5±1 min. The compressive strength after 24h of incubation was approximately 8.45±1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10±1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16±4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. PMID:25746244

  4. Blended cement using volcanic ash and pumice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Khandaker M. Anwar Hossain

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the results of investigation to assess the suitability of volcanic ash (VA) and pumice powder (VPP) for blended cement production. Tests were conducted on cement where Portland cement (PC) was replaced by VA and VPP within the range of 0 to 50%. The physical and chemical properties of VA and VPP were critically reviewed to evaluate the

  5. Method of producing light weight cement for use of cementation of oil and gas wells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Skjeldal

    1983-01-01

    A cement slurry of low specific density for cementation of oil and gas wells is produced by mixing oil-well cement with finely divided emission products comprising amorphous silica dust which has been obtained during the electrothermal preparation of ferrosilicon and\\/or silicon metal, water, and any desirable dispersion components, the emission products being added in an amount in the range of

  6. Production of TNF ? and bone resorbing activity by macrophages in response to different types of bone cement particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eileen Ingham; Tim R Green; Martin H Stone; Rick Kowalski; Neil Watkins; John Fisher

    2000-01-01

    We have compared the capacity of clinically relevant wear debris from seven different cement types to activate macrophages to produce TNF-?, IL-1?, IL-6 and bone resorbing activity in vitro. The bone cements were: CMW 1 original (PMMA only); CMW 1RO (1?m BaSO4;9.2%); CMW copolymer bone cement 1 (10?m BaSO4;10%); CMW copolymer bone cement 2 (1?m BaSO4;10%); Palacos R (10?m ZrO2;15.6%);

  7. Simultaneous chromizing-aluminizing coating of low-alloy steels by a halide-activated, pack-cementation process

    SciTech Connect

    Geib, F.D.; Rapp, R.A. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States))

    1993-10-01

    The simultaneous chromizing aluminizing of low-alloy steels has achieved Kanthal-like surface compositions of 16-21Cr and 5 8wt.% AI by the use of cementation packs with a Cr Al masteralloy and an NH[sub 4]Cl activator salt. An initial preferential deposition of Al into the alloy induces the phase transformation from austenite to ferrite at the 1150[degrees]C process temperature. The low solubility of carbon in ferrite results in the rejection of solute C into the austenitic core, thereby presenting the formation of an external Cr-carbide layer, which would otherwise block aluminizing and chromizing. The deposition and rapid diffusion of Cr and Al into the external bcc ferrite layer follows. Parabolic, cyclic-oxidation kinetics for alumina growth on the coated steels in air were observed over a wide range of relatively low temperatures (637-923[degrees]C). 20 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Simultaneous chromizing-aluminizing coating of low alloy steels by a halide-activated pack cementation process

    SciTech Connect

    Geib, F.D.; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1992-11-01

    The simultaneous chromizing-aluminizing of low-alloy steels has achieved Kanthal-like surface compositions of 16--2lCr and 5--8 wt%Al by the use of cementation packs with a Cr-Al masteralloy and an NH{sub 4}Cl activator salt. An initial preferential deposition of Al into the alloy induces the phase transformation from austenite to ferrite at the 1150{degrees}C process temperature. The low solubility of carbon in ferrite results in the rejection of solute C into the core of the austenitic substrate, thereby preventing the formation of an external Cr-carbide layer, which would otherwise block aluminizing and chromizing. The deposition and rapid diffusion of Cr and Al into the external bcc ferrite layer follows. Parabolic cyclic oxidation kinetics for alumina growth in air were observed over a wide range of relatively low temperatures (637--923{degrees}C).

  9. Simultaneous chromizing-aluminizing coating of low alloy steels by a halide-activated pack cementation process

    SciTech Connect

    Geib, F.D.; Rapp, R.A. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-11-01

    The simultaneous chromizing-aluminizing of low-alloy steels has achieved Kanthal-like surface compositions of 16--2lCr and 5--8 wt%Al by the use of cementation packs with a Cr-Al masteralloy and an NH[sub 4]Cl activator salt. An initial preferential deposition of Al into the alloy induces the phase transformation from austenite to ferrite at the 1150[degrees]C process temperature. The low solubility of carbon in ferrite results in the rejection of solute C into the core of the austenitic substrate, thereby preventing the formation of an external Cr-carbide layer, which would otherwise block aluminizing and chromizing. The deposition and rapid diffusion of Cr and Al into the external bcc ferrite layer follows. Parabolic cyclic oxidation kinetics for alumina growth in air were observed over a wide range of relatively low temperatures (637--923[degrees]C).

  10. Comparing Product Development Processes and Managing Risk

    E-print Network

    Unger, Darian W.

    Product Development Processes (PDPs) require careful design to reduce development time, create better products and manage the risks of bringing new products to market. This paper investigates the relationship between product ...

  11. Synthesis of aluminum-rich coatings on new high-temperature cast austenitic steel CF8C-Plus by a pack cementation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Alex Keith

    2011-12-01

    In this research, a pack cementation process is developed for coating the newly developed cast austenitic steel CF8C-Plus. The developed coating process is capable of producing pack particle free coatings on large fatigue test specimens in a horizontal laboratory tube furnace as well as smaller oxidation and creep test samples. Several methods for the production of the pack powder free Al-rich coating are presented and evaluated for samples of both sizes. The developed coating is intended to compete with coatings of a similar quality produced with chemical vapor deposition and slurry coating methods. Additionally, because CF8C-Plus has only recently become available there is currently no available data on the effect of the fabrication of an Al-rich coating on the substrates properties. This research used advanced characterization methods to evaluate the coating surface and cross-sectional features. These methods include scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. This is the first time that this information has been made available to the scientific community. Also, the oxidation performance of the coating will be tested and compared to other coatings developed with CVD and slurry coating methods and the preliminary results of the effect of the coating on the alloys fatigue performance will be presented.

  12. Durability of pulp fiber-cement composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Benjamin J.

    Wood pulp fibers are a unique reinforcing material as they are non-hazardous, renewable, and readily available at relatively low cost compared to other commercially available fibers. Today, pulp fiber-cement composites can be found in products such as extruded non-pressure pipes and non-structural building materials, mainly thin-sheet products. Although natural fibers have been used historically to reinforce various building materials, little scientific effort has been devoted to the examination of natural fibers to reinforce engineering materials until recently. The need for this type of fundamental research has been emphasized by widespread awareness of moisture-related failures of some engineered materials; these failures have led to the filing of national- and state-level class action lawsuits against several manufacturers. Thus, if pulp fiber-cement composites are to be used for exterior structural applications, the effects of cyclical wet/dry (rain/heat) exposure on performance must be known. Pulp fiber-cement composites have been tested in flexure to examine the progression of strength and toughness degradation. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), a three-part model describing the mechanisms of progressive degradation has been proposed: (1) initial fiber-cement/fiber interlayer debonding, (2) reprecipitation of crystalline and amorphous ettringite within the void space at the former fiber-cement interface, and (3) fiber embrittlement due to reprecipitation of calcium hydroxide filling the spaces within the fiber cell wall structure. Finally, as a means to mitigate kraft pulp fiber-cement composite degradation, the effects of partial portland cement replacement with various supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) has been investigated for their effect on mitigating kraft pulp fiber-cement composite mechanical property degradation (i.e., strength and toughness losses) during wet/dry cycling. SCMs have been found to be effective in mitigating composite degradation through several processes, including a reduction in the calcium hydroxide content, stabilization of monosulfate by maintaining pore solution pH, and a decrease in ettringite reprecipitation accomplished by increased binding of aluminum in calcium aluminate phases and calcium in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) phase.

  13. A Thermoelectric Waste-Heat-Recovery System for Portland Cement Rotary Kilns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qi; Li, Peng; Cai, Lanlan; Zhou, Pingwang; Tang, Di; Zhai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Qingjie

    2015-06-01

    Portland cement is produced by one of the most energy-intensive industrial processes. Energy consumption in the manufacture of Portland cement is approximately 110-120 kWh ton-1. The cement rotary kiln is the crucial equipment used for cement production. Approximately 10-15% of the energy consumed in production of the cement clinker is directly dissipated into the atmosphere through the external surface of the rotary kiln. Innovative technology for energy conservation is urgently needed by the cement industry. In this paper we propose a novel thermoelectric waste-heat-recovery system to reduce heat losses from cement rotary kilns. This system is configured as an array of thermoelectric generation units arranged longitudinally on a secondary shell coaxial with the rotary kiln. A mathematical model was developed for estimation of the performance of waste heat recovery. Discussions mainly focus on electricity generation and energy saving, taking a ?4.8 × 72 m cement rotary kiln as an example. Results show that the Bi2Te3-PbTe hybrid thermoelectric waste-heat-recovery system can generate approximately 211 kW electrical power while saving 3283 kW energy. Compared with the kiln without the thermoelectric recovery system, the kiln with the system can recover more than 32.85% of the energy that used to be lost as waste heat through the kiln surface.

  14. Utilization of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash in blended cement Part 1: Processing and characterization of MSWI fly ash.

    PubMed

    Aubert, J E; Husson, B; Sarramone, N

    2006-08-25

    This paper is the first of a series of two articles dealing with the processes applied to MSWI fly ash with a view to reusing it safely in cement-based materials. Part 1 presents two stabilization processes and Part 2 deals with the use of the two treated fly ashes (TFA) in mortars. Two types of binder were used: an Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) containing more than 95% clinker (CEM I 52.5R) and a binary blend cement composed of 70% ground granulated blast furnace slag and 30% clinker (CEM III-B 42.5N). In this first part, two stabilization processes are presented: the conventional process, called "A", based on the washing, phosphation and calcination of the ash, and a modified process, called "B", intended to eliminate metallic aluminum and sulfate contained in the ash. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the two TFA were comparable. The main differences observed were those expected, i.e. TFA-B was free of metallic aluminum and sulfate. The mineralogical characterization of the two TFAs highlighted the presence of large amounts of a calcium aluminosilicate phase taking two forms, a crystalline form (gehlenite) and an amorphous form. Hydration studies on pastes containing mixed TFA and calcium hydroxide showed that this phase reacted with calcium hydroxide to form calcium aluminate hydrates. This formation of hydrates was accompanied by a hardening of the pastes. These results are very encouraging for the reuse of such TFA in cement-based materials because they can be considered as pozzolanic additions and could advantageously replace a part of the cement in cement-based materials. Finally, leaching tests were carried out to evaluate the environmental impact of the two TFAs. The elements which were less efficiently stabilized by process A were zinc, cadmium and antimony but, when the results of the leaching tests were compared with the thresholds of the European landfill directive, TFA-A could nevertheless be accepted at landfills for non-hazardous waste. The modifications of the process led to a significant reduction in the stabilization of chromium, selenium and antimony. PMID:16442718

  15. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    Background. Little is known about the long-term clinical bonding effectiveness of the Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts cemented with self-etch adhesive systems. Bond stability and longevity of the cemented post are adversely affected by physical and chemical factors over time, such as expansion and contraction stresses caused by thermal changes and occlusal load. This clinical condition can be simulated in vitro by thermocyclic loading; and bonding effectiveness can be evaluated by applying the micropush out test. Therefore, more in vitro studies are needed to evaluate the bond strength of the fiber posts cemented with different resin cement systems after simulating the artificial aging induced by thermocycling. The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two different resin cement systems (total etch, and self-etch resin cement system) used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite posts in three different aging periods using thermocycling. Methods. Following IRB approval, sixty freshly extracted bicuspid single rooted natural teeth were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were prepared to receive a fiber-post cemented with either a total etch resin cement (Rely-X Ultimate) or with a self-etch resin cement (Rely-X Unicem). No thermocycling, 20,000 and 40,000 cycles was used to age the specimens. Teeth were randomly allocated into six different groups: G1 - Control: Rely-X Ultimate cement with no thermocycling. G2: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 20,000 thermocycling. G3: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 40,000 thermocycling. G4: Rely-X Unicem cement. G5: Rely-X Unicem cement. G6: Rely-X Unicem cement. Microtensile bond strength determined using a micropush out test on a universal testing machine (MTS). Additionally, the failure mode of each specimen was observed under a stereomicroscope (Olympus) at 40x magnification. Finally, one representative sample was randomly selected from each of the five failure modes for scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of the surface morphology in order to obtain SEM images of the failure patterns at 29--70x magnifications. Statistical analysis: Nested general linear and generalized linear model was created to look for statistical significance. Level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results. No significant differences were found on the bond strength between the two types of resin cement systems (total etch and self-etch). Regarding the thermocycling effect, the bond strengths of the group of 40,000 cycles was significantly lower than the 20,000 cycle group. In addition, the bond strengths of the specimens collected from the coronal third of the root were significantly lower than the specimens from the apical third. A Fisher's Exact test was applied to evaluate the failure mode differences, and showed statistically significant differences between the groups. Conclusions . The bond strength to the root canal dentin did not vary with the type of resin cement systems (total-etch vs self-etch). The microtensile bond strength values of FRC posts were significantly affected by increasing the thermocycling, and were significantly different among the different longitudinal levels of the root canal.

  16. General hydration model for portland cement and blast furnace slag cement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Taerwe

    1995-01-01

    This paper focusses on the evolution of the heat of hydration of hardening concrete or cement based materials. Based on isothermal and adiabatic hydration tests a new general hydration model is developed, valid both for portland cement and blast furnace slag cement. This hydration model enables the calculation of the heat production rate as a function of the actual temperature

  17. Use of diatomite as partial replacement for Portland cement in cement mortars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nurhayat Degirmenci; Arin Yilmaz

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the use of diatomite as a partial replacement for cement in the production of cement mortar. Diatomite was used at 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% replacement by weight for cement while sand and water quantities were kept constant. Compressive and flexural strength, freeze–thaw resistance, sulfate resistance, water absorption and dry unit

  18. Assessment of the radiological impacts of utilizing coal combustion fly ash as main constituent in the production of cement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ?eref Turhan; ?smail H. Ar?kan; Abdullah Köse; Ahmet Varinlio?lu

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess potential radiological impacts of utilizing pulverized fly ash (PFA) as a constituent\\u000a in ordinary Portland cement. For this purpose, the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K in samples of PFA and Portland cement containing 15%, 20%, and 25% by mass PFA were measured using gamma-ray spectrometry\\u000a with HPGe detector. The mean

  19. XML-based product information processing method for product design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen Yu

    2012-01-01

    Design knowledge of modern mechatronics product is based on information processing as the center of the knowledge-intensive engineering, thus product design innovation is essentially the knowledge and information processing innovation. Analysis of the role of mechatronics product design knowledge and information management features, a unified model of XML-based product information processing method is proposed. Information processing model of product design includes functional knowledge, structural knowledge and their relationships. For the expression of product function element, product structure element, product mapping relationship between function and structure based on the XML model are proposed. The information processing of a parallel friction roller is given as an example, which demonstrates that this method is obviously helpful for knowledge-based design system and product innovation.

  20. XML-based product information processing method for product design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen Yu

    2011-12-01

    Design knowledge of modern mechatronics product is based on information processing as the center of the knowledge-intensive engineering, thus product design innovation is essentially the knowledge and information processing innovation. Analysis of the role of mechatronics product design knowledge and information management features, a unified model of XML-based product information processing method is proposed. Information processing model of product design includes functional knowledge, structural knowledge and their relationships. For the expression of product function element, product structure element, product mapping relationship between function and structure based on the XML model are proposed. The information processing of a parallel friction roller is given as an example, which demonstrates that this method is obviously helpful for knowledge-based design system and product innovation.

  1. The 3Rs and cement kiln dust: Opportunities for reduction, reuse and recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Nisbet, M. [JAN Consultants, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    Cement kiln dust (CKD) is a by-product of the cement manufacturing process. This material which is captured in cement kiln dust control equipment consists primarily of raw and partly calcined kiln feed. Factors which contribute to the generation of CKD are described. Cases of successful reduction of CKD generation are presented. Technologies for treating CKD so that it can be reused as a raw material for cement production are discussed. Applications where CKD can be used alone or with other by-products are also presented. Opportunities for developing new uses for CKD are identified and discussed in terms of the drivers behind such applications as well as the economic, technical and regulatory barriers to their development.

  2. Modelling of hydrogen production from pore water radiolysis in cemented intermediate level waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foct, F.; Di Giandomenico, M.-V.; Bouniol, P.

    2013-07-01

    In France, some of the intermediate and low level wastes are embedded in hydraulic binder and put into concrete canisters. They contain ? and ? emitters which cause an irradiation of water present in the pores of the hydraulic binder. This is responsible for a dihydrogen (H2) production due to radiolysis. EDF R&D and CEA have collaborated since many years in order to understand this phenomenon and develop a model called DO-RE-MI which can predict such a production of dihydrogen in concrete waste packages. A parametric study, using the developed model, was implemented in order to determine the effects of each parameter on H2 production. The main results are presented in this paper.

  3. [Radioactivity of bone cement].

    PubMed

    Scherer, M A; Winkler, R; Ascherl, R; Lenz, E

    1993-01-01

    A total of 14 samples of different types of bone cement from five different manufacturers were examined for their radioactivity. Each of the investigated bone cements showed a low radioactivity level, i.e. between < 1 and 100 Bq/kg. The content of U-238 and K-40 always was below the limit of detection (< 1-< 10 Bq/kg). Significant differences were detected in the amount of Ra-226, Pb-210, and Ra-228 detected between different samples of the same product from the same manufacturer, as well as between various types of cements. The highest radioactivity level was measured for Ra-226. Although stochastic radiation effects can not totally be excluded, it is extremely unlikely that the small amount of radioactive substances additionally transferred into the body by the bone cement has negative effects on the recipient's organism or on the fate of the alloplastic implant: "The risk factor and extrapolation in a low dosage range ... do not lead to an underestimation but more likely to an overestimation of the radiation hazard" [18]. PMID:8441806

  4. A modified technique for extraoral cementation of implant retained restorations for preventing excess cement around the margins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The major drawback of cement-retained restorations is the extrusion of the excess cement into the peri-implant sulcus, with subsequent complications. Insufficient removal of the excess cement may initiate a local inflammatory process, which may lead to implant failure. This article presents a method of controlling cement flow on implant abutments, minimizing the excess cement around implant-retained restorations. PMID:24843401

  5. Micro- and nano-scale characterization to study the thermal degradation of cement-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Seungmin, E-mail: lim76@illinois.edu; Mondal, Paramita

    2014-06-01

    The degradation of hydration products of cement is known to cause changes in the micro- and nano-structure, which ultimately drive thermo-mechanical degradation of cement-based composite materials at elevated temperatures. However, a detailed characterization of these changes is still incomplete. This paper presents results of an extensive experimental study carried out to investigate micro- and nano-structural changes that occur due to exposure of cement paste to high temperatures. Following heat treatment of cement paste up to 1000 °C, damage states were studied by compressive strength test, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM image analysis. Using experimental results and research from existing literature, new degradation processes that drive the loss of mechanical properties of cement paste are proposed. The development of micro-cracks at the interface between unhydrated cement particles and paste matrix, a change in C–S–H nano-structure and shrinkage of C–S–H, are considered as important factors that cause the thermal degradation of cement paste. - Highlights: • The thermal degradation of hydration products of cement is characterized at micro- and nano-scale using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). • The interface between unhydrated cement particles and the paste matrix is considered the origin of micro-cracks. • When cement paste is exposed to temperatures above 300 ºC, the nano-structure of C-S-H becomes a more loosely packed globular structure, which could be indicative of C-S-H shrinkage.

  6. Surface pretreatment for prolonged survival of cemented tibial prosthesis components: full- vs. surface-cementation technique

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Rudolf; Qunaibi, Mutaz; Wirtz, Dieter Christian; Niethard, Fritz Uwe; Mumme, Thorsten

    2005-01-01

    Background One of few persisting problems of cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is aseptic loosening of tibial component due to degradation of the interface between bone cement and metallic tibial shaft component, particularly for surface cemented tibial components. Surface cementation technique has important clinical meaning in case of revision and for avoidance of stress shielding. Degradation of the interface between bone cement and bone may be a secondary effect due to excessive crack formation in bone cement starting at the opposite metallic surface. Methods This study was done to prove crack formation in the bone cement near the metallic surface when this is not coated. We propose a newly developed coating process by PVD layering with SiOx to avoid that crack formation in the bone cement. A biomechanical model for vibration fatigue test was done to simulate the physiological and biomechanical conditions of the human knee joint and to prove excessive crack formation. Results It was found that coated tibial components showed a highly significant reduction of cement cracking near the interface metal/bone cement (p < 0.01) and a significant reduction of gap formation in the interface metal-to-bone cement (p < 0.05). Conclusion Coating dramatically reduces hydrolytic- and stress-related crack formation at the prosthesis interface metal/bone cement. This leads to a more homogenous load transfer into the cement mantle which should reduce the frequency of loosening in the interfaces metal/bone cement/bone. With surface coating of the tibial component it should become possible that surface cemented TKAs reveal similar loosening rates as TKAs both surface and stem cemented. This would be an important clinical advantage since it is believed that surface cementing reduces metaphyseal bone loss in case of revision and stress shielding for better bone health. PMID:16262888

  7. Powdered materials, products, and coating: Finely disperse cemented carbides WC-Ni. II. Physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sverdel, V.V.; Shatov, A.V.; Yurchuk, N.A. [Institute of Materials Science, Kiev (Russian Federation)

    1994-09-01

    A change of the conditions of sintering of ceneted carbides will lead to a change in the completeness and speed of the sintering process forming the structure of the material. Changes in structure affect the mechanical and physical properties. Investigations were performed on tungsten carbides and nickel systems.

  8. Shotcrete -- Understanding of the hydration process of mixes containing CAC and Portland cement and proposal for a simple rheological characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Bayoux, J.P.; Testud, M.; Guinot, D. [Lafarge Coppee Recherche, Saint-Quentin-Fallavier (France); Willocq, J.; Capmas, A. [Lafarge Fondu International, Neuilly-sur-Seine (France)

    1995-12-31

    In order to better understand the performances of CAC-slag cement and CAC--PC cement the hydration study of these mixes was undertaken. The hydrates which are responsible for the early stiffening/strengthening are identical in both mixes; it is only the time of appearance and amount which varies. Ettringite always forms first followed by the precipitation of C{sub 4}AH{sub 13}. They will both form faster then the temperature rises. As a complement, a simple laboratory equipment is proposed to characterize the stiffening behavior of the mixes straight after gauging.

  9. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

    2008-07-30

    The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per year); (5) the amount of production of cement by type and grade (in tonnes per year); (6) the electricity generated onsite; and, (7) the energy used by fuel type; and, the amount (in RMB per year) spent on energy. The tool offers the user the opportunity to do a quick assessment or a more detailed assessment--this choice will determine the level of detail of the energy input. The detailed assessment will require energy data for each stage of production while the quick assessment will require only total energy used at the entire facility (see Section 6 for more details on quick versus detailed assessments). The benchmarking tool provides two benchmarks--one for Chinese best practices and one for international best practices. Section 2 describes the differences between these two and how each benchmark was calculated. The tool also asks for a target input by the user for the user to set goals for the facility.

  10. Briquette product, and process for its production

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.W.; Blackmore, G.; Blackmore, G.; Komerek, K.R.; Komerek, R.

    1991-11-26

    This patent describes a process for restructuring particulate coal fines without the introduction of extraneous binder material, comprising the steps of: drying coal particle feed material; compressing the material into a constrained briquette form at a pressure in the range 30,000 to 50,000 psi. This patent also describes an apparatus for reconstituting coal from naturally occurring coal fines wet feed material of variable water content, generally in the size range up to 1/16 inch mesh and predominantly particulate 28 mesh to zero into a compacted form possessing adequate crushing strength to withstand bulk handling without substantial damage. It comprises: a high pressure cavity die roll press operable in a pressure range above about 30,000 psi to abut 50,000 psi; gas heating means for producing hot reducing gas at a pressure above atmospheric; dryer means to receive the hot reducing gas and the wet feed material in mutual heat exchange relation therein.

  11. Process Engineering Economics of Bioethanol Production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mats Galbe; Per Sassner; Anders Wingren; Guido Zacchi

    This work presents a review of studies on the process economics of ethanol production from lignocellulosic\\u000a materials published since 1996. Our objective was to identify the most costly process steps and the impact\\u000a of various parameters on the final production cost, e.g. plant capacity, raw material cost, and overall\\u000a product yield, as well as process configuration. The variation in estimated ethanol

  12. Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-11-30

    The Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project was a technical success and demonstrated the following: CKD can be used successfully as the sole reagent for removing SO2 from cement kiln flue gas, with removal efficiencies of 90 percent or greater; Removal efficiencies for HCl and VOCs were approximately 98 percent and 70 percent, respectively; Particulate emissions were low, in the range of 0.005 to 0.007 grains/standard cubic foot; The treated CKD sorbent can be recycled to the kiln after its potassium content has been reduced in the scrubber, thereby avoiding the need for landfilling; The process can yield fertilizer-grade K2SO4, a saleable by-product; and Waste heat in the flue gas can provide the energy required for evaporation and crystallization in the by-product recovery operation. The demonstration program established the feasibility of using the Recovery Scrubber{trademark} for desulfurization of flue gas from cement kilns, with generally favorable economics, assuming tipping fees are available for disposal of ash from biomass combustion. The process appears to be suitable for commercial use on any type of cement kiln. EPA has ruled that CKD is a nonhazardous waste, provided the facility meets Performance Standards for the Management of CKD (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1999d). Therefore, regulatory drivers for the technology focus more on reduction of air pollutants and pollution prevention, rather than on treating CKD as a hazardous waste. Application of the Recovery Scrubbe{trademark} concept to other waste-disposal operations, where pollution and waste reductions are needed, appears promising.

  13. Productivity enhancement through process integration 

    E-print Network

    Alotaibi, Meteab Aujian

    2006-10-30

    A hierarchical procedure is developed to determine maximum overall yield of a process and optimize process changes to achieve such a yield. First, a targeting procedure is developed to identify an upper bound of the overall ...

  14. Process capability indices and product reliability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bharatwaj Ramakrishnan; Peter Sandborn; Michael G. Pecht

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses process capability indices—Cp and Cpk, their underlying assumptions, and the relationships between process capability indices and product reliability. An actual case is presented to demonstrate this relationship.

  15. Generative inspection process planner for integrated production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.W. (Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Kansas City, MO (USA). Kansas City Div.) [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Kansas City, MO (USA). Kansas City Div.; Gyorog, D.A. (Kansas Univ., Lawrence, KS (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering) [Kansas Univ., Lawrence, KS (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1990-04-01

    This work describes the design prototype development of a generative process planning system for dimensional inspection. The system, IPPEX (Inspection Process Planning EXpert), is a rule-based expert system for integrated production. Using as advanced product modeler, relational databases, and artificial intelligence techniques, IPPEX generates the process plan and part program for the dimensional inspection of products using CMMs. Through an application interface, the IPPEX system software accesses product definition from the product modeler. The modeler is a solid geometric modeler coupled with a dimension and tolerance modeler. Resource data regarding the machines, probes, and fixtures are queried from databases. IPPEX represents inspection process knowledge as production rules and incorporates an embedded inference engine to perform decision making. The IPPEX system, its functional architecture, system architecture, system approach, product modeling environment, inspection features, inspection knowledge, hierarchical planning strategy, user interface formats, and other fundamental issues related to inspection planning and part programming for CMMs are described. 27 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production 

    E-print Network

    Hasanbeigi, A.; Price, L.; Lin, E.

    2012-01-01

    Globally, the cement industry accounts for approximately 5 percent of current man-made carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and CO2 emission-reduction technologies and their deployment in the market will be key...

  17. Immobilisation of heavy metal in cement-based solidification/stabilisation: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q.Y. [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China)], E-mail: qychen@dhu.edu.cn; Tyrer, M. [Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London SW7 4AZ (United Kingdom); Hills, C.D. [Centre for Contaminated Land Remediation, Medway School of Science, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB (United Kingdom); Yang, X.M. [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China); Carey, P. [Centre for Contaminated Land Remediation, Medway School of Science, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB (United Kingdom)

    2009-01-15

    Heavy metal-bearing waste usually needs solidification/stabilization (s/s) prior to landfill to lower the leaching rate. Cement is the most adaptable binder currently available for the immobilisation of heavy metals. The selection of cements and operating parameters depends upon an understanding of chemistry of the system. This paper discusses interactions of heavy metals and cement phases in the solidification/stabilisation process. It provides a clarification of heavy metal effects on cement hydration. According to the decomposition rate of minerals, heavy metals accelerate the hydration of tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S) and Portland cement, although they retard the precipitation of portlandite due to the reduction of pH resulted from hydrolyses of heavy metal ions. The chemical mechanism relevant to the accelerating effect of heavy metals is considered to be H{sup +} attacks on cement phases and the precipitation of calcium heavy metal double hydroxides, which consumes calcium ions and then promotes the decomposition of C{sub 3}S. In this work, molecular models of calcium silicate hydrate gel are presented based on the examination of {sup 29}Si solid-state magic angle spinning/nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS/NMR). This paper also reviews immobilisation mechanisms of heavy metals in hydrated cement matrices, focusing on the sorption, precipitation and chemical incorporation of cement hydration products. It is concluded that further research on the phase development during cement hydration in the presence of heavy metals and thermodynamic modelling is needed to improve effectiveness of cement-based s/s and extend this waste management technique.

  18. Assessing online collaborative learning: process and product

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet Macdonald

    2003-01-01

    The assessment of online collaborative study presents new opportunities and challenges, both in terms of separating the process and product of collaboration, and in the support of skills development. The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of assessment with respect to the processes and products of online col- laborative study. It describes a qualitative case study of

  19. The effects of the mechanical–chemical stabilization process for municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash on the chemical reactions in cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Cheng-Gang [Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Tamkang University, 151, Ying-chung Road, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei City 251, Taiwan, ROC (China); Sun, Chang-Jung, E-mail: sun.3409@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Technology and Management, Taoyuan Innovation Institute of Technology, 414, Sec. 3, Jhongshan E. Rd., Zhongli City, Taoyuan County 320, Taiwan, ROC (China); Gau, Sue-Huai; Wu, Ching-Wei; Chen, Yu-Lun [Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Tamkang University, 151, Ying-chung Road, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei City 251, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ? Milling extracted MSWI fly ash. ? Increasing specific surface area, destruction of the crystalline texture, and increasing the amount of amorphous materials. ? Increasing heavy metal stability. ? Inducing pozzolanic reactions and increasing the early and later strength of the cement paste. - Abstract: A water extraction process can remove the soluble salts present in municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash, which will help to increase the stability of the synthetic materials produced from the MSWI fly ash. A milling process can be used to stabilize the heavy metals found in the extracted MSWI fly ash (EA) leading to the formation of a non-hazardous material. This milled extracted MSWI fly ash (MEA) was added to an ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste to induce pozzolanic reactions. The experimental parameters included the milling time (96 h), water to binder ratios (0.38, 0.45, and 0.55), and curing time (1, 3, 7 and 28 days). The analysis procedures included inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES), BET, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. The results of the analyses indicate that the milling process helped to stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA, with an increase in the specific surface area of about 50 times over that of OPC. The addition of the MEA to the OPC paste decreased the amount of Ca(OH){sub 2} and led to the generation of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H) which in turned increased the amount of gel pores and middle sized pores in the cement. Furthermore, a comparison shows an increase in the early and later strength over that of OPC paste without the addition of the milled extracted ash. In other words, the milling process could stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA and had an activating effect on the MEA, allowing it to partly substitute OPC in OPC paste.

  20. Processed Fishery Products FRESH AND FROZEN

    E-print Network

    INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS. Oyster shell products, together with agar-agar, animal feeds, crab and clam shells and animal food. CANNED SALMON. The 2003 U.S. pack of salmon was 188.1 million pounds valued at $242 processed for food serving, fish pellets, Irish moss extracts, kelp products, dry and liquid fertilizers

  1. Processed Fishery Products FRESH AND FROZEN

    E-print Network

    PRODUCTS. Oyster shell products, together with agar-agar, animal feeds, crab and clam shells processed and animal food. CANNED SALMON. The 2007 U.S. pack of salmon was 182.8 million pounds valued at $282 for food serving, fish pellets, Irish moss extracts, kelp products, dry and liquid fertilizers, and mussel

  2. Bacterial Production Lab State variables and processes

    E-print Network

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    (125I) 60 d Types Helium nuclei Electron Gamma ray For bacterial production, 3H and 14C used. NoteBacterial Production Lab State variables and processes BDOM Other compounds (e.g., EtOH) CO2 G (also called bacteria production) B DOM DIN Z Time Concentration B Z DOM DIN Turnover: [B]/G U State Var

  3. Bacterial Production Lab State variables and processes

    E-print Network

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Helium nuclei Electron Gamma ray For bacterial production, 3H and 14C used. Note, 3H and 14C are weakBacterial Production Lab State variables and processes BDOM Other compounds (e.g., EtOH) CO2 r (also called bacteria production) B DOM DIN G Time Concentration B G DOM DIN Turnover: [B]/rB U State

  4. Products from Lignocellulosic Materials via Degradation Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Demirbas

    2007-01-01

    Products from lignicellulosic materials by degradation processes are reviewed based on the results of some investigations. Biomass provides a potential source of added value chemicals, such as reducing sugars, furfural, ethanol and other products by using biochemical or chemical and thermochemical. The initial degradation reactions include depolymerization, hydrolysis, oxidation, dehydration, and decarboxylation. The gas phase of pyrolitic degradation products contain

  5. Consolidated processes for product recovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, fermentation industries are structured on individual unit operations for production of biofuels such as ethanol, butanol, and 2,3-butanediol which result in increased capital and operational costs. Such increased costs result in low profitability and increased consumer price. With the d...

  6. Process for improving metal production in steelmaking processes

    DOEpatents

    Pal, U.B.; Gazula, G.K.M.; Hasham, A.

    1996-06-18

    A process and apparatus for improving metal production in ironmaking and steelmaking processes is disclosed. The use of an inert metallic conductor in the slag containing crucible and the addition of a transition metal oxide to the slag are the disclosed process improvements. 6 figs.

  7. Mass balance of dioxins over a cement kiln in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yeqing; Chen, Tong; Zhang, Jiang; Meng, Weijie; Yan, Mi; Wang, Huanzhong; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-02-01

    The cement production process may be a potential source of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs, "dioxins"), due to the widespread distribution of dioxins and potential precursors in raw materials and to conditions favorable to de novo formation in the heat exchangers. The emission, gas/particle distribution, and mass balance of PCDD/Fs were investigated at a typical state-of-the-art Chinese cement kiln. Input and output inventories were established for three campaigns, including two in normal operation and one while co-processing refuse derived fuel (RDF). Sample analysis from stack gas, cement kiln dust, raw meal, fly dust and clinker for the analysis of PCDD/Fs were reported in this study. Dioxins were also analyzed at various positions in the pre-heater, presenting an adsorption-desorption circulation process of PCDD/Fs. The over-all dioxin mass balance was negative, indicating that this cement kiln is not a source but a sink process of dioxins. PMID:25532674

  8. Cement kiln NOx control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. T. McQueen; S. J. Bortz; M. S. Hatch; H. J. Buening; D. E. Shore; R. L. Leonard; E. F. Bouse

    1993-01-01

    Cement kilns represent an important source of NOx emissions. The results of a critical analysis of the state-of-the-art in cement kiln NOx control are presented. A survey of current and anticipated cement kiln NOx regulations, NOx formation mechanisms and common NOx control technologies (as applied to boilers) is presented. Cement kiln features relating to NO x control, such as combustion

  9. Properties of volcanic pumice based cement and lightweight concrete

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Khandaker M Anwar Hossain

    2004-01-01

    The results of investigations on the suitability of using volcanic pumice (VP) as cement replacement material and as coarse aggregate in lightweight concrete production are reported. Tests were conducted on cement by replacing 0% to 25% of cement by weight and on concrete by replacing 0% to 100% of coarse aggregate by volume. The physical and chemical properties of VP

  10. Product automata and process algebra Kamal Lodaya

    E-print Network

    Lodaya, Kamal

    languages. Process algebra is a large enough field of research to have come out with its own handbook [8Product automata and process algebra Kamal Lodaya The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, C that ideas from process algebra can usefully be applied to verification using automata theory. Since

  11. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2004-08-31

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be economically competitive with current processes, and yet be environmentally friendly as well. The solvent extraction process developed uses mild hydrogenation of low cost oils to create powerful solvents that can dissolve the organic portion of coal. The insoluble portion, consisting mainly of mineral matter and fixed carbon, is removed via centrifugation or filtration, leaving a liquid solution of coal chemicals and solvent. This solution can be further refined via distillation to meet specifications for products such as synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and fibers. The most economical process recycles 85% of the solvent, which itself is obtained as a low-cost byproduct from industrial processes such as coal tar or petroleum refining. Alternatively, processes have been developed that can recycle 100% of the solvent, avoiding any need for products derived from petroleum or coal tar.

  12. Magnesia modification of alkali-activated slag fly ash cement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Weiguo Shen; Yiheng Wang; Tao Zhang; Mingkai Zhou; Jiasheng Li; Xiaoyu Cui

    2011-01-01

    A new type of magnesia modification alkali-activated cement was prepared, the strength, setting time, shrinkage ratio and\\u000a cracking behavior, as well as the composition and structure of the hydration product were investigated. The results indicate\\u000a that the setting time of this cement is similar to that of the ordinary commercial cements; its strength reaches the standard\\u000a of 42.5 degree cement,

  13. Dispersion strengthened cemented carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, R.A.; Alexander, G.B.; Plichta, M.R.

    1983-09-01

    The research studied the feasibility of strengthening WC-CO cermets by adding refractory oxides to the binder phase. Cemented carbides containing 0.06 to 1.5 vol. % finely dispersed oxide particles in cobalt powder, prior to liquid phase sintering, were densified and compared to undoped control powders. Three different processes for dispersing refractory oxides in cobalt metal were investigated. Results suggest that the oxide particles coalesced and/or segregated to WC-CO interfaces during the liquid-phase sintering process.

  14. General hydration model for portland cement and blast furnace slag cement

    SciTech Connect

    De Schutter, G.; Taerwe, L. [Magnel Laboratory for Concrete Research, Ghent (Belgium)] [Magnel Laboratory for Concrete Research, Ghent (Belgium)

    1995-04-01

    This paper focuses on the evolution of the heat of hydration of hardening concrete or cement based materials. Based on isothermal and adiabatic hydration tests a new general hydration model is developed, valid both for portland cement and blast furnace slag cement. This hydration model enables the calculation of the heat production rate as a function of the actual temperature and the degree of hydration.

  15. CITRIC ACID AS A SET RETARDER FOR CALCIUM ALUMINATE PHOSPHATE CEMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.; BROTHERS, L.E.

    2005-01-01

    Citric acid added as set retarder significantly contributed to enhancing the setting temperature and to extending the thickening time of a calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) geothermal cement slurry consisting of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) as the base reactant and sodium polyphosphate (NaP) solution as the acid reactant. The set-retarding activity of citric acid was due to the uptake of Ca{sup 2+} ions from the CAC by carboxylic acid groups within the citric acid. This uptake led to the precipitation of a Ca-complexed carboxylate compound as a set-retarding barrier layer on the CAC grains' surfaces. However, this barrier layer was vulnerable to disintegration by the attack of free Ca{sup 2+} ions from CAC, and also to degradation at elevated temperature, thereby promoting the generation of exothermic energy from acid-base reactions between the CAC and NaP after the barrier was broken. The exothermic reaction energy that was promoted in this way minimized the loss in strength of the citric acid-retarded cement. The phase composition assembled in both retarded and non-retarded cements after autoclaving at 180 C encompassed three reaction products, hydroxyapatite (HOAp), hydrogrossular and boehmite, which are responsible for strengthening the autoclaved cement. The first two reaction products were susceptible to reactions with sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate to form crystalline bassanite scale as the corrosion product. The boehmite phase possessed a great resistance to acid and sulfate. Although the bassanite scales clinging to the cement's surfaces were the major factor governing the loss in weight, they served in protecting the cement from further acid- and sulfate-corrosion until their spallation eventually occurred. Nevertheless, the repetitive processes of HOAp and hydrogrossular {yields} bassanite {yields} spallation played an important role in extending the useful lifetime of CaP cement in a low pH environment at 180 C.

  16. Mariner 9-Image processing and products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levinthal, E.C.; Green, W.B.; Cutts, J.A.; Jahelka, E.D.; Johansen, R.A.; Sander, M.J.; Seidman, J.B.; Young, A.T.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the system for the display, processing, and production of image-data products created to support the Mariner 9 Television Experiment. Of necessity, the system was large in order to respond to the needs of a large team of scientists with a broad scope of experimental objectives. The desire to generate processed data products as rapidly as possible to take advantage of adaptive planning during the mission, coupled with the complexities introduced by the nature of the vidicon camera, greatly increased the scale of the ground-image processing effort. This paper describes the systems that carried out the processes and delivered the products necessary for real-time and near-real-time analyses. References are made to the computer algorithms used for the, different levels of decalibration and analysis. ?? 1973.

  17. Product Development Processes, Three Vectors Of Improvement

    E-print Network

    Holmes, Maurice

    2003-01-01

    Product Development Processes have achieved a state of some maturity in recent years, but have focused primarily on structuring technical activities from the initiation of development to launch. We advocate major advances ...

  18. Production of Hydrogen via Biological Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Balat

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews biological production processes of hydrogen as a renewable and alternative energy source. Biological hydrogen produced from renewable sources (biomass, water, and organic wastes) either biologically or photo-biologically is called “biohydrogen.” The phenomenon of biological hydrogen production was observed one century ago. When the oil crisis broke out in 1970s, the technology started receiving attention, especially in hydrogen

  19. Benchmarking Peer Production Mechanisms, Processes & Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Thomas; Kretschmer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This deliverable identifies key approaches for quality management in peer production by benchmarking peer production practices and processes in other areas. (Contains 29 footnotes, 13 figures and 2 tables.)[This report has been authored with contributions of: Kaisa Honkonen-Ratinen, Matti Auvinen, David Riley, Jose Pinzon, Thomas Fischer, Thomas…

  20. Bacterial Production Lab State variables and processes

    E-print Network

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Bacterial Production Lab State variables and processes BDOM Other compounds (e.g., EtOH) CO2 r (also called bacteria production) B DOM DIN G Time Concentration B G DOM DIN Turnover: [B]/rB U StateI) 8.06 d , Iodine-125 (125I) 60 d Types Helium nuclei Electron Gamma ray For bacterial

  1. Towards lean product and process development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Muhammad S. Khan; Ahmed Al-Ashaab; Essam Shehab; Badr Haque; Paul Ewers; Mikel Sorli; Amaia Sopelana

    2011-01-01

    Successes in lean manufacture have led researchers and practitioners to consider extending ‘lean' to different parts of the engineering enterprise, including product and process development (PPD). Lean product development (PD) has been understood to mean lean manufacture applied to PD, while the roots of lean PD – just like lean manufacture – go back to Toyota. This article presents the

  2. New refractory concretes and binding systems: Basic trends of development, production, and use of refractories in the 21st century. Part IV. Low-cement concretes and cement-free unshaped refractories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu. E. Pivinskii

    1998-01-01

    New refractory concretes based on high-alumina cement are classified and a description of their main properties is presented.\\u000a Ultra-low-cement concretes of this group are shown to have special importance. The efficiency of the technology of continuous\\u000a monolithic lining of steel-teeming ladles with the use of these concretes is noted. Use of the concretes is complicated by\\u000a the necessity of long-duration

  3. A Novel Oil Well Cementing Technology Using Natural Fibers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Al-Darbi; N. O. Saeed; L. O. Ajijolaiya; M. R. Islam

    2006-01-01

    In many industrial processes, the pipeline systems are lined with a protective layer of cement mortar. In petroleum wells, cement slurry is placed in a wellbore to be hardened into an impermeable mass that seals the annulus from fluid flow and protects the casing from corrosion for the life of the well. When uniform linings of neat cement fail in

  4. Early age hydration and pozzolanic reaction in natural zeolite blended cements: Reaction kinetics and products by in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Snellings, R., E-mail: ruben.snellings@ees.kuleuven.b [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200E, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Mertens, G. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200E, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Cizer, O. [Department of Civil Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 40, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Elsen, J. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200E, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2010-12-15

    The in situ early-age hydration and pozzolanic reaction in cements blended with natural zeolites were investigated by time-resolved synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction with Rietveld quantitative phase analysis. Chabazite and Na-, K-, and Ca-exchanged clinoptilolite materials were mixed with Portland cement in a 3:7 weight ratio and hydrated in situ at 40 {sup o}C. The evolution of phase contents showed that the addition of natural zeolites accelerates the onset of C{sub 3}S hydration and precipitation of CH and AFt. Kinetic analysis of the consumption of C{sub 3}S indicates that the enveloping C-S-H layer is thinner and/or less dense in the presence of alkali-exchanged clinoptilolite pozzolans. The zeolite pozzolanic activity is interpreted to depend on the zeolite exchangeable cation content and on the crystallinity. The addition of natural zeolites alters the structural evolution of the C-S-H product. Longer silicate chains and a lower C/S ratio are deduced from the evolution of the C-S-H b-cell parameter.

  5. Materials Processing and Product Fabrication Course Description

    E-print Network

    Materials Processing and Product Fabrication (EK 132) Course Description Materials processing used. The word manufacture is several centuries old, and was derived from two Latin words manus (hand) and factus the word was coined, today manufacturing is accomplished by automated and computer- controlled machinery

  6. Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greenbaum

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this mission-oriented research program is the production of renewable hydrogen for fossil fuel processing. This program will build upon promising results that have been obtained in the Chemical Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the utilization of intact microalgae for photosynthetic water splitting. In this process, specially adapted algae are used to perform the light-activated

  7. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

    1992-08-01

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form`` (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity.

  8. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity.

  9. Innovation mode of product design process management based on modularization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fei Ma; Heng Xu; Lian Wang

    2011-01-01

    Product design process is a complex system engineering. To improve the management efficiency of product design process, this paper, presents a new mode of product design process management from the perspective of modularization. Firstly, the related concepts and attributes of product design process module (DPM) are put forward. Then, the structure model of product design process based on DPM is

  10. Method of producing light weight cement for use of cementation of oil and gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Skjeldal, S.

    1983-05-31

    A cement slurry of low specific density for cementation of oil and gas wells is produced by mixing oil-well cement with finely divided emission products comprising amorphous silica dust which has been obtained during the electrothermal preparation of ferrosilicon and/or silicon metal, water, and any desirable dispersion components, the emission products being added in an amount in the range of 1-50% of the total weight of dry material. The emission products can either be mixed with the cement while both components are in the dry state whereupon there is added a sufficient quantity of water in order to obtain a desired specific weight of the slurry or first mixed with water and any other desired dispersion components and this slurry is mixed with the oil-well cement.

  11. Continuous process of production of pentaerythritol

    SciTech Connect

    Pakulin, V.V.; Rogachev, Y.V.; Gulevich, P.E.; Kruglikov, A.A.

    1982-12-01

    To meet the rising needs of the national economy for pentaerythritol, used in the production of alkyd resins, polyurethane foams, ester lubricants, and so forth, it is necessary to set up large-tonnage continuous production meeting the modern level of technology with a precise system of automatic process control. A continuous method for production of pentaerythritol in the presence of sodium hydroxide has been developed at the Uralkhimplast production association. The technology of the process was tested and developed on an experimental-industrial installation in the present pentaerythritol plant. The basic merit of the continuous process for production of pentaerythritol using NaOH as catalyst over the traditional method based on calcium hydroxide as catalyst, besides the increase of productivity, is the simpler technological scheme of the process. In the continuous production of pentaerythritol, the steps of catalyst preparation (roasting of limestone, slaking of lime, preparation of milk of lime), vacuum filtration of the condensation solution to remove gypsum (elimination of solid wastes in the form of gypsum) are eliminated. In addition, the specific consumption of acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, formic acid, electric power and steam is reduced. A characteristic distinction of the process using sodium hydroxide from that using calcium hydroxide is the fact that the condensation solutions produced in the former case are almost colorless and do not change color at the end of the reaction. Therefore, the finished product produced in the presence of NaOH is superior with regard to physicochemical properties to that produced in the presence of Ca(OH)/sub 2/.

  12. Cement analysis using d + D neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womble, Phillip C.; Paschal, Jon; Moore, Ryan

    2005-12-01

    In the cement industry, the primary concern is quality control. The earlier the cement industry can institute quality control upon their product, the more significant their savings in labor, energy and material. We are developing a prototype cement analyzer using pulsed neutrons from a d-D electronic neutron generator with the goal of ensuring quality control of cement in an on-line manner. By utilizing a low intensity d-D neutron source and a specially-designed moderator assembly, we are able to produce one of the safest neutron-based systems in the market. Also, this design includes some exciting new methods of data acquisition which may substantially reduce the final installation costs. In our proof-of-principle measurements, we were able to measure the primary components of cement (Al, Si, Ca and Fe) to limits required for the raw materials, the derived mixes and the clinkers utilizing this neutron generator.

  13. The effects of the mechanical-chemical stabilization process for municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash on the chemical reactions in cement paste.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Gang; Sun, Chang-Jung; Gau, Sue-Huai; Wu, Ching-Wei; Chen, Yu-Lun

    2013-04-01

    A water extraction process can remove the soluble salts present in municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash, which will help to increase the stability of the synthetic materials produced from the MSWI fly ash. A milling process can be used to stabilize the heavy metals found in the extracted MSWI fly ash (EA) leading to the formation of a non-hazardous material. This milled extracted MSWI fly ash (MEA) was added to an ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste to induce pozzolanic reactions. The experimental parameters included the milling time (96h), water to binder ratios (0.38, 0.45, and 0.55), and curing time (1, 3, 7 and 28 days). The analysis procedures included inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES), BET, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. The results of the analyses indicate that the milling process helped to stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA, with an increase in the specific surface area of about 50times over that of OPC. The addition of the MEA to the OPC paste decreased the amount of Ca(OH)2 and led to the generation of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) which in turned increased the amount of gel pores and middle sized pores in the cement. Furthermore, a comparison shows an increase in the early and later strength over that of OPC paste without the addition of the milled extracted ash. In other words, the milling process could stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA and had an activating effect on the MEA, allowing it to partly substitute OPC in OPC paste. PMID:23375995

  14. A cross-shift study of lung function, exhaled nitric oxide and inflammatory markers in blood in Norwegian cement production workers

    PubMed Central

    Notø, Hilde; Skogstad, Marit; Nordby, Karl-Christian; Eduard, Wijnand; Svendsen, Martin Veel; Øvstebø, Reidun; Trøseid, Anne Marie Siebke; Kongerud, Johny

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To study possible effects of aerosol exposure on lung function, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and inflammatory markers in blood from Norwegian cement production workers across one work shift (0 to 8?h) and again 32?h after the non-exposed baseline registration. Methods 95 workers from two cement plants in Norway were included. Assessment of lung function included spirometry and gas diffusion pre- and post-shift (0 and 8?h). FeNO concentrations were measured and blood samples collected at 0, 8 and 32?h. Blood analysis included cell counts of leucocytes and mediators of inflammation. Results The median respirable aerosol level was 0.3?mg/m3 (range 0.02–6.2?mg/m3). FEV1, FEF25–75% and DLCO decreased by 37?ml (p=0.04), 170?ml/s (p<0.001) and 0.17?mmol/min/kPa (p=0.02), respectively, across the shift. A 2?ppm reduction in FeNO between 0 and 32?h was detected (p=0.01). The number of leucocytes increased by 0.6×109?cells/l (p<0.001) across the shift, while fibrinogen levels increased by 0.02?g/l (p<0.001) from 0 to 32?h. TNF-? level increased and IL-10 decreased across the shift. Baseline levels of fibrinogen were associated with the highest level of respirable dust, and increased by 0.39?g/l (95% CI 0.06 to 0.72). Conclusions We observed small cross-shift changes in lung function and inflammatory markers among cement production workers, indicating that inflammatory effects may occur at exposure levels well below 1?mg/m3. However, because the associations between these acute changes and personal exposure measurements were weak and as the long-term consequences are unknown, these findings should be tested in a follow-up study. PMID:21297153

  15. Estimates of global, regional, and national annual CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring: 1950--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Boden, T.A.; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Andres, R.J. [University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering

    1995-12-01

    This document describes the compilation, content, and format of the most comprehensive C0{sub 2}-emissions database currently available. The database includes global, regional, and national annual estimates of C0{sub 2} emissions resulting from fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing, and gas flaring in oil fields for 1950--92 as well as the energy production, consumption, and trade data used for these estimates. The methods of Marland and Rotty (1983) are used to calculate these emission estimates. For the first time, the methods and data used to calculate CO, emissions from gas flaring are presented. This C0{sub 2}-emissions database is useful for carbon-cycle research, provides estimates of the rate at which fossil-fuel combustion has released C0{sub 2} to the atmosphere, and offers baseline estimates for those countries compiling 1990 C0{sub 2}-emissions inventories.

  16. Hidden Talents: Process/Product Perspectives in Gifted Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    1981-01-01

    The article provides three perspectives teachers of gifted students can adopt in the relationship of process to product: (1) products are viewed nonjudgmentally, (2) product does not presume process, and (3) products suggest standards and expectations. (DB)

  17. Process redesign of production maintenance operations

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, M.; Lowe, B.; Disney, V. Spilman, K.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a methodology for the systematic redesign of traditional production maintenance operations as they relate to subsurface failures of sucker rod pumped wells. The paper advocates an organized approach to process definition, refinement and redesign such that improvement objectives are clearly communicated, appropriate human and physical resources are brought to bear, and a system of improvement measurements becomes the overriding focus of the operation. Specific examples of the use of statistical process control tools in the production maintenance quality improvement effort are explored.

  18. Cementation of colloidal particles on electrodes in a galvanic microreactor.

    PubMed

    Jan, Linda; Punckt, Christian; Aksay, Ilhan A

    2013-07-10

    We have studied the processes leading to the cementation of colloidal particles during their autonomous assembly on corroding copper electrodes within a Cu-Au galvanic microreactor. We determined the onset of particle immobilization through particle tracking, monitored the dissolution of copper as well as the deposition of insoluble products of the corrosion reactions in situ, and showed that particle immobilization initiated after reaction products (RPs) began to deposit on the electrode substrate. We further demonstrated that the time and the extent of RP precipitation and thus the strength of the particle-substrate bond could be tuned by varying the amount of copper in the system and the microreactor pH. The ability to cement colloidal particles at locations undergoing corrosion illustrates that the studied colloidal assembly approach holds potential for applications in dynamic material property adaptation. PMID:23808394

  19. Achieving Integrated Process and Product Safety Arguments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ibrahim Habli; Tim Kelly

    2007-01-01

    \\u000a Process-based certification standards such as IEC 61508 and DO-178B are often criticised for being highly prescriptive and\\u000a impeding the adoption of new and novel methods and techniques. Rather than arguing safety based on compliance with a prescribed\\u000a and fixed process, product-based certification standards require the submission of a well structured and reasoned safety case.\\u000a Ideally, the safety case presents an

  20. Acrylic bone cement: current concept review.

    PubMed

    Magnan, B; Bondi, M; Maluta, T; Samaila, E; Schirru, L; Dall'Oca, C

    2013-08-01

    Acrylic bone cement has had for years an important role in orthopedic surgery. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) has been extended from the ophthalmological and dental fields to orthopedics, as acrylic cement used for fixation of prosthetic implants, for remodeling osteoporotic, neoplastic and vertebral fractures repair. The PMMA bone cement is a good carrier for sustained antibiotic release in the site of infection. Joint prostheses chronic infection requires surgical removal of the implant, in order to eradicate the infection process. This can be performed in the same surgical time (one-stage procedure) or in two separate steps (two-stage procedure, which involves the use of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer). The mechanical and functional characteristics of the spacers allow a good joint range of motion, weight-bearing in selected cases and a sustained release of antibiotic at the site of infection. The improvement of fixation devices in recent years was not accompanied by the improvement of elderly bone quality. Some studies have tested the use of PMMA bone cement or calcium phosphate as augmentation support of internal fixation of these fractures. Over the past 20 years, experimental study of acrylic biomaterials (bone cement, bioglass ceramic, cement additives, absorbable cement, antibiotic spacers) has been of particular importance, offering numerous models and projects. PMID:23893506

  1. Understanding the Term Gifted: Process? Product? Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloat, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    A model is presented that views gifted individuals as being process oriented, creative individuals as product oriented, and talented individuals as performance oriented. Approaches to acting that differ based on elements of giftedness, creativity, talent, and combinations thereof are explored. (JDD)

  2. Process for the production of aromatic fuel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Jr. Yancey; W. P. Jr. Hettinger

    1986-01-01

    A process is described for the production of high octane gasoline component comprising the sequential steps of: A. Cracking carbometallic petroleum oil characterized by a Conradson Carbon content of at least 1.0 wt% and a metals content of at least 4 ppm Nickel Equivalents by weight in a riser cracking zone at cracking conditions in the presence of fluid cracking

  3. Using Petri nets to represent production processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Didier Dubois; Kathryn E. Stecke

    1983-01-01

    A preliminary investigation, and extension of the power, of timed Petri nets to describe, model, and analyze production processes is reported. In particular, insights into real-time control aspects as well as the performance of flexible manufacturing systems are sought. Comparisons with previous investigative models are made. New and general modeling conventions are provided, which extend the realm of Petri net

  4. Preventive maintenance holds key to processing productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Carrieri, J.

    1983-11-01

    Preventive maintenance can be the means of ensuring processing productivity. Regular lubrication, spares and overhauling are part of effective preventive maintenance. However, the author also emphasises that other considerations, such as equipment selection, personnel training, inspection, early warning devices and continuous performance monitoring are also important.

  5. Processed Fishery Products FRESH AND FROZEN

    E-print Network

    products, together with agar-agar, animal feeds, crab and clam shells processed for food serving, fish at $216.0 million for bait and animal food. CANNED SALMON. The 2009 U.S. pack of salmon was 141.9 million pellets, Irishmossextracts,kelpproducts,dryandliquidfertilizers, and mussel shell buttons were valued

  6. CHH Cement Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cwirzen, A.; Habermehl-Cwirzen, K.; Nasibulina, L. I.; Shandakov, S. D.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Kauppinen, E. I.; Mudimela, P. R.; Penttala, V.

    The compressive strength and electrical resistivity for hardened pastes produced from nanomodified Portland SR cement (CHH- Carbon Hedge Hog cement) were studied. The nanomodification included growing of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the cement particles. Pastes having water to binder ratio of 0.5 were produced. The obtained hardened material was characterized by increased compressive strength in comparison with the reference specimens made from pristine SR cement, which was attributed to reinforcing action of the CNTs and CNFs. The electrical resistivity of CHH composite was lower by one order of magnitude in comparison with reference Portland cement paste.

  7. Combined hydrogen storage and production process

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhard, P.; Muller, A.; Weisang, J.E.

    1980-04-29

    In a combined process for the storage and production of hydrogen from a hydrogen reserve containing magnesium in the free or combined state, said process consisting of storing the hydrogen in the supply, decomposing the supply to produce hydrogen, and reconstituting the supply of hydrogenation; the use of a dope comprising two elements in the free or combined state selected from the group consisting of cerium, nickel, titanium and molybdenum. Said process may be applied to hydrogen reserves used to fuel internal-combustion engines and for similar applications.

  8. Comparative assessment of TRU waste forms and processes. Volume I. Waste form and process evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A.; Lokken, R.O.; May, R.P.; Roberts, F.P.; Timmerman, C.L.; Treat, R.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    This study provides an assesses seven waste forms and eight processes for immobilizing transuranic (TRU) wastes. The waste forms considered are cast cement, cold-pressed cement, FUETAP (formed under elevated temperature and pressure) cement, borosilicate glass, aluminosilicate glass, basalt glass-ceramic, and cold-pressed and sintered silicate ceramic. The waste-immobilization processes considered are in-can glass melting, joule-heated glass melting, glass marble forming, cement casting, cement cold-pressing, FUETAP cement processing, ceramic cold-pressing and sintering, basalt glass-ceramic processing. Properties considered included gas generation, chemical durability, mechanical strength, thermal stability, and radiation stability. The ceramic products demonstrated the best properties, except for plutonium release during leaching. The glass and ceramic products had similar properties. The cement products generally had poorer properties than the other forms, except for plutonium release during leaching. Calculations of the Pu release indicated that the waste forms met the proposed NRC release rate limit of 1 part in 10/sup 5/ per year in most test conditions. The cast-cement process had the lowest processing cost, followed closely by the cold-pressed and FUETAP cement processes. Joule-heated glass melting had the lower cost of the glass processes. In-can melting in a high-quality canister had the highest cost, and cold-pressed and sintered ceramic the second highest. Labor and canister costs for in-can melting were identified. The major contributor to costs of disposing of TRU wastes in a defense waste repository is waste processing costs. Repository costs could become the dominant cost for disposing of TRU wastes in a commercial repository. It is recommended that cast and FUETAP cement and borosilicate glass waste-form systems be considered. 13 figures, 16 tables.

  9. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1993-09-21

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120 C to about 300 C to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate. 10 figures.

  10. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-04-29

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, and shear bond. Testing to determine the effect of temperature cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. In addition, the stress-strain behavior of the cement types was studied. This report discusses a software program that is being developed to help design ULHS cements and foamed cements.

  11. Optical evaluation on the setting of cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De León Martínez, H. A.; Bernal, J. J. Soto; González Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2015-01-01

    In the construction area, one of the most widely used cement is the CPC 30R, it is a hydraulic binder consisting of CaO, SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3, when mixed with water forms cement pastes and its four crystallographic phases start to hydrate. The diffuse reflection on cement paste can give an indication of the behaviour on optical properties on the hydration of the cement and early formation products. In this study, Portland cement (CPC) pastes were prepared with 0.45 a water to cement ratio (w/c). This work is aimed to evaluate the optical properties of cement pastes on the hydration reaction during the first 24 hours by measuring the intensity of diffuse reflection changes.

  12. Reusing pretreated desulfurization slag to improve clinkerization and clinker grindability for energy conservation in cement manufacture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Liang; Chang, Juu-En; Shih, Pai-Haung; Ko, Ming-Sheng; Chang, Yi-Kuo; Chiang, Li-Choung

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to combine the physical pretreatments of grinding, sieving, and magnetic-separation processes to reclaim iron-rich materials from the desulfurization slag, and to use the remainder for cement clinker production. The iron-rich materials can be separated out efficiently by grinding for 30 min and sieving with a 0.3 mm mesh. The non-magnetic fraction of the particles smaller than 0.3 mm was in the majority, and proved to be suitable for use as a cement raw material. The raw mixes prepared with a pretreated desulfurization slag had a relatively high reactivity, and the temperature at which alite forms was significantly reduced during the clinkerization process. The clinkers produced with 10% desulfurization slag had a high level of alite and good grindability. Generally, the improvements in clinkerization and clinker grindability are beneficial to energy conservation in cement manufacture. PMID:20493627

  13. The implementation of wood waste ash as a partial cement replacement material in the production of structural grade concrete and mortar: An overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chee Ban Cheah; Mahyuddin Ramli

    2011-01-01

    The timber manufacturing and power generation industry is gradually shifting towards the use of biomass such as timber processing waste for fuel and energy production and to help supplement the electrical energy demand of national electric gridlines. Though timber processing waste is a sustainable and renewable source of fuel for energy production, the thermal process of converting the aforementioned biomass

  14. Cementation and Neomorphism: Incorporating the Basics of Diagenesis into Any Sedimentary Geology Course

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kathy Benison

    Two or three weeks of the course are dedicated to studying diagenesis. Lectures start with a general definition of diagenesis, the range of conditions under which it occurs, and examples of diverse diagenetic environments and features. I use rice crispy cereal and rice crispy treats to introduce cement (the marshmellow is the cement that "glues" the rice krispies together). I also incorporate basic hydrogeology to show how pores filled with (or partially filled with) groundwater provide both the space and the material for cementation. As part of this lecture, I show the students various rock samples and photomicrographs in which they can see cement examples. I outline the different cement minerals and shapes and how they can be used to interpret past diagenetic conditions (eg., gravitational "pendant" calcite cements indicate that the host sediment was once in a vadose zone with groundwater rich in calcium and carbonate). I also discuss types of pores during these lectures and the ways that pores form. We also discuss criteria for recognizing cements. After two one-hour lectures about cements, we have a lab exercise in which the students are given ~10 samples (including hand samples and thin sections) and asked to sketch and describe the cement types. The next one-hour lecture focuses on neomorphic processes and their products, including replacement, recrystallization, and polymorphic transition. As part of the lecture, we look at photomicrographs and hand samples that illstrate various neomorphic features, such as replacement dolomite and replacement chert. We establish criteria for distinguishing cements from neomorphic fabrics. This lecture is followed by a lab exercise that presents the students with ~10 rocks and thin sections and asks them to sketch and identify neomorphic fabrics. This lab is follwed by another one-hour lecture on compaction features, dissolution evidence, and determining paragentic sequences. If I am short on time, that is all I do for diagenesis. However, ideally, I continue with a lecture focused on the "dolomite problem" and some case studies of other types of diagenesis, as well as a third lab assignment that combines cementation, neomorphism, compaction, dissolution, and paragenetic sequences. As part of this section, I also try to incorporate examples of methods other than petrology (eg., fluid inclusion studies, stable isotope studies, dating) that are used for diagenetic studies. Later in the course, we take several field trips in which the students examine diagenetic features.

  15. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweigh cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary surface pipe and intermediate casing cementing conditions historically encountered in the US and establishment of average design conditions for ULHS cements. Russian literature concerning development and use of ultra-lightweight cements employing either nitrogen or ULHS was reviewed, and a summary is presented. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was conducted to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS. This protocol is presented and discussed. finally, results of initial testing of ULHS cements is presented along with analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project.

  16. Metastable ion production in the RCE process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. V. Balashov; I. V. Bodrenko

    2006-01-01

    Metastable ion production under resonant coherent excitation (RCE) of channeled ions in crystals is considered theoretically together with other characteristics of the process within the unified density matrix approach [V.V. Balashov, I.V. Bodrenko, Moscow State University Bulletin, Physics and Astronomy, No. 1 (2001) 27]. Calculations for hydrogen-like and helium-like ions in gold crystal show that the resonance yield of their

  17. Thermoradiation processes of energy-carrier production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. G. Dzantiev; A. N. Ermakov; V. M. Zhitomirskii; V. N. Popov

    1984-01-01

    Thermoradiation processes in the production of hydrogen and carbon monoxide from water vapor and CO2 are discussed. An radiolysis experiment was conducted using a one-pass flow system and an electron accelerator (with energy of 3 Me V), according to parameters of dose rate, regent-radiation contact time, and temperature (700 deg). Steady-state concentrations of H2 and CO were found to correspond

  18. Characteristics of products and PCDD\\/DF emissions from a pyrolysis process of urethane\\/styrofoam waste from electrical home appliances

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sung-Jin Cho; Ki-Heon Kim; Hae-Young Jung; Oh-Jun Kwon; Yong-Chil Seo

    2010-01-01

    A plastic fraction consisting mainly of polyurethane\\/styrofoam waste is generated after separating valuable spare parts and\\u000a metals from used electrical home appliances. In Korea, such waste is currently incinerated in cement kilns or is landfilled.\\u000a However, owing to its high volatile matter content, conversion into gaseous or liquid pyrolysis products is a preferable alternative.\\u000a A pyrolysis process of polyurethane and

  19. Soft X-ray Microscopy of Green Cements

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, P. J. M.; Mancio, M.; Chae, R.; Ha, J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kirchheim, A. P. [Department of Civil Engineering, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, 90035-190 (Brazil); Fischer, P. [Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, 94720 (United States); Tyliszczak, T. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, 94720 (United States)

    2011-09-09

    The present status of the cement and concrete industry is not sustainable. The production of Portland cement is responsible for 7% of the CO{sub 2} emissions in the world and existing reinforced concrete infrastructure is deteriorating at a fast pace. The change in the existing technology requires new developments in our understanding of the nanostructure of hydration products and the complex deterioration reactions. We have been developing an elaborate research program to advance the existing cement and concrete science by characterizing its nanostructure by synchrotron radiation. A new generation of green cements is being studied using high-resolution soft x-ray microscopy at the nano-level.

  20. Accelerated biodegradation of cement by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria as a bioassay for evaluating immobilization of low-level radioactive waste.

    PubMed

    Aviam, Orli; Bar-Nes, Gabi; Zeiri, Yehuda; Sivan, Alex

    2004-10-01

    Disposal of low-level radioactive waste by immobilization in cement is being evaluated worldwide. The stability of cement in the environment may be impaired by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria that corrode the cement by producing sulfuric acid. Since this process is so slow that it is not possible to perform studies of the degradation kinetics and to test cement mixtures with increased durability, procedures that accelerate the biodegradation are required. Semicontinuous cultures of Halothiobacillus neapolitanus and Thiomonas intermedia containing thiosulfate as the sole energy source were employed to accelerate the biodegradation of cement samples. This resulted in a weight loss of up to 16% after 39 days, compared with a weight loss of 0.8% in noninoculated controls. Scanning electron microscopy of the degraded cement samples revealed deep cracks, which could be associated with the formation of low-density corrosion products in the interior of the cement. Accelerated biodegradation was also evident from the leaching rates of Ca(2+) and Si(2+), the major constituents of the cement matrix, and Ca exhibited the highest rate (up to 20 times greater than the control rate) due to the reaction between free lime and the biogenic sulfuric acid. Leaching of Sr(2+) and Cs(+), which were added to the cement to simulate immobilization of the corresponding radioisotopes, was also monitored. In contrast to the linear leaching kinetics of calcium, silicon, and strontium, the leaching pattern of cesium produced a saturation curve similar to the control curve. Presumably, the leaching of cesium is governed by the diffusion process, whereas the leaching kinetics of the other three ions seems to governed by dissolution of the cement. PMID:15466547

  1. Accelerated Biodegradation of Cement by Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria as a Bioassay for Evaluating Immobilization of Low-Level Radioactive Waste

    PubMed Central

    Aviam, Orli; Bar-Nes, Gabi; Zeiri, Yehuda; Sivan, Alex

    2004-01-01

    Disposal of low-level radioactive waste by immobilization in cement is being evaluated worldwide. The stability of cement in the environment may be impaired by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria that corrode the cement by producing sulfuric acid. Since this process is so slow that it is not possible to perform studies of the degradation kinetics and to test cement mixtures with increased durability, procedures that accelerate the biodegradation are required. Semicontinuous cultures of Halothiobacillus neapolitanus and Thiomonas intermedia containing thiosulfate as the sole energy source were employed to accelerate the biodegradation of cement samples. This resulted in a weight loss of up to 16% after 39 days, compared with a weight loss of 0.8% in noninoculated controls. Scanning electron microscopy of the degraded cement samples revealed deep cracks, which could be associated with the formation of low-density corrosion products in the interior of the cement. Accelerated biodegradation was also evident from the leaching rates of Ca2+ and Si2+, the major constituents of the cement matrix, and Ca exhibited the highest rate (up to 20 times greater than the control rate) due to the reaction between free lime and the biogenic sulfuric acid. Leaching of Sr2+ and Cs+, which were added to the cement to simulate immobilization of the corresponding radioisotopes, was also monitored. In contrast to the linear leaching kinetics of calcium, silicon, and strontium, the leaching pattern of cesium produced a saturation curve similar to the control curve. Presumably, the leaching of cesium is governed by the diffusion process, whereas the leaching kinetics of the other three ions seems to governed by dissolution of the cement. PMID:15466547

  2. Enhancing the mechanical properties of cement paste by growing in-situ fiber reinforcement during hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinides, Margarita

    Efforts to improve the mechanical properties of concrete by modifying the cement paste matrix have focused entirely on strength enhancement. But the intrinsic brittleness of the cement paste matrix limits the possible improvement in the mechanical properties of concrete, and in particular the toughness of the material. Increasing the toughness of the cement paste matrix could lead to a reduction in flaw sensitivity by delaying unstable crack propagation. Consequently, the resistance of the material to cracking due to drying shrinkage, thermal shrinkage, expansive deterioration processes, and applied loads could increase considerably. The goal of this study was to grow in-situ fiber reinforcement in cement paste, a technique never before applied to cement-based materials, to enhance the toughness of the material. Ettringite, an existing, fiber-like hydration product was selected as the fiber reinforcement. Ettringite met all the necessary criteria to act as reinforcement in cement paste: adequate distribution in the matrix; adjustable volume fraction, aspect ratio and size; high stiffness along the fiber length; and finally compatibility with existing hydration products. Alkali-free accelerators were selected as the admixtures used to grow the ettringite in the cement paste. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy experiments were performed to study the volume fraction, distribution, size, and morphology of the ettringite crystals in the cement paste matrix (both plain and accelerator-containing). Mechanical tests (compression, splitting tension, flexural, compact tension) were used to evaluate the effect of the accelerators on the strength and toughness of cement paste. Microindentations on the surface of the cement paste matrix were performed to study the morphology of the cracks and the toughening mechanisms taking place. Through the characterization tests we identified that while more ettringite forms with the addition of the alkali-free accelerators, some of that ettringite forms in highly-porous inclusions distributed throughout the matrix. The compact tension specimen results showed that the accelerated specimens had a higher toughness and ductility compared to the control specimens. The dominant toughening mechanism identified was constrained microcracking, with the ettringite inclusions contributing to microcracking.

  3. Calcium silicate cement sorbent for H/sub 2/S removal and improved gasification processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, H.J.; Steinberg, M.

    1983-10-01

    Based on the studies performed on the agglomerated cement sorbent (ACS) pellet for in-situ desulfurization of gases and for improved gasification, in low and medium Btu fluidized bed coal gasifier (FBG) systems, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) The pelletization method by a drum pelletizer is a good way of agglomerating large sized (>20 US mesh) ACS pellets having high sorbent performance. (2) The ACS pellets have a sulfur capture capacity of about 60% at 950/sup 0/C, are 100% regenerable, and so not lose reactivity during cyclic use. (3) The rate of sulfidation increases linearly with H/sub 2/S concentration in the feed gas stream up to 1.0%. (4) The rate of sulfidation first increases with temperature in an Arrhenius fashion in the temperature range of 800/sup 0/C to 1000/sup 0/C and then decreases with further increase in temperatures, giving rise to an optimum sulfidation temperature of about 1000/sup 0/C. (5) The gasification of coal or coal char either with CO/sub 2/ gas or by partial oxidation in a 40 mm ID FBG shows that the gasification efficiency of coal (or coal char) is very much enhanced with the ACS pellets and with Greer limestone over the coal (or coal char) alone. There is, however, not much difference between the ACS pellets and Greer limestone in the degree of enhancement. (6) The gasification of coal by partial oxidation with air to low Btu gas in a 1-inch coal-fired FBG unit shows that in the temperature range of 800/sup 0/ to 900/sup 0/C the efficiency of coal gasification is improved by as much as 40% when ACS pellets are used compared to the use of Greer limestone. At the same time the sulfur removal efficiency is increased from 50 to 65% with Greer limestone to over 95% with the ACS pellets.

  4. Amphoteric surfactants: processing, product composition and properties.

    PubMed

    Leidreiter, H I; Gruning, B; Kaseborn, D

    1997-10-01

    Cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) has been the most important secondary surfactant for personal-cleansing products for a long time. Its excellent toxicological profile is an important reason for its increasing use in oral-care products. Recently it has gained interest for further applications such as household cleaners, dish-washing liquids, and industrial and technical products. Imidazoline-derived amphoterics such as sodium cocoampho-acetate (SCAA) or diacetate play a more minor role than CAPB. Owing to the low irritation potential of the pure surfactant and its good toxicological properties, ampho-acetates have mainly found applications in cosmetics. Their industrial applications have been relatively small. While CAPB has a well-defined chemical structure from a straightforward production process, most imidazoline-derived amphoterics exhibit a complex composition of compounds with different structures. This depends on the production parameters. Improved processing methods have recently led to the commercial availability of well-defined SCAA with low levels of by-products. Modern production processes and the composition of high-purity amphoterics are reviewed. Raw materials and by-products are described, together with their analytical methods. The cosmetic performance, cleansing and foaming power, rheological effects and mildness-enhancing properties of both CAPB and SCAA are compared. La cocamidopropyl-betaine (CAPB) est, depuis longtemps le tensio-actif secondaire le plus important pour les produits d'hygiene personnelle. L'excellent profil toxicologique de la CAPB est certainement une raison majeure de son usage croissant dans les produits de soin buccaux. La CAPB a suscite depuis peu un interet pour des applications supplementaires telles que les nettoyants menagers, les liquides vaisselle, les produits industriels et techniques. Les derives amphoteres de l'imidazoline tels que le cocoampho-acetate de sodium (SCAA) ou le diacetate occupent une place mineure comparee a la CAPB. En raison du faible potentiel irritant du tensio-actif pur et meme de bonne proprietes toxicologiques, les ampho-acetates trouvent principalement leurs applications dans les cosmetiqes. Leur role dans les applications industrielles est relativement limite. Alors que la CAPB a une structure chimique bien definie a partir d'un procede de production direct, la plupart des derives amphoteres d'imidazoline presentent une composition complexe de composes aux structures differentes. Ceci depend des parametres de production. Des procedes de production ameliores ont recemment conduit a une disponibilite commerciale de SCAA bien definis avec de faibles teneurs en produits secondaires. Les procedes modernes de production et la composition d'amphoteres de grande purete sont decrits. Les matieres premieres et les produits secondaires sont decrits ainsi que leurs methodes d'analyse. Le comportement cosmetique, le pouvoir nettoyant et moussant, les effets rheologiques et les proprietes adoucissantes sont compares, a la fois pour la CAPB et le SCAA. PMID:18507630

  5. Laboratory-produced high-volume fly ash blended cements: physical properties and compressive strength of mortars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Bouzoubaa; M. H. Zhang; A. Bilodeau; V. M. Malhotra

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the production of laboratory-produced high-volume fly ash blended cements. The effect of grinding of the Portland cement clinker, fly ash, and gypsum with or without a superplasticizer on the physical properties of the cements, and the compressive strength of the mortars made with the resulting blended cements, is discussed. The use of ground fly ash compared with

  6. Nano-ChemoMechanical assessment of Rice Husk Ash cement by wavelength dispersive spectroscopy and nanoindentation

    E-print Network

    Abuhaikal, Muhannad (Muhannad A. R.)

    2011-01-01

    Cement global production stands at 3 Giga tons making concrete the most consumed structural mateial worldwide. This massively produced material comes with a heavy environmental footprint rendering the cement industry ...

  7. 30 CFR 250.428 - What must I do in certain cementing and casing situations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...contemplated for production, Have at least two cemented casing strings (does not include liners) in the well. Note: All producing wells must have at least two cemented casing strings. (g) Want to drill a well without setting conductor...

  8. 30 CFR 250.428 - What must I do in certain cementing and casing situations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...contemplated for production, Have at least two cemented casing strings (does not include liners) in the well. Note: All producing wells must have at least two cemented casing strings. (g) Want to drill a well without setting conductor...

  9. 30 CFR 250.428 - What must I do in certain cementing and casing situations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...contemplated for production Have at least two cemented casing strings (does not include liners) in the well. Note: All producing wells must have at least two cemented casing strings. (g) Want to drill a well without setting conductor...

  10. 30 CFR 250.428 - What must I do in certain cementing and casing situations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...contemplated for production, Have at least two cemented casing strings (does not include liners) in the well. Note: All producing wells must have at least two cemented casing strings. (g) Want to drill a well without setting conductor...

  11. 30 CFR 250.428 - What must I do in certain cementing and casing situations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...contemplated for production Have at least two cemented casing strings (does not include liners) in the well. Note: All producing wells must have at least two cemented casing strings. (g) Want to drill a well without setting conductor...

  12. 9 CFR 590.680 - Approval of labeling for egg products processed in exempted egg products processing plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Approval of labeling for egg products processed in exempted egg products processing plants. 590.680 Section...AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND...

  13. CHH Cement Composite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Cwirzen; K. Habermehl-Cwirzen; L. I. Nasibulina; S. D. Shandakov; A. G. Nasibulin; E. I. Kauppinen; P. R. Mudimela; V. Penttala

    2009-01-01

    The compressive strength and electrical resistivity for hardened pastes produced from nanomodified Portland SR cement (CHH-\\u000a Carbon Hedge Hog cement) were studied. The nanomodification included growing of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibers\\u000a (CNFs) on the cement particles. Pastes having water to binder ratio of 0.5 were produced. The obtained hardened material was\\u000a characterized by increased compressive strength in comparison

  14. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  15. Cement clinker: A environmental sink for residues from hazardous waste treatment in cement kilns

    SciTech Connect

    Kleppinger, E.W. (EWK Consultants Inc., Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-01-01

    About 70% of all of the liquid and solid hazardous wastes commercially incinerated in the United States is being burned in cement kilns. The process inevitably results in residues, primarily heavy metals, entering the clinker and waste dusts (cement kiln dust, CKD) produced by these kilns. The effects of this trend on the nature and chemical composition of cement, actual and future, are discussed. The wastes burned by cement kilns are expected to increasingly have higher levels of heavy metals per Btu. In general, the effects are very simple to describe but have as yet unknown consequences. The present American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard does not effectively control hazardous waste burning residues in Portland Cement. The regulatory and economic pressures on CKD disposal suggest that much of it, and its heavy metal residues, will, in time, end up in the clinker and the resultant cement. The end point to the trend is the ability to make cement that passes the performance specifications while containing high levels of heavy metals. The only other alternative is to maximize the levels of heavy metals in the CKD, minimize the amount of CKD, and dispose of it as a hazardous waste. It is recommended that an effort to correlate heavy metal levels in clinker with adverse effects by undertaken, a new standard for cement containing hazardous and other waste residuals be developed, and labeling be required.

  16. Power Ultrasound to Process Dairy Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez-Aguirre, Daniela; Barbosa-Cánovas, Gustavo V.

    Conventional methods of pasteurizing milk involve the use of heat regardless of treatment (batch, high temperature short time - HTST or ultra high temperature - UHT sterilization), and the quality of the milk is affected because of the use of high temperatures. Consequences of thermal treatment are a decrease in nutritional properties through the destruction of vitamins or denaturation of proteins, and sometimes the flavor of milk is undesirably changed. These changes are produced at the same time that the goal of the pasteurization process is achieved, which is to have a microbiological safe product, free of pathogenic bacteria, and to reduce the load of deteriorative microorganisms and enzymes, resulting in a product with a longer storage life.

  17. Standardization of Components, Products and Processes with Data Mining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruno AGARD; Andrew KUSIAK

    2004-01-01

    Data mining offers tools for extracting knowledge from databases. This paper discusses applications of data mining in standardization of components, products, and processes. Standardization of components is accomplished using association rules derived from customers' requirements. A design process is proposed for the standardization of products. The design of a unique standardized product, different standardized products, and a standardized product for

  18. Hydration kinetics of cement composites with varying water-cement ratio using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Shaumik; Dash, Jyotirmayee; Devi, Nirmala; Sasmal, Saptarshi; Pesala, Bala

    2015-03-01

    Cement is mixed with water in an optimum ratio to form concrete with desirable mechanical strength and durability. The ability to track the consumption of major cement constituents, viz., Tri- and Dicalcium Silicates (C3S, C2S) reacting with water along with the formation of key hydration products, viz., Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (C-S-H) which gives the overall strength to the concrete and Calcium Hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), a hydration product which reduces the strength and durability, using an efficient technique is highly desirable. Optimizing the amount of water to be mixed with cement is one of the main parameters which determine the strength of concrete. In this work, THz spectroscopy has been employed to track the variation in hydration kinetics for concrete samples with different water-cement ratios, viz., 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6. Results show that for the sample with water-cement ratio of 0.3, significant amount of the C3S and C2S remain unreacted even after the initial hydration period of 28 days while for the cement with water-cement ratio of 0.6, most of the constituents get consumed during this stage. Analysis of the formation of Ca(OH)2 has been done which shows that the concrete sample with water-cement ratio of 0.6 produces the highest amount of Ca(OH)2 due to higher consumption of C3S/C2S in presence of excess water which is not desirable. Samples with water-cement ratio of 0.4 and 0.5 show more controlled reaction during the hydration which can imply formation of an optimized level of desired hydration products resulting in a more mechanically strong and durable concrete.

  19. Reaction of CO2 and brine at the interface between Portland cement and casing steel: Application to CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, J. W.; Zhang, J.; Lichtner, P. C.; Grigg, R.; Svec, B.; Pawar, R.

    2008-12-01

    Prediction of CO2 leakage through wellbore systems is a multiscale problem in geologic sequestration. In order for wellbore leakage to occur, km-scale processes must deliver CO2 from the point of injection to the wellbore. But, in order for the wellbore to actually leak, ?m-scale processes must operate to allow CO2 to flow up the wellbore. In this study, we describe experiments and modeling of microscale processes accompanying CO2 leakage along the cement-casing interface. This work fits within a broader predictive study of CO2 sequestration performance (Viswanathan et al. 2008, Env Sci and Tech, in press) that includes calculation of CO2-migration times to wellbores. Experiments carried out in this report consisted of synthetic wellbore systems constructed of Portland cement and casing-grade steel in which a mixture of CO2 and brine were forced along the cement-casing interface at in situ sequestration conditions (40 °C and 14 MPa). The CO2-brine mixture was pre- equilibrated by flow through limestone before encountering the cement-casing composite. (The limestone- equilibrated fluid was calculated to be strongly out of equilibrium with both cement and the casing.) We used a high CO2-brine flux (10-20 ml/hour along the interface) and hypothesized that the interface would widen with time due to dissolution of either or both cement and steel. In addition to experiments, we conducted reactive transport modeling of cement reactivity using FLOTRAN, which was modified to allow representation of solid solution in the dominant cement phase, calcium-silicate-hydrate. We also developed a corrosion model for the steel. The experimental results showed that the steel was more reactive than the Portland cement. Extensive deposits or oxidation products of FeCO3-rich material developed at the interface and in some places led to an apparent closure of the interface despite the large flux through the system. In contrast, alteration of the cement appeared to be limited by diffusion of CO2 into the cement matrix and carbonation of the cement to CaCO3. The cement interface did not appear to have been significantly eroded. The experiment was used to calibrate numerical models for corrosion rates and for cement carbonation. These results were applied to interpret samples recovered from a CO2-enhanced oil recovery field (SACROC in West Texas; Carey et al. 2007, Int J. Greenhouse Gas Control, 1: 75-85). The results suggest that CO2-brine flux must have been limited along the cement-casing interface because the casing showed very little corrosion. They also suggest that CO2 penetration along the cement-formation interface was limited in volume because the depth of carbonation at SACROC was limited. These microscale models suggest that cement-casing flow has the potential to be self-limiting due to precipitation of CO2 and that standard logging measurements of casing integrity can be used to assess whether significant flow of CO2-brine has occurred at the casing interface.

  20. Metastable ion production in the RCE process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashov, V. V.; Bodrenko, I. V.

    2006-04-01

    Metastable ion production under resonant coherent excitation (RCE) of channeled ions in crystals is considered theoretically together with other characteristics of the process within the unified density matrix approach [V.V. Balashov, I.V. Bodrenko, Moscow State University Bulletin, Physics and Astronomy, No. 1 (2001) 27]. Calculations for hydrogen-like and helium-like ions in gold crystal show that the resonance yield of their long-living 2s: 2S and 1s2s: 1S states is expected to be of the same order of magnitude as that of the characteristic X-ray radiation from their dipole excitations.

  1. Independent Innovation System of China's Agricultural Products Processing Industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ailian Ren

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces the importance of innovation system for agricultural products processing industry. Based on the principles of openness, dynamics, systematization, outstanding industrial characteristics and close cooperation, a diversified agro-processing innovation system is constructed. It is an innovation subject system of agricultural products processing industry which takes agricultural products processing industry as the core, independent innovation as the center, and

  2. Elementary Theory of Graviton Production Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1995-02-01

    A simplified formulation is outlined for the calculation of graviton processes by classical and quantum mechanical methods. The methods apply for processes involving radiation-field gravitons and for which the particles with finite mass are nonrelativistic. In the quantum mechanical formulation, perturbation diagrams are introduced-the nonrelativistic analog of Feynman diagrams in a covariant formulation; however, the exact meaning of the diagrams and vertices is different. For example, diagrams involving gravitons coupling to other interactions (vertices) are now important, in contrast to the usual cases in a covariant formulation. The methods are employed to calculate rates and cross sections for, in particular, the following processes: inner (graviton) bremsstrahlung, graviton production in scattering in a long-and short-range external potential, production in scattering of identical particles, and photograviton Compton scattering (? + e ? e + g). In the photograviton process, one diagram gives the main contribution; the diagram is associated with the graviton coupling to the vertex describing the photon interacting with the intrinsic magnetic moment of the electron. Graviton scattering is also considered. This is a higher-order process that requires an extension of the methods developed for its calculation. In the "Thomson limit" in which the graviton energy is small compared with the rest energy of the target particle, the main contribution to the cross section comes from a perturbation diagram associated with the exchange of a graviton between the target particle and the scattered graviton (a diagram with a three-graviton vertex). Photon scattering by an uncharged spinless particle is also considered, with the scattered photon exchanging a graviton with the target particle-the quantum mechanical version of light bending. For both of these processes, results are obtained that agree with previous calculations that started from a covariant formulation. A brief comparison is made with the classical calculation of the processes, and the validity domains of the classical and Born-approximation limits are discussed. The classical and Born formulas agree only in the limit of small scattering angles.

  3. Wellbore cement fracture evolution at the cement–basalt caprock interface during geologic carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hun Bok; Kabilan, Senthil; Carson, James P.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Um, Wooyong; Martin, Paul F.; Dahl, Michael E.; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Varga, Tamas; Stephens, Sean A.; Arey, Bruce W.; Carroll, KC; Bonneville, Alain; Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2014-08-01

    Composite Portland cement-basalt caprock cores with fractures, as well as neat Portland cement columns, were prepared to understand the geochemical and geomechanical effects on the integrity of wellbores with defects during geologic carbon sequestration. The samples were reacted with CO2-saturated groundwater at 50 ºC and 10 MPa for 3 months under static conditions, while one cement-basalt core was subjected to mechanical stress at 2.7 MPa before the CO2 reaction. Micro-XRD and SEM-EDS data collected along the cement-basalt interface after 3-month reaction with CO2-saturated groundwater indicate that carbonation of cement matrix was extensive with the precipitation of calcite, aragonite, and vaterite, whereas the alteration of basalt caprock was minor. X-ray microtomography (XMT) provided three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the opening and interconnection of cement fractures due to mechanical stress. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling further revealed that this stress led to the increase in fluid flow and hence permeability. After the CO2-reaction, XMT images displayed that calcium carbonate precipitation occurred extensively within the fractures in the cement matrix, but only partially along the fracture located at the cement-basalt interface. The 3-D visualization and CFD modeling also showed that the precipitation of calcium carbonate within the cement fractures after the CO2-reaction resulted in the disconnection of cement fractures and permeability decrease. The permeability calculated based on CFD modeling was in agreement with the experimentally determined permeability. This study demonstrates that XMT imaging coupled with CFD modeling represent a powerful tool to visualize and quantify fracture evolution and permeability change in geologic materials and to predict their behavior during geologic carbon sequestration or hydraulic fracturing for shale gas production and enhanced geothermal systems.

  4. Alkali-slag cements for the immobilization of radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, C. [Wastewater Technology Centre, Burlington, Ontario (Canada); Day, R.L. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-12-31

    Alkali-slag cements consist of glassy slag and an alkaline activator and can show both higher early and later strengths than Type III Portland cement, if a proper alkaline activator is used. An examination of microstructure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes with the help of XRD and SEM with EDAX shows that the main hydration product is C-S-H (B) with low C/S ratio and no crystalline substances exist such as Ca(OH){sub 2}, Al (OH){sub 3} and sulphoaluminates. Mercury intrusion tests indicate that hardened alkali-slag cement pastes have a lower porosity than ordinary Portland cement, and contain mainly gel pores. The fine pore structure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes will restrict the ingress of deleterious substances and the leaching of harmful species such as radionuclides. The leachability of Cs{sup + } from hardened alkali-slag cement pastes is only half of that from hardened Portland cement. From all these aspects, it is concluded that alkali-slag cements are a better solidification matrix than Portland cement for radioactive wastes.

  5. Flavor violating processes with sgoldstino pair production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, S. V.; Gorbunov, D. S.

    2012-04-01

    In supersymmetric extensions of the standard model of particle physics (SM), goldstino superpartners—scalar and pseudoscalar sgoldstinos—can be light enough for emerging in decays of SM particles. Sgoldstino interaction with SM fields is suppressed by the scale of supersymmetry breaking in the whole theory. Hence, searches for sgoldstinos give an opportunity to probe the underlying mechanism of supersymmetry breaking. Sgoldstino couplings to SM fields are proportional to the supersymmetry breaking parameters—MSSM soft terms—and therefore can lead to flavor violating processes in quark and lepton sectors. We consider flavor violating processes involving sgoldstino pair production which are driven by sgoldstino couplings proportional to squark and slepton soft mass terms, m˜LL2 and m˜RR2. We find that present limits on off-diagonal entries in squark and slepton squared mass matrices allow t-, b-, c-quark and ?-lepton decays at levels available for study with existing data (BaBar, Belle, CLEOc) and in ongoing experiments (LHCb, CMS, ATLAS). In particular, we obtain the following branching ratios Br(t?cSP)?10-7, Br(???SP)?10-7, Br(Bs?SP)?10-4, Br(B?K(*)SP)?10-4, Br(D?SP)?10-7 with sgoldstino subsequent decays into kinematically allowed pairs of SM particles ??, e+e-, ?+?-, etc. Remarkably, the prominent signature of sgoldstino pair production is two muon pairs with pair momenta peaked at sgoldstino masses.

  6. Cement kiln NOX control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. T. McQueen; S. J. Bortz; M. S. Hatch; R. L. Leonard

    1995-01-01

    Control of NOX emissions from combustion sources has become an important issue in recent years, particularly in the ozone nonattainment areas of California. Cement kilns represent an important source of NOX emissions, and they either have already been regulated or are being considered for future regulations. This paper presents the results of a critical analysis of the state-of-the-art in cement

  7. Analysis of rheological properties of bone cements.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, M K D; Waters, M G J; Holford, K M; Adusei, G

    2007-07-01

    The rheological properties of three commercially available bone cements, CMW 1, Palacos R and Cemex ISOPLASTIC, were investigated. Testing was undertaken at both 25 and 37 degrees C using an oscillating parallel plate rheometer. Results showed that the three high viscosity cements exhibited distinct differences in curing rate, with CMW 1 curing in 8.7 min, Palacos R and Cemex ISOPLASTIC in 13 min at 25 degrees C. Furthermore it was found that these curing rates were strongly temperature dependent, with curing rates being halved at 37 degrees C. By monitoring the change of viscosity with time over the entire curing process, the results showed that these cements had differing viscosity profiles and hence exhibit very different handling characteristics. However, all the cements reached the same maximum viscosity of 75 x 10(3) Pa s. Also, the change in elastic/viscous moduli and tan delta with time, show the cements changing from a viscous material to an elastic solid with a clear peak in the viscous modulus during the latter stages of curing. These results give valuable information about the changes in rheological properties for each commercial bone cement, especially during the final curing process. PMID:17277981

  8. Parallel-processing techniques for production systems

    SciTech Connect

    da Mota Tenorio, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    Production systems static and dynamic characteristics are modeled with the use of graph grammar, in order to create means to increase the processing efficiency and the use of parallel computation through compile-time analysis. The model is used to explicate rule interaction, so that proofs of equivalence between knowledge bases can be attempted. Solely relying on program static characteristics shown by the model, a series of observations are made to determine the system dynamic characteristics and modifications to the original knowledge base are suggested as a means of increasing efficiency and decreasing overall search and computational effort. Dependencies between the rules are analyzed and different approaches for automatic detection are presented. From rule dependences, tools for programming environments,logical evaluation of search spaces and Petri net models of production systems are shown. An algorithm for the allocation and partitioning of a production system into a multiprocessor system is also shown, and addresses the problems of communication and execution of these systems in parallel. Finally, the results of a simulator constructed to test several strategies, networks, and algorithms are presented.

  9. Preparation of leady oxide for lead–acid battery by cementation reaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joon-Ho Shin; Ki-Won Kim; Hyo-Jun Ahn

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this research is to prepare leady oxide with high specific area for lead–acid batteries by a new production process. Leady oxide is produced by a cementation reaction in 1.0 wt% HCl solution using a pure aluminum or a magnesium rod as the reductant. Leady oxide prepared in this process is much superior to Barton-pot or ball-mill oxide

  10. Cascaded processing in written compound word production.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Raymond; Tønnessen, Finn Egil; Strömqvist, Sven; Hyönä, Jukka; Niemi, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the intricate interplay between central linguistic processing and peripheral motor processes during typewriting. Participants had to typewrite two-constituent (noun-noun) Finnish compounds in response to picture presentation while their typing behavior was registered. As dependent measures we used writing onset time to assess what processes were completed before writing and inter-key intervals to assess what processes were going on during writing. It was found that writing onset time was determined by whole word frequency rather than constituent frequencies, indicating that compound words are retrieved as whole orthographic units before writing is initiated. In addition, we found that the length of the first syllable also affects writing onset time, indicating that the first syllable is fully prepared before writing commences. The inter-key interval results showed that linguistic planning is not fully ready before writing, but cascades into the motor execution phase. More specifically, inter-key intervals were largest at syllable and morpheme boundaries, supporting the view that additional linguistic planning takes place at these boundaries. Bigram and trigram frequency also affected inter-key intervals with shorter intervals corresponding to higher frequencies. This can be explained by stronger memory traces for frequently co-occurring letter sequences in the motor memory for typewriting. These frequency effects were even larger in the second than in the first constituent, indicating that low-level motor memory starts to become more important during the course of writing compound words. We discuss our results in the light of current models of morphological processing and written word production. PMID:25954182

  11. A literature review of mixed waste components: Sensitivities and effects upon solidification/stabilization in cement-based matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Mattus, C.H.; Gilliam, T.M.

    1994-03-01

    The US DOE Oak Ridge Field Office has signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) regarding Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) mixed wastes subject to the land disposal restriction (LDR) provisions of the Resource conservation and Recovery Act. The LDR FFCA establishes an aggressive schedule for conducting treatability studies and developing treatment methods for those ORR mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes listed in Appendix B to the Agreement. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program has been initiated to provide those efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all of the wastes that meet Appendix B criteria. The program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs in a variety of areas, including that of final waste forms (i.e., stabilization/solidification processes). A literature research has been performed, with the objective of determining waste characterization needs to support cement-based waste-form development. The goal was to determine which waste species are problematic in terms of consistent production of an acceptable cement-based waste form and at what concentrations these species become intolerable. The report discusses the following: hydration mechanisms of Portland cement; mechanisms of retardation and acceleration of cement set-factors affecting the durability of waste forms; regulatory limits as they apply to mixed wastes; review of inorganic species that interfere with the development of cement-based waste forms; review of radioactive species that can be immobilized in cement-based waste forms; and review of organic species that may interfere with various waste-form properties.

  12. Kinetics and deposit morphology of gold cemented on magnesium, aluminum, zinc, iron and copper from ammonium thiosulfate–ammonia solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Karavasteva

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of gold cementation by magnesium aluminum, zinc, iron and copper at equal conditions as well as the morphology of cementation products and the dissolution of cementing agents were investigated. Both the effect of cementing agents on gold cementation rate and the dissolution of metals decrease in order Cu>Zn>Mg>Fe>Al. High dissolution of magnesium, zinc, iron and copper per mol

  13. Reducing the greenhouse effect through new cements

    SciTech Connect

    Malek, R.I.A.; Roy, D.M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A novel approach to synthesize aluminosilicate cementitious materials according to the formula: has been developed. The new cement can reduce CO{sub 2} emission resulting from manufacture of Portland cement. In addition to its use as replacement for normal cement, the zeolitic nature of the new materials makes them particularly useful in trapping hazardous ions as in the case of radioactive waste disposal and tie-in of the alkali metal ions responsible for the alkali-silica reaction. The new cement utilizes large volume waste materials and industrial by products such as slags and fly ash and should provide significant economic and environmental benefits. Two systems were studied, namely, K-activated system composed of metakaolinite, class-F fly ash, potassium silicate and potassium hydroxide and K, Ca-activated system composed of metakaolinite, class-C fly ash, slag, potassium silicate and potassium hydroxide. Isothermal calorimetry experiments indicated an acceleration of hydration reaction and the compressive strength at 14 days is nearly equivalent to that of neat cement pastes. The pore structures of the new systems are finer than normal cement pastes and their reactivities towards alkali-silica reaction are minimal. The magic angle NMR studies indicate that Si/Al ratios are 1 and 1.3 for K, Ca-activated and K-activated systems, respectively.

  14. Critical process parameters for UCO kernel production

    SciTech Connect

    DeVelasco, R.I.

    1988-09-20

    UCO kernel fabrication was previously demonstrated at 2 kg per batch. The limiting factors were the size of the sintering furnace and the UCO drop columns. The former UCO drop columns also showed considerable variability in the quality of gelled microspheres. A larger-size sintering furnace and a set of drop columns with an improved design were installed in 1987. The new set of drop columns and sintering furnace, in conjunction with other modular-sized equipment, were designed to produce the reference batch size of 5.5 kg of UCO kernels containing 5 kg of heavy metal (HM). The new equipment was utilized in the manufacture of several 2 kg batches of UCO kernels and ran well. In the process development reported here, the batch size was scaled-up to 5.5 kg. While the equipment is performing as expected, some of the process parameters still need to be optimized. In the body of this document is a description of the process to make UCO kernels via Gel Supported Precipitation (GSP) technology and the critical parameters that were changed to scale-up the kernel batch size to 5.5 kg, while meeting product specifications.

  15. 21 CFR 820.70 - Production and process controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01...2010-04-01 false Production and process controls...70 Section 820.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Production and Process Controls...

  16. Product development processes and their importance to organizational capabilities

    E-print Network

    Liu, Bing, 1968 Oct. 25-

    2003-01-01

    Product development is a creative and interdisciplinary activity that transforms a market opportunity and technological innovation into successful products. It is a set of activity-based processes in a product-oriented ...

  17. Product-level bill of material development process : managing complexity

    E-print Network

    Lester, Ryan John

    2009-01-01

    Cisco's current process for developing and maintaining product-level bills of materials (BOMs) has resulted in inconsistencies in BOM structure leading to product launch delays, increased product support costs, and lower ...

  18. Alignment strategies for drug product process development and manufacturing

    E-print Network

    Garvin, Christopher John

    2012-01-01

    The transfer of information between the drug product development and manufacturing organizations is fundamental to drug product commercialization. This information is used to characterize the product-process interaction ...

  19. The density of cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Balonis, M. [Department of Chemistry, Meston Building, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB24 3UE, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.balonis@abdn.ac.uk; Glasser, F.P. [Department of Chemistry, Meston Building, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB24 3UE, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    The densities of principal crystalline phases occurring in Portland cement are critically assessed and tabulated, in some cases with addition of new data. A reliable and self-consistent density set for crystalline phases was obtained by calculating densities from crystallographic data and unit cell contents. Independent laboratory work was undertaken to synthesize major AFm and AFt cement phases, determine their unit cell parameters and compare the results with those recorded in the literature. Parameters were refined from powder diffraction patterns using CELREF 2 software. A density value is presented for each phase, showing literature sources, in some cases describing limitations on the data, and the weighting attached to numerical values where an averaging process was used for accepted data. A brief discussion is made of the consequences of the packing of water to density changes in AFm and AFt structures.

  20. Pack Set and the Effect on Pneumatic Conveying of Cement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. S. Schwartz

    2008-01-01

    Energy consumption in any manufacturing has become of greater importance in recent years, particularly in energy intensive industries such as cement production. Any factors that can lower the energy consumption, and therefore the energy cost of an operation are carefully analyzed. This is especially true for certain areas of the cement industry, for example, import and distribution terminals. In light

  1. Minimum Fly Ash Cement Replacement To Mitigate Alkali Silica Reaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. J. Malvar; L. R. Lenke

    Alkali silica reaction (ASR) in concrete results in deleterious expansion and deterioration. For a given aggregate and a given cement, the potential for deleterious expansion can be assessed using ASTM C 1260. While recent specifications already address ASR prevention using recycled products, such as fly ashes as cement replacement, the restrictions on the fly ashes may be too conservative and

  2. Proposed Recommended Practices for Cement Plant Power Distribution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1966-01-01

    The continuing expansion and modernization program in the cement industry has placed an increasing importance on the cement plant power distribution system. The use of fewer larger production units and the increased use of automatic controls has placed greater stress on the adequacy and reliability of the power system. Safety, capacity, reliability, and low maintenance, all at a reasonable cost,

  3. IMPORTANCE OF CEMENT MARKET CHARACTERISTICS TO THE INDUSTRIAL GEOLOGIST

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GEORGE H. K. SCHENCK; HENRY N. McCARL

    Decisions to develop deposits of calcareous materials for cement production are based largely on anticipated markets for heavy construction which utilizes concrete. The geol- ogist should understand the fundamental factors that underlie such management decisions, so that his field work and reports will more effectively relate to the information require- ments of managers in the cement industry. The paper examines

  4. Effect of stem preheating and precooling on residual stress formation at stem/cement interface for cemented hip implants.

    PubMed

    Madrala, A; Nuño, N

    2010-04-01

    PMMA polymerization is an exothermic phenomenon during which stresses and porosity are observed. An experimental model is devised to directly measure radial forces, to be converted to radial stresses, at the stem/cement interface, and temperatures at both interfaces during cement curing. The effects of stem and bone cement initial temperatures (preheating or precooling vs. room temperature) as well as mixing method (hand vs. vacuum mixing) and cement type (Simplex P vs. Palacos R) on radial stress and temperatures are investigated. Compressive radial residual stresses at the stem/cement interface are measured for hand mixed PMMA with preheated stem, with a maximum magnitude of 1.0 MPa. No radial residual stresses are observed when the stem is initially at room temperature or precooled, suggesting that during curing, bone cement can polymerize away from the stem/cement interface generating radial stress in tension or gaps. The results demonstrate the reverse direction of polymerization for preheated stems. Stem preheating significantly increases transient temperatures at the bone/cement interface and also the risk of bone thermal necrosis, because the exposure time to high temperature is prolonged. The results provide interfacial characteristics for accurate modeling of bone cement polymerization to better understand the debonding process of cemented hip prostheses. PMID:20091924

  5. Interface abrasion between rough surface femoral stems and PMMA cement results in extreme wear volumes--a retrieval study and failure analysis.

    PubMed

    Buchhorn, Gottfried Hans; Bersebach, Petra; Stauch, Tilo; Schultz, Wolfgang; Köster, Georg

    2015-01-01

    During the loosening cascade of cemented rough femoral stems, the destruction of the mantle and the production of cement and metal wear debris occur after the loss of constraint at the interface. Two-dimensional (2D) measurements (light microscopy based morphometry on fragments of mantles and vertical scanning interferometry of femoral stems) permitted mathematical 3D-extrapolations to estimate the wear volumes. Fragments of the cement mantles available lost volumes from 0.85 mm(3) to 494.10 mm(3) (median amount of bone cement wear?=?178,426 mg). The harder metal surfaces lost between 1.459 mm(3) and 5.688 mm(3) of material (the median amount of metal wear per surface?=?1.504 mg/100 mm(2)). Compared to the loss of material due to the fretting of stems, the abrasion of metal, and cement in defective cement mantles produced wear volumes sufficiently high to induce osteolysis. Though the design of the femoral stem and the handling of bone cement do not represent contemporary design and clinical practice, respectively, an extremely high number of joint replacements still in daily use may be impacted by this study because of possible predicted failures. Once the processes of fragmentation, abrasion, and osteolysis have been realized, the time until revision surgery should not be unduly prolonged. PMID:24820132

  6. Process-Product Research on Teaching: Ten Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, James W.; Macmillan, C. J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The essay discusses Nathaniel Gage's research on teaching and looks at Gage and Needels' (1989) response to critics of process-product research on teaching. A review of three related issues examines the inability of process-product research to deal with intentionality, the atheoretical posture of process-product research, and normative issues. (SM)

  7. Coupled X-ray Microtomography Imaging and Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling for Evaluation of Wellbore Cement Fracture Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Kabilan, S.; Carson, J.; Kuprat, A.; Um, W.; Carroll, K. C.; Bonneville, A.; Fernandez, C.

    2013-12-01

    Composite Portland cement-basalt caprock cores with fractures, as well as neat Portland cement columns, were prepared to understand the geochemical and geomechanical effects on the integrity of wellbores with defects during geologic carbon sequestration. The samples were reacted with CO2-saturated groundwater at 50 degrees Celsius and 10 MPa for 3 months under static conditions, while one cement-basalt core was subjected to mechanical stress at 2.7 MPa before the CO2 reaction. X-ray microtomography (XMT) provided three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the opening and interconnection of cement fractures due to mechanical stress. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling further revealed that this stress led to the increase in fluid flow and hence permeability. After the CO2-reaction, XMT images displayed that calcium carbonate precipitation occurred extensively within the fractures in the cement matrix, but only partially along the fracture located at the cement-basalt interface. The 3-D visualization and CFD modeling also showed that the precipitation of calcium carbonate within the cement fractures after the CO2-reaction resulted in the opening of fractures due to crystallization-induced pressure, as well as disconnection of cement fractures and permeability decrease. The permeability calculated based on CFD modeling was in agreement with the experimentally determined permeability. The study also suggests that in deep geological reservoirs the geochemical and geomechanical processes have coupled effects on the fracture evolution and fluid flow. Finally, it is important to emphasize that XMT imaging coupled with CFD modeling represents a powerful tool to visualize and quantify fracture evolution and permeability in geologic materials and predict their behavior during geologic carbon sequestration or hydraulic fracturing for shale gas production and enhanced geothermal system.

  8. Anisotropic porous metals production by melt processing

    SciTech Connect

    Shapovalov, V.; Boiko, L. [State Metallurgical Academy of Ukraine, Dnepropetrovsk (Ukraine); Baldwin, M.D.; Maguire, M.C.; Zanner, F.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Liquid Metal Processing Lab.

    1997-02-01

    The collapse of the Soviet Union has left many of its scientific institutes and technical universities without their traditional backbone of financial support. In an effort to stem the export of science to nations advocating nuclear proliferation, and to acquire potentially useful technology, several US government-sponsored programs have arise to mine the best of former USSR scientific advances. In the field of metallurgy, the earliest institutes to be investigated by Sandia National Laboratories are located in Ukraine. In particular, scientists at the State Metallurgical Academy have developed unique porous metals, resembling what could be described as gas-solid ``eutectic``. While porous metals are available in the US and other western countries, none have the remarkable structure and properties of these materials. Sandia began a collaborative program with the Ukrainian scientists to bring this technology to the US, verify the claims regarding these materials, and begin production of the so-called Gasars. This paper will describe the casting process technology and metallurgy associated with the production of Gasars, and will review the progress of the collaborative project.

  9. Timing of syntaxial cement

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.D.

    1985-02-01

    Echinodermal fragments are commonly overgrown in ancient limestones, with large single crystals growing in optical continuity over their skeletal hosts (i.e., syntaxial overgrowths). Such syntaxial cements are usually considered to have precipitated from meteoric pore waters associated with a later stage of subaerial exposure. Although several examples have been reported from ancient carbonates where petrographic relationships may indicate an early submarine formation of syntaxial cement, no occurrences have been noted in Holocene submarine-cemented rocks. Syntaxial cements of submarine origin have been found in Bermuda beachrock where isopachous high-magnesian calcite cements merge with large optically continuous crystals growing on echinodermal debris. Examination of other Holocene sediments cemented by magnesian calcite indicates that echinodermal fragments are not always overgrown syntaxially, but may be rimmed by microcrystalline calcite. The reason for this difference is not clear, although it may be a function of the spacing of nucleation sites and rates of crystal growth. A review of syntaxial cements from several localities in ancient carbonate sequences reveals that many are best interpreted as having formed in the submarine setting, whereas it is more clear that others formed from meteoric precipitation. These occurrences suggest that care should be exercised in inferring meteoric diagenesis from syntaxial overgrowths and that the possibility of submarine formation should be considered.

  10. Process improvements during production ramp-up

    E-print Network

    Chew, Ryan W. (Ryan Wayne)

    2007-01-01

    Raytheon Company is currently ramping up production radars for a fighter aircraft. This product is doubling production in the next year to meet customer demand; however, the program has not been able to meet the current ...

  11. Feasibility of disposing waste glyphosate neutralization liquor with cement rotary kiln.

    PubMed

    Bai, Y; Bao, Y B; Cai, X L; Chen, C H; Ye, X C

    2014-08-15

    The waste neutralization liquor generated during the glyphosate production using glycine-dimethylphosphit process is a severe pollution problem due to its high salinity and organic components. The cement rotary kiln was proposed as a zero discharge strategy of disposal. In this work, the waste liquor was calcinated and the mineralogical phases of residue were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mineralogical phases and the strength of cement clinker were characterized to evaluate the influence to the products. The burnability of cement raw meal added with waste liquor and the calorific value of waste liquor were tested to evaluate the influence to the thermal state of the kiln system. The results showed that after the addition of this liquor, the differences of the main phases and the strength of cement clinker were negligible, the burnability of raw meal was improved; and the calorific value of this liquor was 6140 J/g, which made it could be considered as an alternative fuel during the actual production. PMID:25010454

  12. [Optimization of the pertussis vaccine production process].

    PubMed

    Germán Santiago, J; Zamora, N; de la Rosa, E; Alba Carrión, C; Padrón, P; Hernández, M; Betancourt, M; Moretti, N

    1995-01-01

    The production of Pertussis Vaccine was reevaluated at the Instituto Nacional de Higiene "Rafael Rangel" in order to optimise it in terms of vaccine yield, potency, specific toxicity and efficiency (cost per doses). Four different processes, using two culture media (Cohen-Wheeler and Fermentación Glutamato Prolina-1) and two types of bioreactors (25 L Fermentador Caracas and a 450 L industrial fermentor) were compared. Runs were started from freeze-dried strains (134 or 509) and continued until the obtention of the maximal yield. It was found that the combination Fermentación Glutamato Prolina-1/industrial fermentor, shortened the process to 40 hours while consistently yielding a vaccine of higher potency (7.91 +/- 2.56 IU/human dose) and lower specific toxicity in a mice bioassay. In addition, the physical aspect of the preparation was rather homogeneous and free of dark aggregates. Most importantly, the biomass yield more than doubled those of the Fermentador Caracas using the two different media and that in the industrial fermentor with the Cohen-Wheeler medium. Therefore, the cost per doses was substantially decreased. PMID:9279028

  13. Bone cement implantation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Razuin, R; Effat, O; Shahidan, M N; Shama, D V; Miswan, M F M

    2013-06-01

    Bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS) is characterized by hypoxia, hypotension, cardiac arrhythmias, increased pulmonary vascular resistance and cardiac arrest. It is a known cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing cemented orthopaedic surgeries. The rarity of the condition as well as absence of a proper definition has contributed to under-reporting of cases. We report a 59-year-old woman who sustained fracture of the neck of her left femur and underwent an elective hybrid total hip replacement surgery. She collapsed during surgery and was revived only to succumb to death twelve hours later. Post mortem findings showed multiorgan disseminated microembolization of bone marrow and amorphous cement material. PMID:23817399

  14. Process for Converting Waste Glass Fiber into Value Added Products, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmings, Raymond T.

    2005-12-31

    Nature of the Event: Technology demonstration. The project successfully met all of its technical objectives. Albacem has signed an exclusive licensing agreement with Vitro Minerals Inc., a specialty minerals company, to commercialize the Albacem technology (website: www.vitrominerals.com). Location: The basic research for the project was conducted in Peoria, Illinois, and Atlanta, Georgia, with third-party laboratory verification carried out in Ontario, Canada. Pilot-scale trials (multi-ton) were conducted at a facility in South Carolina. Full-scale manufacturing facilities have been designed and are scheduled for construction by Vitro Minerals during 2006 at a location in the Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina tri-state area. The Technology: This technology consists of a process to eliminate solid wastes generated at glass fiber manufacturing facilities by converting them to value-added materials (VCAS Pozzolans) suitable for use in cement and concrete applications. This technology will help divert up to 250,000 tpy of discarded glass fiber manufacturing wastes into beneficial use applications in the concrete construction industry. This technology can also be used for processing glass fiber waste materials reclaimed from monofills at manufacturing facilities. The addition of take-back materials and reclamation from landfills can help supply over 500,000 tpy of glass fiber waste for processing into value added products. In the Albacem process, waste glass fiber is ground to a fine powder that effectively functions as a reactive pozzolanic admixture for use in portland ce¬ment-based building materials and products, such as concrete, mortars, terrazzo, tile, and grouts. Because the waste fiber from the glass manufacturing industry is vitreous, clean, and low in iron and alkalis, the resulting pozzolan is white in color and highly consistent in chemical composition. This white pozzolan, termed VCAS Pozzolan (for Vitreous Calcium-Alumino-Silicate). is especially suited for white concrete applications where it imparts desirable benefits such as increased long-term strength and improved long-term durability of concrete products. Two U.S. patents entitled have been issued to Albacem covering the technology. Third-party validation testing has confirmed that the pozzolanic product is an excellent, high performance material that conforms to a ASTM standards and improves the strength and durability of concrete. Currently, there are no known significant competing technologies to process glass fiber manufacturing by-products and con¬vert them into value-added products. Most glass fiber-forming and fabrication wastes continue to be disposed in landfills at significant costs and with associated negative environmental impact. It is estimated that in a typical glass fiber manufactur¬ing facility, 10-20% by weight of the processed glass material is sent for dis¬posal to a landfill. Today, supplementary ce¬menting materials or mineral admixtures are key to achieving strong and durable concrete. Recovered materials such as coal fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag and silica fume are widely accepted and used in concrete all over the world, espe¬cially in the construction of “high performance” structures such as massive dams, bridges, subway tunnels, etc. These min¬eral admixtures are not suitable for white concrete and light-colored architectural concrete applications. Converting waste glass fibers into a high performance white pozzolan would allow white concrete producers to gain from the same durability benefits currently realized by gray concrete producers. Description of the Benefit: Albacem’s technology will enable the glass fiber industry to eliminate nearly 100% of its glass fiber produc¬tion waste streams by converting them into viable value-added products. With this technology, the glass industry can prevent the landfilling of about 250,000 tons of waste glass fiber annually. Glass manufacturers will realize improved production efficiency by reducing process costs through the elimination of solid was

  15. Processed Fishery Products FRESH AND FROZEN

    E-print Network

    .4 billion--an increase in volume of 20 million pounds and an increase in value of 4.0 million dollars.9 million pounds worth $217.7 million. INDUSTRIAL FISHERY PRODUCTS INDUSTRIAL FISHERY PRODUCTS. The value of the domestic production of industrial fishery products was $281.6 million--an decrease of $7.5 million com

  16. Accelerated carbonation of Friedel's salt in calcium aluminate cement paste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Goñi; A. Guerrero

    2003-01-01

    The stability of Friedel's salt with respect to carbonation has been studied in calcium aluminate cement (CAC) pastes containing NaCl (3% of Cl? by weight of cement). Carbonation was carried out on a powdered sample in flowing 5% CO2 gas at 65% relative humidity to accelerate the process. At an intermediate carbonation step, a part of the sample was washed

  17. Modelling of leaching in pure cement paste and mortar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Mainguy; Claire Tognazzi; Jean-Michel Torrenti; Frédéric Adenot

    2000-01-01

    The leaching of cement-based materials is analysed through experimental and numerical results. From the experimental point of view, the leaching processes of a pure cement paste and a mortar are characterised by the degraded depths and the cumulative amount of leached calcium at different times. From the mathematical point of view, the leaching is modelled with the mass balance equation

  18. The shape of WC crystals in cemented carbides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. V. Shatov; S. A. Firstov; I. V. Shatova

    1998-01-01

    A study has been made of the shape development of WC crystals in cemented carbides during liquid phase sintering. The relative influence of shape relaxation and carbide crystal growth processes on the shape is discussed. An effect of titanium additions on the shape of WC crystals in WC–Ni cemented carbides was observed. A shape parameter referred to as shape equiaxiality

  19. Monitoring the ettringite formation in cement paste using low field T2-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Alexandra; Badea, Codruta; Ardelean, Ioan

    2013-11-01

    In the present work, we study the transverse relaxation time evolution of water molecules confined inside cement paste during the hydration process. The cement paste under study was manufactured with different water-to-cement ratios and using two types of cement: gray cement (CEM I 52.5 R) having a high content of magnetic impurities and white cement (CEM I 52.5 N) with lower amount of magnetic impurities. The two cement types were chosen in order to better distinguish the surface contribution to the relaxation process. On this basis a relationship between porosity evolution, ettringite formation and the transverse relaxation time evolution was established. It was also observed that the increase in the water-to-cement ratio better reveals the ettringite formation.

  20. Development of an advanced continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products. Quarterly report, January--March, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neal, G.W.

    1996-04-01

    Determination of the best furnace for a commercial coke plant is underway. A shuttle or tunnel kiln has economic advantage over a rotary hearth design. Production of 20 tons of coke in a small shuttle kiln is near completion which will provide experience for this design. Twenty tons of CTC continuous coke are being produced for testing at a General Motors` foundry. The production is approximately 75 percent complete. During this production, variables of the process are being studied to aid in design of a commercial coke plant. Raw material composition, blending, briquetting variables, and calcining heat profile are the major areas of interest. Western SynCoal Company produces a dried coal product from sub-bituminous coal. This upgraded product was evaluated for producing coke products by blending char from this coal product with the coal product along with suitable binders. The green briquettes were then calcined to produce coke. The resulting coke was judged to be usable as part of a cupola coke charge or as a fuel in cement kilns and sugar beet furnaces.

  1. By-Products Utilization

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    In the last few decades, industrial by-products such as fly ash, blast-furnace slag, and silica fume have been cement consisting of portland cement, granulated blast-furnace slag, and fly ash (PC-SL- FA system- SL-SF (portland cement, blast-furnace slag, and silica fume) and PC-FA-SF (portland cement, fly ash

  2. Rotate liners for a successful cement job

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, H.E. Jr.

    1986-10-01

    Until recently, few liners were moved-rotated or reciprocated-during the cementing process, because of difficulties inherent in liner placement. Now rotation or reciprocation is practiced on an estimated 20% of all liner jobs, and rotation is becoming an increasingly popular technique. Successful rotation has even been accomplished from floating drilling vessels in holes deviated as much as 47/sup 0/. This article discusses equipment and techniques that will allow rotation throughout the cementing process and overcome usual causes of rotation job failure.

  3. Writing in dyslexia: product and process.

    PubMed

    Morken, Frøydis; Helland, Turid

    2013-08-01

    Research on dyslexia has largely centred on reading. The aim of this study was to assess the writing of 13 children with and 28 without dyslexia at age 11?years. A programme for keystroke logging was used to allow recording of typing activity as the children performed a sentence dictation task. Five sentences were read aloud twice each. The task was to type the sentence as correctly as possible, with no time constraints. The data were analysed from a product (spelling, grammar and semantics) and process (transcription fluency and revisions) perspective, using repeated measures ANOVA and t-tests to investigate group differences. Furthermore, the data were correlated with measures of rapid automatic naming and working memory. Results showed that the group with dyslexia revised their texts as much as the typical group, but they used more time, and the result was poorer. Moreover, rapid automatic naming correlated with transcription fluency, and working memory correlated with the number of semantic errors. This shows that dyslexia is generally not an issue of effort and that cognitive skills that are known to be important for reading also affect writing. PMID:23720272

  4. Fermentation process for production of xanthan

    SciTech Connect

    Wernau, W.C.

    1981-08-04

    Xanthomonas polymers used in displacement of oil from partially depleted reservoirs are produced in higher concentrations and yields by the gradual addition of a source of assimilable carbon, preferably glucose, to the aqueous nutrient medium during the course of a Xanthomonas fermentation. The cost factors involved in secondary and tertiary oil recovery and the competitive use of diluted Xanthomonas whole broths in such recovery dictate increasing the fermentation concentration of the Xanthomonas polymers. Reduced shipping costs, broth storage facilities, and handling costs are some of the benefits derived. Furthermore, reduced volumes of solvent are needed for recovery when initial broth concentrations are high in those processes where Xanthomonas gums are recovered for oil recovery applications. Increasing the fermentation yield of a desired microbial product is accomplished by adding or feeding a nutrient or nutrients during the course of the fermentation cycle. The addition of glucose solution is started immediately after inoculation. The glucose is fed at an exponentially increasing rate up to 24 hr after inoculation and thereafter at a constant rate. Other nutrients may be fed with the source of assimilable carbon. (Also related to US 11/30/78 Appl. 964,951). 4 claims.

  5. Fermentation process for production of Xanthan

    SciTech Connect

    Wernau, W.C.

    1981-08-04

    Xanthomonas polymers used in displacement of oil from partially depleted reservoirs are produced in higher concentrations and yields by the gradual addition of a source of assimilable carbon, preferably glucose, to the aqueous nutrient medium during the course of a Xanthomonas fermentation. The cost factors involved in secondary and tertiary oil recovery and the competitive use of diluted Xanthomonas whole broths in such recovery dictate increasing the fermentation concentration of the Xanthomonas polymers. Reduced shipping costs, broth storage facilities, and handling costs are some of the benefits derived. Furthermore, reduced volumes of solvent are needed for recovery when initial broth concentrations are high in those processes where Xanthomonas gums are recovered for oil recovery applications. Increasing the fermentation yield of a desired microbial product is accomplished by adding or feeding a nutrient or nutrients during the course of the fermentation cycle. The addition of glucose solution is started immediately after inoculation. The glucose is fed at an exponentially increasing rate up to 24 hr after inoculation and thereafter at a constant rate. Other nutrients may be fed with the source of assimilable carbon. (Also related to US 11/30/78 Appl. 964,951). 4 claims.

  6. Measurement of Particle Size Distribution in Portland Cement Powder: Analysis of ASTM Round Robin Studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chiara F. Ferraris; Vincent A. Hackley; Ana Ivelisse Avilés

    2004-01-01

    A distribution of particle sizes or particle size distribution (PSD) is a fundamental characteristic of cement powder. Accurate PSDs are required in computational efforts to model the hydration process and it is an important practical issue for the cement industry. Presently, the only available standard method for measuring the PSD of cement, namely ASTM C115, is limited in scope, with

  7. A Prevalidation of the Product-Process Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashenbaum, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for instructors of supply chain and operations management (SCOM) courses is to help students who have never seen a production floor visualize concepts, such as the product-process matrix from standard introductory SCOM texts. This article presents a classroom exercise, which "prevalidates" the product-process matrix.…

  8. Trends in Processing Technologies for Dried Aquatic Products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yingqiang Wang; Min Zhang; Arun S. Mujumdar

    2011-01-01

    Fresh aquatic products are rich in nutritional compounds and are an important source of good protein for humans. Dehydration processing technologies of aquatic products used in practice are a mix of old and new technologies. With the rapid development of drying technologies and steadily increasing living standards, drying processing techniques as well as types of products produced have changed fundamentally.

  9. Mechano-chemical modification of cement with high volumes of blast furnace slag

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Konstantin Sobolev

    2005-01-01

    The application of chemical admixtures significantly improves the performance of cement-based materials. Some admixtures can also be used to modify the cement grinding process and induce changes in the structure of cement minerals due to mechano-chemical activation. A reactive silica-based complex admixture was developed for the modification of cement grinding. This paper examines the effect of grinding on the strength

  10. Inter-process synchronization in steel production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. PETERSEN; K. L. SØRENSEN; R. V. V. VIDAL

    1992-01-01

    The development of strategies for sequencing slabs through the reheat furnace and rolling mill of a modern steel production facility is complicated by multiple, and often conflicting production objectives. Optimal energy efficiency through the reheat furnace may lead to inefficient rolling sequences or less than desirable product delivery schedules. Not only is model formulation complicated, but the combinatorial nature of

  11. Process reengineering for the product development process at an analytical instrument manufacturer

    E-print Network

    Tandon, Shubhang

    2014-01-01

    In an analytical instrument manufacturing company, the new product development process was analyzed with the objective of reducing time to market, to full scale production of new products and to improve project management ...

  12. Electrical conductivity is a parameter that can be used to monitor the entire hardening process of oilwell cement slurries. The theo-

    E-print Network

    Backe, Knut

    . The principle of measuring conductivity, in which alternating current is transmitted through the cement slurry of additives,9,10 and corrosion risk of concrete reinforce- ments.11,12 More recently, several publications ) and the current through the sample (I) are known, the conductivity (s) can be calculated as follows. where =the

  13. The Kosmosdale expansion project [cement plant upgrade

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Rowley; D. Babel

    2002-01-01

    Kosmos Cement Company, a partnership between Southdown (now CEMEX, responsible for operation) and Lonestar Industries (now Heidelberger) decided in 1998 to increase the clinker production of the Kosmosdale plant from 2500 stpd to 4700 stpd. To achieve this capacity increase of almost 90%, extensive additions and modifications had to be made in almost all manufacturing areas. These main areas were

  14. Optimisation of a two-liquid component pre-filled acrylic bone cement system: a design of experiments approach to optimise cement final properties.

    PubMed

    Clements, James; Walker, Gavin; Pentlavalli, Sreekanth; Dunne, Nicholas

    2014-10-01

    The initial composition of acrylic bone cement along with the mixing and delivery technique used can influence its final properties and therefore its clinical success in vivo. The polymerisation of acrylic bone cement is complex with a number of processes happening simultaneously. Acrylic bone cement mixing and delivery systems have undergone several design changes in their advancement, although the cement constituents themselves have remained unchanged since they were first used. This study was conducted to determine the factors that had the greatest effect on the final properties of acrylic bone cement using a pre-filled bone cement mixing and delivery system. A design of experiments (DoE) approach was used to determine the impact of the factors associated with this mixing and delivery method on the final properties of the cement produced. The DoE illustrated that all factors present within this study had a significant impact on the final properties of the cement. An optimum cement composition was hypothesised and tested. This optimum recipe produced cement with final mechanical and thermal properties within the clinical guidelines and stated by ISO 5833 (International Standard Organisation (ISO), International standard 5833: implants for surgery-acrylic resin cements, 2002), however the low setting times observed would not be clinically viable and could result in complications during the surgical technique. As a result further development would be required to improve the setting time of the cement in order for it to be deemed suitable for use in total joint replacement surgery. PMID:25005558

  15. Reusing pretreated desulfurization slag to improve clinkerization and clinker grindability for energy conservation in cement manufacture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ying-Liang Chen; Juu-En Chang; Pai-Haung Shih; Ming-Sheng Ko; Yi-Kuo Chang; Li-Choung Chiang

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to combine the physical pretreatments of grinding, sieving, and magnetic-separation processes to reclaim iron-rich materials from the desulfurization slag, and to use the remainder for cement clinker production. The iron-rich materials can be separated out efficiently by grinding for 30 min and sieving with a 0.3 mm mesh. The non-magnetic fraction of the particles smaller than

  16. PROCESS MODEL FOR BIODIESEL PRODUCTION FROM VARIOUS FEEDSTOCKS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Tapasvi; D. Wiesenborn; C. Gustafson

    Tools are needed to evaluate and compare different available feedstocks, and process parameters and modifications for biodiesel production. To address this need, a biodiesel process model was developed with commonly used spreadsheet software and process-engineering principles. The basis of the model is a continuous process with two stirred-tank reactors and sodium methoxide catalysis. The process was modeled as 27 units

  17. Managing New Product Development Performance: A Process-Based Automotive Product Realization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Komsan Sanongpong

    2009-01-01

    The new product development (NPD) is the process by which a new product idea is conceived, investigated, taken through the design process, manufactured, marketed and serviced. In the automotive industry, within the context of ISO\\/TS16949:2002 (the automotive quality management system international standard), these related to the product realization process (PRP) which consists of five phases: \\

  18. Quantifying microstructural variations in cement pastes: Implications on drying shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garci, Maria Cecilia

    The objective of this research was to better understand the interrelationship between processing/composition, microstructure, and properties/performance in cement pastes. The most challenging aspect of this process is the investigation of microstructure. The primary hydration product in cement pastes, calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), has historically had an elusive chemistry and microstructure. It is generally accepted that both the microstructure and stoichiometry of this phase are variable and highly responsive to environmental changes. This sensitivity makes examination of C-S-H problematic. A method of examining the microstructure of cement pastes must meet two criteria. First, the method must be reproducible and sensitive to minute changes occurring in C-S-H. Second, it is desirable that the method be quantitative so as to facilitate correlation with processing variables and properties. With both of these criteria in mind, the nitrogen sorption method of measuring surface area and porosity was chosen for this investigation. Nitrogen sorption results have historically not been reproducible. This dilemma was approached first, and the effects of sample preparation were examined. Next, the surface area was manipulated using temperature and chemical admixtures. Finally, the effects of these variables on total, reversible, and irreversible drying shrinkage were examined. Results indicate that there are at least two types of C-S-H. One type has a high density (HD) while the other is less dense (LD). Nitrogen sorption measures only LD surfaces. Processing and chemical admixtures influence the ratio of the two types of C-S-H (LD/HD). Drying shrinkage results indicate that the greater the proportion of LD (as seen by higher nitrogen surface area), the greater the irreversible shrinkage.

  19. Importance of granulometry on phase evolution and phase-to-phase relationships of experimentally burned impure limestones intended for production of hydraulic lime and/or natural cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovcev, Petr; P?ikryl, Richard; P?ikrylová, Ji?ina

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to modern ordinary Portland cement production from finely ground raw material blends, ancient burning of hydraulic lime was conducted by burning larger pieces of natural raw material. Due to natural variability of raw material composition, exploitation of different beds from even one formation can result the product with significantly different composition and/or properties. Prague basin (Neoproterozoic to pre-Variscan Palaeozoic of the central part of the Bohemian Massif - the so-called Barrandian area, Czech Republic) represents a classical example of the limestone-rich region with long-term history of limestone burning for quick lime and/or various types of hydraulic binders. Due to the fact that burning of natural hydraulic lime has been abandoned in this region at the turn of 19th/20th c., significant gap in knowledge on the behavior of various limestone types and on the influence of minor variance in composition on the quality of burned product is encountered. Moreover, the importance of employment of larger pieces of raw material for burning for the development of proper phase-to-phase relationships (i.e. development of hydraulic phases below sintering temperature at mutual contacts of minerals) has not been examined before. To fill this gap, a representative specimens of major limestone types from the Prague basin have been selected for experimental study: Upper Silurian limestone types (P?ídolí and Kopanina Lms.), and Lower Devonian limestones (Radotín, Kotýs, ?eporyje, Dvorce-Prokop, and Zlíchov Lms.). Petrographic character of the experimental material was examined by polarizing microscopy, cathodoluminescence, scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) of insoluble residue. Based on the data from wet silicate analyses, modal composition of studied impure limestones was computed. Experimental raw material was burned in laboratory electric furnace at 1000 and 1200°C for 3 and/or 6 hours. Burned samples were examined by XRD for phase composition and by SEM-EDS for phase-to-phase relationships due to the burning. Based on our data it is evident that larnite-belite (dicalcium-silicate) is dominant phase in burned silica-rich limestones (represented by e.g. Dvorce-Prokop, P?ídolí and/or Kopanina Lms.). In clay-rich limestones containing kaolinite and illite, gehlenite and other calcium aluminates and aluminosilicates were detected (represented by Koso?, ?eporyje, and/or a portion of Dvorce-Prokop Lms.). Due to higher proportion of Fe-oxihydroxides in the ?eporyje Lms., brownmillerite (calcium aluminoferrite) forms as a typical minor phases during burning. Free-lime (plus its hydrated form - portlandite) makes dominant phase in limestones exhibiting low non-carbonate admixture (Kotýs and/or a portion of Kopanina Lms.). These results clearly demonstrate that presence of certain non-carbonate minerals governs formation of certain hydraulic phases in burned product, whilst mutual proportions of individual minerals in raw materials influence amount of newly formed phases.

  20. Powder-Metallurgy Process And Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Henry G.

    1988-01-01

    Rapid-solidification processing yields alloys with improved properties. Study undertaken to extend favorable property combinations of I/M 2XXX alloys through recently developed technique of rapid-solidification processing using powder metallurgy(P/M). Rapid-solidification processing involves impingement of molten metal stream onto rapidly-spinning chill block or through gas medium using gas atomization technique.

  1. Hydrogen in the Methanol Production Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralj, Anita Kovac; Glavic, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very important industrial gas in chemical processes. It is very volatile; therefore, it can escape from the process units and its mass balance is not always correct. In many industrial processes where hydrogen is reacted, kinetics are often related to hydrogen pressure. The right thermodynamic properties of hydrogen can be found for…

  2. Economic Process Capability Index for Product Design and Process Planning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angus Jeang

    2008-01-01

    The process capability index (PCI) is a value which reflects real-time quality status. The PCI acts as the reference for real-time\\u000a monitoring that enables process controllers to acquire a better grasp of the quality of their on site processes. The PCI value\\u000a is typically defined as the ability to carry out a task or achieve a goal. However, simply increasing

  3. Mitigating the impact of a time-dependent production process

    E-print Network

    Dudnik, Sara A

    2007-01-01

    Value-added processes that bear associated wait times occur frequently during production manufacturing and increase cycle time. Since the wait time is integral to the value created by the process, it can be difficult to ...

  4. International MODIS and AIRS processing package: AIRS products and applications

    E-print Network

    Li, Jun

    International MODIS and AIRS processing package: AIRS products and applications Elisabeth Weisz Administration) Earth Observing System (EOS)-Aqua satellite represents the most advanced sounding system in space MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer)/AIRS Processing Package (IMAPP) software package

  5. MAINTAINING SOIL PROCESSES FOR PLANT PRODUCTIVITY AND COMMUNITY DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rangeland soil biota affect soil properties and processes that control the availability of water and nutrients that are essential for the maintenance of productivity and vegetation composition. oil processes mediated by soil biota include decomposition, nutrient immobilization an...

  6. Economics of Milk Products Processing Plants in Texas. 

    E-print Network

    Stelly, Randall

    1957-01-01

    BULLETIN 883 &@+; ' Economics of ~ilk'Pioducts " / @* !@ Processing Plants -i~*T&s Location of milk products manufacturing plants in Texas. by types of product. summer 1957. DECEMBER 1957 TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS... and processors. Data on production of manufactured products for 1957 represent estimates of plant managers and are based on actual output up to the time of interview (summer 1957) and anticipated production for the remainder of the year. Twenty-one of the 34...

  7. Reduced product yield in chemical processes by second law effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Funk, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of second law effects in chemical processes, where product yield is explicitly related to the individual irreversibilities within the process to indicate a maximum theoretical yield, is presented. Examples are given that indicate differences between first and second law approaches toward process efficiency and process yield. This analysis also expresses production capacity in terms of the heating value of a product. As a result, it is particularly convenient in analyzing fuel conversion plants and their potential for improvement. Relationships are also given for the effects of irreversibilities on requirements for process heat and for feedstocks.

  8. Modified-sulfur cements for use in concretes, flexible pavings, coatings, and grouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1981-05-01

    A family of modified-sulfur cements was developed for the preparation of construction materials with improved properties. Various types of sulfur cements were prepared by reacting sulfur with mixtures of dicyclopentadiene and oligomers of cyclopentadiene. Durable cements were prepared with structural characteristics ranging from rigid to flexible. These cements were used to prepare corrosion-resistant materials for use in a wide variety of industrial applications where resistance to acidic and salt conditions is needed. These materials were prepared as rigid concretes, flexible pavings, spray coatings, and grouts. Production of modified-sulfur cements in a commercial-size plant was demonstrated.

  9. SRIC and productivity: process behind the concept

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    There is sufficient similarity of maximum yields over a range of densities (i.e., trees per hectare) in experimental SRIC plots to suggest that density is not a major factor in determining the theoretical maximum productivity rate. However, to attain maximum productivity, the time involved varies significantly with density; in a world where time is money, density appears to make a big difference in determining economic viability of SRIC.

  10. Particulate Analysis Instrumentation for the Cement Industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emil C. Muly; Harold N. Frock; Donald L. Grammes

    1979-01-01

    At present, even though most cement plants are computer controlled, they depend on manual particle analysis and feed settings. Automatic process control through the use of continuous particle size analysis can provide the maximum obtainable throughput at optimum particle size. A new particle size measurement technology using a helium-neon laser and a unique optical filtering system has been reported previously.

  11. Materials science of cemented carbides — an overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. S Upadhyaya

    2001-01-01

    The processing and properties of cemented carbides are highly dependent on the basic nature of the component, i.e. hard carbide and soft metal binder phases. The present overview covers the nature of refractory carbides and binders, phase equilibria, and sintering and mechanical properties. The role of microstructural evolution during sintering is also highlighted.

  12. Integration of Product Design Process and Task Management for Product Data Management Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rui Lu; Wu-liang Peng; Cheng-en Wang

    2007-01-01

    Product design is an evolving process which is characterized with creativity and uncertainty. The task management in this\\u000a process is different from traditional ones because it involves more specific factors such as user specifications, product\\u000a design specifications, reengineering, design process, and design data. In this article, we aim to analyze product design process\\u000a with the viewpoint of project management and

  13. Set retarded cement compositions and methods for well cementing

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, L.E.; Lindsey, D.W.; Terry, D.T.

    1990-07-17

    This patent describes a method of cementing a zone in a subterranean formation penetrated by a wellbore; It comprises: forming a pumpable set retarded cement slurry comprising hydraulic cement, fresh water, particulate silica having a particle size in the range of from about 0.02 to about 0.5 micron and a set retarder comprising a copolymer consisting essentially of 2-acrylamido, 2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS) and acrylic acid having an average molecular weight below about 5000 and comprising from about 40 to about 60 mole percent AMPS; pumping the cement slurry into the zone by way of the wellbore, and allowing the cement slurry to set therein.

  14. Current Composition: Beyond Process vs. Product.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Christine R.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the development of writing paradigms from Aristotle's emphasis on invention, to eighteenth-century emphasis on induction and style, to the recent process approach, and the current expressive and cognitive approaches to writing instruction. Notes problems left unresolved by process theory and recommends the socio-contextual approach which…

  15. Capability index of a complex-product machining process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Chen; F. Zhu; G. Y. Li; Y. Z. Ma; Y. L. Tu

    2011-01-01

    A complex product often requires a high machining precision. This is often achieved by a close-loop machining process to be carried out in several stages, and the measurements, fixture adjustments, and feedback or feed-forward control are inserted after each of these stages. The Complex Product Machining Process (CPMP) Capability Index (CPMPCI) is affected by the control and adjustments in a

  16. Capability index of a complex-product machining process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Chen; F. Zhu; G. Y. Li; Y. Z. Ma; Y. L. Tu

    2012-01-01

    A complex product often requires a high machining precision. This is often achieved by a close-loop machining process to be carried out in several stages, and the measurements, fixture adjustments, and feedback or feed-forward control are inserted after each of these stages. The Complex Product Machining Process (CPMP) Capability Index (CPMPCI) is affected by the control and adjustments in a

  17. Heat transfer in food processing: ensuring product quality and safety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter J. Fryer; Phillip T. Robbins

    2005-01-01

    Heat transfer to foods is commonplace but critical; heating develops flavour and texture and ensures product safety. The food industry must ensure that all parts of the product have all been processed sufficiently, without unacceptable loss of quality. Conventionally, food is significantly over-processed to ensure safety. This paper reviews some problems which heat-transfer engineers face in the food industry, and

  18. "Key Moments" as Pedagogical Windows into the Video Production Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Erica; Gibbons, Damiana

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we trace learning across the digital video production process through case studies with four youth media arts organizations (YMAOs) across the United States. We hypothesize that what these organizations share is a series of key moments throughout the production process in which youth must articulate the relationship between the…

  19. Product-Process Distinctions in ELT Curriculum Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wette, Rosemary

    2011-01-01

    ELT theory classifies curricula as belonging to one of two contrasting approaches: either process or product. While foundation-level teacher education literature offers strongly product-oriented advice, research- and theory-oriented texts stress the need to negotiate with learners, and to take language-learning processes into account. This article…

  20. The Interaction between Central and Peripheral Processes in Handwriting Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roux, Sebastien; McKeeff, Thomas J.; Grosjacques, Geraldine; Afonso, Olivia; Kandel, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Written production studies investigating central processing have ignored research on the peripheral components of movement execution, and vice versa. This study attempts to integrate both approaches and provide evidence that central and peripheral processes interact during word production. French participants wrote regular words (e.g. FORME),…

  1. An Integrated Product Development Process for Mobile Software

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Zeidler; Christian Kittl; Otto Petrovic

    2007-01-01

    The rising penetration of smartphones enables new mobile services and business models. A huge number of different operating systems, available functionalities, open questions regarding revenue sources and streams, legal issues, as well as a lack of knowledge in designing mobile user experiences call for a holistic product development process in this domain. This paper describes a five-step product development process

  2. An autonomous decentralized process computer system for steel production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yasuhiko Mashino; Shigeki Yoshinaga; Hiroyuki Yokota

    1993-01-01

    The reconstruction of the total process control system for cold rolling of steel is described. The goals were to allow the production of more kinds and smaller lots of products with higher quality; to achieve a more flexible system, with high expandability and maintainability; and to increase software productivity. To satisfy these requirements, an autonomous decentralized architecture was adopted for

  3. Collaborative Product and Process Model: Multiple Viewpoints Approach

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Collaborative Product and Process Model: Multiple Viewpoints Approach Hichem M. Geryville1.ouzrout}@univ-lyon2.fr 2 Department of Product and Systems Design Engineering, University of the Aegean, Ermoupolis-Syros 84100 Greece {sapidis}@syros.aegean.gr Abstract The design and development of complex products

  4. Process and Product Certification Arguments -Getting the Balance Right

    E-print Network

    Kelly, Tim

    on the generation and assurance of product-specific evidence that meets safety requirements derived from hazard. Such arguments justify the acceptability of software safety based on product-specific and targeted evidence on the provision of both product and process evidence. Safety arguments, along with their evidence, are typically

  5. Mapping Knowledge in Product Development through Process Modelling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qianwang Deng; Dejie Yu

    2006-01-01

    The product development capability is a core competence in a company, and the product development process is a knowledge-intensive process. The evolution of engineering design shows that knowledge is a key factor of a successful product development. From the 70's in the last century, artificial intelligence has been introduced into this field. It evolves from expert system through knowledge-based system

  6. Product Binding Varies Dramatically between Processive and Nonprocessive Cellulase Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, L.; Nimlos, M. R.; Shirts, M. R.; Stahlberg, J.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-07-13

    Cellulases hydrolyze {beta}-1,4 glycosidic linkages in cellulose, which are among the most prevalent and stable bonds in Nature. Cellulases comprise many glycoside hydrolase families and exist as processive or nonprocessive enzymes. Product inhibition negatively impacts cellulase action, but experimental measurements of product-binding constants vary significantly, and there is little consensus on the importance of this phenomenon. To provide molecular level insights into cellulase product inhibition, we examine the impact of product binding on processive and nonprocessive cellulases by calculating the binding free energy of cellobiose to the product sites of catalytic domains of processive and nonprocessive enzymes from glycoside hydrolase families 6 and 7. The results suggest that cellobiose binds to processive cellulases much more strongly than nonprocessive cellulases. We also predict that the presence of a cellodextrin bound in the reactant site of the catalytic domain, which is present during enzymatic catalysis, has no effect on product binding in nonprocessive cellulases, whereas it significantly increases product binding to processive cellulases. This difference in product binding correlates with hydrogen bonding between the substrate-side ligand and the cellobiose product in processive cellulase tunnels and the additional stabilization from the longer tunnel-forming loops. The hydrogen bonds between the substrate- and product-side ligands are disrupted by water in nonprocessive cellulase clefts, and the lack of long tunnel-forming loops results in lower affinity of the product ligand. These findings provide new insights into the large discrepancies reported for binding constants for cellulases and suggest that product inhibition will vary significantly based on the amount of productive binding for processive cellulases on cellulose.

  7. Heavy quark production processes in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Gunion, J.F.

    1984-12-01

    We have identified two novel effects in QCD, each of which acts to enhance the production of heavy quark and supersymmetric particles beyond what is conventionally expected from gluon fusion. Both effects are present in QED, but are compounded in QCD because of the increased number of diagrams and the much larger coupling constant. The intrinsic charm quark distribution in the nucleon could account for the observed enhancements of the charm structure function at large x and features of the charm production data but this mechanism is relatively suppressed for heavier systems. Prebinding distortion of the fusion cross section is, however, likely to be significant for the production at low p/sub T/ of all particles containing heavy colored constituents. At this stage the QCD calculations are highly model dependent although they agree with the general properties which can be inferred from the operator product expansion in the heavy quark mass. Much more theoretical analysis of these effects is clearly needed. It is also clear that much more experimental work is necessary to extend and confirm the reported anomalous heavy quark signals. 22 references.

  8. Process improvement exploration: mapping multimedia production process to CMMI-DEV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, ChienWin; Kamaruddin, Noraida; Daud, Nor Izyani; Zainal Osman, Zosipha

    2013-03-01

    Multimedia takes improvement of multiple computing technologies to incorporate data from a wide variety of resources, without involving users to know how and where the data is encoded and stored. By reason of Multimedia applications interact with users with numerous diverse techniques and incorporate into strong applications that greatly extend the range and strength of applications, the production process are often complicated and complex. Production of such applications requires both process- and product-based quality assurance. Apparently, there are no universally accepted technical production standards. Consequently, Multimedia applications have sometimes diminished the quality of the end product, increased costs, delayed completion and failure. The focus is on the mapping between the current practices of multimedia production process and one of universal process improvement framework, Capability Maturity Model Integration for Development (CMMI-DEV). It shows that how current practices of multimedia production process address the Engineering Process Areas of CMMI-DEV. For each of the relevant process areas, it then explores how current practices can contribute to achieve the specific goals of that process area. This is practical for organizations that have their plan-driven process based on the CMMI-DEV model and are planning to improve the current practices of multimedia production process or to assist organization to define an innovative multimedia production process cycle based on CMMI-DEV practices.

  9. Effect of mixing water magnetic activation cycle on cement stone structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugaevskaya, S. A.; Abzaev, Yu A.; Safronov, V. N.; Sarkisov, Yu S.; Gorlenko, N. P.; Ermilova, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents results of investigations of hydration processes and structure formation of the cement paste matrix mixed with water activated by magneto static field using water treatment cycle technology. It is shown that crystallization of phases occurs in the cement-water system at different rates, and phase redistribution in the structure of the cement paste matrix is described before and after magnetic activation of mixing water. Also, modeling of the cement-water system and calculations of amorphous and crystalline phases using the Rietveld refinement method before and after magnetic activation show that strength properties of the cement paste matrix depend not only on quantitative but also qualitative relationship between phases.

  10. Constructing multivariate process capability indices for short-run production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chung-Ho Wang

    2005-01-01

    Job-shop factories (or short-run production facilities) are now becoming increasingly widespread as consumer requirements increase and production techniques are improved. The number of products in a short-run lot is small, so engineers cannot collect sufficient samples to determine the distribution of quality characteristics and estimate process parameters. Additionally, multiple quality characteristics must be simultaneously evaluated to determine product quality, when

  11. A DESIGN CASE STUDY: INTEGRATED PRODUCT AND PROCESS MANAGEMENT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto Arbulu; Javier Soto

    Traditional design practices in construction indicate that most of the emphasis appears to be on product design. This may be the result of the traditional process of design-bid-build, where the design team pre-defines means and methods to the contracting team. In contrast, lean design incorporates not only product design, but also process design. Process design is commonly one of the

  12. Gentamicin in bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Y.; Tai, C-L.; Hsieh, P-H.; Ueng, S. W. N.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study is to determine an optimal antibiotic-loaded bone cement (ALBC) for infection prophylaxis in total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Methods We evaluated the antibacterial effects of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cements loaded with vancomycin, teicoplanin, ceftazidime, imipenem, piperacillin, gentamicin, and tobramycin against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant Staph. aureus (MRSA), coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Standardised cement specimens made from 40 g PMMA loaded with 1 g antibiotics were tested for elution characteristics, antibacterial activities, and compressive strength in vitro. Results The ALBC containing gentamicin provided a much longer duration of antibiotic release than those containing other antibiotic. Imipenem-loading on the cement had a significant adverse effect on the compressive strength of the ALBC, which made it insufficient for use in prosthesis fixation. All of the tested antibiotics maintained their antibacterial properties after being mixed with PMMA. The gentamicin-loaded ALBC provided a broad antibacterial spectrum against all the test organisms and had the greatest duration of antibacterial activity against MSSA, CoNS, P. aeruginosa and E. coli. Conclusion When considering the use of ALBC as infection prophylaxis in TJA, gentamicin-loaded ALBC may be a very effective choice. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:220–6. PMID:24128666

  13. Biohydrogen gas production from food processing and domestic wastewaters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven W. Van Ginkel; Sang-Eun Oh; Bruce E. Logan

    2005-01-01

    The food processing industry produces highly concentrated, carbohydrate-rich wastewaters, but their potential for biological hydrogen production has not been extensively studied. Wastewaters were obtained from four different food-processing industries that had chemical oxygen demands of 9g\\/L (apple processing), 21g\\/L (potato processing), and 0.6 and 20g\\/L (confectioners A and B). Biogas produced from all four food processing wastewaters consistently contained 60%

  14. Method of reducing fluid loss in cement compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, L.E.

    1989-02-21

    A method is described for cementing a conduit in a borehole penetrating an earthen formation by introducing a cementing composition into the space between the conduit and the formation, the cementing composition comprising: hydraulic content, an aqueous fluid, and a fluid-loss additive consisting essentially of a polymer reaction product of styrene with 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid and their salts, the styrene being present in the polymer in an amount of from about 15 to about 60 mole percent of the polymer.

  15. Furnace for processing scrap and waste products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. B. Kudzagov

    2006-01-01

    The company METPROMMASh has been developing and introducing metallurgical technologies and equipment for the nonferrous metals\\u000a sector for more than 10 years. A particular focus of the company has been the construction of furnaces for recycling aluminum-and\\u000a copper-bearing scrap and waste products. Furnaces made by METPROMMASh are currently being used by shops and factories that\\u000a recycle nonferrous metals, these furnaces

  16. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Cha, C.H.; Bauer, H.F.; Grimes, R.W.

    1993-03-30

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen and carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  17. From Process to Product: Your Risk Process at Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig E.; Fogarty, Jenifer; Charles, John; Buquo, Lynn; Sibonga, Jean; Alexander, David; Horn, Wayne G.; Edwards, J. Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) and Human Research Program (HRP) at the NASA/Johnson Space Center work together to address and manage the human health and performance risks associated with human space flight. This includes all human system requirements before, during, and after space flight, providing for research, and managing the risk of adverse long-term health outcomes for the crew. We previously described the framework and processes developed for identifying and managing these human system risks. The focus of this panel is to demonstrate how the implementation of the framework and associated processes has provided guidance in the management and communication of human system risks. The risks of early onset osteoporosis, CO2 exposure, and intracranial hypertension in particular have all benefitted from the processes developed for human system risk management. Moreover, we are continuing to develop capabilities, particularly in the area of information architecture, which will also be described. We are working to create a system whereby all risks and associated actions can be tracked and related to one another electronically. Such a system will enhance the management and communication capabilities for the human system risks, thereby increasing the benefit to researchers and flight surgeons.

  18. Process for the production of liquid hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Bhatt, Bharat Lajjaram; Engel, Dirk Coenraad; Heydorn, Edward Clyde; Senden, Matthijis Maria Gerardus

    2006-06-27

    The present invention concerns a process for the preparation of liquid hydrocarbons which process comprises contacting synthesis gas with a slurry of solid catalyst particles and a liquid in a reactor vessel by introducing the synthesis gas at a low level into the slurry at conditions suitable for conversion of the synthesis gas into liquid hydrocarbons, the solid catalyst particles comprising a catalytic active metal selected from cobalt or iron on a porous refractory oxide carrier, preferably selected from silica, alumina, titania, zirconia or mixtures thereof, the catalyst being present in an amount between 10 and 40 vol. percent based on total slurry volume liquids and solids, and separating liquid material from the solid catalyst particles by using a filtration system comprising an asymmetric filtration medium (the selective side at the slurry side), in which filtration system the average pressure differential over the filtration medium is at least 0.1 bar, in which process the particle size distribution is such that at least a certain amount of the catalyst particles is smaller than the average pore size of the selective layer of the filtration medium. The invention also comprises an apparatus to carry out the process described above.

  19. Hydrogen production by steam-iron process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Viktor; Fankhauser, Robert; Faleschini, Gottfried; Fuchs, Heidrun; Friedrich, Kurt; Muhr, Michael; Kordesch, Karl

    The steam-iron process is one of the oldest methods of producing hydrogen. It is a cyclic process for water cleavage, whereby coal is consumed. Coal is gassified to a lean reducing gas, containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen. This gas reacts with iron oxides (haematite Fe 2O 3, magnetite Fe 3O 4, wuestite FeO) to produce a reduced form of iron oxide (wuestite FeO, iron Fe). The reduced iron oxide is re-oxidised with steam to form magnetite and hydrogen. After studies concerning theoretical limitations, the subsequent practical realisation by construction of a suitable laboratory prototype reactor was performed. Further, the investigation and optimisation of process variables, accompanied by respective chemical analyses, and finally the simulation of the whole process and the design of a demonstration plant for electricity generation system in the range of 10 MW were carried out. The resulting overall efficiency (heat and electricity) of the respective power plant was calculated as 35% and the electrical efficiency at about 25%. The operation of the small scale "Sponge Iron Reactor" (SIR) showed that the hydrogen produced is sufficiently pure for use in any kind of fuel cell (CO <10 ppm).

  20. Preventive maintenance holds key to processing productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Carrieri, J.

    1983-11-01

    The popular term ''preventive maintenance'' brings to mind lubrication schedules, wear gauges and spare parts. Yet somehow, processing equipment--crushers, washers, conveyors, feeders, screens, etc.--continues to go down just when it hurts most. And when a part of the processing line stops, everything stops. Regular lubrication, spares and the like are indeed part of effective preventive maintenance. But other considerations, some of them made before the equipment is ever purchased, play an added, often more important role in keeping your processing equipment running in top form. Not all crushing elements lend themselves to weld build-up though. That depends upon the metallurgy and design of the crushing element. It may be less expensive to allow the crushing element to achieve its maximum wear and then replace it with a new element. If the metallurgy of the crushing wear is changed, be sure to follow welding instructions from the equipment manufacturer or a reputable supplier of welding rods. When smooth rolls are involved, portable roll grinders often may be able to true up the rolls on site. Obviously, crushers have their own peculiar set of vulnerabilities, as do feeders, breakers, conveyors and other processing equipment. Yet the principles of careful equipment selection, training, inspection, spare parts provisions, early warning devices and performance monitoring will for the most part catch trouble in its earliest stages for any piece of equipment.

  1. Processed Fishery Products FRESH AND FROZEN

    E-print Network

    with agar-agar, animal feeds, crab and clam shells processed for food serving, fish pellets, Irish moss consumption and 600.5 million pounds valued at $229.6 million for bait and animal food. CANNED SALMON Canned 13 16 Cured 2 2 93 93 Industrial: Bait and animal food

  2. Process for converting coal into liquid products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Brink; B. Jager; C. Kleynjan

    1982-01-01

    The invention provides a process and an apparatus for hydrogenative liquefaction of coal to produce high yields of gasoline fraction and optional yields of diesel and residue fraction, all of superior quality. The coal is slurried and digested in two separate and distinct streams. The parting oil of the first stream is heavy residue fraction derived to a substantial extend

  3. Content, Process, and Product: Modeling Differentiated Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Barbara Kline

    2015-01-01

    Modeling differentiated instruction is one way to demonstrate how educators can incorporate instructional strategies to address students' needs, interests, and learning styles. This article discusses how secondary teacher candidates learn to focus on content--the "what" of instruction; process--the "how" of instruction;…

  4. Group Work: From Process to Product.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Rosemarie Giroux

    1994-01-01

    Describes a step-by-step process for conducting a small-group activity for intermediate students of French as a Second Language in which the students are asked to create a print advertisement for a new, nutritious snack. The steps include contextualization, brainstorming, establishing criteria, planning the activity, language, and reflection on…

  5. Novel pyrolysis-gas chromatography\\/mass spectrometric techniques for the characterization of chemical additives in portland cement and concrete

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ara A. Jeknavorian; E. F. Barry; J. J. Litzau

    1998-01-01

    The application of pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (py-GC\\/MS) has been improved for the determination of chemical additives that are either interground with cement clinker during the manufacture of Portland cement or admixed with a mixture of cement, sand, and stone, and water for the production of concrete. This technique has been found to be readily applicable for phenol-based cement

  6. A Model for Teaching Writing: Process and Product. Fastback 256.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    Intended to help teachers understand the complexities of the writing process, this pamphlet offers a model for writing conceptualized in three phases: stimulus, process, and product. The process phase is then examined from the perspectives of: consciousness, speed and elaboration, and mental/physical interaction. The following implications for…

  7. Novel process control strategies for 300 mm semiconductor production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lothar Pfitzner; Richard Oechsner; Claus Schneider; Heiner Ryssel; Manfred Riemer; Mario von Podewils

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor industry is one of the fastest growing businesses. Integrated circuit production process is becoming more and more challenging as the increase in complexity and in wafer size continues. Semiconductor manufacturing comprises hundreds of mostly complex processing steps, almost each of them has to be controlled within a narrow process window. Measurement steps are more or less frequently used in

  8. Matrix Product States approach to non-Markovian processes

    E-print Network

    Descamps Benoit

    2014-10-31

    A matrix product state approach to non-Markovian, classical and quantum processes is discussed. In the classical case, the Radon-Nikodym derivative of all processes can be embedded into quantum measurement procedure. In the both cases, quantum and classical, the master equation can be derived from a projecting a quantum Markovian process onto a lower dimensional subspace.

  9. New product development process and total quality management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Bellary; D. N. P. Murthy

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. The total quality management (TQM) paradigm provides an approach for achieving continuous improvement. Critical for this are (i) a good understanding of the new product development (NPD) process and (ii) defining suitable metrics to assess the NPD process. Once this is done, data needs to be collected to assess the quality of the NPD process in

  10. LITERATURE SURVEY ON CEMENTS FOR REMEDIATION OF DEFORMED CASING IN GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    ALLAN,M.L.; PHILIPPACOPOULOS,A.J.

    1998-11-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory was requested to conduct a literature survey for the best available cement to use in the proposed casing patch as part of the Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) project on remediation of deformed casings. A total of 50 wells has been identified with deformed production casing in Unocal's portion of The Geysers geothermal field. Reduced internal diameter and casing doglegs result in lost production and the possible need for abandonment. The cause of the deformations is believed to be formation movement along fault planes and/or along weaker layers or interfaces between high impedance contrast media. Apparently, it is unclear whether shear or axial compression is the dominant failure mechanism. A procedure to address the casing deformation and avoid abandonment of these wells has been developed as described in the Geysers Deformed Casing Remediation Proposal. The proposed remediation procedure involves isolation of the zone of interest with an inflatable packer, milling the deformed casing and cementing a 7 inch diameter liner to extend approximately 100 ft above and 100 ft below the milled zone. During the milling operation it is possible that the original cement and surrounding formation may slough away. In order to specify a suitable cement formulation for the casing patch it is first necessary to identify and understand the deformation mechanism/s operating in The Geysers field. Subsequently, the required cement mechanical properties to withstand further deformation of the repaired system must be defined. From this information it can be determined whether available cement formulations meet these requirements. In addition to The Geysers, other geothermal fields are at possible risk of casing deformation due to subsidence, seismic activity, lateral and vertical formation movement or other processes. Therefore, the proposed remediation procedure may have applications in other fields. The literature survey focused on published properties for cements used in geothermal and oil well applications and the experiences of well casing deformation occurring in oil and gas fields. Dr. Mike Bruno of Terralog Technologies kindly supplied a reference list from the DEA (Drilling Engineering Association) 99 Project on Analysis of Well Casing Damage Induced by Reservoir Compaction and Overburden Shear.

  11. An Overview of APP Processing Enzymes and Products

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Vivian W.; Mattson, Mark P.; Wong, Philip C.; Gleichmann, Marc

    2009-01-01

    The generation of amyloid ?-peptide (A?) by enzymatic cleavages of the ?-amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been at the center of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research. While the basic process of ?- and ?-secretase-mediated generation of A? is text book knowledge, new aspects of A? and other cleavage products have emerged in recent years. Also our understanding of the enzymes involved in APP proteolysis has increased dramatically. All of these discoveries contribute to a more complete understanding of APP processing and the physiological and pathological roles of its secreted and intracellular protein products. Understanding APP processing is important for any therapeutic strategy aimed at reducing A? levels in AD. In this review we provide a concise description of the current state of understanding the enzymes involved in APP processing, the cleavage products generated by different processing patterns, and the potential functions of those cleavage products. PMID:20232515

  12. Characterization of various cement grinding aids and their impact on grindability and cement performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Katsioti; P. E. Tsakiridis; P. Giannatos; Z. Tsibouki; J. Marinos

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present research work was the evaluation of six commercial grinding additives, which were used for the production of Portland cement (ground in a ball mill at a laboratory stage). For this purpose, a reference sample was also produced without using any admixture. The characterization of the grinding aids (GA) was carried out by Fourier transform infra-red

  13. Process for converting coal into liquid products

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, A.; Jager, B.; Kleynjan, C.

    1982-03-09

    The invention provides a process and an apparatus for hydrogenative liquefaction of coal to produce high yields of gasoline fraction and optional yields of diesel and residue fraction, all of superior quality. The coal is slurried and digested in two separate and distinct streams. The parting oil of the first stream is heavy residue fraction derived to a substantial extend from the second stream, mixed with light oil derived partly or wholly from the first stream. The pasting oil of the second stream is middle oil derived from the fractionated discharge of the first stream, any shortfall being made up from the discharge of the second stream. A high degree of flexibility is possible by varying the ratio of coal fed to the respective streams between 3:1 and 1:3, and individual manipulation of the process parameters within each stream in respect of pressure, temperature, catalyst, residence time, pasting oil composition and coal quality.

  14. Processed Fishery Products FRESH AND FROZEN

    E-print Network

    -agar, animal feeds, crab and clam shells processed for food serving, fish pellets, Irish moss extracts, kelp.1 million for bait and animal food. CANNED SALMON. The 2006 U.S. pack of salmon was 151.7 million pounds 1 95 94 Industrial: Bait and animal food 2 3 Meal and oil 2 2 Other 1 1 5 6 Grand total 100 100 (1

  15. Process for production desulfurized of synthesis gas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James K. Wolfenbarger; Mitri S. Najjar

    1993-01-01

    A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1900.degree.-2600.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises a calcium-containing compound portion, a sodium-containing

  16. Calcium silicate cement sorbent for H/sub 2/S removal and improved gasification processes. Annual progress report, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, H.J.; Steinberg, M.

    1982-10-01

    Commercial calcium silicate bearing Portland cement type III (PC III), in the form of agglomerated cement sorbent (ACS) pellets, is being investigated for in-situ desulfurization of fuel gases and for improved coal gasification. The preparation procedure and conditions for pelletizing agglomerated cement sorbent (ACS) by a low energy, low cost agglomeration technique have been modified using a two-stage pelletization procedure, which yields ACS pellets of greater mechanical strength. A 40 mm ID bench scale fluidized bed gasifier (FBG) was used to determine sulfur removal efficiency of ACS pellets as well as their attrition resistance, using a simulated gas mixture. These tests show that 90% or more of the sulfur removal from the gas is achieved until 35% of the ACS pellet is sulfidated and that it has excellent attrition resistance (less than 0.1% wt loss) during cyclic tests excluding the first conditioning cycle. The gasification of coal by partial oxidation with air to low Btu gas was conducted in a 1-inch bench scale FBG unit by our collaborator, the Foster Wheeler Corporation (FWC). At temperatures between 800/sup 0/C and 950/sup 0/C the efficiency of coal gasification is improved by as much as 40% when ACS pellets are used compared to the use of Greer limestone. At the same time the sulfur removal efficiency is increased from 50 to 65% with Greer limestone to over 95% with the ACS pellets. The test on sulfur fixation characteristics of the sorbent in the 1-inch FBG unit using a simulated gas also shows that the ACS pellet is much more reactive toward H/sub 2/S than Greer limestone. The ability of ACS pellets to simultaneously desulfurize and improve the gasification efficiency of coal in FBG justifies further investigation.

  17. Double J /? production in central diffractive processes at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotto, C. Brenner; Goncalves, V. P.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we study the double J /? production in central diffractive processes considering the resolved Pomeron model. Based on the nonrelativistic QCD factorization formalism for the quarkonium production mechanism we estimate the rapidity and transverse momentum dependence of the cross section for the double J /? production in diffractive processes at LHC energies. The contributions of the color-singlet and color-octet channels are estimated and predictions for the total cross sections in the kinematical regions of the LHC experiments are also presented. Our results demonstrate that the contribution of central diffractive processes is not negligible and that its study can be useful to test the resolved Pomeron model.

  18. Stabilization/solidification of hazardous and radioactive wastes with alkali-activated cements.

    PubMed

    Shi, Caijun; Fernández-Jiménez, A

    2006-10-11

    This paper reviews progresses on the use of alkali-activated cements for stabilization/solidification of hazardous and radioactive wastes. Alkali-activated cements consist of an alkaline activator and cementing components, such as blast furnace slag, coal fly ash, phosphorus slag, steel slag, metakaolin, etc., or a combination of two or more of them. Properly designed alkali-activated cements can exhibit both higher early and later strengths than conventional portland cement. The main hydration product of alkali-activated cements is calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) with low Ca/Si ratios or aluminosilicate gel at room temperature; CSH, tobmorite, xonotlite and/or zeolites under hydrothermal condition, no metastable crystalline compounds such as Ca(OH)(2) and calcium sulphoaluminates exist. Alkali-activated cements also exhibit excellent resistance to corrosive environments. The leachability of contaminants from alkali-activated cement stabilized hazardous and radioactive wastes is lower than that from hardened portland cement stabilized wastes. From all these aspects, it is concluded that alkali-activated cements are better matrix for solidification/stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes than Portland cement. PMID:16787699

  19. The radiation crosslinking process and new products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Keiji

    In 1988 there were over 90 EB accelerators for industrial use in Japan. The number one industrial application was Wire and Cable, the 2nd was PE foam and Curing, and the 3rd was Precure of tyre. R & D has a very high ration of EB accelerator use. Low energy industrial applications were coated steel (white board), plaster slab, coated paper, magnetic tape and floppy disks. As a new application of the radiation crosslinking process, we have studied radiation crosslinking of engineering plastics and succeeded in improving the hea tresistivity without using glass fibers. Many kinds of polyfunctional monomers used as crosslinking reagents of irradiated Nylon and PBT were studied.

  20. Study of laser molten welding of cemented carbides and steel

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Nailiang [Tianjin Inst. of Tech. (China). Dept. of Physics; Yang Yongqiang [South Univ. of Science and Technology, Guangzhou (China). Center of Laser Engineering Research

    1996-12-31

    The laser molten welding of cemented carbides and steel is discussed in this paper. It presents the mechanism of dip soldering. The changes of material structure of welding seam, elements composition and the cause of fissures have been analyzed. The changes of tension of carbides and cobaltic phase in welding process are investigated. The effect of laser plasma on surface of specimen is discussed. The welding results of heterogeneous materials between L135 cemented carbides and 6542{number_sign} tool steel, YG15, YG12, YG8 cemented carbides and 45{number_sign} steel are also discussed.

  1. An alternative to Portland Cement for waste encapsulation--the calcium sulfoaluminate cement system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Q; Milestone, N B; Hayes, M

    2006-08-10

    Currently, Portland Cement (PC) is used extensively in the solidification/stabilisation of a wide variety of wastes. In the nuclear industry, low and intermediate level radioactive wastes are encapsulated or immobilised within composite PC cement systems based on high replacement with blast furnace slag or fly ash. However, the high alkalinity of these PC-based systems will corrode reactive metals found in some wastes releasing hydrogen and forming expansive corrosion products. Alternative cement systems could provide a different hydration chemistry, which would allow wastes containing these metals to be encapsulated with lower reactivity. Calcium sulfoaluminate (CS A) cement is one such cement. It combines economy of cost and low emission of CO(2) with rapid strength gain and compatibility with other construction materials. Hydration provides an internal pore solution where the pH is considerably lower than that of PC. The main hydration product, ettringite, can incorporate a number of ions into its crystal structure, making it an ideal candidate for waste immobilisation. This paper details some results from a commercial CS A system that examines aspects of mixing, hydration of different formulations and aluminium corrosion behaviour. The fluidity of mixes can be adjusted by changing the formulations. All designed mixes were set within 24 h with little bleeding and the pH values were in the range of 10-11.5. In addition, a significant reduction in Al corrosion was observed compared to a composite OPC system. Although these results provide encouragement for the idea that CS A cement can provide a possible alternative to PC in the immobilisation of difficult and reactive wastes, further investigation is needed. PMID:16406289

  2. By-Products Utilization

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization PRELIMINARY DRAFT REPORT CEMENT KILN DUST (CKD) - BASED SORBENT Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN ­ MILWAUKEE #12;i TABLE OF CONTENTS Cement Kiln Dust (CKD) - Based ;.......................................................................................................... 4 Why Use CKD

  3. Novel particulate production processes to create unique security materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampden-Smith, Mark; Kodas, Toivo; Haubrich, Scott; Oljaca, Miki; Einhorn, Rich; Williams, Darryl

    2006-02-01

    Particles are frequently used to impart security features to high value items. These particles are typically produced by traditional methods, and therefore the security must be derived from the chemical composition of the particles rather than the particle production process. Here, we present new and difficult-to-reproduce particle production processes based on spray pyrolysis that can produce unique particles and features that are dependent on the use of these new-to-the-world processes and process trade secrets. Specifically two examples of functional materials are described, luminescent materials and electrocatalytic materials.

  4. Integrated analysis of the production planning process using Trampolin and DGRAI as process modelling tools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. S. Aguilar-Sommar; R. Poler

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides managers and other decision-makers with support on how to analyse business processes by presenting the use and features of Trampolin and DGRAI as complementary tools for the analysis of business processes to support enterprise integration. Two business process models were built for the production planning process in a large telecommunication company one using Trampolin and the other

  5. GREENING STANDARDS FOR GREEN STRUCTURES: PROCESS AND PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project is to provide a mechanism that equips consumers with the means for encouraging the homebuilding industry—designers, homebuilders, retail suppliers—to use environmentally preferable products (ENP) and processes in the design and con...

  6. STATE OF THE ART: SWINE WASTE PRODUCTION AND PRETREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A review of waste generation and pretreatment processes was compiled, expanded, and interpreted for the swine production industry. Typical swine units based upon waste management techniques were detailed as concrete slab facilities, slotted floorpit units, and swine drylot or pas...

  7. 21 CFR 820.70 - Production and process controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION ...adverse effect on product quality, the manufacturer...adversely affect the device's quality. The removal or reduction...computers or automated data processing systems...

  8. 21 CFR 820.70 - Production and process controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION ...adverse effect on product quality, the manufacturer...adversely affect the device's quality. The removal or reduction...computers or automated data processing systems...

  9. 21 CFR 820.70 - Production and process controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION ...adverse effect on product quality, the manufacturer...adversely affect the device's quality. The removal or reduction...computers or automated data processing systems...

  10. 21 CFR 820.70 - Production and process controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION ...adverse effect on product quality, the manufacturer...adversely affect the device's quality. The removal or reduction...computers or automated data processing systems...

  11. The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Product Denitrator Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1982-05-01

    The upgrade and redesign of a fluidized-bed denitrator for production of uranium trioxide from uranyl nitrate solution is discussed. The success of the project in improving process efficiency and personnel safety is also addressed based on subsequent operation.

  12. Process for production desulfurized of synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Wolfenbarger, James K. (Torrance, CA); Najjar, Mitri S. (Wappingers Falls, NY)

    1993-01-01

    A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1900.degree.-2600.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises a calcium-containing compound portion, a sodium-containing compound portion, and a fluoride-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (1) a sulfur-containing sodium-calcium-fluoride silicate phase; and (2) a sodium-calcium sulfide phase.

  13. 76 FR 13973 - United States Warehouse Act; Processed Agricultural Products Licensing Agreement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ...of a processed agricultural product is apple juice concentrate. In the past, USDA...processed agricultural products such as apple juice concentrate and other similar products...processed agricultural products such as apple juice concentrate? What types of...

  14. Ion release and pH of a new endodontic cement, MTA and Portland cement

    PubMed Central

    Amini Ghazvini, Sara; Abdo Tabrizi, Maryam; Kobarfard, Farzad; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza; Asgary, Saeed

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This in vitro study measured and compared pH and phosphate and calcium ions release of a new endodontic material (CEM cement), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and Portland cement (PC) using UV-visible technique, atomic absorption spectrophotometry methods, and pH meter, respectively. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Each material was placed in a plastic tube (n=10) and immersed in a glass flask containing deionized water. Half of the samples were tested for determining pH and released ions after 1h, 3h, 24h, 48h, 7d and 28d. Remaining samples (n=5), were evaluated after 28d. Data was analyzed using one way ANOVA and Tukey tests. RESULTS: Results indicated that all materials were highly alkaline and released calcium and low concentration of phosphate ions in all the time intervals. CEM cement released considerably higher concentration of phosphate during the first hour (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: This novel endodontic cement promoted alkaline pH in a similar manner to MTA and released calcium and phosphate. These conditions can stimulate the calcification process and explain the basic physico-chemical mechanisms of hard tissue regeneration of CEM cement. PMID:23940490

  15. Constraints Based Modeling for Innovative Product & Process Designs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Sampath

    2007-01-01

    An innovative, constraints based modeling (CBM) approach proved successful for product developments and process improvements.\\u000a The product developments involved specifying the chemical composition range for a set of chromium-free, high-performance consumable\\u000a electrodes intended for gas-metal arc welding (GMAW) of high-strength steels used in hull constructions while significantly\\u000a reducing energy costs. The process improvements involved selecting appropriate non-carcinogenic chemicals for a

  16. Cranberry processing waste for solid state fungal inoculant production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zuoxing Zheng; Kalidas Shetty

    1998-01-01

    Cranberry pomace is a primary by-product of the traditional cranberry juice processing industry and its disposal presents economic and environmental problems. Microbial conversion of cranberry pomace into various value-added products is a practical approach for solving such disposal problems. The present research was undertaken to test the growth of several agriculturally and industrially important fungi on cranberry pomace substrate through

  17. Function flow-based product design process modeling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shuxia Li; Hongbo Shan

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, product design process is divided into multiple phases, and the distributed design flow across these phases emphasizes on task solving and realization within one of the design phases in term of the perspective of designer. Increasing personalized product design demand, however, often leads to frequent redesign of design work mainly due to distortion of ambiguous and discrete customer requirement

  18. PROCESS AND EQUIPMENT CHANGES FOR CLEANER PRODUCTION IN FEDERAL FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses process and equipment changes for cleaner production in federal facilities. During the 1990s, DoD and EPA conducted joint research and development, aimed at reducing the discharge of hazardous and toxic pollutants from military production and maintenance faci...

  19. DEMAND ESTIMATION FOR AGRICULTURAL PROCESSING CO-PRODUCTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheryl J. Wachenheim; Patrick J. Novak; Eric A. DeVuyst; David K. Lambert

    2001-01-01

    Co-products of processing agricultural commodities are often marketed through private transaction rather than through public markets or those in which public transaction information is recorded or available. The resulting lack of historical price information prohibits the use of positive time series techniques to estimate demand. Demand estimates for co-products are of value to both livestock producers, who obtain them for

  20. Sum rules for partial waves in production processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsella, John

    1981-12-01

    Using general crossing symmetry a complete set of sum rules for partial waves in production processes is derived. These sum rules are derived explicitly for the case of pion production and are particularly suited to provide constraints on model (e.g., isobar) amplitudes.

  1. NIR spectroscopy for determining soy contents in processed meat products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy products such as soy concentrate, soy protein and soy grits are used as a meat extender in processed meat products to improve meat texture. However, soy allergies are one of the common food allergies, especially in infants and young children, and can be mild to life-threatening. The United State...

  2. A Macro Process Model for Product Innovation Using TRIZ

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tan Runhua

    The process of product innovation consists of three stages, which are fuzzy front end (FFE), new product development (NPD) and commercialization (COM). Theory of inventive problem solving (TRIZ) is a systematic approach to find innovative solutions for technical problems. The patterns and lines of TRIZ are applied to FFE to produce new ideas. The principles, standard solutions and effects of

  3. Near infrared and Raman spectroscopy for the in-process monitoring of pharmaceutical production processes.

    PubMed

    De Beer, T; Burggraeve, A; Fonteyne, M; Saerens, L; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2011-09-30

    Within the Process Analytical Technology (PAT) framework, it is of utmost importance to obtain critical process and formulation information during pharmaceutical processing. Process analyzers are the essential PAT tools for real-time process monitoring and control as they supply the data from which relevant process and product information and conclusions are to be extracted. Since the last decade, near infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy have been increasingly used for real-time measurements of critical process and product attributes, as these techniques allow rapid and nondestructive measurements without sample preparations. Furthermore, both techniques provide chemical and physical information leading to increased process understanding. Probes coupled to the spectrometers by fiber optic cables can be implemented directly into the process streams allowing continuous in-process measurements. This paper aims at reviewing the use of Raman and NIR spectroscopy in the PAT setting, i.e., during processing, with special emphasis in pharmaceutics and dosage forms. PMID:21167266

  4. Automating the Product Derivation Process of Multi-agent Systems Product Lines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elder Cirilo; Ingrid Nunes; Uirá Kulesza; Carlos Lucena

    2009-01-01

    Agent-oriented software engineering and software product lines are two promising software engineering techniques. Recent research work explores the integration between them to allow reuse and variability management in the context of complex systems. However, the automatic product derivation process is not addressed in the current literature. In this paper, we present our approach to deal with multi-agent systems product lines

  5. Integrating artificial and human intelligence into tablet production process.

    PubMed

    Gams, Matjaž; Horvat, Matej; Ožek, Matej; Luštrek, Mitja; Gradišek, Anton

    2014-12-01

    We developed a new machine learning-based method in order to facilitate the manufacturing processes of pharmaceutical products, such as tablets, in accordance with the Process Analytical Technology (PAT) and Quality by Design (QbD) initiatives. Our approach combines the data, available from prior production runs, with machine learning algorithms that are assisted by a human operator with expert knowledge of the production process. The process parameters encompass those that relate to the attributes of the precursor raw materials and those that relate to the manufacturing process itself. During manufacturing, our method allows production operator to inspect the impacts of various settings of process parameters within their proven acceptable range with the purpose of choosing the most promising values in advance of the actual batch manufacture. The interaction between the human operator and the artificial intelligence system provides improved performance and quality. We successfully implemented the method on data provided by a pharmaceutical company for a particular product, a tablet, under development. We tested the accuracy of the method in comparison with some other machine learning approaches. The method is especially suitable for analyzing manufacturing processes characterized by a limited amount of data. PMID:24970587

  6. Abrasive wear of cemented carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Wilson, Rick D.

    2003-10-01

    Cemented carbides are used for a wide variety of applications where wear is a problem. Usually the wear of the cemented carbides is a combination of metal-to-metal and abrasion. Wear can occur at room or elevated temperatures. This research summarizes initial research to understand the abrasive wear of various cemented carbides (various grain sizes, carbide types, carbide grain sizes and binder compositions) in terms of absolute material removal rates and material removal mechanisms.

  7. Cementing techniques in hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Chandler, M; Kowalski, R S Z; Watkins, N D; Briscoe, A; New, A M R

    2006-02-01

    The subject of the cementing technique in hip resurfacing has been poorly studied to date. The hip resurfacing prosthesis is unique in the family of cemented prostheses because the cement mantle is blind (hidden underneath the implant) and is radiographically obscured. This presents an immediate challenge to the surgeon at the time of surgery, but also has a longer-term implication in terms of lack of post-operative clinical observation. This should be compared with total hip replacement or total knee replacement where the cement mantle can at least be partially observed both intra- and post-operatively. With this in mind, the objective of this review is, firstly, to understand the cement mantles typically achieved in current clinical practice and, secondly, to identify those factors affecting the cement mantle and to consolidate them into an improved and reproducible cementing technique. The outcome of this work shows that the low-viscosity technique can commonly lead to excessive cement penetration in the proximal femoral head and an incompletely seated component, whereas a more consistent controlled cement mantle can be achieved with a high-viscosity cementing technique. Consequently, it is recommended that a high-viscosity technique should be used to minimize the build-up of excessive cement, to reduce the temperature created by the exothermic polymerization, and to help to ensure correct seating of the prosthesis. A combination of these factors is potentially critical to the clinical success of some articular surface replacement (ASR) procedures. It is important to note that we specifically studied the DePuy ASR system; therefore only the general principles (and not the specifics) of the cementing technique may apply to other resurfacing prostheses, because of differences in internal geometry, clearance, and surgical technique. PMID:16669398

  8. Solidification\\/stabilization of technetium in cement-based grouts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Michael Gilliam; W. D. Bostick; R. D. Spence; J. L. Shoemaker

    1990-01-01

    Mixed low-level radioactive and chemically hazardous process treatment wastes from the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are stabilized by solidification in cement-based grouts. Conventional portland cement and fly ash grouts have been shown to be effective for retention of hydrolyzable metals (e.g., lead, cadmium, uranium and nickel) but are marginally acceptable for retention of radioactive Tc-99, which is present in the

  9. Anaerobic digestion of fish processing by-products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Ward; Bill Slater

    2002-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion can be used to treat many organic waste streams. However, fish wastes pose a particular technological problem, as they release high levels of ammonia when digested, which then inhibits the digestion process. Having overcome these technical problems, it is important that there is a long term, financially viable outlet for the products of the digestion process. The organic

  10. Integrated PV-thermal panel and process for production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jarnagin

    1986-01-01

    A process is described for production of integrated photovoltaic-thermal panels, the preferred process including the following chemical vapor depositions, in air, and the following work stations: (a) copper oxide station, whereby sheet copper, Cu, is cleaned and a layer of copper oxide, CuO, is formed thereon by heating the copper in air or steam, (b) silica station, whereby silicic acid,

  11. Supporting medical device development: a standard product design process model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lourdes A. Medina; Gül E. Okudan Kremer; Richard A. Wysk

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the complex nature of the medical device development (MDD) process and presents a product design process model to aid designers engaged in MDD. Basically, the model serves as a conceptual framework and provides a set of formalisms to define the development landscape for medical devices. Specifically, the model describes the phases of MDD and their relationships, including

  12. COBY PRODUCTS AND A PROCESS FOR THEIR MANUFACTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel method for the treatment of cotton byproducts to yield value-added products while reducing the wear on processing equipment is described. In this process, cotton byproducts, or waste, are ground and compacted and treated with a gellable polysaccharide. The polysaccharide is gelatinized, eith...

  13. Image processing system performance prediction and product quality evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, E. K.; Hammill, H. B. (principal investigators)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A new technique for image processing system performance prediction and product quality evaluation was developed. It was entirely objective, quantitative, and general, and should prove useful in system design and quality control. The technique and its application to determination of quality control procedures for the Earth Resources Technology Satellite NASA Data Processing Facility are described.

  14. Low energy production processes in manufacturing of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1976-01-01

    Ion implantation and pulsed energy techniques are being combined for fabrication of silicon solar cells totally under vacuum and at room temperature. Simplified sequences allow very short processing times with small process energy consumption. Economic projections for fully automated production are excellent.

  15. PAPER PRODUCTION AND PROCESSING - OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL RELEASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents an analysis of chemicals and processes used during the production and processing of paper and paper goods with emphasis on the workplace exposure and environmental release of chemicals from these operations. Reviews of chemical substances in this report are i...

  16. Auditing improvements in a product delivery process (AIPDP)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Childerhouse; Andrew Thomas; Gareth Phillips; Denis R. Towill

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to assess the appropriateness of using the 12 previously published material flow simplicity rules (SRs) to shape the successful design and implementation of improvements in a casting company product delivery process (PDP). Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The business process improvement (BPI) project described in this case study was actively supported by the UK knowledge

  17. Access to Land Data Products Through the Land Processes DAAC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. L. Klaassen; C. K. Gacke

    2004-01-01

    The Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) was established as part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS) initiative to process, archive, and distribute land-related data collected by EOS sensors, thereby promoting the inter-disciplinary study and understanding of the integrated Earth system. The LP DAAC is responsible for archiving, product development, distribution, and user

  18. Mapping Asbestos-Cement Roofing with Hyperspectral Remote Sensing over a Large Mountain Region of the Italian Western Alps

    PubMed Central

    Frassy, Federico; Candiani, Gabriele; Rusmini, Marco; Maianti, Pieralberto; Marchesi, Andrea; Nodari, Francesco Rota; Via, Giorgio Dalla; Albonico, Carlo; Gianinetto, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that 100 thousand people in the world die every year from asbestos-related cancers and more than 300 thousand European citizens are expected to die from asbestos-related mesothelioma by 2030. Both the European and the Italian legislations have banned the manufacture, importation, processing and distribution in commerce of asbestos-containing products and have recommended action plans for the safe removal of asbestos from public and private buildings. This paper describes the quantitative mapping of asbestos-cement covers over a large mountainous region of Italian Western Alps using the Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer sensor. A very large data set made up of 61 airborne transect strips covering 3263 km2 were processed to support the identification of buildings with asbestos-cement roofing, promoted by the Valle d'Aosta Autonomous Region with the support of the Regional Environmental Protection Agency. Results showed an overall mapping accuracy of 80%, in terms of asbestos-cement surface detected. The influence of topography on the classification's accuracy suggested that even in high relief landscapes, the spatial resolution of data is the major source of errors and the smaller asbestos-cement covers were not detected or misclassified. PMID:25166502

  19. Mapping asbestos-cement roofing with hyperspectral remote sensing over a large mountain region of the Italian Western Alps.

    PubMed

    Frassy, Federico; Candiani, Gabriele; Rusmini, Marco; Maianti, Pieralberto; Marchesi, Andrea; Rota Nodari, Francesco; Dalla Via, Giorgio; Albonico, Carlo; Gianinetto, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that 100 thousand people in the world die every year from asbestos-related cancers and more than 300 thousand European citizens are expected to die from asbestos-related mesothelioma by 2030. Both the European and the Italian legislations have banned the manufacture, importation, processing and distribution in commerce of asbestos-containing products and have recommended action plans for the safe removal of asbestos from public and private buildings. This paper describes the quantitative mapping of asbestos-cement covers over a large mountainous region of Italian Western Alps using the Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer sensor. A very large data set made up of 61 airborne transect strips covering 3263 km2 were processed to support the identification of buildings with asbestos-cement roofing, promoted by the Valle d'Aosta Autonomous Region with the support of the Regional Environmental Protection Agency. Results showed an overall mapping accuracy of 80%, in terms of asbestos-cement surface detected. The influence of topography on the classification's accuracy suggested that even in high relief landscapes, the spatial resolution of data is the major source of errors and the smaller asbestos-cement covers were not detected or misclassified. PMID:25166502

  20. Ionic liquid-based green processes for energy production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suojiang; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Xiaochun; Xin, Jiayu; Miao, Qingqing; Wang, Jianji

    2014-11-21

    To mitigate the growing pressure on resource depletion and environment degradation, the development of green processes for the production of renewable energy is highly required. As a class of novel and promising media, ionic liquids (ILs) have shown infusive potential applications in energy production. Aiming to offer a critical overview regarding the new challenges and opportunities of ILs for developing green processes of renewable energy, this article emphasises the role of ILs as catalysts, solvents, or electrolytes in three broadly interesting energy production processes from renewable resources, such as CO2 conversion to fuels and fuel additives, biomass pretreatment and conversion to biofuels, as well as solar energy and energy storage. It is expected that this article will stimulate a generation of new ideas and new technologies in IL-based renewable energy production. PMID:24553494

  1. Microstructure and microanalysis of hardened cement pastes involving ground granulated blast-furnace slag

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. G. Richardson; G. W. Groves

    1992-01-01

    The microstructure and composition of hardened cement pastes of a wide range of blends of ground granulated blast-furnace slag with ordinary Portland cement have been studied, using techniques of transmission electron microscopy with microanalysis combined with electron microprobe analysis. Throughout the range, a calcium silicate hydrate gel (C-S-H) is the dominant cementing phase, present in the “inner product” within the

  2. Fish Processed Production Planning Using Integer Stochastic Programming Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firmansyah, Mawengkang, Herman

    2011-06-01

    Fish and its processed products are the most affordable source of animal protein in the diet of most people in Indonesia. The goal in production planning is to meet customer demand over a fixed time horizon divided into planning periods by optimizing the trade-off between economic objectives such as production cost and customer satisfaction level. The major decisions are production and inventory levels for each product and the number of workforce in each planning period. In this paper we consider the management of small scale traditional business at North Sumatera Province which performs processing fish into several local seafood products. The inherent uncertainty of data (e.g. demand, fish availability), together with the sequential evolution of data over time leads the production planning problem to a nonlinear mixed-integer stochastic programming model. We use scenario generation based approach and feasible neighborhood search for solving the model. The results which show the amount of each fish processed product and the number of workforce needed in each horizon planning are presented.

  3. Hierarchical Timed Colored Petri Nets Based Product Development Process Modeling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hong-zhong Huang; Xu Zu

    2004-01-01

    \\u000a Product development (PD) process modeling has been a critical problem in modern PD process management. First we discuss the\\u000a many benefits of PD process modeling, and then we outline the characteristics of PD pattern in order to provide a full and\\u000a exact description of it. A powerful modeling language is introduced which is based on the characteristics of modern PD

  4. Implementing process capability indices for a complete product

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. C. Wu; H. L. Kuo; K. S. Chen

    2004-01-01

    This study develops a novel procedure for measuring the process capability indices of a complete product with several quality characteristics. The p-values of the estimators of C pl, C pu, and C pp, so that the process works at least 100(1-?)% of the time, are provided. An evaluation checklist is also given to determine whether the process’s potentiality and performance

  5. A novel method for immobilization of heavy metals from MSW incinerator fly ash via use of Sorel cement

    SciTech Connect

    Macakova, S. [Waste Treatment Center, Kosice (Slovakia); Hepworth, M.H. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Since fly ash contains a higher concentration of toxic elements than bottom ash, it is not usually possible to deposit it in ordinary landfills. The special landfill sites (ash monofills) for ash, which do not endanger ground water supplies are both temporary and an expensive solution and are not acceptable by people who live adjacent to them. According to the United States Supreme Court decision ruling on May 2, 1994, incinerator ash from municipal combustion facilities are subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as potentially hazardous waste. In the autumn of 1993, a research program was initiated by one of the authors to employ a novel method for stabilization of the fly ash from electrostatic precipitators. The novelty of this method is that it used by-products from magnesium processing plants to prepare magnesia cement, so called Sorel cement, to stabilize fly ash from MSWI. Sorel cement is a combination of magnesium oxide and magnesium chloride, currently by-products of a combination of magnesium oxide and magnesium chloride, currently by-products of magnesium processing operations. The main goal of this research program was to treat fly ash prior to its disposal and to investigate the possibility of utilizing a new ash-concrete product.

  6. The calcination process in a system for washing, calcinating, and converting treated municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash into raw material for the cement industry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fenfen; Takaoka, Masaki; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    2011-07-01

    Calcination is the second step in a washing-calcination-conversion system in which treated municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash and bottom ash can be reused as raw material in the cement industry and can decompose or stabilize hazardous compounds, reduce residue amounts, and alter residue characteristics. In this research, only fly ash is discussed. Chloride reduction is important if treated fly ash is to be reused in cement; however, the relationship between washed fly ash properties and chloride reduction by calcination is not well understood. This study used washed residues of three types of fly ash-raw fly ash (RFA) from the boiler or economizer of an incineration system, fly ash collected in a bag filter injected with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) for acid removal (CaFA), and fly ash collected in a bag filter injected with sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) for acid removal (NaFA)-in calcination experiments with varying temperature (400-1100 degrees C) and atmosphere (100% nitrogen [N2] at 25 mL/min or 10% oxygen [O2] [90% N2] at fluxes of 25, 50, and 75 mL/min). From the perspective of chloride reduction, heating to 1000 degrees C with 1-hr heating time, 1-hr holding time, and an atmosphere of 10% O2/90% N2 was most suitable for calcination. Under these conditions, chloride levels were reduced by 91, 52, and 96% in washed residues of RFA, CaFA, and NaFA, respectively. Among the washed residues, the weight of the washed residue of NaFA decreased the most. PMID:21850828

  7. Recent advances in lactic acid production by microbial fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed Ali; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2013-11-01

    Fermentative production of optically pure lactic acid has roused interest among researchers in recent years due to its high potential for applications in a wide range of fields. More specifically, the sharp increase in manufacturing of biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA) materials, green alternatives to petroleum-derived plastics, has significantly increased the global interest in lactic acid production. However, higher production costs have hindered the large-scale application of PLA because of the high price of lactic acid. Therefore, reduction of lactic acid production cost through utilization of inexpensive substrates and improvement of lactic acid production and productivity has become an important goal. Various methods have been employed for enhanced lactic acid production, including several bioprocess techniques facilitated by wild-type and/or engineered microbes. In this review, we will discuss lactic acid producers with relation to their fermentation characteristics and metabolism. Inexpensive fermentative substrates, such as dairy products, food and agro-industrial wastes, glycerol, and algal biomass alternatives to costly pure sugars and food crops are introduced. The operational modes and fermentation methods that have been recently reported to improve lactic acid production in terms of concentrations, yields, and productivities are summarized and compared. High cell density fermentation through immobilization and cell-recycling techniques are also addressed. Finally, advances in recovery processes and concluding remarks on the future outlook of lactic acid production are presented. PMID:23624242

  8. The Fractal Ratio as a Metric of Nanostructure Development in Hydrating Cement Paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, R. A.; Bumrongjaroen, W.; Allen, A. J.

    It is necessary to have appropriate metrics to quantify the development of the nanostructure in Portland cement paste. The fractal ratio, calculated from Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) data, serves as such a metric. It expresses the proportion of the volume-fractal surface area of calcium-silicate-hydrate gel (C-S-H) to the surface-fractal surface area. The volume fractal develops in the scale range from ? 5 nm to ? 100 nm, and it is associated with the formation of outer product in the capillary pore space by the through-solution mechanism. The surface fractal is attributed to the surface structure formed by colloidal particles on solid substrates such as the Portland cement grains and fly ash particles. The evolution of this ratio over time provides insight into which types of hydration processes are dominant. Applied to study of the hydration of fly ash/Portland cement mixes at later ages, the fractal ratio method showed that in every case, except two, there was a reduced hydration rate due to the dilution effect. The two exceptions involved fly ash fractions with sufficient CaO to generate significant C-S-H gel by the alkali-activated reaction. In all cases the fractal ratio increased with time, indicating the production of additional C-S-H through the topochemical reaction.

  9. Process capability: a criterion for optimizing multiple response product and process design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert D. Plante

    2001-01-01

    In this research, we consider the maximization of process capability as the criterion in product\\/process design that is used for selecting preferred design factor levels and propose several approaches for single and multiple response performance measure designs. All of these approaches assume that the relationship between a process performance measure and a set of design factors is represented via an

  10. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Lynn; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Lu, Hongyou; Wang, Lan

    2009-10-01

    China's cement industry, which produced 1,388 million metric tons (Mt) of cement in 2008, accounts for almost half of the world's total cement production. Nearly 40% of China's cement production is from relatively obsolete vertical shaft kiln (VSK) cement plants, with the remainder from more modern rotary kiln cement plants, including plants equipped with new suspension pre-heater and pre-calciner (NSP) kilns. Shandong Province is the largest cement-producing Province in China, producing 10% of China's total cement output in 2008. This report documents an analysis of the potential to improve the energy efficiency of NSP kiln cement plants in Shandong Province. Sixteen NSP kiln cement plants were surveyed regarding their cement production, energy consumption, and current adoption of 34 energy-efficient technologies and measures. Plant energy use was compared to both domestic (Chinese) and international best practice using the Benchmarking and Energy Saving Tool for Cement (BEST-Cement). This benchmarking exercise indicated an average technical potential primary energy savings of 12% would be possible if the surveyed plants operated at domestic best practice levels in terms of energy use per ton of cement produced. Average technical potential primary energy savings of 23% would be realized if the plants operated at international best practice levels. Energy conservation supply curves for both fuel and electricity savings were then constructed for the 16 surveyed plants. Using the bottom-up electricity conservation supply curve model, the cost-effective electricity efficiency potential for the studied cement plants in 2008 is estimated to be 373 gigawatt hours (GWh), which accounts for 16% of total electricity use in the 16 surveyed cement plants in 2008. Total technical electricity-saving potential is 915 GWh, which accounts for 40% of total electricity use in the studied plants in 2008. The fuel conservation supply curve model shows the total technical fuel efficiency potential equal to 7,949 terajoules (TJ), accounting for 8% of total fuel used in the studied cement plants in 2008. All the fuel efficiency potential is shown to be cost effective. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emission reduction potential associated with cost-effective electricity saving is 383 kiloton (kt) CO{sub 2}, while total technical potential for CO{sub 2} emission reduction from electricity-saving is 940 ktCO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2} emission reduction potentials associated with fuel-saving potentials is 950 ktCO{sub 2}.

  11. Process and reactor design for biophotolytic hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Tamburic, Bojan; Dechatiwongse, Pongsathorn; Zemichael, Fessehaye W; Maitland, Geoffrey C; Hellgardt, Klaus

    2013-07-14

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has the ability to produce molecular hydrogen (H2), a clean and renewable fuel, through the biophotolysis of water under sulphur-deprived anaerobic conditions. The aim of this study was to advance the development of a practical and scalable biophotolytic H2 production process. Experiments were carried out using a purpose-built flat-plate photobioreactor, designed to facilitate green algal H2 production at the laboratory scale and equipped with a membrane-inlet mass spectrometry system to accurately measure H2 production rates in real time. The nutrient control method of sulphur deprivation was used to achieve spontaneous H2 production following algal growth. Sulphur dilution and sulphur feed techniques were used to extend algal lifetime in order to increase the duration of H2 production. The sulphur dilution technique proved effective at encouraging cyclic H2 production, resulting in alternating Chlamydomonas reinhardtii recovery and H2 production stages. The sulphur feed technique enabled photobioreactor operation in chemostat mode, resulting in a small improvement in H2 production duration. A conceptual design for a large-scale photobioreactor was proposed based on these experimental results. This photobioreactor has the capacity to enable continuous and economical H2 and biomass production using green algae. The success of these complementary approaches demonstrate that engineering advances can lead to improvements in the scalability and affordability of biophotolytic H2 production, giving increased confidence that H2 can fulfil its potential as a sustainable fuel of the future. PMID:23689756

  12. The Plasma Production of Ferromolybdenum — Process Development and Economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauvin, W. H.; Kubanek, G. R.; Irons, G. A.

    1981-01-01

    The production of ferromolybdenum by the plasma decomposition of molybdenite concentrate to molybdenum and sulfur is used to illustrate the industrial application of plasmas to metallurgical processes. This process has stringent requirements for very high sulfur elimination (<0.15% S in the product) and low specific energy consumption in order to be competitive with the conventional process (roasting to the oxide, followed by thermite reduction). Direct-current transferred arcs appear to offer the most promising approach to the design of commercial reactors for this application. Following a brief review of the development work on the thermal decomposition of molybdenite, a process flowsheet and the results of an economic assessment for a commercial plant are presented. The latter show the relative cost breakdown between key process units. The sensitivity of costs to factors such as scale of operation, specific energy consumption and electricity prices, raw materials, gas system (recycle versus once-through), and product recovery is illustrated. It is concluded that, while the plasma generator/reactor may be the technical heart of the overall process, industrial development programs must consider the capital and operating costs of a complete plant, including peripheral equipment and product marketing, as well as the duration, cost, and risk associated with the development project.

  13. CO-PRODUCT ENHANCEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT FOR THE MASADA OXYNOL PROCESS PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Donald V. Watkins

    2010-06-14

    The focus of this project was an overall process improvement through the enhancement of the co-product streams. The enhancement of the process operations and co-products will increase both ethanol production and the value of other process outputs and reduces the amount of waste byproducts. This leads to a more economical and environmentally sound alternative to landfill disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW). These enhancements can greatly increase the commercial potential for the production of ethanol from MSW by the Masada CES OxyNol process. Both technological and economical issues were considered for steps throughout the conversion process. The research efforts of this project are varied but synergistic. The project investigated many of the operations involved in the Masada process with the overall goal of process improvements. The general goal of the testing was to improve co-product quality, improve conversions efficiencies, minimize process losses, increase energy efficiency, and mitigate process and commercialization risks. The project was divided into 16 subtasks as described in general terms below. All these tasks are interrelated but not necessarily interdependent.

  14. Effect of the leaching of calcium hydroxide from cement paste on mechanical and physical properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christophe Carde; Raoul François

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of the leaching process of cement based materials on their mechanical and physical properties. In order to characterize this effect, we have performed experiments on cement paste samples. The leaching process was achieved by the use of a 50% concentrate solution of ammonium nitrate. Both compression tests and water porosity tests were conducted on

  15. Sulphate Resistance of Slag Cements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles A. Low

    1980-01-01

    The vulnerability of concrete to sulphate attack has been recognized and studied for at least two centuries. The basic needs that prompted that study were: (a) there are no available Canadian Standards on the sulphate resistance of slag cements; and (b) slag cements in general are not well known in Canada. There were three main phases in the study: Phase

  16. Benzene distribution in product streams from in-tank processing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1987-01-15

    Benzene is the major product of radiolytic decomposition of tetraphenylborate salts during in-tank salt decontamination. Its production rate has been measured at the Savannah River Laboratory (SR) and at the University of Florida under various conditions of importance to the in-tank process. Recent work has been concerned with the extent of decomposition for long storage periods, and the composition of the product streams from the process. The major results from this work are: the stored potassium tetraphenylborate precipitate will decompose at a rate of 7.3 {plus minus} 1.1% per year; the major products of the decomposition are benzene, phenol, biphenyl, and phenylboric acid; decomposition is directly proportional to the total dose and is unaffected by dose rate; the decomposition produces acidic compounds which will cause a decrease in the pH of the storage tank. 13 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Cement brand and preparation effects cement-in-cement mantle shear strength.

    PubMed

    Holsgrove, Timothy P; Pentlow, Alanna; Spencer, Robert F; Miles, Anthony W

    2015-01-01

    Creating bi-laminar cement mantles as part of revision hip arthroplasty is well-documented but there is a lack of data concerning the effect of cement brand on the procedure. The aim of this study was to compare the shear strength of bi-laminar cement mantles using various combinations of two leading bone cement brands.Bi-laminar cement mantles were created using Simplex P with Tobramycin, and Palacos R+G: Simplex-Simplex (SS); Simplex-Palacos (SP); Palacos-Simplex (PS); and Palacos-Palacos (PP). Additionally, specimens were produced by rasping (R) the surface of the original mantle, or leaving it unrasped (U), leading to a total of eight groups (n = 10). Specimens were loaded in shear, at 0.1 mm/min, until failure, and the maximum shear strength calculated.The highest mean shear strength was found in the PSU and PSR groups (23.69 and 23.89 MPa respectively), and the lowest in the PPU group (14.70 MPa), which was significantly lower than all but two groups. Unrasped groups generally demonstrated greater standard error than rasped groups.In a further comparison to assess the effect of the new cement mantle brand, irrespective of the brand of the original mantle, Simplex significantly increased the shear strength compared to Palacos with equivalent preparation.It is recommended that the original mantle is rasped prior to injection of new cement, and that Simplex P with Tobramycin be used in preference to Palacos R+G irrespective of the existing cement type. Further research is needed to investigate more cement brands, and understand the underlying mechanisms relating to cement-in-cement procedures. PMID:25044271

  18. NGNP Process Heat Applications: Hydrogen Production Accomplishments for FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V Park

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes FY10 accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Engineering Process Heat Applications group in support of hydrogen production technology development. This organization is responsible for systems needed to transfer high temperature heat from a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) reactor (being developed by the INL NGNP Project) to electric power generation and to potential industrial applications including the production of hydrogen.

  19. Information processing and new product success: a meta-analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iryna Pentina; David Strutton

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to analyze and quantitatively compare existing empirical findings on the role of organizational information-processing and new product outcomes. The meta-analytic technique is used to reconcile some of the current divergent thinking on the role of organizational learning in new product success. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The method and procedure of the meta-analysis are utilized to generalize existing

  20. Greening the construction industry: enhancing the performance of cements by adding bioglycerol.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Michele; Della Pina, Cristina; Pagliaro, Mario; Ciriminna, Rosaria; Forni, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    The addition of glycerol, a by-product of biodiesel manufacturing, to cement eases its grinding and handling while considerably enhancing the strength of the resulting concrete. The benefits of using bioglycerol are significant both for the environment and for the concrete and biodiesel industries. The advantages for industry derive from having a single, readily available material that offers all three major technical improvements required of cement additives, namely enhanced concrete strength, and grinding and handling aids for cement, while the environmental impact is eased by using bioglycerol instead of ethylene glycol and hydroxyamines that are presently used as major components of cement additives. PMID:18773410

  1. Experimental Investigation of Concrete with Combined High alumina cement, Silica fume and M-Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Dona Maria; Devi, Manjula; Senthilkumar, S.

    2013-03-01

    Concrete is by far the most widely used construction material today. It is estimated that present consumption of concrete in the world is of the order of 10 billion tonnes every year. The cement industry is responsible for about 6% of all CO2 emissions. So nowadays there is a great interest in the development and implementation of various alternatives to Portland cement as a binder in concrete and also alternatives to fine and coarse aggregates in concrete to reduce the energy used in production of Portland cement clinker and the associated greenhouse gas emission and also for reducing resources consumption by proper recycling. This research work is carried out in order to explore the effect of various replacement percentages of cement by combined High alumina cement with silica fume and also the fine aggregate is fully replaced with manufacturing sand. Conclusion is made based on the comparison between the performance of blended cement concrete and conventional concrete.

  2. Agglomerates processing on in-flight images of granular products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Frederic; Guillaume, S.; Sevila, Francis

    1993-11-01

    Image analysis can be used to characterize granular populations in many processes in food industry or in agricultural engineering. Either global or individual parameters can be extracted from the image. However, granular products may appear agglomerate on the image, bringing biasing on individual parameters. Combining statistical and neural network technics enables the build of a system which can recognize if products are agglomerate or not. To process images after agglomerates detection, two approaches have been studied: the first is based on erosion, followed by conditional dilation with the original image; the second takes advantage of the graph's properties of the agglomerate's skeleton.

  3. Satellite Imagery Production and Processing Using Apache Hadoop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. V.; Werpy, J.

    2011-12-01

    The United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center Land Science Research and Development (LSRD) project has devised a method to fulfill its processing needs for Essential Climate Variable (ECV) production from the Landsat archive using Apache Hadoop. Apache Hadoop is the distributed processing technology at the heart of many large-scale, processing solutions implemented at well-known companies such as Yahoo, Amazon, and Facebook. It is a proven framework and can be used to process petabytes of data on thousands of processors concurrently. It is a natural fit for producing satellite imagery and requires only a few simple modifications to serve the needs of science data processing. This presentation provides an invaluable learning opportunity and should be heard by anyone doing large scale image processing today. The session will cover a description of the problem space, evaluation of alternatives, feature set overview, configuration of Hadoop for satellite image processing, real-world performance results, tuning recommendations and finally challenges and ongoing activities. It will also present how the LSRD project built a 102 core processing cluster with no financial hardware investment and achieved ten times the initial daily throughput requirements with a full time staff of only one engineer. Satellite Imagery Production and Processing Using Apache Hadoop is presented by David V. Hill, Principal Software Architect for USGS LSRD.

  4. 27 CFR 40.1 - Manufacture of tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. 40.1 Section...TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Scope of Regulations...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. This...

  5. 27 CFR 40.1 - Manufacture of tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. 40.1 Section...TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Scope of Regulations...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. This...

  6. 27 CFR 40.1 - Manufacture of tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. 40.1 Section...TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Scope of Regulations...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. This...

  7. 27 CFR 41.1 - Importation of tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. 41.1 Section...TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Scope of Regulations...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. This...

  8. 27 CFR 41.1 - Importation of tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. 41.1 Section...TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Scope of Regulations...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. This...

  9. 27 CFR 41.1 - Importation of tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. 41.1 Section...TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Scope of Regulations...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. This...

  10. Dual setting ?-tricalcium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Christel, T; Kuhlmann, M; Vorndran, E; Groll, J; Gbureck, U

    2013-03-01

    An extension of the application of calcium phosphate cements (CPC) to load-bearing defects, e.g. in vertebroplasty, would require less brittle cements with an increased fracture toughness. Here we report the modification of CPC made of alpha-tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP) with 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), which is polymerised during setting to obtain a mechanically stable polymer-ceramic composite with interpenetrating organic and inorganic networks. The cement liquid was modified by the addition of 30-70 % HEMA and ammoniumpersulfate/tetramethylethylendiamine as initiator. Modification of ?-TCP cement paste with HEMA decreased the setting time from 14 min to 3-8 min depending on the initiator concentration. The 4-point bending strength was increased from 9 MPa to more than 14 MPa when using 50 % HEMA, while the bending modulus decreased from 18 GPa to approx. 4 GPa. The addition of ?50 % HEMA reduced the brittle fracture behaviour of the cements and resulted in an increase of the work of fracture by more than an order of magnitude. X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that the degree of transformation of ?-TCP to calcium deficient hydroxyapatite was lower for polymer modified cements (82 % for polymer free cement and 55 % for 70 % HEMA) after 24 h setting, while the polymerisation of HEMA in the cement liquid was quantitative according to FT-IR spectroscopy. This work demonstrated the feasibility of producing fracture resistant dual-setting calcium phosphate cements by adding water soluble polymerisable monomers to the liquid cement phase, which may be suitable for an application in load-bearing bone defects. PMID:23239262

  11. Design of synthetic microbial communities for biotechnological production processes.

    PubMed

    Jagmann, Nina; Philipp, Bodo

    2014-08-20

    In their natural habitats microorganisms live in multi-species communities, in which the community members exhibit complex metabolic interactions. In contrast, biotechnological production processes catalyzed by microorganisms are usually carried out with single strains in pure cultures. A number of production processes, however, may be more efficiently catalyzed by the concerted action of microbial communities. This review will give an overview of organismic interactions between microbial cells and of biotechnological applications of microbial communities. It focuses on synthetic microbial communities that consist of microorganisms that have been genetically engineered. Design principles for such synthetic communities will be exemplified based on plausible scenarios for biotechnological production processes. These design principles comprise interspecific metabolic interactions via cross-feeding, regulation by interspecific signaling processes via metabolites and autoinducing signal molecules, and spatial structuring of synthetic microbial communities. In particular, the implementation of metabolic interdependencies, of positive feedback regulation and of inducible cell aggregation and biofilm formation will be outlined. Synthetic microbial communities constitute a viable extension of the biotechnological application of metabolically engineered single strains and enlarge the scope of microbial production processes. PMID:24943116

  12. An assessment of gas-side fouling in cement plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marner, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    The cement industry is the most energy-intensive industry in the United States in terms of energy cost as a percentage of the total product cost. An assessment of gas-side fouling in cement plants with special emphasis on heat recovery applications is provided. In the present context, fouling is defined as the buildup of scale on a heat-transfer surface which retards the transfer of heat and includes the related problems of erosion and corrosion. Exhaust gases in the cement industry which are suitable for heat recovery range in temperature from about 100 to 1300 K, are generally dusty, may be highly abrasive, and are often heavily laden with alkalies, sulfates, and chlorides. Particulates in the exhaust streams range in size from molecular to about 100 micrometers in diameter and come from both the raw feed as well as the ash in the coal which is the primary fuel used in the cement industry. The major types of heat-transfer equipment used in the cement industry include preheaters, gas-to-air heat exchangers, waste heat boilers, and clinker coolers. At the present time, the trend in this country is toward suspension preheater systems, in which the raw feed is heated by direct contact with the hot kiln exit gases, and away from waste heat boilers as the principal method of heat recovery. The most important gas-side fouling mechanisms in the cement industry are those due to particulate, chemical reaction, and corrosion fouling.

  13. Potential for energy conservation in the cement industry

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett-Price, B.A.

    1985-02-01

    This report assesses the potential for energy conservation in the cement industry. Energy consumption per ton of cement decreased 20% between 1972 and 1982. During this same period, the cement industry became heavily dependent on coal and coke as its primary fuel source. Although the energy consumed per ton of cement has declined markedly in the past ten years, the industry still uses more than three and a half times the fuel that is theoretically required to produce a ton of clinker. Improving kiln thermal efficiency offers the greatest opportunity for saving fuel. Improving the efficiency of finish grinding offers the greatest potential for reducing electricity use. Technologies are currently available to the cement industry to reduce its average fuel consumption per ton by product by as much as 40% and its electricity consumption per ton by about 10%. The major impediment to adopting these technologies is the cement industry's lack of capital as a result of low or no profits in recent years.

  14. UCN production by multiphonon processes in superfluid Helium under pressure

    E-print Network

    P. Schmidt-Wellenburg; K. H. Andersen; O. Zimmer

    2009-01-29

    Cold neutrons are converted to ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) by the excitation of a single phonon or multiphonons in superfluid helium. The dynamic scattering function S(q, omega) of the superfluid helium strongly depends on pressure, leading to a pressure- dependent differential UCN production rate. A phenomenological expression for the multiphonon part of the scattering function s(lambda) describing UCN production has been derived from inelastic neutron scattering data. When combined with the production rate from single phonon processes this allows us to calculate the UCN production for any incident neutron flux. For calculations of the UCN production from single phonon processes we propose to use the values for S*(SVP) = 0.118(8) and S*(20 bar) = 0.066(6). As an example we will calculate the expected UCN production rate at the cold neutron beam for fundamental physics PF1b at the Institut Laue Langevin. We conclude that UCN production in superfluid helium under pressure is not attractive.

  15. Improving the Product Documentation Process of a Small Software Company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtanen, Anu; Ahonen, Jarmo J.; Savolainen, Paula

    Documentation is an important part of the software process, even though it is often neglected in software companies. The eternal question is how much documentation is enough. In this article, we present a practical implementation of lightweight product documentation process resulting from SPI efforts in a small company. Small companies’ financial and human resources are often limited. The documentation process described here, offers a template for creating adequate documentation consuming minimal amount of resources. The key element of the documentation process is an open source web-based bugtracking system that was customized to be used as a documentation tool. The use of the tool enables iterative and well structured documentation. The solution best serves the needs of a small company with off-the-shelf software products and striving for SPI.

  16. Monitoring lignocellulosic bioethanol production processes using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Jens A; Ahring, Birgitte K

    2014-11-01

    Process control automation in the emerging biorefinery industry may be achieved by applying effective methods for monitoring compound concentrations during the production processes. This study examines the application of Raman spectroscopy with an excitation wavelength of 785nm and an immersion probe for in situ monitoring the progression of pretreatment, hydrolysis and fermentation processes in the production of lignocellulosic ethanol. Raman signals were attenuated by light scattering cells and lignocellulosic particulates, which the quantification method to some degree could correct for by using an internal standard in the spectra. Allowing particulates to settle by using a slow stirring speed further improved results, suggesting that Raman spectroscopy should be used in combination with continuous separation when used to monitor process mixtures with large amounts of particulates. The root mean square error of prediction (RMSE) of ethanol and glucose measured in real-time was determined to be 0.98g/L and 1.91g/L respectively. PMID:25255187

  17. Summary report: Economic feasibility studies of alcohol fuel production processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.D.; Milne, T.; Karpuk, M.E.; Isaacs, S.; Hoagland, W.

    1986-09-01

    In 1983 SERI awarded six subcontracts to four engineering firms to conduct technical and economic feasibility studies of processes to convert lignocellulosic feedstocks into premium fuels (methanol and ethanol). In this report general conclusions are drawn about the status of alcohol fuels production from cellulosic feedstocks and detailed conclusions about the status, economics, research needs, and process steps. Stone and Webster Engineering Corp. studied the oxygen gasification route to methanol; Stone and Webster and Badger Engineers Inc. evaluated acid hydrolysis processes; Stone and Webster, Arthur D. Little Inc., and Chem Systems Inc. evaluated enzymatic hydrolysis processes. Methanol production is best understood and acid hydrolysis requires engineering development; both show near-term promise. Enzymatic hydrolysis still requires basic and applied research and could lower liquid fuel costs in the long term, potentially being the lowest. 15 refs., 7 figs., 19 tabs.

  18. Development of the Use of Alternative Cements for the Treatment of Intermediate Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, M. [Nexia Solutions, Warrington, Cheshire WA (United Kingdom); Godfrey, I.H. [Nexia Solutions Limited, Havelock Road, Derwent Howe, Workington, Cumbria CA (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes initial development studies undertaken to investigate the potential use of alternative, non ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based encapsulation matrices to treat historic legacy wastes within the UK's Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) inventory. Currently these wastes are encapsulated in composite OPC cement systems based on high replacement with blast furnace slag of pulverised fuel ash. However, the high alkalinity of these cements can lead to high corrosion rates with reactive metals found in some wastes releasing hydrogen and forming expansive corrosion products. This paper therefore details preliminary results from studies on two commercial products, calcium sulfo-aluminate (CSA) and magnesium phosphate (MP) cement which react with a different hydration chemistry, and which may allow wastes containing these metals to be encapsulated with lower reactivity. The results indicate that grouts can be formulated from both cements over a range of water contents and reactant ratios that have significantly improved fluidity in comparison to typical OPC cements. All designed mixes set in 24 hours with zero bleed and the pH values in the plastic state were in the range 10-11 for CSA and 5-7 for MP cements. In addition, a marked reduction in aluminium corrosion rate has been observed in both types of cements compared to a composite OPC system. These results therefore provide encouragement that both cement types can provide a possible alternative to OPC in the immobilisation of reactive wastes, however further investigation is needed. (authors)

  19. Fungal multienzyme production on industrial by-products of the citrus-processing industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diomi Mamma; Elisavet Kourtoglou; Paul Christakopoulos

    2008-01-01

    Orange peels is the principal solid by-product of the citrus processing industry and the disposal of the fresh peels is becoming a major problem to many factories. Dry citrus peels are rich in pectin, cellulose and hemicellulose and may be used as a fermentation substrate. Production of multienzyme preparations containing pectinolytic, cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes by the mesophilic fungi Aspergillus

  20. By-Products Utilization

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization LIST OF REFERENCENCES FOR CKD By Tarun R. Naik and Fethullah #12;1 LIST OF REFERENCES FOR CEMENT KILN DUST (CKD) 1. "An Analysis of Selected Trace Metals in Cement-418. 3. Al-Harthy, A. S., Taha, R., and Al-Maamary, F., 2003, "Effect of Cement Kiln Dust (CKD) on Mortar

  1. Corrosion resistant cemented carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.

    1990-10-16

    This paper describes a corrosion resistant cemented carbide composite. It comprises: a granular tungsten carbide phase, a semi-continuous solid solution carbide phase extending closely adjacent at least a portion of the grains of tungsten carbide for enhancing corrosion resistance, and a substantially continuous metal binder phase. The cemented carbide composite consisting essentially of an effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive, from about 4 to about 16 percent by weight metal binder phase, and with the remaining portion being from about 84 to about 96 percent by weight metal carbide wherein the metal carbide consists essentially of from about 4 to about 30 percent by weight of a transition metal carbide or mixtures thereof selected from Group IVB and of the Periodic Table of Elements and from about 70 to about 96 percent tungsten carbide. The metal binder phase consists essentially of nickel and from about 10 to about 25 percent by weight chromium, the effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive being selected from the group consisting essentially of copper, silver, tine and combinations thereof.

  2. A Hybrid Gas Cleaning Process for Production of Ultraclean Syngas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. C. Merkel; B. S. Turk; R. P. Gupta; Daniel C. Cicero; S. C. Jain

    2002-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning\\/conditioning IGCC generated syngas to meet contaminant tolerance limits for fuel cell and chemical production applications. The specific goals are to develop processes for (1) removal of reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a

  3. Soil Production and Erosion Rates and Processes in Mountainous Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimsath, A. M.; DiBiase, R. A.; Whipple, K. X.

    2012-12-01

    We focus here on high-relief, steeply sloped landscapes from the Nepal Himalaya to the San Gabriels of California that are typically thought to be at a critical threshold of soil cover. Observations reveal that, instead, there are significant areas mantled with soil that fit the conceptual framework of a physically mobile layer derived from the underlying parent material with some locally-derived organic content. The extent and persistence of such soils depends on the long-term balance between soil production and erosion despite the perceived discrepancy between high erosion and low soil production rates. We present cosmogenic Be-10-derived soil production and erosion rates that show that soil production increases with catchment-averaged erosion, suggesting a feedback that enhances soil-cover persistence, even in threshold landscapes. Soil production rates do decline systematically with increasing soil thickness, but hint at the potential for separate soil production functions for different erosional regimes. We also show that a process transistion to landslide-dominated erosion results in thinner, patchier soils and rockier topography, but find that there is no sudden transition to bedrock landscapes. Our landslide modeling is combined with a detailed quantification of bedrock exposure for these steep, mountainous landscapes. We also draw an important conclusion connecting the physical processes producing and transporting soil and the chemical processes weathering the parent material by measuring parent material strength across three different field settings. We observe that parent material strength increases with overlying soil thickness and, therefore, the weathered extent of the saprolite. Soil production rates, thus, decrease with increasing parent material competence. These observation highlight the importance of quantifying hillslope hydrologic processes where such multi-facted measurements are made.

  4. Cancer Mortality and Incidence in Cement Industry Workers in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Woo; Jang, Seung Hee; Ryu, Hyang-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Cement contains hexavalent chromium, which is a human carcinogen. However, its effect on cancer seems inconclusive in epidemiologic studies. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to elucidate the association between dust exposure in the cement industry and cancer occurrence. Methods The cohorts consisted of male workers in 6 Portland cement factories in Korea. Study subjects were classified into five groups by job: quarry, production, maintenance, laboratory, and office work. Cancer mortality and incidence in workers were observed from 1992 to 2007 and 1997-2005, respectively. Standardized mortality ratios and standardized incidence ratios were calculated according to the five job classifications. Results There was an increased standardized incidence ratio for stomach cancer of 1.56 (27/17.36, 95% confidence interval: 1.02-2.26) in production workers. The standardized mortality ratio for lung cancer increased in production workers. However, was not statistically significant. Conclusion Our result suggests a potential association between cement exposure and stomach cancer. Hexavalent chromium contained in cement might be a causative carcinogen. PMID:22953208

  5. Cement advanced furnace component and system optimization. Volume 1. Final report, August 1989April 1993

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Keane; A. Chatwani; A. Litka

    1994-01-01

    Research and development of the Cement Advanced Furnace (CAF) vertical shaft kiln has been performed under the sponsorship of the Gas Research Institute and Southern California Gas Co. by Textron Defense Systems and Fuller Co. The CAF represents a low cost, energy efficient, very low polluting alternative to traditional rotary kilns for the production of Portland and specialty cements. The

  6. Portland cement for SO/sub 2/ control in coal-fired power plants

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, M.

    1984-10-17

    A method is described for removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. The cement products that result from this method is also described. 1 tab.

  7. Ground iron blast furnace slag as a matrix for cellulose-cement materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H Savastano; P. G Warden; R. S. P Coutts

    2001-01-01

    The use of ground iron blast furnace slag (BFS) as a low-cost alternative to ordinary Portland cement (OPC) binders in fibre-cement products was examined. Both high quality softwood fibres and residual sisal from agricultural waste were chemically pulped and used as reinforcement. Composites based on several different binder formulations consisting of slag chemically activated by mixtures of gypsum and hydrated

  8. Short-term implantation effects of a DCPD-based calcium phosphate cement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick Frayssinet; Laurent Gineste; Philippe Conte; Jacques Fages; Nicole Rouquet

    1998-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cements can be handled in paste form and set in a wet medium after precipitation of calcium phosphate crystals in the implantation site. Depending on the products entering into the chemical reaction leading to the precipitation of calcium phosphates, different phases can be obtained with different mechanical properties, setting times and injectability. We tested a cement composed of

  9. Assessment of the thermal performance and energy conservation opportunities of a cement industry in Indonesia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. G. Rasul; W. Widianto; B. Mohanty

    2005-01-01

    A simple model is presented to assess the thermal performance of a cement industry with an integrated view to improve the productivity of the plant. The model is developed on the basis of mass, energy and exergy balance and is applied to an existing Portland cement industry in Indonesia. The data obtained from industry show that the burning efficiency and

  10. Corrosion of Aluminium in Composite Cements Anthony Setiadi* and Neil B. Milestone

    E-print Network

    Sheffield, University of

    . The product of corrosion is less dense than the metal and hence it occupies more volume. This may leadCorrosion of Aluminium in Composite Cements Anthony Setiadi* and Neil B. Milestone Immobilisation of which may contain metals such as aluminium, magnesium and steel. Cements are used because

  11. The effect of cement composition and fineness on expansion associated with delayed ettringite formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Kelham

    1996-01-01

    A large number of laboratory ground cements were prepared from five production clinkers. Grind variables included cement SO3, source of added SO3 and specific surface area. Mortar prisms were cast as described in EN 196-1 except that the prisms were 16 × 16 × 160 mm with stainless steel pins cast in their end faces. Sets of prisms were cured

  12. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY ON CLEAN PRODUCTS & PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Led by the United States, represented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Risk Management Research Laboratory, the Pilot Study on Clean Products and Processes was instituted to create an international forum where current trends, developments, and expert...

  13. A taxonomy of the product realization process environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John J. Mills

    1992-01-01

    The realization of concepts into products is an extremely complex and poorly understood process. Companies and researchers are developing software aids and tools in a somewhat ad hoc manner. Differing claims are made for such tools, without there being much underlying understanding about what they are supposed to do. As part of a project to develop a strategy for applying

  14. INPUT SUBSTITUTION AND DEMAND IN THE WATER SUPPLY PRODUCTION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The structure of input demand for U.S. water utilities is analyzed by estimating a translog cost function. An important feature of the model includes the multiproduct specification of the water supply production process. Operating variables are also specified to include capacity ...

  15. Characteristic X-ray production in the RCE process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. V. Balashov; I. V. Bodrenko

    2006-01-01

    Density matrix approach [V.V. Balashov, I.V. Bodrenko, Moscow State Univ. Bull. Phys. Astron. 1 (2001) 27] to describe characteristic X-ray production under resonant coherent excitation of channeled ions (the RCE process) is applied to the case of helium-like N5+ ions in gold crystal.

  16. Characteristic X-ray production in the RCE process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashov, V. V.; Bodrenko, I. V.

    2006-03-01

    Density matrix approach [V.V. Balashov, I.V. Bodrenko, Moscow State Univ. Bull. Phys. Astron. 1 (2001) 27] to describe characteristic X-ray production under resonant coherent excitation of channeled ions (the RCE process) is applied to the case of helium-like N5+ ions in gold crystal.

  17. Hydrothermal Processing of Lignin for Bio-crude Production

    E-print Network

    Toor, Saqib

    Hydrothermal Processing of Lignin for Bio-crude Production Ionela F. Grigoras, Jessica Hoffmann wet biomass into bio-oil and residual streams of solids, water soluble substances and gas to provide heat, electricity and transport fuels. Low value wastes can become a sustainable source for bio

  18. Vacuum swing adsorption process for oxygen production - a historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R. [Boc Process Plants, Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Adsorbent and cycle developments for the last 25 years have resulted in the advancement of vacuum swing adsorption processes for the production of oxygen from air, and in this review are traced and critically examined. The key criteria in the past developments and for future improvements are identified.

  19. Production of Biogas from Wastewaters of Food Processing Industries

    E-print Network

    Sax, R. I.; Holtz, M.; Pette, K. C.

    1980-01-01

    production is at a rate of about 1 therm (100000 BTU) per 10 Kg COD treated. A moderately sized (1000 m3) wastewater treatment plant processing the order of 10000 Kg COD per day will, therefore, produce the order of 1000 therms of energy per day while...

  20. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY - CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed objective of the NATO/CCMS Pilot on clean products and processes is to facilitate further gains in pollution prevention, waste minimization, and design for the environment. It is anticipated that the free exchange of knowledge, experience, data, and models will fost...

  1. Aligning products with supply chain processes and strategy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Euthemia Stavrulaki; Mark Davis

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – As supply chain management has become more strategic (rather than transactional) in nature the need for a more integrated perspective of how products, and processes should be aligned with strategic decisions to enhance competitive advantage has been amplified. The purpose of this paper is to provide a better understanding of how this alignment should be done. Design\\/methodology\\/approach –

  2. Carburization process rate in production of synthetic cast iron

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Janerka; D. Bartocha; J. Szajnar

    Purpose: The main goal of the paper was to determine the possibility of synthetic cast iron production on base of steel and process scraps as well as the carburization effectiveness, realized with three methods - fully described in main text. Design\\/methodology\\/approach: Each of described methods has undoubted advantages but also has a number of disadvantages. In foundry engineering practice the

  3. Language Production and Reception: A Processability Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinner, Patti

    2013-01-01

    Pienemann's Processability Theory (PT) predicts an order of emergence of morphosyntactic elements in second language (L2) production data. This research investigates whether the same order of emergence can be detected in L2 reception data, specifically, data from a timed audio grammaticality judgment task (GJT). The results from three related…

  4. Product and process design optimization by quality engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guangming Chen

    1990-01-01

    This research is concerned with product and process design optimization by quality engineering based on the work of Dr Taguchi, with emphasis on the optimization of dynamic systems and tolerance design. Various quality loss functions are presented in this thesis which can be used for quality evaluation. The goal of robust design for dynamic systems is to reduce the deviations

  5. How mobile are protons in the structure of dental glass ionomer cements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Ana R.; Jacobsen, Johan; Lehnhoff, Benedict; Momsen, Niels C. R.; Okhrimenko, Denis V.; Telling, Mark T. F.; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Strobl, Markus; Seydel, Tilo; Manke, Ingo; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2015-03-01

    The development of dental materials with improved properties and increased longevity can save costs and minimize discomfort for patients. Due to their good biocompatibility, glass ionomer cements are an interesting restorative option. However, these cements have limited mechanical strength to survive in the challenging oral environment. Therefore, a better understanding of the structure and hydration process of these cements can bring the necessary understanding to further developments. Neutrons and X-rays have been used to investigate the highly complex pore structure, as well as to assess the hydrogen mobility within these cements. Our findings suggest that the lower mechanical strength in glass ionomer cements results not only from the presence of pores, but also from the increased hydrogen mobility within the material. The relationship between microstructure, hydrogen mobility and strength brings insights into the material's durability, also demonstrating the need and opening the possibility for further research in these dental cements.

  6. How mobile are protons in the structure of dental glass ionomer cements?

    PubMed Central

    Benetti, Ana R.; Jacobsen, Johan; Lehnhoff, Benedict; Momsen, Niels C. R.; Okhrimenko, Denis V.; Telling, Mark T. F.; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Strobl, Markus; Seydel, Tilo; Manke, Ingo; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2015-01-01

    The development of dental materials with improved properties and increased longevity can save costs and minimize discomfort for patients. Due to their good biocompatibility, glass ionomer cements are an interesting restorative option. However, these cements have limited mechanical strength to survive in the challenging oral environment. Therefore, a better understanding of the structure and hydration process of these cements can bring the necessary understanding to further developments. Neutrons and X-rays have been used to investigate the highly complex pore structure, as well as to assess the hydrogen mobility within these cements. Our findings suggest that the lower mechanical strength in glass ionomer cements results not only from the presence of pores, but also from the increased hydrogen mobility within the material. The relationship between microstructure, hydrogen mobility and strength brings insights into the material's durability, also demonstrating the need and opening the possibility for further research in these dental cements. PMID:25754555

  7. Quotation for the Value Added Assessment during Product Development and Production Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alain Bernard; Nicolas Perry; Jean-Charles Delplace; Serge Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    This communication is based on an original approach linking economical factors to technical and methodological ones. This work is applied to the decision process for mix production. This approach is relevant for costing driving systems. The main interesting point is that the quotation factors (linked to time indicators for each step of the industrial process) allow the complete evaluation and

  8. QUOTATION FOR THE VALUE ADDED ASSESSMENT DURING PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND PRODUCTION PROCESSES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alain Bernard; Nicolas Perry; Jean-Charles Delplace; Serge Gabriel

    2004-01-01

    This communication is based on an original approach linking economical factors to technical and methodological ones. This work is applied to the decision process for mix production. This approach is relevant for costing driving systems. The main interesting point is that the quotation factors (linked to time indicators for each step of the industrial process) allow the complete evaluation and

  9. Early Implementation of Large Scale Carbon Dioxide Removal Projects through the Cement Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    The development of large-scale carbon dioxide reduction projects requires high purity CO2and a reactive cation source. A project seeking to provide both of these requirements will likely face cost barriers with current carbon prices. The cement industry is a suitable early implementation site for such projects by virtue of the properties of its exhaust gases and those of waste concrete. Cement plants are the second largest source of industrial CO2 emissions, globally. It is also the second largest commodity after water, has no ready substitute and is literally the foundation of society. Finally, half of the CO2 emissions originate from process reactions rather than fossil fuel combustion resulting in higher flue gas CO2concentrations. These properties, with the co-benefits of oxygen combustion, create a favorable environment for spatially suitable projects. Oxygen combustion involves substituting produced oxygen for air in a combustion reaction. The absence of gaseous N2 necessitates the recirculation of exhaust gases to maintain kiln temperatures, which increase the CO2 concentrations from 28% to 80% or more. Gas exit temperatures are also elevated (>300oC) and can reach higher temperatures if the multi stage pre-heater towers, that recover heat, are re-designed in light of FGR. A ready source of cations can be found in waste concrete, a by-product of construction and demolition activities. These wastes can be processed to remove cations and then reacted with atmospheric CO2 to produce carbonate minerals. While not carbon negative, they represent a demonstration opportunity for binding atmospheric CO2while producing a saleable product (precipitated calcium carbonate). This paper will present experimental results on PCC production from waste concrete along with modeling results for oxygen combustion at cement facilities. The results will be presented with a view to mineral sequestration process design and implementation.

  10. Impact of Alternative Processes for Aluminum Production on Energy Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grjotheim, Kai; Welch, Barry

    1981-09-01

    Increasing prices and the shortage of large blocks of electrical energy have given greater impetus to the search for viable alternative processes for aluminum production. These include electrolysis of aluminum chloride, sulfide, and nitride; carbothermal reduction of either the ore or alumina; and disproportioning reactions of either aluminum sulfide or the monochloride route. Common to all these processes are the starting material—an ore containing aluminum oxide—and the final product—the metal. Thus, the thermodynamic cycle will invariably dictate similar theoretical energy requirements for the three processes. In practice, however, the achievable efficiencies and, more noticeably, the proportion of electrical to carbothermal energy required for the various stages of operation can vary. The present status of these alternative processes indicates that while alternative routes, such as the Alcoa-AlCl3-Smelting Process, show distinct potential for reducing electrical energy requirements, they offer little chance of reducing overall energy requirements. Furthermore, because of more stringent purity requirements, any gains made may be at the expense of production costs.

  11. Land processes distributed active archive center product lifecycle plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daucsavage, John C.; Bennett, Stacie D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Science Data System Program worked together to establish, develop, and operate the Land Processes (LP) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) to provide stewardship for NASA’s land processes science data. These data are critical science assets that serve the land processes science community with potential value beyond any immediate research use, and therefore need to be accounted for and properly managed throughout their lifecycle. A fundamental LP DAAC objective is to enable permanent preservation of these data and information products. The LP DAAC accomplishes this by bridging data producers and permanent archival resources while providing intermediate archive services for data and information products.

  12. Valuable processes and products from marine intertidal microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Morales, Benjamín Otto; Chan-Bacab, Manuel Jesús; De la Rosa-García, Susana del Carmen; Camacho-Chab, Juan Carlos

    2010-06-01

    Microbial communities are ubiquitous in marine intertidal environments. These communities, which grow preferentially as biofilms on natural and artificial surfaces, carry out key processes contributing to the functioning of coastal environments and providing valuable services to human society, including carbon cycling, primary productivity, trophic linkage, and transfer and removal of pollutants. In addition, their surface-associated life style greatly influences the integrity and performance of marine infrastructure and archaeological heritage materials. The fluctuating conditions of the intertidal zone make it an extreme environment to which intertidal biofilm organisms must adapt at varying levels. This requirement has probably favored the development and spread of specific microorganisms with particular physiological and metabolic processes. These organisms may have potential biotechnological utility, in that they may provide novel secondary metabolites, biopolymers, lipids, and enzymes and even processes for the production of energy in a sustainable manner. PMID:20202811

  13. The crystallization processes in the aluminum particles production technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, Vladimir; Bondarchuk, Sergey; Goldin, Victor; Zharova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    The physical and mathematical model of the crystallization process of liquid aluminum particles in the spray-jet of the ejection-type atomizer was proposed. The results of mathematical modeling of two-phase flow in the spray-jet and the crystallization process of fluid particles are given. The influence of the particle size, of the flow rate and the stagnation temperature gas in the ranges of industrial technology implemented for the production of powders aluminum of brands ASD, on the crystallization characteristics were investigated. The approximations of the characteristics of the crystallization process depending on the size of the aluminum particles on the basis of two approaches to the mathematical description of the process of crystallization of aluminum particles were obtained. The results allow to optimize the process parameters of ejection-type atomizer to produce aluminum particles with given morphology.

  14. Process simulation in stamping – recent applications for product and process design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W Thomas; T Oenoki; T Altan

    2000-01-01

    Process simulation for product and process design is currently being practiced in industry. However, a number of input variables have a significant effect on the accuracy and reliability of computer predictions. A study was conducted to evaluate the capability of FE-simulations for predicting part characteristics and process conditions in forming complex-shaped, industrial parts.In industrial applications, there are two objectives for

  15. Biodiesel production process from microalgae oil by waste heat recovery and process integration.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunfeng; Chen, Guanyi; Ji, Na; Liu, Qingling; Kansha, Yasuki; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the optimization of microalgae oil (MO) based biodiesel production process is carried out by waste heat recovery and process integration. The exergy analysis of each heat exchanger presented an efficient heat coupling between hot and cold streams, thus minimizing the total exergy destruction. Simulation results showed that the unit production cost of optimized process is 0.592$/L biodiesel, and approximately 0.172$/L biodiesel can be avoided by heat integration. Although the capital cost of the optimized biodiesel production process increased 32.5% and 23.5% compared to the reference cases, the operational cost can be reduced by approximately 22.5% and 41.6%. PMID:26133477

  16. Low temperature fabrication of spherical brushite granules by cement paste emulsion.

    PubMed

    Moseke, Claus; Bayer, Christoph; Vorndran, Elke; Barralet, Jake E; Groll, Jürgen; Gbureck, Uwe

    2012-11-01

    Secondary protonated calcium phosphates such as brushite (CaHPO(4)·2H(2)O) or monetite (CaHPO(4)) have a higher resorption potential in bone defects than sintered ceramics, e.g. tricalcium phosphate or hydroxyapatite. However, processing of these phosphates to monolithic blocks or granules is not possible by sintering due to thermal decomposition of protonated phosphates at higher temperatures. In this study a low temperature technique for the preparation of spherical brushite granules in a cement setting reaction is presented. These granules were synthesized by dispersing a calcium phosphate cement paste composed of ?-tricalcium phosphate and monocalcium phosphate together with a surfactant to an oil/water emulsion. The reaction products were characterized regarding their size distribution, morphology, and phase composition. Clinically relevant granule sizes ranging from 200 ?m to 1 mm were obtained, whereas generally smaller granules were received with higher oil viscosity, increasing temperature or higher powder to liquid ratios of the cement paste. The hardened granules were microporous with a specific surface area of 0.7 m(2)/g and consisted of plate-like brushite (>95 % according to XRD) crystals of 0.5-7 ?m size. Furthermore it was shown that the granules may be also used for drug delivery applications. This was demonstrated by adsorption of vancomycin from an aqueous solution, where a load of 1.45-1.88 mg drug per g granules and an almost complete release within 2 h was obtained. PMID:22903599

  17. Holocene cemented beach deposits in Belize

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eberhard Gischler; Anthony J. Lomando

    1997-01-01

    Two types of cemented beach deposits occur on reef islands off the coast of Belize. These are (1) intertidal beachrock that is dominantly cemented by marine aragonite and high-magnesium-calcite cements, and (2) supratidal cayrock that is cemented mainly by vadose low-magnesium-calcite cements. Besides differences in position relative to present sea level and resulting early diagenesic features, beachrock and cayrock can

  18. Titanium Metal Powder Production by the Plasma Quench Process

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Cordes; A. Donaldson

    2000-09-01

    The goals of this project included the scale-up of the titanium hydride production process to a production rate of 50 kg/hr at a purity level of 99+%. This goal was to be achieved by incrementally increasing the production capability of a series of reactor systems. This methodic approach was designed to allow Idaho Titanium Technologies to systematically address the engineering issues associated with plasma system performance, and powder collection system design and performance. With quality powder available, actual fabrication with the titanium hydride was to be pursued. Finally, with a successful titanium production system in place, the production of titanium aluminide was to be pursued by the simultaneously injection of titanium and aluminum precursors into the reactor system. Some significant accomplishments of the project are: A unique and revolutionary torch/reactor capable of withstanding temperatures up to 5000 C with high thermal efficiency has been operated. The dissociation of titanium tetrachloride into titanium powder and HC1 has been demonstrated, and a one-megawatt reactor potentially capable of producing 100 pounds per hour has been built, but not yet operated at the powder level. The removal of residual subchlorides and adsorbed HC1 and the sintering of powder to form solid bodies have been demonstrated. The production system has been operated at production rates up to 40 pounds per hour. Subsequent to the end of the project, Idaho Titanium Technologies demonstrated that titanium hydride powder can indeed be sintered into solid titanium metal at 1500 C without sintering aids.

  19. Biohydrogen production: strategies to improve process efficiency through microbial routes.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Kuppam; Lee, Yong-Jik; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    The current fossil fuel-based generation of energy has led to large-scale industrial development. However, the reliance on fossil fuels leads to the significant depletion of natural resources of buried combustible geologic deposits and to negative effects on the global climate with emissions of greenhouse gases. Accordingly, enormous efforts are directed to transition from fossil fuels to nonpolluting and renewable energy sources. One potential alternative is biohydrogen (H2), a clean energy carrier with high-energy yields; upon the combustion of H2, H2O is the only major by-product. In recent decades, the attractive and renewable characteristics of H2 led us to develop a variety of biological routes for the production of H2. Based on the mode of H2 generation, the biological routes for H2 production are categorized into four groups: photobiological fermentation, anaerobic fermentation, enzymatic and microbial electrolysis, and a combination of these processes. Thus, this review primarily focuses on the evaluation of the biological routes for the production of H2. In particular, we assess the efficiency and feasibility of these bioprocesses with respect to the factors that affect operations, and we delineate the limitations. Additionally, alternative options such as bioaugmentation, multiple process integration, and microbial electrolysis to improve process efficiency are discussed to address industrial-level applications. PMID:25874756

  20. Biohydrogen Production: Strategies to Improve Process Efficiency through Microbial Routes

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekhar, Kuppam; Lee, Yong-Jik; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    The current fossil fuel-based generation of energy has led to large-scale industrial development. However, the reliance on fossil fuels leads to the significant depletion of natural resources of buried combustible geologic deposits and to negative effects on the global climate with emissions of greenhouse gases. Accordingly, enormous efforts are directed to transition from fossil fuels to nonpolluting and renewable energy sources. One potential alternative is biohydrogen (H2), a clean energy carrier with high-energy yields; upon the combustion of H2, H2O is the only major by-product. In recent decades, the attractive and renewable characteristics of H2 led us to develop a variety of biological routes for the production of H2. Based on the mode of H2 generation, the biological routes for H2 production are categorized into four groups: photobiological fermentation, anaerobic fermentation, enzymatic and microbial electrolysis, and a combination of these processes. Thus, this review primarily focuses on the evaluation of the biological routes for the production of H2. In particular, we assess the efficiency and feasibility of these bioprocesses with respect to the factors that affect operations, and we delineate the limitations. Additionally, alternative options such as bioaugmentation, multiple process integration, and microbial electrolysis to improve process efficiency are discussed to address industrial-level applications. PMID:25874756

  1. Processes affecting greenhouse gas production in experimental boreal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkiteswaran, Jason J.; Schiff, Sherry L.; St. Louis, Vincent L.; Matthews, Cory J. D.; Boudreau, Natalie M.; Joyce, Elizabeth M.; Beaty, Kenneth G.; Bodaly, R. Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Flooding land for water reservoir creation has many environmental impacts including the production of the greenhouse gases (GHG) carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). To assess processes governing GHG emissions from the flooding of terrestrial carbon, three experimental reservoirs were constructed in upland boreal forest areas of differing carbon stores as part of the Flooded Upland Dynamics Experiment (FLUDEX). We calculated process-based GHG budgets for these reservoirs over 5 years following the onset of flooding. Stable isotopic budgets of carbon were necessary to separate community respiration (CR), which produces CO2, from net primary production (NPP), which consumes CO2, and to separate CH4 production from CH4 consumption via oxidation. NPP removed up to 44% of the CO2 produced from CR. CR and NPP exhibited different year-after-year trends. CH4 flux to the atmosphere increased about twofold over 3 years, yet isotopic budgets showed CH4 production in flooded soils increased nearly tenfold. CH4 oxidation near the flooded soil-water interface greatly decreased the CH4 flux from the water column to the atmosphere. Ebullition was the most important conduit of CH4 to the atmosphere after 3 years. Although CH4 production increased with time, the total GHG flux, in CO2 equivalents, declined. Contrary to expectations, neither CR nor total GHG fluxes were directly related to the quantity of organic carbon flooded. Instead, these reservoirs produced a strikingly similar amount of CO2 equivalents over 5 years.

  2. Early hydration and setting of oil well cement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jie; Weissinger, Emily A. [Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Peethamparan, Sulapha [Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699 (United States); Scherer, George W., E-mail: scherer@princeton.ed [Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    A broad experimental study has been performed to characterize the early hydration and setting of cement pastes prepared with Class H oil well cement at water-to-cement ratios (w/c) from 0.25 to 0.40, cured at temperatures from 10 to 60 {sup o}C, and mixed with chemical additives. Chemical shrinkage during hydration was measured by a newly developed system, degree of hydration was determined by thermogravimetric analysis, and setting time was tested by Vicat and ultrasonic velocity measurements. A Boundary Nucleation and Growth model provides a good fit to the chemical shrinkage data. Temperature increase and accelerator additions expedite the rate of cement hydration by causing more rapid nucleation of hydration products, leading to earlier setting; conversely, retarder and viscosity modifying agents delay cement nucleation, causing later setting times. Lower w/c paste needs less hydration product to form a percolating solid network (i.e., to reach the initial setting point). However, for the systems evaluated, at a given w/c, the degree of hydration at setting is a constant, regardless of the effects of ambient temperature or the presence of additives.

  3. Hot alkali carbonation of sodium metaphosphate modified fly ash/calcium aluminate blend hydrothermal cements

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Energy Efficiency and Conservation Div.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Energy Efficiency and Conservation Div.

    1996-11-01

    Sodium metaphosphate-modified fly ash/calcium aluminate blend (SFCB) cements were prepared by autoclaving for 1 day at 300 C and their resistance was evaluated in a highly concentrated Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution at 300 C. The hydroxyapatite and analcime phases formed in the autoclaved SFCB cements played an essential role in conferring resistance to the degradation of cements caused by alkali carbonation. Although the carbonating reaction of the analcime phase led to the formation of cancrinite, this analcime cancrinite transformation did not show any influence on the changes in the mechanical and physical properties of the cements. Additionally, there was no formation of the water-soluble calcium bicarbonate in the cements exposed for 28 days. Contrarily, the conventional class G cement systems were very vulnerable to a hot alkali carbonation. The major reason for the damage caused by carbonation of the cements was the fact that the xonotlite phase formed in the 300{degree} autoclaved cements was converted into two carbonation products, calcite and pectolite. Furthermore, the reaction between calcite and carbonic acid derived from Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} led to the formation of water-soluble calcium bicarbonate, thereby causing the alteration of dense structures into porous ones and the loss of strength of cements.

  4. Production of PUFA Concentrates from Poultry and Fish Processing Waste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dipak Patil; Ahindra Nag

    2011-01-01

    In fish and poultry processing, viscera are generally considered as a waste product and often discarded. Chicken and hilsa\\u000a fish (Hilsa ilisa) viscera were used for the production of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) linoleic (18:2n-6), eicosapentaenoic (EPA; 20:5n-3)\\u000a and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3). Free fatty acids (FFA) were extracted by alkaline hydrolysis of chicken and fish\\u000a viscera; yields were 5.2

  5. Input Substitution and Demand in the Water Supply Production Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. Youn; Clark, Robert M.

    1987-02-01

    The structure of input demand for U.S. water utilities is analyzed by estimating a translog cost function. An important feature of the model includes the multiproduct specification of the water supply production process. Operating variables are also specified to include capacity utilization and service distance, which are considered important for delivery of water supply. Results show that capital is a substitute for both energy and labor, but that no strong substitution possibilities exist between energy and labor. Energy is an input which requires intensive use in water production. Small utilities are found to enjoy economies of scale. Capacity utilization and service distance are found to have significant effects on input demand.

  6. Effect of Metakaolin on Strength and Efflorescence Quantity of Cement-Based Composites

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Tsai-Lung; Lin, Wei-Ting; Cheng, An

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the basic mechanical and microscopic properties of cement produced with metakaolin and quantified the production of residual white efflorescence. Cement mortar was produced at various replacement ratios of metakaolin (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25% by weight of cement) and exposed to various environments. Compressive strength and efflorescence quantify (using Matrix Laboratory image analysis and the curettage method), scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis were reported in this study. Specimens with metakaolin as a replacement for Portland cement present higher compressive strength and greater resistance to efflorescence; however, the addition of more than 20% metakaolin has a detrimental effect on strength and efflorescence. This may be explained by the microstructure and hydration products. The quantity of efflorescence determined using MATLAB image analysis is close to the result obtained using the curettage method. The results demonstrate the best effectiveness of replacing Portland cement with metakaolin at a 15% replacement ratio by weight. PMID:23737719

  7. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  8. Waste heat recovery and power generation in cement works

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yang Wei-hua; Xu Tao; Jia Li-yue; Guo Yue-jiao; Chen Guang; Li Wei

    2009-01-01

    In cement plant, about 90% of total energy is used as heat energy in the clinker calcination process. Out of total heat consumed in the clinker calcination process, more than 35% of heat is discharged as waste heat to the surroundings without utilization. Therefore, a great deal of energy is wasted, and the heat pollution in the workplace is serious.

  9. Utilization of washed MSWI fly ash as partial cement substitute with the addition of dithiocarbamic chelate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xingbao Gao; Wei Wang; Tunmin Ye; Feng Wang; Yuxin Lan

    2008-01-01

    The management of the big amount of fly ash as hazardous waste from the municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) has encountered many problems in China. In this study, a feasibility research on MSWI fly ash utilization as partial cement substitute in cement mortars was therefore carried out. MSWI fly ash was subjected to washing process to reduce its chlorine content

  10. Performance Cements Focus on Sustainability

    E-print Network

    - Composite Cement CEM IV - Pozzolanic CEM III - Blast furnace slag CEM II - Portland-composite CEM II - Portland-limestone CEM II - Portland-fly ash CEM II - Portland-pozzolana CEM II - Portland-slag CEM I

  11. Ossiculoplasty with hydroxyapatite bone cement: our reconstruction philosophy.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Jean-Marc; De Bie, Gersende; Franceschi, Daniel; Deggouj, Naima; Gersdorff, Michel

    2015-07-01

    The main objective of this study is to analyze results obtained with hydroxyapatite bone cement (HABC) ossiculoplasties. This is a retrospective study of a case series. This study was conducted in an academic hospital and tertiary referral center. A total of 127 ossiculoplasties using HABC were evaluated. Ears were divided into three groups according to procedure: group 1 involved reinforcement of the incudostapedial joint with cement and reconstruction of an incus long process defect with cement. Group 2 involved partial ossicular reconstruction between the stapes and malleus handle with HABC. Group 3 was divided into two subgroups. Group 3B entailed reconstruction of the stapes with a mobile footplate (Austin-Kartush type B = group 3B) and group 3F with a fixed footplate (Austin-Kartush type F = group 3F) using a K-Helix piston (Grace Medical, Memphis, TN, USA) or a classical titanium piston (Kurz, Fuerth, Germany) glued to the incus remnant or malleus handle with cement. Anatomical and pre- and postoperative audiological results were assessed. The mean follow-up was 26 ± 14 months. Percentages of average postoperative air-bone gap ?20 dB were 95, 82.5, 50 and 83.3 %, and for air-bone gap ?10 dB, 80, 50.9, 16.6 and 50 % for groups 1, 2, 3B and 3F, respectively. No complications related to the cement or extrusion occurred. Hearing outcomes also remained stable over time. In our experience, ossiculoplasty with cement provides good and stable functional results, is safe, cost effective, and easy to use. HABC with or without biocompatible ossicular prostheses allows repair of different types of ossicular defects with preservation of the anatomical and physiological ossicular chain, as well as improved stability. Reconstruction of the incus long process or incudostapedial joint defect with cement is preferred over partial ossicular reconstruction. PMID:24615652

  12. Treatment and recycling of asbestos-cement containing waste.

    PubMed

    Colangelo, F; Cioffi, R; Lavorgna, M; Verdolotti, L; De Stefano, L

    2011-11-15

    The remediation of industrial buildings covered with asbestos-cement roofs is one of the most important issues in asbestos risk management. The relevant Italian Directives call for the above waste to be treated prior to disposal on landfill. Processes able to eliminate the hazard of these wastes are very attractive because the treated products can be recycled as mineral components in building materials. In this work, asbestos-cement waste is milled by means of a high energy ring mill for up to 4h. The very fine powders obtained at all milling times are characterized to check the mineralogical and morphological transformation of the asbestos phases. Specifically, after 120 min of milling, the disappearance of the chrysotile OH stretching modes at 3690 cm(-1), of the main crystalline chrysotile peaks and of the fibrous phase are detected by means of infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses, respectively. The hydraulic behavior of the milled powders in presence of lime is also tested at different times. The results of thermal analyses show that the endothermic effects associated to the neo-formed binding phases significantly increase with curing time. Furthermore, the technological efficacy of the recycling process is evaluated by preparing and testing hydraulic lime and milled powder-based mortars. The complete test set gives good results in terms of the hydration kinetics and mechanical properties of the building materials studied. In fact, values of reacted lime around 40% and values of compressive strength in the range of 2.17 and 2.29 MPa, are measured. PMID:21924550

  13. VersaBond bone cement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tore Dalén; Kjell G. Nilsson

    2005-01-01

    VersaBond is a newly developed bone cement. To investigate its clinical performance, VersaBond was compared to Palacos R in a prospective randomized study in total knee replacement. Fifty-nine patients (61 knees) undergoing total knee replacement were randomized to either VersaBond or Palacos R bone cement and followed for 24 months using radiostereometric analysis (RSA).Up to 2 years there were no

  14. Portland cement-blast furnace slag blends in oilwell cementing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, D.T.; DiLullo, G.; Hibbeler, J. [and others

    1995-12-31

    Recent investigations of blast furnace slag cementing technologies. have been expanded to include Portland cement/blast furnace slag blends. Mixtures of Portland cement and blast furnace slag, while having a long history of use in the construction industry, have not been used extensively in oilwell cementing applications. Test results indicate that blending blast furnace slag with Portland cement produces a high quality well cementing material. Presented are the design guidelines and laboratory test data relative to mixtures of blast furnace slag and Portland cements. Case histories delineating the use of blast furnace slag - Portland cement blends infield applications are also included.

  15. Study of total emissions and spot emissions of total suspended particulate at the South Dakota cement plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. R. Johnson; M. J. Flannagan

    1980-01-01

    The project determined the source emissions of total suspended particulate (TSP) of the cement plant during a period of limited activity. Because of large stock piles and a slowdown in the building industry, the cement plant ceased production operations for the month of May in 1980. Routine maintenance and loading operations continued even though no actual production was underway. The

  16. Solder extrusion pressure bonding process and bonded products produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Beavis, L.C.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Yost, F.G.

    1992-06-16

    Disclosed is a process for production of soldered joints which are highly reliable and capable of surviving 10,000 thermal cycles between about [minus]40 C and 110 C. Process involves interposing a thin layer of a metal solder composition between the metal surfaces of members to be bonded and applying heat and up to about 1000 psi compression pressure to the superposed members, in the presence of a reducing atmosphere, to extrude the major amount of the solder composition, contaminants including fluxing gases and air, from between the members being bonded, to form a very thin, strong intermetallic bonding layer having a thermal expansion tolerant with that of the bonded members.

  17. Apatite formation on bioactive calcium-silicate cements for dentistry affects surface topography and human marrow stromal cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Taddei, Paola; Perut, Francesca; Tinti, Anna; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Prati, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    The effect of ageing in phosphate-containing solution of bioactive calcium-silicate cements on the chemistry, morphology and topography of the surface, as well as on in vitro human marrow stromal cells viability and proliferation was investigated. A calcium-silicate cement (wTC) mainly based on dicalcium-silicate and tricalcium-silicate was prepared. Alpha-TCP was added to wTC to obtain wTC-TCP. Bismuth oxide was inserted in wTC to prepare a radiopaque cement (wTC-Bi). A commercial calcium-silicate cement (ProRoot MTA) was tested as control. Cement disks were aged in DPBS for 5 h ('fresh samples'), 14 and 28 days, and analyzed by ESEM/EDX, SEM/EDX, ATR-FTIR, micro-Raman techniques and scanning white-light interferometry. Proliferation, LDH release, ALP activity and collagen production of human marrow stromal cells (MSC) seeded for 1-28 days on the cements were evaluated. Fresh samples exposed a surface mainly composed of calcium-silicate hydrates CSH (from the hydration of belite and alite), calcium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and ettringite. Apatite nano-spherulites rapidly precipitated on cement surfaces within 5 h. On wTC-TCP the Ca-P deposits appeared thicker than on the other cements. Aged cements showed an irregular porous calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) coating, formed by aggregated apatite spherulites with interspersed calcite crystals. All the experimental cements exerted no acute toxicity in the cell assay system and allowed cell growth. Using biochemical results, the scores were: fresh cements>aged cements for cell proliferation and ALP activity (except for wTC-Bi), whereas fresh cementscements for collagen synthesis. Summarizing (1) non-aged cements showed higher cell proliferation than aged cements, probably favoured by the presence of Si-OH gel and the early formation of apatite nano-spherulites; (2) the alpha-TCP doped cement aged for 28 days displayed the highest bioactivity and cell proliferation; (3) the deleterious effect of bismuth on cell proliferation was reduced by the progressive increase of the biocoating thickness on aged cement. In conclusion, the experimental cements have adequate biological properties to be used as root-end/root repair filling materials or pulp capping materials. The alfa-TCP doped cement represents a new potential bioactive material for expanded applications in dentistry. PMID:20655582

  18. Modeling and simulation of cement hydration kinetics and microstructure development

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Jeffrey J., E-mail: jthomas39@slb.com [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Biernacki, Joseph J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tennessee Tech University, Cookeville, TN (United States); Bullard, Jeffrey W. [Materials and Construction Research Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Bishnoi, Shashank [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi (India); Dolado, Jorge S. [Center for Nanomaterials Application in Construction, LABEIN-Tecnalia, Bilbao (Spain); Scherer, George W. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Luttge, Andreas [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Efforts to model and simulate the highly complex cement hydration process over the past 40 years are reviewed, covering different modeling approaches such as single particle models, mathematical nucleation and growth models, and vector and lattice-based approaches to simulating microstructure development. Particular attention is given to promising developments that have taken place in the past few years. Recent applications of molecular-scale simulation methods to understanding the structure and formation of calcium-silicate-hydrate phases, and to understanding the process of dissolution of cement minerals in water are also discussed, as these topics are highly relevant to the future development of more complete and fundamental hydration models.

  19. Accelerated carbonation of Friedel's salt in calcium aluminate cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Goni, S.; Guerrero, A

    2003-01-01

    The stability of Friedel's salt with respect to carbonation has been studied in calcium aluminate cement (CAC) pastes containing NaCl (3% of Cl{sup -} by weight of cement). Carbonation was carried out on a powdered sample in flowing 5% CO{sub 2} gas at 65% relative humidity to accelerate the process. At an intermediate carbonation step, a part of the sample was washed and dried up to 10 cycles to simulate a dynamic leaching attack. The two processes were followed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), pH and Cl{sup -} analyses in the simulated pore solution.

  20. Toughening of ceramics through alumina-based cemented oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.Y.; Kohler, S.P.; Kramer, B.M. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA))

    1988-07-01

    The cemented structure of ceramic-metal composites is examined as a means of effective toughening in ceramics; Ni-TiC was identified as a favorable binder for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A new process using plasma CVD was developed that could deposit TiC on fine Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. The TiC-coated alumina powders were consolidated with nickel-based binders to produce the cemented structure. An indentation crack resistance test showed that TiC-coated alumina cermets impeded crack propagation effectively, improving substantially the toughness compared to conventionally processed alumina cermets.

  1. Production of continuous mullite fiber via sol-gel processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Sparks, J. Scott; Esker, David C.

    1990-01-01

    The development of a continuous ceramic fiber which could be used in rocket engine and rocket boosters applications was investigated at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Methods of ceramic fiber production such as melt spinning, chemical vapor deposition, and precursor polymeric fiber decomposition are discussed and compared with sol-gel processing. The production of ceramics via the sol-gel method consists of two steps, hydrolysis and polycondensation, to form the preceramic, followed by consolidation into the glass or ceramic structure. The advantages of the sol-gel method include better homogeneity and purity, lower preparation temperature, and the ability to form unique compositions. The disadvantages are the high cost of raw materials, large shrinkage during drying and firing which can lead to cracks, and long processing times. Preparation procedures for aluminosilicate sol-gel and for continuous mullite fibers are described.

  2. Radiation processing to improve the quality of fishery products.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, V; Doke, S N; Thomas, P

    1999-09-01

    Extensive investigations, worldwide, in the last 4 decades have shown the benefits of radiation processing for the preservation and microbial quality improvement of seafoods. In the present review, the various factors determining the quality of seafoods are first presented. The basic principles underlying the effects of ionizing radiation and specific effects on food constituents such as proteins, amino acids, lipids, vitamins, and tissue enzymes are discussed. Data on radiation processing of seafoods are reported and discussed with respect to shelf life enhancement under refrigeration by control of bacteria causing spoilage, radiation sensitivity of pathogenic microorganisms and parasites of public health significance and their elimination in fresh and frozen fishery products, control of insect disinfestation in dried fishery products, influence of irradiation on nutritional and sensory quality attributes, detection of irradiation treatment, economics, and international status. PMID:10516913

  3. A more reliable method for incudostapedial rebridging ossiculoplasty: bone cement and wire.

    PubMed

    Hafiz, Gunter

    2005-01-01

    Polymaleinate glass ionomer cement is a commercially available bone cement (Ketac Cem Radiopaque, ESPE, Germany) that can be used to reconstruct a discontinuity between the incus and the stapes. The popularity of bone cement in otologic surgery is increasing. If the missing part of the incus is too long, the results in the long term could be unsatisfying. Under such circumstances, a new method of incudostapediopexy that uses wire and involves remodeling of the long process of the incus with bone cement is introduced. A retrospective analysis of the outcomes of incudostapedial rebridging ossiculoplasty (ISRO) procedures carried out in 21 patients between June 1999 and September 2003 was performed. A total of 17 patients were treated with bone cement only; in 4 of these patients, hearing loss reoccurred within 6 months. The procedure was repeated in 2 of these patients using both bone cement and wire with satisfactory hearing results (air-bone gaps, 7.5 and 8.8 decibels hearing level [dB HL]) after 1 year. Four patients underwent ISRO wire and bone cement initially. The long-term results of these 6 "wire-and-cement" cases, which were followed for a mean of 21 months, were satisfactory (air-bone gap, 9.8 dB HL). The postoperative air-bone gap in the 15 patients who were treated by ISRO with bone cement only excluding the 2 reoperation cases was 12.1 dB HL. ISRO with bone cement is a cost-effective and safe procedure that yields good hearing results in selected cases. If the distance between eroded incus and stapes is too long to be reconstructed with bone cement alone, the surgeon should consider using wire with bone cement. PMID:15943223

  4. Development of a process for continuous creation of lean value in product development organizations

    E-print Network

    Kato, Jin

    2005-01-01

    Ideas and methodologies of lean product development were developed into tools and processes that help product development organizations improve their performances. The definition of waste in product development processes ...

  5. Cement pulmonary embolism after vertebroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sifuentes Giraldo, Walter Alberto; Lamúa Riazuelo, José Ramón; Gallego Rivera, José Ignacio; Vázquez Díaz, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of vertebral cementing techniques for vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty has spread for the treatment of pain associated with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. This is also associated with the increased incidence of complications related with these procedures, the most frequent being originated by leakage of cementation material. Cement can escape into the vertebral venous system and reach the pulmonary circulation through the azygous system and cava vein, producing a cement embolism. This is a frequent complication, occurring in up to 26% of patients undergoing vertebroplasty but, since most patients have no clinical or hemodynamical repercussion, this event usually goes unnoticed. However, some serious, and even fatal cases, have been reported. We report the case of a 74-year-old male patient who underwent vertebroplasty for persistent pain associated with osteoporotic L3 vertebral fracture and who developed a cement leak into the cava vein and right pulmonary artery during the procedure. Although he developed a pulmonary cement embolism, the patient remained asymptomatic and did not present complications during follow-up. PMID:23481509

  6. Standardizing PhenoCam Image Processing and Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliman, T. E.; Richardson, A. D.; Klosterman, S.; Gray, J. M.; Hufkens, K.; Aubrecht, D.; Chen, M.; Friedl, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The PhenoCam Network (http://phenocam.unh.edu) contains an archive of imagery from digital webcams to be used for scientific studies of phenological processes of vegetation. The image archive continues to grow and currently has over 4.8 million images representing 850 site-years of data. Time series of broadband reflectance (e.g., red, green, blue, infrared bands) and derivative vegetation indices (e.g. green chromatic coordinate or GCC) are calculated for regions of interest (ROI) within each image series. These time series form the basis for subsequent analysis, such as spring and autumn transition date extraction (using curvature analysis techniques) and modeling the climate-phenology relationship. Processing is relatively straightforward but time consuming, with some sites having more than 100,000 images available. While the PhenoCam Network distributes the original image data, it is our goal to provide higher-level vegetation phenology products, generated in a standardized way, to encourage use of the data without the need to download and analyze individual images. We describe here the details of the standard image processing procedures, and also provide a description of the products that will be available for download. Products currently in development include an "all-image" file, which contains a statistical summary of the red, green and blue bands over the pixels in predefined ROI's for each image from a site. This product is used to generate 1-day and 3-day temporal aggregates with 90th percentile values of GCC for the specified time-periodwith standard image selection/filtering criteria applied. Sample software (in python, R, MATLAB) that can be used to read in and plot these products will also be described.

  7. Process for the production of hydrogen from water

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL); Willit, James L. (Batavia, IL)

    2010-05-25

    A method and device for the production of hydrogen from water and electricity using an active metal alloy. The active metal alloy reacts with water producing hydrogen and a metal hydroxide. The metal hydroxide is consumed, restoring the active metal alloy, by applying a voltage between the active metal alloy and the metal hydroxide. As the process is sustainable, only water and electricity is required to sustain the reaction generating hydrogen.

  8. Measurement of Information Security in Processes and Products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reijo Savola; Juhani Anttila; Anni Sademies; Jorma Kajava; Jarkko Holappa

    In order to better understand the information security performance in products, processes, technical systems or organizations\\u000a as a whole, and to plan, control, and improve it, security engineers, system developers and business managers must be able\\u000a to get early feedback information from the achieved security situation. Systematic security metrics provides the means for\\u000a managing security-related measurements comprehensively. We reflect on

  9. Separation of products from mild coal gasification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wallman, P.H.

    1991-09-11

    The primary mild coal gasification product mixture containing noncondensible gas, high-boiling hydrocarbon vapors and entrained fines is difficult to process into the desired pure products: gas, liquids, and dry solids. This challenge for mild coal gasification process development has been studied by surveying the technical literature for suitable separations processes and for similar issues in related processes. The choice for a first-stage solids separation step is standard cyclones, arranged in parallel trains for large-volume applications in order to take advantage of the higher separation efficiency of smaller cyclones. However, mild gasification pilot-plant data show entrainment of ultrafine particles for which standard cyclones have poor separation efficiency. A hot secondary solids separation step is needed for the ultrafine entrainment in order to protect the liquid product from excessive amounts of contaminating solids. The secondary solids separation step is similar to many high-temperature flue-gas applications with an important complicating condition: Mild gasifier vapors form coke on surfaces in contact with the vapors. Plugging of the filter medium by coke deposition is concluded to be the main product separation problem for mild gasification. Three approaches to solution of this problem are discussed in the order of preference: (1) a barrier filter medium made of a perforated foil that is easy to regenerate, (2) a high-efficiency cyclone coupled with recycle of a solids-containing tar fraction for coking/cracking in the gasifier, and (3) a granular moving bed filter with regeneration of the bed material. The condensation of oil vapors diluted by noncondensible gas is analyzed thermodynamically, and the conclusion is that existing commercial oil fractionator designs are adequate as long as the vapor stream does not contain excessive amounts of solids. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Handwriting evaluation for developmental dysgraphia: Process versus product

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sara Rosenblum; Patrice L. Weiss; Shula Parush

    2004-01-01

    The act of writing presents difficulties for10–30% of elementary school children. Thisstudy's objectives were to compare theabilities of digitizer-based evaluation of thehandwriting process and conventional evaluationof the handwriting product to discriminatebetween children with proficient and dysgraphichandwriting. Copied and dictated writingsamples were collected from 3rd grade students,50 with proficient and 50 with dysgraphichandwriting. Results indicated that bothdigitizer-based and conventional evaluationsdifferentiated between

  11. Cementation: methods and materials. Part two.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2013-01-01

    This is a review of the literature of the last 21 years about cementing or luting indirect restorations to tooth structure. Recommendations are made as to the surface preparation of precious metals, non-precious metals, indirect composite materials, and all available porcelain materials including feldspathic, luecite reinforced, lithium di-silicate, slip cast aluminum oxide, densely sintered aluminum oxide, and zirconia prior to luting. Using data from a variety of sources, product categories of materials and various bonding materials and procedures are ranked according to their bond strength and durability. PMID:24579257

  12. Setting reaction and hardening of an apatitic calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Ginebra, M P; Fernández, E; De Maeyer, E A; Verbeeck, R M; Boltong, M G; Ginebra, J; Driessens, F C; Planell, J A

    1997-04-01

    The combination of self-setting and biocompatibility makes calcium phosphate cements potentially useful materials for a variety of dental applications. The objective of this study was to investigate the setting and hardening mechanisms of a cement-type reaction leading to the formation of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite at low temperature. Reactants used were alpha-tricalcium phosphate containing 17 wt% beta-tricalcium phosphate, and 2 wt% of precipitated hydroxyapatite as solid phase and an aqueous solution 2.5 wt% of disodium hydrogen phosphate as liquid phase. The transformation of the mixture was stopped at selected times by a freeze-drying techniques, so that the cement properties at various stages could be studied by means of x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Also, the compressive strength of the cement was measured as a function of time. The results showed that: (1) the cement setting was the result of the alpha-tricalcium phosphate hydrolysis, giving as a product calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite, while beta-tricalcium phosphate did not participate in the reaction; (2) the extent of conversion of alpha-TCP was nearly 80% after 24 hr; (3) both the extent of conversion and the compressive strength increased initially linearly with time, subsequently reaching a saturation level, with a strong correlation observed between them, indicating that the microstructural changes taking place as the setting reaction proceeded were responsible for the mechanical behavior of the cement; and (4) the microstructure of the set cement consisted of clusters of big plates with radial or parallel orientations in a matrix of small plate-like crystals. PMID:9126187

  13. Effect of processing technologies on the allergenicity of food products.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Saiz, Rodrigo; Benedé, Sara; Molina, Elena; López-Expósito, Iván

    2015-11-10

    Heat treatment has been used since ancient times for food processing, first to ensure the safety of food and its storage, but also to transform its characteristics (in its raw form) and obtain new textures, flavors, or novel foods. However, the transformation experienced by food components when heated, or processed, can dramatically affect the allergenicity of food, either reducing or increasing it. To date, most of the articles published dealing with the changes in the potential allergenicity of food are focused on heat treatment and the Maillard reaction. However, it is also important to give prominence to other group of new technologies developed nowadays, such as high-pressure processing, microwaves and food irradiation. These techniques are not likely to replace traditional processing methods, but they are becoming attractive for the food industry due to different reasons, and it is expected in the near future to have different products on the market processed with these new technologies at an affordable cost. Moreover, other biochemical modifications, particularly enzymatic cross-linking of proteins, have attracted wide-spread attention and will be considered as well in this review, because of its great opportunities to induce protein modification and thus affect food allergenicity. Together with the effect of processing of food allergens, this review will place special attention on gastroduodenal digestion of processed allergens, which directly affects their allergenicity. PMID:24734775

  14. Galactic r-process production: The inhomogeneous approach

    E-print Network

    Wehmeyer, B; Thielemann, F -K

    2015-01-01

    The origin of elements made by the rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) is not fully understood. Different sources have been proposed, e.g., core-collapse supernovae and neutron star mergers. Old metal-poor stars carry the signature of the astrophysical r-process source(s). Europium is the most indicative element to trace the r-process production, since it is mostly made by the r-process and it is easy to observe compared to other heavy r-process elements. In this work we simulate the evolution of europium in our Galaxy with the inhomogeneous chemical evolution model ICE, and we compare our results with spectroscopic observations. We test the most important parameters affecting the chemical evolution of the r-process element Eu: (a) for neutron star mergers the coalescence time scale of the merger and the probability to experience a neutron star merger event after two supernova explosions occurred and formed a double neutron star system ) and (b) for the sub-class of magneto-rotationally driven Supernova...

  15. SENTINEL-2 Level 1 Products and Image Processing Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillarin, S. J.; Meygret, A.; Dechoz, C.; Petrucci, B.; Lacherade, S.; Tremas, T.; Isola, C.; Martimort, P.; Spoto, F.

    2012-07-01

    In partnership with the European Commission and in the frame of the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) program, the European Space Agency (ESA) is developing the Sentinel-2 optical imaging mission devoted to the operational monitoring of land and coastal areas. The Sentinel-2 mission is based on a satellites constellation deployed in polar sun-synchronous orbit. While ensuring data continuity of former SPOT and LANDSAT multi-spectral missions, Sentinel-2 will also offer wide improvements such as a unique combination of global coverage with a wide field of view (290 km), a high revisit (5 days with two satellites), a high resolution (10 m, 20 m and 60 m) and multi-spectral imagery (13 spectral bands in visible and shortwave infra-red domains). In this context, the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) supports ESA to define the system image products and to prototype the relevant image processing techniques. This paper offers, first, an overview of the Sentinel-2 system and then, introduces the image products delivered by the ground processing: the Level-0 and Level-1A are system products which correspond to respectively raw compressed and uncompressed data (limited to internal calibration purposes), the Level-1B is the first public product: it comprises radiometric corrections (dark signal, pixels response non uniformity, crosstalk, defective pixels, restoration, and binning for 60 m bands); and an enhanced physical geometric model appended to the product but not applied, the Level-1C provides ortho-rectified top of atmosphere reflectance with a sub-pixel multi-spectral and multi-date registration; a cloud and land/water mask is associated to the product. Note that the cloud mask also provides an indication about cirrus. The ground sampling distance of Level-1C product will be 10 m, 20 m or 60 m according to the band. The final Level-1C product is tiled following a pre-defined grid of 100x100 km2, based on UTM/WGS84 reference frame. The stringent image quality requirements are also described, in particular the geo-location accuracy for both absolute (better than 12.5 m) and multi-temporal (better than 0.3 pixels) cases. Then, the prototyped image processing techniques (both radiometric and geometric) will be addressed. The radiometric corrections will be first introduced. They consist mainly in dark signal and detector relative sensitivity correction, crosstalk correction and MTF restoration. Then, a special focus will be done on the geometric corrections. In particular the innovative method of automatic enhancement of the geometric physical model will be detailed. This method takes advantage of a Global Reference Image database, perfectly geo-referenced, to correct the physical geometric model of each image taken. The processing is based on an automatic image matching process which provides accurate ground control points between a given band of the image to refine and a reference image, allowing to dynamically calibrate the viewing model. The generation of the Global Reference Image database made of Sentinel-2 pre-calibrated mono-spectral images will be also addressed. In order to perform independent validation of the prototyping activity, an image simulator dedicated to Sentinel-2 has been set up. Thanks to this, a set of images have been simulated from various source images and combining different acquisition conditions and landscapes (mountains, deserts, cities …). Given disturbances have been also simulated so as to estimate the end to end performance of the processing chain. Finally, the radiometric and geometric performances obtained by the prototype will be presented. In particular, the geo-location performance of the level-1C products which widely fulfils the image quality requirements will be provided.

  16. Production of vitamins, coenzymes and related biochemicals by biotechnological processes.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, E J

    1992-01-01

    Vitamins and related biofactors belong to those few chemicals with a direct positive appeal to people. There is indeed a large need for extra vitamins, other than those derived from plant and animal food sources, due to unbalanced food habits or processing, food shortage or disease. Added vitamins are now either prepared chemically or biotechnologically via fermentation or bioconversion processes. Several vitamins and related biofactors are now only or mainly produced chemically (vitamin A, cholecalciferol (D3), tocopherol (E), vitamin K2, thiamine (B1), niacin (PP or B3), pantothenic acid (B5), pyridoxine (B6), biotin (H or B8), folic acid (B9) or via extraction processes (beta-carotene or provitamin A, provitamin D3, tocopherol, vitamin F-group). However, for several of these compounds microbiological or algal methods also exist or are rapidly emerging. Others are produced practically exclusively via fermentation (ergosterol or provitamin D2, riboflavin (B2), cyanocobalamin (B12), orotic acid (B13), vitamin F-group, ATP, nucleosides, coenzymes, etc. or via microalgal culture (beta-carotene, E, F). Both chemical and microbial processes are run industrially for vitamin B2 while vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is produced via a combination of chemical reactions and fermentation processes. A survey is given here of the current state of vitamin production, with emphasis on developments and strategies for improved biotechnological production and its significance, as compared to existing chemical processes. The screening or construction of vitamin hyperproducing microbial strains is a difficult task; pathway elucidation and metabolic (de)regulation need further study; r-DNA technology has only recently been introduced; improved fermentation processes and immobilised biocatalysts bioconversions for the synthesis of chiral vitamin compounds or intermediates or derivatives are gaining importance; the recovery and purification of these vitamin compounds from their fermentation broths remains equally complex. PMID:1368195

  17. Preparation of macroporous calcium phosphate cement tissue engineering scaffold.

    PubMed

    Barralet, J E; Grover, L; Gaunt, T; Wright, A J; Gibson, I R

    2002-08-01

    Unlike sintered hydroxyapatite there is evidence to suggest that calcium phosphate cement (CPC) is actively remodelled in vivo and because CPC is formed by a low-temperature process, thermally unstable compounds such as proteins may be incorporated into the matrix of the cement which can then be released after implantation. The efficacy of a macroporous CPC as a bone tissue engineering scaffold has been reported; however, there have been few previous studies on the effect of macroporosity on the mechanical properties of the CPC. This study reports a novel method for the formation of macroporous CPC scaffolds, which has two main advantages over the previously reported manufacturing route: the cement matrix is considerably denser than CPC formed from slurry systems and the scaffold is formed at temperatures below room temperature. A mixture of frozen sodium phosphate solution particles and CPC powder were compacted at 106 MPa and the sodium phosphate was allowed to melt and simultaneously set the cement. The effect of the amount of porogen used during processing on the porosity, pore size distribution and compressive strength of the scaffold was investigated. It was found that macroporous CPC could reliably be fabricated using cement:ice ratios as low as 5:2. PMID:12102177

  18. Geographic patterns of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring on a one degree by one degree grid cell basis: 1950 to 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Brenkert, A.L. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Andres, R.J. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Fung, I. [Univ. of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies; Matthews, E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies

    1997-03-01

    Data sets of one degree latitude by one degree longitude carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon (C) per year from anthropogenic sources have been produced for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO{sub 2} emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions. Global, regional and national annual estimates for 1950 through 1992 were published previously. Those national, annual CO{sub 2} emission estimates were based on statistics on fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing and gas flaring in oil fields as well as energy production, consumption and trade data, using the methods of Marland and Rotty. The national annual estimates were combined with gridded one-degree data on political units and 1984 human populations to create the new gridded CO{sub 2} emission data sets. The same population distribution was used for each of the years as proxy for the emission distribution within each country. The implied assumption for that procedure was that per capita energy use and fuel mix is uniform over a political unit. The consequence of this first-order procedure is that the spatial changes observed over time are solely due to changes in national energy consumption and nation-based fuel mix. Increases in emissions over time are apparent for most areas.

  19. Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, Anthony

    2012-10-31

    The objective of the research was to determine the best low cost method for the large scale production of the Nickel-Cobalt-Manganese (NCM) layered cathode materials. The research and development focused on scaling up the licensed technology from Argonne National Laboratory in BASF’s battery material pilot plant in Beachwood Ohio. Since BASF did not have experience with the large scale production of the NCM cathode materials there was a significant amount of development that was needed to support BASF’s already existing research program. During the three year period BASF was able to develop and validate production processes for the NCM 111, 523 and 424 materials as well as begin development of the High Energy NCM. BASF also used this time period to provide free cathode material samples to numerous manufactures, OEM’s and research companies in order to validate the ma-terials. The success of the project can be demonstrated by the construction of the production plant in Elyria Ohio and the successful operation of that facility. The benefit of the project to the public will begin to be apparent as soon as material from the production plant is being used in electric vehicles.

  20. Reducing the potential for processing contaminant formation in cereal products.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Tanya Y; Postles, Jennifer; Halford, Nigel G

    2014-05-01

    Processing contaminants may be defined as substances that are produced in a food when it is cooked or processed, are not present or are present at much lower concentrations in the raw, unprocessed food, and are undesirable either because they have an adverse effect on product quality or because they are potentially harmful. The presence of very low levels of processing contaminants in common foods is becoming an increasingly important issue for the food industry, as developments in analytical techniques and equipment bring foods under closer and closer scrutiny. This review considers the formation of lipid oxidation products, hydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids to prevent lipid oxidation and the associated risk of trans fatty acid formation. The formation of acrylamide in the Maillard reaction is described, as well as the genetic and agronomic approaches being taken to reduce the acrylamide-forming potential of cereal grain. The multiple routes for the formation of furan and associated chemicals, including hydroxymethylfurfuryl, are also described. The evolving regulatory and public perception situations for these processing contaminants and their implications for the cereal supply chain are discussed, emphasising the need for cereal breeders to engage with the contaminants issue. PMID:24882936