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Sample records for cement treated soils

  1. Physical and geotechnical properties of cement-treated clayey soil using silica nanoparticles: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasabkolaei, N.; Janalizadeh, A.; Jahanshahi, M.; Roshan, N.; Ghasemi, Seiyed E.

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the use of nanosilica to improve geotechnical characteristics of cement-treated clayey soil from the coastal area of the eastern Caspian Sea in the Golestan province, Iran. Atterberg limits, unconfined compressive strength, and California bearing ratio (CBR) tests were performed to investigate the soil plastic and strength parameters. The specimens were prepared by mixing soil with 9% cement and various contents of nanosilica. An ultrasonic bath device was used to disperse nanosilica in water. The addition of nanosilica enhanced the strength parameters of the clayey soil. Moreover, a nanosilica percentage of 1.5% by weight of cement improved the compressive strength of the cement-treated clay up to 38%, at age of 28 days. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an atomic force microscope (AFM) were used to evaluate specimen morphology. SEM and AFM results confirm the experimental ones. Therefore, nanosilica can be employed for soil improvement in geotechnical engineering.

  2. Effect of clays and cement on the solidification/stabilization of phenol-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Vipulanandan, C.

    1995-12-31

    Solidification/stabilization of phenol-contaminated soil was investigated by studying the interaction between soil, phenol and cement. The soil (with 20% kaolinite or bentonite clay) was contaminated with phenol up to 2,000 mg/kg. Type I Portland cement was used as the binder (20% by weight of contaminated soil) in the solidification/stabilization (S/S) treatment. In the phenol-cement interaction studies, the effect of various phenol concentrations on cement setting time, strength and pore fluid composition was studied. Phenol increased the initial and final setting time of cement and reduced the compressive strength. More than 85% of the phenol was desorped from the contaminated soils. The compressive strength of treated, contaminated soil decreased with higher phenol content but increased with curing time. Leachability of phenol from the solidified cement and treated, contaminated soil cured up to 180 days, was evaluated using the US EPA recommended Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and the American Nuclear Society`s ANS 16.1 leaching test. The percentage of phenol leached from the solidified contaminated soil was independent of the initial concentration of phenol in the contaminated soil. While the TCLP tests on treated soils showed that over 70% of phenol in the contaminated soil was leached out, the ANS 16.1 tests showed less than 35% phenol in the leachate. A simple model has been proposed to quantify the phenol leached from the cement-solidified, contaminated soil during both leaching tests.

  3. Apparatus for treating cement kiln dust

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, R.

    1986-04-22

    An apparatus is described for treating cement kiln dust comprising an elongate reaction chamber, kiln dust entry means in the reaction chamber, atomized-spray nozzles in the reaction chamber for introducing atomized spray to kiln dust, separate conduits for liquid and gas separately connected to the atomized-spray nozzles for atomizing liquid by gas to form a fog of the liquid in an atmosphere of the gas, mixing means in the reaction chamber for mixing the kiln dust in contact with the fog and gaseous atmosphere of the reaction chamber, discharge means at one end of the reaction chamber for discharging the mixed and contacted kiln dust product from the reaction chamber. The kiln dust entry means are located in an upper region of the reaction chamber for depositing kiln dust gravitationally to a lower region of the reaction chamber. The atomized-spray nozzles are located in the upper region of the reaction chamber for depositing fog on kiln dust during mixing thereof, gas entry means on the reaction chamber for delivering gas to the reaction chamber for reaction with kiln dust and fog, gas exit means on the reaction chamber for discharging gas products from the reaction chamber. The gas entry and exit means are at opposite ends of the reaction chamber, and pre-entry liquid atomizing spray means in the gas entry means for treating gas by atomized liquid spray to effectively saturate the gas before delivery to the reaction chamber.

  4. Geotechnical properties of dredged marine sediments treated at high water/cement ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekik, Boubaker; Boutouil, Mohamed

    2009-06-01

    Cement and lime are widely employed in soil and sediment treatment for an improvement of geotechnical properties, such as an increase in mechanical strength which enables beneficial use in various geotechnical applications. In this study, fine organic-rich dredged harbour sediments of 120% relative water content were treated with dry cement at contents varying between 2% and 10% of bulk sediment wet weight. Tests based on assessments of one-dimensional compression and Atterberg limits were performed on untreated and cement-treated sediments for various curing periods, as well as grain-size, SEM and X-ray diffraction analyses. The results confirm that increasing the cement content improves the geotechnical properties of these harbour sediments. Already in the early phase of curing (first 3 days of curing), particle size increases while sediment plasticity decreases. Changes in the compressibility behaviour include an increase in apparent preconsolidation pressure, in the compression index C c and in the primary consolidation coefficient C v, and a decrease in the secondary compression index C_α . This means that the new materials are characterized by a behaviour intermediate between that of fine and that of coarser soils.

  5. Hydraulic Conductivity of Residual Soil-Cement Mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindasamy, P.; Taha, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    In Malaysia, although there are several researches on engineering properties of residual soils, however study on the hydraulic conductivity properties of metasedimentary residual soils is still lacking. Construction of containment walls like slurry wall techniques can be achieved with hydraulic conductivity of approximately 5 x 10-7cm/sec. The objectives of the study were to determine the physical properties of metasedimentary residual soils and to determine the influence of 1%, 3%, 5% and 10% of cement on hydraulic conductivity parameters. The coefficient of hydraulic conductivity of the soil naturally and soil-cement mixtures were determined by using the falling head test. According to the test, the hydraulic conductivity of the original soil was 4.16 x 10-8 m/s. The value decreases to 3.89 x 10-8 m/s, 2.78 x 10-8 m/s then 6.83 x 10-9 m/s with the addition of 1%, 3% and 5% of cement additives, respectively. During the hydration process, cement hydrates is formed followed by the increase in pH value and Ca(OH)2 which will alter the modification of pores size and distribution. When the quantity of cement increases, the pores size decrease. But, the addition of 10% cement gives an increased hydraulic conductivity value to 2.78 x 10-8 m/s. With 10%, the pore size increase might due to flocculation and agglomeration reaction. The generated hydraulic conductivity values will indirectly become a guide in the preliminary soil cement stabilization to modify the properties of the soil to become more like the properties of a soft rock.1. Introduction

  6. Criteria for Remote Sensing Detection of Sulfate Cemented Soils on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Christopher D.; Mustard, John F.

    2000-01-01

    Spectral measurements of loose and cemented mixtures of palagonitic soil and sulfates were made to determine whether cemented soils could be identified on Mars. Cemented MgSO4 mixtures exhibit an enhanced 9 micron sulfate fundamental compared to gypsum mixtures due to more diffuse and pervasive cementing.

  7. Peach leaf responses to soil and cement dust pollution.

    PubMed

    Maletsika, Persefoni A; Nanos, George D; Stavroulakis, George G

    2015-10-01

    Dust pollution can negatively affect plant productivity in hot, dry and with high irradiance areas during summer. Soil or cement dust were applied on peach trees growing in a Mediterranean area with the above climatic characteristics. Soil and cement dust accumulation onto the leaves decreased the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) available to the leaves without causing any shade effect. Soil and mainly cement dust deposition onto the leaves decreased stomatal conductance, photosynthetic and transpiration rates, and water use efficiency due possibly to stomatal blockage and other leaf cellular effects. In early autumn, rain events removed soil dust and leaf functions partly recovered, while cement dust created a crust partially remaining onto the leaves and causing more permanent stress. Leaf characteristics were differentially affected by the two dusts studied due to their different hydraulic properties. Leaf total chlorophyll decreased and total phenol content increased with dust accumulation late in the summer compared to control leaves due to intense oxidative stress. The two dusts did not cause serious metal imbalances to the leaves, except of lower leaf K content. PMID:26054460

  8. Cemented Volcanic Soils, Martian Spectra and Implications for the Martian Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Schiffman, P.; Drief, A.; Southard, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Cemented soils formed via reactions with salts are studied here and provide information about the climate when they formed. Spectroscopic and microprobe studies have been performed on cemented volcanic crusts in order to learn about the composition of these materials, how they formed, and what they can tell us about climatic interactions with surface material on Mars to form cemented soils. These crusts include carbonate, sulfate and opaline components that may all be present in cemented soil units on Mars.

  9. Behaviour of cement-treated MSWI bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Pecqueur, G; Crignon, C; Quénée, B

    2001-01-01

    MSWI bottom ash is the residue of combustion. The use of bottom ash in road construction is wide spread. French legislation forbids the disposal of resuable waste in special landfill from 2002. Moreover, "arrêté du 9 mai 1994" provides environmental criteria (leaching threshold, etc.), and evaluates this material according to utilisation in road construction. In such application, bottom ash is often treated with binder to improve its mechanical features. Nevertheless, bottom ash is subject to chemical problems. These problems induce an expansion which brings about cracking and finally road destruction. Therefore, it is necessary to estimate the swelling potential of MSWI bottom ash prior utilisation. This is one of the aims of the European contract "Mashroad" (contract BRST CT97-5150). This study involved 4 years of work on cement-treated MSWI bottom ash. It examined different tests that show the importance of oxidation of aluminium in the swelling reaction and the efficiency of different treatments. Different binders were used in order to have different proportions of clinker. The kinetic aspects of aluminium-binder reaction were also studied. Finally, we present a special cell to measure the swelling pressure of these materials is presented. PMID:11280513

  10. A Model of Thermal Conductivity for Planetary Soils. 2; Theory for Cemented Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piqueux, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model of heat conduction through particulate media made of spherical grains cemented by various bonding agents is presented. The pore-filling gas conductivity, volume fraction, and thermal conductivity of the cementing phase are tunable parameters. Cement fractions <0.001-0.01% in volume have small effects on the soil bulk thermal conductivity. A significant conductivity increase (factor 3-8) is observed for bond fractions of 0.01 to 1% in volume. In the 1 to 15% bond fraction domain, the conductivity increases continuously but less intensely (25-100% conductivity increase compared to a 1% bond system). Beyond 15% of cements, the conductivity increases vigorously and the bulk conductivity rapidly approaches that of bedrock. The composition of the cements (i.e. conductivity) has little influence on the bulk thermal inertia of the soil, especially if the volume of bond <10%. These results indicate that temperature measurements are sufficient to detect cemented soils and quantify the amount of cementing phase, but the mineralogical nature of the bonds and the typical grain size are unlikely to be determined from orbit. On Mars, a widespread surface unit characterized by a medium albedo (0.19-0.26) and medium/high thermal inertia (200-600 J s(0.5)/sq m/K) has long been hypothesized to be associated with a duricrust. The fraction of cement required to fit the thermal data is less than approx.1-5% by volume. This small amount of material is consistent with orbital observations, confirming that soil cementation is an important factor controlling the thermal inertia of the Martian surface

  11. Iron filings cement engineered soil mix

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioretention cells are used in urban stormwater management to reduce storm surge and nutrient loss. The cells are filled with mixtures of soil, sand, compost, and other materials, and are underlain by a drain. The purpose of this study was to determine if iron filings would be a suitable filter for ...

  12. A mild alkali treated jute fibre controlling the hydration behaviour of greener cement paste

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Byung-Wan; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    To reduce the antagonistic effect of jute fibre on the setting and hydration of jute reinforced cement, modified jute fibre reinforcement would be a unique approach. The present investigation deals with the effectiveness of mild alkali treated (0.5%) jute fibre on the setting and hydration behaviour of cement. Setting time measurement, hydration test and analytical characterizations of the hardened samples (viz., FTIR, XRD, DSC, TGA, and free lime estimation) were used to evaluate the effect of alkali treated jute fibre. From the hydration test, the time (t) required to reach maximum temperature for the hydration of control cement sample is estimated to be 860 min, whilst the time (t) is measured to be 1040 min for the hydration of a raw jute reinforced cement sample. However, the time (t) is estimated to be 1020 min for the hydration of an alkali treated jute reinforced cement sample. Additionally, from the analytical characterizations, it is determined that fibre-cement compatibility is increased and hydration delaying effect is minimized by using alkali treated jute fibre as fibre reinforcement. Based on the analyses, a model has been proposed to explain the setting and hydration behaviour of alkali treated jute fibre reinforced cement composite. PMID:25592665

  13. A mild alkali treated jute fibre controlling the hydration behaviour of greener cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Byung-Wan; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    To reduce the antagonistic effect of jute fibre on the setting and hydration of jute reinforced cement, modified jute fibre reinforcement would be a unique approach. The present investigation deals with the effectiveness of mild alkali treated (0.5%) jute fibre on the setting and hydration behaviour of cement. Setting time measurement, hydration test and analytical characterizations of the hardened samples (viz., FTIR, XRD, DSC, TGA, and free lime estimation) were used to evaluate the effect of alkali treated jute fibre. From the hydration test, the time (t) required to reach maximum temperature for the hydration of control cement sample is estimated to be 860 min, whilst the time (t) is measured to be 1040 min for the hydration of a raw jute reinforced cement sample. However, the time (t) is estimated to be 1020 min for the hydration of an alkali treated jute reinforced cement sample. Additionally, from the analytical characterizations, it is determined that fibre-cement compatibility is increased and hydration delaying effect is minimized by using alkali treated jute fibre as fibre reinforcement. Based on the analyses, a model has been proposed to explain the setting and hydration behaviour of alkali treated jute fibre reinforced cement composite.

  14. A mild alkali treated jute fibre controlling the hydration behaviour of greener cement paste.

    PubMed

    Jo, Byung-Wan; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    To reduce the antagonistic effect of jute fibre on the setting and hydration of jute reinforced cement, modified jute fibre reinforcement would be a unique approach. The present investigation deals with the effectiveness of mild alkali treated (0.5%) jute fibre on the setting and hydration behaviour of cement. Setting time measurement, hydration test and analytical characterizations of the hardened samples (viz., FTIR, XRD, DSC, TGA, and free lime estimation) were used to evaluate the effect of alkali treated jute fibre. From the hydration test, the time (t) required to reach maximum temperature for the hydration of control cement sample is estimated to be 860 min, whilst the time (t) is measured to be 1040 min for the hydration of a raw jute reinforced cement sample. However, the time (t) is estimated to be 1020 min for the hydration of an alkali treated jute reinforced cement sample. Additionally, from the analytical characterizations, it is determined that fibre-cement compatibility is increased and hydration delaying effect is minimized by using alkali treated jute fibre as fibre reinforcement. Based on the analyses, a model has been proposed to explain the setting and hydration behaviour of alkali treated jute fibre reinforced cement composite. PMID:25592665

  15. Reduction of soil pollution by usingwaste of the limestone in the cement industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, M. Cecilia Soto; Robles Castillo, Marcelo; Blanco Fernandez, David; Diaz Gonzalez, Marcos; Naranjo Lamilla, Pedro; Moore Undurraga, Fernando; Pardo Fabregat, Francisco; Vidal, Manuel Miguel Jordan; Bech, Jaume; Roca, Nuria

    2016-04-01

    In the cement manufacturing process (wet) a residue is generated in the flotation process. This builds up causing contamination of soil, groundwater and agricultural land unusable type. In this study to reduce soil and water pollution 10% of the dose of cement was replaced by waste of origin limestone. Concretes were produced with 3 doses of cement and mechanical strengths of each type of concrete to 7, 28 and 90 days were determined. the results indicate that the characteristics of calcareous residue can replace up to 10% of the dose of cement without significant decreases in strength occurs. It is noted that use of the residue reduces the initial resistance, so that the dose of cement should not be less than 200 kg of cement per m3. The results allow recommends the use of limestone waste since it has been observed decrease in soil and water contamination without prejudice construction material Keywords: Soil contamination; Limestone residue; Adding concrete

  16. Soil Remediation of an Arsenic-Contaminated Site With Ferrous Sulfate and Type V Portland Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illera, V.; O'Day, P. A.; Rivera, N.; Root, R.; Rafferty, M. T.; Vlassopoulos, D.

    2005-12-01

    High levels of arsenic are present in a site adjacent to San Francisco Bay (in East Palo Alto, CA) as a consequence of the activity of a former pesticide manufacturing plant. Most of the readily accessible arsenic at the site has been removed by remedial excavation and surface capping. In-situ fixation of residual arsenic was performed close to the source about 10 years ago where arsenic values in capped soils ranged from 500 to 5000 mg kg-1. The fixation method consisted of the addition of ferrous sulfate (3% w/w), type V Portland cement (10% w/w) and water. Both products were mixed with the contaminated soil to a treatment depth between 1.5 and 9 meters. The treated soil was then capped to prevent weathering. This long-term amended soil offers an opportunity to compare the processes that prevent microbial arsenic reduction and control the immobilization of arsenic in the treated soils versus natural soils, and to study the aging effects of arsenic sorption. Solid phase characterization of soil samples from both the field and controlled laboratory experiments were carried out to study the speciation and bioavailability of arsenic and to ascertain the mechanisms of the arsenic immobilization in the treated soil. These methods included physical description by field observations, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy, total elemental concentrations, and solid phase fractionation by sequential extraction. Both synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and XRD measurements were used to determine oxidation state of arsenic and iron and host phases present in the soil. The remedial treatment was successful in immobilizing the arsenic in the contaminated soil, and decreasing its leachability. Measurements taken at short aging times (during the first month) showed that the treatment was effective in reducing leachable arsenic as evidenced by the TCLP wet test (< 5 mg l-1 leached). The field amendment influenced

  17. Mechanical and leaching behaviour of slag-cement and lime-activated slag stabilised/solidified contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kogbara, Reginald B; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2011-05-01

    Stabilisation/solidification (S/S) is an effective technique for reducing the leachability of contaminants in soils. Very few studies have investigated the use of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) for S/S treatment of contaminated soils, although it has been shown to be effective in ground improvement. This study sought to investigate the potential of GGBS activated by cement and lime for S/S treatment of a mixed contaminated soil. A sandy soil spiked with 3000mg/kg each of a cocktail of heavy metals (Cd, Ni, Zn, Cu and Pb) and 10,000mg/kg of diesel was treated with binder blends of one part hydrated lime to four parts GGBS (lime-slag), and one part cement to nine parts GGBS (slag-cement). Three binder dosages, 5, 10 and 20% (m/m) were used and contaminated soil-cement samples were compacted to their optimum water contents. The effectiveness of the treatment was assessed using unconfined compressive strength (UCS), permeability and acid neutralisation capacity (ANC) tests with determination of contaminant leachability at the different acid additions. UCS values of up to 800kPa were recorded at 28days. The lowest coefficient of permeability recorded was 5×10(-9)m/s. With up to 20% binder dosage, the leachability of the contaminants was reduced to meet relevant environmental quality standards and landfill waste acceptance criteria. The pH-dependent leachability of the metals decreased over time. The results show that GGBS activated by cement and lime would be effective in reducing the leachability of contaminants in contaminated soils. PMID:21420148

  18. Reuse of grits waste for the production of soil--cement bricks.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, F B; Holanda, J N F

    2013-12-15

    This investigation focuses on the reuse of grits waste as a raw material for replacing Portland cement by up to 30 wt.% in soil-cement bricks. The grits waste was obtained from a cellulose factory located in south-eastern Brazil. We initially characterized the waste sample with respect to its chemical composition, X-ray diffraction, fineness index, morphology, pozzolanic activity, and pollution potential. Soil-cement bricks were then prepared using the waste material and were tested to determine their technological properties (e.g., water absorption, apparent density, volumetric shrinkage, and compressive strength). Microstructural evolution was accompanied by confocal microscopy. It was found that the grits waste is mainly composed of calcite (CaCO3) particles. Our results indicate that grits waste can be used economically, safely, and sustainably at weight percentages of up to 20% to partially replace Portland cement in soil-cement bricks. PMID:24140481

  19. Effect of drying-wetting cycles on leaching behavior of cement solidified lead-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang-Shan; Xue, Qiang; Wang, Ping; Li, Zhen-Ze; Liu, Lei

    2014-12-01

    Lead contaminated soil was treated by different concentration of ordinary Portland cement (OPC). Solidified cylindrical samples were dried at 40°C in oven for 48 h subsequent to 24h of immersing in different solution for one drying-wetting. 10 cycles were conducted on specimens. The changes in mass loss of specimens, as well as leaching concentration and pH of filtered leachates were studied after each cycle. Results indicated that drying-wetting cycles could accelerate the leaching and deterioration of solidified specimens. The cumulative leached lead with acetic acid (pH=2.88) in this study was 109, 83 and 71 mg respectively for solidified specimens of cement-to-dry soil (C/Sd) ratios 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4, compared to 37, 30, and 25mg for a semi-dynamic leaching test. With the increase of cycle times, the cumulative mass loss of specimens increased linearly, but pH of filtered leachates decreased. The leachability and deterioration of solidified specimens increased with acidity of solution. Increases of C/Sd clearly reduced the leachability and deterioration behavior. PMID:25433988

  20. [Peculiarities of structure-function organization of microbial groups of soil contaminated by cement dust].

    PubMed

    Stefurak, V P

    2001-01-01

    Long-term contamination of the forest soil by the cement dust leads to disturbances of stability of natural microbial groups, changes their quantitative and qualitative composition, results in substitution of some microbial associations by other ones. The intensive contamination of the soil by the effluents of cement integrated works, inhibits the intensity of nitrogen fixation processes and decay of the forest litter, development of micromycetes, results in the decrease of the length of mycelium and its biomass. PMID:11692672

  1. Spectroscopy of Loose and Cemented Sulfate-Bearing Soils: Implications for Duricrust on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christopher D.; Mustard, John F.

    2002-07-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the spectroscopic properties of sulfate in martian soil analogs over the wavelength range 0.3 to 25 μm (which is relevant to existing and planned remotely sensed data sets for Mars). Sulfate is an abundant component of martian soil (up to 9% SO 3 by weight) and apparently exists as a particulate in the soil but also as a cement. Although previous studies have addressed the spectroscopic identity of sulfates on Mars, none have used laboratory mixtures of materials with sulfates at the abundances measured by landed spacecraft, nor have any works considered the effect of salt-cementation on spectral properties of soil materials. For this work we created mixtures of a palagonitic soil (JSC Mars-1) and sulfates (MgSO 4 and CaSO 4·2H 2O). The effects of cementation were determined and separated from the effects of packing and hydration by measuring the samples as loose powders, packed powders, cemented materials, and disaggregated materials. The results show that the presence of particulate sulfate is best observed in the 4-5 μm region. Soils cemented with sulfate exhibit a pronounced restrahlen band between 8 and 9 μm as well as well-defined absorptions in the 4-5 μm region. Cementation effects are distinct from packing effects and disaggregation of cemented samples rapidly diminishes the strength of the restrahlen bands. The results of this study show that sulfate in loose materials is more detectable in the near infrared (4-5 μm) than in the thermal infrared (8-9 μm). However, cemented materials are easily distinguished from loose mixtures in the thermal infrared because of the high values of their absorption coefficient in this region. Together these results suggest that both wavelength regions are important for determining the spatial extent and physical form of sulfates on the surface of Mars.

  2. Stabilization treatment of soft subgrade soil by sewage sludge ash and cement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Lin, Deng-Fong

    2009-02-15

    In this study, incinerated sewage sludge ash (ISSA) is mixed with cement in a fixed ratio of 4:1 for use as a stabilizer to improve the strength of soft, cohesive, subgrade soil. Five different ratios (in wt%: 0%, 2%, 4%, 8%, and 16%) of ISSA/cement admixture are mixed with cohesive soil to make soil samples. In order to understand the influences of admixtures on the soil properties, tests of the pH value, Atterberg limits, compaction, California bearing ratio (CBR), unconfined compressive strength, and triaxial compression were performed on those samples. The study shows that the unconfined compressive strength of specimens with the ISSA/cement addition was improved to approximately 3-7 times better than that of the untreated soil; furthermore, the swelling behavior was also effectively reduced as much as 10-60% for those samples. In some samples, the ISSA/cement additive improved the CBR values by up to 30 times that of untreated soil. This suggests that ISSA/cement has many potential applications in the field of geotechnical engineering. PMID:18579294

  3. Characteristics and mechanical properties of acrylolpamidronate-treated strontium containing bioactive bone cement.

    PubMed

    Li, Z Y; Yang, C; Lu, W W; Xu, B; Lam, W M; Ni, G X; Abbah, S A; Yang, F; Cheung, K M C; Luk, K D K

    2007-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of surface treatment on the mechanical properties of strontium-containing hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA) bioactive bone cement. Previously we developed an injectable bioactive cement (SrHAC) system composed of Sr-HA powders and bisphenol A diglycidylether dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA). In this study, the Sr-HA powder was subjected to surface treatment using acrylolpamidronate, a bisphosphonate derivative, which has a polymerizable group, to improve the interface between inorganic filler and organic matrix by binding Sr-HA and copolymerizing into the matrix. After surface treatment, the compression strength, bending strength, and stiffness of the resulting composites were defined by using a material testing machine (MTS) according to ISO 5833. The fracture surface of the bone cement specimen was observed with a scanning electron microscope. Invitro cytotoxicity of surface-treated SrHAC was also studied using a tetrazolium-based cell viability assay (MTS/pms) on human osteoblast-like cells, the SaOS-2 cell line. Cells were seeded at a density of 10(4)/mL and allowed to grow in an incubator for 48 h at 37 degrees C. Results indicated that after surface treatment, the compression strength and stiffness significantly improved by 22.68 and 14.51%, respectively. The bending strength and stiffness of the bioactive bone cement also showed 19.06 and 8.91% improvements via three-point bending test. The fracture surface micromorphology after compression and bending revealed that the bonding between the resin to surface-treated filler considerably improved. The cell viability indicated that the treated particles were nontoxic and did not inhibit cell growth. This study demonstrated a new surface chemistry route to enhance the covalent bonds between inorganic fillers and polymer matrix for improving the mechanical properties of bone cement. This method not only improves the overall mechanical performance but also increases

  4. Assessment of Physical and Mechanical Properties of Cement Panel Influenced by Treated and Untreated Coconut Fiber Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Alida; Jamaludin, Shamsul Baharin; Anwar, Mohamed Iylia; Noor, Mazlee Mohd; Hussin, Kamarudin

    This project was conducted to produce a cement panel with the addition of treated and untreated coconut fiber in cement panel. Coconut fiber was added to replace coarse aggregate (sand) in this cement panel. In this project, the ratios used to design the mixture were 1:1:0, 1:0.97:0.03, 1:0.94:0.06, 1:0.91:0.09 (cement: sand: coconut fiber). The water cement ratio was constant at 0.55. The sizes of sample tested were, 160 mm x 40 mm x 40 mm for compression test, and 100 mm x 100 mm x 40 mm for density, moisture content and water absorption tests. After curing samples for 28 days, it was found that the addition of coconut fiber, further increase in compressive strength of cement panel with untreated coconut fiber. Moisture content of cement panel with treated coconut fiber increased with increasing content of coconut fiber whereas water absorption of cement panel with untreated coconut fiber increased with increasing content of coconut fiber. The density of cement panel decreased with the addition of untreated and treated coconut fiber.

  5. Characterization of iron- and manganese-cemented redoximorphic aggregates in wetland soils contaminated with mine wastes.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Patrick J; McDaniel, Paul A; Strawn, Daniel G

    2008-01-01

    In wetlands, translocation of Fe and Mn from reducing to oxidizing zones creates localized enrichments and depletions of oxide minerals. In zones of enrichment, oxides cement matrix particles together into aggregates. In this paper, we describe the various Fe- and Mn-cemented features present in the 1 to 2-mm size fraction of mine-waste contaminated wetland soils of the Coeur d'Alene (CDA) River Basin in northern Idaho. These aggregates are categorized based on color and morphology. Total Fe and Mn concentrations are also reported. Distribution of the aggregates in soil profiles along an elevation transect with varying water table heights was investigated. Six distinct categories of aggregates were characterized in the 1 to 2-mm size fraction. The two most predominant categories were aggregates cemented by only Fe oxides and aggregates cemented by a mixture of Fe and Mn oxides. Iron-depleted aggregates, Fe and Mn-cemented sand aggregates, and root channel linings were also identified. The remaining aggregates were categorized into a catch-all category that consisted of primarily charcoal particles. The highest Fe content was in the root channel linings, and the highest Mn content was in the Fe/Mn cemented particles. Iron-cemented aggregates were most common in surface horizons at all sites, and root channels were most common in the 30 to 45-cm core at the lowland point, reflecting the presence of deep rooting vegetation at this site. Spatial distributions of other aggregates at the site were not significant. PMID:18948492

  6. The functional role of carbonate-cemented soil horizons in desert ecosystems: Spatial and temporal dynamics of plant water availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In water limited ecosystems, soil profile characteristics can control plant community composition and production through their effects on spatial and temporal patterns of plant available water. Little is known, however, about water availability in soil horizons cemented with carbonates (petrocalcic ...

  7. Effects of direct land application of calcitic lime and lime- and cement kiln dust-sanitized biosolids on the chemical and spectroscopic characteristics of soil lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Dinel, H.; Schnitzer, M.; Pare, T.; Topp, E. ); Lemee, L.; Ambles, A. . Lab. de Chimie); Pelzer, N. )

    1999-05-01

    To determine the extent to which applications of calcitic lime and sanitized biosolids affect the quality of soil organic matter (SOM), lipids extracted from an unamended soil (CON) and from soils amended with calcitic lime (CAL), and lime (LSB)- and cement kiln dust (CDB)-sanitized biosolids were characterized by chemical analysis and Pyrolysis-Gas chromatography (Py-GC). From diethyl ether (DEE) and CHCl[sub 3] soluble lipids, and from weight ratios of the extracts, the organic matter in the soil amended with CDB-treated biosolids seemed to be more biodegraded and biochemically inert than the organic matter in soils that received LSB-treated biosolids and calcitic lime and that in the control soil.

  8. ALTERNATIVE FIELD METHODS TO TREAT MERCURY IN SOIL

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest F. Stine Jr; Steven T. Downey

    2002-08-14

    contamination and to increase the TCLP mercury values. IT/NFS investigated ambient temperature amalgamation/stabilization/fixation of mercury-contaminated soils to meet these objectives. Treatment ranged in size from a few ounces to 10 pounds. The treatability study philosophy was to develop working envelops of formulations where reasonable minimum and maximum amounts of each reagent that would successfully treat the contaminated soil were determined. The dosages investigated were based on ratios of stoichiometric reactions and applications of standard sets of formulations. The approach purposely identified formulations that failed short or longer cure-time performance criteria to define the limits of the envelope. Reagent envelops successfully met the project requirements one day after treatment and after greater than 30-day cures. The use of multiple levels of spikes allowed the establishment of reagent dosages that were successful across a broad range of mercury values, e.g., 50 to 6000 mg/kg mercury. The treatment products were damp to slightly wet material. Enough drying reagent, e.g., Portland cement or lime by-product, were added to some formulations to control the leachability of uranium and other hazardous metals and to ensure the product passed the paint filter test. Cost analyzes and conceptual designs for four alternatives for full-scale treatments were prepared. The alternatives included two in-situ treatments and two ex-situ treatments. The cost estimates were based on the results from the bench-scale study. All four alternatives treatment costs were well below the baseline costs.

  9. Metals distribution in soils around the cement factory in southern Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Khashman, Omar A; Shawabkeh, Reyad A

    2006-04-01

    Thirty one soil samples were collected from south Jordan around the cement factory in Qadissiya area. The samples were obtained at two depths, 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm and were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometery for Pb, Zn, Cd, Fe, Cu and Cr. Physicochemical factors believed to affect their mobility of metals in soil of the study area were examined such as; pH, TOM, CaCO3, CEC and conductivity. The relatively high concentrations of lead, zinc and cadmium in the soil samples of the investigated area were related to anthropogenic sources such as cement industry, agriculture activities and traffic emissions. It was found that the lead, zinc and cadmium have the highest level in area close to the cement factory, while the concentration of chromium was low. This study indicate that all of the metals are concentrated on the surface soil, and decreased in the lower part of the soil, this due to reflects their mobility and physical properties of soil and its alkaline pH values. The use of factor analysis showed that anthropogenic activities seem to be the responsible source of pollution for metals in urban soils. PMID:16361028

  10. Treating giant cell tumours with curettage, electrocautery, burring, phenol irrigation, and cementation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Myung-Sang; Kim, Sung-SooS S; Moon, Jeong-Lim; Kim, Sung-Sim; Moon, Hanlim

    2013-08-01

    PURPOSE. To report on 23 patients with giant cell tumour (GCT) of the femur or tibia treated with curettage, electrocautery, burring, phenol irrigation, and cementation. METHODS. Records of these 14 men and 9 women aged 22 to 38 (mean, 31) years were reviewed. The most common site involved was the distal femur (n=13), followed by proximal tibia (n=8), proximal femur (n=1), and distal tibia (n=1). The lesions were classified as grade I (n=3), grade II (n=18), and grade III (n=2). Based on histology, the tumour stage was classified as grade I (n=5) and grade II (n=18). Two of these patients had recurrences, which were initially treated with simple curettage and bone grafting of the distal femur and distal tibia. RESULTS. The mean follow-up period was 5.7 (range, 2.5-10.1) years. 14 of the 23 patients were followed up for over 10 years. No patient developed any local recurrence, remote metastasis, or complication related to surgery or adjuvant therapy. CONCLUSION. Combined treatment entailing curettage, electrocautery, burring, phenol irrigation, and cementation was effective in treating GCT of bone. PMID:24014786

  11. Soil stabilization and pavement recycling with self-cementing coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-15

    This manual provides design information for self-cementing coal fly ash as the sole stabilizing agent for a wide range of engineering applications. As in any process, the application of sound engineering practices, appropriate testing, and evaluation of fly ash quality and characteristics will lend themselves to successful projects using the guidelines in this manual. Topics discussed include: self-cementing coal fly ash characteristics; laboratory mix design; stabilization of clay soils; stabilisation of granular materials; construction considerations; high sulfate ash; environmental considerations for fly ash stabilization; design considerations; state specification/guidelines/standards; and a sample of a typical stabilization specification.

  12. Hybrid life cycle assessment comparison of colloidal silica and cement grouted soil barrier remediation technologies.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patricia M; Spatari, Sabrina; Cucura, Jeffrey

    2013-04-15

    Site remediation involves balancing numerous costs and benefits but often neglects the environmental impacts over the entire project life cycle. Life cycle assessment (LCA) offers a framework for inclusion of global environmental "systems-level" decision metrics in combination with technological and cost analysis. We compare colloidal silica (CS) and cement grouted soil barrier remediation technologies for soils affected by low level radionuclides at a U.S. Superfund site using hybrid LCA methods. CS is a new, high performance grouting material installed using permeation grouting techniques. Cement, a more traditional grouting material, is typically installed using jet grouting techniques. Life cycle impacts were evaluated using the US EPA TRACI 2 model. Results show the highest life cycle environmental impacts for the CS barrier occur during materials production and transportation to the site. In general, the life cycle impacts for the cement barrier were dominated by materials production; however, in the extreme scenario the life cycle impacts were dominated by truck transportation of spoils to a distant, off-site radioactive waste facility. It is only in the extreme scenario tested in which soils are transported by truck (Option 2) that spoils waste transport dominates LCIA results. Life cycle environmental impacts for both grout barriers were most sensitive to resource input requirements for manufacturing volumes and transportation. Uncertainty associated with the efficacy of new technology such as CS over its required design life indicates that barrier replacement could increase its life cycle environmental impact above that of the cement barrier. PMID:23500422

  13. Lithological and land-use based assessment of heavy metal pollution in soils surrounding a cement plant in SW Europe.

    PubMed

    Cutillas-Barreiro, Laura; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paula; Gómez-Armesto, Antía; Fernández-Sanjurjo, María José; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-15

    We study the influence of phasing out a cement plant on the heavy metal (Hg, Pb and Cr) content in the surrounding soils, taking into account factors often neglected, such as contributions due to local lithology or land use. The range of total Hg was 10-144µg kg(-1), reaching up to 41 and 145mgkg(-1) for total contents of Pb and Cr, respectively. Forest soils showed higher concentration of Hg than prairie soils, indicating the importance of land use on the accumulation of volatile heavy metals in soils. In forest soils, total Hg showed a trend to decrease with soil depth, whereas in prairie soils the vertical pattern of heavy metal concentrations was quite homogeneous. In most cases, the distance to the cement plant was not a factor of influence in the soils content of the analyzed heavy metals. Total Pb and Cr contents in soils nearby the cement plant were quite similar to those found in the local lithology, resulting in enrichment factor values (EF's) below 2. This suggests that soil parent material is the main source of these heavy metals in the studied soils, while the contribution of the cement plant to Pb and Cr soil pollution was almost negligible. On the contrary, the soils surrounding the cement plant accumulate a significant amount of Hg, compared to the underlying lithology. This was especially noticeable in forest soils, where Hg EF achieved values up to 36. These results are of relevance, bearing in mind that Hg accumulation in soils may be an issue of environmental concern, particularly in prairie soils, where temporal flooding can favor Hg transformation to highly toxic methyl-Hg. In addition, the concurrence of acid soils and total-Cr concentrations in the range of those considered phytotoxic should be also stressed. PMID:27099999

  14. An assessment of post-remediation changes in sediment chemistry partitioning in an S/S treated soil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutter, S.; MacLeod, C. L.; Canning, K.; Carey, P. J.; Hills, C. D.

    2003-04-01

    The Astra Pyrotechnics plant located in the Dartford Marshes, Kent, UK was the site of a field trial utilizing cement stabilization/solidification (S/S) in September 2000. A hotspot containing 35% copper and several thousand part per million lead and zinc was treated in order to trial an new form of cement stabilization (accelerated carbonation technology or ACT) developed by the Centre for Contaminated Land Remediation. A 10 by 20 meter plot was divided into 4 cells into which untreated, OPC (ordinary Portland cement) treated, Envirocem (a Lafarge special cement) treated and ACT treated soil was placed. Each cell has a leachate collection system and the leachate is monitored monthly. In August 2003, 24 cm cores were collected from each cell. These cores were analysed to determine changes in sediment chemistry and metal partitioning characteristics. Sediment chemistry was determined using an aqua regia digestion followed by ICP OES analysis. The CISMED extraction procedure was used to examine partitioning changes. The contaminant concentrations in the leachates remain below UK drinking water standards. However, seasonal cyclicity is observed with an increase of metals in the leachates during winter months. The sediment cores were analysed for Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mn, Mg, Na, Ni, Pb and Zn. Only the untreated cell showed any discernable changes in metal concentration with depth. The S/S treated cells show no trends although differences in partitioning between the cells is observed.

  15. Morphological properties of surface-treated carbon nanotubes in cement-based composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baomin; Han, Yu; Zhang, Tingting

    2012-11-01

    The morphological properties of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reinforced Portland cement composites were investigated. MWCNTs with addition of up to 0.15 wt% of cement were incorporated to Portland cement with a water to cement ratio of 0.35. The porosity and pore size distribution of the composites were measured by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), and the results indicate that the cement doped with MWCNTs obtained lower porosity and concentrated pore size distribution. The microstructure was analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). It is shown that MWCNTs act as bridges and networks across cracks and voids. PMID:23421224

  16. A Novel Injectable Borate Bioactive Glass Cement as an Antibiotic Delivery Vehicle for Treating Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xu; Gu, Yi-Fei; Jia, Wei-Tao; Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Wang, Yang; Huang, Wen-Hai; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Background A novel injectable cement composed of chitosan-bonded borate bioactive glass (BG) particles was evaluated as a carrier for local delivery of vancomycin in the treatment of osteomyelitis in a rabbit tibial model. Materials and Methods The setting time, injectability, and compressive strength of the borate BG cement, and the release profile of vancomycin from the cement were measured in vitro. The capacity of the vancomycin-loaded BG cement to eradicate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-induced osteomyelitis in rabbit tibiae in vivo was evaluated and compared with that for a vancomycin-loaded calcium sulfate (CS) cement and for intravenous injection of vancomycin. Results The BG cement had an injectability of >90% during the first 3 minutes after mixing, hardened within 30 minutes and, after hardening, had a compressive strength of 18±2 MPa. Vancomycin was released from the BG cement into phosphate-buffered saline for up to 36 days, and the cumulative amount of vancomycin released was 86% of the amount initially loaded into the cement. In comparison, vancomycin was released from the CS cement for up 28 days and the cumulative amount released was 89%. Two months post-surgery, radiography and microbiological tests showed that the BG and CS cements had a better ability to eradicate osteomyelitis when compared to intravenous injection of vancomycin, but there was no significant difference between the BG and CS cements in eradicating the infection. Histological examination showed that the BG cement was biocompatible and had a good capacity for regenerating bone in the tibial defects. Conclusions These results indicate that borate BG cement is a promising material both as an injectable carrier for vancomycin in the eradication of osteomyelitis and as an osteoconductive matrix to regenerate bone after the infection is cured. PMID:24427311

  17. Effect of acid rain pH on leaching behavior of cement stabilized lead-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan-Jun; Wei, Ming-Li; Reddy, Krishna R; Liu, Zhao-Peng; Jin, Fei

    2014-04-30

    Cement stabilization is a practical approach to remediate soils contaminated with high levels of lead. However, the potential for leaching of lead out of these stabilized soils under variable acid rain pH conditions is a major environmental concern. This study investigates the effects of acid rain on the leaching characteristics of cement stabilized lead contaminated soil under different pH conditions. Clean kaolin clay and the same soil spiked with 2% lead contamination are stabilized with cement contents of 12 and 18% and then cured for 28 days. The soil samples are then subjected to a series of accelerated leaching tests (or semi-dynamic leaching tests) using a simulated acid rain leachant prepared at pH 2.0, 4.0 or 7.0. The results show that the strongly acidic leachant (pH ∼2.0) significantly altered the leaching behavior of lead as well as calcium present in the soil. However, the differences in the leaching behavior of the soil when the leachant was mildly acidic (pH ∼4.0) and neutral (pH ∼7.0) prove to be minor. In addition, it is observed that the lead contamination and cement content levels can have a considerable impact on the leaching behavior of the soils. Overall, the leachability of lead and calcium is attributed to the stability of the hydration products and their consequent influence on the soil buffering capacity and structure. PMID:24637445

  18. Effects of irrigation with treated wastewater on chemical soil properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvan, M.; Danesh, S.; Alizadeh, A.

    2009-04-01

    The use of treated wastewater, as a marginal quality water, in agriculture is a justified practice, yet care should be taken to minimize adverse environmental impacts and to prevent soil deterioration. The objective of this research was to investigate the long-term effects of irrigation with treated wastewater on soil properties. The investigation was carried out by comparison of soil properties in two different fields; one irrigated with the effluent from Parkand Abad Wastewater Treatment Plant over a period of six years and the other one irrigated with water over the same period of time. Soil samples were taken from different depths of 0-25, 25-50, 50-100, 100-150 and 150-200 cm in both fields, and analyzed for various chemical properties. The results indicated that EC, TDS and Chlorine were increased significantly, in all depths, in the soil irrigated with the treated wastewater. The use of treated wastewater increased exchangeable potassium, magnesium and phosphorous significantly in the top soil layer (0-25), while the increase in calcium was occurred up to depth of 50 cm. Irrigation with the treated wastewater increased soil sodium content in all depths except for the depth of 100-150 cm. Irrigation with the treated wastewater did not affect the soil pH and nitrogen content significantly.

  19. The effect of portland cement for solidification of soils contaminated by mine tailings containing heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian-Jun, Chen; Zheng-Miao, Xie

    2010-05-01

    Portland cement(PC) was used to solidify the lead-zinc mine tailings contaminated soils(CS) in this work. The soils were heavily polluted by heavy metals with lead(up to 19592 mg/kg), zinc(up to 647mg/kg), Cd(up to 14.65mg.kg) and Cu(up to 287mg/kg). Solidified/stabilized(s/s)forms with a range of cement contents, 40-90 wt%, were evaluated to determine the optimal binder content. Unconfined compression strength test(UCS), Chinese solid waste-extraction procedure for leaching toxicity - Horizontal vibration method, toxicity characteristic leaching procedures(TCLP) were used for physical and chemical characterization of the s/s forms. The procedure of Tessier et al.(1979) was used to separate S/S forms Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu into different fractions. The results show that addition of 50% cement was enough for the s/s forms to satisfy the MU10 requirements (0.10 MPa). Under the 50% addition, the content of the water-exchangeable fraction of Pb reduced from 2.25% to 0.2%, the carbonate-bound fraction and organic-bound fraction reduced by about half, while the Fe-Mn oxide-bound fraction was more than doubled. The residual fraction decreased 8% on the contrary. For Zn, except for the carbonate-bound fraction increased slightly, the features of other items were same as that of Pb. For Cd, the water-exchangeable fraction was reduced largely, the residual fraction and Fe-Mn oxide-bound fraction increased 2-3%. For Cu, A distinct feature is the organic-bound fraction reduced with the reduction in consumption of cement, at the same time, the residual fraction increased corresponding. Leaching test results indicate that the leaching contents of Pb2+ of the six specimens are quite different at low pH value(

  20. Sacral radiculopathy due to cement leakage from percutaneous sacroplasty, successfully treated with surgical decompression.

    PubMed

    Barber, Sean M; Livingston, Andrew D; Cech, David A

    2013-05-01

    Percutaneous sacroplasty is a procedure adapted from vertebroplasty, which is designed to ameliorate the painful morbidity associated with sacral insufficiency fractures without the invasiveness of open surgery. Early estimates of efficacy, according to several case reports and small series, appear promising, but the procedure is not without risk. Several cases of radiculopathy due to nerve root compression by extravasated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) have been reported. The authors present a case of radiculopathy caused by cement leakage from sacroplasty, treated with surgical decompression of the compromised nerve root. The patient presented with left S-1 radiculopathy and was found on CT to have a left S-1 nerve root completely encased in PMMA over a portion of its length. The patient underwent sacral laminectomy with the removal of PMMA and experienced pain relief and the return of function postoperatively. Surgical removal of PMMA extravasated during sacroplasty is feasible and should be considered when nerve root compression or canal stenosis causes pain or neurological deficit refractory to conservative therapy. PMID:23521686

  1. Resistance to bond degradation between dual-cure resin cements and pre-treated sintered CAD-CAM dental ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Raquel; Monticelli, Francesca; Osorio, Estrella; Toledano, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the bond stability of resin cements when luted to glass-reinforced alumina and zirconia CAD/CAM dental ceramics. Study design: Eighteen glass-infiltrated alumina and eighteen densely sintered zirconia blocks were randomly conditioned as follows: Group 1: No treatment; Group 2: Sandblasting (125 µm Al2O3-particles); and Group 3: Silica-coating (50 µm silica-modified Al2O3-particles). Composite samples were randomly bonded to the pre-treated ceramic surfaces using different resin cements: Subgroup 1: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC); Subgroup 2: RelyX Unicem (RXU); and Subgroup 3: Calibra (CAL). After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into 1 ± 0.1 mm2 sticks. One-half of the beams were tested for microtensile bond strength (MTBS). The remaining one-half was immersed in 10 % NaOCl aqueous solution (NaOClaq) for 5 h before testing. The fracture pattern and morphology of the debonded surfaces were assessed with a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). A multiple ANOVA was conducted to analyze the contributions of ceramic composition, surface treatment, resin cement type, and chemical challenging to MTBS. The Tukey test was run for multiple comparisons (p < 0.05). Results: After 24 h, CEC luted to pre-treated zirconia achieved the highest MTBS. Using RXU, alumina and zirconia registered comparable MTBS. CAL failed prematurely, except when luted to sandblasted zirconia. After NaOClaq storage, CEC significantly lowered MTBS when luted to zirconia or alumina. RXU decreased MTBS only when bonded to silica-coated alumina. CAL recorded 100 % of pre-testing failures. Micromorphological alterations were evident after NaOClaq immersion. Conclusions: Resin-ceramic interfacial longevity depended on cement selection rather than on surface pre-treatments. The MDP-containing and the self-adhesive resin cements were both suitable for luting CAD/CAM ceramics. Despite both cements being prone to degradation, RXU luted to zirconia or untreated or

  2. Geochemical analysis of leachates from cement/low-level radioactive waste/soil systems

    SciTech Connect

    Criscenti, L.J.; Serne, R.J.

    1988-09-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted as part of the Special Waste Form Lysimeters/endash/Arid Program. These experiments were conducted to investigate the performance of solidified low-level nuclear waste in a typical arid, near-surface disposal site, and to evaluate the ability of laboratory tests to predict leaching in actual field conditions. Batch leaching, soil adsorption column, and soil/waste form column experiments were conducted using Portland III cement waste forms containing boiling-water reactor evaporator concentrate and ion-exchange resin waste. In order to understand the reaction chemistry of the cement waste form/soil/ground-water system, the compositions of the leachates from the laboratory experiments were studied with the aid of the MINTEQ ion speciation/solubility and mass transfer computer code. The purpose of this report is to describe the changes in leachate composition that occur during the course of the experiments, to discuss the geochemical modeling results, and to explore the factors controlling the major element chemistry of these leachates. 18 refs., 84 figs., 14 tabs.

  3. Bond strength of resin cement to CO2 and Er:YAG laser-treated zirconia ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Kasraei, Shahin; Heidari, Bijan; Vafaee, Fariborz

    2014-01-01

    Objectives It is difficult to achieve adhesion between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using routine surface preparation methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of CO2 and Er:YAG laser treatment on the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics. Materials and Methods In this in-vitro study 45 zirconia disks (6 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were assigned to 3 groups (n = 15). In control group (CNT) no laser treatment was used. In groups COL and EYL, CO2 and Er:YAG lasers were used for pretreatment of zirconia surface, respectively. Composite resin disks were cemented on zirconia disk using dual-curing resin cement. Shear bond strength tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min after 24 hr distilled water storage. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's HSD tests. Results The means and standard deviations of shear bond strength values in the EYL, COL and CNT groups were 8.65 ± 1.75, 12.12 ± 3.02, and 5.97 ± 1.14 MPa, respectively. Data showed that application of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers resulted in a significant higher shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics (p < 0.0001). The highest bond strength was recorded in the COL group (p < 0.0001). In the CNT group all the failures were adhesive. However, in the laser groups, 80% of the failures were of the adhesive type. Conclusions Pretreatment of zirconia ceramic via CO2 and Er:YAG laser improves the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic, with higher bond strength values in the CO2 laser treated samples. PMID:25383349

  4. Clastogenicity of landfarming soil treated with sugar cane vinasse.

    PubMed

    da Silva Souza, Tatiana; Hencklein, Fabiana Aparecida; de Franceschi de Angelis, Dejanira; Fontanetti, Carmem Silvia

    2013-02-01

    The addition of nutrients and/or soil bulking agents is used in bioremediation to increase microbial activity in contaminated soils. For this purpose, some studies have assessed the effectiveness of vinasse in the bioremediation of soils contaminated with petroleum waste. The present study was aimed at investigating the clastogenic/aneugenic potential of landfarming soil from a petroleum refinery before and after addition of sugar cane vinasse using the Allium cepa bioassay. Our results show that the addition of sugar cane vinasse to landfarming soil potentiates the clastogenic effects of the latter probably due the release of metals that were previously adsorbed into the organic matter. These metals may have interacted synergistically with petroleum hydrocarbons present in the landfarming soil treated with sugar cane vinasse. We recommend further tests to monitor the effects of sugar cane vinasse on soils contaminated with organic wastes. PMID:22580848

  5. Earthworm (Eisenia andrei) Avoidance of Soils Treated with Cypermethrin

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Ana Paula A.; de Andréa, Mara M.

    2011-01-01

    The pyrethroid insecticide cypermethrin is used for agricultural and public health campaigns. Its residues may contaminate soils and the beneficial soil organisms, like the earthworms, that may ingest the contaminated soil particles. Due to its ecological relevance, earthworms Eisenia andrei/fetida have been used in different ecotoxicological tests. The avoidance of soils treated with cypermethrin by compost worms Eisenia andrei was studied here as a bioindicator of the influence of treatment dosage and the pesticide formulation in three different agricultural soils indicated by the Brazilian environmental authorities for ecotoxicological tests. This earthworms’ behavior was studied here as a first attempt to propose the test for regulation purposes. The two-compartment test systems, where the earthworms were placed for a two-day exposure period, contained samples of untreated soil alone or together with soil treated with technical grade or wettable powder formulation of cypermethrin. After 48 h, there was no mortality, but the avoidance was clear because all earthworms were found in the untreated section of each type of soil (p < 0.05). No differences were found by the Fisher’s exact test (p ≤ 1.000) for each soil and treatment, demonstrating that the different soil characteristics, the cypermethrin concentrations and formulation, as well as the smaller amounts of soil and earthworms did not influence the avoidance behavior of the earthworms to cypermethrin. The number and range of treatments used in this study do not allow a detailed recommendation of the conditions applied here, but to the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported attempt to identify the avoidance of pesticide treated tropical soils by earthworms. PMID:22247652

  6. Solidification of microbiologically treated ion-exchange resins using Portland cement-based systems

    SciTech Connect

    Voima Oy, I.

    1993-12-31

    Pretreated inactive ion exchange resins from the Loviisa nuclear power plant (NPP) were first reduced to one tenth of the original volume through microbiological treatment. During the process, the granular ion exchange resins were decomposed to result in dregs, which were solidified with two types of Portland cements. The objective of the present experiments was to investigate whether commercial cements are suitable solidification agents for this kind of waste. A total of ten mixtures were pretested for their rheological and setting properties. On the basis of the pretest results, four additional mixtures were chosen and tested for the spread value, density, air content, setting time and bleeding of the fresh waste product and for the dimensional stability and compressive strength of the hardened waste product. The cementing systems incorporated in the tests were ASTM type V Portland cement and ASTm type P Portland Composite cements. The dregs used in the tests were taken from a Pilot-Plant experiment at the Loviisa NPP and contained 2 wt-% solids. The test results were promising in showing that microbiological dregs can very easily be soldified with Portland cements to form a high-quality waste product. Thus, the microbiological treatment of spent ion exchange resins will drastically decrease the amount of solidified waste to be disposed of at the Loviisa NPP.

  7. Sulfur cement production using by products of the perchloroethylene coal cleaning process and the FC4-1 cleaned soil

    SciTech Connect

    Bassam Masri, K.L.; Fullerton, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    An introductory set of experiments to show the feasibility of making sulfur cement were carried out at the University of Akron according to Parrett and Currett`s patent which requires the use of sulfur, a filler, a plasticizer, and a vulcanization accelerator. Small blocks of cement were made using byproducts of the perchloroethylene coal cleaning process. Extracted elemental and organic sulfur, ash and mineral matters from the float sink portion of the PCE process, and FC4-1 cleaned soil were used as substitutes for sulfur and filler needed for the production of sulfur cement. Leaching tests in different solutions and under different conditions were conducted on the sulfur blocks. Other tests such as strength, durability, resistance to high or low temperatures will be conducted in the future. Sulfur cement can be used as a sealing agent at a joint, roofing purposes, forming ornamental figures, and coating of exposed surfaces of iron or steel. When mixed with an aggregate, sulfur concrete is formed. This concrete can be used for structural members, curbings, guthers, slabs, and can be precast or cast at the job site. An advantage of sulfur cement over Portland cement is that it reaches its design strength in two to three hours after processing and it can be remelted and recast.

  8. Application of soil quality indices to assess the status of agricultural soils irrigated with treated wastewaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morugán-Coronado, A.; Arcenegui, V.; García-Orenes, F.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Mataix-Beneyto, J.

    2013-03-01

    The supply of water is limited in some parts of the Mediterranean region, such as southeastern Spain. The use of treated wastewater for the irrigation of agricultural soils is an alternative to using better-quality water, especially in semi-arid regions. On the other hand, this practice can modify some soil properties, change their relationships and influence soil quality. In this work two soil quality indices were used to evaluate the effects of irrigation with treated wastewater in soils. The indices were developed studying different soil properties in undisturbed soils in SE Spain, and the relationships between soil parameters were established using multiple linear regressions. These indices represent the balance reached among properties in "steady state" soils. This study was carried out in four study sites from SE Spain irrigated with wastewater, including four study sites. The results showed slight changes in some soil properties as a consequence of irrigation with wastewater, the obtained levels not being dangerous for agricultural soils, and in some cases they could be considered as positive from an agronomical point of view. In one of the study sites, and as a consequence of the low quality wastewater used, a relevant increase in soil organic matter content was observed, as well as modifications in most of the soil properties. The application of soil quality indices indicated that all the soils of study sites are in a state of disequilibrium regarding the relationships between properties independent of the type of water used. However, there were no relevant differences in the soil quality indices between soils irrigated with wastewater with respect to their control sites for all except one of the sites, which corresponds to the site where low quality wastewater was used.

  9. [Morphology of a lithic lesion of the bone treated with cement filling with the addition of methotrexate].

    PubMed

    Król, R; Waloszczyk, P; Uciński, R; Pankowski, J

    2000-01-01

    The results of histopathologic examination of a lithic bony lesion and of the surrounding soft tissues obtained from a metastatic site from 2 patients are presented. Both patients had been previously treated surgically with a 40 g bone cement filling with 2 g of methotrexate. Revision surgical intervention was necessary because of loss of stability at the fracture site in a 68 year old female after with a metastasis from breast cancer after 8 weeks and in a 72 year old male with metastasis from cancer of the prostate after 10 weeks. During revision surgery the metal plates and the cement were removed. Tissues samples from the fracture site were taken for histopathologic examination. Fibrosis of connective tissue and haemosiderin accumulation were noted in the soft tissues surrounding the fractures site. Where there was direct contact between the bone cement and bone, necrosis of bone trabeculae and granuloma like bodies were noted. Revision surgery 10 weeks after the first procedure revealed more advanced bony necrosis. No cancerous tissue was observed in any of the cases. PMID:10838774

  10. Modeling Water Infiltration in Soil Irrigated with Treated Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaibeh, Mamoun; Albalasmeh, Ammar; Alghzawi, Ma'in

    2015-04-01

    Infiltration of soils irrigated with treated wastewater (TWW) was modeled using Philip, Horton, Kostiakov, and modified Kostiakov. Treatments were: soil irrigated with TWW for 5 years, 2 years, and a control site. Cumulative (Ft), rate of infiltration (ft), and hydraulic conductivity (HC) were measured in the field and aggregate stability (AS) in the lab. Both HC and ft were decreased with and AS was increased with TWW use and period of application. The Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) and correlation coefficient (R2) were used to measure the goodness of fit and linearity of the relationship between models and measured data. Philip model was best to fit infiltration compared to other models. High AS values in treated areas compared to control area indicated that infiltration was more affected by pore clogging than soil dispersion and swelling,

  11. Application of soil quality indices to assess the status of agricultural soils irrigated with treated wastewaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morugán-Coronado, A.; Arcenegui, V.; García-Orenes, F.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Mataix-Beneyto, J.

    2012-12-01

    The supply of water is limited in some parts of the Mediterranean region, such as southeastern Spain. The use of treated wastewater for the irrigation of agricultural soils is an alternative to using better-quality water, especially in semi-arid regions. On the other hand, this practice can modify some soil properties, change their relationships, the equilibrium reached and influence soil quality. In this work two soil quality indices were used to evaluate the effects of irrigation with treated wastewater in soils. The indices were developed studying different soil properties in undisturbed soils in SE Spain, and the relationships between soil parameters were established using multiple linear regressions. This study was carried out in three areas of Alicante Province (SE Spain) irrigated with wastewater, including four study sites. The results showed slight changes in some soil properties as a consequence of irrigation with wastewater, the obtained levels not being dangerous for agricultural soils, and in some cases they could be considered as positive from an agronomical point of view. In one of the study sites, and as a consequence of the low quality wastewater used, a relevant increase in soil organic matter content was observed, as well as modifications in most of the soil properties. The application of soil quality indices indicated that all the soils of study sites are in a state of disequilibrium regarding the relationships between properties independent of the type of water used. However, there were no relevant differences in the soil quality indices between soils irrigated with wastewater with respect to their control sites for all except one of the sites, which corresponds to the site where low quality wastewater was used.

  12. Greater Trochanter Reconstruction in Unstabl Intertrochanteric Fractures Treated With Cemented Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, G V; Guravareddy, A V; Reddy, Anil Kumar K R; Chiranjeevi, T

    2012-01-01

    Cemented Bipolar arthroplasty is an established method for treatment of comminuted Intertrochanteric fractures. Reconstruction of greater trochanter is an essential technical step to avoid complications like abductor lurch gait. We here describe a technique of reconstruction and fixation of greater trochanter using cancellous screws with wide washers made of reconstruction plate and tension band wiring. This gives a stable fixation of greater trochanter and avoids cut out, slippage of implants.

  13. Greater Trochanter Reconstruction in Unstabl Intertrochanteric Fractures Treated With Cemented Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty: A Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, G V; Guravareddy, A V; Reddy, Anil Kumar K R; Chiranjeevi, T

    2012-01-01

    Cemented Bipolar arthroplasty is an established method for treatment of comminuted Intertrochanteric fractures. Reconstruction of greater trochanter is an essential technical step to avoid complications like abductor lurch gait. We here describe a technique of reconstruction and fixation of greater trochanter using cancellous screws with wide washers made of reconstruction plate and tension band wiring. This gives a stable fixation of greater trochanter and avoids cut out, slippage of implants. PMID:27298870

  14. Use of treated wastewater in agriculture: effects on soil environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Guy J.; Lado, Marcos

    2014-05-01

    Disposal of treated sewage, both from industrial and domestic origin (herein referred to as treated wastewater [TWW]), is often considered as an environmental hazard. However, in areas afflicted by water scarcity, especially in semi-arid and arid regions, where the future of irrigated agriculture (which produces approximately one third of crop yield and half the return from global crop production) is threatened by existing or expected shortage of fresh water, the use of TWW offers a highly effective and sustainable strategy to exploit a water resource. However, application of TWW to the soil is not free of risks both to organisms (e.g., crops, microbiota) and to the soil. Potential risks may include reduction in biological activity (including crop yield) due to elevated salinity and specific ion toxicity, migration of pollutants towards surface- and ground-water, and deterioration of soil structure. In recent years, new evidence about the possible negative impact of long-term irrigation with TWW on soil structure and physical and chemo-physical properties has emerged, thus putting the sustainability of irrigation with TWW in question. In this presentation, some aspects of the effects of long-term irrigation with TWW on soil properties are shown.

  15. Effect of antioxidants on push-out bond strength of hydrogen peroxide treated glass fiber posts bonded with two types of resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mazaheri, Hamid; Tarighi, Pardis; Samimi, Pouran

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) surface treatment of fiber posts has been reported to increase bond strength of fiber posts to resin cements. However, residual oxygen radicals might jeopardize the bonding procedure. This study examined the effect of three antioxidant agents on the bond strength of fiber posts to conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. Materials and Methods Post spaces were prepared in forty human maxillary second premolars. Posts were divided into five groups of 8 each: G1 (control), no pre-treatment; G2, 10% H2O2 pre-treatment; G3, G4 and G5. After H2O2 application, Hesperidin (HES), Sodium Ascorbate (SA) or Rosmarinic acid (RA) was applied on each group respectively. In each group four posts were cemented with Duo-Link conventional resin cement and the others with self-adhesive BisCem cement. Push-out test was performed and data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). Results There was a statistically significant interaction between the cement type and post surface treatment on push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p < 0.001, F = 16). Also it was shown that different posts' surface treatments significantly affect the push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p = 0.001). H2O2 treated posts (G2) and control posts (G1) cemented with Duo-link showed the highest (15.96 ± 5.07MPa) and lowest bond strengths (6.79 ± 3.94) respectively. Conclusions It was concluded that H2O2 surface treatment might enhance the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with conventional resin cements. The effect of antioxidants as post's surface treatment agents depends on the characteristics of resin cements used for bonding procedure. PMID:25383350

  16. Disposal of historically contaminated soil in the cement industry and the evaluation of environmental performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Yeqing; Zhang, Jiang; Miao, Wenjuan; Wang, Huanzhong; Wei, Mao

    2015-09-01

    Approximately 400000t of DDTs/HCHs-contaminated soil (CS) needed to be co-processed in a cement kiln with a time limitation of 2y. A new pre-processing facility with a "drying, grinding and DDTs/HCHs vaporizing" ability was equipped to meet the technical requirements for processing cement raw meal and the environmental standards for stack emissions. And the bottom of the precalciner with high temperatures >1000°C was chosen as the CS feeding point for co-processing, which has rarely been reported. To assess the environmental performance of CS pre- and co-processing technologies, according to the local regulation, a test burn was performed by independent and accredited institutes systematically for determination of the clinker quality, kiln stack gas emissions and destruction efficiency of the pollutant. The results demonstrated that the clinker was of high quality and not adversely affected by CS co-processing. Stack emissions were all below the limits set by Chinese standards. Particularly, PCDD/PCDF emissions ranged from 0.0023 to 0.0085ngI-TEQNm(-3). The less toxic OCDD was the peak congener for CS co-processing procedure, while the most toxic congeners (i.e. 2,3,7,8-TeCDD, 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDD and 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDD) remained in a minor proportion. Destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) and destruction efficiency (DE) of the kiln system were better than 99.9999% and 99.99%, respectively, at the highest CS feeding rate during normal production. To guarantee the environmental performance of the system the quarterly stack gas emission was also monitored during the whole period. And all of the results can meet the national standards requirements. PMID:25966458

  17. Cement Calcaneoplasty: An Innovative Method for Treating Nonunion in Calcaneal Insufficiency Fracture.

    PubMed

    Godavitarne, Charles; Fawzy, Ernest; Giancola, Giorgio; Louette, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Insufficiency type stress fractures are common in older patients with osteoporosis. Persistent pain after nonunion of these fractures can be disabling, with the management options often limited. We aimed to assess the suitability of fluoroscopic-guided injection of bone cement into a persistently symptomatic nonuniting calcaneal insufficiency fracture. To the best of our knowledge, this technique has not previously been described in the published data. After local subcutaneous anesthesia, the midpoint of the fracture site was accessed by trocar insertion under radiographic guidance, and bone cement was injected directly into the site. A preprocedure visual analog scale pain score of 90 of 100 was recorded. This had improved to 0 of 100 at the 12-month follow-up point after the procedure. The aim of the present case report was to raise awareness of percutaneous calcaneoplasty, which we believe to be a safe and well-tolerated technique for the management of osteoporotic insufficiency fracture of the calcaneus. We propose that this technique be considered when conservative methods aimed at promoting fracture healing have failed. PMID:26875768

  18. Periprosthetic joint infection treated via bone cement and without the removal of hardware

    PubMed Central

    Göçer, Hasan; Dabak, Nevzat

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a challenging complication with a frequency of 0.5–3%. The patient's age, recurrent surgeries, and comorbid systemic diseases increase the risk of infection. Although the current approach in the treatment of PJI is a two-stage revision; sometimes, removing all the implants can lead to more serious complications. PJI's complications are increase in the time of surgery, loss of blood volume, and increase in the amount of bone loss. Infected soft tissue and dead bone tissue debridement must be made in all cases. One of our cases had bone defects due to recurrent hip arthroplasty revisions. Our case that was given PJI treatment by covering the well-fixed components with bone cement and removing only the mobile parts was discussed in line with the literature.

  19. ALTERNATIVE FIELD METHODS TO TREAT MERCURY IN SOIL

    SciTech Connect

    Ernie F. Stine

    2002-08-14

    The Department of Energy (DOE) currently has mercury (Hg) contaminated materials and soils at the various sites. Figure 1-1 (from http://www.ct.ornl.gov/stcg.hg/) shows the estimated distribution of mercury contaminated waste at the various DOE sites. Oak Ridge and Idaho sites have the largest deposits of contaminated materials. The majorities of these contaminated materials are soils, sludges, debris, and waste waters. This project concerns treatment of mercury contaminated soils. The technology is applicable to many DOE sites, in-particular, the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge Tennessee and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These sites have the majority of the soils and sediments contaminated with mercury. The soils may also be contaminated with other hazardous metals and radionuclides. At the Y12 plant, the baseline treatment method for mercury contaminated soil is low temperature thermal desorption (LTTD), followed by on-site landfill disposal. LTTD is relatively expensive (estimated cost of treatment which exclude disposal cost for the collect mercury is greater than $740/per cubic yard [cy] at Y-12), does not treat any of the metal or radionuclides. DOE is seeking a less costly alternative to the baseline technology. As described in the solicitation (DE-RA-01NT41030), this project initially focused on evaluating cost-effective in-situ alternatives to stabilize or remove the mercury (Hg) contamination from high-clay content soil. It was believed that ex-situ treatment of soil contaminated with significant quantities of free-liquid mercury might pose challenges during excavation and handling. Such challenges may include controlling potential mercury vapors and containing liquid mercury beads. As described below, the focus of this project was expanded to include consideration of ex-situ treatment after award of the contract to International Technology Corporation (IT). After award of the contract, IT became part of Shaw

  20. Microtensile strength of resin cement bond to indirect composite treated by different output powers of Er:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Garshasbzadeh, Nazanin Zeinab; Mirzaie, Mansoreh; Yassini, Esmaeil; Shahabi, Sima; Benedicenti, Stefano; Angiero, Francesca; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2016-04-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of different output powers of Er:YAG laser on microtensile bonding strength of indirect composite to resin cements.36 indirect composite blocks (GC Gradia DA2, Japan) size 15 × 10 × 10 mm(3) were constructed, and divided into 12 groups, as follows:G1: control group (no treatment); Groups G2 to G6: treated with Er:YAG laser (2,940 nm) in noncontact mode, frequency 20 Hz, pulse duration 470 µs, with output power ranging from 2W to 6W; Groups G7 sandblasting, Groups 8 to G12: as Groups G2 to G 6 with preparatory sandblasting. One specimen from each group was analyzed by SEM; each specimen was fixed to a specialized metal jig using cyanoacrylate (Mitreapel, Beta Kimya San. Ve TIC, Iran) and debonded under tension with a universal testing machine (Zwick, Germany) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min(-1). Sandblasting and laser can improve bond strength above an energy level of 150 mJ. SEM evaluation of laser-treated specimens showed irregularities and deep undercuts. T test analysis showed no significant difference between sandblasted and non-sandblasted group, with laser output power of 0, 100, or 150 mJ (P = 0.666, P = 0.875, and P =  .069); in the specimens irradiated with energy output of 200, 250, or 300 mJ, sandblasted specimens showed higher bond strength than non-sandblasted ones. The results demonstrate that, in composite resin irradiated with laser at energy output of 200-300 mJ, sandblasting might be a suitable procedure to enhance bond strength of resin cement. PMID:26873266

  1. Fate of Soil Organic Carbon and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a Vineyard Soil Treated with Biochar.

    PubMed

    Rombolà, Alessandro G; Meredith, Will; Snape, Colin E; Baronti, Silvia; Genesio, Lorenzo; Vaccari, Francesco Primo; Miglietta, Franco; Fabbri, Daniele

    2015-09-15

    The effect of biochar addition on the levels of black carbon (BC) and polcyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a vineyard soil in central Italy was investigated within a two year period. Hydropyrolysis (HyPy) was used to determine the contents of BC (BCHyPy) in the amended and control soils, while the hydrocarbon composition of the semi-labile (non-BCHyPy) fraction released by HyPy was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, together with the solvent-extractable PAHs. The concentrations of these three polycyclic aromatic carbon reservoirs changed and impacted differently the soil organic carbon over the period of the trial. The addition of biochar (33 ton dry biochar ha(-1)) gave rise to a sharp increase in soil organic carbon, which could be accounted for by an increase in BCHyPy. Over time, the concentration of BCHyPy decreased significantly from 36 to 23 mg g(-1) and as a carbon percentage from 79% to 61%. No clear time trends were observed for the non-BCHyPy PAHs varying from 39 to 34 μg g(-1) in treated soils, not significantly different from control soils. However, the concentrations of extractable PAHs increased markedly in the amended soils and decreased with time from 153 to 78 ng g(-1) remaining always higher than those in untreated soil. The extent of the BCHyPy loss was more compatible with physical rather than chemical processes. PMID:26263378

  2. The Adsorption and Desorption of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) in Freeze-Thaw Treated Soils.

    PubMed

    Li, Linhui; Ma, Jincai; Xu, Meng; Li, Xu; Tao, Jiahui; Wang, Guanzhu; Yu, Jitong; Guo, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption and desorption are important processes that influence the potential toxicity and bioavailability of heavy metals in soils. However, information regarding adsorption and desorption behavior of heavy metals in soils subjected to freeze-thaw cycles is poorly understood. In the current study, the effect of freeze-thaw cycles with different freezing temperature (-15, -25, -35°C) on soil properties was investigated. Then the adsorption and desorption behavior of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) in freeze-thaw treated soils was studied. The adsorption amounts of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) in freeze-thaw treated soils were smaller than those in unfrozen soils (p < 0.05), due to the fact that pH, cation exchange capacity, organic matter content, free iron oxide content, and CaCO3 content in freeze-thaw treated soils were smaller than those in unfrozen soils. The adsorption amounts of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) in soils treated with lower freezing temperatures were higher than those in soils treated with higher freezing temperatures. Desorption percentages of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) in unfrozen soils were smaller than those in freeze-thaw treated soils (p < 0.05). The desorption percentages of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) were smaller in soils treated with lower freezing temperatures than those in soils treated with higher freezing temperatures. The results obtained highlight the change of the adsorption and desorption behavior of typical heavy metals in freeze-thaw treated soils located in seasonal frozen soils zone in northeast China. PMID:26644028

  3. Re-use of stabilised flue gas ashes from solid waste incineration in cement-treated base layers for pavements.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zuansi; Jensen, Dorthe L; Christensen, Thomas H; Bager, Dirch H

    2003-02-01

    Fly ash from coal-burning power plants has been used extensively as a pozzolan and fine filler in concrete for many years. Laboratory experiments were performed investigating the effect of substituting the coal-based fly ash with chemically stabilised flue gas ashes (FGA) from waste incineration. Two types of FGA were treated by the Ferrox-process, which removes the majority of the easily soluble salts in the FGA and provides binding sites for heavy metals in terms of ferrihydrite. Cubes of cement treated base layer materials containing 5% stabilised FGA were cast, sealed and cured for two weeks. Cylinders (diameter 100 mm, length 150 mm) were drilled from these cubes for tank leaching experiments. Duplicate specimens were subject to compression strength testing and to tank leaching experiments. The compressive strength of the CTB fulfilled the Danish requirements for CTB, i.e. strength more than 5 MPa after 7 days. The tank leaching tests revealed that leaching of heavy metals was not significantly affected by the use of chemically stabilised flue gas ashes from waste incineration. Assuming that diffusion controls the leaching process it was calculated that less than 1% of the metals would leach during a 100-year period from a 0.5 m thick concrete slab exposed to water on one side. Leaching of the common ions Ca, Cl, Na and SO4 was increased 3-20 times from the specimens with chemically stabilised flue gas ashes from waste incineration. However, the quantities leached were still modest. These experiments suggest that FGA from waste incineration after Ferrox-treatment could be re-used in CTB without compromising the strength and leaching from the base layer. PMID:12667018

  4. Soil quality in a cropland soil treated with wood ash containing charcoal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omil, Beatriz; Balboa, Miguel A.; Fonturbel, M. Teresa; Gartzia-Bengoetxea, Nahia; Arias-González, Ander; Vega, Jose A.; Merino, Agustin

    2014-05-01

    The strategy of the European Union "Europe 2020" states that by 2020, 20% of final energy consumption must come from renewables. In this scenario, there is an increasing use of biomass utilization for energy production. Indeed, it is expected that the production of wood-ash will increase in coming years. Wood ash, a mixture of ash and charcoal, generated as a by-product of biomass combustion in power plants, can be applied to soil to improve the soil quality and crop production. Since the residue contains significant content of charcoal, the application of mixed wood ash may also improve the SOM content and soil quality in the long term, in soils degraded as a consequence of intensive management. The objective of this study was asses the changes in SOM quality and soil properties in a degraded soils treated with wood ash containing charcoal. The study was carried out in a field devoted to cereal crops during the last decades. The soil was acidic (pH 4.5) with a low SOC content (3 %) and fine texture. The experiment was based on a randomised block design with four replicates. Each block included the following four treatments: Control, 16 Mg fly wood ash ha-1, 16 Mg mixed wood ash ha-1 (16 Mg) and 32 Mg mixed wood ash ha-1 (32 Mg). The application was carried out once. The ash used in the study was obtained from a thermal power plant and was mainly derived from the combustion of Pinus radiata bark and branches. The wood ash is highly alkaline (pH= 10), contains 10 % of highly condensed black carbon (atomic H/C ratio < 0.5 and T50 en DSC= 500 ºC). The evolution of SOM properties were monitored over three years by solid state 13C CPMAS NMR and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). These techniques were applied in bulk samples and aggregates of different sizes. The changes in microbial activity were studied by analysis of microbial biomass C and basal respiration. The soil bacterial community was studied by the Biolog method. Several physical properties, such soil

  5. Soil-Water Characteristic Curves of Red Clay treated by Ionic Soil Stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, D.; Xiang, W.

    2009-12-01

    The relationship of red clay particle with water is an important factor to produce geological disaster and environmental damage. In order to reduce the role of adsorbed water of red clay in WuHan, Ionic Soil Stabilizer (ISS) was used to treat the red clay. Soil Moisture Equipment made in U.S.A was used to measure soil-water characteristic curve of red clay both in natural and stabilized conditions in the suction range of 0-500kPa. The SWCC results were used to interpret the red clay behavior due to stabilizer treatment. In addition, relationship were compared between the basic soil and stabilizer properties such as water content, dry density, liquid limit, plastic limit, moisture absorption rate and stabilizer dosages. The analysis showed that the particle density and specific surface area increase, the dehydration rate slows and the thickness of water film thins after treatment with Ionic Soil Stabilizer. After treatment with the ISS, the geological disasters caused by the adsorbed water of red clay can be effectively inhibited.

  6. Dynamics of soil organic carbon and microbial activity in treated wastewater irrigated agricultural soils along soil profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jüschke, Elisabeth; Marschner, Bernd; Chen, Yona; Tarchitzky, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    Treated wastewater (TWW) is an important source for irrigation water in arid and semiarid regions and already serves as an important water source in Jordan, the Palestinian Territories and Israel. Reclaimed water still contains organic matter (OM) and various compounds that may effect microbial activity and soil quality (Feigin et al. 1991). Natural soil organic carbon (SOC) may be altered by interactions between these compounds and the soil microorganisms. This study evaluates the effects of TWW irrigation on the quality, dynamics and microbial transformations of natural SOC. Priming effects (PE) and SOC mineralization were determined to estimate the influence of TWW irrigation on SOC along soil profiles of agricultural soils in Israel and the Westbank. The used soil material derived from three different sampling sites allocated in Israel and The Palestinian Authority. Soil samples were taken always from TWW irrigated sites and control fields from 6 different depths (0-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-50, 50-70, 70-100 cm). Soil carbon content and microbiological parameters (microbial biomass, microbial activities and enzyme activities) were investigated. In several sites, subsoils (50-160 cm) from TWW irrigated plots were depleted in soil organic matter with the largest differences occurring in sites with the longest TWW irrigation history. Laboratory incubation experiments with additions of 14C-labelled compounds to the soils showed that microbial activity in freshwater irrigated soils was much more stimulated by sugars or amino acids than in TWW irrigated soils. The lack of such "priming effects" (Hamer & Marschner 2005) in the TWW irrigated soils indicates that here the microorganisms are already operating at their optimal metabolic activity due to the continuous substrate inputs with soluble organic compounds from the TWW. The fact that PE are triggered continuously due to TWW irrigation may result in a decrease of SOC over long term irrigation. Already now this could be

  7. The partitioning behavior of trace element and its distribution in the surrounding soil of a cement plant integrated utilization of hazardous wastes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenzhou; Chen, Yan; Sun, Yongqi; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Zuotai; Ge, Xinlei

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the trace elements partitioning behavior during cement manufacture process were systemically investigated as well as their distribution behaviors in the soil surrounding a cement plant using hazardous waste as raw materials. In addition to the experimental analysis, the thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were simultaneously conducted. The results demonstrate that in the industrial-scale cement manufacture process, the trace elements can be classified into three groups according to their releasing behaviors. Hg is recognized as a highly volatile element, which almost totally partitions into the vapor phase. Co, Cu, Mn, V, and Cr are considered to be non-volatile elements, which are largely incorporated into the clinker. Meanwhile, Cd, Ba, As, Ni, Pb, and Zn can be classified into semi-volatile elements, as they are trapped into clinker to various degrees. Furthermore, the trace elements emitted into the flue gas can be adsorbed onto the fine particles, transport and deposit in the soil, and it is clarified here that the soil around the cement plant is moderately polluted by Cd, slightly polluted by As, Cr, Ba, Zn, yet rarely influenced by Co, Mn, Ni, Cu, Hg, and V elements. It was also estimated that the addition of wastes can efficiently reduce the consumption of raw materials and energy. The deciphered results can thus provide important insights for estimating the environmental impacts of the cement plant on its surroundings by utilizing wastes as raw materials. PMID:27040541

  8. TREATING SOIL SOLUTION SAMPLERS TO PREVENT MICROBIAL REMOVAL OF ANALYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil microorganisms colonizing soil water sampling devices (lysimeters) reduced concentrations of biodegradable organic chemicals, including 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid methyl ester, alachlor, methyl m-chlorobenzoate, and metolachlor as water entered through porous ceramic cu...

  9. Germination of Blue Wildrye in Biochar Treated Mining Impacted Soils

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stabilization of mine sites with vegetation is an important management strategy to reduce metal movement off-site. Plant growth, however, is often hampered by poor soil conditions. Biochar is a novel soil amendment that may improve soil health conditions and improve plant growt...

  10. Vegetation on the Soil Infiltration System Treating Livestock Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Shinji; Fujikawa, Yoko; Fukui, Masami; Hamasaki, Tastuhide; Sugahara, Masataka

    In the overland flow wastewater treatments and the constructed wetlands, the purification by soil infiltration units is enhanced using vegetation. However, wetland plants (i.e. cattail (Typha latifolia)) and trees, rather than agronomic crops, have been used in conventional systems. We carried out laboratory-scale soil infiltration experiments using two forage crops, tall fescue (Festuca araundinacea) and white clover (Trifolium repens) while using livestock wastewater for irrigation. The purpose of the study was to clarify the amount of accumulation of available phosphorus and exchangeable cations in the soil and its effect on the plant growth. The application of livestock wastewater increased available phosphorus, and exchangeable potassium and sodium in the upper soil. The soil sodification, examined based on exchangeable sodium ratio and plant growth, was not very significant after 10 months of livestock wastewater application. Growing forage crops on the soil infiltration system may be a promising technology to improve crop production and treatment efficacy.

  11. Soil recycling paves the way for treating brownfields

    SciTech Connect

    Gladdys, R.

    1996-02-01

    A soil recycling and stabilization process allows once-contaminated soil to be incorporated into paving materials. Contaminated soils is more widespread than often realized, with one of the more common sources being petroleum products such as fuel oil and gasoline. Until recently, the conventional solution was to have the material excavated, separated from remining soil and trucked to a hazardous waste landfill. This article describes an alternative approach under the following topics: move the solution, not the problem; on site recycling; heavy metals stabilization; economics.

  12. Strength Development of Lime Treated Artificial Organic Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, S. W.; Ling, F. N. L.; Sulaeman, A.; Low, V. S.; Toh, K. L.

    2016-07-01

    In over many years, considerable research has been carried out on organic soils which consists of various components of organic matter but the effect of particular organic matter is less reported. Thus, some of contributing factors for each organic matter are not fully understood yet. Hence, the aim of this study is to determine the effect of organic acid concentration on the strength of artificial organic soil. There are four types of artificial organic soil created by mixing kaolin (inorganic matter) and organic acid (a kind of humified organic matter) in different concentrations. Unconfined Compressive Strength test (UCT) was carried out for all soil samples after being cured for 7 and 28 days under room temperature and 50°C. Soil samples shows highest strength when cured for 28 days under 50°C compared to those cured under room temperature. However, when the organic acid concentration decrease, the strength increased for soil 2 after 7 and 28 days cured under room temperature and 50°C. Apart from this, soil 3 and soil 4 that were cured under room temperature shows decrease in strength when the organic acid concentration decreasing but different result shown for both samples when cured under 50°C.

  13. Aggregate Stability and Phosphorous Loss from Soils Treated with Biosolids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solid organic material recovered from sewage treatment processes, also known as compost, sewage sludge, or biosolids, can help maintain soil nutrient levels (e.g., nutrient P availability) and may also change soil physical properties. However, nutrient P loss by wind erosion or runoff from biosolid...

  14. The enhanced biodegradation of fenamiphos in soils from previously treated sites and the effect of soil fumigants.

    PubMed

    Karpouzas, Dimitrios Georgios; Hatziapostolou, Polydoros; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, Euphemia; Giannakou, Ioannis O; Georgiadou, Athena

    2004-09-01

    The application of fenamiphos either alone or in combination with soil fumigants is a common practice in greenhouses and potato-cultivation areas in Greece. However, repeated applications of fenamiphos in the same field for a number of years can lead to the development of enhanced biodegradation of the nematicide. Studies in previously treated greenhouse sites and potato field sites in Greece were employed in order to investigate the development of enhanced biodegradation of fenamiphos and the respective effect of soil fumigants on the development of the phenomenon. Enhanced biodegradation of fenamiphos in a soil from a previously treated greenhouse site from the area of Aggelohori in Northern Greece was observed using both incubation and bioassay studies with nematodes. Fumigation of the enhanced soil with methyl bromide (MeBr) only temporarily inhibited degradation of fenamiphos unlike metham sodium (MS) whose application significantly reduced microbial degradation of fenamiphos. Similarly, enhanced biodegradation of fenamiphos was evident in soil from potato fields that had a history of previous exposure to fenamiphos. The slow rates of fenamiphos degradation observed in soils from the previously treated sites after sterilization with broad-spectrum antibiotics and also in soils from previously untreated sites suggested that soil microorganisms were responsible for its rapid degradation. The inhibition of enhanced biodegradation of fenamiphos in soil from the previously treated greenhouse site caused by the antibiotic penicillin probably indicates that Gram+ or other bacteria sensitive to penicillin are responsible for the rapid degradation of fenamiphos in this soil. No cross-adaptation was observed between fenamiphos and other nematicides registered in Greece for the control of root-knot and potato cyst nematodes, including cadusafos, ethoprophos, and oxamyl. According to our results, applications of MS followed by fenamiphos or in rotation with other

  15. Pull-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to NaOCl-treated root dentin: effect of antioxidizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Kachuei, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the effect of three antioxidizing agents on pull-out bond strengths of dentin treated with sodium hypochlorite. Materials and Methods Root canals of 75 single-rooted human teeth were prepared. Fifteen teeth were irrigated with normal saline for a negative control group, and the remaining 60 teeth (groups 2 - 5) with 2.5% NaOCl. The teeth in group 2 served as a positive control. Prior to post cementation, the root canals in groups 3 - 5 were irrigated with three antioxidizing agents including 10% rosmarinic acid (RA, Baridge essence), 10% hesperidin (HPN, Sigma), and 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel (SA, AppliChem). Seventy-five spreaders (#55, taper .02, Produits Dentaires S.A) were coated with silica and silanized with the Rocatec system and ceramic bond. All the prepared spreaders were cemented with a self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE, Voco Gmbh) in the prepared canals. After storage in distilled water (24 h/37℃), the spreaders were pulled out in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Pull-out strength values were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (α = 0.05). Results There were significant differences between study groups (p = 0.016). The highest pull-out strength was related to the SA group. The lowest strength was obtained in the positive control group. Conclusions Irrigation with NaOCl during canal preparation decreased bond strength of resin cement to root dentin. Amongst the antioxidants tested, SA had superior results in reversing the diminishing effect of NaOCl irrigation on the bond strength to root dentin. PMID:24790921

  16. REVIEW OF SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR TREATING PESTICIDE-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pesticide contamination results from manufacturing, improper storage, handling, or disposal of pesticides, and from agricultural processes. Since most pesticides are mixtures of different compounds, selecting a remedy for pesticide-contaminated soils can be a complicated process....

  17. Impact of cement dust pollution on Cedrela fissilis Vell. (Meliaceae): A potential bioindicator species.

    PubMed

    Siqueira-Silva, Advanio Inácio; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão; Modolo, Luzia Valentina; Lemos-Filho, José Pires; Paiva, Elder Antonio Sousa

    2016-09-01

    Considering the impacts caused to vegetation in the vicinity of cement factories, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impacts of cement dust on the structural organization and physiological/biochemical traits of Cedrela fissilis leaflets, a woody species native to tropical America. Plants were exposed to 2.5 or 5 mg cm-2 cement dust applied to the leaf surface, to the soil or simultaneously to the leaf surface and the soil.. Leaves of shoot-treated plants exhibited chlorosis, marginal and inter veins necrosis, diminished thickness, epidermal cells less turgid, cellular collapse, obstructed stomata, senescence, rolling and some abscission. In few cases, individual death was recorded. Cement dust-treated plants also presented decreased amount of photosynthetic pigments and iron (Fe) and increase in calcium (Ca) levels. The cement crust formed in leaves surface blocked from 30 to 50% of the incoming light and reduced the stomatal conductance and the potential quantum yield of photosystem II. Control or soil-treated plants did not exhibit morphophysiological changes throughout the experiment. The activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase increased in leaves of plants upon treatment with 2.5 mg cm(-2) cement dust, independent of the site application. Overall, these results indicate that C. fissilis is highly sensitive to cement dust at the initial stage of development. PMID:27243585

  18. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  19. Phosphatase activities in soil after repeated untreated and alum-treated poultry litter applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Repeated additions of untreated and aluminum sulfate (alum)-treated poultry litter to soil affect ecology and consequent nutrient dynamics. The objective of this study was to determine how repeated annual poultry litter additions affected phosphatase activities in concert with changes in soil phosph...

  20. ENGINEERING FORUM ISSUE: CONSIDERATIONS IN DECIDING TO TREAT CONTAMINATED UNSATURATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this document is to provide assistance in deciding in situ treatment of contaminated soils is a potentially feasible remedial alternative. echnical considerations that affect the decision to treat soils in situ are discussed. eneral factors which influence the sele...

  1. Phosphorus mobility in soil columns treated with dairy manures and commercial fertilizer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentration of animal production in some areas of the United States has led to concern about the environmental fate of manure derived phosphorus (P) in soils. A column study was conducted to quantify P leaching in a calcareous soil treated with mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP), two solid dairy m...

  2. Bioavailability of heavy metals in strongly acidic soils treated with exceptional quality biosolids

    SciTech Connect

    Basta, N.T.; Sloan, J.J.

    1999-03-01

    New federal regulations may increase application of exceptional quality (EQ) biosolids to acidic soils, and information on the effect of this practice on bioavailability of heavy metal is limited. The objective of this study was to compare bioavailability of heavy metal in soil treated with nonalkaline or alkaline EQ biosolids with limestone-treated soils. Three acidic soils (pH 3.7--4.3) were treated with three amounts of lime-stabilized biosolids (LS), anaerobic-digested biosolids (AN), or agricultural limestone (L), and incubated at 25 C. Soil solution Cd, Zn, and other chemical constituents were measured at 1, 30, 90, and 180 d incubation. Soil solution Cd and Zn were AN > LS {ge} L, C. Soil solution Cd and Zn increased with AN applied but decreased wit h LS applied. The high application of LS had soil solution Zn dramatically decreased at soil pH > 5.5 and >5.1, respectively. Soil solution Cd and Zn increases were AN > LS with incubation time. Biosolids treatments increased heavy metal in Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and NaOAc fractions. Except for Cd, most metal from biosolids were in EDTA and HNO{sub 3} fractions. Heavy metal bioavailability, measured using lettuce (Latuca sativa L.), was AN > LS {ge} L, C. Although state regulations prohibiting application of nonalkaline EQ biosolids to acidic soil is a prudent practice, application of EQ alkaline biosolids that achieves soil pH > 5 minimizes risk from soil solution Cd and Zn and plant uptake of heavy metal.

  3. Impact of treated sewage sludge application on phosphorus release kinetics in some calcareous soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpur, Alireza; Pashamokhtari, Hamed

    2008-09-01

    Treated sewage sludge contains significant amount of phosphorus and is widely used in agriculture. Kinetics of P release in soils is a subject of importance in soil and environmental sciences. There are few studies about P release kinetics in treated sewage sludge amended soils. For this purpose, sludge was mixed with ten soils at a rate equivalent to 100 Mg sludge ha-1, and P desorption was determined by successive extraction using 0.01 M CaCl2 over a period of 65 days at 25 ± 1°C. Phosphorus release rate was rapid at first (until about first 360 h) and then became slower until equilibrium was approached. Average of P released within 360 h for the unamended and amended soils was about 65 and 73% of the total desorbed P, respectively. Zero-order, first-order, second-order, power function, simplified Elovich and parabolic diffusion law kinetics models were used to describe P release. First-order, Elovich, power function and parabolic diffusion models could well describe P release in the unamended and amended soils. Correlation coefficients between P release rate parameters and selected soil properties showed that in the control soils, calcium carbonate equivalent and Olsen-extractable P; and in the amended soils, calcium carbonate equivalent, cation exchange capacity, organic matter and Olsen-extractable P were significantly correlated with P release parameters. The results of this study showed that application of sewage sludge can change P release characteristics of soils and increase P in runoff.

  4. Cement and concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corley, Gene; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    To produce lunar cement, high-temperature processing will be required. It may be possible to make calcium-rich silicate and aluminate for cement by solar heating of lunar pyroxene and feldspar, or chemical treatment may be required to enrich the calcium and aluminum in lunar soil. The effects of magnesium and ferrous iron present in the starting materials and products would need to be evaluated. So would the problems of grinding to produce cement, mixing, forming in vacuo and low gravity, and minimizing water loss.

  5. Using Iron to Treat Chlorohydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitchens, G. Duncan; Hodko, Dalibor; Kim, Heekyung; Rogers, Tom; Singh, Waheguru Pal; Giletto, Anthony; Cisar, Alan

    2004-01-01

    A method of in situ remediation of soil contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents involves injection of nanometer-size iron particles. The present method exploits a combination of prompt chemical remediation followed by longer-term enhanced bioremediation and, optionally, is practiced in conjunction with the method of bioremediation described earlier. Newly injected iron particles chemically reduce chlorinated hydrocarbons upon contact. Thereafter, in the presence of groundwater, the particles slowly corrode via chemical reactions that effect sustained release of dissolved hydrogen. The hydrogen serves as an electron donor, increasing the metabolic activity of the anaerobic bacteria and thereby sustaining bioremediation at a rate higher than the natural rate.

  6. Ammonia-oxidizer communities in an agricultural soil treated with contrasting nitrogen sources

    PubMed Central

    Habteselassie, Mussie Y.; Xu, Li; Norton, Jeanette M.

    2013-01-01

    The community of ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes was examined in an agricultural soil treated for six seasons with contrasting nitrogen (N) sources. Molecular tools based on the genes encoding ammonia monooxygenase were used to characterize the ammonia oxidizer (AO) communities and their abundance. Soil DNA was extracted from soils sampled from silage corn plots that received no additional N (control), dairy waste compost, liquid dairy waste (LW), and ammonium sulfate (AS) treatments at approximately 100 and 200 kg available N ha-1 over 6 years. The N treatment affected the quantity of AO based on estimates of amoA by real-time PCR. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were higher in soils from the AS200, AS100, and LW200 treatments (2.5 × 107, 2.5 × 107, and 2.1 × 107copies g-1 soil, respectively) than in the control (8.1 × 106 copies g-1 soil) while the abundance of amoA encoding archaea [ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA)] was not significantly affected by treatment (3.8 × 107 copies g-1 soil, average). The ratio of AOA/AOB was higher in the control and compost treated soils, both treatments have the majority of their ammonium supplied through mineralization of organic nitrogen. Clone libraries of partial amoA sequences indicated AOB related to Nitrosospira multiformis and AOA related to uncultured Nitrososphaera similar to those described by soil fosmid 54d9 were prevalent. Profiles of the amoC-amoA intergenic region indicated that both Nitrosospira- and Nitrosomonas-type AOB were present in all soils examined. In contrast to the intergenic amoC-amoA profile results, Nitrosomonas-like clones were recovered only in the LW200 treated soil-DNA. The impact of 6 years of contrasting nitrogen sources applications caused changes in AO abundance while the community composition remained relatively stable for both AOB and AOA. PMID:24223575

  7. Effects of incorporating differently-treated rice straw on phytoavailability of methylmercury in soil.

    PubMed

    Shu, Rui; Dang, Fei; Zhong, Huan

    2016-02-01

    Differently-treated crops straw is being widely used to fertilize soil, while the potential impacts of straw amendment on the biogeochemistry and phytoavailability of mercury in contaminated soils are largely unknown. In the present study, differently-treated rice straw (dry straw, composted straw, straw biochar, and straw ash) was incorporated into mercury-contaminated soil at an environment relevant level (1/100, w/w), and mercury speciation, methylmercury (MeHg) phytoavailability (using ammonium thiosulfate extraction method, validated elsewhere) and bioaccumulation (in Indian mustard Brassica junceas) were quantified. Our results indicated that incorporating straw biochar or composted straw into soil would decrease phytoavailable MeHg levels, possibly due to the strong binding of MeHg with particulate organic matter in amended straw ('MeHg immobilization effect'). Consequently, MeHg accumulation in aboveground tissue of Indian mustard harvested from straw biochar-amended soil decreased by 20% compared to the control. Differently, incorporation of dry straw resulted in elevated MeHg levels in soil ('Mercury methylation effect'). Decomposition of amended dry straw in soil would evidently increase DOC levels (averagely 40%-195% higher than the control), which may subsequently mobilize MeHg in the soil ('MeHg mobilization effect'). Accordingly, incorporation of dry straw led to increased phytoavailable MeHg levels in the soil and doubled MeHg accumulation in Indian mustard. Our results provided the first evidence that incorporating differently-treated rice straw into soil could have diverse effects on mercury biogeochemistry and phytoavailability, which should be taken into account in risk assessment or soil remediation. PMID:26694796

  8. Degradation of nonylphenol in spiked soils and in soils treated with organic waste products.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Gerda Krog; Kure, Liv Kerstin

    2003-04-01

    Widespread application of sewage sludge to agricultural soils in Denmark has led to concern about the accumulation and effects of nonylphenol (NP) in the soil ecosystem. We have thus studied the degradation of NP and possible uptake in agricultural plants in greenhouse pot experiments. Different waste products including anaerobic and aerobic sludge, compost, and pig manure were incorporated into a sandy soil. In addition, NP was used to spike soil to known concentrations. Rape (Brassica napus L. cv Hyola 401) was sown in the pots and harvested after 30 d. In order to investigate the influence of plant growth on the degradation, plant-free pots were established. The concentrations in the soil were between 13 and 534 ppb dry weight. No plant uptake was observed above the detection limit at 100 ppb dry weight. When NP was added as waste to the soil, plant growth significantly stimulated the degradation. In experiments with anaerobic and aerobic sludge, respectively, 13 and 8.3% of NP remained in the soil from pots planted with rape compared with 26 and 18% in soil without plant growth. When NP was added as a spike to soil, the degradation was more complete and plant growth did not influence the degradation. Percentages of 2.2 and 1.8 were still in the soil at harvest for planted and plant-free pots, respectively. The degradation of NP was more extensive in sludge-amended soil compared with compost. PMID:12685703

  9. Soil surface colonization by phototrophic indigenous organisms, in two contrasted soils treated by formulated maize herbicide mixtures.

    PubMed

    Joly, Pierre; Misson, Benjamin; Perrière, Fanny; Bonnemoy, Frédérique; Joly, Muriel; Donnadieu-Bernard, Florence; Aguer, Jean-Pierre; Bohatier, Jacques; Mallet, Clarisse

    2014-11-01

    Soil phototrophic microorganisms, contributors to soil health and food webs, share their particular metabolism with plants. Current agricultural practices employ mixtures of pesticides to ensure the crops yields and can potentially impair these non-target organisms. However despite this environmental reality, studies dealing the susceptibility of phototrophic microorganisms to pesticide mixtures are scarce. We designed a 3 months microcosm study to assess the ecotoxicity of realistic herbicide mixtures of formulated S-metolachlor (Dual Gold Safeneur(®)), mesotrione (Callisto(®)) and nicosulfuron (Milagro(®)) on phototrophic communities of two soils (Limagne vertisol and Versailles luvisol). The soils presented different colonizing communities, with diatoms and chlorophyceae dominating communities in Limagne soil and cyanobacteria and bryophyta communities in Versailles soil. The results highlighted the strong impairment of Dual Gold Safeneur(®) treated microcosms on the biomass and the composition of both soil phototrophic communities, with no resilience after a delay of 3 months. This study also excluded any significant mixture effect on these organisms for Callisto(®) and Milagro(®) herbicides. We strongly recommend carrying on extensive soil studies on S-metolachlor and its commercial formulations, in order to reconsider its use from an ecotoxicological point of view. PMID:25129149

  10. Use of Cemented Spacer with a Handmade Stem to Treat Acute Periprosthetic Tibial Fracture Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Font-Vizcarra, LluÍs; Izquierdo, Oscar; GarcÍa-NuÑo, Laura; GonzÁlez, Araceli; Diaz-Brito, VicenÇ; Castellanos, Juan

    2014-01-01

    We report an 85-year-old woman with dementia and dependent for normal life activities who was admitted due to a left periprosthetic tibial fracture. The tibial component was replaced by one with a long stem and she was discharged. Four weeks after the intervention the patient was re-admitted due to an acute prosthetic joint infection. All the components were removed and a bone-cement spacer with a handmade stem with a metal core was implanted. Radiological signs of fracture consolidation were observed after 3 months of follow-up. Due to the previous health status of the patient, it was decided to keep the spacer as a definitive treatment. After 24 months, the patient was able to sit without pain and to stand up with help using a knee brace. There were no radiological or clinical signs of infection. PMID:24551027

  11. Testing CO2 Sequestration in an Alkaline Soil Treated with Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y.; Tokunaga, T. K.

    2012-12-01

    Identifying effective and economical methods for increasing carbon storage in soils is of interest for reducing soil CO2 fluxes to the atmosphere in order to partially offset anthropogenic CO2 contributions to climate change This study investigates an alternative strategy for increasing carbon retention in soils by accelerating calcite (CaCO3) precipitation and promoting soil organic carbon (SOC) complexation on mineral surfaces. The addition of calcium ion to soils with pH > 8, often found in arid and semi-arid regions, may accelerate the slow process of calcite precipitation. Increased ionic strength from addition of a soluble Ca source also suppresses microbial activity which oxidizes SOC to gaseous CO2. Through obtaining C mass balances in soil profiles, this study is quantifying the efficiency of gypsum amendments for mitigating C losses to the atmosphere. The objective of this study is to identify conditions in which inorganic and organic C sequestration is practical in semi-arid and arid soils by gypsum treatment. As an inexpensive calcium source, we proposed to use flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG), a byproduct of fossil fuel burning electric power plants. To test the hypothesis, laboratory column experiments have been conducted in calcite-buffered soil with addition of gypsum and FGDG. The results of several months of column monitoring are demonstrating that gypsum-treated soil have lowered amounts of soil organic carbon loss and increased inorganic carbon (calcite) production. The excess generation of FGDG relative to industrial and agricultural needs, FGDG, is currently regarded as waste. Thus application of FGDG application in some soils may be an effective and economical means for fixing CO2 in soil organic and inorganic carbon forms.Soil carbon cycle, with proposed increased C retention by calcite precipitation and by SOC binding onto soil mineral surfaces, with both processes driven by calcium released from gypsum dissolution.

  12. In vitro gastrointestinal bioavailability of arsenic in soils collected near CCA-treated utility poles.

    PubMed

    Pouschat, Priscilla; Zagury, Gerald J

    2006-07-01

    Because of the potentially high arsenic concentrations found in soils immediately adjacent to chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood structures and utility poles, CCA-contaminated soil ingestion may be a significant exposure route to arsenic for children. Therefore, a strong need exists to provide accurate data on oral relative bioavailability (RBA) of arsenic (in vivo or in vitro) in field-collected CCA-contaminated soils. The objectives of this study were (1) to assess arsenic bioaccessibility in contaminated soils collected near in-service CCA-treated utility poles, (2) to determine the influence of soil properties and arsenic fractionation on arsenic bioaccessibility, and (3) to estimate an average daily arsenic intake from incidental soil ingestion. Arsenic bioaccessibility (in vitro gastrointestinal (IVG) method) was determined on surface soil samples collected immediately adjacent to 12 CCA-treated utility poles after 18 months of service. Bioaccessible arsenic was also determined in 3 certified reference materials. Total arsenic concentrations in soils (<300 microm) varied from 37 +/- 2 to 251 +/- 12 mg/kg, irrespective of soil organic matter contentwith the major soil-bound arsenic species being As(V). Arsenic bioaccessibility ranged between 25.0 +/- 2.7 and 66.3 +/- 2.3% (mean value 40.7 +/- 14.9%). The mean value was in agreement with the in vivo arsenic RBA reported by Casteel et al. (2003) in soil near CCA-treated utility poles. Bioaccessible arsenic was positively correlated with total organic carbon content (r2 = 0.36, p < 0.05) and with water-soluble arsenic (2 = 0.51, p < 0.01), and was negatively correlated with clay content (r2 = 0.43, p < 0.05). Using conservative exposure parameters, the mean daily arsenic intake from incidental ingestion of contaminated soil near CCA-treated utility poles was 0.18 +/- 0.09 microg As kg(-1) d(-1). This arsenic intake appeared negligible compared to the daily intake of inorganic arsenic from water and food

  13. Risk assessment applications for determining cleanup limits for uranium in treated and untreated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, A.Q.; Layton, D.W.; Rutz, E.E.

    1994-06-01

    Uranium-contaminated soils are present at various locations across the US where uranium was processed for nuclear fuels or atomic weapons. Important issues relative to such contamination include the assessment of potential health risks associated with human exposures to the residual uranium and the determination of safe levels of uranium in soils that have been treated by a given technology. This paper discusses various risk assessment considerations that must be dealt with when developing cleanup limits for uranium in treated and untreated soils. Key issues addressed include alternative land use scenarios, potential exposure pathways, characterization of the bioavailability of uranium compounds in food and water, a brief overview of health risks associated with uranium and its daughter products as well as a summary of considerations for development of risk-based cleanup limits for uranium in soils.

  14. The calcination process in a system for washing, calcinating, and converting treated municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash into raw material for the cement industry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fenfen; Takaoka, Masaki; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    2011-07-01

    Calcination is the second step in a washing-calcination-conversion system in which treated municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash and bottom ash can be reused as raw material in the cement industry and can decompose or stabilize hazardous compounds, reduce residue amounts, and alter residue characteristics. In this research, only fly ash is discussed. Chloride reduction is important if treated fly ash is to be reused in cement; however, the relationship between washed fly ash properties and chloride reduction by calcination is not well understood. This study used washed residues of three types of fly ash-raw fly ash (RFA) from the boiler or economizer of an incineration system, fly ash collected in a bag filter injected with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) for acid removal (CaFA), and fly ash collected in a bag filter injected with sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) for acid removal (NaFA)-in calcination experiments with varying temperature (400-1100 degrees C) and atmosphere (100% nitrogen [N2] at 25 mL/min or 10% oxygen [O2] [90% N2] at fluxes of 25, 50, and 75 mL/min). From the perspective of chloride reduction, heating to 1000 degrees C with 1-hr heating time, 1-hr holding time, and an atmosphere of 10% O2/90% N2 was most suitable for calcination. Under these conditions, chloride levels were reduced by 91, 52, and 96% in washed residues of RFA, CaFA, and NaFA, respectively. Among the washed residues, the weight of the washed residue of NaFA decreased the most. PMID:21850828

  15. Impact of treated wastewater irrigation on antibiotic resistance in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Negreanu, Yael; Pasternak, Zohar; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Cytryn, Eddie

    2012-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a global phenomenon with severe epidemiological ramifications. Anthropogenically impacted natural aquatic and terrestrial environments can serve as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes (ARG), which can be horizontally transferred to human-associated bacteria through water and food webs, and thus contribute to AR proliferation. Treated-wastewater (TWW) irrigation is becoming increasingly prevalent in arid regions of the world, due to growing demand and decline in freshwater supplies. The release of residual antibiotic compounds, AR bacteria, and ARGs from wastewater effluent may result in proliferation of AR in irrigated soil microcosms. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of TWW-irrigation on soil AR bacterial and ARG reservoirs. Tetracycline, erythromycin, sulfonamide, and ciprofloxacin resistance in soil was assessed using standard culture-based isolation methods and culture-independent molecular analysis using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). High levels of bacterial antibiotic resistance were detected in both freshwater- and TWW-irrigated soils. Nonetheless, in most of the soils analyzed, AR bacteria and ARG levels in TWW-irrigated soils were on the whole identical (or sometimes even lower) than in the freshwater-irrigated soils, indicating that the high number of resistant bacteria that enter the soils from the TWW are not able to compete or survive in the soil environment and that they do not significantly contribute ARG to soil bacteria. This strongly suggests that the impact of the TWW-associated bacteria on the soil microbiome is on the whole negligible, and that the high levels of AR bacteria and ARGs in both the freshwater- and the TWW-irrigated soils are indicative of native AR associated with the natural soil microbiome. PMID:22494147

  16. Arsenic mobilization by citrate and malate from a red mud-treated contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Castaldi, Paola; Silvetti, Margherita; Mele, Elena; Garau, Giovanni; Deiana, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    The mobility and bioavailability of As in the soil-plant system can be affected by a number of organic acids that originate from the activity of plants and microorganisms. In this study we evaluated the ability of citrate and malate anions to mobilize As in a polluted subacidic soil (UP soil) treated with red mud (RM soil). Both anions promoted the mobilization of As from UP and RM soils, with citrate being more effective than malate. The RM treatment induced a greater mobility of As. The amounts of As released in RM and UP soils treated with 3.0 mmol L citric acid solution were 2.78 and 1.83 μmol g respectively, whereas an amount equal to 1.73 and 1.06 μmol g was found after the treatment with a 3.0 mmol L malic acid solution. The release of As in both soils increased with increasing concentration of organic acids, and the co-release of Al and Fe in solution also increased. The sequential extraction showed that Fe/Al (oxi)hydroxides in RM were the main phases involved in As binding in RM soil. Two possible mechanisms could be responsible for As solubilization: (i) competition of the organic anions for As adsorption sites and (ii) partial dissolution of the adsorbents (e.g., dissolution of iron and aluminum oxi-hydroxides) induced by citrate or malate and formation of complexes between dissolved Fe and Al and organic anions. This is the first report on the effect of malate and citrate on the As mobility in a polluted soil treated with RM. PMID:23673944

  17. Irrigation with treated wastewater: effects on soil, lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) crop and dynamics of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Mañas, Pilar; Castro, Elena; de Las Heras, Jorge

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of treated wastewater for horticultural crops, assess the effects of continuous use of treated water on soil and crops, and analyse the physical, chemical and biological effects of irrigation with recycled water. Two lettuce plots watered with drinking water and treated wastewater were monitored over a three year period. Nutrients, heavy metal and the dynamics of pathogen and indicator microorganism content in soil and foliar tissues were analysed. Wastewater irrigation had a high influence on soil parameters: organic matter, N, P, Ca, Al, Fe, Pb and Zn. Indicator and pathogenic microorganisms were detected in soil and plants grown in the wastewater-irrigated plot, and persisted in the soil for 27 days during the study under humid conditions. N, P, Pb and Al content were significantly higher in plant tissues of wastewater-irrigated plots than in the control after 3 years of irrigation. Harvest was significantly higher in the wastewater-irrigated plot. Wastewater can be a resource for agricultural irrigation. In any case, the possible heavy metal accumulation in soils and presence of pathogenic organisms require careful management of this alternative resource: use of a drip irrigation system, previous wastewater disinfection and a limited irrigation period are recommended. PMID:19847714

  18. Evaluation of a soil slurry reactor system for treating soil contaminated with munitions compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.; Montemagno, C.; Kulpa, C.F.

    1994-05-01

    Two 0.5-L semicontinuous soil slurry reactors were operated for seven months to evaluate the performance of the slurry reactor system in bioremediating soil contaminated with munitions compounds. Nitrogen and carbon were supplemented. The soil slurry was mixed continuously and aerated 10 min/day. Ten percent of the contaminated soil was replaced every week. The 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) concentration in soil began to drop after 15 days of treatment, falling to less than 0.5 mg/kg from 7800 mg/kg. Total plate counts in both reactors indicated that the bacterial population was maintained, with an average plate count of about 10{sup 8} CFU/mL. The soil slurry was slightly acidic. In addition to TNT, the slurry reactor also removed the other munitions compounds trinitrobenzene (TNB), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), RDX, and HMX. Radiolabeling studies on the reactor biomass showed that 23% of [{sup C}14]TNT was mineralized, while 27% was used as biomass and 8% was adsorbed on to the soil. The rest of the [{sup 14}C]TNT was accounted for as TNT metabolites. Increasing the frequency of soil replacement from once to two or three times weekly did not affect the TNT removal rates. However, the slurry system showed signs of stress, with highly acidic conditions and low oxygen uptake rates.

  19. Evaluation of the use of solar irradiation for the decontamination of soils containing wood treating wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, R.R.; McLean, J.E.; Hoff, R.H.; Moore, W.M. )

    1990-08-01

    Laboratory evaluation of the efficacy of soil phase photodegradation of recalcitrant hazardous organic components of wood treating wastes is described. The photodecomposition of anthracene, biphenyl, 9H-carbazole, m-cresol, dibenzofuran, fluorene, pentachlorophenol, phenanthrene, pyrene and quinoline under UV and visible light was monitored over a 50-day reaction period in three test soils. Methylene blue, riboflavin, hydrogen peroxide, peat moss and diethylamine soil amendments were evaluated as to their effect on the enhancement of compound photoreaction rates in the test soil systems. Dark control samples monitored over the entire study period were utilized to quantify non-photo mediated reaction losses. Compounds losses in both the dark control and irradiated samples were found to follow first order kinetics, allowing the calculation of first order photodegradation reaction rate constants for each test soil/compound combination. Degradation due to photochemical activity was observed for all test compounds, with compound photolytic half-lives ranging from 7 to approximately 180 days. None of the soil amendments were found to improve soil phase photodegradation, although photosensitization by anthracene was shown to significantly enhance the rate of photodegradation of the other test compounds. Soil type, and its characteristic of internal reflectance, proved to be the most significant factor affecting compound degradation rates suggesting the necessity for site specific assessments of soil phase photodegradation potential.

  20. Investigation into the artificial ageing effects on the microstructure of an industrial solid waste treated with cement.

    PubMed

    Choura, M; Keskes, M; Tayibi, H; Rouis, J

    2011-04-01

    Metal hydroxide sludges are classified as hazardous wastes in the European Hazardous Waste Catalogue (EHWC) because of their high heavy metal contents (Zn, Cr, Fe, Cu, etc.) and the release of these pollutants to the environment. Thereby, the disposal of this waste without any treatment is a substantial environmental problem. Stabilization/solidification technologies are widely used for the treatment of wastes and residues in order to obtain inert materials. This work aims to assess the effectiveness of the chemical fixation and solidification of a metal hydroxide sludge generated by the electrotyping surface treatment industry, using Portland Artificial Cement. In order to predict the medium- and long-term behaviour of the solidified waste, an artificial ageing by means of thermal shocks and humidity variation cycles was applied. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction studies revealed a considerable increase in calcite within the solid matrix after the artificial ageing, which can be attributed to the phenomenon of carbonation. It was also found that the mechanical properties of the solidified material, after ageing, were improved by up to 30%. PMID:21877543

  1. Bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Chauhan, Mayank; Vaish, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge about the bone cement is of paramount importance to all Orthopaedic surgeons. Although the bone cement had been the gold standard in the field of joint replacement surgery, its use has somewhat decreased because of the advent of press-fit implants which encourages bone in growth. The shortcomings, side effects and toxicity of the bone cement are being addressed recently. More research is needed and continues in the field of nanoparticle additives, enhanced bone–cement interface etc. PMID:26403875

  2. Effect of dissolved organic matter from treated effluents on sorption of atrazine and prometryn by soils

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Y.; Lee, L.S.

    2000-01-02

    The apparent enhanced transport of soil-applied atrazine following irrigation of treated effluents has been hypothesized to be from complexation of atrazine with effluent-borne dissolved organic matter (DOM). Under long-term effluent irrigation, even small DOM-induced decreases in pesticide sorption can result in significant enhanced pesticide movement due to cumulative effects. The effect of atrazine and prometryn association with DOM extracted from municipal wastewater (MW), swine-derived lagoon wastewater (SW), and dissolved Aldrich humic acid (HA) on sorption by two soils was measured in batch equilibration studies. Individual association of pesticides to DOM, sorption of DOM to soil, and pesticide sorption by soil were also quantified. Pesticide association to DOM normalized to organic carbon (OC) ranged from 30 to 1000 L/kg OC. DOM sorption by soil ranged from 1.5 to 10 L/kg with a silt loam having a higher affinity for the DOM than the sandy loam. DOM up to 150 mg OC/L did not significantly suppress sorption by soils of either atrazine or prometryne in agreement with predictions using the independently measured binary distribution coefficients in a model that assumed linear equilibrium behavior among pesticide, soil, and DOM. A sensitivity analysis was performed using the same model to identify what combination of soil, pesticide, and DOC variables may suppress sorption, resulting in facilitated transport. Results from the sensitivity analysis are presented and the potential for effluent properties other than DOM to facilitate pesticide transport is discussed.

  3. Calculating carbon mass balance from unsaturated soil columns treated with CaSO₄₋minerals: test of soil carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Soo; Tokunaga, Tetsu K

    2014-12-01

    Renewed interest in managing C balance in soils is motivated by increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and consequent climate change. Here, experiments were conducted in soil columns to determine C mass balances with and without addition of CaSO4-minerals (anhydrite and gypsum), which were hypothesized to promote soil organic carbon (SOC) retention and soil inorganic carbon (SIC) precipitation as calcite under slightly alkaline conditions. Changes in C contents in three phases (gas, liquid and solid) were measured in unsaturated soil columns tested for one year and comprehensive C mass balances were determined. The tested soil columns had no C inputs, and only C utilization by microbial activity and C transformations were assumed in the C chemistry. The measurements showed that changes in C inventories occurred through two processes, SOC loss and SIC gain. However, the measured SOC losses in the treated columns were lower than their corresponding control columns, indicating that the amendments promoted SOC retention. The SOC losses resulted mostly from microbial respiration and loss of CO2 to the atmosphere rather than from chemical leaching. Microbial oxidation of SOC appears to have been suppressed by increased Ca(2+) and SO4(2)(-) from dissolution of CaSO4 minerals. For the conditions tested, SIC accumulation per m(2) soil area under CaSO4-treatment ranged from 130 to 260 g C m(-1) infiltrated water (20-120 g C m(-1) infiltrated water as net C benefit). These results demonstrate the potential for increasing C sequestration in slightly alkaline soils via CaSO4-treatment. PMID:24974014

  4. Controllability of runoff and soil loss from small plots treated by vinasse-produced biochar.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Seyed Hamidreza; Hazbavi, Zeinab; Harchegani, Mahboobeh Kiani

    2016-01-15

    Many different amendments, stabilizers, and conditioners are usually applied for soil and water conservation. Biochar is a carbon-enriched substance produced by thermal decomposition of organic material in the absence of oxygen with the goal to be used as a soil amendment. Biochar can be produced from a wide range of biomass sources including straw, wood, manure, and other organic wastes. Biochar has been demonstrated to restore soil fertility and crop production under many conditions, but less is known about the effects of its application on soil erosion and runoff control. Therefore, a rainfall simulation study, as a pioneer research, was conducted to evaluate the performance of the application of vinasse-produced biochar on the soil erosion control of a sandy clay loam soil packed in small-sized runoff 0.25-m(2) plots with 3 replicates. The treatments were (i) no biochar (control), (ii) biochar (8 tha(-1)) application at 24h before the rainfall simulation and (iii) biochar (8 tha(-1)) application at 48 h before the rainfall simulation. Rainfall was applied at 50 mm h(-1) for 15 min. The mean change of effectiveness in time to runoff could be found in biochar application at 24 and 48 h before simulation treatment with rate of +55.10% and +71.73%, respectively. In addition, the mean runoff volume 24 and 48 h before simulation treatments decreased by 98.46% and 46.39%, respectively. The least soil loss (1.12 ± 0.57 g) and sediment concentration (1.44 ± 0.48 gl(-1)) occurred in the biochar-amended soil treated 48 h before the rainfall simulation. In conclusion, the application of vinasse-produced biochar could effectively control runoff and soil loss. This study provided a new insight into the effects of biochar on runoff, soil loss, and sediment control due to water erosion in sandy clay loam soils. PMID:26410722

  5. FIELD EVALUATION OF THE LIGNIN-DEGRADING FUNGUS PHANEROCHAETE SORDIDA TO TREAT CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study to determine the ability of selected lignin-degrading fungi to remediate soil contaminated with creosote was performed at a wood-treating facility in south central Mississippi in the autumn of 1991. The effects of solid-phase bioremediation with Phanerochaete sordid...

  6. FIELD EVALUATION OF LIGNIN-DEGRADING FUNGI TO TREAT CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study to determine the ability of selected lignin-degrading fungi to remediate soil contaminated with pentachlorophenol and creosote was performed at a wood treating facility in south central Mississippi in the Autumn of 1991. he study was designed to evaluate 7 fungal tr...

  7. Strategies for Treating and Dewatering Contaminated Soils and Sediments Simultaneously - 13389

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, Jody; Foote, Martin

    2013-07-01

    MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) was asked to perform a series of treatability studies by Global Technologies, Inc. (Global) and M{sup 2} Polymer Technologies, Inc. (M{sup 2} Polymer) using Global's metal treatment agent, Molecular Bonding System (MBS) and M{sup 2} Polymer's super-absorbent polymer, Waste Lock 770 (WL-770). The primary objective of the study was to determine if the two products could be used as a one-step treatment process to reduce the leachability of metals and de-water soils and/or sediments simultaneously. Three phases of work were performed during the treatability study. The first phase consisted of generating four bench-scale samples: two treated using only MBS and two treated using only WL- 770, each at variable concentrations. The second phase consisted of generating nine bench-scale samples that were treated using MBS and WL-770 in combination with three different addition techniques. The third phase consisted of generating four intermediate-scale samples that were treated using MBS and WL-770 simultaneously. The soils used in the treatability study were collected at the Mike Mansfield Advanced Technology Center in Butte, Montana. The collected soils were screened at 4 mesh (4.75 millimeters (mm)) to remove the coarse fraction of the soil and spiked with metallic contaminants of lead, cadmium, nickel, mercury, uranium, chromium, and zinc. (authors)

  8. Solidification/stabilization of contaminated soil and concrete debris with thermal-treated BTM

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Hsin-Neng; Yu, Qing-Rui; Chang, J.

    1994-12-31

    Contaminated black tarry materials was treated thermally and converted to a material with properties similar to petroleum-based asphalt. This property-improved material was then used as a binder to enclose contaminated concrete debris and soil in the solidification/stabilization process. The final product can be used for medium traffic pavement. 9 refs., 5 tabs.

  9. Zinc movement in sewage-sludge-treated soils as influenced by soil properties, irrigation water quality, and soil moisture level

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, J.E.; Lund, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    A soil column study was conducted to assess the movement of Zn in sewage-sludge-amended soils. Varables investigated were soil properties, irrigation water quality, and soil moisture level. Bulk samples of the surface layer of six soil series were packed into columns, 10.2 cm in diameter and 110 cm in length. An anaerobically digested municipal sewage sludge was incorporated into the top 20 cm of each column at a rate of 300 mg ha-1. The columns were maintained at moisture levels of saturation and unsaturation and were leached with two waters of different quality. At the termination of leaching, the columns were cut open and the soil was sectioned and analyzed. Zinc movement was evaluated by mass balance accounting and correlation and regression analysis. Zinc movement in the unsaturated columns ranged from 3 to 30 cm, with a mean of 10 cm. The difference in irrigation water quality did not have an effect on Zn movement. Most of the Zn applied to the unsaturated columns remained in the sludge-amended soil layer (96.1 to 99.6%, with a mean of 98.1%). The major portion of Zn leached from the sludge-amended soil layer accumulated in the 0- to 3-cm depth (35.7 to 100%, with a mean of 73.6%). The mean final soil pH values decreased in the order: saturated columns = sludge-amended soil layer > untreated soils > unsaturated columns. Total Zn leached from the sludge-amended soil layer was correlated negatively at P = 0.001 with final pH (r = -0.85). Depth of Zn movement was correlated negatively at P = 0.001 with final pH (r = -0.91). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the final pH accounted for 72% of the variation in the total amounts of Zn leached from the sludge-amended soil layer of the unsaturated columns and accounted for 82% of the variation in the depth of Zn movement among the unsaturated columns. A significant correlation was not found between Zn and organic carbon in soil solutions, but a negative correlation significant at P = 0.001 was found

  10. Effect of irrigation with treated wastewater on soil chemical properties and infiltration rate.

    PubMed

    Bedbabis, Saida; Ben Rouina, Béchir; Boukhris, Makki; Ferrara, Giuseppe

    2014-01-15

    In Tunisia, water scarcity is one of the major constraints for agricultural activities. The reuse of treated wastewater (TWW) in agriculture can be a sustainable solution to face water scarcity. The research was conducted for a period of four years in an olive orchard planted on a sandy soil and subjected to irrigation treatments: a) rain-fed conditions (RF), as control b) well water (WW) and c) treated wastewater (TWW). In WW and TWW treatments, an annual amount of 5000 m(3) ha(-1) of water was supplied to the orchard. Soil samples were collected at the beginning of the study and after four years for each treatment. The main soil properties such as electrical conductivity (EC), pH, soluble cations, chloride (Cl(-)), sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), organic matter (OM) as well as the infiltration rate were investigated. After four years, either a significant decrease of pH and infiltration rate or a significant increase of OM, SAR and EC were observed in the soil subjected to treated wastewater treatment. PMID:24361727

  11. Priming effects and enzymatic activity in Israeli soils under treated wastewater and freshwater irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anissimova, Marina; Heinze, Stefanie; Chen, Yona; Tarchitzky, Jorge; Marschner, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Irrigation of soils with treated wastewater (TWW) directly influences microbial processes of soil. TWW contains easily decomposable organic material, which can stimulate the activity of soil microorganisms and, as a result, lead to the excessive consumption of soil organic carbon pool. We investigated the effects of irrigation with TWW relative to those of irrigation with freshwater (FW) on the microbial parameters in soils with low (7%) and medium (13%) clay content in a lysimeter experiment. The objectives of our study were to (i) determine the impact of water quality on soil respiration and enzymatic activity influenced by clay content and depth, and (ii) work out the changes in the turnover of soil organic matter (PE, priming effects). Samples were taken from three soil depths (0-10, 10-20, and 40-60 cm). Soil respiration and PE were determined in a 21-days incubation experiment after addition of uniformly 14C-labeled fructose. Activity of 10 extracellular enzymes (EEA, from C-, N-, P-, and S-cycle), phenol oxidase and peroxidase activity (PO+PE), and dehydrogenase activity (DHA) were assayed. Microbial Community-Level Physiological Profiles (CLPP) using four substrates, and microbial biomass were determined. The results showed that the clay content acted as the main determinative factor. In the soil with low clay content the water quality had a greater impact: the highest PE (56%) was observed in the upper layer (0-10cm) under FW irrigation; EEA of C-, P-, and S-cycles was significantly higher in the upper soil layer under TWW irrigation. Microbial biomass was higher in the soil under TWW irrigation and decreased with increasing of depth (50 μg/g soil in the upper layer, 15 μg/g soil in the lowest layer). This tendency was also observed for DHA. Contrary to the low clay content, in the soil with medium clay content both irrigation types caused the highest PE in the lowest layer (65% under FW irrigation, 48% under TWW irrigation); the higher substrate

  12. Salinity effect of irrigation with treated wastewater in basal soil respiration in SE of Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morugan, A.; Garcia-Orenes, F.; Mataix-Solera, J.

    2012-04-01

    The use of treated wastewater for the irrigation of agricultural soils is an alternative to utilizing better-quality water, especially in semiarid regions where water shortage is a very serious problem. Wastewater use in agriculture is not a new practice, all over the world this reuse has been common practice for a long time, but the concept is of greater importance currently because of the global water crisis. Replacement of freshwater by treated wastewater is seen as an important conservation strategy contributing to agricultural production, substantial benefits can derive from using this nutrient-rich waste water but there can also be a negative impact. For this reason it is necessary to know precisely the composition of water before applying it to the soil in order to guarantee minimal impact in terms of contamination and salinization. In this work we have been studying, for more than three years, different parameters in calcareous soils irrigated with treated wastewater in an agricultural Mediterranean area located at Biar (Alicante, SE Spain), with a crop of grape (Vitis labrusca). Three types of waters were used for the irrigation of the soil: fresh water (control) (TC), and treated wastewater from secondary (T2) and tertiary treatment (T3). Three different doses of irrigation have been applied to fit the efficiency of the irrigation to the crop and soil type during the study period. A soil sampling was carried out every four months. We show the results of the evolution of basal soil respiration (BSR), and its relationship with other parameters. We observed a similar pattern of behavior for BSR between treatments, a decrease at the first eighteen months of irrigation and an increase at the end of study. In our study case, the variations of BSR obtained for all the treatments seem to be closely related to the dose and frequency of irrigation and the related soil wetting and drying cycles. However, the results showed a negative correlation between BSR and

  13. Comparison of DNA extraction protocols for microbial communities from soil treated with biochar

    PubMed Central

    Leite, D.C.A.; Balieiro, F.C.; Pires, C.A.; Madari, B.E.; Rosado, A.S.; Coutinho, H.L.C.; Peixoto, R.S.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have evaluated the effects of biochar application on soil structure and plant growth. However, there are very few studies describing the effect of biochar on native soil microbial communities. Microbial analysis of environmental samples requires accurate and reproducible methods for the extraction of DNA from samples. Because of the variety among microbial species and the strong adsorption of the phosphate backbone of the DNA molecule to biochar, extracting and purifying high quality microbial DNA from biochar-amended soil is not a trivial process and can be considerably more difficult than the extraction of DNA from other environmental samples. The aim of this study was to compare the relative efficacies of three commercial DNA extraction kits, the FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil (FD kit), the PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (PS kit) and the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit Miniprep™ (ZR kit), for extracting microbial genomic DNA from sand treated with different types of biochar. The methods were evaluated by comparing the DNA yields and purity and by analysing the bacterial and fungal community profiles generated by PCR-DGGE. Our results showed that the PCR-DGGE profiles for bacterial and fungal communities were highly affected by the purity and yield of the different DNA extracts. Among the tested kits, the PS kit was the most efficient with respect to the amount and purity of recovered DNA and considering the complexity of the generated DGGE microbial fingerprint from the sand-biochar samples. PMID:24948928

  14. Thermal analysis of soil treated with biochars from different raw materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ana, Méndez; Paola, Cely; Gabriel, Gascó

    2014-05-01

    Thermal analysis (DTA, DSC, TG and dTG) has been used for decades to characterize carbonaceous materials used as fuels (oil, coal). In the last years, these techniques has been used with soils in order to assess proportions of labile and recalcitrant organic matter and to study the evolution of organic matter in amended soils during laboratory incubations. Indeed, thermogravimetric behaviour of soils can be quantified as the weight loss of samples attributed to different temperature ranges: WL1 from 25 to 150ºC; WL2 from 200 to 350ºC and WL3 from 375 to 600ºC . WL2 and WL3 correspond to weight loss associated to organic matter combustion (Worg=WL2+WL3). It is established that first peak was associated with combustion of less humified organic matter, while the second one was related to the more humified. Also, the WL3/WL2 ratio, named thermostability index, was previously identified as a reliable parameter for evaluating the level of stability of organic matter in composts and other organic wastes that indicated the relative amount of the thermally more stable fraction of organic matter with respect to less stable one. These stability can be related with the soil CO2 emmisions after biochar application. The objective of this presentation is to show the application of thermal analysis to study the stability of soil organic matter in soils treated with different biochars.

  15. Comparison of DNA extraction protocols for microbial communities from soil treated with biochar.

    PubMed

    Leite, D C A; Balieiro, F C; Pires, C A; Madari, B E; Rosado, A S; Coutinho, H L C; Peixoto, R S

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have evaluated the effects of biochar application on soil structure and plant growth. However, there are very few studies describing the effect of biochar on native soil microbial communities. Microbial analysis of environmental samples requires accurate and reproducible methods for the extraction of DNA from samples. Because of the variety among microbial species and the strong adsorption of the phosphate backbone of the DNA molecule to biochar, extracting and purifying high quality microbial DNA from biochar-amended soil is not a trivial process and can be considerably more difficult than the extraction of DNA from other environmental samples. The aim of this study was to compare the relative efficacies of three commercial DNA extraction kits, the FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil (FD kit), the PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (PS kit) and the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit Miniprep™ (ZR kit), for extracting microbial genomic DNA from sand treated with different types of biochar. The methods were evaluated by comparing the DNA yields and purity and by analysing the bacterial and fungal community profiles generated by PCR-DGGE. Our results showed that the PCR-DGGE profiles for bacterial and fungal communities were highly affected by the purity and yield of the different DNA extracts. Among the tested kits, the PS kit was the most efficient with respect to the amount and purity of recovered DNA and considering the complexity of the generated DGGE microbial fingerprint from the sand-biochar samples. PMID:24948928

  16. Carbon dynamics in an almond orchard soil amended with raw and treated pig slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, Sara G.; Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel

    2010-05-01

    In SE Spain, intensive farming is very common which supposes the generation of great amounts of pig slurries. These residues cause many storage problems due to their pollution capacity. A good management of them is necessary to avoid damages to the environment. The use of this effluent as fertilizer is a usual practice that in the correct dose is a good amend and important for sustainable development, but in excess can be a risk of polluting and damaging soil, water and crop conditions. Pig slurry is a source of many nutrients and specially rich in organic matter. The main objective of this study is to determine changes in soil organic carbon dynamics resulting from raw and treated slurry amendments applied in different doses. The experimental area is an almond orchard located in Cartagena (SE Spain). The climate of the area is semiarid Mediterranean with mean annual temperature of 18°C and mean annual rainfall of 275 mm. A total of 10 plots (12 m x 30 m) were designed, one of them being the control without fertilizer. Surface soil samples (0-25 cm) were collected in September 2009. Three different treatments were applied, raw slurry, the effluent obtained after solid-liquid separation and solid manure, all of them in three doses being the first one of 170 kg N/ha, (maximum permitted in nitrates directive 91/676/CEE), and the others two and three times the first one. Soil biochemical parameters are rapid indicators of changes in soil quality. According to this, total organic carbon, soil microbial biomass carbon, soluble carbon, and β-glucosidase, β-galactosidase and arylesterase activities were measured in order to assess some soil biochemical conditions and carbon dynamics in terms of the different treatments. As we expected, the use of these organic fertilizers rich in organic matter, had an effect on soil carbon and soil microbial activity resulting in an increase in most of the parameters; total organic carbon and β-galactosidase activity showed the

  17. Shock-treated Lunar Soil Simulant: Preliminary Assessment as a Construction Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boslough, Mark B.; Bernold, Leonhard E.; Horie, Yasuyuki

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to examine the feasibility of applying dynamic compaction techniques to fabricate construction materials from lunar regolith, preliminary explosive shock-loading experiments on lunar soil simulants were carried out. Analysis of our shock-treated samples suggests that binding additives, such as metallic aluminum powder, may provide the necessary characteristics to fabricate a strong and durable building material (lunar adobe) that takes advantage of a cheap base material available in abundance: lunar regolith.

  18. Study of Mn Phytoavailability in Soil Treated with Biosolids Using NAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Fátima Mateus, Natalina; Filho, Tufic Madi

    2011-08-01

    This work evaluated the behavior of Mn absorption by Eucalyptus grandis that was cultivated in soil treated with biosolid. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) followed by gamma ray spectrometry was the analytical method used to determine the Mn content. Manganese is an important micronutrient because it is an activator of enzymes, controller of oxyreduction reactions, essential to the photosynthesis and synthesis of chlorophyll and protein. The results showed that the phytoavailability of Mn was reduced increasing the doses of biosolid applied.

  19. Shock-treated lunar soil simulant: Preliminary assessment as a construction material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boslough, Mark B.; Bernold, Leonhard E.; Horie, Yasuyuki

    In an effort to examine the feasibility of applying dynamic compaction techniques to fabricate construction materials from lunar regolith, preliminary explosive shock-loading experiments on lunar soil simulants were carried out. Analysis of our shock-treated samples suggests that binding additives, such as metallic aluminum powder, may provide the necessary characteristics to fabricate a strong and durable building material (lunar adobe) that takes advantage of a cheap base material available in abundance: lunar regolith.

  20. Cement disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, L C; Hungerford, D S

    1987-12-01

    Does "cement disease" exist? The bony environment surrounding a loosened cemented prosthesis is an abnormal pathologic condition which, if left unattended, will progress to a total failure of the joint including an inhibition of function and immobilizing pain. That biomaterial properties of the cement used for fixation also contribute to the pathologic state separates this disease from other modes of loosening. This leads inevitably to the conclusion that "cement disease" does exist. Methyl methacrylate has revolutionized the treatment of severe joint dysfunction. There can be no doubt that improving surgical technique, cement handling, and the cement itself will continue to improve the results and reduce the incidence of failure due to loosening. Cement is undoubtedly satisfactory for elderly patients with low activity levels and relatively short life expectancies. However, because of the inherent biologic and biomechanical properties of methyl methacrylate, it is unlikely that it can be rendered satisfactory in the long run for the young, the active, or the overweight patient, for whom alternatives are currently being sought. In such cases, the elimination of "cement disease" can only occur with the elimination of cement. Alternatives include the search for other grouting materials and the development of prostheses with satisfactory surfaces for either press-fit or biologic ingrowth. PMID:3315375

  1. Chemical Speciation and Bioaccessibility of Arsenic and Chromiumin Chromated Copper Arsenate-Treated Wood and Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, Peter S.; Ruby, Michael V.; Lowney, Yvette W.; Holm,Stewart E.

    2005-10-12

    This research compares the As and Cr chemistry ofdislodgeable residues from Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA)-treated woodcollected by two different techniques (directly from the board surfaceeither by rubbing with a soft bristle brush or from human hands aftercontact with CCA-treated wood), and demonstrates that these materials areequivalent in terms of the chemical form and bonding of As and Cr and interms of the As leaching behavior. This finding links the extensivechemical characterization and bioavailability testing that has been donepreviously on the brush-removed residue to a material that is derivedfrom human skin contact with CCA-treated wood. Additionally, thisresearch characterizes the arsenic present in biological fluids (sweatand simulated gastric fluid) following contact with these residues. Thedata demonstrate that in biological fluids, the arsenic is presentprimarily as free arsenate ions.Arsenic-containing soils were alsoextracted into human sweat to evaluate the potential for arsenicdissolution from soils at the skin surface. For soils from field sites,only a small fraction of the total arsenic is soluble in sweat. Based oncomparisons to reference materials that have been used in in vivo dermalabsorption studies, these findings suggest that the actual relativebioavailability via dermal absorption of As from CCA-residues and soilmay be well below the current default value of 3 percent used by U.S.EPA.

  2. Deca-brominated diphenyl ether destruction and PBDD/F and PCDD/F emissions from coprocessing deca-BDE mixture-contaminated soils in cement kilns.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yufei; Huang, Qifei; Tang, Zhenwu; Wang, Qi; Zhu, Xiaohua; Liu, Wenbin

    2012-12-18

    The disposal of soil contaminated with polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) was studied using an industrial coprocessing cement kiln. Two tests, Test 1 and Test 2, studied the destruction, removal, and emissions of PBDE in soils with PBDE concentrations of 4160 and 25,000 mg/kg, respectively. Emissions of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) were also quantified. The PBDE destruction and removal efficiencies for Tests 1 and 2 were 99.9997% and 99.9998%, respectively. PBDE stack gas concentrations were 39.1 and 85.9 ng/Nm³ for Tests 1 and 2, respectively. The mean PBDD/F TEQ stack gas concentrations related to Tests 1 and 2 were 11.0 and 11.4 pg/Nm³, and PBDFs contributed 60.0-64.2% of the total PBDD/F concentrations. 2,3,7,8-TeBDD made the greatest contribution to the total PBDD/Fs, 40%, of all the homologues. The mean PCDD/F TEQ stack gas concentrations in Tests 1 and 2 were 0.74 and 0.65 pg/Nm³. The total PBDE, PBDD/F, and PCDD/F TEQ at the kiln outlet was 0.006% and 0.001% of the feed material TEQ. Therefore, coprocessing heavily PBDE-contaminated soils in a cement kiln is a highly efficient and environmentally sound treatment technology. PMID:23194181

  3. Impact of treated wastewater irrigation on antibiotic resistance in the soil microbiome.

    PubMed

    Gatica, Joao; Cytryn, Eddie

    2013-06-01

    The reuse of treated wastewater (TWW) for irrigation is a practical solution for overcoming water scarcity, especially in arid and semiarid regions of the world. However, there are several potential environmental and health-related risks associated with this practice. One such risk stems from the fact that TWW irrigation may increase antibiotic resistance (AR) levels in soil bacteria, potentially contributing to the global propagation of clinical AR. Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents have been recognized as significant environmental AR reservoirs due to selective pressure generated by antibiotics and other compounds that are frequently detected in effluents. This review summarizes a myriad of recent studies that have assessed the impact of anthropogenic practices on AR in environmental bacterial communities, with specific emphasis on elucidating the potential effects of TWW irrigation on AR in the soil microbiome. Based on the current state of the art, we conclude that contradictory to freshwater environments where WWTP effluent influx tends to expand antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic-resistant genes levels, TWW irrigation does not seem to impact AR levels in the soil microbiome. Although this conclusion is a cause for cautious optimism regarding the future implementation of TWW irrigation, we conclude that further studies aimed at assessing the scope of horizontal gene transfer between effluent-associated ARB and soil bacteria need to be further conducted before ruling out the possible contribution of TWW irrigation to antibiotic-resistant reservoirs in irrigated soils. PMID:23378260

  4. Exploring bacterial community structure and function associated with atrazine biodegradation in repeatedly treated soils.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hua; Lian, Jianjun; Wang, Huifang; Cai, Lin; Yu, Yunlong

    2015-04-01

    Substantial application of the herbicide atrazine in agriculture leads to persistent contamination, which may damage the succeeding crops and pose potential threats to soil ecology and environmental health. Here, the degradation characteristics of atrazine and dynamic change of soil bacterial community structure and function as well as their relations were studied during three repeated treatments at the recommended, double, and five-fold doses. The results showed that the degradation half-life of atrazine obviously decreased with increased treatment frequency. Soil microbial functional diversity displayed a variation trend of suppression-recovery-stimulation, which was associated with increased degradation rate of atrazine. 16S amplicon sequencing was conducted to explore bacterial community structure and correlate the genus to potential atrazine degradation. A total of seven potentially atrazine-degrading bacterial genera were found including Nocardioides, Arthrobacter, Bradyrhizobium, Burkholderia, Methylobacterium, Mycobacterium, and Clostridium. These bacterial genera showed almost complete atrazine degradation pathways including dechlorination, dealkylation, hydroxylation, and ring cleavage. Furthermore, the relative abundance of four of them (i.e., Nocardioides, Arthrobacter, Methylobacterium, and Bradyrhizobium) increased with treatment frequency and atrazine concentration, suggesting that they may participate in atrazine degradation during repeated treatments. Our findings reveal the potential relationship between atrazine degradation and soil bacterial community structure in repeatedly treated soils. PMID:25603295

  5. Soil-food chain-pesticide wildlife relationships in aldrin-treated fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Korschgen, L.J.

    1970-01-01

    Soil-food-chain-pesticide wildlife relationships were investigated to learn the concentration of pesticide residues present in soils, macro-invertebrates, vertebrates, and seeds as a result of annual applications of aldrin at recommended rates for pest control. Two central Missouri cornfields treated witb aldrin at 1 lb/acre, for 16 and 15 of the past 17 years, were selected for study during 1965-67. Primary samples collected for residue analyses included soils, earthworms (Lumbricidae), crickets (GryIlidae), and two kinds of ground beetles (Carabidae) obtained during early April, June, August, and October. Vertebrates and plant seeds collected during 1967 included white-footed mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), toads (Bufo americanus), snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis and Pituophis sayi), corn (Zea Mays), foxtail (Setaria Faberii), and annual sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Pesticide residues consisted primarily of dieldrin, the degradation product of aldrin. Combined aldrin and dieldrin residues, as two field all-season averages, wet weight basis, were: soils, 0.31 ppm; earthworms, 1.49 ppm; crickets, 0.23 ppm; Harpalus ground beetles, 1.10 ppm; Poecilus ground beetles, 9.67 ppm; white-footed mice, 0.98 ppm; toads, 3.53 ppm; garter snakes, 12.35 ppm; and corn, foxtail, and sunflower seeds less than 0.02 ppm each. Unusually high average residues (37.48 ppm) in Poecilus beetles during June, 1967, were attributed to abnormally high soil moisture and predacious feeding habits of these insects.

  6. Persistence and fate of anthracene and benzo(a)pyrene in municipal sludge treated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Goodin, J.D.; Webber, M.D.

    1995-03-01

    Greenhouse studies using pots and microcosms were conducted to investigate the persistence and fate of nonlabeled and {sup 14}C-labeled anthracene (ANT) and benzo(a)Pyrene (B(a)P) in sludge treated soil. Results indicated that ANT degraded rapidly (t{sub {1/2}} {approx} 3 wk) from the experimental systems, but that B(a)P was persistent. Cropping did not affect the persistence of either compound. On completion of the experiments {le} 10% of the ANT added to soil was recovered intact, whereas 78% of the B(a)P added to soil was recovered intact. Most ({ge}85%) of the {sup 14}C added to soil as labeled ANT and B(a)P was accounted for. Recoveries of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} indicated significant mineralization of ANT, but not of B(a)P. Trivial amounts ({le}0.2%) of {sup 14}C were recovered as volatile organics and in plant materials, but large amounts were recovered from soil. A considerable proportion of the ANT derived {sup 14}C in soil was not extracted with acetone/hexane, which indicated that it had been converted to bound residue. a much smaller proportion of B(a)P than of ANT derived {sup 14}C in soil was converted to bound residue. No evidence was obtained for uptake of intact ANT or B(a)P by ryegrass (lolium multiflorum Lam.), soybean [Glycinemax (L.) Merr.], and cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.). 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

    2010-09-30

    Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass

  8. Soil temperatures and stability of ice-cemented ground in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, C.; Mellon, M. T.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1998-01-01

    Year-round temperature measurements at 1600 m elevation during 1994 in the Asgard Range Antarctica, indicate that the mean annual frost point of the ice-cemented ground, 25 cm below the surface, is -21.7 +/- 0.2 degrees C and the mean annual frost point of the atmosphere is -27.5 +/- 1.0 degrees C. The corresponding mean annual temperatures are -24.9 degrees C and -23.3 degrees C. These results imply that there is a net flux of water vapour from the ice to the atmosphere resulting in a recession of the ice-cemented ground by about 0.4-0.6 mm yr-1. The level of the ice-cemented permafrost is about 12 cm below the level of dry permafrost. The summer air temperatures would have to increase about 7 degrees C for thawing temperatures to just reach the top of the subsurface ice. Either subsurface ice at this location is evaporating over time or there are sporadic processes that recharge the ice and maintain equilibrium over long timescales.

  9. Transfer of wastewater associated pharmaceuticals and personal care products to crop plants from biosolids treated soil.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenxi; Spongberg, Alison L; Witter, Jason D; Sridhar, B B Maruthi

    2012-11-01

    The plant uptake of emerging organic contaminants such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) is receiving increased attention. Biosolids from municipal wastewater treatment have been previously identified as a major source for PPCPs. Thus, plant uptake of PPCPs from biosolids applied soils needs to be understood. In the present study, the uptake of carbamazepine, diphenhydramine, and triclocarban by five vegetable crop plants was examined in a field experiment. At the time of harvest, three compounds were detected in all plants grown in biosolids-treated soils. Calculated root concentration factor (RCF) and shoot concentration factor (SCF) are the highest for carbamazepine followed by triclocarban and diphenhydramine. Positive correlation between RCF and root lipid content was observed for carbamazepine but not for diphenhydramine and triclocarban. The results demonstrate the ability of crop plants to accumulate PPCPs from contaminated soils. The plant uptake processes of PPCPs are likely affected by their physico-chemical properties, and their interaction with soil. The difference uptake behavior between plant species could not solely be attributed to the root lipid content. PMID:22921256

  10. Enhanced infiltration regime for treated-wastewater purification in soil aquifer treatment (SAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadav, Itamar; Arye, Gilboa; Tarchitzky, Jorge; Chen, Yona

    2012-02-01

    SummaryUtilization of treated wastewater (TWW) for agriculture is a widely accepted practice in regions suffering from freshwater (FW) shortages. Soil aquifer treatment is often employed for wastewater purification in regions with sandy soil. Infiltration rates of water through the soil can decrease as a result organic matter (OM) accumulation and the consequential water repellency. We examined several infiltration regimes with the aim of achieving lower levels of OM accumulation, reduced water repellency and increased infiltration rate in the topsoil layer of the infiltration basin. OM accumulation in the topsoil layer was found to be the main factor adversely affecting soil permeability. In measurements performed in the infiltration basins of the Tel Aviv wastewater-purification facility over a 1-year period, infiltration rates were found to differ with season, being low in the winter and high in the summer. Similar observations were made on small model infiltration ponds established to simulate the large basins. Several water-application regimes were tested for enhancement of the infiltration rates. Rapid application of TWW was the most efficient method in terms of reducing OM accumulation and water repellency in the topsoil layer. Low-rate, and spraying of TWW over the soil using sprinklers produced the highest OM accumulation and consequently, higher water repellency. Low-rate, single outlet application—the conventional infiltration method employed in the commercial infiltration basins—exhibited moderate OM accumulation and water repellency. Neither water repellency nor OM accumulation were observed in the FW-application regime. Accumulation of OM originating from the percolating TWW, at the topsoil layer was identified as dominating infiltration rate at the infiltration basins. Reduction of OM content by the means proposed and evaluated in this experiment can drastically increase infiltration rates.

  11. Impact of Long-Term Irrigation with Treated Sewage on Soil Magnetic Susceptibility and Organic Matter Content in North China.

    PubMed

    Yang, P G; Yang, M; Mao, R Z; Byrne, J M

    2015-07-01

    This study assessed the effect on magnetic susceptibility and organic matter content of arable soil by irrigation with either treated sewage or groundwater. Results indicated that organic matter and magnetic susceptibility values in the soil irrigated with sewage were increased by 7.1 % and 13.5 %, respectively, compared to agricultural soil that irrigated with groundwater. Both the sewage and groundwater irrigated soils contained a significant fraction of ultrafine superpara magnetic grains, as indicated by high frequency dependent susceptibility (χfd > 6 %). The enhancement of soil magnetic properties was determined to be caused by anthropogenic sewage irrigation and agrochemical use by investigation of vertical soil profiles. Magnetic susceptibility parameters were shown to be significantly correlated with organic matter content (y = 0.0057x + 1.3439, R(2) = 0.09, p < 0.05). This work indicates that measurements of magnetic susceptibility may offer a rapid first step for identifying the potential pollution in arable soils. PMID:25985871

  12. Biological functioning of PAH-polluted and thermal desorption-treated soils assessed by fauna and microbial bioindicators.

    PubMed

    Cébron, Aurélie; Cortet, Jérôme; Criquet, Stéven; Biaz, Asmaa; Calvert, Virgile; Caupert, Cécile; Pernin, Céline; Leyval, Corinne

    2011-11-01

    A large number of soil bioindicators were used to assess biological diversity and activity in soil polluted with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the same soil after thermal desorption (TD) treatment. Abundance and biodiversity of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, nematodes and microarthropods, as well as functional parameters such as enzymatic activities and soil respiration, were assessed during a two year period of in situ monitoring. We investigated the influence of vegetation (spontaneous vegetation and Medicago sativa) and TD treatment on biological functioning. Multivariate analysis was performed to analyze the whole data set. A principal response curve (PRC) technique was used to evaluate the different treatments (various vegetation and contaminated vs. TD soil) contrasted with control (bare) soil over time. Our results indicated the value of using a number of complementary bioindicators, describing both diversity and functions, to assess the influence of vegetation on soil and discriminate polluted from thermal desorption (TD)-treated soil. Plants had an influence on the abundance and activity of all organisms examined in our study, favoring the whole trophic chain development. However, although TD-treated soil had a high abundance and diversity of microorganisms and fauna, enzymatic activities were weak because of the strong physical and chemical modifications of this soil. PMID:21392572

  13. Short-term effects of treated waste water irrigation on soil. Two years of a study monitoring a Mediterranean calcareous soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morugán, A.; García-Orenes, F.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Gómez, I.; Arcenegui, V.; Navarro, M. A.; Mataix-Beneyto, J.

    2009-04-01

    Shortage of water and soil degradation are the most important environmental problems in the Mediterranean areas due, in many cases, to inadequate agricultural management of irrigation to which organic matter is not correctly added, and the use of low quality waters for irrigation. For this reason strategies for saving water and for the restoration of the mean properties of soil are necessary. The use of treated waste water for the irrigation of agricultural land is a good solution to these problems, because it reduces the utilization of fresh water and potentially could improve key soil parameters, thus influencing crop production in a positive way by increasing soil nutrients and organic matter content. In this work we are studying the short-term effects of irrigation with waste waters on several soil properties related to fertility, in an agricultural area located at Biar (Alicante, SE of Spain), with a crop of grape (Vitis labrusca). Three treatments are being used in the irrigation of the soil: fresh water (control), and treated waste waters from secondary and tertiary treatment. A soil sampling was carried out every four months. We show here the results after two years of irrigation treatments. Results confirm a slight decrease of organic carbon and nitrogen contents in plots irrigated with water from secondary treatment, in these plots an increase of the electrical conductivity (EC) has also been observed. Laboratory analyses also show an increase in P available, pH and Na on plots with waste water application. At the moment, the changes found between treatments do not imply quantitatively great changes in soil properties and negative impacts into the soil with the exception of EC, which must be monitored to control their values. Although we show here partial results of a long-term experiment, the conclusion is positive since treated waste waters are not producing notable changes on soil parameters in comparison with plots treated with fresh water.

  14. Impact of treated urban wastewater for reuse in agriculture on crop response and soil ecotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Belhaj, Dalel; Jerbi, Bouthaina; Medhioub, Mounir; Zhou, John; Kallel, Monem; Ayadi, Habib

    2016-08-01

    The scarcity of freshwater resources is a serious problem in arid regions, such as Tunisia, and marginal quality water is gradually being used in agriculture. This study aims to study the impact of treated urban wastewater for reuse in agriculture on the health of soil and food crops. The key findings are that the effluents of Sfax wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) did not meet the relevant guidelines, therefore emitting a range of organic (e.g., up to 90 mg L(-1) COD and 30 mg L(-1) BOD5) and inorganic pollutants (e.g., up to 0.5 mg L(-1) Cu and 0.1 mg L(-1) Cd) in the receiving aquatic environments. Greenhouse experiments examining the effects of wastewater reuse on food plants such as tomato, lettuce, and radish showed that the treated effluent adversely affected plant growth, photosynthesis, and antioxidant enzyme contents. However, the pollution burden and biological effects on plants were substantially reduced by using a 50 % dilution of treated sewage effluent, suggesting the potential of reusing treated effluent in agriculture so long as appropriate monitoring and control is in place. PMID:26520100

  15. The assessment of treated wastewater quality and the effects of mid-term irrigation on soil physical and chemical properties (case study: Bandargaz-treated wastewater)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaboosi, Kami

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the characteristics of inflow and outflow wastewater of the Bandargaz wastewater treatment plant on the basis of the data collection of operation period and the samples taken during the study. Also the effects of mid-term use of the wastewater for irrigation (from 2005 to 2013) on soil physical and chemical characteristics were studied. For this purpose, 4 samples were taken from the inflow and outflow wastewater and 25 quality parameters were measured. Also, the four soil samples from a depth of 0-30 cm of two rice field irrigated with wastewater in the beginning and middle of the planting season and two samples from one adjacent rice field irrigated with fresh water were collected and their chemical and physical characteristics were determined. Average of electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, sodium adsorption ratio, chemical oxygen demand and 5 days biochemical oxygen demand in treated wastewater were 1.35 dS/m, 707 ppm, 0.93, 80 ppm and 40 ppm, respectively. Results showed that although some restrictions exist about chlorine and bicarbonate, the treated wastewater is suitable for irrigation based on national and international standards and criteria. In comparison with fresh water, the mid-term use of wastewater caused a little increase of soil salinity. However, it did not lead to increase of soil salinity beyond rice salinity threshold. Also, there were no restrictions on soil in the aspect of salinity and sodium hazard on the basis of many irrigated soil classifications. In comparison with fresh water, the mid-term use of wastewater caused the increase of total N, absorbable P and absorbable K in soil due to high concentration of those elements in treated wastewater.

  16. Copper stabilization by zeolite synthesis in polluted soils treated with coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto Terzano; Matteo Spagnuolo; Luca Medici; Bart Vekemans; Laszlo Vincze; Koen Janssens; Pacifico Ruggiero

    2005-08-15

    This paper reports on the process of zeolite formation in an agricultural soil artificially polluted by high amounts of Cu (15 mg of Cu/g of soil dry weight) and treated with fused coal fly ash at 30 and 60 C and how this process affects the mobility and availability of the metal. As a consequence of the treatment, the amount of dissolved Cu, and thus its mobility, was strongly reduced, and the percentage of the metal stabilized in the solid phase increased over time, reaching values of 30% at 30{sup o}C and 40% at 60{sup o}C. The physicochemical phenomena responsible for Cu stabilization in the solid phase have been evaluated by EDTA sequential extractions and synchrotron radiation based X-ray microanalytical techniques. These techniques were used for the visualization of the spatial distribution and the speciation of Cu in and/or on the neo-formed zeolite particles. In particular, micro XRF (X-ray fluorescence) tomography showed direct evidence that Cu can be entrapped as clusters inside the porous zeolitic structures while -{mu}XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) spectroscopy determinations revealed Cu to be present mainly as Cu(II) hydroxide and Cu(II) oxide. The reported results could be useful as a basic knowledge for planning new technologies for the on-site physicochemical stabilization of heavy metals in heavily polluted soils. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Copper stabilization by zeolite synthesis in polluted soils treated with coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Terzano, Roberto; Spagnuolo, Matteo; Medici, Luca; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Janssens, Koen; Ruggiero, Pacifico

    2005-08-15

    This study deals with the process of zeolite formation in an agricultural soil artificially polluted by high amounts of Cu (15 mg of Cu/g of soil dry weight) and treated with fused coal fly ash at 30 and 60 degrees C and how this process affects the mobility and availability of the metal. As a consequence of the treatment, the amount of dissolved Cu, and thus its mobility, was strongly reduced, and the percentage of the metal stabilized in the solid phase increased over time, reaching values of 30% at 30 degrees C and 40% at 60 degrees C. The physicochemical phenomena responsible for Cu stabilization in the solid phase have been evaluated by EDTA sequential extractions and synchrotron radiation based X-ray microanalytical techniques. These techniques were used for the visualization of the spatial distribution and the speciation of Cu in and/or on the neo-formed zeolite particles. In particular, micro XRF (X-ray fluorescence) tomography showed direct evidence that Cu can be entrapped as clusters inside the porous zeolitic structures while mu-XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) spectroscopy determinations revealed Cu to be present mainly as Cu(ll) hydroxide and Cu(ll) oxide. The reported results could be useful as a basic knowledge for planning new technologies for the on site physicochemical stabilization of heavy metals in heavily polluted soils. PMID:16173593

  18. An example of treated waste water use for soil irrigation in the SAFIR project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cary, L.; Jovanovic, Z.; Stikic, R.; Blagojevic, S.; Kloppmann, W.

    2009-04-01

    The safe use of treated domestic wastewater for irrigation needs to address the risks for humans (workers, exposed via contact with irrigation water, soil, crops and food, consumers, exposed via ingestion of fresh and processed food), for animals (via ingestion of crops on soil), for the crops and agricultural productivity (via salinity and trace element uptake), for soil (via accumulation or release of pollutants) as well as for surface, groundwaters and the associated ecosystems (via runoff and infiltration, Kass et al., 2005, Bouwer, 2000). In this context, the European FP6 SAFIR project (Safe and High Quality Food Production using Low Quality Waters and Improved Irrigation Systems and Management) investigates the geochemical quality of the root zone soil, knowing it is the main transit and storage compartment for pollutants. The type of reaction (sorption, co-precipitation…) and the reactive mineral phases also determine the availability of trace elements for the plant and determine the passage towards crops and products. Reactions of the infiltrating water with the soil solid phase are important for the solute cycling, temporary fixation and remobilisation of trace pollutants. Therefore the soil water quality was directly or indirectly assessed. Direct measurements of soil water were made through porous cups. The experiments were carried out during the growing season of 2006, 2007 and 2008 in a vegetable commercial farm, located at 10 km north of Belgrade. The soil is silty clayey, and developed on alluvial deposits. It was classified as humogley according to USDA Soil Classification. The climate of the field side is a continental type with hot and dry summers and cold and rainy winters. As in the rest of Serbia, farm suffers from water deficits during the main growing season. The initial soil quality was assessed through a sampling campaign before the onset of first year irrigation; the soil quality was then monitored throughout three years. Soil sampling

  19. Impact of treated wastewater on growth, respiration and hydraulic conductivity of citrus root systems in light and heavy soils.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Indira; Cohen, Shabtai; Shaviv, Avi; Bar-Tal, Asher; Bernstein, Nirit; Heuer, Bruria; Ephrath, Jhonathan

    2016-06-01

    Roots interact with soil properties and irrigation water quality leading to changes in root growth, structure and function. We studied these interactions in an orchard and in lysimeters with clay and sandy loam soils. Minirhizotron imaging and manual sampling showed that root growth was three times lower in the clay relative to sandy loam soil. Treated wastewater (TWW) led to a large reduction in root growth with clay (45-55%) but not with sandy loam soil (<20%). Treated wastewater increased salt uptake, membrane leakage and proline content, and decreased root viability, carbohydrate content and osmotic potentials in the fine roots, especially in clay. These results provide evidence that TWW challenges and damages the root system. The phenology and physiology of root orders were studied in lysimeters. Soil type influenced diameter, specific root area, tissue density and cortex area similarly in all root orders, while TWW influenced these only in clay soil. Respiration rates were similar in both soils, and root hydraulic conductivity was severely reduced in clay soil. Treated wastewater increased respiration rate and reduced hydraulic conductivity of all root orders in clay but only of the lower root orders in sandy loam soil. Loss of hydraulic conductivity increased with root order in clay and clay irrigated with TWW. Respiration and hydraulic properties of all root orders were significantly affected by sodium-amended TWW in sandy loam soil. These changes in root order morphology, anatomy, physiology and hydraulic properties indicate rapid and major modifications of root systems in response to differences in soil type and water quality. PMID:27022106

  20. Tensile bond strength of gold and porcelain inlays to extracted teeth using three cements.

    PubMed

    Michelini, F S; Belser, U C; Scherrer, S S; De Rijk, W G

    1995-01-01

    This in vitro study compared the tensile bond strength of gold and porcelain inlays to extracted molars in standardized cavities. Three cements were used: zinc phosphate, glass-ionomer, and a resin composite cement. The gold inlays were cemented using zinc phosphate or glass-ionomer cement, and the porcelain inlays were luted using resin composite or glass-ionomer cement. Surface treatments included, for gold inlays, either no treatment (zinc phosphate cement) or airborne particle abraded and tinplated (glass-ionomer cement); and for porcelain inlays, either no treatment (glass-ionomer cement) or etched and silane-treated (resin composite cement). Statistical analysis was performed using the Weibull distribution. Results showed no significant differences between gold inlays cemented using zinc phosphate or glass-ionomer cements and porcelain inlays luted using glass-ionomer cements. The bonded porcelain inlays (resin composite cement) showed tensile bond strengths two to three times higher than those obtained for cemented gold inlays. PMID:7575974

  1. Distribution and mobility of chromium, copper, and arsenic in soils collected near CCA-treated wood structures in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hekap; Kim, Dong-Jin; Koo, Jin-Hoi; Park, Jeong-Gue; Jang, Yong-Chul

    2007-03-15

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) is currently the most commonly used wood preservative in Korea. Questions, however, have been raised regarding the potential environmental impacts of metal leaching from CCA-treated wood to soil. Although a number of researchers from other countries have reported that chromium, copper, and arsenic do leach from CCA-treated wood over time, to date few field studies have been performed on those metals in soils adjacent to CCA-treated wood structures in Korea. The present study was conducted to determine the lateral and vertical distributions and accumulation of chromium, copper, and arsenic in soils collected from CCA-treated wood structures. A total of fifty-five composite soil samples were collected from four CCA-treated wood structures of approximately one year in age. The samples were analyzed for physicochemical properties as well as for the total chromium, copper, and arsenic concentrations. The chromium, copper, and arsenic concentrations in soil samples adjacent to the structures were as high as 79.0, 98.9, and 128 mg/kg, respectively, compared to background soil samples (48.2, 26.9, and 6.27 mg/kg, respectively). Arsenic was more mobile in soil than chromium and copper. The concentration gradient of arsenic in soil was observed only to the depth of approximately 5 cm in one year of outdoor exposure, whereas chromium and copper apparently remained near the surface (approximately less than 1 cm) after their release. Future efforts should be made to observe seasonal impacts on the release of metals and incorporate metal speciation into determining more detailed mobility and distribution. PMID:17292945

  2. Effects of long-term irrigation with treated wastewater on the hydraulic properties of a clayey soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, S.; Narkis, K.

    2011-08-01

    The increasing demand for freshwater (FW) for domestic use turns treated wastewater (WW) into an attractive source of water for irrigated agriculture. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of 15 yrs of irrigation with WW on hydraulic properties and flow processes in a clayey soil, compared to FW use. It also quantitatively addressed the distribution with depth along the soil profile of that impact on soil hydraulic properties. Standard methods used in soil physics at the laboratory scale, and numerical solutions of the flow equations on the basis of HYDRUS, were applied to define fundamental soil hydraulic properties of disturbed soil samples from 0-20, 20-40, and 40-60 cm layers in the root zone. Results showed that saturated hydraulic conductivity, sorptivity, and infiltration rates are consistently lower in the WW irrigated soil samples at all depths. Water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions were affected by the use of WW, leading to a smaller, simulated-wetted volume below a dripper for the WW-irrigated soil case. These results illustrate the combined and complex effect of WW use on soil-exchangeable sodium percentage, and suggest changes in contact angle and pore size distribution. They also suggest that WW application will affect differently different zones in the soil profile, depending on irrigation management parameters and plant uptake characteristics.

  3. Production of micro- and nanosilica from soil inhabiting Folsomia candida fed with treated rice husk.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Murguía, Barbara; Soto-Mercado, Jorge R; Morales-Malacara, Juan B; Castaño, Victor M

    2015-08-01

    Rice husk was employed as a source for producing silica micro- and nanoparticles through its digestion by soil fauna. Although many physicochemical methods for producing nanostructures have been studied, the biological processes remain mostly unexplored. Alkaline hydrogen peroxide with continuous control of reaction pH allowed removal of lignin bonds while preserving most of the cell wall and the silica present in the rice husk. The accessibility of lignocellulose was achieved without removing appreciable amounts of lignin, so this agricultural byproduct can be employed as feeding material for microarthropods Folsomia candida (Collembola). When these microarthropods are placed on a substrate of treated rice husk, more than 85% of degraded material is obtained, as compared to the untreated rice husk substrate, while the silica particles obtained show a slight decrease in average size. PMID:26224351

  4. The cement solidification systems at LANL

    SciTech Connect

    Veazey, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    There are two major cement solidification systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Both are focused primarily around treating waste from the evaporator at TA-55, the Plutonium Processing Facility. The evaporator receives the liquid waste stream from TA-55's nitric acid-based, aqueous-processing operations and concentrates the majority of the radionuclides in the evaporator bottoms solution. This is sent to the TA-55 cementation system. The evaporator distillate is sent to the TA-50 facility, where the radionuclides are precipitated and then cemented. Both systems treat TRU-level waste, and so are operated according to the criteria for WIPP-destined waste, but they differ in both cement type and mixing method. The TA-55 systems uses Envirostone, a gypsum-based cement and in-drum prop mixing; the TA-50 systems uses Portland cement and drum tumbling for mixing.

  5. Impact of use of treated wastewater for irrigation on soil and quinoa crop in South of Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Youssfi, Lahcen; Choukr-Allah, Redouane; Zaafrani, Mina; Hirich, Aziz; Fahmi, Hasna; Abdelatif, Rami; Laajaj, Khadija; El Omari, Halima

    2015-04-01

    This work was conducted at the experimental station of the IAV Hassan II-CHA-Agadir in southwest Morocco between 2010 and 2012. It aimed the assessment of the effects of use of treated wastewater on soil properties and agronomic parameters by adopting crop rotation introducing quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) as a new crop under semi-arid climate. Biomass production, yield, nutrient accumulation in leaves and the level of electrical conductivity and soil nitrate are the evaluated parameters during three growing seasons. Results show that quinoa has a performing behavior when it is preceded by fabae bean in term of water use efficiency; in addition, the recorded level of salt accumulation in the soil was the lowest in comparison with that of the combinations bean>quinoa and fallow>quinoa. Concerning growth and yield, it was found that growing quinoa after chickpea was more beneficial in terms of biomass productivity and yield. Keywords: Quinoa, soil, treated wastewater semi-arid

  6. Copper, zinc, and arsenic in soil surrounding Douglas-fir poles treated with ammoniacal copper zinc arsenate (ACZA).

    PubMed

    Morrell, J J; Keefe, Donn; Baileys, Randall T

    2003-01-01

    The levels of copper, zinc, and arsenic in soil surrounding Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] utility poles treated with ammoniacal copper zinc arsenate (ACZA) were investigated at sites in Florida, Virginia, and New York. Copper levels were elevated near the poles and declined with both horizontal distance away from the pole and depth beneath the soil surface. Zinc levels were also elevated next to the poles, but the levels declined more slowly than did those of copper. Arsenic levels were elevated in soil immediately next to the poles but declined to near background levels farther away. The results indicate that metals can leach from ACZA-treated poles, but do not migrate far in the soil, and thus the levels decline sharply with distance from the poles. PMID:14674531

  7. Occurrence and distribution of PAHs, PCBs, and chlorinated pesticides in Tunisian soil irrigated with treated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Haddaoui, Imen; Mahjoub, Olfa; Mahjoub, Borhane; Boujelben, Abdelhamid; Di Bella, Giuseppa

    2016-03-01

    Treated wastewater (TWW) is a well recognized source of organic pollutants (OPs) that may accumulate during irrigation. For the first time, data on the occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyles (PCBs) and organochlorinated pesticides (OCPs) in wastewater irrigated soil in Nabeul (Tunisia) are reported. 13 PAHs, 18 PCBs and 16 OCPs were analyzed in soil samples collected at 0-10 and 10-20 cm depth before each and every irrigation and after the irrigation period expanding from June to October. Soil was extracted with an accelerated solvent extractor and analyzed by a tandem gas chromatograph in selected reaction monitoring mode (GC/MS/MS/SRM). OPs residues were detected before irrigation and accumulated at the end of the season for some of them. The total concentration of PAHs varied between 120.01 and 365.18 μg kg(-1) dry weight (dw) at 0-10 cm depth before and at the end of irrigation, respectively. The total concentration of PCBs varied between 11.26 and 21.89 μg kg(-1) dw at 0-10 cm, being higher than those reported for 10-20 cm. The six indicator PCB congeners (28, 52, 101, 138, 153, 180) were predominant. OCPs concentrations ranged between 12.49 and 21.81 μg kg(-1) at 0-10 cm and between 74.03 and 310.54 μg kg(-1) at 10-20 cm depth. DDT was predominant accounting for more than 94% of the total OCPs. In view of the present results, OPs are relevant to the agricultural environment, calling for more research on their persistence and potential transfer to plants and/or groundwater while taking into account farmers' practices. PMID:26716883

  8. Long-Term Exposure of Tropical Soils to Pressure Treated Lumber, Barro Colorado Island, Panama: Impacts on Soil Metal Mobility and Microbial Community Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marietta, M. L.; Fowle, D. A.; Roberts, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Pressure treated lumber (CCA) has been used in a variety of structures for over seven decades, but recent concerns have been raised about leaching of metals such as chromium (Cr) and arsenic (As) into proximal soils and water supplies. Pressure treated lumber abundance and its continued use necessitate a thorough understanding of metal release and sequestration in the subsurface. To date, no long-term, in situ study on the migration of CCA compounds from lumber has been performed. Barro Colorado Island, Panama is the site of several previous CCA studies and provides an opportunity to investigate the long-term (>70 years) effects of pressure treated lumber in oxisols, where high rainfall and warm temperatures may represent an end-member condition for the leaching and mobility of these metals. Soil samples from CCA and control sites were measured for Cr, As, Cu, Zn, and Fe abundances, microbial biomass and community structure via phospholipid fatty acid analysis, along with basic soil properties. CCA lumber samples were also characterized for their metal abundance. Lumber treated with zinc meta-arsenite displayed advanced decay with elevated As, Cu, and Zn concentrations observed in the adjacent soil. Increased soil organic matter and microbial biomass correlate to decreases in Fe and Fe-associated metals compared to the control. High As concentrations persist to <1 m of the source. Lumber treated with potassium dichromate contained high chromium concentrations and displayed little decay, however, soil concentrations of Cr, Fe, and Cu were generally less than control soils. Over these same intervals, soil organic matter and microbial biomass increased, particularly the fraction of metal reducing bacteria (MRB). We hypothesize that organic carbon loading from lumber stimulates MRB, leading to mobilization of Fe and Fe-associated metals from these oxide-rich soils. Principal component analysis of PLFA data confirms a distinction between controls and samples with

  9. Heavy metal input to agricultural soils from irrigation with treated wastewater: Insight from Pb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloppmann, Wolfram; Cary, Lise; Psarras, Georgios; Surdyk, Nicolas; Chartzoulakis, Kostas; Pettenati, Marie; Maton, Laure

    2010-05-01

    A major objective of the EU FP6 project SAFIR was to overcome certain drawbacks of wastewater reuse through the development of a new irrigation technology combining small-scale modular water treatment plants on farm level and improved irrigation hardware, in the aim to lower the risks related to low quality water and to increase water use efficiency. This innovative technology was tested in several hydro-climatic contexts (Crete, Italy, Serbia, China) on experimental irrigated tomato and potato fields. Here we present the heavy metal variations in soil after medium-term (3 irrigation seasons from 2006-2008) use of treated municipal wastewater with a special focus on lead and lead isotope signatures. The experimental site is located in Chania, Crete. A matrix of plots were irrigated, combining different water qualities (secondary, primary treated wastewater, tap water, partially spiked with heavy metals, going through newly developed tertiary treatment systems) with different irrigation strategies (surface and subsurface drip irrigation combined with full irrigation and partial root drying). In order to assess small scale heavy metal distribution around a drip emitter, Pb isotope tracing was used, combined with selective extraction. The sampling for Pb isotope fingerprinting was performed after the 3rd season of ww-irrigation on a lateral profile from a drip irrigator (half distance between drip lines, i.e. 50cm) and three depth intervals (0-10, 10-20, 20-40 cm). These samples were lixiviated through a 3 step selective extraction procedure giving rise to the bio-accessible, mobile and residual fraction: CaCl2/NaNO3 (bio-accessible fraction), DPTA (mobile fraction), total acid attack (residual fraction). Those samples were analysed for trace elements (including heavy metals) and major inorganic compounds by ICP-MS. The extracted fractions were then analysed by Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) for their lead isotope fingerprints (204Pb, 206Pb, 207Pb, 208Pb

  10. Effects of irrigation with treated wastewater on the conditions in the root zone in orchards planted on clayey soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, S.

    2013-12-01

    With increasing water scarcity, treated wastewater (TW) appears as an attractive alternative source of water for irrigation, especially in arid and semi-arid regions where freshwater is naturally scarce. However, it seems that long-term use of TW for irrigation of orchards planted on heavy soils cause to yield reduction and crop damages. In terms of water quality, TW are characterized by higher concentrations of sodium and dissolved organic content that affect soil exchangeable sodium percentage on one hand and soil wettability, on the other hand. The working hypothesis of this study is that long-term use of TW for irrigation of clayey soils causes significant changes in the soil hydraulic properties, thus impacting on the conditions in the root zone. Experimental data show a significant effect of TW application on the main flow processes, infiltration and evaporation, on soil swelling intensity, and on spatial distribution of soil chemical attributes. All these reflect the impact of water quality on soil hydraulic properties. Continuous monitoring of oxygen concentration in the soil profile revealed that the air regime in the root zone is also significantly affected by irrigation water quality, with consequent implications on root respiration and microbial activity.

  11. Structural and functional response of the soil bacterial community to application of manure from difloxacin-treated pigs.

    PubMed

    Jechalke, Sven; Focks, Andreas; Rosendahl, Ingrid; Groeneweg, Joost; Siemens, Jan; Heuer, Holger; Smalla, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    Difloxacin (DIF) belongs to the class of fluoroquinolone antibiotics that have been intensively used for the treatment of bacterial infections in veterinary and human medicine. The aim of this field study was to compare the effect of manure from DIF-treated pigs and untreated pigs on the bacterial community structure and resistance gene abundance in bulk soil and rhizosphere of maize. A significant effect of DIF manure on the bacterial community composition in bulk soil was revealed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from total community DNA. In few samples, quinolone resistance genes qnrB and qnrS1/qnrS2 were detected by PCR and subsequent hybridization, while qnrA was not detected. Quantitative PCR revealed an increased abundance of the integrase gene intI1 of class I integrons and sulfonamide resistance genes sul1 and sul2 in DIF manure-treated bulk soil and rhizosphere, relative to 16S rRNA genes, while traN genes specific for LowGC-type plasmids were increased only in bulk soil. Principal component analysis of DGGE profiles suggested a manure effect in soil until day 28, but samples of days 71 and 140 were found close to untreated soil, indicating resilience of soil community compositions from disturbances by manure. PMID:23962048

  12. The dermal toxicity of cement.

    PubMed

    Winder, Chris; Carmody, Martin

    2002-08-01

    Cement and concrete are products used widely in the construction sector, with a traditional perception that any hazards that they have are limited to dermatitis in a small number of workers. In some cases, employers and builders do not think that concrete is a chemical. However, contact dermatitis is one of the most frequently reported health problems among construction workers. A review of the available literature suggests that cement has constituents that produce both irritant contact dermatitis and corrosive effects (from alkaline ingredients such as lime) and sensitization, leading to allergic contact dermatitis (from ingredients such as chromium). These findings indicate that cement and concrete should be treated as hazardous materials, and that workers handling such products should reduce exposure wherever possible. Initiatives to reduce the chromium content of cement have been shown to be successful in reducing the incidence of allergic dermatitis, although the irritant form remains. PMID:15068132

  13. Efficiency of Micro-fine Cement Grouting in Liquefiable Sand

    SciTech Connect

    Mirjalili, Mojtaba; Mirdamadi, Alireza; Ahmadi, Alireza

    2008-07-08

    In the presence of strong ground motion, liquefaction hazards are likely to occur in saturated cohesion-less soils. The risk of liquefaction and subsequent deformation can be reduced by various ground improvement methods including the cement grouting technique. The grouting method was proposed for non-disruptive mitigation of liquefaction risk at developed sites susceptible to liquefaction. In this research, a large-scale experiment was developed for assessment of micro-fine cement grouting effect on strength behavior and liquefaction potential of loose sand. Loose sand samples treated with micro-fine grout in multidirectional experimental model, were tested under cyclic and monotonic triaxial loading to investigate the influence of micro-fine grout on the deformation properties and pore pressure response. The behavior of pure sand was compared with the behavior of sand grouted with a micro-fine cement grout. The test results were shown that cement grouting with low concentrations significantly decreased the liquefaction potential of loose sand and related ground deformation.

  14. Degradation of vanillin in soil-clay mixtures treated with simulated acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Bewley, R.J.F.; Stotzky, G.

    1984-06-01

    Significant vanillin degradation occurred only in soil amended with 9% montmorillonite and not in soil amended with 9% kaolinite or in soil without addition of clay minerals. Progressively decreasing amounts of vanillin were mineralized in the montmorillonite-amended soil with increasing acidification with H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and complete inhibition of mineralization occurred at a soil pH of 1.6. 16 references, 1 table.

  15. Impact of Soil Type and Application Rate on the Availability of P Applied as Alum-Treated Poultry Litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this laboratory incubation study was to assess the solubility of P in alum-treated poultry litter (ATPL) when applied to three Virginia soils at equivalent P-based rates. Three poultry litter sources; one that had received no alum additions and two that had received alum additions we...

  16. Lunar cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  17. Water Consumption, Soil Temperature and Soil Respiration in Model Ecosystems of Young Oak Stands Treated by Air-warming and Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Thomas; Arend, Matthias; Günthardt-Goerg, Madeleine S.; Schulin, Rainer

    2010-05-01

    IPCC scenarios predict a global mean annual temperature increase during the 21st century of 2 - 6 °C, as well as changes in precipitation patterns. The multidisciplinary project "Querco" addresses the question how increased air temperature and extended drought periods will influence stands of young oaks. For this purpose, mixed stands of young Q. robur, Q. pubescens and Q. petrea (4-year-old trees from seeds of four different provenances each) were composed in the WSL open-top model-ecosystem chambers on either acid or calcareous forest soils and grown under four different climate treatments (control, air-warming, drought, air-warming & drought) from 2007 to 2009. Drought treated chambers only received about one third of water during the growing seasons from May to October as compared to the control. Further, we established longer drought periods without any irrigation. The air-warming treatment was established by keeping the side walls of the open-top chambers more closed than in the controls. Unsurprisingly, evapotranspiration from dry soils was much lower than from irrigated soils. There was significantly more evapotranspiration from the acidic than from the calcareous soil. These findings are in line with increased leaf transpiration rates and a tendency towards higher leaf biomass in oaks growing on acid as compared to calcareous soil. The higher evapotranspiration from acid soils also was in line with the fact that soil water potentials decreased more in acidic than in calcareous soils, an effect that became particularly significant during periods of high consumptive water demand by the trees. While soil water potentials were strongly decreased by the drought treatments down to 1 m depth, the air-warming treatment had almost no effect on soil water potential. Treatments, air-warming and drought, significantly increased soil temperature. In drought treated soils, this effect was related to the lower water content as compared to the control soils. As intended

  18. Influence of chemical and physical characteristics of cement kiln dusts (CKDs) on their hydration behavior and potential suitability for soil stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Peethamparan, Sulapha Olek, Jan Lovell, Janet

    2008-06-15

    The interaction of CKDs with a given soil depends on the chemical and physical characteristics of the CKDs. Hence, the characterization of CKDs and their hydration products may lead to better understanding of their suitability as soil stabilizers. In the present article, four different CKD powders are characterized and their hydration products are evaluated. A detailed chemical (X-ray diffraction), thermogravimetric and morphological (scanning electron microscope) analyses of both the CKD powders and the hydrated CKD pastes are presented. In general, high free-lime content ({approx} 14-29%) CKDs, when reacted with water produced significant amounts of calcium hydroxide, ettringite and syngenite. These CKDs also developed higher unconfined compressive strength and higher temperature of hydration compared to CKDs with lower amounts of free-lime. An attempt was made to qualitatively correlate the performance of CKD pastes with the chemical and physical characteristics of the original CKD powders and to determine their potential suitability as soil stabilizers. To that effect a limited unconfined compressive strength testing of CKD-treated kaolinite clays was performed. The results of this study suggest that both the compressive strength and the temperature of hydration of the CKD paste can give early indications of the suitability of particular CKD for soil stabilization.

  19. Leaf structural traits of tropical woody species resistant to cement dust.

    PubMed

    Siqueira-Silva, Advanio Inácio; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão; Modolo, Luzia Valentina; Paiva, Elder Antonio Sousa

    2016-08-01

    Cement industries located nearby limestone outcrops in Brazil have contributed to the coating of cement dust over native plant species. However, little is known about the extent of the response of tropical woody plants to such environmental pollutant particularly during the first stages of plant development and establishment. This work focused on the investigation of possible alterations in leaf structural and ultrastructural traits of 5-month-old Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. (Malvaceae), 6-month-old Myracrodruon urundeuva Allemão (Anacardiaceae), and 9-month-old Trichilia hirta L. (Meliaceae) challenged superficially with cement dust during new leaf development. Leaf surface of plants, the soil or both (leaf plus soil), were treated (or not) for 60 days, under controlled conditions, with cement dust at 2.5 or 5.0 mg cm(-2). After exposure, no significant structural changes were observed in plant leaves. Also, no plant death was recorded by the end of the experiment. There was also some evidence of localized leaf necrosis in G. ulmifolia and T. hirta, leaf curling in M. urundeuva and T. hirta, and bulges formation on epidermal surface of T. hirta, after cement dust contact with plant shoots. All species studied exhibited stomata obliteration while T. hirta, in particular, presented early leaf abscission, changes in cellular relief, and organization and content of midrib cells. No significant ultrastructural alterations were detected under the experimental conditions studied. Indeed, mesophyll cells presented plastids with intact membrane systems. The high plant survival rates, together with mild morphoanatomic traits alterations in leaves, indicate that G. ulmifolia is more resistant to cement dust pollutant, followed by M. urundeuva and T. hirta. Thus, the three plant species are promising for being used to revegetate areas impacted by cement industries activities. PMID:27146683

  20. Nitrous Oxide Fluxes, Soil Oxygen, and Dentrification Potential from Urine and Non-urine Treated Soil Under Different Irrigation Frequencies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite increased use of irrigation to improve forage quality and quantity for grazing cattle (Bos taurus), few studies have assessed how irrigation practices influence nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from urine-impacted soils. In particular, irrigation effects on soil oxygen (O2) availability, one of...

  1. Temporal changes of antibiotic-resistance genes and bacterial communities in two contrasting soils treated with cattle manure.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hang-Wei; Han, Xue-Mei; Shi, Xiu-Zhen; Wang, Jun-Tao; Han, Li-Li; Chen, Deli; He, Ji-Zheng

    2016-02-01

    The emerging environmental spread of antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) and their subsequent acquisition by clinically relevant microorganisms is a major threat to public health. Animal manure has been recognized as an important reservoir of ARGs; however, the dissemination of manure-derived ARGs and the impacts of manure application on the soil resistome remain obscure. Here, we conducted a microcosm study to assess the temporal succession of total bacteria and a broad spectrum of ARGs in two contrasting soils following manure application from cattle that had not been treated with antibiotics. High-capacity quantitative PCR detected 52 unique ARGs across all the samples, with β-lactamase as the most dominant ARG type. Several genes of soil indigenous bacteria conferring resistance to β-lactam, which could not be detected in manure, were found to be highly enriched in manure-treated soils, and the level of enrichment was maintained over the entire course of 140 days. The enriched β-lactam resistance genes had significantly positive relationships with the relative abundance of the integrase intI1 gene, suggesting an increasing mobility potential in manure-treated soils. The changes in ARG patterns were accompanied by a significant effect of cattle manure on the total bacterial community compositions. Our study indicates that even in the absence of selective pressure imposed by agricultural use of antibiotics, manure application could still strongly impact the abundance, diversity and mobility potential of a broad spectrum of soil ARGs. Our findings are important for reliable prediction of ARG behaviors in soil environment and development of appropriate strategies to minimize their dissemination. PMID:26712351

  2. Simplified urban soil bioaccessible Pb test correlated with bioavailability of soil-Pb to humans in untreated and phosphate-treated Joplin soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urban soils are commonly contaminated with Pb from multiple sources. Total Pb levels commonly exceed 500 mg/kg in center city soils, ranging to above 10,000 where paint residue was incorporated in soils. Many persons seek to grow garden crops in cities, but obtaining useful soil analyses needed to p...

  3. Efficiency of non-ionic surfactants - EDTA for treating TPH and heavy metals from contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction of fuel hydrocarbons and inorganic compounds (heavy metals) into the soil, resulting in a change of the soil quality, which is likely to affect use of the soil or endangering public health and ground water. This study aimed to determine a series of parameters to remediation of TPH and heavy metals contaminated soil by non-ionic surfactants- chelating agents washing process. In this experimental study, the effects of soil washing time, agitation speed, concentration of surfactant, chelating agent and pH on the removal efficiency were studied. The results showed that TPH removal by nonionic surfactants (Tween 80, Brij 35) in optimal condition were 70–80% and 60–65%, respectively. Addition of chelating agent (EDTA) significantly increases Cd and Pb removal. The washing of soil by non- ionic surfactants and EDTA was effective in remediation of TPH and heavy metals from contaminated soil, thus it can be recommended for remediation of contaminated soil. PMID:24359927

  4. Sculpting with Cement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lynn

    1983-01-01

    Cement offers many creative possibilities for school art programs. Instructions are given for sculpting with fiber-cement and sand-cement, as well as for finishing processes and the addition of color. Safety is stressed. (IS)

  5. Nitrous Oxide Fluxes, Soil Oxygen, and Denitrification Potential of Urine- and Non-Urine-Treated Soil under Different Irrigation Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Owens, Jen; Clough, Tim J; Laubach, Johannes; Hunt, John E; Venterea, Rodney T; Phillips, Rebecca L

    2016-07-01

    Despite increased use of irrigation to improve forage quality and quantity for grazing cattle ( Linnaeus), there is a lack of data that assess how irrigation practices influence nitrous oxide (NO) emissions from urine-affected soils. Irrigation effects on soil oxygen (O) availability, a primary controller of NO fluxes, is poorly understood. It was hypothesized that increased irrigation frequency would result in lower NO emissions by increasing soil moisture and decreasing soil O concentrations. This would favor more NO reduction to dinitrogen (N). We examined effects of high (3-d) versus low (6-d) irrigation frequency with and without bovine urine addition to pasture. Nitrous oxide fluxes were measured daily for 35 d. Soil O, temperature, and water content were continuously measured at multiple depths. Inorganic nitrogen, organic carbon, and soil pH were measured at 6-d intervals. Measurements of denitrification enzyme activity with and without acetylene inhibition were used to infer the NO/(NO + N) ratio. The NO/(NO + N) ratio was lower under high- compared with low-frequency irrigation, suggesting greater potential for NO reduction to N with more frequent irrigation. Although NO fluxes were increased by urine addition, they were not affected by irrigation frequency. Soil O decreased temporarily after urine deposition, but O dynamics did not explain NO dynamics. Relative soil gas diffusivity (/) was a better predictor of NO fluxes than O concentration. On a free-draining soil, increasing irrigation frequency while providing the same total water volume did not enhance NO emissions under ruminant urine patches in a grazed pasture. PMID:27380064

  6. Runoff and interrill erosion in sodic soils treated with dry PAM and phosphogypsum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seal formation at the soil surface during rainstorms reduces rain infiltration and leads to runoff and erosion. An increase in soil sodicity increases soil susceptibility to crusting, runoff, and erosion. Surface application of dissolved polyacrylamide (PAM) mixed with gypsum was found to be very ef...

  7. Chromated copper arsenate-treated fence posts in the agronomic landscape: soil properties controlling arsenic speciation and spatial distribution.

    PubMed

    Schwer Iii, Donald R; McNear, David H

    2011-01-01

    Soils adjacent to chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated fence posts along a fence line transecting different soil series, parent material, drainage classes, and slope were used to determine which soil properties had the most influence on As spatial distribution and speciation. Metal distribution was evaluated at macroscopic (total metal concentration contour maps) and microscopic scales (micro-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence maps), As speciation was determined using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and redox status and a myriad of other basic soil properties were elucidated. All geochemical parameters measured point to a condition in which the mobilization of As becomes more favorable moving down the topographic gradient, likely resulting through competition (Meh-P, SOM), neutral or slightly basic pH, and redox conditions that are favorable for As mobilization (higher Fe(II) and total-Fe concentrations in water extracts). On the landscape scale, with hundreds of kilometers of fence, the arsenic loading into the soil can be substantial (∼8-12 kg km). Although a significant amount of the As is stable, extended use of CCA-treated wood has resulted in elevated As concentrations in the local environment, increasing the risk of exposure and ecosystem perturbation. Therefore, a move toward arsenic-free alternatives in agricultural applications for which it is currently permitted should be considered. PMID:21712587

  8. Well cementing in permafrost

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.N.

    1980-01-01

    A process for cementing a string of pipe in the permafrost region of a borehole of a well wherein aqueous drilling fluid actually used in drilling the wellbore in the permafrost region of a wellbore is employed. The drilling fluid contains or is adjusted to contain from about 2 to about 16 volume percent solids. Mixing with the drilling fluid (1) an additive selected from the group consisting of ligno-sulfonate, lignite, tannin, and mixtures thereof, (2) sufficient base to raise the pH of the drilling fluid into the range of from about 9 to about 12, and (3) cementitious material which will harden in from about 30 to about 40 hours at 40/sup 0/F. The resulting mixture is pumped into the permafrost region of a wellbore to be cemented and allowed to harden in the wellbore. There is also provided a process for treating an aqueous drilling fluid after it has been used in drilling the wellbore in permafrost, and a cementitious composition for cementing in a permafrost region of a wellbore.

  9. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    Patients with isolated erosion of the long incus process suffer from severe hearing loss caused by lack of continuity of the ossicular chain. This study is a retrospective evaluation of the hearing results using two different surgical procedures. Since January 1993, 12 consecutive patients with isolated erosion of the long incus process have been treated with a new surgical technique in which the ossicular chain was rebuilt with ionomeric cement. The results in hearing performance (mean pure-tone average (PTA) 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz) were evaluated pre- and post-surgery, and compared to those in a group of 20 historical controls who underwent surgery in 1991 and 1992 using incus autograft interposition. Among the 12 index patients, 7 (58%) achieved improvement in PTA of > 10 dB, in 3 there was no difference and in 2 a slight decline. Among the 20 controls, 14 (70%) achieved improvement in PTA of > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy to perform, presents less risk of damage to the stapes and cochlea, requires less extensive surgery and does not exclude other surgical methods in cases of reoperation. PMID:10909000

  10. Chemical speciation and bioavailability of cadmium in the temperate and semiarid soils treated with wheat residue.

    PubMed

    Safari Sinegani, Ali Akbar; Jafari Monsef, Milad

    2016-05-01

    Heavy metal bioavailability depends on metal fractions in soil. The impacts of mild wheat residue (<2 mm) and incubation time on fractions of Cd were studied in two different spiked soils sampled from Hamadan and Lahijan, Iran with semiarid and temperate climates, respectively. Two factorial experiments were done in two soils polluted with 10 μg Cd g(-1) soil separately. Organic matter (0 and 5 % wheat straw) and soil incubation time (24 and 3600 h) were factors examined in three replicates. The transformation of Cd from KNO3 extractable form to less available fractions was higher in semiarid soils with lower clay and OM contents and higher pH and carbonate contents compared to temperate soils. In polluted semiarid soils after 24 h incubation, greater content of Cd was observed in residual (HNO3 extractable) (45 %), carbonates associated (EDTA extractable) (34 %), organic matter associated (NaOH extractable) (11 %), and KNO3 extractable (10 %) fractions, but in temperate soils, greater content of Cd was observed in KNO3 extractable (61 %), HNO3 extractable (14 %), EDTA extractable (13 %), and NaOH extractable (12 %) fractions. KNO3 extractable form of Cd was decreased, and NaOH extractable and HNO3 extractable forms of Cd were increased by addition of wheat residue to both soils. The initial decrease of added Cd from KNO3 extractable form to less mobile fractions in Hamadan soil was very interesting. But this change was not observed in Lahijan soil. Since contamination factor was significantly high in temperate soils compared to semiarid soils in all treatments, the risk of Cd environmental pollution in temperate region is considerably high. PMID:26850097

  11. Effects of long-term irrigation with treated wastewater on soil quality, soil-borne pathogens, and living organisms: case study of the vicinity of El Hajeb (Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Hentati, Olfa; Chaker, Sana; Wali, Ahmed; Ayoub, Tarek; Ksibi, Mohamed

    2014-05-01

    Medium (i.e. 15 years) and long-term (i.e. 20 years) impact of irrigation using secondary-treated municipal wastewater (TWW) was assessed on two agricultural soil samples, denoted by E and G, respectively, in the vicinity of El Hajeb region (Southern Tunisia). Soil pH, electrical conductivity particle size grading, potential risk of salinity, water holding capacity and chemical composition, as well as organic matter content, pathogenic microorganisms and heavy metal concentrations in the TWW-irrigated (E and G) and rainwater-irrigated (T) soils at various depths, were monitored and compared during a 5-year experiment. Our study showed that bacterial abundance is higher in sandy-clayey soil, which has an enhanced ability to retain moisture and nutrients. The high level of bacterial flora in TWW-irrigated soils was significantly (p < 0.05) correlated (r = ~0.5) with the high level of OM. Avoidance assays have been used to assess toxic effects generated by hazards in soils. The earthworms gradually avoided the soils from the surface (20 cm) to the depth (60 cm) of the G transect and then the E transect, preferring the T transect. The same behaviour was observed for springtails, but they seem to be less sensitive to the living conditions in transects G and E than the earthworms. The avoidance response test of Eisenia andrei was statistically correlated with soil layers at the sampling sites. However, the avoidance response test of Folsomia candida was positively correlated with silt-clay content (+0.744*) and was negatively correlated with sand content (-0.744*). PMID:24362513

  12. The survival of pathogens in soil treated with wastewater sludge and in potatoes grown in such soil.

    PubMed

    Chale-Matsau, J R B; Snyman, H G

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of pathogens on potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) grown in soil amended with a pathogen rich wastewater sludge was investigated. Bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae are important pathogens causing intestinal and systemic illness of humans and other animals. Type B sludge was used. Sludges investigated are the high metal and the low metal sludges. Microorganisms in the sludge-amended soil were using culture-based technique. Salmonella and E. coli were observed in tested soil samples. No microorganisms were isolated from control samples taken throughout the process of the experiment. At harvest time, some of the potato samples from LMS soil were contaminated. These potatoes were subjected to further investigation using molecular techniques (polymerase chain reaction) with fD1 and rP2 as primers. Organisms identified from the sequenced potato peel samples with the BLAST search tool included Enterobacter agglomerans (Pantoea agglomerans), several Buttiauxella spp., Pectobacterium spp., Erwinia spp. and a few Pantoea spp. Other than the E. agglomerans, which is commonly found in the gut and upper respiratory tract of humans and in the environment, all the other species identified were found to be mainly either plant or soil pathogens. The E. agglomerans are not primary pathogens but secondary opportunistic pathogens particularly in immunocompromised individuals. These results suggest that growing high risk crops using wastewater sludge contaminated soil may lead to limited infestation of produce with primary pathogens. It appears that the use of HMS due to early pathogen die-off provides less risk of infection than the LMS. However, proper treatment of wastewater sludge to reduce pathogen load is essential prior to its use as soil conditioner. PMID:17087382

  13. Effectiveness of an anaerobic granular activated carbon fluidized-bed bioreactor to treat soil wash fluids: a proposed strategy for remediating PCP/PAH contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Koran, K M; Suidan, M T; Khodadoust, A P; Sorial, G A; Brenner, R C

    2001-07-01

    An integrated system has been developed to remediate soils contaminated with pentachlorophenol (PCP) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This system involves the coupling of two treatment technologies, soil-solvent washing and anaerobic biotreatment of the extract. Specifically, this study evaluated the effectiveness of a granular activated carbon (GAC) fluidized-bed reactor to treat a synthetic-waste stream of PCP and four PAHs (naphthalene, acenaphthene, pyrene, and benzo(b)fluoranthene) under anaerobic conditions. This waste stream was intended to simulate the wash fluids from a soil washing process treating soils from a wood-preserving site. The reactor achieved a removal efficiency of greater than 99.8% for PCP with conversion to its dechlorination intermediates averaging 46.5%. Effluent, carbon extraction, and isotherm data also indicate that naphthalene and acenaphthene were removed from the liquid phase with efficiencies of 86 and 93%, respectively. Effluent levels of pyrene and benzo(b)fluoranthene were extremely low due to the high-adsorptive capacity of GAC for these compounds. Experimental evidence does not suggest that the latter two compounds were biochemically transformed within the reactor. PMID:11394769

  14. H2-producing bacterial communities from a heat-treated soil inoculum.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Prabha; Bruns, Mary Ann; Zhang, Husen; Van Ginkel, Steve; Logan, Bruce E

    2004-12-01

    Hydrogen gas (approximately 60% H(2)) was produced in a continuous flow bioreactor inoculated with heat-treated soil, and fed synthetic wastewater containing glucose (9.5 g l(-1)). The pH in the bioreactor was maintained at 5.5 to inhibit consumption of H(2) by methanogens. The objective of this study was to characterize bacterial communities in the reactor operated under two different hydraulic retention times (HRTs of 30-h and 10-h) and temperatures (30 degrees C and 37 degrees C). At 30-h HRT, the H(2) production rate was 80 ml h(-1) and yield was 0.91 mol H(2)/mol glucose. At 10-h HRT, the H(2) production rate was more than 5 times higher at 436 ml h(-1), and yield was 1.61 mol H(2)/mol glucose. Samples were removed from the reactor under steady-state conditions for PCR-based detection of bacterial populations by ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA). Populations detected at 30-h HRT were more diverse than at 10-h HRT and included representatives of Bacillaceae, Clostridiaceae, and Enterobacteriaceae. At 10-h HRT, only Clostridiaceae were detected. When the temperature of the 10-h HRT reactor was increased from 30 degrees C to 37 degrees C, the steady-state H(2) production rate increased slightly to 463 ml h(-1) and yield was 1.8 mol H(2)/mol glucose. Compared to 30 degrees C, RISA fingerprints at 37 degrees C from the 10-h HRT bioreactor exhibited a clear shift from populations related to Clostridium acidisoli (subcluster Ic) to populations related to Clostridium acetobutylicum (subcluster Ib). PMID:15558274

  15. Community Structure of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in Soil Treated with the Insecticide Imidacloprid

    PubMed Central

    Cycoń, Mariusz; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to assess the effect of imidacloprid on the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in soil using the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) approach. Analysis showed that AOA and AOB community members were affected by the insecticide treatment. However, the calculation of the richness (S) and the Shannon-Wiener index (H) values for soil treated with the field rate (FR) dosage of imidacloprid (1 mg/kg soil) showed no changes in measured indices for the AOA and AOB community members. In turn, the 10∗FR dosage of insecticide (10 mg/kg soil) negatively affected the AOA community, which was confirmed by the decrease of the S and H values in comparison with the values obtained for the control soil. In the case of AOB community, an initial decline followed by the increase of the S and H values was obtained. Imidacloprid decreased the nitrification rate while the ammonification process was stimulated by the addition of imidacloprid. Changes in the community structure of AOA and AOB could be due to an increase in the concentration of N-NH4+, known as the most important factor which determines the contribution of these microorganisms to soil nitrification. PMID:25705674

  16. Preparative-scale synthesis of two metabolites isolated from soil treated with zoxium fungicide and kerb herbicide.

    PubMed

    Michelotti, Enrique L; Borrell, José I; Roemmele, Renee; Matallana, Josep L; Teixidó, Jordi; Bryman, Lois M

    2002-01-30

    The preparation in multigram scale of two metabolites 3-(3,5-dichloro-4-methyl-benzoylamino)-2-hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid and 3-(3,5-dichloro-benzoylamino)-3-methyl-2-oxo-butyric acid isolated from soil treated with either Zoxium fungicide or Kerb herbicide was efficiently accomplished using a common 5-step synthetic process starting from easily available raw materials. PMID:11804519

  17. ZVI-CLAY SOIL MIXING TREATS DNAPL SOURCE AREA AT 35-FOOT DEPTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DuPont Company and Colorado State University (CSU) are collaborating in development and refinement of a technology that involves in-situ admixing of contaminated soil, granular zero valent iron (ZVI), and clay using conventional soil mixing equipment. A full-scale application...

  18. ENGINEERING APPLICATION OF BIOOXIDATION PROCESSES FOR TREATING PETROLEUM-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Throughout the U.S., the need for effective treatment of petroleum contaminated soil has escalated due to the increase in the number of underground storage tank (UST) systems being upgraded in response to EPA regulations. ptions for excavated contaminated soil have in the past be...

  19. Field measurement and model prediction of infiltration in treated wastewater irrigated clayey soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albalasmeh, Ammar; Gharaibeh, Mamoun; Ghezzehei, Teamrat

    2016-04-01

    Soil water infiltration is a critical process in designing irrigation systems, especially if traded wastewater (TWW) is being used. In this study, the ability of seven different infiltration models (Kostiakov, Modified Kostiakov, Philip, Horton, Holaton, SCS (US-Soil Conservation Service) and Huggins and Monke) were compared to estimate and assess those models' parameters, and to evaluate their prediction ability for TWW irrigated soils. The field measurements were conducted in TWW irrigated soils using a hood infiltrometer. Six comparison criteria including Mean error, Geometric mean error, Root mean square error, Coefficient of determination, F-Statistic and Akaike information criterion were used to determine the best performing model with the least number of fitting parameters. The research indicated that three-parameter models had the best description of the relationship between cumulative infiltration and time in the researched TWW irrigated soils.

  20. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  1. Environmental applications of XANES: Speciation of {Tc} in cement after chemical treatment and Se after bacterial uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Shuh, D.K.; Kaltsoyannis, N.; Bucher, J.J.

    1994-03-01

    XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy) has been employed to evaluate the efficacy of a process designed to encapsulate and reduce {Tc}O{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in cement matrices, thereby immobilizing {Tc}. The oxidation state of Se following.bioremediation of Se by bacteria has also been determined by XANES. The XANES measurements were performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at the respective K edges of {Tc} (21.0 keV) and Se (12.7 keV). Comparison of the XANES spectra of Tc in untreated cement to Tc in slag treated cement and to the chemical shifts of reference materials, shows that the oxidation state of {Tc} is the same in both cements. Thus, the addition of a reducing agent to the cement formulation does not significantly reduce the {Tc}O{sub 4} The common soil bacterium, Bacillus subtilis, is known to incorporate Se on or within the cell wall when exposed to a SE(IV) solution. The Se XANES spectra of B. subtilis, as well as bacillus isolated from selenium rich soil, show that the organisms reduce selenite to the red allotrope of elemental Se.

  2. Heavy metal mobility in runoff water and absorption by eggplant fruits from sludge treated soil.

    PubMed

    Antonious, George F; Turley, Eric T; Sikora, Frank; Snyder, John C

    2008-08-01

    Sewage sludge addition to agricultural lands requires judicious management to avoid environmental risks arising from heavy metal and nitrate contamination of surface water and accumulation in edible plants. A field study was conducted on a silty-loam soil of 10% slope at Kentucky State University Research Farm. Eighteen plots of 22 x 3.7 m each were separated using metal borders and the soil in six plots was mixed with sewage sludge and yard waste compost mix (SS-YW) at 15 t acre(-1), six plots were mixed with sewage sludge (SS) at 15 t acre(-1), and six unamended plots that never received sludge were used for comparison purposes. Plots were planted with eggplant, Solanum melongena L. as the test plant. The objectives of this investigation were to: 1) assess the effect of soil amendments on the transport of NO3, NH4, and heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Zn, Cu, and Mo) into surface water; 2) investigate the effect of soil amendments on heavy metal bioavailability in eggplant fruits at harvest; and 3) assess chemical and physical properties of soil following addition of soil amendments and their impact on the yield and quality of eggplant fruit. SS-YW treatments reduced runoff water by 63% while plots incorporated with sewage sludge alone reduced runoff water by 37% compared to control treatment. The SS-YW treatments transported more mineral nitrogen (NO3-N and NH4-N) in runoff water than SS treatments. Total marketable yield (lbs acre(-1)) and number of eggplant fruits were greatest in SS-YW treatments. This response may be due to improved soil porosity, water, and nutrient retention of the soil amended with SS-YW mixture. Concentrations of heavy metals in soil amended with sludge were below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) limits. Chromium, Ni, Zn, and Cu were taken up by eggplant fruits but their concentrations were below the Codex Commission allowable levels. PMID:18665990

  3. Effect of interactions on the nutrient status of a tropical soil treated with green manures and inorganic phosphate fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Bah, Abdul R; Rahman, Zaharah A; Hussin, Aminuddin

    2004-06-01

    Integrated nutrient management systems using plant residues and inorganic P fertilizers have high potential for increasing crop production and ensuring sustainability in the tropics, but their adoption requires in-depth understanding of nutrient dynamics in such systems. This was examined in a highly weathered tropical soil treated with green manures (GMs) and P fertilizers in two experiments conducted in the laboratory and glasshouse. The treatments were factorial combinations of the GMs (Calopogonium caeruleum, Gliricidia sepium, and Imperata cylindrica) and P fertilizers (phosphate rocks [PRs] from North Carolina, China, and Algeria, and triple superphosphate) replicated thrice. Olsen P, mineral N, pH, and exchangeable K, Ca, and Mg were monitored in a laboratory incubation study for 16 months. The change in soil P fractions and available P was also determined at the end of the study. Phosphorus available from the amendments was quantified at monthly intervals for 5 months by 33P-32P double isotopic labeling in the glasshouse using Setaria sphacelata as test crop. The GMs were labeled with 33P to determine their contribution to P taken up by Setaria, while that from the P fertilizers was indirectly measured by labeling the soil with 32P. The P fertilizers hardly changed Olsen P and exchangeable cations during 16 months of incubation. The legume GMs and legume GM+P did not change Olsen P, lowered exchangeable Ca, and increased exchangeable K about threefold (4.5 cmol[+]kg(-1) soil) in the first 4 months, even as large amounts of NH4-N accumulated (approximately 1000 mg kg soil(-1)) and soil pH increased to more than 6.5. Afterwards, Olsen P and exchangeable Ca and Mg increased (threefold) as NH4+-N and soil pH declined. The legume GMs also augmented reversibly sorbed P in Al-P and Fe-P fractions resulting in high residual effect in the soil, while fertilizer-P was irreversibly retained. The GMs increased PR-P utilization by 40 to over 80%, mobilized soil P, and

  4. A Controlled Trial of 'Senokot' in Faecal Soiling Treated by Behavioural Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, I.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A double-blind randomly controlled trial of one particular laxative, used in moderate dosage, was carried out on a group of 40 children with severe and persistent soiling and with a history of frequent fecal retention. (RH)

  5. TRACE ELEMENT CHEMISTRY IN RESIDUAL-TREATED SOIL: KEY CONCEPTS AND METAL BIOAVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace element solubility and availability in land-applied residuals is governed by fundamental chemical reactions between metal constituents, soil, and residual components. Iron, aluminum, and manganese oxides; organic matter; and phosphates, carbonates, and sulfides are importan...

  6. The survival of Escherichia coli, faecal coliforms and enterobacteriaceae in general in soil treated with sludge from wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Estrada, I B; Aller, A; Aller, F; Gómez, X; Morán, A

    2004-06-01

    We monitored the effect of the application of treated sludge on the behaviour of enterobacteriaceae (mainly faecal coliforms and especially Escherichia coli) in the soil, and studied their evolution over time after application. Three different sludges were used: two from a municipal sewage plant, one of them had been subjected to anaerobic digestion and heat drying, and the other to anaerobic digestion and mechanical dehydration, and one from a dairy waste treatment to aerobic digestion and gravity thickening. Two types of tests were carried out: type O, in the open air, with no possibility of controlling humidity or temperature; and type L, under laboratory conditions, with controlled temperature and humidity. Sludge tests were also run on unscreened soil previously treated with chemical fertilizer. After 80 days of experimentation the populations of faecal coliforms and E. coli had decreased considerably or were undetectable in assays carried out on the soil/sludge mixtures, under both open-air and laboratory conditions, but that, over the same period, in the mixtures containing chemical fertilizer (calcium ammonium nitrate) there had been a considerable increase in the micro-organism populations studied. PMID:15051081

  7. Changes in the chemical composition of an acidic soil treated with marble quarry and marble cutting wastes.

    PubMed

    Tozsin, Gulsen; Oztas, Taskin; Arol, Ali Ihsan; Kalkan, Ekrem

    2015-11-01

    Soil acidity greatly affects the availability of plant nutrients. The level of soil acidity can be adjusted by treating the soil with certain additives. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of marble quarry waste (MQW) and marble cutting waste (MCW) on the chemical composition and the acidity of a soil. Marble wastes at different rates were applied to an acid soil. Their effectiveness in neutralizing the soil pH was compared with that of agricultural lime. The changes in the chemical composition of the soil were also evaluated with column test at the end of a 75-day incubation period. The results indicated that the MQW and MCW applications significantly increased the soil pH (from 4.71 up to 6.54), the CaCO3 content (from 0.33% up to 0.75%), and the exchangeable Ca (from 14.79 cmol kg(-1) up to 21.18 cmol kg(-1)) and Na (from 0.57 cmol kg(-1) up to 1.07 cmol kg(-1)) contents, but decreased the exchangeable K (from 0.46 cmol kg(-1) down to 0.28 cmol kg(-1)), the plant-available P (from 25.56 mg L(-1) down to 16.62 mg L(-1)), and the extractable Fe (from 259.43 mg L(-1) down to 55.4 mg L(-1)), Cu (from 1.97 mg L(-1) down to 1.42 mg L(-1)), Mn (from 17.89 mg L(-1) down to 4.61 mg L(-1)) and Zn (from 7.88 mg L(-1) down to 1.56 mg L(-1)) contents. In addition, the Cd (from 0.060 mg L(-1) down to 0.046 mg L(-1)), Ni (from 0.337 mg L(-1) down to 0.092 mg L(-1)) and Pb (from 28.00 mg L(-1) down to 20.08 mg L(-1)) concentrations decreased upon the treatment of the soil with marble wastes. PMID:26246275

  8. Pyrosequence analysis of bacterial communities in aerobic bioreactors treating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Stephen D.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Two aerobic, lab-scale, slurry-phase bioreactors were used to examine the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil and the associated bacterial communities. The two bioreactors were operated under semi-continuous (draw-and-fill) conditions at a residence time of 35 days, but one was fed weekly and the other monthly. Most of the quantified PAHs, including high-molecular-weight compounds, were removed to a greater extent in the weekly-fed bioreactor, which achieved total PAH removal of 76%. Molecular analyses, including pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, revealed significant shifts in the soil bacterial communities after introduction to the bioreactors and differences in the abundance and types of bacteria in each of the bioreactors. The weekly-fed bioreactor displayed a more stable bacterial community with gradual changes over time, whereas the monthly-fed bioreactor community was less consistent and may have been more strongly influenced by the influx of untreated soil during feeding. Phylogenetic groups containing known PAH-degrading bacteria previously identified through stable-isotope probing of the untreated soil were differentially affected by bioreactor conditions. Sequences from members of the Acidovorax and Sphingomonas genera, as well as the uncultivated ‘‘Pyrene Group 2’’ were abundant in the bioreactors. However, the relative abundances of sequences from the Pseudomonas, Sphingobium, and Pseudoxanthomonas genera, as well as from a group of unclassified anthracene degraders, were much lower in the bioreactors compared to the untreated soil. PMID:21369833

  9. Behavioral Effects and Tunneling Responses of Eastern Subterranean Termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) Exposed to Chlorantraniliprole-Treated Soils.

    PubMed

    Saran, Raj K; Ziegler, Melissa; Kudlie, Sara; Harrison, Danielle; Leva, David M; Scherer, Clay; Coffelt, Mark A

    2014-10-01

    Intrinsic toxicities of chlorantraniliprole, fipronil, and imidacloprid were evaluated with topical applications on worker termites. Worker termites were exposed to substrates treated with formulated chlorantraniliprole to study contact toxicity, tunneling, and postexposure behaviors. The intrinsic toxicities (LD50, ng/termite) of chlorantraniliprole (1.25, 0.96, and 0.44) and fipronil (0.12, 0.11, and 0.13) at 11 d were similar for workers from three termite colonies. Imidacloprid toxicity (LD50) values were highly variable among the workers from three different colonies, values at 11 d ranging from 0.7 to 75 ng/termite. Termite workers exposed to sand and soils treated with chlorantraniliprole at 50 ppm exhibited delayed mortality and, for most of the exposure times, it took >5 d to observe 90-100% mortality in termite workers. Exposure to chlorantraniliprole-treated sand (50 ppm) for as little as 1 min stopped feeding and killed 90-100% of the workers. Tunneling (≈ 2 h) in different soil types treated with chlorantraniliprole at 50 ppm, even those with high organic matter (6.3%) and clay content (30%), caused immediate feeding cessation in worker termites and mortality in the next 7-14 d. Worker termites exposed for 1 and 60 min to sand treated with chlorantraniliprole (50 ppm) were able to walk normally for 4 h after exposure in most cases. Delayed toxicity, increased aggregation, and grooming were observed in exposed termites and discussed in the context of horizontal transfer effects within termite colonies. PMID:26309278

  10. Initial field test of High-Energy Corona process for treating a contaminated soil-offgas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, R R; Garcia, R E; Jeffs, J T; Virden, J W; Heath, W O

    1995-04-01

    The High-Energy Corona (HEC) technology for treating process offgases has been under development at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) since 1991. The HEC process uses high-voltage electrical discharges in air to ionize the air, forming a low-temperature plasma that would be expected to destroy a wide variety of organic compounds in air. The plasma contains strong oxidants, possibly including hydroxyl radicals, hydroperoxy radicals, superoxide radicals, various excited as well as ionized forms of oxygen, high-energy electrons, and ultraviolet (UV) light. Because the high-voltage plasma is produced near ambient temperatures and pressures, yet exhibits extremely rapid destruction kinetics with relatively low power requirements, the HEC technique appears promising as a low-cost treatment technique (Virden et al. 1992). As part of the Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Nonarid Integrated Demonstration (ID) at the DOE Savannah River Site, research activities were initiated in December 1991 to develop a prototype HEC process for a small-scale field demonstration to treat a soil-offgas stream contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) at varying concentrations. Over an 18-month period, the HEC technology was developed on a fast track, through bench and pilot scales into a trailer-mounted system that was tested at the Nonarid ID. Other national laboratories, universities, and private companies have also participated at the Nonarid ID to demonstrate a number of conventional, emerging and innovative approaches for treating the same soil-offgas stream.

  11. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1993-09-21

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120 C to about 300 C to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate. 10 figures.

  12. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120.degree. C. to about 300.degree. C. to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate.

  13. DRIFT and HR MAS NMR characterization of humic substances from a soil treated with different organic and mineral fertilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Erika; Francioso, Ornella; Nardi, Serenella; Saladini, Monica; Ferro, Nicola Dal; Morari, Francesco

    2011-07-01

    In this study, using DRIFT and HR MAS NMR, we analyzed the humic substances isolated from a soil treated, over 40 years, with different organic, mineral and organic plus mineral treatments and cultivated with maize as the main crop. As expected, the structure of humic substances was very complex but by combining both techniques (DRIFT and HR MAS NMR) additional information was obtained on aromatic and aliphatic components, the most recalcitrant parts of these macromolecules. In so doing we wanted to investigate the relationship between HS structure and long-term management practices. An elevated content of lignin, aminoacids, peptides and proteins was observed mainly for farmyard manure treatments with respect to mineral or liquid manure amendments; this supports how the different management practices have greatly influenced the humification process of cultivated soils.

  14. Experimental evaluation of four infiltration models for calcareous soil irrigated with treated untreated grey water and fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaibeh, M. A.; Eltaif, N. I.; Alrababah, M. A.; Alhamad, M. N.

    2009-04-01

    Infiltration is vital for both irrigated and rainfed agriculture. The knowledge of infiltration characteristics of a soil is the basic information required for designing an efficient irrigation system. The objective of the present study was to model soil infiltration using four models: Green and Ampt, Horton, Kostaikov and modified Kostiakov. Infiltration tests were conducted on field plot irrigated with treated, untreated greywater and fresh water. The field water infiltration data used in these models were based on double ring infiltrometer tests conducted for 4 h. The algebraic parameters of the infiltration models and nonlinear least squares regression were fitted using measured infiltration time [I (t)] data. Among process-based infiltration models, the Horton model performed best and matched the measured I (t) data with lower sum of squares (SS).

  15. Composition of a Spanish sewage sludge and effects on treated soil and olive trees.

    PubMed

    Gascó, G; Lobo, M C

    2007-01-01

    The effects of sewage sludge (SL) application on the soil and olive trees (Olea europaea L., cultivar: cornicabra) were studied. The plants were grown in 8.5L pots and subjected to the following treatments: 0, 3.66, 7.32, 14.65, 29.3, 58.6, and 117.2 g SL kg(-1) soil that corresponded, respectively, to 0, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 and 128 M g ha(-1) dry weight of sewage sludge. The application of SL at the rates 64 and 128 M g ha(-1) produced leaf tip burning and leaf drop after 120 days, although cumulative metal pollutant loading rates was below USEPA and European regulations. This toxicity symptom could be caused by the high sodium levels in the leaves (over 0.19%), which can damage olive tree development. The Na contents of leaves were well correlated with soil Na content (r2: 0.91). In general, SL rates significantly increased the level of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in soil and plants, but these concentrations were in the normal ranges, except for the Zn concentration, which was over the critical soil content for the rates of 32, 64, 128 Mg ha(-1) but not in the leaves. Results suggested that regulations about the utilization of sewage sludge on agricultural land should consider the limit values for salt, and not only metals, that may be added to soil, in order to minimize the risk of negative effects to plant health. PMID:17049835

  16. Environmental applications of XANES: Speciation of Tc in cement after chemical treatment and Se after bacterial uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Shuh, D.K.; Kaltsoyannis, N.; Bucher, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy) has been employed to evaluate the efficacy of a process designed to encapsulate and reduce TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in cement matrices, thereby immobilizing Tc. The oxidation state of Se following bioremediation of Se by bacteria has also been determined by XANES. The XANES measurements were performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at the respective K edges of Tc (21.0 keV) and Se (12.7 keV). Comparison of the XANES spectra of Tc in untreated cement to Tc in slag treated cement and to the chemical shifts of reference materials, shows that the oxidation state of Tc is the same in both cements. Thus, the addition of a reducing agent to the cement formulation does not significantly reduce the TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}. The common soil bacterium, Bacillus subtilis, is known to incorporate Se on or within the cell wall when exposed to a Se(IV) solution. The Se XANES spectra of B. subtilis, as well as bacillus isolated from selenium rich soil, show that the organisms reduce selenite to the red allotrope of elemental Se. The first investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness of a chemical reaction designed to slow the release of {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in nuclear wasteform cements. The second investigation was to characterize the oxidation state of Se after microbial uptake from an aqueous solution by common soil bacteria, in order to provide information about the possible mechanisms of bioremediation.

  17. An assessment of fracture resistance of three composite resin core build-up materials on three prefabricated non-metallic posts, cemented in endodontically treated teeth: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Bhupinder; Pujari, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Endodontically treated teeth with excessive loss of tooth structure would require to be restored with post and core to enhance the strength and durability of the tooth and to achieve retention for the restoration. The non-metallic posts have a superior aesthetic quality. Various core build-up materials can be used to build-up cores on the posts placed in endodontically treated teeth. These materials would show variation in their bonding with the non-metallic posts thus affecting the strength and resistance to fracture of the remaining tooth structure. Aims. The aim of the study was to assess the fracture resistance of three composite resin core build-up materials on three prefabricated non-metallic posts, cemented in extracted endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods. Forty-five freshly extracted maxillary central incisors of approximately of the same size and shape were selected for the study. They were divided randomly into 3 groups of 15 each, depending on the types of non-metallic posts used. Each group was further divided into 3 groups (A, B and C) of 5 samples each depending on three core build-up material used. Student’s unpaired ‘t’ test was also used to analyse and compare each group with the other groups individually, and decide whether their comparisons were statistically significant. Results. Luxacore showed the highest fracture resistance among the three core build-up materials with all the three posts systems. Ti-core had intermediate values of fracture resistance and Lumiglass had the least values of fracture resistance. PMID:25755926

  18. Increased bioavailability of metals in two contrasting agricultural soils treated with waste wood-derived biochar and ash.

    PubMed

    Lucchini, P; Quilliam, R S; Deluca, T H; Vamerali, T; Jones, D L

    2014-03-01

    Recycled waste wood is being increasingly used for energy production; however, organic and metal contaminants in by-products produced from the combustion/pyrolysis residue may pose a significant environmental risk if they are disposed of to land. Here we conducted a study to evaluate if highly polluted biochar (from pyrolysis) and ash (from incineration) derived from Cu-based preservative-treated wood led to different metal (e.g., Cu, As, Ni, Cd, Pb, and Zn) bioavailability and accumulation in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). In a pot experiment, biochar at a common rate of 2 % w/w, corresponding to ∼50 t ha(-1), and an equivalent pre-combustion dose of wood ash (0.2 % w/w) were added to a Eutric Cambisol (pH 6.02) and a Haplic Podzol (pH 4.95), respectively. Both amendments initially raised soil pH, although this effect was relatively short-term, with pH returning close to the unamended control within about 7 weeks. The addition of both amendments resulted in an exceedance of soil Cu statutory limit, together with a significant increase of Cu and plant nutrient (e.g., K) bioavailability. The metal-sorbing capacity of the biochar, and the temporary increase in soil pH caused by adding the ash and biochar were insufficient to offset the amount of free metal released into solution. Sunflower plants were negatively affected by the addition of metal-treated wood-derived biochar and led to elevated concentration of metals in plant tissue, and reduced above- and below-ground biomass, while sunflower did not grow at all in the Haplic Podzol. Biochar and ash derived from wood treated with Cu-based preservatives can lead to extremely high Cu concentrations in soil and negatively affect plant growth. Identifying sources of contaminated wood in waste stream feedstocks is crucial before large-scale application of biochar or wood ash to soil is considered. PMID:24217969

  19. C and N accumulations in soil aggregates determine nitrous oxide emissions from cover crop treated rice paddy soils during fallow season.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Prabhat; Haque, Md Mozammel; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Pil Joo

    2014-08-15

    Combination of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues are preferably applied in rice paddy soils to increase the rate of organic matter mineralization and to improve plant growth. However, organic matter addition facilitates methane (CH4) emission from rice paddy soil. Mineralization of organic nitrogen (N) increases NO3-N concentrations in soil, which are precursors for the formation of nitrous oxide (N2O). However, N2O is a minor greenhouse gas emitted from submerged rice field and hence is not often considered during calculation of total global warming potential (GWP) during rice cultivation. The hypothesis of this study was that fluxes of N2O emissions might be changed after removal of flooded water from rice field and the effect of cover crops on N2O emissions in the fallow season might be interesting. However, the effects of N-rich plant residues on N2O emission rates in the fallow season and its effect on annual GWP were not studied before. In this experiment, combination of barley (non-leguminous) and hairy vetch (leguminous) biomasses were applied at 9 Mg ha(-1) and 27 Mg ha(-1) rates in rice paddy soil. Cover crop application significantly increased CH4 emission flux while decreased N2O emissions during rice cultivation. The lowest N2O emission was observed in 27 Mg ha(-1) cover crop treated plots. Cover crop applications increased N contents in soil aggregates especially in smaller aggregates (<250 μm), and that proportionately increased the N2O emission potentials of these soil aggregates. Fluxes of N2O emissions in the fallow season were influenced by the N2O emission potentials of soil aggregates and followed opposite trends as those observed during rice cultivation. Therefore, it could be concluded that the doses of cover crop applications for rice cultivation should not be optimized considering only CH4, but N2O should also be considered especially for fallow season to calculate total GWP. PMID:24880551

  20. Effects of sewage sludges contaminated with chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons on sludge-treated areas (soils and sediments).

    PubMed

    Eljarrat, Ethel

    2002-06-22

    The fate of PCDDs, PCDFs, and PCBs in sewage sludges after different management techniques--such as agricultural application, land restoration, and marine disposal--was studied. Changes observed in the concentrations, in the ratio between PCDD and PCDF levels, and in the isomeric distribution suggest the influence of the sewage sludge on the sludge-treated areas (soils and sediments). Whereas land application techniques seem to produce no serious environmental consequences, marine disposal practices produce considerable increases in the levels of contamination in marine sediments. PMID:12806166

  1. An Observation of Bacterial Population Changes in Fields Treated with Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) has proven to be effective for pathogen and nematode control as an alternative to fumigation. It has been hypothesized that various bacterial populations could play key roles in the disinfestation process through the production of secondary metabolites. In this st...

  2. Infiltration and Erosion in Soils Treated with Dry PAM of Two Molecular Weights and Phosphogypsum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil surface application of dissolved linear polyacrylamide (PAM) of high molecular weight (MW) can mitigate seal formation, runoff and erosion, especially when added with a source of electrolytes (e.g., gypsum). Practical difficulties associated with PAM solution application prohibited commercial u...

  3. Evaluation of PAH contamination in soil treated with solid by-products from shale pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Jaqueline; Khan, Muhammad Y; Matsui, M; Côcco, Lílian C; Yamamoto, Carlos I; Lopes, Wilson A; de Andrade, Jailson B; Pillon, Clenio N; Arizaga, Gregorio G Carbajal; Mangrich, Antonio S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils to which solid shale materials (SSMs) were added as soil conditioners. The SSMs were derived from the Petrosix pyrolysis process developed by Petrobras (Brazil). An improved ultrasonic agitation method was used to extract the PAHs from the solid samples (soils amended with SSMs), and the concentrations of the compounds were determined by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The procedure provided satisfactory recoveries, detection limits, and quantification limits. The two-, three-, and four-ring PAHs were most prevalent, and the highest concentration was obtained for phenanthrene (978 ± 19 μg kg(-1) in a pyrolyzed shale sample). The use of phenanthrene/anthracene and fluoranthene/pyrene ratios revealed that the PAHs were derived from petrogenic rather than pyrogenic sources. The measured PAH concentrations did not exceed national or international limit values, suggesting that the use of SSMs as soil conditioners should not cause environmental damage. PMID:25399121

  4. Nitrate and phosphate leaching in a Phaeozem soil treated with biosolids, composted biosolids and inorganic fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Esteller, M V; Martínez-Valdés, H; Garrido, S; Uribe, Q

    2009-06-01

    The use of organic wastes in agriculture may increase the production of crops by incorporating organic matter and nutrients into the soil, and by improving its physical characteristics; however, this use may cause environmental problems such as the leaching of certain ions. The objective of this study was to establish possible nitrogen and phosphorus leaching under real field conditions in Phaeozem soils. The experimental work was performed in a corn (Zea mays L.) field where three plots were conditioned with inorganic fertilizer, three plots with 4.5 Mgha(-1) of biosolids on dry basis, and three plots with the same amount of composted biosolids. The quality of biosolids and composted biosolids complied with the Mexican Official Standards. Soil water samples were collected with suction cups during two agricultural cycles and were analysed. Soil samples were also taken and analysed. The N-NO(3) concentrations in soil water fluctuated between 0.9 and 98mgL(-1) in the composted biosolid treatment, between 0.7 and 64 mgL(-1) in the biosolid treatment, and between 1 and 61 mgL(-1) in the inorganic fertilizer treatment. The maximum concentration of N-NO(2) and N-NH(3) in soil water was 1.02 and 2.65 mgL(-1), respectively. The greatest percentage of nitrogen leached is produced when inorganic fertilizer is used (37.4% and 24.0% N leached in the first and second years, respectively), followed by composted biosolids (17.1% and 13.5% N leached in the first and second years, respectively) and last by biosolids (11% for both years). This difference could be related to the form in which nitrogen is present in the fertilizers, while commercial fertilizer is as inorganic nitrogen, organic wastes are basically presented as organic nitrogen. The maximum PO(4)(3-) concentration in soil water was 1.9 mgL(-1) in the composted biosolid treatment, 1.7mgL(-1) in the biosolid treatment and 0.9 mgL(-1) in the inorganic fertilizer treatment. The estimated percentage of leached phosphorus

  5. Survival, Pb-uptake and behaviour of three species of earthworm in Pb treated soils determined using an OECD-style toxicity test and a soil avoidance test.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Caroline J; Hodson, Mark E; Arnold, Rebecca E; Black, Stuart

    2005-11-01

    Mature (clitellate) Eisenia andrei Bouché (ultra epigeic), Lumbricus rubellus Hoffmeister (epigeic), and Aporrectodea caliginosa (Savigny) (endogeic) earthworms were placed in soils treated with Pb(NO(3))(2) to have concentrations in the range 1,000 to 10,000 mg Pb kg(-1). After 28 days LC50(-95%confidence limit)(+95%confidence limit) values were E. andrei 5824(-361)(+898) mg Pb kg(-1), L. rubellus 2867(-193)(+145) mg Pb kg(-1) and A. caliginosa2747(-304)(+239) mg Pb kg(-1) and EC50s for weight change were E. andrei2841(-68)(+150) mg Pb kg(-1), L. rubellus1303(-201)(+240) mg Pb kg(-1) and A. caliginosa1208(-206)(+212) mg Pb kg(-1). At any given soil Pb concentration, Pb tissue concentrations after 28 days were the same for all three earthworm species. In a soil avoidance test there was no difference between the behaviour of the different species. The lower sensitivity to Pb exhibited by E. andrei is most likely due to physiological adaptations associated with the modes of life of the earthworms, and could have serious implications for the use of this earthworm as the species of choice in standard toxicological testing. PMID:15951078

  6. Valorization of a treated soil via amendments: fractionation and oral bioaccessibility of Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn.

    PubMed

    Zagury, Gerald J; Rincon Bello, Jhony A; Guney, Mert

    2016-04-01

    The present study aims to transform a treated soil (TS) into a more desirable resource by modifying physico-chemical properties via amendments while reducing toxic metals' mobility and oral bioaccessibility. A hydrocarbon-contaminated soil submitted to treatment (TS) but still containing elevated concentrations of Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn has been amended with compost, sand, and Al2(SO4)3 to render it usable for horticulture. Characterization and sequential extraction were performed for TS and four amended mixtures (AM1-4). P and K availability and metal bioaccessibility were investigated in TS and AM2. Amendment improved soil properties for all mixtures and yielded a usable product (AM2 20 % TS, 49 % compost, 30 % sand, 1 % Al2(SO4)3) satisfying regulatory requirements except for Pb content. In particular, AM2 had improved organic matter (OM) and cation exchange capacity (CEC), highly increased P and K availability, and reduced total metal concentrations. Furthermore, amendment decreased metal mobile fraction likely to be plant-available (in mg kg(-1), assumed as soluble/exchangeable + carbonates fractions). For AM2, estimated Pb bioavailability decreased from 1.50 × 10(3) mg kg(-1) (TS) to 238 mg kg(-1) (52.4 % (TS) to 34.2 %). Bioaccessible concentrations of Cu, Ni, and Zn (mg kg(-1)) were lower in AM2 than in TS, but there was no significant decrease for Pb. The results suggest that amendment improved soil by modifying its chemistry, resulting in lower metal mobile fraction (in %, for Cu and Zn) and bioaccessibility (in %, for Cu only). Amending soils having residual metal contamination can be an efficient valorization method, indicating potential for reducing treatment cost and environmental burden by rendering disposal/additional treatment unnecessary. Further studies including plant bioavailability are recommended to confirm results. PMID:26969154

  7. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra- lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  8. Land application of chemically treated sewage sludge. II. Effects on soil and plant heavy metal content

    SciTech Connect

    Soon, Y.K.; Bates, T.E.; Moyer, J.R.

    1980-07-01

    Anaerobically digested sewage sludges resulting from treatment of sewage with Ca(OH)/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 3/, or FeCl/sub 3/ for phosphorus precipitation were applied to corn (Zea mays L.) and bromegrass (Bromus inermis Leyess) grown on a soil having an initial pH of 7.3. Rates of sludge supplied 200, 400, 800, and and 1,600 kg N/ha each year for 5 years. Treatments with NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/ supplying 0, 100, 20, and 400 kg N/ha were included for comparison. Plant tissue was analyzed for Cu, Zn, Mn, Cd, Ni, Cr, and Pb. No toxicity or deficiency symptoms were noted. Soil Zn, Cd, and Ni extracted by NTA (nitrilotriacetic acid) were increased by continued sludge application. The NTA-extractable Zn and Cd were positively correlated with the Zn and Cd concentrations in corn stover. Soil pH was reduced by the Fe-sludge application, slightly affected by the Al-sludge, and increased by the Ca-sludge. Increases in Cu concentrations in bromegrass and corn stover were associated with increases in the N content rather than the source of N, and plant Cu concentrations remained relatively constant across years. Sewage sludge application increased Zn, Cd, and Ni concentrations in bromegrass and corn stover, and Zn and Ni concentrations in corn grain, particularly at the higher metal loadings from sludge application. Zinc and Cd concentrations, especially in corn stover, increased with continued sludge application during the 5-year period. The inclusion of soil pH as a factor, in addition to cummulative amounts of Zn or Cd added as a constituent of sludge, improved the regression equations predicting Zn or Cd uptake.

  9. Multi-bioindicators to assess soil microbial activity in the context of an artificial groundwater recharge with treated wastewater: a large-scale pilot experiment.

    PubMed

    Michel, Caroline; Joulian, Catherine; Ollivier, Patrick; Nyteij, Audrey; Cote, Rémi; Surdyk, Nicolas; Hellal, Jennifer; Casanova, Joel; Besnard, Katia; Rampnoux, Nicolas; Garrido, Francis

    2014-06-28

    In the context of artificial groundwater recharge, a reactive soil column at pilot-scale (4.5 m depth and 3 m in diameter) fed by treated wastewater was designed to evaluate soil filtration ability. Here, as a part of this project, the impact of treated wastewater filtration on soil bacterial communities and the soil's biological ability for wastewater treatment as well as the relevance of the use of multi-bioindicators were studied as a function of depth and time. Biomass; bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity fingerprints; potential nitrifying, denitrifying, and sulfate-reducing activities; and functional gene (amo, nir, nar, and dsr) detection were analyzed to highlight the real and potential microbial activity and diversity within the soil column. These bioindicators show that topsoil (0 to 20 cm depth) was the more active and the more impacted by treated wastewater filtration. Nitrification was the main activity in the pilot. No sulfate-reducing activity or dsr genes were detected during the first 6 months of wastewater application. Denitrification was also absent, but genes of denitrifying bacteria were detected, suggesting that the denitrifying process may occur rapidly if adequate chemical conditions are favored within the soil column. Results also underline that a dry period (20 days without any wastewater supply) significantly impacted soil bacterial diversity, leading to a decrease of enzyme activities and biomass. Finally, our work shows that treated wastewater filtration leads to a modification of the bacterial genetic and functional structures in topsoil. PMID:24608565

  10. Lunar cement and lunar concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.

    1991-01-01

    Results of a study to investigate methods of producing cements from lunar materials are presented. A chemical process and a differential volatilization process to enrich lime content in selected lunar materials were identified. One new cement made from lime and anorthite developed compressive strengths of 39 Mpa (5500 psi) for 1 inch paste cubes. The second, a hypothetical composition based on differential volatilization of basalt, formed a mineral glass which was activated with an alkaline additive. The 1 inch paste cubes, cured at 100C and 100 percent humidity, developed compressive strengths in excess of 49 Mpa (7100 psi). Also discussed are tests made with Apollo 16 lunar soil and an ongoing investigation of a proposed dry mix/steam injection procedure for casting concrete on the Moon.

  11. Effect of endomycorrhizae on the bioavailability of bound sup 14 C residues to onion plants from an organic soil treated with ( sup 14 C)fonofos

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.D.; Khan, S.U. )

    1990-03-01

    Uptake of bound {sup 14}C residues from an organic soil treated with radiolabeled fonofos (O-ethyl S-phenyl ethylphosphonodithioate) by selected Glomus endomycorrhiza and onion roots was studied. The hyphae of endomycorrhizal associations were capable of removing {sup 14}C residues from the soil and transporting them to onion plants. Bioavailability of soil-bound {sup 14}C residues, as measured by {sup 14}C residue content in onion, was increased 32 and 40% over that of nonmycorrhizal plants by hyphae of Glomus intraradices and Glomus vesiculiferium, respectively. The data suggest that under field conditions endomycorrhizal infection may greatly increase the bioavailability of soil-bound pesticide residues to plants.

  12. False positive identification of E. coli in treated municipal wastewater and wastewater-irrigated soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the growth in use of treated wastewater for municipal and agricultural irrigation, accurate monitoring of water quality parameters, including Escherichia coli (E. coli), increases in importance. Chromogenic media, because they are easy to use and provide rapid sample analysis, are often used fo...

  13. Experimental study of the relationship between formation factor, porosity, and cementation

    SciTech Connect

    Harig, M.D.; Chaney, R.C.

    1999-07-01

    Cemented granular soils are classified based on the size and distribution of the individual grains and qualitatively on the basis of cementation. To uniquely classify these types of soils, information about the fabric (pore geometry and/or level of cementation) of the specimen needs to be quantified. Electrical resistivity, or its reciprocal, conductivity, methods have been extensively used both in situ and in the laboratory to provide a means for determining a variety of soil index, structural, erosional, and cyclic properties. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between formation factor (F), porosity (n), and cementation factor (m) of remolded sand-cement specimens. This relationship is shown to provide a mechanism for estimating the level of cementation in undisturbed specimens. The formation factor is the ratio of the electrical resistivity of the sand-water-cement mixture to that of the interstitial water.

  14. Herbicide residues in leaves of Erythroxylum coca var. coca plants treated with soil-applied tebuthiuron and hexazinone.

    PubMed

    Lydon, J; Darlington, L

    1998-09-01

    The herbicide residue levels in leaves of Erythroxylum coca var. coca Lam. plants treated with soil applications of tebuthiuron and hexazinone at 3.36 and 6.72 kg a.i. ha-1 were determined in order to estimate the potential for human exposure to these residues from consuming the leaves or cocaine produced from them. Field-grown plants were treated with a commercial formulation of tebuthiuron or hexazinone and leaves were harvested at the first indication of herbicide injury (i.e. chlorosis and/or necrosis) and at the onset of leaf abscission. Herbicide residues were detected by HPLC in leaf samples from both harvests of all plants treated with tebuthiuron or hexazinone. At 3.36 kg ha-1, herbicide residues in the leaves were less than 2 micrograms g-1 dry wt. for both harvests of both experiments. The highest residue levels detected were 5.90 micrograms g-1 dry wt. for tebuthiuron and 7.17 micrograms g-1 dry wt. for hexazinone in leaves from plants treated with the herbicide at the rate of 6.72 kg ha-1 and harvested at the onset of leaf drop. Based on published toxicity data and estimates of leaf consumption, the herbicide residues in leaves of E. coca var. coca plants treated with tebuthiuron or hexazinone at twice the recommended control rates or less would have a negligible contribution to the health risks of individuals who chew coca leaves. Furthermore, based on the most conservative estimates of cocaine yield and herbicide carry over, death by cocaine overdose would occur long before the NOEL for either herbicide was reached. PMID:9731307

  15. Fracture Resistance of Teeth Restored with Various Post Designs and Cemented with Different Cements: An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Ajay; Pal, Kapil Singh; Ranganath, L M; Jain, Jayesh Kumar; Patil, Prashanth; Babar, Geetika

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies have been carried out on endodontically treated teeth restored with and without ferrule, and influence of the cementing medium, to evaluate their effect on fracture resistance. This study was conducted on 28 freshly extracted maxillary central incisors. Specimens were restored with two types of post designs, and cemented with two different luting agents, and tested for fracture resistance. Materials and Methods: A total of 28 freshly extracted maxillary central incisors were used. Specimens were restored with two types of post designs and cemented with two different luting agents and tested using Instron universal testing machine. The statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal–Wallis test (H) and Tukey honest significant test. Results: Ferrule helped in increasing the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth. Resin cement showed better results than zinc phosphate cement. The combination of the post with ferrule and resin cement showed the greatest resistance. The combination of the post without ferrule and zinc phosphate cement showed the least resistance. Resin cement increased the resistance of even without ferrule. Conclusion: There was a positive effect of a ferrule in increasing the fracture resistance. Resin cement showed better resistance than zinc phosphate cement. PMID:26225102

  16. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-04-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter.

  17. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-07-18

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job.

  18. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-04-29

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, and shear bond. Testing to determine the effect of temperature cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. In addition, the stress-strain behavior of the cement types was studied. This report discusses a software program that is being developed to help design ULHS cements and foamed cements.

  19. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that will be performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries, as well as the results of Field Tests 1 and 2.

  20. CEMENTING REACTIONS IN THE HAZARDOUS WASTE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of chemical grout for bottom sealing waste sites requires careful consideration of interfering reactions from contaminated soil or ground water. The cementing reactions in the acrylates and urethanes are very specific. The presence of reducers, oxidizers and complexors ca...

  1. Effects of Pseudomonas species on the release of bound sup 14 C residues from soil treated with ( sup 14 C)atrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S.U.; Behki, R.M. )

    1990-11-01

    The release of bound (nonextractable) {sup 14}C residues from soil previously treated with ({sup 14}C)atrazine was investigated by incubation of the solvent-extracted soil with two species of Pseudomonas capable of metabolizing atrazine. The two species, 192 and 194, released bound {sup 14}C residues from the soil. Addition of glucose, known to increase microbiological activities, to the incubated soil appeared to enhance the release of soil-bound {sup 14}C residues, in particular in the presence of Pseudomonas species 192. The {sup 14}C bound residues in soil, mainly present as the parent compound and its hydroxy and monodealkylated analogues, were released into the incubation mixture and were subsequently metabolized by the two species involving dechlorination and dealkylation.

  2. The effect of cement kiln dust on the collapse potential of compacted shale

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.A.; Azad, S.; Dhar, B.

    1997-12-31

    The effects of wetting-induced collapse on compacted soil are well documented in the literature. Objectives of the current study were to evaluate the potential of cement kiln dust, a byproduct of Portland Cement manufacturing, to reduce the collapse settlement of compacted shale caused by inundation with water. One-dimensional consolidation tests were conducted on treated and untreated shales using two different testing procedures to evaluate the Collapse Potential over a broad range of vertical stress levels. Tests were conducted on three different shales and test samples were prepared using three different molding moisture contents--dry of, at, and wet of optimum moisture content. Standard Proctor compaction effort was utilized. Results of odometer tests indicate that kiln dust is a potentially useful additive for reducing wetting-induced collapse settlements and for reducing overall compressibility.

  3. Cytotoxicity evaluation of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation

    PubMed Central

    Dioguardi, M; Perrone, D; Troiano, G; Laino, L; Ardito, F; Lauritano, F; Cicciù, M; Muzio, L Lo

    2015-01-01

    Custom-cast posts and cores are usually used to treat endodontically treated teeth. However, several researches have underlined how these devices may be a much higher elastic modulus than the supporting dentine and the difference in the modulus could lead to stress concentrating in the cement lute, leading to failure. The role of the cement seems to play a fundamental role in order to transfer the strength during the chewing phases. Aim of this research is to record the rate of cytotoxicity of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation. We tested the cytotoxicity of this five materials on MG63 osteoblast-like cells through two different methods: MTT ([3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide succinate) assay which tests for mitochondrial enzyme activity6 and xCELLigence® system. PMID:26309592

  4. Cytotoxicity evaluation of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation.

    PubMed

    Dioguardi, M; Perrone, D; Troiano, G; Laino, L; Ardito, F; Lauritano, F; Cicciù, M; Muzio, L Lo

    2015-01-01

    Custom-cast posts and cores are usually used to treat endodontically treated teeth. However, several researches have underlined how these devices may be a much higher elastic modulus than the supporting dentine and the difference in the modulus could lead to stress concentrating in the cement lute, leading to failure. The role of the cement seems to play a fundamental role in order to transfer the strength during the chewing phases. Aim of this research is to record the rate of cytotoxicity of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation. We tested the cytotoxicity of this five materials on MG63 osteoblast-like cells through two different methods: MTT ([3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide succinate) assay which tests for mitochondrial enzyme activity(6) and xCELLigence® system. PMID:26309592

  5. Impacts of Long-Term Irrigation of Domestic Treated Wastewater on Soil Biogeochemistry and Bacterial Community Structure.

    PubMed

    Wafula, Denis; White, John R; Canion, Andy; Jagoe, Charles; Pathak, Ashish; Chauhan, Ashvini

    2015-10-01

    Freshwater scarcity and regulations on wastewater disposal have necessitated the reuse of treated wastewater (TWW) for soil irrigation, which has several environmental and economic benefits. However, TWW irrigation can cause nutrient loading to the receiving environments. We assessed bacterial community structure and associated biogeochemical changes in soil plots irrigated with nitrate-rich TWW (referred to as pivots) for periods ranging from 13 to 30 years. Soil cores (0 to 40 cm) were collected in summer and winter from five irrigated pivots and three adjacently located nonirrigated plots. Total bacterial and denitrifier gene abundances were estimated by quantitative PCR (qPCR), and community structure was assessed by 454 massively parallel tag sequencing (MPTS) of small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes along with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of nirK, nirS, and nosZ functional genes responsible for denitrification of the TWW-associated nitrate. Soil physicochemical analyses showed that, regardless of the seasons, pH and moisture contents (MC) were higher in the irrigated (IR) pivots than in the nonirrigated (NIR) plots; organic matter (OM) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) were higher as a function of season but not of irrigation treatment. MPTS analysis showed that TWW loading resulted in the following: (i) an increase in the relative abundance of Proteobacteria, especially Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria; (ii) a decrease in the relative abundance of Actinobacteria; (iii) shifts in the communities of acidobacterial groups, along with a shift in the nirK and nirS denitrifier guilds as shown by T-RFLP analysis. Additionally, bacterial biomass estimated by genus/group-specific real-time qPCR analyses revealed that higher numbers of total bacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and the nirS denitrifier guilds were present in the IR pivots than in the NIR plots. Identification of the nir

  6. Impacts of Long-Term Irrigation of Domestic Treated Wastewater on Soil Biogeochemistry and Bacterial Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wafula, Denis; White, John R.; Canion, Andy; Jagoe, Charles; Pathak, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater scarcity and regulations on wastewater disposal have necessitated the reuse of treated wastewater (TWW) for soil irrigation, which has several environmental and economic benefits. However, TWW irrigation can cause nutrient loading to the receiving environments. We assessed bacterial community structure and associated biogeochemical changes in soil plots irrigated with nitrate-rich TWW (referred to as pivots) for periods ranging from 13 to 30 years. Soil cores (0 to 40 cm) were collected in summer and winter from five irrigated pivots and three adjacently located nonirrigated plots. Total bacterial and denitrifier gene abundances were estimated by quantitative PCR (qPCR), and community structure was assessed by 454 massively parallel tag sequencing (MPTS) of small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes along with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of nirK, nirS, and nosZ functional genes responsible for denitrification of the TWW-associated nitrate. Soil physicochemical analyses showed that, regardless of the seasons, pH and moisture contents (MC) were higher in the irrigated (IR) pivots than in the nonirrigated (NIR) plots; organic matter (OM) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) were higher as a function of season but not of irrigation treatment. MPTS analysis showed that TWW loading resulted in the following: (i) an increase in the relative abundance of Proteobacteria, especially Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria; (ii) a decrease in the relative abundance of Actinobacteria; (iii) shifts in the communities of acidobacterial groups, along with a shift in the nirK and nirS denitrifier guilds as shown by T-RFLP analysis. Additionally, bacterial biomass estimated by genus/group-specific real-time qPCR analyses revealed that higher numbers of total bacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and the nirS denitrifier guilds were present in the IR pivots than in the NIR plots. Identification of the nir

  7. Protective effects of Glomus iranicum var. tenuihypharum on soil and Viburnum tinus plants irrigated with treated wastewater under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bellot, María José; Ortuño, María Fernanda; Nortes, Pedro Antonio; Vicente-Sánchez, Javier; Martín, Félix Fernández; Bañón, Sebastián; Sánchez-Blanco, María Jesús

    2015-07-01

    Currently, irrigation using recycled water is increasing, especially in semiarid environments, but a potential problem of using reclaimed wastewater is its elevated salt levels. The application of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) could be a suitable option to mitigate the negative effects produced by the salinity. In this work, the combined effect of Glomus iranicum var. tenuihypharum and two types of water: Control, C, with EC <0.9 dS m(-1) and reclaimed water (wastewater previously treated in a sewage treatment plant) with EC 4 dS m(-1) during a first saline period (11 weeks) and with EC 6 dS m(-1) during a second saline period (25 weeks), was evaluated for laurustinus (Viburnum tinus) plants under field conditions. This plant is a popular shrub very used for gardening. Chemical properties of soil as well as physiological behavior, leaf nutrition, and esthetic value of plants were evaluated. Due to the high salinity from wastewater at 6 dS m(-1), laurustinus plants decreased their stem water potential values and, to a lesser extent, the stomatal conductance. Also, the visual quality of the plants was diminished. The inoculated AMF satisfactorily colonized the laurustinus roots and enhanced the structure of the soil by increasing the glomalin and carbon contents. Furthermore, G. iranicum var. tenuihypharum inoculation decreased Na and Cl content, stimulated flowering and improved the stem water potential of the plants irrigated with both types of reclaimed water. The AMF also had a positive effect as a consequence of stimulation of plant physiological parameters, such as the stem water potential and stomatal conductance. Effective AMF associations that avoid excessive salinity could provide wastewater reuse options, especially when the plants grow in soils. PMID:25492808

  8. Bioavailability and influence of ¹⁴C-carbofuran on Eisenia andrei avoidance, growth and reproduction in treated natural tropical soils.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Regina C B; Papini, Solange; de Andréa, Mara M

    2015-01-01

    The bioavailability of carbofuran to the compost worms Eisenia andrei and the influence of its residual amounts on the avoidance, reproduction and growth of this species were studied in two natural tropical soils: a Typic Humaquept (GM) and a Typic Hapludox (LVD), as indicated by the Brazilian environmental authorities for ecotoxicological tests. The worms avoided the soil LVD treated with different doses of carbofuran. The pesticide also affected the production of juvenile specimens in both soils, but cocoon production was reduced only in the GM soil. The earthworms' growth and weight loss were affected by carbofuran (2,2-dimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1-1-benzofuran-7-yl methylcarbamate. CAS number 1563-66-2) only in the LVD and the mortality detected at 56 days of contact with the treated soils was not statistically significant in both of them. Fourteen days after the soil treatment with(14) c-carbofuran, most residues detected in the soils were bound residues (approximately 36% and 30% in the GM and LVD, respectively) and neither mortality nor bioaccumulation was detected in the earthworms, even with absorptions of 13% and 43%, respectively. The LVD soil has lower organic matter content, and the effects of carbofuran on different aspects of the earthworms' life were more pronounced in this soil, most likely due to the higher bioavailability of the pesticide in the soil solution. The results for carbofuran clearly demonstrate that even small quantities of residues do not assure lack of toxicity. They also make evident the necessity of studying the effects of pesticides in natural agricultural soils. Furthermore, as the bound residues and the earthworm contamination are not detected by conventional techniques, they are not taken into account and may be underestimated on environmental risk assessments. PMID:25714458

  9. Plant uptake of depleted uranium from manure-amended and citrate treated soil.

    PubMed

    Sevostianova, Elena; Lindemann, William C; Ulery, April L; Remmenga, Marta D

    2010-08-01

    Six plant species were tested for their ability to accumulate depleted uranium in their above-ground biomass from deployed munitions contaminated soil in New Mexico. In greenhouse experiments, Kochia (Kochia scoparia L. Schrad.) and pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L) were grown with steer manure added at rates of 22.4, 44.8, and 89.6 Mg ha(-1). Citric acid and glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine) applied at the end of the growing season increased DU concentrations from 2.5 to 17 times. Leaf and stem DU concentrations in kochia increased from 17.0 to 41.9 mg kg(-1) and from 3.5 to 18.0 mg kg(-1), respectively. In pigweed, leaf and stem DU concentrations increased from 1.0 to 17.3 and from 1.0 to 4.7 mg kg(-1), respectively. Manure generally decreased or had no effect on DU uptake. The effect of citric acid and ammonium citrate on DU uptake by kochia, sunflower (Helianthus annuus L), and sweet corn (Zea mays L) was also studied. Ammonium citrate was just as effective in enhancing DU uptake as citric acid. This implies that the citrate ion is more important in DU uptake and translocation than the solubilization of DU through acidification. In both experiments, leaves had higher DU concentrations than stems. PMID:21166280

  10. Abyssal seep site cementation

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, A.C.; Paull, C.K.; Commeau, R.; Commeau, J.

    1988-01-01

    The deepest submarine cements known so far occur along the 3,300-m deep base of the Florida escarpment and are associated with methane-bearing brine seeps, which emanate there. These deep Holocene carbonates, which occur as surficial and buried crusts, burrow fillings, and friable horizons, were sampled via ALVIN. The carbonates form irregular halos extending up to 20 m from seeps colonized by chemosynthetic fauna. Mussels, gastropods, and clams, the carbonate components of the community, produce a shell hash that is locally cemented by coarsely crystalline low-Mg calcite. Halos of palisade calcite are reminiscent of ancient examples of marine cements. Also present are carbonate hemipelagics cemented by micrite into crusts and burrow fillings. The degree of cementation varies from pervasive to light. Slabs of cemented crust up to 30 cm thick contrast with typical shallow crusts and exhibit irregular tops and smooth bottoms indicating different chemical gradients and pathways.

  11. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  12. Desiccation-Induced Volumetric Shrinkage of Compacted Metakaolin-Treated Black Cotton Soil for a Hydraulic Barriers System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, George; Peter, Oriola F. O.; Osinubi, Kolawole J.

    2016-03-01

    Black cotton soil treated with up to 24% metakaolin (MCL) content was prepared by molding water contents of -2, 0, 2, 4 and 6% of optimum moisture content (OMC) and compacted with British Standard Light (BSL) and West African Standard (WAS) or `Intermediate' energies. The specimens were extruded from the compaction molds and allowed to air dry in a laboratory in order to assess the effect of desiccation-induced shrinkage on the compacted mix for use as a hydraulic barrier in a waste containment application. The results recorded show that the volumetric shrinkage strain (VSS) values were large within the first 10 days of drying; the VSS values increased with a higher molding of the water content, relative to the OMC. The VSS generally increased with a higher initial degree of saturation for the two compactive efforts, irrespective of the level of MCL treatment. Generally, the VSS decreased with an increasing MCL content. Only specimens treated with a minimum 20% MCL content and compacted with the WAS energy satisfied the regulatory maximum VSS of 4% for use as a hydraulic barrier.

  13. Cements from nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Barralet, J E; Lilley, K J; Grover, L M; Farrar, D F; Ansell, C; Gbureck, U

    2004-04-01

    Calcium phosphate cements are used as bone substitute materials because they may be moulded to fill a void or defect in bone and are osteoconductive. Although apatite cements are stronger than brushite cements, they are potentially less resorbable in vivo. Brushite cements are three-component systems whereby phosphate ions and water react with a soluble calcium phosphate to form brushite (CaHPO4 x 2H2O). Previously reported brushite cement formulations set following the mixture of a calcium phosphate, such as beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), with an acidic component such as H3PO4 or monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM). Due to its low solubility, hydroxyapatite (HA) is yet to be reported as a reactive component in calcium phosphate cement systems. Here we report a new cement system setting to form a matrix consisting predominantly of brushite following the mixture of phosphoric acid with nanocrystalline HA. As a result of the relative ease with which ionic substitutions may be made in apatite this route may offer a novel way to control cement composition or setting characteristics. Since kinetic solubility is dependent on particle size and precipitation temperature is known to affect precipitated HA crystal size, the phase composition and mechanical properties of cements made from HA precipitated at temperatures between 4 and 60 degrees C were investigated. PMID:15332608

  14. Assessment of intermittently loaded woodchip and sand filters to treat dairy soiled water.

    PubMed

    Murnane, J G; Brennan, R B; Healy, M G; Fenton, O

    2016-10-15

    Land application of dairy soiled water (DSW) is expensive relative to its nutrient replacement value. The use of aerobic filters is an effective alternative method of treatment and potentially allows the final effluent to be reused on the farm. Knowledge gaps exist concerning the optimal design and operation of filters for the treatment of DSW. To address this, 18 laboratory-scale filters, with depths of either 0.6 m or 1 m, were intermittently loaded with DSW over periods of up to 220 days to evaluate the impacts of depth (0.6 m versus 1 m), organic loading rates (OLRs) (50 versus 155 g COD m(-2) d(-1)), and media type (woodchip versus sand) on organic, nutrient and suspended solids (SS) removals. The study found that media depth was important in contaminant removal in woodchip filters. Reductions of 78% chemical oxygen demand (COD), 95% SS, 85% total nitrogen (TN), 82% ammonium-nitrogen (NH4N), 50% total phosphorus (TP), and 54% dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) were measured in 1 m deep woodchip filters, which was greater than the reductions in 0.6 m deep woodchip filters. Woodchip filters also performed optimally when loaded at a high OLR (155 g COD m(-2) d(-1)), although the removal mechanism was primarily physical (i.e. straining) as opposed to biological. When operated at the same OLR and when of the same depth, the sand filters had better COD removals (96%) than woodchip (74%), but there was no significant difference between them in the removal of SS and NH4N. However, the likelihood of clogging makes sand filters less desirable than woodchip filters. Using the optimal designs of both configurations, the filter area required per cow for a woodchip filter is more than four times less than for a sand filter. Therefore, this study found that woodchip filters are more economically and environmentally effective in the treatment of DSW than sand filters, and optimal performance may be achieved using woodchip filters with a depth of at least 1

  15. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2004-01-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  16. Long-term applications of untreated and alum-treated poultry litter drive soil nitrogen concentrations and associated microbial community dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum sulfate (alum)-treatment retains ammonia in poultry litter, potentially altering nitrogen cycling after application to soil. The objective of this research was to assess if eight and nine years of annual application of untreated or alum-treated poultry litters or ammonium nitrate have resul...

  17. Microbial biomass and soil carbon after 8 and 9 years of field applications of alum-treated and untreated poultry litter and inorganic nitrogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amendment with aluminum sulfate (alum) is considered a best management practice for its benefits in poultry production and increased retention of nutrients in the litter. However, little is known about how long-term applications of alum-treated litter to soil will affect the microbial community and ...

  18. ANIMAL PERFORMANCE, CARCASS QUALITY, AND TISSUE RESIDUES WITH BEEF STEERS FED FORAGE SORGHUM SILAGES GROWN ON SOIL TREATED WITH LIQUID DIGESTED SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Processed sewage sludges are a renewable resource which have potential as a fertilizer material on agricultural land. Forage sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) silages, grown on soil treated with Pensacola liquid digested sludge (LDS) turned under prior to planting, were fed as the main i...

  19. CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A CHELATOR-TREATED SOIL HUMATE BY SOLUTION-STATE MULTINUCLEAR TWO-DIMENSIONAL NMR WITH FTIR AND PYROLYSIS-GCMS. (R825960)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A California forest soil used for contaminant bioavailability
    studies was extracted for humic substances (HS) and
    then treated with 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene disulfonate
    ("Tiron") to remove exchangeable metal ions. This yielded
    HS that was readily water-soluble at ...

  20. Changes in Plant Nutrients, and Microbial Biomass in Different Soil Depths After Long-Term Surface Application of Secondary Treated Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rashidi, Radhi; Rusan, Munir; Obaid, Karem

    2013-12-01

    Long-term effects of surface application of secondary treated wastewater on plant nutrients dynamics, the cycling of C and N within the system through the determination of microbial biomass, and associated health hazards were studied in different soil locations. Sites that have been irrigated with wastewater for the last 1, 4, 10, and 17 years were identified and used as sampling locations for this study. Two other sites that have not been irrigated with wastewater were sampled as a control. Soil samples were taken from several sites within each location, and at the following depths: 0-20, 20-40, and 40-60 cm. Results obtained indicated that microbial biomass C and N were increased significantly with increasing application period of treated wastewater. Barley plant tissues analysis showed that plant nutrients content was significantly higher in sites which received wastewater for a long period than other sites. No significances in accumulation of lead (Pb) in barley plant tissues were observed with sites received wastewater for different periods. The bacteriological analysis showed that the total bacterial count of surface soil (0-20 cm) was higher in sites irrigated with wastewater for the last 10 and 17 years. The total coliforms ranged from 0.92x102 cfu/g soil to 3.3x102 cfu/g soil, while fecal coliform were less and detected only in top soils at sites irrigated with wastewater for the last 10 and 17 years.

  1. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  2. Different bacterial communities in heat and gamma irradiation treated replant disease soils revealed by 16S rRNA gene analysis - contribution to improved aboveground apple plant growth?

    PubMed

    Yim, Bunlong; Winkelmann, Traud; Ding, Guo-Chun; Smalla, Kornelia

    2015-01-01

    Replant disease (RD) severely affects apple production in propagation tree nurseries and in fruit orchards worldwide. This study aimed to investigate the effects of soil disinfection treatments on plant growth and health in a biotest in two different RD soil types under greenhouse conditions and to link the plant growth status with the bacterial community composition at the time of plant sampling. In the biotest performed we observed that the aboveground growth of apple rootstock M26 plants after 8 weeks was improved in the two RD soils either treated at 50°C or with gamma irradiation compared to the untreated RD soils. Total community DNA was extracted from soil loosely adhering to the roots and quantitative real-time PCR revealed no pronounced differences in 16S rRNA gene copy numbers. 16S rRNA gene-based bacterial community analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 454-pyrosequencing revealed significant differences in the bacterial community composition even after 8 weeks of plant growth. In both soils, the treatments affected different phyla but only the relative abundance of Acidobacteria was reduced by both treatments. The genera Streptomyces, Bacillus, Paenibacillus, and Sphingomonas had a higher relative abundance in both heat treated soils, whereas the relative abundance of Mucilaginibacter, Devosia, and Rhodanobacter was increased in the gamma-irradiated soils and only the genus Phenylobacterium was increased in both treatments. The increased abundance of genera with potentially beneficial bacteria, i.e., potential degraders of phenolic compounds might have contributed to the improved plant growth in both treatments. PMID:26635733

  3. Cement-cement interface strength: influence of time to apposition.

    PubMed

    Park, S H; Silva, M; Park, J S; Ebramzadeh, E; Schmalzried, T P

    2001-01-01

    Cement-cement interfaces were created under simulated operating-room conditions. In order to analyze the effect of time to apposition on interface strength, two cement surfaces were brought together 1, 2, 4, and 6 min after 1 min of mixing and 45 s of waiting. Cement-cement interface strength was evaluated with the use of a three-point bending to failure test. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the failed interface were obtained. The mean interface strength decreased when the cement-cement interface was time delayed. Compared to bulk cement, interface strength in time-delayed groups decreased 8% after 1-min delay (p=.037), 18% after 2-min delay (p=.0004), 20% after 4-min delay (p=.0005), and 42% after 6-min delay (p<.0001). No statistically significant differences in interface strength were found between the 2- and 4-min delayed groups (p=.73). SEM images revealed that after 6-min delay, up to 50% of the cement surface can remain unbonded, explaining the decrease in strength of the cement-cement interface as a function of time to apposition. This laboratory study indicates that time to apposition plays a critical role in cement-cement interface strength. If any cementing technique involves the joining of two cement surfaces, it is recommended that the two cement surfaces be mated together within 5 min and 45 s after the start of mixing (1 min mixing; 45 s waiting; 4 min delay), in order to obtain a strong cement-cement interface bond. Delay beyond this can result in substantial reduction in the strength of the cement-cement interface bond. PMID:11745529

  4. The effects of Paenibacillus polymyxa E681 on antifungal and crack remediation of cement paste.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Park, Seung-Hwan; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the antifungal effects of cement paste containing Paenibacillus polymyxa E681 against Aspergillus niger, a deleterious fungus commonly found in cement buildings and structures. To test the antifungal effects, cement paste containing P. polymyxa E681 was neutralized by CO2 gas, and the fungal growth inhibition was examined according to the clear zone around the cement specimen. In addition to the antifungal effects of the cement paste added with bacteria, calcium crystal precipitation of P. polymyxa E681 was examined by qualitative and quantitative analyses. The cement paste containing P. polymyxa E681 showed strong antifungal effects but fusA mutant (deficient in fusaricidin synthesis) showed no antifungal activity. Crack sealing of the cement paste treated with P. polymyxa E681 was captured by light microscope showed fungal growth inhibition and crack repairing in cement paste. PMID:24824950

  5. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-07-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the eleventh quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in unacceptable erosion of the test specimens. In subsequent tests, a different expansion procedure was implemented and an alternate curing method for cements formulated with TXI Lightweight cement was employed to prevent sample failure caused by thermal shock. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but data for some compositions were still questionable. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement were implemented and testing is ongoing.

  6. Timing of syntaxial cement

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.D.

    1985-02-01

    Echinodermal fragments are commonly overgrown in ancient limestones, with large single crystals growing in optical continuity over their skeletal hosts (i.e., syntaxial overgrowths). Such syntaxial cements are usually considered to have precipitated from meteoric pore waters associated with a later stage of subaerial exposure. Although several examples have been reported from ancient carbonates where petrographic relationships may indicate an early submarine formation of syntaxial cement, no occurrences have been noted in Holocene submarine-cemented rocks. Syntaxial cements of submarine origin have been found in Bermuda beachrock where isopachous high-magnesian calcite cements merge with large optically continuous crystals growing on echinodermal debris. Examination of other Holocene sediments cemented by magnesian calcite indicates that echinodermal fragments are not always overgrown syntaxially, but may be rimmed by microcrystalline calcite. The reason for this difference is not clear, although it may be a function of the spacing of nucleation sites and rates of crystal growth. A review of syntaxial cements from several localities in ancient carbonate sequences reveals that many are best interpreted as having formed in the submarine setting, whereas it is more clear that others formed from meteoric precipitation. These occurrences suggest that care should be exercised in inferring meteoric diagenesis from syntaxial overgrowths and that the possibility of submarine formation should be considered.

  7. Spatial and temporal variability of plant-available water in calcium carbonate-cemented soils and consequences for arid ecosystem resilience

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased variability in precipitation, including frequency of drought, is predicted for many arid and semiarid regions of the world. The ability of soils to retain water can increase resilience by buffering vegetation communities against precipitation extremes. Little is known, however, about water...

  8. Root-Zone Redox Dynamics - In Search for the Cause of Damage to Treated-Wastewater Irrigated Orchards in Clay Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalin, David; Shenker, Moshe; Schwartz, Amnon; Assouline, Shmuel; Tarchitzky, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Treated wastewater (TW) has become a common source of water for agriculture. However recent findings raise concern regarding its use: a marked decrease (up to 40%) in yield appeared in orchards irrigated with TW compared with fresh water (FW) irrigated orchards. These detrimental effects appeared predominantly in orchards cultivated in clay soils. The association of the damage with clay soils rather than sandy soils led us to hypothesize that the damage is linked to soil aeration problems. We suspected that in clay soils, high sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and high levels of organic material, both typical of TW, may jointly lead to an extreme decrease in soil oxygen levels, so as to shift soil reduction-oxidation (redox) state down to levels that are known to damage plants. Two-year continuous measurement of redox potential, pH, water tension, and oxygen were conducted in the root-zone (20-35 cm depth) of avocado trees planted in clay soil and irrigated with either TW or FW. Soil solution composition was sampled periodically in-situ and mineral composition was sampled in tree leaves and woody organs biannually. In dry periods the pe+pH values indicated oxic conditions (pe+pH>14), and the fluctuations in redox values were small in both TW and FW plots. Decreases in soil water tension following irrigation or rain were followed by drops in soil oxygen and pe+pH values. TW irrigated plots had significantly lower minimum pe+pH values compared with FW-irrigated plots, the most significant differences occurred during the irrigation season rather than the rain season. A linear correlation appeared between irrigation volume and reduction severity in TW-irrigated plots, but not in the FW plots, indicating a direct link to the irrigation regime in TW-irrigated plots. The minimum pe+pH values measured in the TW plots are indicative of suboxic conditions (9soil solution and in

  9. A comparison of retentive strength of implant cement depending on various methods of removing provisional cement from implant abutment

    PubMed Central

    Keum, Eun-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the effectiveness of various methods for removing provisional cement from implant abutments, and what effect these methods have on the retention of prosthesis during the definitive cementation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty implant fixture analogues and abutments were embedded in resin blocks. Forty cast crowns were fabricated and divided into 4 groups each containing 10 implants. Group A was cemented directly with the definitive cement (Cem-Implant). The remainder were cemented with provisional cement (Temp-Bond NE), and classified according to the method for cleaning the abutments. Group B used a plastic curette and wet gauze, Group C used a rubber cup and pumice, and Group D used an airborne particle abrasion technique. The abutments were observed using a stereomicroscope after removing the provisional cement. The tensile bond strength was measured after the definitive cementation. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance test (α=.05). RESULTS Group B clearly showed provisional cement remaining, whereas the other groups showed almost no cement. Groups A and B showed a relatively smooth surface. More roughness was observed in Group C, and apparent roughness was noted in Group D. The tensile bond strength tests revealed Group D to have significantly the highest tensile bond strength followed in order by Groups C, A and B. CONCLUSION A plastic curette and wet gauze alone cannot effectively remove the residual provisional cement on the abutment. The definitive retention increased when the abutments were treated with rubber cup/pumice or airborne particle abraded to remove the provisional cement. PMID:24049563

  10. Modifications of sulfur polymer cement (SPC) stabilization and solidification (S/S) process

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.L.; Lai, J.S.; Chian, E.S.K.

    1995-12-31

    This paper addresses the effectiveness of using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) as a binder to stabilize/solidify lead-contaminated soils. SPC, which has been used as a construction material because of its excellent resistance to acid and salt environments and its superior water tightness as compared with Portland cement concrete, has recently emerged as a possible alternative binder to stabilize/solidify soils contaminated with hazardous, low-level radioactive and mixed wastes. However, it was found that the use of SPC alone could not satisfactorily stabilize/solidify lead-contaminated soils. Nevertheless, it was shown that additives, such as sodium sulfide or sodium sulfite, could be used to greatly enhance the ability of SPC to react chemically with lead contaminants, and physicochemically to bind these compounds. These enable us significantly to lower the leachability (e.g. from 77.8 mg Pb/l to 1.28 mg Pb/l in EPA TCLP extract) of the SPC-treated wastes to the point where they can be recycled as some form of construction material.

  11. Some heavy metals in soils treated with sewage sludge, their effects on yield, and their uptake by plants

    SciTech Connect

    Valdares, J.M.A.S.; Gal, M.; Mingelgrin, U.; Page, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    The possible use of sludge with high heavy metal concentrations and at high rates in calcareous soil was demonstrated in this study. Mixtures of two sludges were added to soils in various proportions up to 4% sludge content. One sludge was rich in Ni and Cd, while the other was relatively poor in heavy metals. Three soils varying in pH from 7.7 to 5.5 were tested. The concentrations of Cd, Ni, Cu and Zn in the DTPA and saturation extracts of the soil-sludge mixtures were determined and correlated with their uptake by plants and the yield of Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris L., cv. Ford Hook Giant) grown on these mixtures. The metal-poor sludge hardly affected the yield of the relatively salt-resistant Swiss chard. The metal-rich sludge reduced the yield drastically in noncalcareous soils after a critical amount of that sludge (1.5%) was added to the soils. Yet, even 4% of this metal-rich sludge increased the yield of Swiss chard, as compared with the sludge-free control in a calcareous soil. The best fit to yield was obtained by multiple regression with metal content in the soil saturation extract. The solubility in soil solution of Cd, Ni and Zn was strongly affected by the pH. The uptake of Ni and Zn by plants was significantly larger in the acid soil than in the calcareous soil. The difference in the uptake of Cd and Cu between the soils was smaller. Plant uptake of the metals was generally predicted better by the total metal addition or concentration in the DPTA extract than by metal concentration in the soil saturation extract. In noncalcaeous soils the total metal addition correlated as well as metal content in the DTPA extracts with the metal concentration in the soil solution, with the uptake by plants and with the yield.

  12. Stage cementing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Blamford, D.M.; Easter, J.H.

    1988-06-21

    A stage cementing apparatus for selectively passing cement from the interior passage of a casing to the annulus between the exterior of the casing and borehole, the casing having an upper portion and a lower portion, is described comprising: a barrel secured to the upper portion of the casing; a mandrel secured to the lower portion of the casing, and a stage cementing tool having a generally cylindrical configuration adapted for attachment to the lower end of the barrel about a portion of the mandrel.

  13. Clinical applications of glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    McLean, J W

    1992-01-01

    The use of glass-ionomer cements in clinical dentistry is now well established. They have a number of unique properties, including adhesion to moist tooth structure, biological compatibility, and anticariogenic properties due to their fluoride release. Their use in treating early carious or erosion lesions has been widely investigated. Established techniques include fissure filling and sealing, restoration of class 5 erosion lesions without cavity preparation, and the internal occlusal fossa or tunnel restoration. The "sandwich" technique using glass-ionomer cements as "dentin substitutes" has enabled composite restorations to be used with greater safety where pulpal damage may occur. The future probably lies in using a laminate technique where materials that attach to dentin and form a biological seal can be covered by tougher and harder enamel veneers, thus mimicking the structure of the tooth. The deficiencies of glass-ionomer cements are well known, including lack of toughness, early water sensitivity, low abrasion resistance, and porosity leading to poor surface polish. Solving these problems is formidable, since inherently the strength of these cements is related to their water content. The clinician should be aware of these deficiencies and stay within the parameters of the techniques outlined in this paper. In particular, clinical success depends upon early protection of the cement from hydration or dehydration, and the current use of light-cured bonding agents has largely solved this problem. PMID:1470548

  14. Corrosion-resistant Foamed Cements for Carbon Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Gill, S.; Pyatina, T., Muraca, A.; Keese, R.; Khan, A.; Bour, D.

    2012-12-01

    The cementitious material consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate designed as an alternative thermal-shock resistant cement for the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells was treated with cocamidopropyl dimethylamine oxide-based compound as foaming agent (FA) to prepare numerous air bubble-dispersed low density cement slurries of and #61603;1.3 g/cm3. Then, the foamed slurry was modified with acrylic emulsion (AE) as corrosion inhibitor. We detailed the positive effects of the acrylic polymer (AP) in this emulsion on the five different properties of the foamed cement: 1) The hydrothermal stability of the AP in 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cements; 2) the hydrolysis-hydration reactions of the slurry at 85 and #61616;C; 3) the composition of crystalline phases assembled and the microstructure developed in autoclaved cements; 4) the mechanical behaviors of the autoclaved cements; and, 5) the corrosion mitigation of carbon steel (CS) by the polymer. For the first property, the hydrothermal-catalyzed acid-base interactions between the AP and cement resulted in Ca-or Na-complexed carboxylate derivatives, which led to the improvement of thermal stability of the AP. This interaction also stimulated the cement hydration reactions, enhancing the total heat evolved during cement’s curing. Addition of AP did not alter any of the crystalline phase compositions responsible for the strength of the cement. Furthermore, the AP-modified cement developed the porous microstructure with numerous defect-free cavities of disconnected voids. These effects together contributed to the improvement of compressive-strength and –toughness of the cured cement. AP modification of the cement also offered an improved protection of CS against brine-caused corrosion. There were three major factors governing the corrosion protection: 1) Reducing the extents of infiltration and transportation of corrosive electrolytes through the cement layer deposited on the underlying CS

  15. Influence of vegetation on the in situ bacterial community and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degraders in aged PAH-contaminated or thermal-desorption-treated soil.

    PubMed

    Cébron, Aurélie; Beguiristain, Thierry; Faure, Pierre; Norini, Marie-Paule; Masfaraud, Jean-François; Leyval, Corinne

    2009-10-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination, bacterial community, and PAH-degrading bacteria were monitored in aged PAH-contaminated soil (Neuves-Maisons [NM] soil; with a mean of 1,915 mg of 16 PAHs.kg(-1) of soil dry weight) and in the same soil previously treated by thermal desorption (TD soil; with a mean of 106 mg of 16 PAHs.kg(-1) of soil dry weight). This study was conducted in situ for 2 years using experimental plots of the two soils. NM soil was colonized by spontaneous vegetation (NM-SV), planted with Medicago sativa (NM-Ms), or left as bare soil (NM-BS), and the TD soil was planted with Medicago sativa (TD-Ms). The bacterial community density, structure, and diversity were estimated by real-time PCR quantification of the 16S rRNA gene copy number, temporal thermal gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting, and band sequencing, respectively. The density of the bacterial community increased the first year during stabilization of the system and stayed constant in the NM soil, while it continued to increase in the TD soil during the second year. The bacterial community structure diverged among all the plot types after 2 years on site. In the NM-BS plots, the bacterial community was represented mainly by Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. The presence of vegetation (NM-SV and NM-Ms) in the NM soil favored the development of a wider range of bacterial phyla (Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Chloroflexi) that, for the most part, were not closely related to known bacterial representatives. Moreover, under the influence of the same plant, the bacterial community that developed in the TD-Ms was represented by different bacterial species (Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Actinobacteria) than that in the NM-Ms. During the 2 years of monitoring, the PAH concentration did not evolve significantly. The abundance of gram-negative (GN

  16. Thermodynamics and cement science

    SciTech Connect

    Damidot, D.; Lothenbach, B.; Herfort, D.; Glasser, F.P.

    2011-07-15

    Thermodynamics applied to cement science has proved to be very valuable. One of the most striking findings has been the extent to which the hydrate phases, with one conspicuous exception, achieve equilibrium. The important exception is the persistence of amorphous C-S-H which is metastable with respect to crystalline calcium silicate hydrates. Nevertheless C-S-H can be included in the scope of calculations. As a consequence, from comparison of calculation and experiment, it appears that kinetics is not necessarily an insuperable barrier to engineering the phase composition of a hydrated Portland cement. Also the sensitivity of the mineralogy of the AFm and AFt phase compositions to the presence of calcite and to temperature has been reported. This knowledge gives a powerful incentive to develop links between the mineralogy and engineering properties of hydrated cement paste and, of course, anticipates improvements in its performance leading to decreasing the environmental impacts of cement production.

  17. [Allergy towards bone cement].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Schuh, A; Summer, B; Mazoochian, F; Thomsen, M

    2006-09-01

    Bone cements based on polymethylmethacrylate are typically used for fixation of artificial joints. Intolerance reactions to endoprostheses not explained by infection or mechanical failure may lead to allergological diagnostics, which mostly focuses on metal allergy. However, also bone cement components may provoke hypersensitivity reactions leading to eczema, implant loosening, or fistula formation. Elicitors of such reactions encompass acrylates and additives such as benzoyl peroxide, N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine, hydroquinone, or antibiotics (particularly gentamicin). Upon repeated contact with bone cement components, e.g., acrylate monomers, also in medical personnel occasionally hand eczema or even asthma may develop. Therefore, in the case of suspected hypersensitivity reactions to arthroplasty, the allergological diagnostics should include bone cement components. PMID:16865384

  18. Environmentally compatible spray cement

    SciTech Connect

    Loeschnig, P.

    1995-12-31

    Within the framework of a European research project, Heidelberger Zement developed a quickly setting and hardening binder for shotcrete, called Chronolith S, which avoids the application of setting accelerators. Density and strength of the shotcrete produced with this spray cement correspond to those of an unaccelerated shotcrete. An increased hazard for the heading team and for the environment, which may occur when applying setting accelerators, can be excluded here. Owing to the special setting properties of a spray cement, the process engineering for its manufacturing is of great importance. The treatment of a spray cement as a dry concrete with kiln-dried aggregates is possible without any problems. The use of a naturally damp pre-batched mixture is possible with Chronolith S but requires special process engineering; spray cement and damp aggregate are mixed with one another immediately before entering the spraying machinery.

  19. Heavy metal accumulation in soils and grains, and health risks associated with use of treated municipal wastewater in subsurface drip irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Kamran; Najafi, Payam; Cornelis, Wim M.

    2014-05-01

    Constant use of treated wastewater for irrigation over long periods may cause buildup of heavy metals up to toxic levels for plants, animals, and entails environmental hazards in different aspects. However, application of treated wastewater on agricultural land might be an effective and sustainable strategy in arid and semi-arid countries where fresh water resources are under great pressure, as long as potential harmful effects on the environment including soil, plants, and fresh water resources, and health risks to humans are minimized. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of using a deep emitter installation on lowering the potential heavy metal accumulation in soils and grains, and health risk under drip irrigation with treated municipal wastewater. A field experiment was conducted according to a split block design with two treatments (fresh and wastewater) and three sub treatments (0, 15 and 30 cm depth of emitters) in four replicates on a sandy loam soil, in Esfahan, Iran. The annual rainfall is about 123 mm, mean annual ETo is 1457 mm, and the elevation is 1590 m a.s.l.. A two-crop rotation of wheat [Triticum spp.] and corn [Zea mays]) was established on each plot with wheat growing from February to June and corn from July to September. Soil samples were collected before planting (initial value) and after harvesting (final value) for each crop in each year. Edible grain samples of corn and wheat were also collected. Elemental concentrations (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni) in soil and grains were determined using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The concentrations of heavy metals in the wastewater-irrigated soils were not significantly different (P>0.05) compared with the freshwater-irrigated soils. The results showed no significant difference (P>0.05) of soil heavy metal content between different depths of emitters. A pollution load index PLI showed that there was not substantial buildup of heavy metals in the wastewater-irrigated soils compared to

  20. Lower leaf gas-exchange and higher photorespiration of treated wastewater irrigated Citrus trees is modulated by soil type and climate.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Indira; Shaviv, Avi; Bernstein, Nirit; Heuer, Bruria; Shapira, Or; Lukyanov, Victor; Bar-Tal, Asher; Rotbart, Nativ; Ephrath, Jhonathan; Cohen, Shabtai

    2016-04-01

    Water quality, soil and climate can interact to limit photosynthesis and to increase photooxidative damage in sensitive plants. This research compared diffusive and non-diffusive limitations to photosynthesis as well as photorespiration of leaves of grapefruit trees in heavy clay and sandy soils having a previous history of treated wastewater (TWW) irrigation for >10 years, with different water qualities [fresh water (FW) vs TWW and sodium amended treated wastewater (TWW + Na)] in two arid climates (summer vs winter) and in orchard and lysimeter experiments. TWW irrigation increased salts (Na(+) and Cl(-) ), membrane leakage, proline and soluble sugar content, and decreased osmotic potentials in leaves of all experiments. Reduced leaf growth and higher stomatal and non-stomatal (i.e. mesophyll) limitations were found in summer and on clay soil for TWW and TWW + Na treatments in comparison to winter, sandy soil and FW irrigation, respectively. Stomatal closure, lower chlorophyll content and altered Rubisco activity are probable causes of higher limitations. On the other hand, non-photochemical quenching, an alternative energy dissipation pathway, was only influenced by water quality, independent of soil type and season. Furthermore, light and CO2 response curves were investigated for other possible causes of higher non-stomatal limitation. A higher proportion of non-cyclic electrons were directed to the O2 dependent pathway, and a higher proportion of electrons were diverted to photorespiration in summer than in winter. In conclusion, both diffusive and non-diffusive limitations contribute to the lower photosynthetic performance of leaves following TWW irrigation, and the response depends on soil type and environmental factors. PMID:26497166

  1. Assessing Environmental Impacts of Treated Wastewater through Monitoring of Fecal Indicator Bacteria and Salinity in Irrigated Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To assess the potential for bacterial persistence and/or growth in reclaimed water irrigation systems and in irrigated soils, and to quantify the effects of wastewater application on soil salinity, levels of fecal indicator bacteria (E. coli, Enterococcus) and environmental covariates were measured ...

  2. Salinity control in a clay soil beneath an orchard irrigated with treated waste water in the presence of a high water table: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, David; Laufer, Asher; Bardhan, Gopali; Levy, Guy J.

    2015-12-01

    A citrus orchard planted on a structured, clay soil associated with a high water table, irrigated by drip irrigation system using treated waste water (TWW) and local well water (LWW) was considered here. The scope of the present study was to analyze transport of mixed-ion, interacting salts in a combined vadose zone-groundwater flow system focusing on the following issues: (i) long-term effects of irrigation with TWW on the response of the flow system, identifying the main factors (e.g., soil salinity, soil sodicity) that control these effects, and (ii) salinity control aiming at improving both crop productivity and groundwater quality. To pursue this two-fold goal, 3-D numerical simulations of field-scale flow and transport were performed for an extended period of time, considering realistic features of the soil, water table, crop, weather and irrigation, and the coupling between the flow and the transport through the dependence of the soil hydraulic functions, K(ψ) and θ(ψ), on soil solution concentration C, and sodium adsorption ratio, SAR. Results of the analyses suggest that in the case studied, the long-term effect of irrigation with TWW on the response of the flow system is attributed to the enhanced salinity of the TWW, and not to the increase in soil sodicity. The latter findings are attributed to: (i) the negative effect of soil salinity on water uptake, and the tradeoff between water uptake and drainage flux, and, concurrently, solute discharge below the root zone; and, (ii) the tradeoff between the effects of C and SAR on K(ψ) and θ(ψ). Furthermore, it was demonstrated that a data-driven protocol for soil salinity control, based on alternating irrigation water quality between TWW and desalinized water, guided by the soil solution salinity at the centroid of the soil volume active in water uptake, may lead to a substantial increase in crop yield, and to a substantial decrease in the salinity load in the groundwater.

  3. Microbiological indicators for assessing ecosystem soil quality and changes in it at degraded sites treated with compost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona, Valeria; Barra Caracciolo, Anna; Grenni, Paola; Di Lenola, Martina; Calabrese, Angelantonio; Campanale, Claudia; Felice Uricchio, Vito

    2014-05-01

    Soil quality is defined as the capacity of a soil to function as a vital system, within natural or managed ecosystem boundaries, sustain plant and animal health and productivity, maintain or enhance air and water environment quality and support human health and habitation. Soil organisms are extremely diverse and contribute to a wide range of ecosystem services that are essential to the sustainable functioning of natural and managed ecosystems. In particular, microbial communities provide several ecosystem services, which ensure soil quality and fertility. In fact, they adapt promptly to environmental changes by varying their activity and by increasing the reproduction of populations that have favourable skills. The structure (e.g. cell abundance) and functioning (e.g. viability and activity) of natural microbial communities and changes in them under different environmental conditions can be considered useful indicators of soil quality state. In this work we studied the quality state of three different soils, located in Taranto Province (Southern Italy), affected by land degradation processes, such as organic matter depletion, desertification and contamination (PCB and metals). Moreover, compost, produced from selected organic waste, was added to the soils studied in order to improve their quality state. Soil samples were collected before and after compost addition and both microbial and chemical analyses were performed in order to evaluate the soil quality state at each site at different times. For this purpose, the microbiological indicators evaluated were bacterial abundance (DAPI counts), cell viability (Live/Dead method), dehydrogenase activity (DHA) and soil respiration. At the same time, the main physico-chemical soil characteristics (organic carbon, available phosphorous, total nitrogen, carbonate and water content, texture and pH) were also measured. Moreover, in the contaminated soil samples PCB and inorganic (e.g. Pb, Se, Sn, Zn) contaminants were

  4. Determination of acute Zn toxicity in pore water from soils previously treated with sewage sludge using bioluminescence assays

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudri, A.M.; Knight, B.P.; Barbosa-Jefferson, V.L.

    1999-06-01

    The effects of increasing concentrations of Zn and Cu in soil pore water from soils of a long-term sewage sludge field experiment on microbial bioluminescence were investigated. Concentrations of total soluble Zn, free Zn{sup 2+}, and soluble Cu increased sharply in soil pore water with increasing total soil metal concentrations above 140 mg of Zn kg{sup {minus}1} or 100 mg of Cu kg{sup {minus}1}. Two luminescence bioassays were tested, based on two bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) with the lux genes encoding bacterial luminescence inserted into them. The bioluminescence response of the two microorganisms declined as total soil Zn, soil pore water soluble Zn, and soil pore water free Zn{sup 2+} concentrations increased. The EC{sub 25} values for E. coli and P. fluorescens were 1.3 {+-} 0.2 and 4.3 {+-} 0.5 mg L{sup {minus}1} on a free Zn{sup 2+} basis, respectively. The EC{sub 50} values were 2.5 {+-} 0.2 and 9.6 {+-} 0.9 mg of free Zn{sup 2+} L{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Copper had no significant effect on bioluminescence in the two assays, even at the largest soil pore water concentration of about 620 {micro}g L{sup {minus}1}, corresponding to a total Cu concentration in bulk soil of about 350 mg kg{sup {minus}1}. Thus, the decline in bioluminescence of the two assays was ascribed to increasing soil pore water free Zn{sup 2+} and not soluble Cu.

  5. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  6. Reduction of Root-Knot Nematode, Meloidogyne javanica, and Ozone Mass Transfer in Soil Treated with Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jinya Jack; Pryor, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Ozone gas (O3) is a reactive oxidizing agent with biocidal properties. Because of the current phasing out of methyl bromide, investigations on the use of ozone gas as a soil-fumigant were conducted. Ozone gas was produced at a concentration of 1% in air by a conventional electrical discharge O3 generator. Two O3 dosages and three gas flow rates were tested on a sandy loam soil collected from a tomato field that had a resident population of root knot nematodes, Meloidogyne javanica. At dosages equivalent to 50 and 250 kg of O3/ha, M. javanica were reduced by 24% and 68%, and free-living nematodes by 19% and 52%, respectively. The reduction for both M. javanica and free-living nematodes was dosage dependent and flow rate independent. The rates of O3 mass transfer (OMT) through three soils of different texture were greater at low and high moisture levels than at intermediate ones. At any one soil moisture level, the OMT rate varied with soil texture and soil organic matter content. Results suggest that soil texture, moisture, and organic matter content should be considered in determining O3 dosage needed for effective nematode control. PMID:22736821

  7. Effect of climatic conditions on the development of soil water repellency in soils treated with the wastewater of the olive oil production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaumann, Gabriele E.; Peikert, Benjamin; Tamimi, Nesreen; Steinmetz, Zacharias; Fischer, Jonas; Bibus, Daniel; Marei Sawalha, Amer; Dag, Arnon

    2014-05-01

    The disposal of untreated wastewater on soil can induce severe water repellency. The final degree of water repellency may strongly depend on the environmental conditions prevailing during and after disposal. Also unpolluted soil can develop severe water repellency upon exposure to extreme heat or draught events. The induced water repellency can be either persistent or of transient nature. However, the underlying mechanisms are not yet completely understood. The objective of this study was to investigate how climatic conditions determine the development and persistence of water repellency following wastewater disposal. Our hypothesis was that amphiphilic organic wastewater compounds physically sorb onto surfaces, which renders them hydrophobic. Depending on temperature and moisture, those compounds are degraded, chemically incorporated into SOM, or irreversibly sorbed to soil particles during the time after the first waste water-soil contact. According to our hypothesis, biological communities favor degradation and transformation of OM of waste water into SOM under moist soil conditions. This would reduce the initial hydrophobization. In contrast, drying irreversibly renders soil hydrophobic and phytotoxic due to immobilization of OMW OM in the soil. To test these hypotheses, we investigated effects of olive mil wastewater (OMW), the effluent originating from olive oil production, directly applied to soil. In Israel and Palastine, olive oil production generates large amounts of OMW within a short period of time between November and January. As sewage facilities do not accept OMW, it is often disposed onto soil, which leads to severe soil and groundwater pollution. If the above mentioned hypotheses match, pollution and hydrophobization might be minimized if the wastewater is discharged at the right time of the year. In order to test this, we conducted field (2-3 years) and laboratory (60 days) experiments in Israel (Gilat, arid climate) and in the West Bank (Bait

  8. Mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

    2001-05-09

    This paper presents the results of laboratory measurements on the mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rock. Artificial rock samples were fabricated by cementing sand and glass beads with sodium silicate binder. During uniaxial compression tests, the rock samples showed stress-strain behavior which was more similar to that of soils than competent rocks, exhibiting large permanent deformations with frictional slip. The mechanical behavior of the samples approached that of competent rocks as the amount of binder was increased. For very weak samples, acoustic waves propagating in these rocks showed very low velocities of less than 1000 m/sec for compressional waves. A borehole made within this weakly cemented rock exhibited a unique mode of failure that is called ''anti-KI mode fracture'' in this paper. The effect of cementation, grain type, and boundary conditions on this mode of failure was also examined experimentally.

  9. System for radioactive waste cementation

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, S.A.; Barinov, A.S.; Varlakov, A.P.; Volkov, A.S.; Karlin, S.V.

    1995-12-31

    NPP, research reactors and radiochemical enterprises produce a great amount of liquid radioactive waste (LRW). One of the methods of LRW solidification is cementation. The recent investigations demonstrated possible inclusion of sufficient amount of waste in the cement matrix (up to 20--30 mass% on dry residue). In this case the cementation process becomes competitive with bituminization process, where the matrix can include 40--50 mass% and the solidified product volume is equal to the volume, obtained by cementation. Additionally, the cement matrix in contrast with the bituminous one is unburnable. Many countries are investigating the cementation process. The main idea governing technological process is the waste and cement mixing method and type of mixer. In world practice some principal types of cementation systems are used. The paper describes the SIA Radon industrial plant in Moscow.

  10. Recycled rubber in cement composites

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, D.; Tratt, K.; Wool, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    Disposal of 200 million waste tires in the US each year has become a major problem. An environmentally sound innovative technology of recycling rubber in cement matrix was examined. Using silane coupling agent the rubber was bonded to the hydrating cement making a lighter composite, which absorbed more energy than ordinary Portland cement. The bonding information was obtained by peel strength analysis. SEM was used to understand the mode of fracture in pure cement paste, cement bonded rubber composite and rubber filled cement paste. It was found that cracks propagate through the rubber particle in rubber bonded cement composite while in unbonded rubber cement mix, the cracks propagate around the interface. The density and shrinkage measurements are also discussed.

  11. Pharmaceuticals and personal care products in untreated and treated sewage sludge: Occurrence and environmental risk in the case of application on soil - A critical review.

    PubMed

    Verlicchi, P; Zambello, E

    2015-12-15

    This review is based on 59 papers published between 2002 and 2015, referring to about 450 treatment trains providing data regarding sludge concentrations for 169 compounds, specifically 152 pharmaceuticals and 17 personal care products, grouped into 28 different classes. The rationale of the study is to provide data to evaluate the environmental risk posed by the spreading of treated sludge in agriculture. Following discussion of the legislative scenario governing the final disposal of treated sludge in European countries and the USA, the study provides a snapshot of the occurrence of selected compounds in primary, secondary, mixed, digested, conditioned, composted and dried sludge originating in municipal wastewater treatment plants fed mainly with urban wastewater as well as in sludge-amended soil. Not only are measured values reported, but also predicted concentrations based on Kd values are reported. It emerges that in secondary sludge, the highest concentrations were found for fragrances, antiseptics and antibiotics and an attenuation in their concentrations occurs during treatment, in particular anaerobic digestion and composting. An in-depth literature survey of the (measured and predicted) Kd values for the different compounds and treated sludge are reported and an analysis of the influence of pH, redox conditions, sludge type was carried out. The data regarding measured and predicted concentrations of selected compounds in sludge-amended soil is then analyzed. Finally an environmental risk assessment posed by their occurrence in soil in the case of land application of sludge is examined, and the results obtained by different authors are compared. The most critical compounds found in the sludge-amended soil are estradiol, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, tetracycline, caffeine, triclosan and triclocarban. The study concludes with a focus on the main issues that should be further investigated in order to refine the environmental risk assessment. PMID:26327643

  12. CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE II REPORT, SEPT.1998-JULY 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.YAGER,K.A.BLANKENHORN,D.

    1999-08-01

    Based upon the previous Phase I research program aimed at looking for ways of recycling the KeySpan-generated wastes, such as waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) and bottom ash (BA), into the potentially useful cementitious materials called chemically bonded cement (CBC) materials, the emphasis of this Phase II program done at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in a period of September 1998 through July 1999, was directed towards the two major subjects: One was to assess the technical feasibility of WWTS-based CBC material for use as Pb-exchange adsorbent (PEA) which remediates Pb-contaminated soils in the field; and the other was related to the establishment of the optimum-packaging storage system of dry BA-based CBC components that make it a promising matrix material for the steam-cured concrete products containing sand and coarse aggregate. To achieve the goal of the first subject, a small-scale field demonstration test was carried out. Using the PEA material consisting of 30 wt% WWTS, 13 wt% Type I cement and 57 wt% water, the PES slurry was prepared using a rotary shear concrete mixer, and then poured on the Pb-contaminated soil. The PEA-to-soil ratio by weight was a factor of 2.0. The placed PEA slurry was blended with soil using hand mixing tools such as claws and shovels. The wettability of soils with the PEA was very good, thereby facilitating the soil-PEA mix procedures. A very promising result was obtained from this field test; in fact, the mount of Pb leached out from the 25-day-aged PEA-treated soil specimen was only 0.74 mg/l, meeting the requirement for EPA safe regulation of < 5 mg/l. In contrast, a large amount (26.4 mg/l) of Pb was detected from the untreated soil of the same age. Thus, this finding demonstrated that the WWTS-based CBC has a potential for use as PEA material. Regarding the second subject, the dry-packed storage system consisting of 68.7 wt% BA, 13.0 wt% calcium aluminate cement (CAC), 13.0 wt% Type I portland cement and 5.3 wt

  13. Small-particle-size cement

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, D.P.; Almond, S.W.; Blerhaus, W.M. II )

    1991-05-01

    Successful remedial cementing has historically been difficult in wells with large-interval, multizone, gravel-packed completions. The reason is the inability of conventional oilfield cements to penetrate gravel packs adequately. Small-particle-size cement (SPSC) was developed to penetrate gravel packs and to provide the zonal isolation required. This paper details the laboratory work, job design, and field implementation of this new cement.

  14. Cross-Contamination of Residual Emerging Contaminants and Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in Lettuce Crops and Soil Irrigated with Wastewater Treated by Sunlight/H2O2.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Giovanna; Polo-López, María I; Martínez-Piernas, Ana B; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar; Agüera, Ana; Rizzo, Luigi

    2015-09-15

    The sunlight/H2O2 process has recently been considered as a sustainable alternative option compared to other solar driven advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) in advanced treatment of municipal wastewater (WW) to be reused for crop irrigation. Accordingly, in this study sunlight/H2O2 was used as disinfection/oxidation treatment for urban WW treatment plant effluent in a compound parabolic collector photoreactor to assess subsequent cross-contamination of lettuce and soil by contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) (determined by QuEChERS extraction and LC-QqLIT-MS/MS analysis) and antibiotic resistant (AR) bacteria after irrigation with treated WW. Three CECs (carbamazepine (CBZ), flumequine (FLU), and thiabendazole (TBZ) at 100 μg L(-1)) and two AR bacterial strains (E. coli and E. faecalis, at 10(5) CFU mL(-1)) were spiked in real WW. A detection limit (DL) of 2 CFU mL(-1) was reached after 120 min of solar exposure for AR E. coli, while AR E. faecalis was more resistant to the disinfection process (240 min to reach DL). CBZ and TBZ were poorly removed after 90 min (12% and 50%, respectively) compared to FLU (94%). Lettuce was irrigated with treated WW for 5 weeks. CBZ and TBZ were accumulated in soil up to 472 ng g(-1) and 256 ng g(-1) and up-taken by lettuce up to 109 and 18 ng g(-1), respectively, when 90 min treated WW was used for irrigation; whereas no bacteria contamination was observed when the bacterial density in treated WW was below the DL. A proper treatment time (>90 min) should be guaranteed in order to avoid the transfer of pathogens from disinfected WW to irrigated crops and soil. PMID:26280108

  15. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  16. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  17. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  18. Effect of Reagents Concentration on Biocementation of Tropical Residual Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiet, K. T. P.; Kassim, K. A.; Chen, K. B.; Martula, U.; Yah, C. S.; Arefnia, A.

    2016-07-01

    This study explores the feasibility of Bacillus subtilis and optimum reagents concentration used in Microbial-Induced Calcite Precipitation (MICP) treatment of tropical residual soil. Experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of cementation reagents concentration toward MICP treatment. The performance of MICP treatment was assessed by measurement of the soil shear strength and calcite content. Based on the experimental results, it is discovered that the cementation reagent concentration has significantly affected on the performance of MICP treatment. The results suggested that the most preferable MICP treatment reagents concentration is 0.25M with the presence of Bacillus subtilis; using these treatment parameters, both UCS value and calcite content of treated soil had increased about 38% and 65.6% respectively. However, the reduction in UCS value was manifested for those samples treated at higher reagents concentration (0.35M); this phenomenon is attributed to the salinity of reagents where high salinity is not favourable to the bacteria growth and microbial activity; subsequently, this resulted in a consequential decrease in shear strength of the treated soil.

  19. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  20. Heavy metal accumulation in soils and grains, and health risks associated with use of treated municipal wastewater in subsurface drip irrigation.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Kamran; Cornelis, Wim M

    2015-07-01

    Constant use of treated wastewater (TWW) for irrigation over prolonged periods may cause buildup of heavy metals up to toxic levels for plants and animals, and entails environmental hazards in different aspects. However, application of TWW on agricultural land might be an effective and sustainable strategy in arid and semi-arid countries where fresh water resources are under great pressure, as long as potential harmful effects on the environment including soil, plants, and fresh water resources, and health risks to humans are minimized. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of deep emitters on limiting potential heavy metal accumulation in soils and grains, and health risk under drip irrigation with treated municipal wastewater. A field experiment was conducted according to a split block design with two treatments (fresh and wastewater) and three sub-treatments (0, 15, and 30 cm depth of emitters) in four replicates on a sandy loam Calcic Argigypsids, in Esfahan, Iran. The annual rainfall is about 123 mm, mean annual ETo is 1457 mm, and the elevation is 1590 m above sea level. A two-crop rotation of wheat (Triticum spp.) and corn (Zea mays) was established on each plot with wheat growing from February to June and corn from July to September. Soil samples were collected before planting and after harvesting for each crop in each year. Edible grain samples of corn and wheat were collected at harvest. Elemental concentrations (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni) in soil and grains were determined using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results showed that the concentrations of heavy metals in the wastewater-irrigated soils were not significantly different (P > 0.05) compared with the freshwater-irrigated soils. No significant difference (P > 0.05) in heavy metal content in soil between different depths of emitters was found. A pollution load index (PLI) showed that there was no substantial buildup of heavy metals in the wastewater-irrigated soils

  1. Kinetics of cobalt cementation on zinc powder

    SciTech Connect

    Polcaro, A.M.; Palmas, S.; Dernini, S.

    1995-09-01

    The cementation process may be considered an interesting method to treat dilute solutions containing metal ions. The aim of the process may be either the removal of pollutant metals or the recovery of economically valuable metals such as Ag from spent photographic liquors. The kinetics of cobalt cementation on Zn powder from zinc sulfate concentrated solutions in the presence of copper and antimony ions was investigated in stirred tank reactors. The composition of the solutions was in the range usually utilized in industrial zinc electrowinning plants. The results showed that the reaction occurs by means of the formation of crystallization nuclei of noble metals on the zinc powder, followed by the cementation of cobalt ions on these newly-formed nuclei. Mass transfer to the reaction surface is shown to be the controlling step in copper and antimony reduction, and an equation correlating mass transfer coefficients has been determined. A kinetic equation, which interprets the influence of stirring speed and solution composition on cobalt cementation, has also been proposed.

  2. Retention of posts cemented with various dentinal bonding cements.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, D B; Eakle, W S

    1994-12-01

    This investigation evaluated the retention of preformed posts with four different cements: C & B Metabond, Panavia, All-Bond 2, and Ketac-Cem. Sixty intact maxillary canines were selected for the study. The clinical crowns were removed and endodontic therapy done on each root, which was then prepared to receive prefabricated posts. The 60 samples were divided into four groups of 15, and the posts in each group were cemented with one of the four cements. The roots were mounted in acrylic resin blocks and the posts were separated from the canals with an Instron testing machine. Analysis of the forces needed to dislodge the posts with analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls test disclosed that C & B Metabond cement was the most retentive (p < 0.05). No difference in retention was recorded between Ketac-Cem and Panavia cements. All-Bond 2 cement was the least retentive of cements. PMID:7853255

  3. Arsenic Accumulation by Pteris vittata L. in Two Chemically Variant Soils Treated with Arsenical Pesticides - Greenhouse Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Therapong, C.; Datta, R.; Sarkar, D.; Pachanoor, D.

    2006-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is one of the most toxic elements present in the environment. Over the years, arsenic has found its way to the environment due to its extensive use in agriculture and in industrial practices as pesticides, fertilizers, wood preservatives, smelter wastes and coal combustion ash, all of which are of great environmental concern. Arsenic contamination affects biological activities because it is a carcinogen and a mutagen, which has detrimental effects on the immune system of animals. Remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils has become a major environmental issue in the recent years. Several physical and chemical treatment methods, such as soil washing, co-precipitation, and excavation, have used to remediate As, but all of these methods are rather expensive and can disturb soil physiology and ecology. Phytoremediation, a plant based technology for the removal of toxic contaminants from soil and water is an attractive approach. Of late, this technology has received a high degree of attention from the scientific community because it is environment-friendly and also because of its tremendous cost efficiency compared to the conventional methods. Chinese Brake Fern (Pteris vittata L.) is a known arsenic hyperaccumulator that is being used extensively at present to remove As from soils. However, the degree of efficiency of this plant in accumulating As is likely to be a function of the soil properties. The objective of the reported study was to investigate arsenic uptake by Chinese Brake Fern in As-contaminated soils from the Immokalee (acid sand with minimal As-retention potential) and Millhopper series (sandy loam with high Fe/Al content, hence, high As-retention potential). A greenhouse experiment was designed to evaluate the effects on As uptake by Chinese Brake Fern at two pesticide application rates: 225 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg As in two chemical forms, namely sodium arsenate (AsV) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Each treatment was replicated three times in

  4. Effects of Long-Term Irrigation with Treated Wastewater on Soil Properties and on Water and Air Regime in the Root Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, S.

    2011-12-01

    With increasing water scarcity, treated wastewater (TW) appears as an attractive alternative source of water for irrigation, especially in arid and semi-arid regions where freshwater is naturally scarce. However, it seems that long-term use of TW for irrigation cause to soil degradation and crop yield reduction. This study aims to describe and quantify changes in the soil properties and in the water and air regime in the root zone resulting from long-term use of TW for irrigation. Combining between analysis of data from a set of complementary laboratory experiments involving infiltration, evaporation, swelling and saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements, and HYDRUS simulations provide quantitative estimates of the negative impact of TW for irrigation on the soil properties. Such impact might affect the hydrological balance components at the field and the regional scale. Monitoring water and oxygen content at high temporal resolution in the field reveals significant effect of irrigation water quality on water and air regime in the root zone. This could affect both the agricultural and the ecosystem response of the upper soil layer.

  5. Cement compositions for cementing wells allowing pressure gas channeling in the cemented annulus to be controlled

    SciTech Connect

    Porcevaux, P. A.; Piot, B. M.; Vercaemer, C. J.

    1985-08-27

    The invention relates to cement compositions for cementing wells, which allow pressure gas-channeling to be effectively controlled up to more than about 485 F. The cement composition contains a styrene-butadiene latex and a stabilizer. The film of latex interrupts gas-channeling after an extremely brief path.

  6. Rubber cement poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... common household glue. It is often used for arts and crafts projects. Breathing in large amounts of rubber cement fumes or swallowing any amount can be extremely dangerous, especially for a small child. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  7. Preliminary systems design study assessment report. [Evaluation of using specific technologies, system concepts for treating the buried waste and surrounding contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, J.L.; Feizollahi, F.; Del Signore, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The System Design Study (SDS), part of the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examined techniques available for the remediation of hazardous and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex's Subsurface Disposal Area at the INEL. Using specific technologies, system concepts for treating the buried waste and the surrounding contaminated soil were evaluated. Evaluation included implementability, effectiveness, and cost. The SDS resulted in the development of technology requirements including demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities needed for implementing each. This volume contains the descriptions and other relevant information of the four subsystems required for most of the ex situ processing systems. This volume covers the metal decontamination and sizing subsystem, soils processing subsystem, low-level waste subsystem, and retrieval subsystem.

  8. [Adhesive strengths of cast crowns with various types of cements].

    PubMed

    Utz, K H; Grüner, M; Büscher, M

    1990-12-01

    In an in vitro study the adhesive strength of sand-blasted castings (gold alloy) was tested on human teeth prepared and finished in different ways. For cementation we used two glass ionomer and one phosphate cement. On the surfaces treated with carbide finishing instruments the force required for separating the crown from the tooth was about 1.9 N/mm2 for Ketac-cem, about 2 N/mm2 for Fuji Ionomer, and about 1.8 N/mm2 for Harvard (a zinc oxide phosphate cement). Compared with this, the values obtained for dentin surfaces pretreated with fine diamonds (red ring) were 1.5 N/mm2 for Ketac-cem, 1.6 N/mm2 for Fuji Ionomer, and 1.9 N/mm2 for Harvard. The measured differences between the various types of cement were statistically not significant. PMID:2135267

  9. Preliminary Systems Design Study assessment report. [Evaluation of using specific technologies, system concepts for treating the buried waste and the surrounding contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, J.L.; Feizollahi, F.; Del Signore, J.C.

    1991-11-01

    The System Design Study (SDS), part of the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examined techniques available for the remediation of hazardous and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex's Subsurface Disposal Area at the INEL. Using specific technologies, system concepts for treating the buried waste and the surrounding contaminated soil were evaluated. Evaluation included implementability, effectiveness, and cost. The SDS resulted in the development of technology requirements including demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities needed for implementing each concept.

  10. DETAILED ANALYSIS OF THE MOST PROMISING ALTERNATIVES TO USING GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TO TREAT 200-ZP-1 GROUNDWATER AND 200-PW-1 SOIL VAPOR

    SciTech Connect

    BYRNES ME, KALMAR JA

    2007-11-26

    This document presents a detailed evaluation of selected alternative treatment options to granular activated carbon (GAC) for removing carbon tetrachloride generated from the groundwater pump-and-treat system at the 200-ZP-I Operable Unit (OU) in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This evaluation of alternative treatment options to GAC is also applicable to the vadose zone soil vapor extraction (SVE) system at the 200-PW-l OU, which is also located in the Hanford Site's 200 West Area.

  11. Comparison of soil amendments to decrease high strength in SE USA Coastal Plain soils using fuzzy decision-making analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cemented subsurface layers restrict root growth in many southeastern USA Coastal Plain soils. Though cementation is usually reduced by tillage, soil amendments can offer a more permanent solution if they develop aggregation. To increase aggregation, we amended 450 g of a Norfolk soil blend of 90% E ...

  12. Removal of Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions using native and acid treated Ni-hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum discolor from Turkish serpentine soil.

    PubMed

    Bayramoglu, Gulay; Arica, M Yakup; Adiguzel, Nezaket

    2012-09-01

    Alyssum discolor biomass was collected from serpentine soil and was used for removal of metal ions. The plant species grown on serpentine soils are known to be rich with metals ions and thus have more capability for accumulating heavy metals. Native and acid-treated biomass of A. discolor (A. discolor) were utilized for the removal of Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions from aqueous solutions. The effects of contact time, initial concentration, and pH on the biosorption of Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions were investigated. Biosorption equilibrium was established in about 60 min. The surface properties of the biomass preparations were varied with pH, and the maximum amounts of Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions on both A. discolor biomass preparations were adsorbed at pH 5.0. The maximum biosorption capacities of the native, and acid-treated biomass preparations for Ni(II) were 13.1 and 34.7 mgg(-1) and for Cu(II) 6.15 and 17.8 mgg(-1) dry biomass, respectively. The biosorption of Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions from single and binary component systems can be successfully described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. When the heavy metal ions were in competition, the amounts of biosorbed metal ions on the acid treated plant biomass were found to be 0.542 mmolg(-1) for Ni(II) and 0.162 mmolg(-1) for Cu(II), the A. discolor biomass was significantly selective for Ni(II) ions. The information gained from these studies was expected to indicate whether the native, and acid-treated forms can have the potential to be used for the removal and recovery of Ni(II) ions from wastewaters. PMID:22608134

  13. Mineral resource of the month: hydraulic cement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic cements are the binders in concrete and most mortars and stuccos. Concrete, particularly the reinforced variety, is the most versatile of all construction materials, and most of the hydraulic cement produced worldwide is portland cement or similar cements that have portland cement as a basis, such as blended cements and masonry cements. Cement typically makes up less than 15 percent of the concrete mix; most of the rest is aggregates. Not counting the weight of reinforcing media, 1 ton of cement will typically yield about 8 tons of concrete.

  14. Recovery of MSWI and soil washing residues as concrete aggregates.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Abbà, Alessandro; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to study if municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) residues and aggregates derived from contaminated soil washing could be used as alternative aggregates for concrete production. Initially, chemical, physical and geometric characteristics (according to UNI EN 12620) of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ashes and some contaminated soils were evaluated; moreover, the pollutants release was evaluated by means of leaching tests. The results showed that the reuse of pre-treated MSWI bottom ash and washed soil is possible, either from technical or environmental point of view, while it is not possible for the raw wastes. Then, the natural aggregate was partially and totally replaced with these recycled aggregates for the production of concrete mixtures that were characterized by conventional mechanical and leaching tests. Good results were obtained using the same dosage of a high resistance cement (42.5R calcareous Portland cement instead of 32.5R); the concrete mixture containing 400 kg/m(3) of washed bottom ash and high resistance cement was classified as structural concrete (C25/30 class). Regarding the pollutants leaching, all concrete mixtures respected the limit values according to the Italian regulation. PMID:20537523

  15. Degradation of atrazine by a novel Fenton-like process and assessment the influence on the treated soil.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Min; Zeng, Guangming; Huang, Danlian; Lai, Cui; Xu, Piao; Zhang, Chen; Liu, Yang; Wan, Jia; Gong, Xiaomin; Zhu, Yuan

    2016-07-15

    This is the premier study reporting the remediation of atrazine contaminated soil with steel converter slag (SCS) catalyzed Fenton-like process. The effects of various operating parameters, such as SCS loads and H2O2 concentrations were evaluated with respect to the removal efficiency of atrazine. Results show the optimal SCS load and H2O2 concentration were 80gkg(-1) and 10%, respectably. The graded modified Fenton's oxidation with a 3-time addition of 10% H2O2 was able to remove 93.7% of total atrazine in the contaminated soil and maintain soil temperature within 50°C. In contrast to traditional Fenton treatment, a slight pH increase has been observed due to the addition of SCS. More importantly, experiment conducted at natural conditions with SCS gave the similar atrazine removal to the experiments with the other catalysts (e.g., FeSO4 and Fe2O3). One thing should be noted that after the treatment, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content increased to 1.206gkg(-1) from an initial value of 0.339gkg(-1). PMID:27037472

  16. Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-11-30

    The Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project was a technical success and demonstrated the following: CKD can be used successfully as the sole reagent for removing SO2 from cement kiln flue gas, with removal efficiencies of 90 percent or greater; Removal efficiencies for HCl and VOCs were approximately 98 percent and 70 percent, respectively; Particulate emissions were low, in the range of 0.005 to 0.007 grains/standard cubic foot; The treated CKD sorbent can be recycled to the kiln after its potassium content has been reduced in the scrubber, thereby avoiding the need for landfilling; The process can yield fertilizer-grade K2SO4, a saleable by-product; and Waste heat in the flue gas can provide the energy required for evaporation and crystallization in the by-product recovery operation. The demonstration program established the feasibility of using the Recovery Scrubber{trademark} for desulfurization of flue gas from cement kilns, with generally favorable economics, assuming tipping fees are available for disposal of ash from biomass combustion. The process appears to be suitable for commercial use on any type of cement kiln. EPA has ruled that CKD is a nonhazardous waste, provided the facility meets Performance Standards for the Management of CKD (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1999d). Therefore, regulatory drivers for the technology focus more on reduction of air pollutants and pollution prevention, rather than on treating CKD as a hazardous waste. Application of the Recovery Scrubbe{trademark} concept to other waste-disposal operations, where pollution and waste reductions are needed, appears promising.

  17. US cement industry

    SciTech Connect

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Cementing oil and gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Bloys, J.B.; Wilson, W.N.; Bradshaw, R.D.

    1991-08-13

    This patent describes a method for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation to which a conduit extends, the wellbore having a space occupied by a fluid composition to be converted to cement for cementing the space to form a seal between spaced apart points in the formation. It comprises providing means for adding cementitious material and a dispersant to the fluid, circulating the fluid and adding the cementitious material and the dispersant to a quantity of the fluid in predetermined proportions to form a settable cement composition comprising a major portion of the drilling fluid in the well as it was drilled; and water; a lesser proportion of dry cementitious material; a minor amount of a dispersant that does not effect a satisfactory set cement within an acceptable time interval; and a compatible accelerator selected from the class consisting of acetic acid; the first four carbon esters thereof; and acedamide and filling the wellbore with the cement composition.

  19. Alkali burns from wet cement.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    When water is added to the dry materials of Portland cement calcium hydroxide is formed; the wet cement is caustic (with a pH as high as 12.9) and can produce third-degree alkali burns after 2 hours of contact. Unlike professional cement workers, amateurs are usually not aware of any danger and may stand or kneel in the cement for long periods. As illustrated in a case report, general physicians may recognize neither the seriousness of the injury in its early stages nor the significance of a history of prolonged contact with wet cement. All people working with cement should be warned about its dangers and advised to immediately wash and dry the skin if contact does occur. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6561052

  20. Prevention and treatment of bone cement-related complications in patients receiving percutaneous kyphoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kaining; Shen, Yingchun; Ren, Yanjun; Zou, Debo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is to investigate the complications and preventive measures of bone cement in percutaneous kyphoplasty for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 134 cases of osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture patients treated with percutaneous kyphoplasty, which involved 182 vertebral fractures, was performed. The bone cement-related complications, the reasons causing these complications, and the preventive measures were investigated. Results: Successful operation was performed in all patients. Operative bone cement toxic reaction occurred in 1 patient. Different degrees of leakage of bone cement were found in 21 patients with 25 fractures and 1 case needed operation treatment. During the long term follow-up, bone necrosis absorption and cement drifted away which needed operation treatment was found in 1 patient with vertebral fracture. Thirteen adjacent vertebral fractures were found in 11 patients and 10 patients underwent operation treatment again. Conclusions: With careful surgery, complications associated with bone cement could be greatly reduced. PMID:25932175

  1. Comparison of the fixation effects of heavy metals by cement rotary kiln co-processing and cement based solidification/stabilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junli; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Cheng; Jin, Yiying; Nie, Yongfeng; Li, Jinhui

    2009-06-15

    Cement rotary kiln co-processing of hazardous wastes and cement based solidification/stabilization could both immobilize heavy metals. The different retention mechanisms of the two technologies lead to different fixation effects of heavy metals. The same amount of heavy metal compounds were treated by the two types of fixation technologies. Long-term leaching test (160 days), the maximum availability leaching test (NEN 7341) and a modified three-step sequential extraction procedure, proposed by the Commission of the European Communities Bureau of Reference (BCR) were employed to compare the fixation effects of the two fixation technologies. The leaching concentrations in NEN 7341 and long-term leaching tests were compared with identification standard for hazardous wastes (GB5085.3-1996) and drinking water standard (GB5749-2005). The results indicate that the leaching concentrations of the long-term leaching test and NEN 7341 test were lower than the regulatory limits and the leached ratios were small. Both cement based solidification/stabilization and cement rotary kiln co-processing could effectively fix heavy metals. Calcination in a cement rotary kiln and the following hydration that follows during cement application could fix As, Cd, Pb and Zn more effectively and decrease the release to the environment. Cement solidification/stabilization technology has better effect in immobilizing Cr and Ni. Cr wastes are more fitful to be treated by cement solidification/stabilization. PMID:19091467

  2. Mineral of the month: cement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2006-01-01

    Hydraulic cement is a virtually ubiquitous construction material that, when mixed with water, serves as the binder in concrete and most mortars. Only about 13 percent of concrete by weight is cement (the rest being water and aggregates), but the cement contributes all of the concrete’s compressional strength. The term “hydraulic” refers to the cement’s ability to set and harden underwater through the hydration of the cement’s components.

  3. Cement penetration after patella venting.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher W; Lam, Li-On; Butler, Adam; Wood, David J; Walsh, William R

    2009-01-01

    There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement-bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration. Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or non-vented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DEXA scanning. In vented specimens, a 1.6 mm Kirschner wire was used to breach the anterior cortex at the center. Specimens were resurfaced with standard Profix instrumentation and Versabond bone cement (Smith and Nephew PLC, UK). Cement penetration was assessed from Faxitron and sectioned images by a digital image software package (ImageJ V1.38, NIH, USA). Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in cement penetration between groups. The relationship between BMD and cement penetration was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. There was a strong negative correlation between peak BMD and cement penetration when analyzed independent of experimental grouping (r(2)=-0.812, p=0.004). Wilcoxon rank sum testing demonstrated no significant difference (rank sum statistic W=27, p=0.579) in cement penetration between vented (10.53%+/-4.66; mean+/-std dev) and non-vented patellae (11.51%+/-6.23; mean+/-std dev). Venting the patella using a Kirschner wire does not have a significant effect on the amount of cement penetration achieved in vitro using Profix instrumentation and Versabond cement. PMID:19010682

  4. [Haemotoxicity of dental luting cements].

    PubMed

    Anders, A; Welker, D

    1989-06-01

    A glass ionomer luting cement (AquaCem) shows a relatively low haemolytic activity in comparison with two zinc phosphate cements. Especially the initial irritation by this cement is smaller. Although it is possible that AquaCem particularly, in unfavourable cases, may damage the pulpa dentin system; this is due to the slowly decrease of the haemolytic activity with increasing of the probes. We found that Adhesor showed in dependence of the batches a varying quality. PMID:2626769

  5. Hypoplastic model for simulation of compressibility characteristics of cement-admixed Bangkok soft clay at high water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattonjai, Piyachat

    2016-06-01

    The developed hypoplastic model for simulation of compressibility characteristics of cement-admixed Bangkok soft clay at high water content was proposed in this paper. By using unique equation, the model is able to predict the relationship between void ratio and vertical effective stress of different water and cement content of soil cement. For practically convenient utilization and understanding, the parameters of Q1 which represented to initial cement bonding of soil (the initial value of structure tensor at time = 0) and C2 which effected to the model stiffness on isotropic consolidation direction, at 45° for loading and 225° for unloading of stress response envelope, were proposed as the function of cement and water content by comparing with dry weight of soil. By numerical integration that satisfied one-dimensional settlement, the simulation results were directly compared with fifteen experimental results to verify the accuracy of the proposed model.

  6. Caustic reaction caused by cement.

    PubMed

    Rados, Jaka; Lipozencić, Jasna; Milavec-Puretić, Visnja

    2005-01-01

    A case is reported of a patient who developed full thickness chemical burns of the skin after a prolonged contact while working with wet cement. The history, course of disease, and therapy are described. Cement is an alkaline substance (pH >12) leading to colliquative necrosis. Tissue damage is due to the exothermic reaction of calcium oxide and water forming calcium hydroxide. Patch test was performed to test sensitization to chromium, chromate and cobalt, the usual cement ingredients. In our opinion, such lesions may not be rare because cement is widely used in construction, but are rarely described or under-recognized. PMID:16324425

  7. [Allergy to bone cement components].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Schuh, A; Eben, R; Thomsen, M

    2008-02-01

    Intolerance reactions to endoprostheses may lead to allergological diagnostics, which focus mainly on metal allergy. However, bone cement may also contain potential allergens, e.g. acrylates and additives such as benzoyl peroxide (BPO), N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine, hydroquinone, and antibiotics (particularly gentamicin). In the Munich implant allergy clinic, we found that 28 of 113 patients (24.8%) with cemented prostheses had contact allergies to bone cement components, mostly to gentamicin (16.8%) and BPO (8.0%). The clinical significance of test results cannot always be shown, but we still recommend including bone cement components in the allergological diagnostics of suspected hypersensitivity reactions to arthroplasty. PMID:18227996

  8. Speciality cements with advanced properties

    SciTech Connect

    Scheetz, B.E. ); Landers, A.G. ); Odler, I. ); Jennings, H. )

    1991-01-01

    The subject matter, specialty cements with advanced properties, highlight some of the recent progress in the non-standard cementitious systems. The topic was intended to be broad enough to include MDF and DSP cement, as well as phosphate-based and other binders. The response to this broad request resulted in a wide variational sampling of potential binder systems, which included calcium phosphates, magnesium phosphates, silica systems derived from sodium fluosilicates, stratlingite glasses, alkali-activated blended cements, and aluminophosphates. Presentations also addressed in depth, the underlying processing and fundamental insight into macro defect cements and DSP.

  9. Soil stabilization using oil shale solid wastes: Laboratory evaluation of engineering properties

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Oil shale solid wastes were evaluated for possible use as soil stabilizers. A laboratory study was conducted and consisted of the following tests on compacted samples of soil treated with water and spent oil shale: unconfined compressive strength, moisture-density relationships, wet-dry and freeze-thaw durability, and resilient modulus. Significant increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a silty sand with combusted western oil shale. Moderate increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a highly plastic clay with combusted western oil shale. Solid waste from eastern shale can be used for soil stabilization if limestone is added during combustion. Without limestone, eastern oil shale waste exhibits little or no cementation. The testing methods, results, and recommendations for mix design of spent shale-stabilized pavement subgrades are presented. 11 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Technogenic Magnetic Particles in Alkaline Dusts from Power and Cement Plants.

    PubMed

    Magiera, Tadeusz; Gołuchowska, Beata; Jabłońska, Mariola

    2013-01-01

    most dangerous to the environment. Stoichiometric analysis of micro-particles confirmed the presence of heavy metals such as Pb, Mn, Cd, and Zn connected with TMPs, which are carriers of magnetic signals in atmospheric dust. Therefore, in some cases, their presence in topsoil when detected by magnetic measurement can be treated as an indicator of inorganic soil contamination. PMID:23325986

  11. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  12. Effect of kiln dust from a cement factory on growth of Vicia faba L.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Ismet; Ozdilek, Hasan Göksel; Oztürk, Münir

    2012-04-01

    This study was undertaken to study the effects of different amounts of kiln dust mixed with soil on the seed germination, plant growth, leaf area and water content of Vicia faba cv. Eresen. The reason for this was that cement kiln dust generated as a by-product from the cement factories is rich in potassium, sulfate and other compounds. This product becomes a serious problem when it comes in contact with water. The dust was collected from a cement factory located in Canakkale. Various elements such as Al, Co, Mo, Ca, B, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, Se and Zn were determined both in soil as well as kiln dust. Kiln dust was mixed with soil in pots (20 cm diameter) to make seven different treatments varying from 15 to 105 g kiln dust kg(-1) of soil. The experiment lasted for 4 months. Seeds of V faba were sown in the pots filled with mixtures of preanalysed kiln dust and soil. Germination was high in the pots with a lower treatment of cement kiln dust. However, lower germination rates were observed in the pots mixed with the highest and the medium amounts of cement kiln dust. Plants growing in the soil including 15 g kiln dust showed better performance in length as compared to control. Leaf area increased with increase in cement kiln dust content up to 60 g kiln dust kg(-1) of soil, but declined after 75 g kg(-1). Water content of leaves (mg cm(-2) leaf area) was found to be constantly decreasing with respect to increasing cement kiln content in the pots. Differences between the averages were evaluated by Tukey test and results were found to be significant. PMID:23424859

  13. Germination and Seedling Growth of Perennial Ryegrass in Acid Sulfate Soil Treated by Pyrite Nano-Encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Kim, J.; Yi, J.; Kim, T.

    2007-05-01

    The trial pot experiment was conducted to validate the effect of encapsulation in reduction of acid rock drainage. Six different treatments were performed: A = control, four times spraying of distilled water; B = four times of 0.01 M H2O2; C = once-encapsulated and three times spraying of distilled water; D = twice-encapsulated and twice spraying of distilled water; E = three times-encapsulated and once spraying of distilled water and F = four times-encapsulated for the acid sulfate soil with pyrite bearing andesite powder and sand. After the encapsulation treatment, the perennial ryegrass (Loium perenne) was sowed to evaluate germination rate and growth for three months. The leachate was examined for the chemical properties. The leachate from the A pot (control) is characterized as acidic (pH below 3) and high concentrations of SO4-2: 12,022 mg/L, Al: 85.8 mg/L and Mn: 34.1 mg/L which can be toxic effect to the plant growth. However, the leachate from encapsulated pots showed near neutral (pH 6 to 7) and low concentrations of SO4-2 (below 3,000 mg/L), Al (below 45mg/L) and Mn (24 gm/L). The frequency of encapsulation treatment is related to reduction of acidic drainage. It was hard to identify the significant difference of the seed germination rate of ryegrass between the treatments, although root and shoot growth showed three times difference between the control (1.90g/pot) and four times encapsulated treatment (6.33g/pot) after 2 month growth. It is suggested that encapsulation of pyrite in acid sulfate soil causes the reduction of acidic drainage resulting in the higher growth of herbaceous plants.

  14. An Ice Block: A Novel Technique of Successful Prevention of Cement Leakage Using an Ice Ball

    SciTech Connect

    Uri, Ishaq Fahmi; Garnon, Julien Tsoumakidou, Georgia Gangi, Afshin

    2015-04-15

    We report three cases of painful bone metastases with extraosseous invasion treated with cementoplasty and cryoablation. Due to significant cortical loss in all cases, the ice ball was used simultaneously during cementoplasty to deter potential cement leakage. This was achieved by direct application of the ice ball against the cortical surface, resulting in adequate consolidation and successful containment of the cement within the treated bones. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report to describe such a combined technique.

  15. An ice block: a novel technique of successful prevention of cement leakage using an ice ball.

    PubMed

    Uri, Ishaq Fahmi; Garnon, Julien; Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Gangi, Afshin

    2015-04-01

    We report three cases of painful bone metastases with extraosseous invasion treated with cementoplasty and cryoablation. Due to significant cortical loss in all cases, the ice ball was used simultaneously during cementoplasty to deter potential cement leakage. This was achieved by direct application of the ice ball against the cortical surface, resulting in adequate consolidation and successful containment of the cement within the treated bones. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report to describe such a combined technique. PMID:25280953

  16. Prediction of zeolite-cement-sand unconfined compressive strength using polynomial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MolaAbasi, H.; Shooshpasha, I.

    2016-04-01

    The improvement of local soils with cement and zeolite can provide great benefits, including strengthening slopes in slope stability problems, stabilizing problematic soils and preventing soil liquefaction. Recently, dosage methodologies are being developed for improved soils based on a rational criterion as it exists in concrete technology. There are numerous earlier studies showing the possibility of relating Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) and Cemented sand (CS) parameters (voids/cement ratio) as a power function fits. Taking into account the fact that the existing equations are incapable of estimating UCS for zeolite cemented sand mixture (ZCS) well, artificial intelligence methods are used for forecasting them. Polynomial-type neural network is applied to estimate the UCS from more simply determined index properties such as zeolite and cement content, porosity as well as curing time. In order to assess the merits of the proposed approach, a total number of 216 unconfined compressive tests have been done. A comparison is carried out between the experimentally measured UCS with the predictions in order to evaluate the performance of the current method. The results demonstrate that generalized polynomial-type neural network has a great ability for prediction of the UCS. At the end sensitivity analysis of the polynomial model is applied to study the influence of input parameters on model output. The sensitivity analysis reveals that cement and zeolite content have significant influence on predicting UCS.

  17. Advanced cement solidification system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, T.; Kuribayashi, H.; Todo, F.

    1993-12-31

    In order to easily and economically store and transport radioactive waste generated at nuclear power stations, it is essential to reduce the waste volume to the maximum extent. It is also necessary to transform the waste into a stable form for final disposal which will maintain its chemical and physical stability over a long period of time. For this purpose, the Advanced Cement Solidification Process (AC-process) was developed. The AC-process, which utilizes portland cement, can be applied to several kinds of waste such as boric acid waste, laboratory drain waste, incineration ash and spent ion exchange resin. In this paper, the key point of the AC-process, the pretreatment concept for each waste, is described. The AC-process has been adopted for two Japanese PWR stations: the Genkai Nuclear Power Station (Kyushu Electric Power Co.) and the Ikata Nuclear Power Station (Shikoku Electric Power Co.). Construction work has almost finished and commissioning tests are under way at both power stations.

  18. Radioactive bone cement for the treatment of spinal metastases: a dosimetric analysis of simulated clinical scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, T. S.; Sehgal, V.; Skinner, H. B.; Al-Ghazi, M. S. A. L.; Ramsinghani, N. S.; Marquez Miranda, M.; Keyak, J. H.

    2012-07-01

    Vertebral metastases are a common manifestation of many cancers, potentially leading to vertebral collapse and neurological complications. Conventional treatment often involves percutaneous vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty followed by external beam radiation therapy. As a more convenient alternative, we have introduced radioactive bone cement, i.e. bone cement incorporating a radionuclide. In this study, we used a previously developed Monte Carlo radiation transport modeling method to evaluate dose distributions from phosphorus-32 radioactive cement in simulated clinical scenarios. Isodose curves were generally concentric about the surface of bone cement injected into cadaveric vertebrae, indicating that dose distributions are relatively predictable, thus facilitating treatment planning (cement formulation and dosimetry method are patent pending). Model results indicated that a therapeutic dose could be delivered to tumor/bone within ∼4 mm of the cement surface while maintaining a safe dose to radiosensitive tissue beyond this distance. This therapeutic range should be sufficient to treat target volumes within the vertebral body when tumor ablation or other techniques are used to create a cavity into which the radioactive cement can be injected. With further development, treating spinal metastases with radioactive bone cement may become a clinically useful and convenient alternative to the conventional two-step approach of percutaneous strength restoration followed by radiotherapy.

  19. Effects of composition and exposure on the solar reflectance of Portland Cement Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem

    2002-06-01

    Increasing the solar reflectance (albedo) of a paved surface keeps it cooler in the sun, reducing convection of heat from pavement to air and thereby decreasing the ambient air temperature. Lower air temperatures decrease demand for cooling energy and slow the formation of urban smog. Variations with composition and environmental exposure of the albedos of portland cement concrete pavements were investigated through laboratory fabrication and exposure of 32 mixes of concrete. Concrete albedo generally correlated with cement albedo and sand albedo and, after abrasion, with rock albedo. Cement albedo had a disproportionately strong influence on the reflectance of concrete. Simulated weathering, soiling, and abrasion each reduced average concrete albedo, though some samples became slightly more reflective through weathering or soiling. Concrete albedo grew as the cement hydration reaction progressed, but stabilized within six weeks of casting.

  20. Mapping the depth to ice-cemented ground in the high elevation Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinova, M.; McKay, C. P.; Heldmann, J. L.; Davila, A. F.; Andersen, D. T.; Jackson, A.; Lacelle, D.; Paulsen, G.; Pollard, W. H.; Zacny, K.

    2011-12-01

    The high elevation Dry Valleys of Antarctica provide a unique location for the study of permafrost distribution and stability. In particular, the extremely arid and cold conditions preclude the presence of liquid water, and the exchange of water between the ice-cemented ground and the atmosphere is through vapour transport (diffusion). In addition, the low atmospheric humidity results in the desiccation of the subsurface, forming a dry permafrost layer (i.e., cryotic soils which are dry and not ice-cemented). Weather data suggests that subsurface ice is unstable under current climatic conditions. Yet we do find ice-cemented ground in these valleys. This contradiction provides insight into energy balance modeling, vapour transport, and additional climate effects which stabilize subsurface ice. To study the driving factors in the stability and distribution of ice-cemented ground, we have extensively mapped the depth to ice-cemented ground in University Valley (1730 m; 77°S 51.8', 160°E 43'), and three neighbouring valleys in the Beacon Valley area. We measured the depth to ice-cemented ground at 15-40 locations per valley by digging soil pits and drilling until ice was reached; for each location 3-5 measurements within a ~1 m2 area were averaged (see figure). This high-resolution mapping of the depth to ice-cemented ground provides new insight on the distribution and stability of subsurface ice, and shows significant variability in the depth to ground ice within each valley. We are combining data from mapping the depth to ice-cemented ground with year-round, in situ measurements of the atmospheric and subsurface conditions, such as temperature, humidity, wind, and light, to model the local stability of ice-cemented ground. We are using this dataset to examine the effects of slopes, shading, and soil properties, as well as the suggested importance of snow recurrence, to better understand diffusion-controlled subsurface ice stability.

  1. Nutrient, metal and microbial loss in surface runoff following treated sludge and dairy cattle slurry application to an Irish grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Peyton, D P; Healy, M G; Fleming, G T A; Grant, J; Wall, D; Morrison, L; Cormican, M; Fenton, O

    2016-01-15

    Treated municipal sewage sludge ("biosolids") and dairy cattle slurry (DCS) may be applied to agricultural land as an organic fertiliser. This study investigates losses of nutrients in runoff water (nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)), metals (copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr)), and microbial indicators of pollution (total and faecal coliforms) arising from the land application of four types of treated biosolids and DCS to field micro-plots at three time intervals (24, 48, 360 h) after application. Losses from biosolids-amended plots or DCS-amended plots followed a general trend of highest losses occurring during the first rainfall event and reduced losses in the subsequent events. However, with the exception of total and faecal coliforms and some metals (Ni, Cu), the greatest losses were from the DCS-amended plots. For example, average losses over the three rainfall events for dissolved reactive phosphorus and ammonium-nitrogen from DCS-amended plots were 5 and 11.2 mg L(-1), respectively, which were in excess of the losses from the biosolids plots. When compared with slurry treatments, for the parameters monitored biosolids generally do not pose a greater risk in terms of losses along the runoff pathway. This finding has important policy implications, as it shows that concern related to the reuse of biosolids as a soil fertiliser, mainly related to contaminant losses upon land application, may be unfounded. PMID:26410697

  2. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  3. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  4. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  5. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  6. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  7. Epigeal fauna of a degraded soil treated with mineral fertilizer and compound cellulose cultivated of tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giácomo, R. G.; de Arruda, O. G.; Souto Filho, S. N.; Alves, M. C.; Pereira, M. G.; Frigério, G. C.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of the epigeal fauna in a degraded soil in the recovery process after one year of cultivated with tree species. The experiment was established in February 2010 in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. The experimental design was randomized blocks in split plots with five treatments and four replications. In the main plots, pure cultivation of Eucalyptus urograndis (exotic species - hybrids) and Mabea fistulifera Mart. (native species) and the subplot treatments: Control; D0 - without fertilization; DM - mineral fertilizer according to crop need; DC - with compost manure according to crop need (10 t ha-1); D15 - 15 t ha-1 and D20 - 20 t ha-1 of the compound. In February of the years 2010 and 2011 were installed in the central region of each treatment two traps "pitt fall" which remained for seven days in the field. We calculated Shannon diversity and Pielou evenness indices, and richness of wildlife activity groups. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Scott Knott test at 5% significance level. In 2010, the area with M. fistulifera, was captured a total of 2697 organisms distributed mainly in: Hymenoptera with 45.83% of the total collected, Collembola (36.93%), Hemiptera Heteroptera (6.56%). In the area with E. urograndis, 1938 organisms were captured, being 50.67% of the order Hymenoptera, Collembola 26.83%, 7.59% Hemiptera Heteroptera. It was found that there was no significant difference between treatments and between species for all variables. Collected in 2011 were 4970 organisms in 56.22% of the order Hymenoptera, Collembola 18.49% and 7.12% beetle in the area of M. fistulifera. In the area of E. urograndis were 4200 organisms, 55.29% (Hymenoptera), 23.79% (Collembola) and 5.86% (Coleoptera). It appears that the activity values and richness of the fauna groups were significantly higher in treatments with organic fertilization in both cultive. It is concluded that after one year there was a variation of the dominant

  8. Resin cementation of zirconia ceramics with different bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akay, Canan; Karakış, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different chemical bonding agents on shear bond strength of zirconia and conventional resin cement. In this study, 35 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: control; Group II: sandblasting; Group III: sandblasting + Monobond S; Group IV: sandblasting + Monobond Plus; Group V: sandblasting + Z-Prime Plus. The specimens in each group were bonded with conventional composite resin cement Variolink II. After cementation, specimens were stored in distilled water (at 37 °C) for 24 h and shear test was performed. The highest shear bond strength values were observed in Groups IV and V. The lowest shear bond strength values were observed in Group I. Using 10-methacryloyloxy-decyl dihydrogenphosphate monomer-containing priming agents, e.g. Monobond Plus and Z-PRIME Plus, combined with sandblasting can be an effective method for resin bonding of zirconia restorations. PMID:26019653

  9. Cementing porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns.

    PubMed

    Vadachkoria, D

    2009-12-01

    The clinical success of fixed prosthodontic restorations can be complex and involve multifaceted procedures. Preparation design, oral hygiene/micro flora, mechanical forces, and restorative materials are only a few of the factors which contribute to overall success. One key factor to success is choosing the proper cement. Popular use of cements for PFM crowns has shifted from zinc phosphate and glass ionomer cements to resin-reinforced glass ionomer, or RRGI, cements. This change has been rapid and profound. Dental cements have always been less than ideal materials, but this is shift to the relatively new RRGI category justified. Resin-reinforced glass ionomer (RRGI) cements appear to be better than zinc phosphate and glass ionomer cements when placing porcelain-to-metal crowns. RRGI cements, such as RelyX Luting, Fuji Plus and Vitremer Luting Cement, satisfy more of the ideal characteristics of PFM cementation than any other previous cement. Expansion of all three cements has not caused any apparent problems with the cements when used with PFM or metal crowns, but these cements, however, should be avoided when cementing all-ceramic crowns. PMID:20090144

  10. Graphite-reinforced bone cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    Chopped graphite fibers added to surgical bone cement form bonding agent with mechanical properties closely matched to those of bone. Curing reaction produces less heat, resulting in reduced traumatization of body tissues. Stiffness is increased without affecting flexural strength.

  11. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Eilers, L. H.

    1985-12-03

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight monoor copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  12. Magnesium substitution in brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Cabrejos-Azama, Jatsue; Rodríguez, Carmen Rueda; Jerez, Luis Blanco; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnesium-doped ceramics has been described to modify brushite cements and improve their biological behavior. However, few studies have analyzed the efficiency of this approach to induce magnesium substitution in brushite crystals. Mg-doped ceramics composed of Mg-substituted β-TCP, stanfieldite and/or farringtonite were reacted with primary monocalcium phosphate (MCP) in the presence of water. The cement setting reaction has resulted in the formation of brushite and newberyite within the cement matrix. Interestingly, the combination of SAED and EDX analyses of single crystal has indicated the occurrence of magnesium substitution within brushite crystals. Moreover, the effect of magnesium ions on the structure, and mechanical and setting properties of the new cements was characterized as well as the release of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions. Further research would enhance the efficiency of the system to incorporate larger amounts of magnesium ions within brushite crystals. PMID:25428098

  13. Arsenic encapsulation using Portland cement with ferrous sulfate/lime and Terra-Bond™ technologies - Microcharacterization and leaching studies.

    PubMed

    Randall, Paul M

    2012-03-15

    This work reports the results of an investigation on the treatment and encapsulation of arsenic-containing materials by Portland cement with ferrous sulfate and lime (PFL) and Terra-Bond™, a commercially available patented technology. The arsenic materials included: chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood materials; scorodite-rich mine tailings from the La Trinidad Mine in California; and a soil/smelter dust mixture from the Anaconda Superfund site spiked with monosodium methyl arsenate (MSMA) to simulate an organoarsenic soil material. SEM/EDS and XRD spectra of PFL treated samples showed similarity across all three waste materials while Terra-Bond treated samples showed predominance of elemental sulfur. SEM/EDS of PFL treated samples showed that calcium was imbedded in the structure while micrographs of Terra-Bond treated samples showed the appearance of an epoxy material on the surface. The epoxy material appears to be responsible for encapsulating and reducing the leachability of arsenic. XANES spectra for the PFL treatment of CCA-containing samples showed that arsenic has a predominant pentavalent form (As +5), and the PFL treatment process did not alter the arsenic oxidation state. But, distinct differences were observed for XANES spectra of untreated and PFL treated scorodite-rich mine tailing which changed the arsenic coordination structure from a mixture of As (+3/+5) to exclusively As (+5). Both S/S techniques reduced the amount of arsenic released in the leaching tests. Most cases show lower amounts of arsenic released from wastes treated by the Terra-Bond™ technique when compared to the PFL technique. The pH of the solution significantly affected the leachability, with the amount of arsenic released increasing with pH. Sequential extraction results indicate that sodium hydroxide was favorable in releasing arsenic in the mine tailings. This is due to ligand displacement reactions of hydroxyl ions with arsenic species and high pH conditions that

  14. Solubility of cobalt in cement.

    PubMed

    Fregert, S; Gruvberger, B

    1978-02-01

    Unlike chromate, cobalt occurring as cobalt oxides in cement is not water-soluble in a detectable amount. Cobalt oxides are to some extent soluble in the presence of amino acids with which cobalt forms complexes. Such complexes can elicit patch test reactions. It is postulated that cobalt is more readily dissolved by forming complexes in eczematous skin than in normal skin. This may explain why cobalt sensitization in cement eczemas is secondary to chromate sensitivity. PMID:657784

  15. Durability of Cement Composites Reinforced with Sisal Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianqiang

    understanding of degradation mechanisms, two approaches are proposed to mitigate the degradation of sisal fiber in the cement matrix. In order to relieve the aggressive environment of hydrated cement, cement substitution by a combination of metakaolin and nanoclay, and a combination of rice husk ash and limestone are studied. Both metakaolin and nanoclay significantly optimize the cement hydration, while the combination of these two supplementary cementitious materials validates their complementary and synergistic effect at different stages of aging. The presented approaches effectively reduce the calcium hydroxide content and the alkalinity of the pore solution, thereby mitigating the fiber degradation and improving both the initial mechanical properties and durability of the fiber-cement composites. The role of rice husk ash in cement modification is mainly as the active cementitious supplementary material. In order to improve the degradation resistance of sisal fiber itself, two novel, simple, and economical pretreatments of the fibers (thermal and sodium carbonate treatment) are investigated. Both thermal treatment and Na 2CO3 treatment effectively improve the durability of sisal fiber-reinforced concrete. The thermal treatment achieves improvement of cellulose's crystallization, which ensures the initial strength and improved durability of sisal fiber. A layer consisting of calcium carbonate sediments, which protects the internals of a fiber from the strong alkali pore solution, is formed and filled in pits and cavities on the Na2CO3 treated sisal fiber's surface.

  16. Effect of vacuum-treatment on deformation properties of PMMA bone cement.

    PubMed

    Zivic, Fatima; Babic, Miroslav; Grujovic, Nenad; Mitrovic, Slobodan; Favaro, Gregory; Caunii, Mihaela

    2012-01-01

    Deformation behavior of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is explored using microindentation. Two types of PMMA bone cement were prepared. Vacuum treated samples were subjected to the degassing of the material under vacuum of 270 mbar for 35 s, followed by the second degassing under vacuum of 255 mbar for 35 s. Air-cured samples were left in ambient air to cool down and harden. All samples were left to age for 6 months before the test. The samples were then subjected to the indentation fatigue test mode, using sharp Vickers indenter. First, loading segment rise time was varied in order to establish time-dependent behavior of the samples. Experimental data showed that viscous part of the deformation can be neglected under the observed test conditions. The second series of microindentation tests were realized with variation of number of cycles and indentation hardness and modulus were obtained. Approximate hardness was also calculated using analysis of residual impression area. Porosity characteristics were analyzed using CellC software. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that air-cured bone cement exhibited significant number of large voids made of aggregated PMMA beads accompanied by particles of the radiopaque agent, while vacuum treated samples had homogeneous structure. Air-cured samples exhibited variable hardness and elasticity modulus throughout the material. They also had lower hardness values (approximately 65-100 MPa) than the vacuum treated cement (approximately 170 MPa). Porosity of 5.1% was obtained for vacuum treated cement and 16.8% for air-cured cement. Extensive plastic deformation, microcracks and craze whitening were produced during indentation of air-cured bone cement, whereas vacuum treated cement exhibited no cracks and no plastic deformation. PMID:22100087

  17. Hard-pan soils - Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hard pans, hard layers, or compacted horizons, either surface or subsurface, are universal problems that limit crop production. Hard layers can be caused by traffic or soil genetic properties that result in horizons with high density or cemented soil particles; these horizons have elevated penetrati...

  18. Quality improvement of photopolimerizable-cement root canal obturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupato Conrado, Luis A.; Frois, Iris M.; Amaro Zangaro, Renato; Munin, Egberto; Kuranaga, Carlos; Dias da Silva, Marcos; do Carmo de Andrade Nono, Maria; Cerquiera Rezende, Mirabel

    2003-06-01

    The sealing cements commonly used for endodontic applications are of the type cured through chemical reactions. During the polymerization process, mechanical contractions are not uncommon, leading to a non-perfect sealing. Photopolymerizable cements usually presents superior performance as compared to those chemically activated. However, difficulties in carrying the light to difficult-to-reach regions like the dental apex preclude those material of being accepted in the dental office routine. This work reports on a novel technique which allow the light curing of photopolymerizable cements in endodontic applications. A special light guide had been developed to allow the curing light to reach and polymerize the sealing cement in the apex region. The technique was tested by using single-root human teeth with normal canal morphology. The Ultradent EndoREZ root canal sealer and a resin-based photopolymerizable filler specially developed for the current application had been used. The cone-shaped light guide was introduced into treated canals filled with the photopolymerizable material, up to the apical region. Light from an argon laser was launched onto the light guide for polymerization. All test samples were immersed in methylene-blue solution for microleakage testing. All samples treated with the self-polymerizable material presented dye penetration to some extent. No sample within the group which had the filling material polymerized by using the light guide presented dye penetration through the canal wall.

  19. Method for treating materials for solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Martin, H.L.

    1995-07-18

    A method is described for treating materials such as wastes for solidification to form a solid, substantially nonleachable product. Addition of reactive silica rather than ordinary silica to the material when bringing the initial molar ratio of its silica constituent to a desired ratio within a preselected range increases the solubility and retention of the materials in the solidified matrix. Materials include hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and heavy metal species. Amounts of other constituents of the material, in addition to its silica content are also added so that the molar ratio of each of these constituents is within the preselected ranges for the final solidified product. The mixture is then solidified by cement solidification or vitrification. The method can be used to treat a variety of wastes, including but not limited to spent filter aids from waste water treatment, waste sludges, combinations of spent filter aids and waste sludges, combinations of supernate and waste sludges, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, combinations of incinerator ash and offgas blowdown, cementitious wastes and contaminated soils. 4 figs.

  20. Method for treating materials for solidification

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Martin, Hollis L.

    1995-01-01

    A method for treating materials such as wastes for solidification to form a solid, substantially nonleachable product. Addition of reactive silica rather than ordinary silica to the material when bringing the initial molar ratio of its silica constituent to a desired ratio within a preselected range increases the solubility and retention of the materials in the solidified matrix. Materials include hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and heavy metal species. Amounts of other constituents of the material, in addition to its silica content are also added so that the molar ratio of each of these constituents is within the preselected ranges for the final solidified product. The mixture is then solidified by cement solidification or vitrification. The method can be used to treat a variety of wastes, including but not limited to spent filter aids from waste water treatment, waste sludges, combinations of spent filter aids and waste sludges, combinations of supernate and waste sludges, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, combinations of incinerator ash and offgas blowdown, cementitious wastes and contaminated soils.

  1. Development of Multiple Cement Mixture and Its Applied Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Li, Qiaoling; Liu, Feng; Liu, Shipeng

    Currently, materials used to backfill grooves in municipal pipeline projects are pure soil and lime earth generally. Besides, punning or rolling compaction is used. Thus, it is difficult to compact or tamp haunches under pipes. Because of immersion of surface water and activities of underground water and as water inside pipes or underground structures leaks outward, fine-grained soil in backfill move with activities of underground water and collapse is caused for ground. This thesis mainly introduces multiple cement mixture and its performance.

  2. Cemented femoral fixation: the North Atlantic divide.

    PubMed

    Murray, David W

    2011-09-01

    In the United Kingdom, more cemented than cementless stems are implanted, whereas in North America, few cemented stems are implanted. This is primarily because cemented stems have not performed well in North America, whereas they have in the United Kingdom, as different designs have been used. The majority of cemented stems used in the United Kingdom are polished, collarless, and tapered. These are forgiving, as they subside within the cement mantle and compress the cement and stabilize the interface. They perform well in both young and active patients and elderly patients. They also do well in osteoporotic bone, with deformity, or with suboptimal cementing techniques. As the position of the stem can be varied, it is simple to achieve appropriate leg length, offset, and version. Cement can be used to deliver antibiotics locally. If revision is necessary, it is relatively straightforward. Cement has numerous advantages that outweigh the main disadvantage of an extended operating time. PMID:21902131

  3. Manufacture and properties of fluoride cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malata-Chirwa, Charles David

    This research work aimed at characterising composition, hydration and physical properties of fluoride cement, by studying samples of the cement obtained from Malawi, and comparing them to ordinary Portland cement. By confirming the suitable characteristics of fluoride cement through this work, the results of the research work provide a good basis for the wider adoption of fluoride cement as an alternative to ordinary Portland cement, especially in developing economies. Numerous accounts have been cited regarding the production and use of fluoride cement. Since there have not been conclusive agreement as to its properties, this study was limited to the theories of successful incorporation of fluoride compounds in the manufacture of fluoride cement. Hence, the properties and characteristics reported in this study relate to the cement currently manufactured in Malawi, and, on a comparative basis only, to that manufactured in other parts of the world. Samples of the fluoride cement used in the study were obtained by synthetic manufacture of the cement using common raw materials for the manufacture of fluoride cement that is limestone, silica sand, and fluorspar. These samples were subjected to several comparative tests used to characterise cements including examination under x-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy and tests for setting time and compressive strength. Under similar laboratory conditions, it was possible to prove that fluoride cement hardens more rapidly than ordinary Portland cement. Also observed during the experimental work is that fluoride cement develops higher compressive strengths than ordinary Portland cement. The hardening and setting times are significantly different between the two cements. Also the nature of the hydration products, that is the microstructural development is significantly different in the two cements. The differences brought about between the two cements are because of the presence of fluorine during the clinkering

  4. Amelioration of acidic soil using various renewable waste resources.

    PubMed

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Chang, Yoon-Young; Ok, Yong Sik; Cheong, Kyung Hoon; Koutsospyros, Agamemnon; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, improvement of acidic soil with respect to soil pH and exchangeable cations was attempted for sample with an initial pH of approximately 5. Acidic soil was amended with various waste resources in the range of 1 to 5 wt.% including waste oyster shells (WOS), calcined oyster shells (COS), Class C fly ash (FA), and cement kiln dust (CKD) to improve soil pH and exchangeable cations. Upon treatment, the soil pH was monitored for periods up to 3 months. The exchangeable cations were measured after 1 month of curing. After a curing period of 1 month, a maize growth experiment was conducted with selected-treated samples to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment. The treatment results indicate that in order to increase the soil pH to a value of 7, 1 wt.% of WOS, 3 wt.% of FA, and 1 wt.% of CKD are required. In the case of COS, 1 wt.% was more than enough to increase the soil pH value to 7 because of COS's strong alkalinity. Moreover, the soil pH increases after a curing period of 7 days and remains virtually unchanged thereafter up to 1 month of curing. Upon treatment, the summation of cations (Ca, Mg, K, and Na) significantly increased. The growth of maize is superior in the treated samples rather than the untreated one, indicating that the amelioration of acidic soil is beneficial to plant growth, since soil pH was improved and nutrients were replenished. PMID:24078235

  5. Influence of Thermal Treatment Conditions on the Properties of Dental Silicate Cements.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Georgeta; Popa, Alexandru Mihai; Badanoiu, Alina Ioana; Iordache, Florin

    2016-01-01

    In this study the sol-gel process was used to synthesize a precursor mixture for the preparation of silicate cement, also called mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cement. This mixture was thermally treated under two different conditions (1400 °C/2 h and 1450 °C/3 h) followed by rapid cooling in air. The resulted material (clinker) was ground for one hour in a laboratory planetary mill (v = 150 rot/min), in order to obtain the MTA cements. The setting time and mechanical properties, in vitro induction of apatite formation by soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) and cytocompatibility of the MTA cements were assessed in this study. The hardening processes, nature of the reaction products and the microstructural characteristics were also investigated. The anhydrous and hydrated cements were characterized by different techniques e.g., X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermal analysis (DTA-DTG-TG). The setting time of the MTA cement obtained by thermal treatment at 1400 °C/2 h (MTA1) was 55 min and 15 min for the MTA cement obtained at 1450 °C/3 h (MTA2). The compressive strength values were 18.5 MPa (MTA1) and 22.9 MPa (MTA2). Both MTA cements showed good bioactivity (assessed by an in vitro test), good cytocompatibility and stimulatory effect on the proliferation of cells. PMID:26901185

  6. Effects of Using Pozzolan and Portland Cement in the Treatment of Dispersive Clay

    PubMed Central

    Vakili, A. H.; Selamat, M. R.; Moayedi, H.

    2013-01-01

    Use of dispersive clay as construction material requires treatment such as by chemical addition. Treatments to dispersive clay using pozzolan and Portland cement, singly and simultaneously, were carried out in this study. When used alone, the optimum amount of pozzolan required to treat a fully dispersive clay sample was 5%, but the curing time to reduce dispersion potential, from 100% to 30% or less, was 3 month long. On the other hand, also when used alone, a 3% cement content was capable of reducing dispersion potential to almost zero percent in only 7 days; and a 2% cement content was capable of achieving similar result in 14 days. However, treatment by cement alone is costly and could jeopardize the long term performance. Thus, a combined 5% pozzolan and 1.5% cement content was found capable of reducing dispersion potential from 100% to zero percent in 14 days. The results indicate that although simultaneous treatment with pozzolan and cement would extend the required curing time in comparison to treatment by cement alone of a higher content, the task could still be carried out in a reasonable period of curing time while avoiding the drawbacks of using either pozzolan or cement alone. PMID:23864828

  7. Mechanical and In Vitro Biocompatibility of Brushite Cement Modified by Polyethylene Glycol.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mangal; Devoe, Ken; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2012-12-01

    Brushite (dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, DCPD) cement, owing to its high solubility in physiological condition and ability to guide new bone formation, is widely used to treat bone defects. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of poly ethylene glycol (PEG) addition on the setting time, compressive strength and in vitro biocompatibility of brushite cement. The brushite cements were prepared by mixing β-tricalcium phosphate [β-TCP, Ca(3)(PO(4))(2)] and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [MCPM, Ca(H(2)PO(4))(2). H(2)O]. PEG was introduced at 2.0 and 5.0 wt% with the liquid. Introduction of PEG resulted in marginal increase in both initial and final setting time; however, significantly affected the compressive strength. Effects of PEG incorporation on in vitro biocompatibility of brushite cements were studied by using human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB) cells. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images and immunohistochemical analysis indicated that pure and PEG incorporated brushite cement facilitates cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Fewer cells expressed vinculin protein with increased PEG content in the cement. Cell proliferation was found to decrease with increased PEG concentration while the cell differentiation increased with PEG content. Our results provide a better understanding of in vitro biocompatibility of PEG added brushite cements that can be used to customize the cement compositions based on application need. PMID:23139441

  8. Mechanical and In Vitro Biocompatibility of Brushite Cement Modified by Polyethylene Glycol

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Mangal; DeVoe, Ken; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2012-01-01

    Brushite (dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, DCPD) cement, owing to its high solubility in physiological condition and ability to guide new bone formation, is widely used to treat bone defects. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of poly ethylene glycol (PEG) addition on the setting time, compressive strength and in vitro biocompatibility of brushite cement. The brushite cements were prepared by mixing β-tricalcium phosphate [β-TCP, Ca3(PO4)2] and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [MCPM, Ca(H2PO4)2. H2O]. PEG was introduced at 2.0 and 5.0 wt% with the liquid. Introduction of PEG resulted in marginal increase in both initial and final setting time; however, significantly affected the compressive strength. Effects of PEG incorporation on in vitro biocompatibility of brushite cements were studied by using human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB) cells. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images and immunohistochemical analysis indicated that pure and PEG incorporated brushite cement facilitates cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Fewer cells expressed vinculin protein with increased PEG content in the cement. Cell proliferation was found to decrease with increased PEG concentration while the cell differentiation increased with PEG content. Our results provide a better understanding of in vitro biocompatibility of PEG added brushite cements that can be used to customize the cement compositions based on application need. PMID:23139441

  9. Performance study and influence of radiation emission energy and soil contamination level on γ-radiation shielding of stabilised/solidified radionuclide-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Falciglia, Pietro P; Puccio, Valentina; Romano, Stefano; Vagliasindi, Federico G A

    2015-05-01

    This work focuses on the stabilisation/solidification (S/S) of radionuclide-polluted soils at different (232)Th levels using Portland cement alone and with barite aggregates. The potential of S/S was assessed applying a full testing protocol and calculating γ-radiation shielding (γRS) index, that included the measurement of soil radioactivity before and after the S/S as a function of the emission energy and soil contamination level. The results indicate that setting processes are strongly dependent on the contaminant concentration, and for contamination level higher than 5%, setting time values longer than 72 h. The addition of barite aggregates to the cement gout leads to a slight improvement of the S/S performance in terms of durability and contaminant leaching but reduces the mechanical resistance of the treated soils samples. Barite addition also causes an increase in the γ-rays shielding properties of the S/S treatment up to about 20%. Gamma-ray measurements show that γRS strongly depends on the energy, and that the radioactivity with the contamination level was governed by a linear trend, while, γRS index does not depend on the radionuclide concentration. Results allow the calculated γRS values and those available from other experiments to be applied to hazard radioactive soil contaminations. PMID:25710096

  10. Cemented hemiarthroplasty in traumatic displaced femoral neck fractures and deep vein thrombosis: is there really a link?

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Choon Chiet; Nashi, Nazrul; Makandura, Milindu Chanaka; Krishna, Lingaraj

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Traumatic displaced femoral neck fractures in the elderly can be treated with cemented or uncemented hemiarthroplasty with good outcomes. Earlier studies reported a higher incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) associated with cemented prostheses in elective total hip or knee arthroplasty. In addition, the hypercoagulable state after a traumatic femoral neck fracture and possible thrombogenic properties of bone cement could put these patients at greater risk for thromboembolism. We aimed to compare the incidence of DVT and progression to pulmonary embolism (PE) or mortality in cemented and uncemented hemiarthroplasty. METHODS The data of 271 patients treated with cemented or uncemented hemiarthroplasty after a traumatic displaced femoral neck fracture was retrospectively analysed for the incidence of DVT. The level of thrombosis, progression to PE and mortality were compared. RESULTS There were 133 (49.1%) patients with cemented hemiarthroplasty, while 138 (50.9%) had uncemented hemiarthroplasty. The patients had an average age of 76.6 (range 53–99) years and 11 (4.1%) patients had DVT. There were no significant differences in development of DVT, level of thrombosis, PE and mortality regardless of whether a cemented or an uncemented prosthesis was used. CONCLUSION Cemented hemiarthroplasty is not associated with higher risks of DVT, PE or mortality in patients with traumatic displaced femoral neck fracture. Cemented prostheses can be safely used for this group of patients. PMID:26892829

  11. Different bacterial communities in heat and gamma irradiation treated replant disease soils revealed by 16S rRNA gene analysis – contribution to improved aboveground apple plant growth?

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Bunlong; Winkelmann, Traud; Ding, Guo-Chun; Smalla, Kornelia

    2015-01-01

    Replant disease (RD) severely affects apple production in propagation tree nurseries and in fruit orchards worldwide. This study aimed to investigate the effects of soil disinfection treatments on plant growth and health in a biotest in two different RD soil types under greenhouse conditions and to link the plant growth status with the bacterial community composition at the time of plant sampling. In the biotest performed we observed that the aboveground growth of apple rootstock M26 plants after 8 weeks was improved in the two RD soils either treated at 50°C or with gamma irradiation compared to the untreated RD soils. Total community DNA was extracted from soil loosely adhering to the roots and quantitative real-time PCR revealed no pronounced differences in 16S rRNA gene copy numbers. 16S rRNA gene-based bacterial community analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 454-pyrosequencing revealed significant differences in the bacterial community composition even after 8 weeks of plant growth. In both soils, the treatments affected different phyla but only the relative abundance of Acidobacteria was reduced by both treatments. The genera Streptomyces, Bacillus, Paenibacillus, and Sphingomonas had a higher relative abundance in both heat treated soils, whereas the relative abundance of Mucilaginibacter, Devosia, and Rhodanobacter was increased in the gamma-irradiated soils and only the genus Phenylobacterium was increased in both treatments. The increased abundance of genera with potentially beneficial bacteria, i.e., potential degraders of phenolic compounds might have contributed to the improved plant growth in both treatments. PMID:26635733

  12. {sup 29}Si solid state NMR investigation of pozzolanic reaction occurring in lime-treated Ca-bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Pomakhina, Elena; Deneele, Dimitri; Gaillot, Anne-Claire; Paris, Michael; Ouvrard, Guy

    2012-04-15

    Lime is widely used as additive to improve the mechanical properties of natural soil used in earthworks. However, the physico-chemical mechanisms involved are yet not well understood. In order to develop and optimize this treatment method, a better understanding of the interaction between lime and the minerals of the soils, in particular clay minerals, is required. In this study, Ca-bentonite was treated with 2, 5 and 10 wt.% of lime during 1 to 98 days. Modifications in the Si local environment were then monitored by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate the pozzolanic reaction. All the soil mineral phases contribute to the release of Si and to the pozzolanic reaction, with a rapid and total consumption of Si-polymorph and an exacerbated dissolution of montmorillonite. Mechanism of C-S-H formation, function of the Ca content in the system, was found to match the sorosilicate-tobermorite model described in cement systems.

  13. The effect of cement creep and cement fatigue damage on the micromechanics of the cement-bone interface.

    PubMed

    Waanders, Daan; Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A; Verdonschot, Nico

    2010-11-16

    The cement-bone interface provides fixation for the cement mantle within the bone. The cement-bone interface is affected by fatigue loading in terms of fatigue damage or microcracks and creep, both mostly in the cement. This study investigates how fatigue damage and cement creep separately affect the mechanical response of the cement-bone interface at various load levels in terms of plastic displacement and crack formation. Two FEA models were created, which were based on micro-computed tomography data of two physical cement-bone interface specimens. These models were subjected to tensile fatigue loads with four different magnitudes. Three deformation modes of the cement were considered: 'only creep', 'only damage' or 'creep and damage'. The interfacial plastic deformation, the crack reduction as a result of creep and the interfacial stresses in the bone were monitored. The results demonstrate that, although some models failed early, the majority of plastic displacement was caused by fatigue damage, rather than cement creep. However, cement creep does decrease the crack formation in the cement up to 20%. Finally, while cement creep hardly influences the stress levels in the bone, fatigue damage of the cement considerably increases the stress levels in the bone. We conclude that at low load levels the plastic displacement is mainly caused by creep. At moderate to high load levels, however, the plastic displacement is dominated by fatigue damage and is hardly affected by creep, although creep reduced the number of cracks in moderate to high load region. PMID:20692663

  14. Access to Abutment Screw in Cement Retained Restorations: A Clinical Tip

    PubMed Central

    Harianawala, Husain; Kantharia, Nidhi; Sethi, Tania; Jambhekar, Shantanu

    2015-01-01

    Abutment screw loosening has been reported to be the most common prosthetic complications occurring in screw retained as well as cement retained implant restorations. Different methods to treat this issue have been reported in the literature so far; however these have their own short-comings. Retrievability of an implant restoration intact becomes a clinical challenge when the restoration is cement retained especially with an angulated abutment. This technique is aimed at accurately determining the position of the abutment screw in 3 dimensional relationships using a vacuum formed clear stent. This technique can be used as a viable protocol for management of screw loosening in cement retained implant restorations. PMID:25859535

  15. Immobilization of caesium-loaded ion exchange resins in zeolite-cement blends

    SciTech Connect

    Bagosi, S.; Csetenyi, L.J.

    1999-04-01

    In several countries, low-level radioactive waste immobilization strategies are based on cementitious materials. Water leaching of caesium (Cs)-loaded cemented ion exchange resin and the mechanism of Cs immobilization were studied in the cement-resin-zeolite (mainly clinoptilolite) system. Present work focuses on the reduction of significant Cs leaching (in terms of the total Cs adsorbed on the resin) by blending natural untreated and chemically treated zeolites to the cement. Addition of natural zeolites decreased Cs release by up to 70--75% (of the quantity originally bonded in the resin) in the course of a 3-year leaching period.

  16. Application of Bacillus subtilis 168 as a multifunctional agent for improvement of the durability of cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Park, Jong-Myong; Kim, Wha-Jung; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2012-11-01

    Microbiological calcium carbonate precipitation (MCCP) has been investigated for its ability to improve the durability of cement mortar. However, very few strains have been applied to crack remediation and strengthening of cementitious materials. In this study, we report the biodeposition of Bacillus subtilis 168 and its ability to enhance the durability of cement material. B. subtilis 168 was applied to the surface of cement specimens. The results showed a new layer of deposited organic-inorganic composites on the surface of the cement paste. In addition, the water permeability of the cement paste treated with B. subtilis 168 was lower than that of non-treated specimens. Furthermore, artificial cracks in the cement paste were completely remediated by the biodeposition of B. subtilis 168. The compressive strength of cement mortar treated with B. subtilis 168 increased by about 19.5% when compared with samples completed with only B4 medium. Taken together, these findings suggest that the biodeposition of B. subtilis 168 could be used as a sealing and coating agent to improve the strength and water resistance of concrete. This is the first paper to report the application of Bacillus subtilis 168 for its ability to improve the durability of cement mortar through calcium carbonate precipitation. PMID:23124349

  17. Radioactive wastes dispersed in stabilized ash cements

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, J.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Carey, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    One of the most widely-used methods for the solidification/stabilization of low-level radwaste is by incorporation into Type-I/II ordinary portland cement (OPC). Treating of OPC with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) has been shown to significantly increase the density, while simultaneously decreasing porosity. In addition, the process significantly reduces the hydrogenous content, reducing the likelihood of radiolytic decomposition reactions. This, in turn, permits increased actinide loadings with a concomitant reduction in disposable waste volume. In this article, the authors discuss the combined use of fly-ash-modified OPC and its treatment with SCCO{sub 2} to further enhance immobilization properties. They begin with a brief summary of current cement immobilization technology in order to delineate the areas of concern. Next, supercritical fluids are described, as they relate to these areas of concern. In the subsequent section, they present an outline of results on the application of SCCO{sub 2} to OPC, and its effectiveness in addressing these problem areas. Lastly, in the final section, they proffer their thoughts on why they believe, based on the OPC results, that the incorporation of fly ash into OPC, followed by supercritical fluid treatment, can produce highly efficient wasteforms.

  18. Cement applicator use for hip resurfacing arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Sebastian; Rieger, Johannes S; Obermeyer, Beate; Klotz, Matthias C; Kretzer, J Philippe; Bitsch, Rudi G

    2015-05-01

    We compared the manufacturer recommended cementing technique for a femoral hip resurfacing implant (BHR, S&N) to a newly designed cement applicator on 20 porous carbon foam specimens. Substantial design changes and improvements of the cement applicator were necessary: The diameter and number of the cement escaping holes at the top of the applicator were optimized for medium viscosity cement. It was necessary to add four separate air inlet holes with large diameters. The inner shape of the applicator had to be adapted to the BHR design with a circular extending chamfer in the proximal region, a parallel inner wall and a second chamfer distally. The interface temperatures showed no risk for heat necrosis using both techniques. The cement penetration depth was more uniform and significantly reduced for the applicator cementing technique (4.34 ± 1.42 mm, 6.42 ± 0.43 mm, p = 0.001). The cement-applicator showed no cement defects compared to a large defect length (0.0 ± 0.0 mm, 10.36 ± 1.10 mm, p < 0.001) with the manufacturer recommended cementing technique. The cement applicator technique appears to be effective for a homogenous cement distribution without cement defects and safe with a lower risk of polar over-penetration. PMID:25772262

  19. Degradable borate glass polyalkenoate cements.

    PubMed

    Shen, L; Coughlan, A; Towler, M; Hall, M

    2014-04-01

    Glass polyalkenoate cements (GPCs) containing aluminum-free borate glasses having the general composition Ag2O-Na2O-CaO-SrO-ZnO-TiO2-B2O3 were evaluated in this work. An initial screening study of sixteen compositions was used to identify regions of glass formation and cement compositions with promising rheological properties. The results of the screening study were used to develop four model borate glass compositions for further study. A second round of rheological experiments was used to identify a preferred GPC formulation for each model glass composition. The model borate glasses containing higher levels of TiO2 (7.5 mol %) tended to have longer working times and shorter setting times. Dissolution behavior of the four model GPC formulations was evaluated by measuring ion release profiles as a function of time. All four GPC formulations showed evidence of incongruent dissolution behavior when considering the relative release profiles of sodium and boron, although the exact dissolution profile of the glass was presumably obscured by the polymeric cement matrix. Compression testing was undertaken to evaluate cement strength over time during immersion in water. The cements containing the borate glass with 7.5 mol % TiO2 had the highest initial compressive strength, ranging between 20 and 30 MPa. No beneficial aging effect was observed-instead, the strength of all four model GPC formulations was found to degrade with time. PMID:24435528

  20. A modified PMMA cement (Sub-cement) for accelerated fatigue testing of cemented implant constructs using cadaveric bone.

    PubMed

    Race, Amos; Miller, Mark A; Mann, Kenneth A

    2008-10-20

    Pre-clinical screening of cemented implant systems could be improved by modeling the longer-term response of the implant/cement/bone construct to cyclic loading. We formulated bone cement with degraded fatigue fracture properties (Sub-cement) such that long-term fatigue could be simulated in short-term cadaver tests. Sub-cement was made by adding a chain-transfer agent to standard polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. This reduced the molecular weight of the inter-bead matrix without changing reaction-rate or handling characteristics. Static mechanical properties were approximately equivalent to normal cement. Over a physiologically reasonable range of stress-intensity factor, fatigue crack propagation rates for Sub-cement were higher by a factor of 25+/-19. When tested in a simplified 2 1/2-D physical model of a stem-cement-bone system, crack growth from the stem was accelerated by a factor of 100. Sub-cement accelerated both crack initiation and growth rate. Sub-cement is now being evaluated in full stem/cement/femur models. PMID:18774136

  1. [Antimicrobial activity of orthodontic band cements].

    PubMed

    Pavic, J; Arriagada, M; Elgueta, J; García, C

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence of enamel decalcification and caries beneath orthodontic bands, has indicated the need for a new enamel binding adhesive orthodontic cement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity, in vitro, on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus, acidophillus, of three materials used to cements the orthodontic bands. The cements studied were: Zinc phosphate cement, Glass-ionomer cement, and Policarboxylate cement. Thirty petri plates were seeded with S. mutans, and thirty with L. acidophillus; on each plate three pellet were placed, one of each cement studied. Petri plates were incubated under microaerophilic conditions at 37 C, and checked at 72 hrs. for Streptococcus, mutans, and four days for Lactobacillus acidophillus to evaluate the inhibition zone. The results were tabulated for each material. It was demonstrated that exists important variations in the antimicrobial properties of the materials studied, as in the microbial sensitivity to these cements. PMID:2135908

  2. Cytotoxicity and biocompatibility of Zirconia (Y-TZP) posts with various dental cements

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyeongsoon; Ko, Hyunjung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Endodontically treated teeth with insufficient tooth structure are often restored with esthetic restorations. This study evaluated the cytotoxicity and biological effects of yttria partially stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) blocks in combination with several dental cements. Materials and Methods Pairs of zirconia cylinders with medium alone or cemented with three types of dental cement including RelyX U200 (3M ESPE), FujiCEM 2 (GC), and Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray) were incubated in medium for 14 days. The cytotoxicity of each supernatant was determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays on L929 fibroblasts and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA were evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and IL-6 protein was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests. A p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The MTT assays showed that MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were more susceptible to dental cements than L929 fibroblasts. The resin based dental cements increased IL-6 expression in L929 cells, but reduced IL-6 expression in MC3T3-E1 cells. Conclusions Zirconia alone or blocks cemented with dental cement showed acceptable biocompatibilities. The results showed resin-modified glass-ionomer based cement less produced inflammatory cytokines than other self-adhesive resin-based cements. Furthermore, osteoblasts were more susceptible than fibroblasts to the biological effects of dental cement. PMID:27508157

  3. Effects of Silicon on Osteoclast Cell Mediated Degradation, In Vivo Osteogenesis and Vasculogenesis of Brushite Cement

    PubMed Central

    Vahabzadeh, Sahar; Roy, Mangal; Bose, Susmita

    2015-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are being widely used for treating small scale bone defects. Among the various CPCs, brushite (dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, DCPD) cement is widely used due to its superior solubility and ability to form new bone. In the present study, we have studied the physical, mechanical, osteoclast-like-cells differentiation and in vivo osteogenic and vasculogenic properties of silicon (Si) doped brushite cements. Addition of Si did not alter the phase composition of final product and regardless of Si level, all samples included β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and DCPD. 1.1 wt. % Si addition increased the compressive strength of undoped brushite cement from 4.78±0.21 MPa to 5.53±0.53 MPa, significantly. Cellular activity was studied using receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand (RANKL) supplemented osteoclast-like-cells precursor RAW 264.7 cell. Phenotypic expressions of the cells confirmed successful differentiation of RAW264.7 monocytes to osteoclast-like-cells on undoped and doped brushite cements. An increased activity of osteoclast-like cells was noticed due to Si doping in the brushite cement. An excellent new bone formation was found in all cement compositions, with significant increase in Si doped brushite samples as early as 4 weeks post implantation in rat femoral model. After 4 weeks of implantation, no significant difference was found in blood vessel formation between the undoped and doped cements, however, a significant increase in vasculgenesis was found in 0.8 and 1.1 wt. % Si doped brushite cements after 8 weeks. These results show the influence of Si dopant on physical, mechanical, in vitro osteoclastogenesis and in vivo osteogenic and vasculogenic properties of brushite cements. PMID:26855779

  4. Cementing oil and gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Bloys, J.B.; Wilson, W.N.; Bradshaw, R.D.

    1991-12-31

    This patent describes a cement composition for cementing in a well penetrating subterranean formations and having an aqueous drilling fluid containing at least one cement retarder. It comprises a major proportion of the drilling fluid from the well as it was drilled the fluid having a density in the range of about 9.0 - 18.0 ppg; water; a lesser proportion of dry cementitious material; about 0.5 to about 10.0 ppb of a dispersant selected from the group consisting of sulfonated styrene maleic anhydride, sulfonated styrene imide, and sulfonate styrene itaconic acid; and a compatible accelerator selected from the group consisting of acetic acid; the first 4 carbon esters thereof; acetamide; monoethanolamine; and diethanolamine.

  5. High temperature well bore cement slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Nahm, J.J.W.; Vinegar, H.J.; Karanikas, J.M.; Wyant, R.E.

    1993-07-13

    A low density well bore cement slurry composition is described suitable for cementing well bores with high reservoir temperatures comprising: (a) a high alumina cement in an amount of about 40 pounds per barrel of slurry or greater: (b) graphite in an amount greater than about one quarter, by volume, of the solids in the cement slurry; and (c) and a carrier fluid comprising drilling mud.

  6. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further

  7. Skin ulceration due to cement.

    PubMed

    Robinson, S M; Tachakra, S S

    1992-09-01

    Despite legislation that requires manufacturers to inform the public about the dangers of contact with cement, severe ulceration from cement contact still occurs. We present a retrospective study of seven patients presenting to this department over a 2-year period. All were male and employed in the building trade, their injuries being sustained whilst at work. The injuries were to the lower limb, often multiple and required a median of seven visits before healing was complete. One required hospital admission and skin grafting. PMID:1449582

  8. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  10. High piezoelectric properties of cement piezoelectric composites containing kaolin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Huang Hsing; Yang, Ruei-Hao; Cheng, Yu-Chieh

    2015-04-01

    To obtain high piezoelectric properties, PZT/cement composites with kaolin were fabricated and polarized by 1.5kV/mm electric field for 40 min, where lead zirconate titanate (PZT) inclusion with 50% by volume was used. After the polarization, piezoelectric properties of the composite were measured daily till 100 days. Results indicated that relative dielectric constant (ɛr) and piezoelectric strain constant (d33) increase with aging day, and approach to asymptotic values after 70 days. Temperature treatment to the composite is a dominate factor to enhance piezoelectric properties. The d33 and ɛr values of PZT/cement composites treated at the ambient temperature (23℃) were 57pC/N and 275 at the 70th aging day respectively, and then reached 106pC/N and 455 in turn with 150℃ treatment. The composite contains 4% kaolin having the highest value of d33=111pC/N and ɛr=500 at 90 days because the porosity is the less than the others. Cement piezoelectric composites containing kaolin own the higher d33 and ɛr value, compared with the other reported composites with 50% PZT. The porosity, the electromechanical coupling factor and impedance-frequency spectra of the cement piezoelectric composites were also discussed.

  11. The effectiveness of arbuscular-mycorrhizal fungi and Aspergillus niger or Phanerochaete chrysosporium treated organic amendments from olive residues upon plant growth in a semi-arid degraded soil.

    PubMed

    Medina, A; Roldán, A; Azcón, R

    2010-12-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and a residue from dry olive cake (DOC) supplemented with rock phosphate (RP) and treated with either Aspergillus niger (DOC-A) or Phanerochaete chrysosporium (DOC-P), were assayed in a natural, semi-arid soil using Trifolium repens or Dorycnium pentaphyllum plants. The effects of the AM fungi and/or DOC-A were compared with P-fertilisation (P) over eleven successive harvests to evaluate the persistence of the effectiveness of the treatments. The biomass of dually-treated plants after four successive harvests was greater than that obtained for non-treated plants or those receiving the AM inoculum or DOC-A treatments after eleven yields. The AM inoculation was critical for obtaining plant growth benefit from the application of fermented DOC-A residue. The abilities of the treatments to prevent plant drought stress were also assayed. Drought-alleviating effects were evaluated in terms of plant growth, proline and total sugars concentration under alternative drought and re-watering conditions (8th and 9th harvests). The concentrations of both compounds in plant biomass increased under drought when DOC-A amendment and AM inoculation were employed together: they reinforced the plant drought-avoidance capabilities and anti-oxidative defence. Water stress was less compensated in P-fertilised than in DOC-A-treated plants. DOC-P increased D. pentaphyllum biomass, shoot P content, nodule number and AM colonisation, indicating the greater DOC-transforming ability of P. chrysosporium compared to A. niger. The lack of AM colonisation and nodulation in this soil was compensated by the application of DOC-P, particularly with AM inoculum. The management of natural resources (organic amendments and soil microorganisms) represents an important strategy that assured the growth, nutrition and plant establishment in arid, degraded soils, preventing the damage that arises from limited water and nutrient supply. PMID:20705386

  12. Patch testing with cement containing iron sulfate.

    PubMed

    Bruze, M; Fregert, S; Gruvberger, B

    1990-01-01

    Addition of iron sulfate to cement means transformation of water-soluble hexavalent chromium into nonwater-soluble trivalent chromium. This has been the basis for preventive measures concerning sensitization to hexavalent chromium (chromate) in cement. For some years, iron sulfate has been added to cement manufactured in the Scandinavian countries. In the present in vivo study, cements with and without iron sulfate were compared concerning their capacity to elicit allergic patch-test reactions in eight chromate-hypersensitive individuals. No patch-test reactions were obtained from a water extract of cement with iron sulfate when appropriately buffered. PMID:2137395

  13. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    DOEpatents

    Eilers, Louis H.

    1985-01-01

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  14. Effects of composition and exposure on the solar reflectance of Portland cement concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem

    2001-12-21

    Increasing the solar reflectance (albedo) of a paved surface keeps it cooler in the sun, reducing convection of heat from pavement to air and thereby decreasing the ambient air temperature. Simulations of the influence of pavement albedo on air temperature in Los Angeles predict that increasing the albedo of 1,250 km2 of pavement by 0.25 would save cooling energy worth $15M yr-1, and reduce smog-related medical and lost-work expenses by $76M yr-1. Most sidewalks and a small fraction of roads and parking areas are paved with portland cement concrete, which can be made quite reflective through suitable choice of cement and aggregate. Variations with composition and environmental exposure of the albedos of portland cement concrete pavements were investigated through laboratory fabrication and exposure of 32 mixes of concrete. Twenty-four mixes yielded substandard, ''rough'' concretes due to high, unmet aggregate water demand. The albedos of the remaining eight ''smooth'' concrete mixes ranged from 0.41 to 0.77 (mean 0.59). Simulated weathering, soiling, and abrasion each reduced average concrete albedo (mean decreases 0.06, 0.05, and 0.19, respectively), though some samples became slightly more reflective through weathering or soiling. Simulated rain (wetting) strongly depressed the albedos of concretes (mean decrease 0.23) until their surfaces were dried. Concrete albedo grew as the cement hydration reaction progressed (mean increase 0.08), but stabilized within six weeks of casting. White-cement concretes were on average significantly more reflective than gray-cement concretes. The albedo of the most-reflective white-cement concrete was 0.18 to 0.39 higher than that of the most-reflective gray-cement concrete, depending on state of exposure. Concrete albedo generally correlated with cement albedo and sand albedo, and, after abrasion, with rock albedo. Cement albedo had a disproportionately strong influence on the reflectance of concrete. Efflorescence and surface

  15. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates.

    PubMed

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-02-23

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C-S-H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C-S-H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C-S-H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C-S-H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C-S-H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  16. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G.; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C–S–H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C–S–H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C–S–H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C–S–H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C–S–H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  17. Lightweight Cement Slurries based on vermiculite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, K.; Gorbenko, V.; Ulyanova, O.

    2014-08-01

    The main purpose of the research is to study the lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite and its parameters in accordance with GOST 1581-96 requirements as well as improvement of its formulation by polymer additives. Analysis of vermiculite-containing mixture providing the lowest density while maintaining other required parameters was conducted. As a cement base, cement PTscT-I-G-CC-1, cement PTscT - 100 and vermiculite M200 and M150 were used. Vermiculite content varied from 10 to 15 %; and water-to-cement-ratio ranged from 0.65 to 0.8. To sum up, despite the fact that lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite satisfies GOST 1581-96 requirements under laboratory conditions, field studies are necessary in order to make a conclusion about applicability of this slurry for well cementing.

  18. The 3Rs and cement kiln dust: Opportunities for reduction, reuse and recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Nisbet, M.

    1997-12-31

    Cement kiln dust (CKD) is a by-product of the cement manufacturing process. This material which is captured in cement kiln dust control equipment consists primarily of raw and partly calcined kiln feed. Factors which contribute to the generation of CKD are described. Cases of successful reduction of CKD generation are presented. Technologies for treating CKD so that it can be reused as a raw material for cement production are discussed. Applications where CKD can be used alone or with other by-products are also presented. Opportunities for developing new uses for CKD are identified and discussed in terms of the drivers behind such applications as well as the economic, technical and regulatory barriers to their development.

  19. Seismic Response of Carbonate Cemented Sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, T.; Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G.

    2007-12-01

    This study focuses on how carbonate cementation precipitated at the key sequence stratigraphic surfaces impact the seismic impedance. Our goals are two-fold: (1) to identify the sedimentological variations within carbonate- cemented sandstones and (2) to quantify their effects on P-impedance. To accomplish this goal, we identify the relationship between carbonate cementation and key stratigraphic surfaces, such as, the incision surfaces and the flooding surfaces. Next, we use effective medium models to quantify the impact of sediment parameters on P- impedance. We find that the carbonate cemented sandstones are extremely heterogeneous in nature, even within a depth interval of 60 meter in our study area offshore Equatorial Guinea, West Africa. Their grain-size, sorting, mineralogy, clay-content, amount of cement and degree of leaching vary considerably. We identify two distinct clusters of data in the P-impedance vs. porosity plane. The carbonate cemented sandstones from the base of incision are usually associated with lower shaliness, lower porosity and higher P-impedance. On the contrary, data from the top of flooding surfaces exhibit higher shaliness, higher porosity and lower P-impedance. The contact cement model fails to predict the trend shown by the later cluster of data. The predictions using the constant cement model with 1% constant carbonate cement, and the modified stiffsand model with 15% critical porosity agree reasonably well with the data. Furthermore, we find that the modified differential effective media model with 40% percolation porosity, and Berryman's self consistent model with 20% percolation porosity fit P- impedance vs. porosity trend of the carbonated cemented sandstones. In conclusion, the carbonate cements are different than the siliciclastic cements in terms of sedimentological parameters, and the commonly used rock physics model for quartz cemented sandstones are not always suitable to predict P-impedance vs. porosity trends for the

  20. The effect of cement creep and cement fatigue damage on the micromechanics of the cement-bone interface

    PubMed Central

    Waanders, Daan; Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A.; Verdonschot, Nico

    2010-01-01

    The cement-bone interface provides fixation for the cement mantle within the bone. The cement-bone interface is affected by fatigue loading in terms of fatigue damage, or micro cracks, and creep, both mostly in the cement. This study investigates how fatigue damage and cement creep separately affect the mechanical response of the cement-bone interface at various load levels in terms of plastic displacement and crack formation. Two FEA models were created, which were based on micro-computed tomography data of two physical cement-bone interface specimens. These models were subjected to tensile fatigue loads with four different magnitudes. Three deformation modes of the cement were considered; ‘only creep’, ‘only damage’ or ‘creep and damage’. The interfacial plastic deformation, the crack reduction as a result of creep and the interfacial stresses in the bone were monitored. The results demonstrate that, although some models failed early, the majority of plastic displacement was caused by fatigue damage, rather than cement creep. However, cement creep does decrease the crack formation in the cement up to 20%. Finally, while cement creep hardly influences the stress levels in the bone, fatigue damage of the cement considerably increases the stress levels in the bone. We conclude that at low load levels the plastic displacement is mainly caused by creep. At moderate to high load levels, however, the plastic displacement is dominated by fatigue damage and is hardly affected by creep, although creep reduced the number of cracks in moderate to high load region. PMID:20692663

  1. Research of magnesium phosphosilicate cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhu

    Magnesium phosphosilicate cement (MPSC) is a novel phosphate bonded cement, which consists mainly of magnesia, phosphate and silicate minerals. The traditional magnesium phosphate cements (MPCs) usually composed by ammonium phosphate, and gaseous ammonia will emit during mixing and in service. There is no noxious ammonia released from MPSC, furthermore, it can recycle a large volume of the non-hazardous waste. The goal of this research is to investigate the composition, reaction products, reaction mechanism, microstructure, properties, durability and applications of the MPSC. MPSC sets rapidly and has high early strength. It reacts better with solid industrial waste when compared to Portland cement. Many solid industrial wastes, such as fly ash, steel slag, coal gangue, red coal gangue, red mud, barium-bearing slag, copper slag, silica fume, and ground granulated blast furnace slag, have been used as the main component (40% by weight) in MPSC. The research has found that these aluminosilicate (or ironsilicate, or calciumsilicate) minerals with an amorphous or glass structure can enhance the performance of MPSC. The disorganized internal structure of amorphous materials may make it possess higher reactivity compared to the crystalline phases. Chemical reaction between phosphate and these minerals may form an amorphous gel, which is favorable to the cementing. Borax, boric acid and sodium tripolyphosphate have been used as retardants in the MPSC system. It is found that boric acid has a higher retarding effect on the setting of cement, than borax does. However, sodium polyphosphate accelerates the reaction of MPSC. The hydration of MPSC is exothermic reaction. The heat evolution may prompt hydrates formation, and shorten the setting process. Modern materials characterization techniques, XRD, DSC, TG-DTA FTIR, XPS, MAS-NMR, SEM, TEM, MIP, etc. were used to analyze the phase composition, micro morphology, and microstructure of hardened MPSC. The main hydration product

  2. Evaluation of amendments to decrease high strength in southeastern USA Coastal Plain soils using fuzzy multi-attributive comparison of alternatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Productivity of many southeastern USA Coastal Plain soils is reduced by cemented subsurface layers that restrict root growth. Though tillage is the usual way to reduce cementation, if soil amendments can develop aggregation, they offer a more permanent solution. To improve soil physical properties a...

  3. Effective properties of a cemented or an injected granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhamida, A.; Bouchelaghem, F.; Dumontet, H.

    2005-02-01

    In this paper the macroscopic elastic properties of injected or cemented sands are derived from the characteristics of the constituents and the analysis of the microstructure using a multi-scale modelling approach. Particular interest is given to the choice of the representative elementary volume, by relying on existing microstructural data. The periodic homogenization is adopted and required numerical solutions are performed by the finite element method. An assessment of the validity of the multi-scale approach is achieved through comparison with theoretical and experimental results on cemented and injected granular media reported in the literature. The capabilities of the model are also used to investigate the influence of geometrical and mechanical microscale parameters on the macroscopic behaviour of the treated materials. Copyright

  4. Retention of gold alloy crowns cemented with traditional and resin cements.

    PubMed

    Pinzón, Lilliam M; Frey, Gary N; Winkler, Mark M; Tate, William H; Burgess, John O; Powers, John M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure in vitro retention of cast gold crowns cemented with traditional and resin cements. Forty-eight human molars were prepared on a lathe to produce complete crown preparations with a consistent taper and split into six groups, eight crowns in each group. Crowns were cast in a high-gold alloy and then cemented. After 24 hours, the retention force (N) was recorded and mean values were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and the Fisher post-hoc least significant difference (PLSD) multiple comparisons test (a = .05). Failure sites were examined under 3100 magnification and recorded. Mean values (SD) for each group in increasing order of retention force were: Harvard Cement: 43 N (27), TempoCem: 59 N (16), PermaCem Dual: 130 N (42), RelyX Luting Cement: 279 N (26), Contax and PermaCem Dual: 286 N (38), and TempoCem with Contax and PermaCem Dual: 340 N (14). The Fisher PLSD interval (P = .05) for comparing cements was 29 N. Zinc-phosphate cement and provisional resin cements had the lowest retention forces. Resin cement with a bonding agent and the hybrid-ionomer cement had similar retention forces. Resin cement with a bonding agent applied after use of a provisional resin cement had a significantly higher retention force than the other cements tested. PMID:19639070

  5. About Calcium Phosphate Cements (CPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñera, Silvia; Piña, Cristina

    2006-09-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPC) are used in orthopaedic surgery as bone substitution and fixation of metallic implants, showing advantages with respect to other materials like polymeric cements or ceramic blocks also used for bone repair. For example, they are easy to shape and fill bone defects, react at low temperature and their setting product is hydroxyapatite, mineral from it's composed the inorganic part of the bone, resulting a bioabsorbable material that can be replaced by new bone. Nevertheless there are still some complications like their low absorption rate, inyectability, setting times and their low strength that limits their use to only non load bearing applications. In this work we present a brief resume of some investigations that has been proposed to solve some of these problems, like the addition of phosphates solutions or seeds to increase the reaction rate, or fibers and hard particles to produce a composite material.

  6. Performance of volcanic ash and pumice based blended cement concrete in mixed sulfate environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, K.M.A. . E-mail: ahossain@ryerson.ca; Lachemi, M.

    2006-06-15

    The deterioration of concrete structures due to the presence of mixed sulfate in soils, groundwater and marine environments is a well-known phenomenon. The use of blended cements incorporating supplementary cementing materials and cements with low C{sub 3}A content is becoming common in such aggressive environments. This paper presents the results of an investigation on the performance of 12 volcanic ash (VA) and finely ground volcanic pumice (VP) based ASTM Type I and Type V (low C{sub 3}A) blended cement concrete mixtures with varying immersion period of up to 48 months in environments characterized by the presence of mixed magnesium-sodium sulfates. The concrete mixtures comprise a combination of two Portland cements (Type I and Type V) and four VA/VP based blended cements with two water-to-binder ratio of 0.35 and 0.45. Background experiments (in addition to strength and fresh properties) including X-ray diffraction (XRD), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and rapid chloride permeability (RCP) were conducted on all concrete mixtures to determine phase composition, pozzolanic activity, porosity and chloride ion resistance. Deterioration of concrete due to mixed sulfate attack and corrosion of reinforcing steel were evaluated by assessing concrete weight loss and measuring corrosion potentials and polarization resistance at periodic intervals throughout the immersion period of 48 months. Plain (Type I/V) cement concretes, irrespective of their C{sub 3}A content performed better in terms of deterioration and corrosion resistance compared to Type I/V VA/VP based blended cement concrete mixtures in mixed sulfate environment.

  7. Strength and Stiffness Development in Soft Soils: A FESEM aided Soil Microstructure Viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijeyesekera, D. C.; Ho, M. H.; Bai, X.; Bakar, I.

    2016-07-01

    This paper opens with an overview of the debatable definition of soft soil that goes beyond a (CH) organic / inorganic clay and OH peat to include weakly cemented periglacial deposits of loess and alike. It then outlines the findings obtained from stiffness test on cement-stabilised soft clay. The findings are complemented with a microstructure viewpoint obtained using field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). Research also comprised of making cylindrical stabilised clay samples, prepared in the laboratory with various rubber chips contents and cement, and then aged for 28 days. The samples were then subjected to unconfined compressive strength (UCS) test and observations were also made of its microstructure using the FESEM. The impact of the soil microstructure on the stiffness result was studied both with the stabilized soil and also of some of the natural undisturbed loess soils. Sustainability aspect and the potential of the use of rubber chips and sand as additives to cement stabilisation are also discussed. The overall test results indicated that rubber chips and sand contributed to the improvement in unconfined compressive strength (qu). The derogatory influence of moisture on the stiffness of the stabilised clay was studied simultaneously. SEM micrographs are presented that show bonding of cement, rubber chips/ sand and soft clay, granular units and aggregated / agglomerated units in loess. The paper concludes with observations on the dependence of soil microstructure on the soil strength and deformability and even collapsibility of the loess. Current practices adopted as engineering solutions to these challenging soils are outlined.

  8. The Visible Cement Data Set

    PubMed Central

    Bentz, Dale P.; Mizell, Symoane; Satterfield, Steve; Devaney, Judith; George, William; Ketcham, Peter; Graham, James; Porterfield, James; Quenard, Daniel; Vallee, Franck; Sallee, Hebert; Boller, Elodie; Baruchel, Jose

    2002-01-01

    With advances in x-ray microtomography, it is now possible to obtain three-dimensional representations of a material’s microstructure with a voxel size of less than one micrometer. The Visible Cement Data Set represents a collection of 3-D data sets obtained using the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France in September 2000. Most of the images obtained are for hydrating portland cement pastes, with a few data sets representing hydrating Plaster of Paris and a common building brick. All of these data sets are being made available on the Visible Cement Data Set website at http://visiblecement.nist.gov. The website includes the raw 3-D datafiles, a description of the material imaged for each data set, example two-dimensional images and visualizations for each data set, and a collection of C language computer programs that will be of use in processing and analyzing the 3-D microstructural images. This paper provides the details of the experiments performed at the ESRF, the analysis procedures utilized in obtaining the data set files, and a few representative example images for each of the three materials investigated. PMID:27446723

  9. Natural cement as the precursor of Portland cement: Methodology for its identification

    SciTech Connect

    Varas, M.J. . E-mail: mjvaras@geo.ucm.es; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2005-11-15

    When cements appeared in the 19th century, they took the place of traditional binding materials (lime, gypsum, and hydraulic lime) which had been used until that time. Early cements can be divided into two groups, natural and artificial (Portland) cements. Natural cements were introduced first, but their widespread usage was short-lived as they were quickly replaced by artificial cements (Portland), still the most important and predominant today. The main differences between natural and artificial cements arise during the manufacturing process. The final properties of the cements are greatly influenced by differences in the raw materials and burning temperatures employed. The aim of this paper is to assess the efficiency of traditional analytical techniques (petrographic microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)) used to differentiate natural and artificial cements.

  10. Calcium sulfoaluminate cement blended with OPC: A potential binder to encapsulate low-level radioactive slurries of complex chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Cau Dit Coumes, Celine

    2009-09-15

    Investigations were carried out in order to solidify in cement a low-level radioactive waste of complex chemistry obtained by mixing two process streams, a slurry produced by ultra-filtration and an evaporator concentrate with a salinity of 600 gxL{sup -1}. Direct cementation with Portland cement (OPC) was not possible due to a very long setting time of cement resulting from borates and phosphates contained in the waste. According to a classical approach, this difficulty could be solved by pre-treating the waste to reduce adverse cement-waste interactions. A two-stage process was defined, including precipitation of phosphates and sulfates at 60 deg. C by adding calcium and barium hydroxide to the waste stream, and encapsulation with a blend of OPC and calcium aluminate cement (CAC) to convert borates into calcium quadriboroaluminate. The material obtained with a 30% waste loading complied with specifications. However, the pre-treatment step made the process complex and costly. A new alternative was then developed: the direct encapsulation of the waste with a blend of OPC and calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) at room temperature. Setting inhibition was suppressed, which probably resulted from the fact that, when hydrating, CSA cement formed significant amounts of ettringite and calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate which incorporated borates into their structure. As a consequence, the waste loading could be increased to 56% while keeping acceptable properties at the laboratory scale.

  11. Cementing steamflood and fireflood wells - slurry design

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.B.; Eilers, L.H.

    1983-01-01

    Steamflood and fireflood wells present special challenges when designing a cement slurry. In most cases, the cement slurry is subjected to relatively low temperature during the cement job and early curing. However, after the cement sets, it must be able to withstand the thermal shock associated with the initiation of steamflooding or fireflooding. In addition, the cement must be able to preserve adequate compressive strength and low permeability despite the potentially disruptive crystalline changes that occur at high temperatures. Another complicating factor is the weak or incompetent formations often encountered with thermal recovery wells. This work discusses the chemical and phase equilibria relationships which prevail when cements are exposed to the high temperatures associated with fireflood and steamflood wells.

  12. Sustainable cement production-present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.; Romer, M.; Tschudin, M.; Bolio, H.

    2011-07-15

    Cement will remain the key material to satisfy global housing and modern infrastructure needs. As a consequence, the cement industry worldwide is facing growing challenges in conserving material and energy resources, as well as reducing its CO{sub 2} emissions. According to the International Energy Agency, the main levers for cement producers are the increase in energy efficiency and the use of alternative materials, be it as fuel or raw materials. Accordingly, the use of alternative fuels has already increased significantly in recent years, but potential for further increases still exists. In cement, the reduction of the clinker factor remains a key priority: tremendous progress has already been made. Nevertheless, appropriate materials are limited in their regional availability. New materials might be able to play a role as cement constituents in the future. It remains to be seen to what extent they could substitute Portland cement clinker to a significant degree.

  13. Effect of Gamma Irradiation on Cement Composites Observed with XRD and SEM Methods in the Range of Radiation Dose 0-1409 MGy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łowińska-Kluge, A.; Piszora, P.

    2008-08-01

    The effect of gamma radiation in the range of 0-1409 MGy on the structure of a new mineral additive to cement based composites was investigated in the perspective of employing them as radioactive waste protection material. According to the authors knowledge, it is the first paper dealing with observations of the cement matrix, both pure and modified, treated with so giant radiation dose. The absorption of gamma radiation modifies the morphology of the additive grains, causes decomposition of cement hydrates and clinker relicts in cement paste containing the additive at twice higher radiation dose than that inducing the decomposition of the reference pure cement paste and the cement paste containing pozzolane additives.

  14. Assessment of the plasma desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry technique for pesticide adsorption and degradation on 'as-received' treated soil samples.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J P; Nsouli, B; Darwish, T; Fallavier, M; Khoury, R; Wehbé, N

    2005-01-01

    The assessment of the plasma desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PD-TOFMS) technique as a tool for direct characterization of pesticides adsorbed on agricultural soil is made for the first time in this study. Pellets of soils impregnated by solutions of three pesticides, namely norflurazon, malathion and oxyfluorfen, as well as deposits of these solutions onto aluminum surfaces, were investigated to this end. The yield values of the most characteristic peaks of the negative ion mass spectra were used to determine both the lowest concentrations detected on soils and limits of detection from thin films. The lowest values on soils are for malathion (1000 ppm range), and the largest for norflurazon (20,000 ppm), which is close to the limit of detection (LOD) found for the pesticide on the aluminum substrate (approximately 0.2 microg . cm(-2)). Different behaviors were observed as a function of time of storage in the ambient atmosphere or under vacuum; norflurazon adsorbed on soil exhibited high stability for a long period of time, and a rapid degradation of malathion with the elapsed time was clearly observed. The behavior of oxyfluorfen was also investigated but segregation processes seem to occur after several days. Although by far less sensitive than conventional methods based on extraction processes and used for real-world analytical applications, this technique is well suited to the study of the transformations occurring at the sample surface. A discussion is presented of the future prospects of such experiments in degradation studies. PMID:16047317

  15. Quantitative determination of octylphenol, nonylphenol, alkylphenol ethoxylates and alcohol ethoxylates by pressurized liquid extraction and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in soils treated with sewage sludges.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Vicente; Ferrer, Emilia; Rubio, José Luís; Font, Guillermina; Picó, Yolanda

    2007-05-25

    Surfactants have one of the highest production rates of all organic chemicals. Non-ionic surfactants, especially alkylphenol ethoxylates, received most attention as precursors of estrogenic metabolic products generated during wastewater treatment. Alkylphenols (octyl and nonylphenol), alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APEOs), and alcohol ethoxylates (AEOs) have been determined in a Mediterranean forest soil (Mediterranean Rendzic Leptosol) amended with sludges from six waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) located in the Valencian Community. These compounds were isolated from soil by pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) using a mixture acetone-hexane (50:50 v/v), the extracts were cleaned up by solid-phase extraction (SPE) with C(18), and determined by liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS) using analytical standards for quantification. The method enabled high-reliable identification by monitoring the corresponding ammonium adduct [M+NH(3)](+) for AEOs and APEOs, and the deprotonated molecule [M-H](-) for octyl and nonylphenol. Recoveries, determined spiking soil samples at different concentrations, ranged from 89 to 94%, with limits of quantification from 1 to 100 microg kg(-1). Data obtained from a soil sample mixed with biosolids in the laboratory showed that these compounds are present at concentrations ranging from 0.02 to 5 mg kg(-1). According to these concentrations, levels of possible risk can be concluded for the presence of non-ionic surfactants in soil. However, further assessment will be necessary to establish the relationship between exposure and effect findings. PMID:17306341

  16. Water dynamics in glass ionomer cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, M. C.; Jacobsen, J.; Momsen, N. C. R.; Benetti, A. R.; Telling, M. T. F.; Seydel, T.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-07-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are an alternative for preventive dentistry. However, these dental cements are complex systems where important motions related to the different states of the hydrogen atoms evolve in a confined porous structure. In this paper, we studied the water dynamics of two different liquids used to prepare either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. By combining thermal analysis with neutron scattering data we were able to relate the water structure in the liquids to the materials properties.

  17. HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

    1980-06-01

    Low cost material is needed for grouting abandoned retorts. Experimental work has shown that a hydraulic cement can be produced from Lurgi spent shale by mixing it in a 1:1 weight ratio with limestone and heating one hour at 1000°C. With 5% added gypsum, strengths up to 25.8 MPa are obtained. This cement could make an economical addition up to about 10% to spent shale grout mixes, or be used in ordinary cement applications.

  18. Total hip arthroplasty in patients with avascular necrosis of the hip. Follow-up observations on cementless and cemented operations.

    PubMed

    Katz, R L; Bourne, R B; Rorabeck, C H; McGee, H

    1992-08-01

    Thirty-one patients with avascular necrosis of the hip were treated by 34 total hip arthroplasties (THAs). All patients were observed prospectively with a minimum two-year follow-up evaluation (average, 46 months; range, 24-84 months). Twenty had cemented arthroplasties using contemporary cementing techniques. This included insertion of a medullary plug, cleansing of the canal with a medullary brush, pulsatile lavage irrigation, and insertion of the cement with a cement gun. In 14 hips, a cementless prosthesis was used. Patients were rated using a modified Harris hip score. Sequential postoperative roentgenograms were analyzed in each patient. The overall Harris hip score ratings were 88 in the cemented and 84 in the noncemented groups. Mechanical failure with loosening of the femoral component occurred in one patient who developed deep sepsis. Significant thigh pain occurred in four patients in the noncemented group. Previous studies in the literature have generally reported unfavorable results in patients with avascular necrosis of the hip treated with THA. Using cementless and cemented fixation with contemporary cementing techniques, improved results can be expected. A high incidence of thigh pain (29%) in the cementless group remains a problem. PMID:1499201

  19. Pulp tissue response to Portland cement associated with different radio pacifying agents on pulpotomy of human primary molars.

    PubMed

    Marques, N; Lourenço Neto, N; Fernandes, A P; Rodini, C; Hungaro Duarte, M; Rios, D; Machado, M A; Oliveira, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the response of Portland cement associated with different radio pacifying agents on pulp treatment of human primary teeth by clinical and radiographic exams and microscopic analysis. Thirty mandibular primary molars were randomly divided into the following groups: Group I - Portland cement; Group II - Portland cement with iodoform (Portland cement + CHI3 ); Group III - Portland cement with zirconium oxide (Portland cement + ZrO2 ); and treated by pulpotomy technique (removal of a portion of the pulp aiming to maintain the vitally of the remaining radicular pulp tissue using a therapeutic dressing). Clinical and radiographic evaluations were recorded at 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up. The teeth at the regular exfoliation period were extracted and processed for histological analysis. Data were tested using statistical analysis with a significance level of 5%. The microscopic findings were descriptively analysed. All treated teeth were clinically and radiographically successful at follow-up appointments. The microscopic analysis revealed positive response to pulp repair with hard tissue barrier formation and pulp calcification in the remaining roots of all available teeth. The findings of this study suggest that primary teeth pulp tissue exhibited satisfactory biological response to Portland cement associated with radio pacifying agents. However, further studies with long-term follow-up are needed to determine the safe clinical indication of this alternative material for pulp therapy of primary teeth. PMID:26258985

  20. Influence of temporary cement remnant and surface cleaning method on bond strength to dentin of a composite luting system.

    PubMed

    Kanakuri, Katsuhito; Kawamoto, Yoshikazu; Matsumura, Hideo

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the influence of polycarboxylate temporary cement remaining on the dentin surface on the bond strength of a composite luting system. An acrylic resin plate was luted to bovine dentin with a polycarboxylate temporary cement (HY-Bond Temporary Cement Hard, HYB). The temporary cement was not used for the control groups. After removing the temporary cement with an excavator, dentin specimens were divided into five groups; 1) no subsequent treatment, 2) cleaning with a rotational brush (RTB), 3) cleaning with a rotational brush and non-fluoridated flour of pumice, 4) sweeping with an air scaler, and 5) treated with a sonic toothbrush. A silane-treated ceramic disk (IPS Empress) was bonded to each dentin specimen with a composite luting system (Panavia F). Shear testing results showed that the RTB groups exhibited the highest bond strength regardless of the use of temporary cement (P < 0.05). The use of a rotational brush with water coolant is recommended to achieve ideal bond strength between the Panavia F luting system and dentin to which HYB temporary cement was primarily applied. PMID:15881223

  1. The resin-bonded cast post core: technical preparation and cementation protocols.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, M; Vichi, A; Colt, S G; Mason, P N

    1997-03-01

    Post and core restorations have been widely utilized in the reconstruction of endodontically treated teeth. This study compares the traditional cast post core with the bonded type, and reviews the restoration of devitalized teeth without imposing frictional forces within the root canal walls. Clinical and laboratory aspects are discussed, with emphasis on the cementing procedure. Several resin cements are evaluated and compared to traditional zinc oxide phosphate cement techniques; microleakage test results are presented. The learning objective of this article is to outline the clinical indications, advantages, disadvantages, and the clinical techniques employed for resin-bonded cast post core restoration. A case of an endodontically treated maxillary left central incisor following a direct trauma is used to illustrate the procedure of resin-bonded post core placement. Biocompatibility of the cast post core is confirmed by a radiograph 2 years postoperatively. PMID:12698529

  2. Retention of Root Canal Posts: Effect of Cement Film Thickness, Luting Cement, and Post Pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Sahafi, A; Benetti, A R; Flury, S; Peutzfeldt, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the cement film thickness of a zinc phosphate or a resin cement on retention of untreated and pretreated root canal posts. Prefabricated zirconia posts (CosmoPost: 1.4 mm) and two types of luting cements (a zinc phosphate cement [DeTrey Zinc] and a self-etch adhesive resin cement [Panavia F2.0]) were used. After removal of the crowns of 360 extracted premolars, canines, or incisors, the root canals were prepared with a parallel-sided drill system to three different final diameters. Half the posts did not receive any pretreatment. The other half received tribochemical silicate coating according to the manufacturer's instructions. Posts were then luted in the prepared root canals (n=30 per group). Following water storage at 37°C for seven days, retention of the posts was determined by the pull-out method. Irrespective of the luting cement, pretreatment with tribochemical silicate coating significantly increased retention of the posts. Increased cement film thickness resulted in decreased retention of untreated posts and of pretreated posts luted with zinc phosphate cement. Increased cement film thickness had no influence on retention of pretreated posts luted with resin cement. Thus, retention of the posts was influenced by the type of luting cement, by the cement film thickness, and by the post pretreatment. PMID:25764045

  3. Cobalt and nickel content of Asian cements.

    PubMed

    Goh, C L; Kwok, S F; Gan, S L

    1986-09-01

    The total cobalt and nickel concentration of 11 brands of Asian cement ranged from 8.1 to 14.2 micrograms/g and 14.9 to 28.5 micrograms/g, respectively. These metals exist mainly as insoluble salts; the water-soluble concentration of cobalt and nickel in the cements ranged from 0.39 to 0.65 micrograms/g and from 0-1.2 micrograms/g, respectively. 1.5% (4/272) of construction workers in a prefabrication construction factory had cobalt sensitivity. All had allergic contact dermatitis from chromate in cement. No worker had isolated cobalt sensitivity and cement dermatitis. It appeared that sensitization to cobalt in cement occurs only secondarily to an existing cement dermatitis. 1.8% (5/272) workers had nickel sensitivity: 2 with allergic contact dermatitis to nickel in their watches, 2 were asymptomatic and 1 had allergic contact dermatitis to chromate and cobalt in cement. The low prevalence of cobalt and nickel sensitivity from cement was probably related to the low concentration of soluble cobalt and nickel salts in the cement. However, these insoluble salts can form soluble complexes with body fluids on eczematous skin and sensitize the skin. PMID:2946537

  4. Antibiotic-eluting hydrophilized PMMA bone cement with prolonged bactericidal effect for the treatment of osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eun Jo; Oh, Se Heang; Lee, In Soo; Kwon, Oh Soo; Lee, Jin Ho

    2016-05-01

    Osteomyelitis is still considered to be one of the major challenges for orthopedic surgeons despite advanced antiseptic surgical procedures and pharmaceutical therapeutics. In this study, hydrophilized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cements containing Pluronic F68 (EG79PG28EG79) as a hydrophilic additive and vancomycin (F68-VAcements) were prepared to allow the sustained release of the antibiotic for adequate periods of time without any significant loss of mechanical properties. The compressive strengths of the bone cements with Pluronic F68 compositions less than 7 wt% were not significantly different compared with the control vancomycin-loaded bone cement (VAcement). TheF68 (7 wt%)-VAcement showed sustained release of the antibiotic for up to 11 weeks and almost 100% release from the bone cement. It also prohibited the growth ofS. aureus(zone of inhibition) over six weeks (the required period to treat osteomyelitis), and it did not show any notable cytotoxicity. From an animal study using a femoral osteomyelitis rat model, it was observed that theF68 (7 wt%)-VAcement was effective for the treatment of osteomyelitis, probably as a result of the prolonged release of antibiotic from the PMMA bone cement. On the basis of these findings, it can be suggested that the use of Pluronic F68 as a hydrophilic additive for antibiotic-eluting PMMA bone cement can be a promising strategy for the treatment of osteomyelitis. PMID:26847915

  5. Effect of thermal cycling on the bond strength of self-adhesive cements to fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Mazzitelli, Claudia; Monticelli, Francesca; Toledano, Manuel; Ferrari, Marco; Osorio, Raquel

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the push-out bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements to epoxy resin-based fiber posts after challenging by thermocycling. Thirty-six single-rooted premolars were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were drilled to receive RelyX Fiber posts #1. Three self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, and Breeze) were used for luting fiber posts. The bonded specimens were either stored for 1 month in a moist field (37°C) or submitted to thermocycling (5,000 times) prior to push-out test. The maximum force required to dislodge the post via an apical-coronal direction was recorded (megapascal). The data were statistically analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (p < 0.05). The factors "luting cement" and "thermocycling" significantly influenced bond strengths. The initial push-out values of RelyX Unicem and Breeze were higher than those of G-Cem. After thermocycling, the bond strength of G-Cem increased and no differences were found between groups. RelyX Unicem and Breeze bond strengths were not affected by the thermal challenge. Thermal cycling and cement type differently influence the bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements. Self-adhesive cements can represent an option for luting fiber posts into root canal. PMID:21670983

  6. Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Amoretti, Nicolas Huwart, Laurent

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

  7. The use of PFA: Cement pastes in the stabilization of abandoned mineworkings

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, S.T.; Brooks, T.G.

    1996-12-31

    A project to treat abandoned limestone workings in the West Midlands has led to the development of low-cost PFA/cement bulk infilling materials (or pastes) using cement contents of as little as 2%. The use of mixtures of PFA, cement and water is well established and the technology involved in producing a relatively high cement and water content mix to produce low-viscosity grouts with rapid strength gain is well understood. However, the large volumes required to infill limestone mines sometimes as much as 20 m high and several hectares in area would make traditional grouts prohibitively expensive. This paper describes studies carried out to identify suitable PFA sources and the case histories of two treatment projects at Castlefields Mine in Dudley and Cow Pasture Mine in Sandwell. The design criteria, plant used, quality control testing carried out and the injection and verification processes are described. The relationship between cement content, moisture content, flowability and strength is examined. The paper also discusses a third case history where the low viscosity/rapid strength gain characteristics of a higher cement content mix paste were used to infill part of the 14 m high Stores Cavern in Dudley using no permanent containment works.

  8. Treating the Aging Spine.

    PubMed

    Choma, Theodore J; Rechtine, Glenn; McGuire, Robert A; Brodke, Darrel S

    2016-01-01

    Demographic trends make it incumbent on orthopaedic spine surgeons to recognize the special challenges involved in caring for older patients with spine pathology. Unique pathologies, such as osteoporosis and degenerative deformities, must be recognized and treated. Recent treatment options and recommendations for the medical optimization of bone health include vitamin D and calcium supplementation, diphosphonates, and teriparatide. Optimizing spinal fixation in elderly patients who have osteoporosis is critical; cement augmentation of pedicle screws is promising. In the management of geriatric odontoid fractures, nonsurgical support with a collar may be considered for low-demand patients, whereas surgical fixation is favored for high-demand patients. Management of degenerative deformity must address sagittal plane balance, which includes consideration of pelvic incidence. Various osteotomies may prove helpful in this setting. PMID:27049195

  9. Try-in Pastes Versus Resin Cements: A Color Comparison.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Edenize Cristina; Vaz, Maysa Magalhães; Rodrigues Gonçalves de Oliveira, Maria Beatriz; Takano, Alfa Emília; de Carvalho Cardoso, Paula; de Torres, Érica Miranda; Gonzaga Lopes, Lawrence

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the color of ceramic veneer restorations using different shades of try-in pastes and resin cement. Researchers found no differences between try-in pastes and resin cements after cementation. PMID:27213935

  10. Amendments to increase aggregation in SE Coastal Plain soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many southeastern Coastal Plain soils have a cemented subsurface hard layer that restricts root growth into the subsoil and decreases productivity. Soil properties are usually improved by tillage but might also be improved by amending the soil. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) residue and polyacrylamide...

  11. Utilization of flotation wastes of copper slag as raw material in cement production.

    PubMed

    Alp, I; Deveci, H; Süngün, H

    2008-11-30

    Copper slag wastes, even if treated via processes such as flotation for metal recovery, still contain heavy metals with hazardous properties posing environmental risks for disposal. This study reports the potential use of flotation waste of a copper slag (FWCS) as iron source in the production of Portland cement clinker. The FWCS appears a suitable raw material as iron source containing >59% Fe(2)O(3) mainly in the form of fayalite (Fe(2)SiO(4)) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). The clinker products obtained using the FWCS from the industrial scale trial operations over a 4-month period were characterised for the conformity of its chemical composition and the physico-mechanical performance of the resultant cement products was evaluated. The data collected for the clinker products produced using an iron ore, which is currently used as the cement raw material were also included for comparison. The results have shown that the chemical compositions of all the clinker products including those of FWCS are typical of a Portland cement clinker. The mechanical performance of the standard mortars prepared from the FWCS clinkers were found to be similar to those from the iron ore clinkers with the desired specifications for the industrial cements e.g. CEM I type cements. Furthermore, the leachability tests (TCLP and SPLP) have revealed that the mortar samples obtained from the FWCS clinkers present no environmental problems while the FWCS could act as the potential source of heavy metal contamination. These findings suggest that flotation wastes of copper slag (FWCS) can be readily utilised as cement raw material due to its availability in large quantities at low cost with the further significant benefits for waste management/environmental practices of the FWCS and the reduced production and processing costs for cement raw materials. PMID:18384950

  12. Remediation of a heavy metal-contaminated soil by means of agglomeration.

    PubMed

    Polettini, Alessandra; Pomi, Raffaella; Valente, Mattia

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of treating a heavy metal-contaminated soil by means of a solidification/stabilization treatment consisting of a granulation process is discussed in the present article. The aim of the study was to attain contaminant immobilization within the agglomerated solid matrix. The soil under concern was characterized by varying levels of heavy metal contamination, ranging from 50 to 500 mg kg(-1) dry soil for chromium. from 300 to 2000 mg kg(-1) dry soil for lead and from 270 to 5000 mg kg(-1) dry soil for copper. An artificially contaminated soil with contaminant concentrations corresponding to the upper level of the mentioned ranges was prepared from a sample of uncontaminated soil by means of spiking experiments. Pure soluble species of chromium, copper and lead. namely CrCl3.6H2O, CuCl2.2H2O and Pb(NO3)2, were selected for the spiking experiments, which were arranged according to a 2(3) full factorial design. The solidification/stabilization treatment was based on an agglomeration process making use of hydraulic binders including Portland cement, hydrated lime and sodium methasilicate, which were selected on the basis of preliminary test runs. It was found that after 7 days of curing the applied treatment was able to efficiently immobilize the investigated heavy metals within the hydrated matrix. Good acid neutralization behavior was also observed, indicating improved matrix resistance to acid attack and decreased potential for metal leaching. PMID:15137715

  13. Chemical stabilization of subgrade soil for the strategic expeditionary landing field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conaway, M. H.

    1983-06-01

    The Strategic Expeditionary Landing Field (SELF) is a military expeditionary-type airfield with an aluminum matted surface that is designed for sustained tactical and cargo airlift operations in an amphibious objective area. Because of the operational traffic parameters such as loads of the various types of aircraft, tire pressures and volume of traffic, a base layer must be constructed over subgrade soil support conditions which may be only marginal. The base layer could be constructed with conventional soil construction techniques (compaction) and yield the required strength. It would be difficult, however, to maintain this strength for the required one-year service life under many climatic conditions due to the degrading effects of water on the support capacity of many soils. Chemical soil stabilization with lime, portland cement and asphalt stabilizing agents could be used to treat the soil. These additives, when properly mixed with certain types of soils, initiate reactions which will increase soil support strength and enhance durability (resistance to the degrading effects of water). Technically, this procedure is quite viable but logistically, it may not be feasible.

  14. Vertebroplasty Using Calcium Triglyceride Bone Cement (Kryptonite™) for Vertebral Compression Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Gianluigi; Tecame, Mario; Izzo, Roberto; Vassallo, Pasquale; Sardaro, Angela; Iasiello, Francesca; Cavaliere, Carlo; Muto, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Summary This study assessed the one-year clinical and radiographic outcomes, in terms of pain-relief, vertebral re-fracture and complications, after vertebroplasty (VP) using a new osteoconductive cement (calcium triglyceride bone cement - Kryptonite™ bone cement, Doctors Research Group Inc., Southbury, CT, USA) to treat osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. Sixteen consecutive osteoporotic patients (12 women and four men, mean age 68+/-10.5) were treated with VP using Kryptonite™ bone cement for a total of 20 vertebral fractures. All the patients complained of a pain syndrome resistant to medical therapy and all procedures were performed under fluoroscopy control with neuroleptoanalgesia using a monopedicular approach in 12 patients and bipedicular approach in four patients. All patients were studied by MR and MDCT and were evaluated with the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry disability index (ODI) before treatment and at one and 12 months after the procedure. A successful outcome was observed in 80% of patients, with a complete resolution of pain. Differences in pre and post treatment VAS and ODI at one-year follow-up were significant (P<0.0001). We observed a disk and venous leakage in 66% of patients but only in one case did an asymptomatic pulmonary embolism occur during cement injection. Two cases of vertebral re-fractures at distant metamers were observed during follow-up. VP using Kryptonite bone cement is a helpful procedure that allows complete and long-lasting resolution of painful vertebral symptoms. The cost of the material is very high and the rate of disk and venous leakage is too high compared to standard cement. PMID:25363260

  15. Liquid antibiotics in bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Y. H.; Tai, C. L.; Hsu, H. Y.; Hsieh, P. H.; Lee, M. S.; Ueng, S. W. N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to compare the elution characteristics, antimicrobial activity and mechanical properties of antibiotic-loaded bone cement (ALBC) loaded with powdered antibiotic, powdered antibiotic with inert filler (xylitol), or liquid antibiotic, particularly focusing on vancomycin and amphotericin B. Methods Cement specimens loaded with 2 g of vancomycin or amphotericin B powder (powder group), 2 g of antibiotic powder and 2 g of xylitol (xylitol group) or 12 ml of antibiotic solution containing 2 g of antibiotic (liquid group) were tested. Results Vancomycin elution was enhanced by 234% in the liquid group and by 12% in the xylitol group compared with the powder group. Amphotericin B elution was enhanced by 265% in the liquid group and by 65% in the xylitol group compared with the powder group. Based on the disk-diffusion assay, the eluate samples of vancomycin-loaded ALBC of the liquid group exhibited a significantly larger inhibitory zone than samples of the powder or the xylitol group. Regarding the ALBCs loaded with amphotericin B, only the eluate samples of the liquid group exhibited a clear inhibitory zone, which was not observed in either the xylitol or the powder groups. The ultimate compressive strength was significantly reduced in specimens containing liquid antibiotics. Conclusions Adding vancomycin or amphotericin B antibiotic powder in distilled water before mixing with bone cement can significantly improve the efficiency of antibiotic release than can loading ALBC with the same dose of antibiotic powder. This simple and effective method for preparation of ALBCs can significantly improve the efficiency of antibiotic release in ALBCs. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:246–51. PMID:25104836

  16. Nanotechnology for treating osteoporotic vertebral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chunxia; Wei, Donglei; Yang, Huilin; Chen, Tao; Yang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a serious public health problem affecting hundreds of millions of aged people worldwide, with severe consequences including vertebral fractures that are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To augment or treat osteoporotic vertebral fractures, a number of surgical approaches including minimally invasive vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty have been developed. However, these approaches face problems and difficulties with efficacy and long-term stability. Recent advances and progress in nanotechnology are opening up new opportunities to improve the surgical procedures for treating osteoporotic vertebral fractures. This article reviews the improvements enabled by new nanomaterials and focuses on new injectable biomaterials like bone cements and surgical instruments for treating vertebral fractures. This article also provides an introduction to osteoporotic vertebral fractures and current clinical treatments, along with the rationale and efficacy of utilizing nanomaterials to modify and improve biomaterials or instruments. In addition, perspectives on future trends with injectable bone cements and surgical instruments enhanced by nanotechnology are provided. PMID:26316746

  17. Nanotechnology for treating osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunxia; Wei, Donglei; Yang, Huilin; Chen, Tao; Yang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a serious public health problem affecting hundreds of millions of aged people worldwide, with severe consequences including vertebral fractures that are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To augment or treat osteoporotic vertebral fractures, a number of surgical approaches including minimally invasive vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty have been developed. However, these approaches face problems and difficulties with efficacy and long-term stability. Recent advances and progress in nanotechnology are opening up new opportunities to improve the surgical procedures for treating osteoporotic vertebral fractures. This article reviews the improvements enabled by new nanomaterials and focuses on new injectable biomaterials like bone cements and surgical instruments for treating vertebral fractures. This article also provides an introduction to osteoporotic vertebral fractures and current clinical treatments, along with the rationale and efficacy of utilizing nanomaterials to modify and improve biomaterials or instruments. In addition, perspectives on future trends with injectable bone cements and surgical instruments enhanced by nanotechnology are provided. PMID:26316746

  18. Antireflection coating for high index cemented doublets.

    PubMed

    Willey, R R

    1990-11-01

    Uncoated surfaces of high index glasses when cemented to form lens doublets have inferior antireflection properties to doublets of low index glass. This can be overcome by the application of a single layer coating of aluminum oxide prior to cementing. PMID:20577426

  19. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE CEMENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WESSON, CARL E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY IS TO PRESENT A PRELIMINARY PICTURE OF OCCUPATIONAL CHANGES BROUGHT ABOUT IN THE MANUFACTURE OF CEMENT AS A RESULT OF INTRODUCING AUTOMATED EQUIPMENT. ONE AUTOMATED AND SEVERAL CONVENTIONAL TYPE CEMENT PLANTS WERE STUDIED. ANALYSIS OF DATA OBTAINED THROUGH RESEARCH AND DATA COLLECTED DURING THE STUDY REVEALED THAT…

  20. Basic Chemistry for the Cement Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Mason

    This combined student workbook and instructor's guide contains nine units for inplant classes on basic chemistry for employees in the cement industry. The nine units cover the following topics: chemical basics; measurement; history of cement; atoms; bonding and chemical formulas; solids, liquids, and gases; chemistry of Portland cement…

  1. Tires fuel oil field cement manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Caveny, B.; Ashford, D.; Garcia, J.G.; Hammack, R.

    1998-08-31

    In a new process, waste automobile tires added to the fuel mix of gas, coal, and coke help fire kilns to produce API-quality oil field cement. Capital Cement uses this process in its cement-manufacturing plant in San Antonio, in which it also produces construction cement. The tires provide a lower-cost fuel and boost the temperature at a critical stage in the kiln burn process. Also, steel-belted tires add iron content to the mix. According to lab results, tire-burned cement slurries will perform the same as conventionally burned cement slurries. Actual field applications have proven that cement produced by burning tires performs no different than conventionally produced slurries. Capital`s plant uses both dry and wet processes, with separate kilns running both processes at the same time. Cement clinker is partially fired by waste tires in both kiln processes. The tires represent 12% of the fuel consumed by the plant, a number that is expected to increase. Capital burns about 200 tires/hr, or about 1.6 million tires/year.

  2. A note on cement in asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilalbegović, G.

    2016-09-01

    Cement mineral tobermorite was formed in hydrothermal experiments on alternation of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Unidentified bands at 14 μm were measured for CAIs and the matrix of the Allende meteorite sample, as well as for Hektor and Agamemnon asteroids. The presence of cement nanoparticles may explain the feature at 14 μm.

  3. Biodegradation of s-triazine herbicide atrazine by Enterobacter cloacae and Burkholderia cepacia sp. from long-term treated sugarcane-cultivated soils in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ngigi, Anastasiah N; Getenga, Zachary M; Boga, Hamadi I; Ndalut, Paul K

    2012-09-01

    In this study soils from sugarcane-cultivated fields were screened for bacterial species capable of atrazine (6-chloro-N²-ethyl-N⁴-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) degradation due to long exposure of the soils to this herbicide. To enrich for atrazine degraders, Minimal Salt Medium containing atrazine as the sole N source and glucose as the C source was inoculated with soils impacted with this herbicide and incubated. Bacterial growth was monitored by measuring optical density. The degradation of atrazine was followed by measuring residual atrazine in liquid cultures over a given time period by high performance liquid chromatography. Bacterial strains isolated from the enrichment cultures were characterized by biochemical tests and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Two bacterial strains coded ISL 8 and ISL 15 isolated from two different fields were shown to have 94 and 96% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Burkholderia cepacia respectively. Another bacterial sp., ISL 14 was closely related to Enterobacter cloacae with a 96% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. There was not much difference between the extents of atrazine degradation by the enrichment cultures with communities (79-82% applied amount) from which pure strains were isolated and the pure strains themselves in liquid cultures that showed a degradation of 53-83% of applied amount. The study showed existence of bacterial strains in different sugarcane-cultivated fields which can use atrazine as a nitrogen source. The bacterial strains isolated can be used to enhance the degradation of atrazine in contaminated soils where atrazine is still considered to be recalcitrant. PMID:22575004

  4. Cr(VI) adsorption/desorption on untreated and mussel shell-treated soil materials: fractionation and effects of pH and chromium concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, M.; Cutillas-Barreiro, L.; Nóvoa-Muñoz, J. C.; Arias-Estévez, M.; Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Álvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Núñez-Delgado, A.

    2014-12-01

    We used batch-type experiments to study Cr(VI) adsorption/desorption on granitic material, forest soil, pyritic material, mussel shell, and on forest soil and granitic material amended with 12 t ha-1 shell, considering the effects of varying Cr(VI) concentration and pH. Sequential extractions were carried out to fractionate adsorbed Cr(VI) and to determine the stability of Cr(VI) retention. The pyritic material had the highest Cr(VI) retention capacity, whereas the granitic material showed the lowest retention potential. When high Cr concentrations were added, some saturation of the adsorbent surfaces became apparent, but Cr release remained low. The highest Cr retention was achieved at very acid pH value, with release progressively increasing as a function of increasing pH. The amendment with 12 t ha-1 mussel shell did not cause marked changes in Cr(VI) retention. Adsorption data were satisfactory adjusted to the Freundlich model. Regarding Cr(VI) fractionation, the soluble fraction (weakly bound) was the dominant in mussel shell and in the un-amended and amended granitic material, whereas more stable fractions dominated in the pyritic material (residual fraction) and in the forest soil (oxidizable fraction). In conclusion, the pyritic material presented the highest Cr(VI) retention capacity, while the retention was low and weak on the granitic material; mussel shell was characterized by not marked Cr(VI) retention potential, and it did not cause remarkable increase in Cr(VI) retention when used to amend the granitic material or the forest soil.

  5. Cr(VI) sorption/desorption on untreated and mussel-shell-treated soil materials: fractionation and effects of pH and chromium concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, M.; Cutillas-Barreiro, L.; Nóvoa-Muñoz, J. C.; Arias-Estévez, M.; Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Álvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Núñez-Delgado, A.

    2015-04-01

    We used batch-type experiments to study Cr(VI) sorption/desorption on granitic material, forest soil, pyritic material, mussel shell, and on forest soil and granitic material amended with 12 t ha-1 (1.2 kg m -2) shell, considering the effects of varying Cr(VI) concentration and pH. Sequential extractions were carried out to fractionate adsorbed Cr(VI) and to determine the stability of Cr(VI) retention. The pyritic material had the highest Cr(VI) retention capacity, whereas the granitic material showed the lowest retention potential. When high Cr concentrations were added, some saturation of the adsorbent surfaces became apparent, but Cr release remained low. The highest Cr retention was achieved at a very acid pH value, with release progressively increasing as a function of increasing pH. The amendment with 12 t ha-1 mussel shell did not cause marked changes in Cr(VI) retention. Sorption data were satisfactory adjusted to the Freundlich model. Regarding Cr(VI) fractionation, the soluble fraction (weakly bound) was dominant in mussel shell and in the unamended and amended granitic material, whereas more stable fractions dominated in the pyritic material (residual fraction) and in the forest soil (oxidizable fraction). In conclusion, the pyritic material presented the highest Cr(VI) retention capacity, while the retention was low and weak on the granitic material; mussel shell was not characterized by a marked Cr(VI) retention potential, and it did not cause remarkable increase in Cr(VI) retention when used to amend the granitic material or the forest soil.

  6. Current Status of Geothermal Well Cement Development

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a study made in 1976 indicated that the cements used for well completion deteriorate in the geothermal environments and that the life expectancy of a well, and therefore the economics of geothermal processes, could be improved significantly if better materials were developed. On the basis of this assessment, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) helped the Department of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy to organize a program to develop materials that meet the estimated design criteria for geothermal well cements. The BNL work involves research on polymer cements and full management of an integrated program involving contract research and industrial participation. The program consists of the following phases: (1) problem definition, (2) cement research and development, (3) property verification, (4) downhole testing, and (5) cementing of demonstration wells.

  7. MDF cements: Chemistry, processing and microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, A.J.; Tan, L.S.; Lewis, J.

    1995-12-31

    Macro-Defect-Free (MDF) cements are low water content, polymer-cement composites which can exhibit flexural strengths over 30 times in excess of normally cast cement. The microstructure of hardened MDF, responsible for the vastly improved properties, is the direct outcome of mechano-chemically induced reactions which take place during shear mixing of the damp powder. Mixing torque curves exhibit a characteristic shape which reflects the temperature and shear-rate-dependent kinetics of the polymer-cement crosslinking reactions. These kinetics are parametrically related to the viscoelastic and Theological properties of the paste which also enhance its overall processability. The evolution of overall composite structure and the microstructure of the cement-polymer interphase region are quantified using scanning and transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with energy dispersion spectrometry. Mechanical flexural strength of the hardened composites are also determined.

  8. Cement analysis using d + D neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womble, Phillip C.; Paschal, Jon; Moore, Ryan

    2005-12-01

    In the cement industry, the primary concern is quality control. The earlier the cement industry can institute quality control upon their product, the more significant their savings in labor, energy and material. We are developing a prototype cement analyzer using pulsed neutrons from a d-D electronic neutron generator with the goal of ensuring quality control of cement in an on-line manner. By utilizing a low intensity d-D neutron source and a specially-designed moderator assembly, we are able to produce one of the safest neutron-based systems in the market. Also, this design includes some exciting new methods of data acquisition which may substantially reduce the final installation costs. In our proof-of-principle measurements, we were able to measure the primary components of cement (Al, Si, Ca and Fe) to limits required for the raw materials, the derived mixes and the clinkers utilizing this neutron generator.

  9. Effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of zirconia to three resin cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadjoo, Nisa

    Statement of problem: There are no standard guidelines for material selection to obtain acceptable bonding to high-strength zirconium oxide ceramic. Studies suggest resin cements in combination with MDP-containing primer is a reasonable choice, however, the other cements cannot be rejected and need further investigation. Objective: The purpose of this in vitro study was the evaluation of the shear bond strength of three composite resin cements to zirconia ceramic after using different surface conditioning methods. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty sintered Y-TZP ceramic (IPS e.max ZirCAD) squares (8 x 8 x 4 mm) were embedded in acrylic molds, then divided into three groups (n=40) based on the type of cement used. Within each group, the specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=10) and treated as follows: (1) Air abrasion with 50microm aluminum oxide (Al2O 3) particles (ALO); (2) Air abrasion + Scotchbond Universal adhesive (SBU); (3) Air abrasion + Monobond Plus (MBP); (4) Air abrasion + Z-Prime Plus (ZPP). Composite cylinders were used as carriers to bond to conditioned ceramic using (1) RelyX Ultimate adhesive resin cement (RX); (2) Panavia SA self-adhesive resin cement (PSA); (3) Calibra esthetic cement (CAL). The bonded specimens were submerged in distilled water and subjected to 24-hour incubation period at 37°C. All specimens were stressed in shear at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA. The bond strength values (MPa), means and standard deviations were calculated and data were analyzed using analysis of variance with Fisher's PLSD multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. The nature of failure was recorded. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed Panavia SA to have the highest strength at 44.3 +/- 16.9 MPa (p<0.05). The combination of Scotchbond Universal surface treatment with Panavia SA cement showed statistically higher bond strength (p=0.0054). The highest bond

  10. Biomonitoring of airborne particulate matter emitted from a cement plant and comparison with dispersion modelling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, Gabriela A.; Wannaz, Eduardo D.; Mateos, Ana C.; Pignata, María L.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of a cement plant that incinerates industrial waste on the air quality of a region in the province of Córdoba, Argentina, was assessed by means of biomonitoring studies (effects of immission) and atmospheric dispersion (effects of emission) of PM10 with the application of the ISC3 model (Industrial Source Complex) developed by the USEPA (Environmental Protection Agency). For the biomonitoring studies, samples from the epiphyte plant Tillandsia capillaris Ruíz & Pav. f. capillaris were transplanted to the vicinities of the cement plant in order to determine the physiological damage and heavy metal accumulation (Ca, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb). For the application of the ISC3 model, point and area sources from the cement plant were considered to obtain average PM10 concentration results from the biomonitoring exposure period. This model permitted it to be determined that the emissions from the cement plant (point and area sources) were confined to the vicinities, without significant dispersion in the study area. This was also observed in the biomonitoring study, which identified Ca, Cd and Pb, pH and electric conductivity (EC) as biomarkers of this cement plant. Vehicular traffic emissions and soil re-suspension could be observed in the biomonitors, giving a more complete scenario. In this study, biomonitoring studies along with the application of atmospheric dispersion models, allowed the atmospheric pollution to be assessed in more detail.

  11. Cements with low Clinker Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lodeiro, I.; Fernández-Jiménez, A.; Palomo, A.

    2015-11-01

    Hybrid alkaline cements are multi-component systems containing a high percentage of mineral additions (fly ash, blast furnace slag), low proportions (<30%) of Portland clinker and scarce amounts of alkaline activators. The substantially lower amount of clinker needed to manufacture these binders in comparison to ordinary Portland cement is both economically and ecologically beneficial. Their enormous versatility in terms of the raw materials used has made them the object of considerable interest. The present study explored the mechanical strength of binary blends mixes; B1= 20% clinker (CK) + 80% fly ash (FA) and B2=20% clinker + 80% blast furnace slag (BFS), both hydrated in the presence and absence of an alkaline activator specifically designed for this purpose. The use of the activator enhanced the development of early age strength considerably. All the hydrated matrices were characterised with XRD, SEM/EDX and (29Si and 27Al) NMR. The use of the alkaline activator generated reaction products consisting primarily of a mix of gels ((N,C)-A-S-H and C-A-S-H) whose respective proportions were found to depend upon system composition and initial reactivity.

  12. Pack cementation coatings for alloys

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi-Rong; Zheng, Minhui; Rapp, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on a Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloy in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the composition of the pack and on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi{sub 2} and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. In cyclic and isothermal oxidation in air at 700 and 1050{degrees}C, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. The codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium into low alloy steel have been achieved using elemental Al and Cr powders and a two-step pack cementation process. Sequential process treatments at 925{degrees}C and 1150{degrees}C yield dense and uniform ferrite coatings, whose compositions are close to either Fe{sub 3}Al or else FeAl plus a lower Cr content, when processed under different conditions. The higher content of Al in the coatings was predicted by thermodynamic calculations of equilibrium in the gas phase. The effect of the particle size of the metal powders on the surface composition of the coating has been studied for various combinations of Al and Cr powders.

  13. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Noble and Base Metal Alloys with Different Surface Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Raeisosadat, Farkhondeh; Ghavam, Maryam; Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoomeh; Arami, Sakineh; Sedaghati, Maedeh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The bond strength of resin cements to metal alloys depends on the type of the metal, conditioning methods and the adhesive resins used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of resin cements to base and noble metal alloys after sand blasting or application of silano-pen. Materials and Method: Cylinders of light cured Z 250 composite were cemented to “Degubond 4” (Au Pd) and “Verabond” (Ni Cr) alloys by either RelyX Unicem or Panavia F2, after sandblasting or treating the alloys with Silano-Pen. The shear bond strengths were evaluated. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t tests at a significance level of P<0.05. Results: When the alloys were treated by Silano-Pen, RelyX Unicem showed a higher bond strength for Degubond 4 (P=0.021) and Verabond (P< 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the bond strength of Panavia F2 to the alloys after either of surface treatments, Degubond 4 (P=0.291) and Verabond (P=0.899). Panavia F2 showed a higher bond strength to sandblasted Verabond compared to RelyX Unicem (P=0.003). The bond strength of RelyX Unicem was significantly higher to Silano-Pen treated Verabond (P=0.011). The bond strength of the cements to sandblasted Degubond 4 showed no significant difference (P=0.59). RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated Degubond 4 (P=0.035). Conclusion: The bond strength of resin cements to Verabond alloy was significantly higher than Degubond 4. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated alloys. Surface treatments of the alloys did not affect the bond strength of Panavia F2. PMID:25628687

  14. SOIL WASHING TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing is a water-based process for mechanically scrubbing soils ex-situ to remove undesirable contaminants. he process removes contaminants from soils in one of two ways: by dissolving or suspending them in the wash solution (which is later treated by conventional wastewat...

  15. Push-out bond strength of quartz fibre posts to root canal dentin using total-etch and self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Navimipour, Elmira J.; Shakerifar, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Several adhesive systems are available for cementation of fibre posts into the root canal. The aim of the present study was to investigate the push-out bond strengths of quartz fibre posts to root dentin with the use of different total-etch and self-adhesive resin cements. Study Design: Ninety single-rooted human premolars were endodontically treated and standardized post-spaces were prepared. Fibre posts were cemented with different luting agents: total-etch (Nexus NX3, Duo-Link, and RelyX ARC) and self-adhesive resin cements (Maxcem Elite, BisCem, and RelyX Unicem). Three post/dentin sections (coronal, middle and apical) were obtained from each specimen, and push-out bond strength test was performed in each section at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data was analyzed with two-factor and one-way analysis of variance and a post-hoc Tukey test at a significance level of p < 0.05. Results: Cement type, canal region, and their interaction significantly influenced bond strength. Significantly higher bond strength values were observed in the apical region of self-adhesive cements. Only Duo-Link and RelyX ARC cements resulted in homogeneous bond strengths. Conclusions: Cementation of quartz fibre posts using self-adhesive cements provided higher push-out bond strengths especially in the apical region, while total-etch cements resulted in more uniform bond strengths in different regions of the root canal. Key words: Push-out bond strength; quartz fibre post; total-etch resin cement; self-adhesive resin cement. PMID:22143695

  16. Microscale investigation of arsenic distribution and species in cement product from cement kiln coprocessing wastes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yufei; Xue, Jingchuan; Huang, Qifei

    2013-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the immobilization mechanism and the leaching risk of Arsenic (As) in the cement product from coprocessing wastes using cement kiln, distribution and species of As in cement product were determined by microscale investigation methods, including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this study, sodium arsenate crystals (Na3AsO412H2O) were mixed with cement production raw materials and calcined to produce cement clinker. Then, clinker was mixed water to prepare cement paste. EPMA results showed that As was generally distributed throughout the cement paste. As content in calcium silicate hydrates gel (C-S-H) was in low level, but higher than that in other cement mineral phases. This means that most of As is expected to form some compounds that disperse on the surfaces of cement mineral phases. Linear combination fitting (LCF) of the X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra revealed that As in the cement paste was predominantly As(V) and mainly existed as Mg3(AsO4)2, Ca3(AsO4)2, and Na2HAsO4. PMID:24223030

  17. Microscale Investigation of Arsenic Distribution and Species in Cement Product from Cement Kiln Coprocessing Wastes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yufei; Xue, Jingchuan; Huang, Qifei

    2013-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the immobilization mechanism and the leaching risk of Arsenic (As) in the cement product from coprocessing wastes using cement kiln, distribution and species of As in cement product were determined by microscale investigation methods, including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this study, sodium arsenate crystals (Na3AsO412H2O) were mixed with cement production raw materials and calcined to produce cement clinker. Then, clinker was mixed water to prepare cement paste. EPMA results showed that As was generally distributed throughout the cement paste. As content in calcium silicate hydrates gel (C-S-H) was in low level, but higher than that in other cement mineral phases. This means that most of As is expected to form some compounds that disperse on the surfaces of cement mineral phases. Linear combination fitting (LCF) of the X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra revealed that As in the cement paste was predominantly As(V) and mainly existed as Mg3(AsO4)2, Ca3(AsO4)2, and Na2HAsO4. PMID:24223030

  18. Sustainable development of the cement industry and blended cements to meet ecological challenges.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, Konstantin

    2003-05-01

    The world production of cement has greatly increased in the past 10 years. This trend is the most significant factor affecting technological development and the updating of manufacturing facilities in the cement industry. Existing technology for the production of cement clinker is ecologically damaging; it consumes much energy and natural resources and also emits pollutants. A new approach to the production of blended or high-volume mineral additive (HVMA) cement helps to improve its ecological compatibility. HVMA cement technology is based on the intergrinding of portland cement clinker, gypsum, mineral additives, and a special complex admixture. This new method increases the compressive strength of ordinary cement, improves durability of the cement-based materials, and--at the same time--uses inexpensive natural mineral additives or industrial by-products. This improvement leads to a reduction of energy consumption per unit of the cement produced. Higher strength, better durability, reduction of pollution at the clinker production stage, and decrease of landfill area occupied by industrial by-products, all provide ecological advantages for HVMA cement. PMID:12806096

  19. Measurement of transient and residual stresses during polymerization of bone cement for cemented hip implants.

    PubMed

    Nuño, N; Madrala, A; Plamondon, D

    2008-08-28

    The initial fixation of a cemented hip implant relies on the strength of the interface between the stem, bone cement and adjacent bone. Bone cement is used as grouting material to fix the prosthesis to the bone. The curing process of bone cement is an exothermic reaction where bone cement undergoes volumetric changes that will generate transient stresses resulting in residual stresses once polymerization is completed. However, the precise magnitude of these stresses is still not well documented in the literature. The objective of this study is to develop an experiment for the direct measurement of the transient and residual radial stresses at the stem-cement interface generated during cement polymerization. The idealized femoral-cemented implant consists of a stem placed inside a hollow cylindrical bone filled with bone cement. A sub-miniature load cell is inserted inside the stem to make a direct measurement of the radial compressive forces at the stem-cement interface, which are then converted to radial stresses. A thermocouple measures the temperature evolution during the polymerization process. The results show the evolution of stress generation corresponding to volumetric changes in the cement. The effect of initial temperature of the stem and bone as well as the cement-bone interface condition (adhesion or no adhesion) on residual radial stresses is investigated. A maximum peak temperature of 70 degrees C corresponds to a peak in transient stress during cement curing. Maximum radial residual stresses of 0.6 MPa in compression are measured for the preheated stem. PMID:18692188

  20. Method for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants

    DOEpatents

    Wickramanayake, Godage B.

    1993-01-01

    A method for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil to decompose the organic compounds. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

  1. Bone cement with a modified polyphosphate network structure stimulates hard tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Hong, Min-Ho; Kim, Min-Chul; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Ko, Yeong-Mu; Choi, Heon-Jin; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a calcium polyphosphate cement (CpPC) consisting of basic components was investigated to assess its potential for hard tissue regeneration. The added basic components for improving the structural stability, which controlled the setting time, where the setting reaction resulted in the formation of amorphous structure with a re-constructed polyphosphate. Moreover, the characteristics were controlled by the composition, which determined the polyphosphate structure. CpPC exhibited outstanding dissolution rate compared with the common biodegradable cement, brushite cement (2.5 times). Despite high amounts of dissolution products, no significant cytotoxicity ensued. Induction of calcification in MG-63 cells treated with CpPC, the level of calcification increased with increasing CpPC dissolution rate. Induced calcification was observed also in CpPC-treated ST2 cells, in contrast with MG-63 and ST2 treated with brushite cement, for which no calcification was observed. In vivo tests using a rat calvarial defect model showed that resorbed CpPC resulted in favorable host responses and promoted bone formation. Additionally, there was a significant increase in defect closure, and new bone formation progressed from CpPC mid-sites as well as defect margins. From these results, CpPC exhibits significant potential as biodegradable bone substitute for bone regeneration. PMID:27511981

  2. Extraoral Cementation Technique to Minimize Cement-Associated Peri-implant Marginal Bone Loss: Can a Thin Layer of Zinc Oxide Cement Provide Sufficient Retention?

    PubMed

    Frisch, Eberhard; Ratka-Krüger, Petra; Weigl, Paul; Woelber, Johan

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the use of laboratory-fabricated crown intaglio replicas for extraorally prepared cementation of fixed restorations to implants. This technique minimizes excess cement and may therefore reduce the risk of cement-related marginal peri-implant bone loss. It is unclear whether the remaining thin layer of luting agent provides sufficient retention if low-adhesive zinc oxide (ZnO) cement is used. In 85 consecutive patients, 113 single crowns were cemented to implants using extraoral cementation technique (ECT) and ZnO cement. All patients were followed for 6 months and investigated for decementation. Seven events of decementation (incidence: 6.19%) were found in 7 patients (8.24%). ECT may represent a viable cementation technique for implant-supported single crowns, even using low-adhesion cements. PMID:27479343

  3. Correlating cement characteristics with rheology of paste

    SciTech Connect

    Vikan, H. Justnes, H.; Winnefeld, F.; Figi, R.

    2007-11-15

    The influence of cement characteristics such as cement fineness and clinker composition on the 'flow resistance' measured as the area under the shear stress-shear rate flow curve has been investigated. Three different types of plasticizers namely naphthalene sulphonate-formaldehyde condensate, polyether grafted polyacrylate, and lignosulphonate have been tested in this context on 6 different cements. The flow resistance correlated well with the cement characteristic (Blaine.{l_brace}d.cC{sub 3}A + [1 - d].C{sub 3}S{r_brace}) where the factor d represents relative reactivity of cubic C{sub 3}A and C{sub 3}S while cC{sub 3}A and C{sub 3}S represent the content of these minerals. It was found to be either a linear or exponential function of the combined cement characteristic depending on plasticizer type and dosage. The correlation was valid for a mix of pure cement and cement with fly ash, limestone filler (4%), as well as pastes with constant silica fume dosage, when the mineral contents were determined by Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffractograms.

  4. Dermatoses in cement workers in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y L; Wang, B J; Yeh, K C; Wang, J C; Kao, H H; Wang, M T; Shih, H C; Chen, C J

    1999-01-01

    Construction workers are known to have occupational dermatoses. The prevalence of such dermatoses was unknown in Taiwanese construction workers. The objective of this study was to determine the work exposure, prevalence of skin manifestations, and sensitivity to common contact allergens in cement workers of southern Taiwan. A total of 1147 current regular cement workers were telephone-interviewed about skin problems during the past 12 months, work exposure, and personal protection. Among those interviewed, 166 were examined and patch tested with common contact allergens. A high % of cement workers reported skin problems in the past 12 months. More men (13.9%) reported skin problems possibly related to work than women (5.4%). Prevalence was associated with lower use of gloves, duration of work as cement worker, and more time in jobs involving direct manual handling of cement, especially tiling. A high % of dermatitis was noted in the 166 workers examined, which correlated with reported skin problems. On patch testing, construction workers had a high frequency of sensitivity to chromate. Sensitivity to chromate or cobalt was associated with reported skin problems, or dorsal hand dermatitis on examination. These workers' dermatitis was under-diagnosed and inadequately managed. It is concluded that cement workers in southern Taiwan had a high prevalence of skin problems related to cement use. Protective measures, work practice, and physician education should be improved to prevent or manage such problems. PMID:9928797

  5. Calcite cements in the modern Floridan aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes, U.; Budd, D.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Calcite cements in the Ocala (Eocene) and Suwannee (Oligocene) formations, southwestern Floridan aquifer have been studied to determine updip to downdip variations in cement chemistries and cathodoluminescence within a modern regional confined aquifer. Interparticle, intraparticle, and fracture-fill cements comprise 5-15% of the limestones. Five different calcite cement morphologies are distinguishable and occur throughout the aquifer: (1) circumgranular microspar, (2) fine- to medium-crystalline rhombs, (3) medium-crystalline syntaxial overgrowths on echinoderms, (4) fine-crystalline pore-filling mosaics, and (5) micrite. Type 5 occurs only below former exposure surfaces. Volumetrically, type 3 is the most important and type 4 is the least. Cathodoluminescence observations reveal only nonluminescent cements updip and an increase in luminescent zones and luminescent intensity downdip. Updip nonluminescent cements have very low Fe and Mn concentrations, but high Mg and Sr concentrations. These relations are interpreted to reflect oxidizing conditions and high rock/water interaction. Fe and Mn concentrations increase and Sr and Mg contents decrease downdip. These trends are interpreted to reflect reducing conditions, cross-formational flow, and slower rock/water interaction. Downdip cathodoluminescence zonations consist of a broad nonluminescent zone, followed by a thin bright orange zone, and then a dull luminescence zone. These geochemical and luminescent patterns along a regional flow line in the confined Floridan aquifer have many similarities to those observed in calcite cements described from ancient aquifers.

  6. PMMA-based composite materials with reactive ceramic fillers: IV. Radiopacifying particles embedded in PMMA beads for acrylic bone cements.

    PubMed

    Abboud, M; Casaubieilh, L; Morvan, F; Fontanille, M; Duguet, E

    2000-01-01

    New acrylic bone cements were prepared from alumina particles previously treated by 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (gamma-MPS) and embedded in poly(methylmethacrylate-co-ethylacrylate) beads with about 7 mol% of ethyl acrylate repeating units. The encapsulation was performed through a conventional suspension polymerization process. The influence of (i) the concentration of the dispersion stabilizer and (ii) the alumina content upon the shape, size, and size distribution of the acrylic beads was studied. Cements were prepared from each batch by hand-mixing alumina-filled acrylic beads with a liquid monomer mixture containing methyl methacrylate, n-butyl methacrylate, and N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine. Benzoyl peroxide was previously added to the solid part. The powder-to-liquid ratio was equal to 2 for each formulation. Compressive strength of cured cement decreases with alumina content, whereas compressive modulus remains roughly constant. These results are in contradiction to those obtained for cements based on a mixture of gamma-MPS-treated alumina and unfilled acrylic beads. Nevertheless, they are interpreted in terms of alumina arrangement in the cement. In the first case, alumina particles contribute to the reinforcement of the dispersed acrylic phase, with poor benefits for the whole materials. In the second case, they allow the reinforcement of the continuous acrylic phase and, therefore, the cement's one. PMID:11074433

  7. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on bond durability of fiber posts cemented with etch-and-rinse adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Sarafraz, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was undertaken to investigate whether use of an adhesive penetration enhancer, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), improves bond stability of fiber posts to root dentin using two two-step etch-and-rinse resin cements. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty human maxillary central incisor roots were randomly divided into 4 groups after endodontic treatment and post space preparation, based on the fiber post/cement used with and without DMSO pretreatment. Acid-etched root dentin was treated with 5% DMSO aqueous solution for 60 seconds or with distilled water (control) prior to the application of Excite DSC/Variolink II or One-Step Plus/Duo-link for post cementation. After micro-slicing the bonded root dentin, push-out bond strength (P-OBS) test was performed immediately or after 1-year of water storage in each group. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Student's t-test (α=.05). RESULTS A significant effect of time, DMSO treatment, and treatment × time interaction were observed (P<.001). DMSO did not affect immediate bonding of the two cements. Aging significantly reduced P-OBS in control groups (P<.001), while in DMSO-treated groups, no difference in P-OBS was observed after aging (P>.05). CONCLUSION DMSO-wet bonding might be a beneficial method in preserving the stability of resin-dentin bond strength over time when fiber post is cemented with the tested etch-and-rinse adhesive cements. PMID:27555893

  8. Effect of different provisional cement remnant cleaning procedures including Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength of ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Zortuk, Mustafa; Gumus, Hasan Onder; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cement removal by different dentin cleaning protocols (dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, Er:YAG laser) on the shear bond strength between ceramic and dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS In total, 36 caries-free unrestored human third molars were selected as tooth specimens. Provisional restorations were fabricated and cemented with eugenol-free provisional cement. Then, disc-shaped ceramic specimens were fabricated and randomly assigned to four groups of dentin cleaning protocols (n = 9). Group 1 (control): Provisional cements were mechanically removed with a dental explorer. Group 2: The dentin surfaces were treated with a cleaning brush with pumice Group 3: The dentin surfaces were treated with a cleaning bur. Group 4: The provisional cements were removed by an Er:YAG laser. Self-adhesive luting cement was used to bond ceramic discs to dentin surfaces. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.05 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed using a Kolmogorov Smirnov, One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests to perform multiple comparisons (α=0.05). RESULTS The dentin cleaning methods did not significantly affect the SBS of ceramic discs to dentin as follows: dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, and Er:YAG laser. CONCLUSION The use of different cleaning protocols did not affect the SBS between dentin and ceramic surfaces. PMID:23236570

  9. Holocene cemented beach deposits in Belize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gischler, Eberhard; Lomando, Anthony J.

    1997-06-01

    Two types of cemented beach deposits occur on reef islands off the coast of Belize. These are (1) intertidal beachrock that is dominantly cemented by marine aragonite and high-magnesium-calcite cements, and (2) supratidal cayrock that is cemented mainly by vadose low-magnesium-calcite cements. Besides differences in position relative to present sea level and resulting early diagenesic features, beachrock and cayrock can be distinguished on the basis of differences in composition, texture, geographical position, and age. Whereas the composition of beachrock is similar to that of the adjacent marginal reef sediments, cayrock is enriched in benthic foraminifera. Intertidal beachrock is moderately to well sorted and well cemented, while supratidal cayrock is very well sorted, poorly cemented and friable. Beachrock occurs preferentially on windward beaches of sand-shingle Gays on the middle and southern barrier reefs and on the isolated platforms Glovers and Lighthouse Reefs. Cayrock only occurs on larger mangrove-sand Gays of the isolated platforms Turneffe Islands, Lighthouse Reef, and the northern barrier reef. 14C-dating of ten whole-rock and mollusk shell samples produced calibrated dates between AD 345 and AD 1435 for beachrock and between BC 1085 and AD 1190 for cayrock. The large-scale distribution of beachrock in Belize supports the contention that physical processes such as water agitation rather than biological processes control beachrock formation and distribution. Only on windward sides of cays that are close to the reef crest, where large amounts of seawater flush the beaches, considerable amounts of cements can be precipitated to produce beachrock. Cayrock forms due to cementation in the vadose zone and is only preserved on larger, stable mangrove-sand cays.

  10. Results of cement augmentation and curettage in aneurysmal bone cyst of spine

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Saumyajit; Patel, Dharmesh R; Dhakal, Gaurav; Sarangi, T

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a vascular tumor of the spine. Management of spinal ABC still remains controversial because of its location, vascular nature and incidence of recurrence. In this manuscript, we hereby describe two cases of ABC spine treated by curettage, vertebral cement augmentation for control of bleeding and internal stabilization with two years followup. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature describing the role of cement augmentation in spinal ABC in controlling vascular bleeding in curettage of ABC of spine. Case 1: A 22 year old male patient presented with chronic back pain. On radiological investigation, there were multiple, osteolytic septite lesions at L3 vertebral body without neural compression or instability. Percutaneous transpedicular biopsy of L3 from involved pedicle was done. This was followed by cement augmentation through the uninvolved pedicle. Next, transpedicular complete curettage was done through involved pedicle. Case 2: A 15-year-old female presented with nonradiating back pain and progressive myelopathy. On radiological investigation, there was an osteolytic lesion at D9. At surgery, decompression, pedicle screw-rod fixation and posterolateral fusion from D7 to D11 was done. At D9 level, through normal pedicle cement augmentation was added to provide anterior column support and to control the expected bleeding following curettage. Transpedicular complete curettage was done through the involved pedicle with controlled bleeding at the surgical field. Cement augmentation was providing controlled bleeding at surgical field during curettage, internal stabilization and control of pain. On 2 years followup, pain was relieved and there was a stable spinal segment with well filled cement without any sign of recurrence in computed tomography scan. In selected cases of spinal ABC with single vertebral, single pedicle involvement; cement augmentation of vertebra through normal pedicle has an

  11. Influence of strontia on various properties of surgical simplex P acrylic bone cement and experimental variants.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gladius; Xu, Jie; Madigan, Seamus; Towler, Mark R

    2007-11-01

    The fact that the composition of acrylic bone cement, as used in cemented primary arthroplasties, is not optimal has been highlighted in the literature. For example: (i) deleterious effects of the radiopacifier (BaSO(4) or ZrO(2) particles in the powder) have been reported; (ii) there is an indication that pre-polymerized poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) beads in the powder may be dispensed with; and (iii) there is a strong consensus that the accelerator commonly used, N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMPT), is toxic and has many other undesirable properties. At the same time, the effectiveness of drugs that contain a strontium compound in treating the effects of osteoporosis has been explained in terms of the role of strontium in bone formation and resorption. This indicates that strontium compounds may also have desirable effects on osseointegration of arthroplasties. The present study is a detailed evaluation of 24 acrylic bone cement formulations comprising different relative amounts of BaSO(4), strontia (as an alternative radiopacifier), pre-polymerized PMMA beads and DMPT. A large number of properties of the curing and cured cement were determined, including setting time, polymerization rate, fracture toughness and fatigue life. The focus was on the radiopacifier, with the finding being that many properties of formulations that contained strontia were about the same or better than those for cements that contained BaSO(4). Thus, further developmental work on strontia-containing acrylic bone cements is justified, with a view to making them candidates for use in cemented primary arthroplasties. PMID:17512808

  12. Results of cement augmentation and curettage in aneurysmal bone cyst of spine.

    PubMed

    Basu, Saumyajit; Patel, Dharmesh R; Dhakal, Gaurav; Sarangi, T

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a vascular tumor of the spine. Management of spinal ABC still remains controversial because of its location, vascular nature and incidence of recurrence. In this manuscript, we hereby describe two cases of ABC spine treated by curettage, vertebral cement augmentation for control of bleeding and internal stabilization with two years followup. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature describing the role of cement augmentation in spinal ABC in controlling vascular bleeding in curettage of ABC of spine. Case 1: A 22 year old male patient presented with chronic back pain. On radiological investigation, there were multiple, osteolytic septite lesions at L3 vertebral body without neural compression or instability. Percutaneous transpedicular biopsy of L3 from involved pedicle was done. This was followed by cement augmentation through the uninvolved pedicle. Next, transpedicular complete curettage was done through involved pedicle. Case 2: A 15-year-old female presented with nonradiating back pain and progressive myelopathy. On radiological investigation, there was an osteolytic lesion at D9. At surgery, decompression, pedicle screw-rod fixation and posterolateral fusion from D7 to D11 was done. At D9 level, through normal pedicle cement augmentation was added to provide anterior column support and to control the expected bleeding following curettage. Transpedicular complete curettage was done through the involved pedicle with controlled bleeding at the surgical field. Cement augmentation was providing controlled bleeding at surgical field during curettage, internal stabilization and control of pain. On 2 years followup, pain was relieved and there was a stable spinal segment with well filled cement without any sign of recurrence in computed tomography scan. In selected cases of spinal ABC with single vertebral, single pedicle involvement; cement augmentation of vertebra through normal pedicle has an

  13. Effects of different surface treatments on bond strength between resin cements and zirconia ceramics.

    PubMed

    Erdem, A; Akar, G C; Erdem, A; Kose, T

    2014-01-01

    This study compares the bond strength of resin cement and yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic with different surface conditioning methods. Two hundred presintered Y-TZP ceramic specimens were prepared, sintered (4 × 4 × 4 mm), and randomly assigned to four equal groups as control (C, no conditioning); airborne particle abraded (APA, air abrasion with 11 μm Al2O3); tribochemical silica coating/silane coupling system (TSC, Rocatec, air abrasion with 110 μm Al2O3, 30 μm silica-coated Al2O3 and silane); and laser (L, Er:YAG laser irradiation treated at a power setting of 200 mJ). After specimen preparation, composite resin cylinders were prepared and cemented with resin cements (Clearfil Esthetic, Panavia F 2.0, Rely X-U100, Super Bond C&B, and Multilink Automix) on the ceramic surfaces and kept in an incubator at 37°C for 60 days. All specimens were tested for shear bond strength with a universal testing machine, and fractured surfaces were evaluated by environmental scanning electron microscopy. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α=0.05). The bond strengths for C and L groups were not significantly different according to adhesive resin cement. APA and TSC resulted in increased bond strength for Panavia F 2.0 and Rely X-U100 resin cements. Additionally, TSC presented higher bond strength with Multilink Automix. Adhesive fracture between the ceramic and resin cement was the most common failure. Complete cohesive fracture at the ceramic or composite cylinders was not observed. Regardless of the adhesive resin cement used, laser treatment did not improve resin bond strength. PMID:24299447

  14. Compound stabilization/solidification of MSWI fly ash with trimercapto-s-triazine and cement.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qiang; Li, Jiangshan; Hu, Zhuyun

    2012-01-01

    A new treatment technology of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash is presented in this paper. Feasibility of solidification/stabilization treatment of MSWI by successively adding trimercapto-s-triazine and cement, and the effect of addition, fly ash size and curing time were studied by batch tests. The results showed that MSWI posed a huge environmental risk, the partial distribution showed normal distribution approximately. Treatment of fly ash with trimercapto-s-triazine and cement showed a good effect, the leaching toxicity of treated fly ash solidified blocks with 2% trimercapto-s-triazine and 20% cement could meet the standard for pollution control on the landfill site of MSW in China after curing for 7 days, and the flexural strength of solidified blocks could reach 2.4 MPa. Ground fly ash had a positive effect on both leaching toxicity and strength. PMID:22744703

  15. Cement sequence stratigraphy in carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Braithwaite, C.J.R. )

    1993-03-01

    Conventional paragenesis analysis commonly fails to describe the subtleties of regional variation found in carbonate cement sequences. Application of the concept of sequence stratigraphy to diagenetic studies allows grouping of the products of depositional (precipitation or crystallization) events into sequences. The boundaries to these sequences are surfaces reflecting erosion (dissolution), non-deposition (renucleation), compaction or imposed fracture events. The pattern of chemical changes within a diagenetic sequence provides a fingerprint which allows that sequence to be recognized among others. Diagenetic sequences may be grouped into temporal series to provide an overall view of the diagenesis of the unit which takes account of local unconformities. The belief that lateral stratigraphical equivalence can serve as a proxy for diagenetic time equivalence is evidently mistaken; diagenetic boundaries may cross stratigraphic boundaries. The application of sequence stratigraphy concepts provides a valuable tool for interpreting regional diagenesis in carbonates and potentially offers insight into the pathways of hydrocarbon or ore fluid migration.

  16. Silica Transport and Cementation in Quartz Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pebble, C.; Farver, J.; Onasch, C.; Winslow, D.

    2008-12-01

    Silica transport and cementation in quartz aggregates have been experimentally investigated. Starting materials include a natural quartz arenite (Pocono sandstone), sized clasts of synthetic quartz, and sized grains of disaggregated natural sandstones. Experimental charges consisted of amorphous silica powder (~25 mg), AlCl3 powder (~3 mg), 25 wt% NaCl brine solution (~20 mg), and the starting material (~150 mg). The charges were weld-sealed in gold capsules and run in cold-seal pressure vessels at 300°C to 600°C at 150 MPa confining pressure for up to 4 weeks. Detailed calibrations of the furnaces indicate the maximum temperature variation across the length of the sample charges (3-7mm) was <5°C, and typically <3°C. After the experiments, samples were vacuum impregnated with epoxy containing a blue dye and sawn in half along the long axis of the sample charge. The nature and amount of silica transport and cementation in the samples was determined by a combination of Cathodoluminescence (CL), Light Microscopy (LM), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Photomosaics of the samples were collected and the amount of cement, porosity, and average grain sizes were determined by point-counting. The cement was easily recognized from the quartz grains by the difference in luminescence. The experiments indicate that the presence of amorphous silica results in rapid silica cementation in quartz aggregates (e.g., up to 12% cement by volume in 4 weeks at 450°C). The amount of cementation is a function of substrate type, time, temperature, and ionic strength of the brine. The rate of silica transport through the length of the experimental charge appears to be limited by the silica solubility and its rapid depletion by cementation. Although most of the cement was derived from the amorphous silica, evidence for local dissolution-precipitation was observed. The experiments demonstrate that the mobility of silica, and consequent precipitation of cement, does not require a

  17. Assessment of halite-cemented reservoir zones

    SciTech Connect

    Huurdeman, A.J.M.; Floris, F.J.T.; Lutgert, J.E. ); Breunese, J.N. ); Al-Asbahl, A.M.S. )

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes the techniques used to identify the presence and distribution of halite-cemented layers in a sandstone oil reservoir. The distribution of these layers in the wells was found by matching the core data with two independent halite identifiers from the well logs. Numerical well models were used to assess the dimensions and spatial distribution of the halite-cemented layers. Multiple simulation runs in which the spatial distribution, the dimensions, and the vertical permeability were varied resulted in a stochastic model that best matched the production history. Gas and water coning are retarded by the halite-cemented layers if the perforations are properly located.

  18. Reinforcement of osteosynthesis screws with brushite cement.

    PubMed

    Van Landuyt, P; Peter, B; Beluze, L; Lemaître, J

    1999-08-01

    The fixation of osteosynthesis screws remains a severe problem for fracture repair among osteoporotic patients. Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) is routinely used to improve screw fixation, but this material has well-known drawbacks such as monomer toxicity, exothermic polymerization, and nonresorbability. Calcium phosphate cements have been developed for several years. Among these new bone substitution materials, brushite cements have the advantage of being injectable and resorbable. The aim of this study is to assess the reinforcement of osteosynthesis screws with brushite cement. Polyurethane foams, whose density is close to that of cancellous bone, were used as bone model. A hole was tapped in a foam sample, then brushite cement was injected. Trabecular osteosynthesis screws were inserted. After 24 h of aging in water, the stripping force was measured by a pull-out test. Screws (4.0 and 6.5 mm diameter) and two foam densities (0.14 and 0.28 g/cm3) were compared. Cements with varying solid/liquid ratios and xanthan contents were used in order to obtain the best screw reinforcement. During the pull-out test, the stripping force first increases to a maximum, then drops to a steady-state value until complete screw extraction. Both maximum force and plateau value increase drastically in the presence of cement. The highest stripping force is observed for 6.5-mm screws reinforced with cement in low-density foams. In this case, the stripping force is multiplied by 3.3 in the presence of cement. In a second experiment, cements with solid/liquid ratio ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 g/mL were used with 6.5-mm diameter screws. In some compositions, xanthan was added to improve injectability. The best results were obtained with 2.5 g/mL cement containing xanthan and with 3.0 g/mL cements without xanthan. A 0.9-kN maximal stripping force was observed with nonreinforced screws, while 1.9 kN was reached with reinforced screws. These first results are very promising regarding screw

  19. Radon resistant potential of concrete manufactured using Ordinary Portland Cement blended with rice husk ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, R. P.; Kumar, Amit

    2013-12-01

    The emission of radon from building materials and soil depends upon the radium content, porosity, moisture content and radon diffusion length of materials. Several techniques have been used to reduce the radon emission from the soil using different flooring materials. But the effectiveness of radon shielding depends upon the diffusion of radon through these materials. The present study proposes a method for producing a radon resistant material for decreasing radon diffusion through it. The method involves rice husk ash (RHA) in addition to cement for the preparation of concrete used for flooring and walls. The radon diffusion, exhalation and mechanical property of concrete prepared by rice husk ash blended cement were studied. The addition of RHA caused the reduction in radon diffusion coefficient, exhalation rates, porosity and enhanced the compressive strength of concrete. The bulk radon diffusion coefficient of cementitious concrete was reduced upto 69% by addition of rice husk ash as compare to that of control concrete.

  20. Use of cemented paste backfill in arsenic-rich tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamberg, Roger; Maurice, Christian; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Gold is extracted by cyanide leaching from inclusions in arsenopyrite from a mine in the north of Sweden. The major ore mineral assemblage consists of pyrrhotite and arsenopyrite-loellingite. Effluents from the gold extraction were treated with Fe2(SO4)3, with the aim to form stable As-bearing Fe-precipitates (FEP). The use of the method called cemented paste backfill (CPB) is sometimes suggested for the management of tailings. In CPB, tailings are commonly mixed with low proportions (3 - 7 %) of cement and backfilled into underground excavated area. To reduce costs, amendments such as granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS), biofuel fly ash (BFA) and cement kiln dust (CKD) are used for partial replacement of cement in CPB due to their pozzolanic and alkaline properties. The objective for this study was to evaluate the leaching behaviour of As in CPB-mixtures with low proportions (1 - 3 %) of BFA and ordinary cement and unmodified tailings. The selection of CPB-recipies was made based on technical and economical criterias to adress the demands deriving from the mining operations. Speciation of the As in ore and tailings samples revealed that mining processes have dissolved the majority of the arsenopyrite in the ore, causing secondary As phases to co-precipitate with newly formed FEP:s. Tank leaching tests (TLT) and weathering cells (WCT) were used to compare leaching behaviour in a monolithic mass contra a crushed material. Quantification of the presumed benefit of CPB was made by calculation of the cumulative leaching of As. Results from the leaching tests (TLT and WCT) showed that the inclusion of As-rich tailings into a cementitious matrix increased leaching of As. This behaviour could partially be explained by an increase of pH. The addition of alkaline binder materials to tailings increased As leaching due to the relocation of desorbed As from FEPs into less acid-tolerant species such as Ca-arsenates and cementitious As-phases. Unmodified tailings generated an

  1. Dataset of producing and curing concrete using domestic treated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Asadollahfardi, Gholamreza; Delnavaz, Mohammad; Rashnoiee, Vahid; Fazeli, Alireza; Gonabadi, Navid

    2016-03-01

    We tested the setting time of cement, slump and compressive and tensile strength of 54 triplicate cubic samples and 9 cylindrical samples of concrete with and without a Super plasticizer admixture. We produced concrete samples made with drinking water and treated domestic wastewater containing 300, 400 kg/m(3) of cement before chlorination and then cured concrete samples made with drinking water and treated wastewater. Second, concrete samples made with 350 kg/m(3) of cement with a Superplasticizer admixture made with drinking water and treated wastewater and then cured with treated wastewater. The compressive strength of all the concrete samples made with treated wastewater had a high coefficient of determination with the control concrete samples. A 28-day tensile strength of all the samples was 96-100% of the tensile strength of the control samples and the setting time was reduced by 30 min which was consistent with a ASTMC191 standard. All samples produced and cured with treated waste water did not have a significant effect on water absorption, slump and surface electrical resistivity tests. However, compressive strength at 21 days of concrete samples using 300 kg/m(3) of cement in rapid freezing and thawing conditions was about 11% lower than concrete samples made with drinking water. PMID:26862577

  2. Dataset of producing and curing concrete using domestic treated wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Asadollahfardi, Gholamreza; Delnavaz, Mohammad; Rashnoiee, Vahid; Fazeli, Alireza; Gonabadi, Navid

    2015-01-01

    We tested the setting time of cement, slump and compressive and tensile strength of 54 triplicate cubic samples and 9 cylindrical samples of concrete with and without a Super plasticizer admixture. We produced concrete samples made with drinking water and treated domestic wastewater containing 300, 400 kg/m3 of cement before chlorination and then cured concrete samples made with drinking water and treated wastewater. Second, concrete samples made with 350 kg/m3 of cement with a Superplasticizer admixture made with drinking water and treated wastewater and then cured with treated wastewater. The compressive strength of all the concrete samples made with treated wastewater had a high coefficient of determination with the control concrete samples. A 28-day tensile strength of all the samples was 96–100% of the tensile strength of the control samples and the setting time was reduced by 30 min which was consistent with a ASTMC191 standard. All samples produced and cured with treated waste water did not have a significant effect on water absorption, slump and surface electrical resistivity tests. However, compressive strength at 21 days of concrete samples using 300 kg/m3 of cement in rapid freezing and thawing conditions was about 11% lower than concrete samples made with drinking water. PMID:26862577

  3. Effect of surface treatment on the initial bond strength of different luting cements to zirconium oxide ceramic.

    PubMed

    Nothdurft, F P; Motter, P J; Pospiech, P R

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the shear bond strength to zirconium oxide ceramic of adhesive-phosphate-monomer-containing (APM) and non-APM-containing (nAPM) luting cements after different surface treatments. nAPM cements: Bifix QM, Dual Cement, Duo Cement Plus, Multilink Automix, ParaCem Universal DC, PermaCem Smartmix, RelyX ARC, Variolink Ultra, and Variolink II; APM cements: Panavia EX, Panavia F2.0, and RelyX UniCem. Groups of ten test specimens were each prepared by layering luting cement, using cylindrical Teflon molds, onto differently treated zirconium dioxide discs. The surface treatments were airborne-particle abrasion with 110 mum alumina particles, silica coating (SC) using 30 mum alumina particles modified by silica (Rocatec System) or SC and silanization. Bifix QM and Multilink Automix were used in combination with an additional bonding/priming agent recommended by the manufacturers. After 48 h of water storage, each specimen was subjected to a shear test. Combinations involving APM-containing cements (14.41-23.88 MPa) generally exhibited higher shear bond strength than those without APM (4.29-17.34 MPa). Exceptions were Bifix QM (14.20-25.11 MPa) and Multilink Automix (19.14-23.09 MPa) in combination with system-specific silane or priming agent, which were on the upper end of shear bond strength values. With the use of the Rocatec system, a partially significant increase in shear bond strength could be achieved in nAPM cement. Modified surface treatment modalities increased the bond strength to zirconium oxide, although the most important factor in achieving a strong bond was the selection of a suitable cement. System-specific priming or bonding agents lead to further improvement. PMID:18758827

  4. Chromate sensitization and elicitation from cement with iron sulfate.

    PubMed

    Bruze, M; Gruvberger, B; Hradil, E

    1990-01-01

    For some years, iron sulfate has been added to cement manufactured in the Scandinavian countries to prevent sensitization to and elicitation from chromate in cement. Allergic contact dermatitis from chromate is reported here in 3 workers with hand dermatitis and exposure to cement containing iron sulfate. Although iron sulfate had been added to the cement, high chromate concentrations were found in many samples of cement to which these workers were exposed. PMID:1969204

  5. [Asbestos concentrations in drinking water. Asbestos cement pipes and geogenic sources in Austria].

    PubMed

    Neuberger, M; Frank, W; Golob, P; Warbichler, P

    1996-03-01

    Sources of asbestos in drinking water may be natural deposits or the use of asbestos cement for water distribution. 50 water samples were selected in Austria to detect fibre contamination from either geology or asbestos cement by comparison with control areas and by comparison of raw and treated water. Standardized EPA/BGA methodology with transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and selected area electron diffraction was used to quantify concentrations of different sized amphibole and chrysotile fibres. In 10 areas with asbestos deposits and in 14 areas with use of asbestos cement pipes asbestos concentrations in drinking water were low and not significantly different from 6 control areas (median 32,000 total asbestos fibres per litre). The relative highest concentration was found in an area with natural deposits at the source of the water supply (190,000 per litre). In areas without natural deposits the increase of asbestos concentrations from origin to consumer of water was not significant and unrelated to water aggressiveness, age and length of asbestos cement pipes. This could be mainly due to the fact that in areas with aggressive water asbestos cement pipes have been coated in Austria. A sample from a cistern, however, showed considerable asbestos contamination and raises concern about the use of surface water for room air humidification. PMID:9376056

  6. Effect of MMA-g-UHMWPE grafted fiber on mechanical properties of acrylic bone cement.

    PubMed

    Yang, J M; Huang, P Y; Yang, M C; Lo, S K

    1997-01-01

    Ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers were treated with argon plasma for 5 min, followed by uv irradiation in methyl methacrylate (MMA)-chloroform solution for 5 h to obtain MMA-g-UHMWPE grafted fiber. The grafting content was estimated by the titration of esterification method. The grafting amount of 5280 nmol/g was the largest for the MMA concentration at 18.75 vol%. To improve the mechanical properties of acrylic bone cement, pure UHMWPE fiber and MMA-g-UHMWPE fiber were added to the surgical Simplex. P radiopaque bone cement. The mechanical properties including tensile strength, tensile modulus, compressive strength, bending strength, and bending stiffness were measured. Dynamic mechanical analysis was also performed. By comparing the effect of the pure UHMWPE fiber and MMA-g-UHMWPE grafted fiber on the mechanical properties of acrylic bone cement, it was found that the acrylic bone cement with MMA-g-UHMWPE grafted fiber had a more significant reinforcing effect than that with untreated UHMWPE fiber. This might be due to the improvement of the interfacial bonding between the grafted fibers and the acrylic bone cement matrix. PMID:9421758

  7. Evaluation of polymerization shrinkage of resin cements through in vitro and in situ experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A. P. G. O.; Karam, L. Z.; Pulido, C. A.; Gomes, O. M. M.; Kalinowski, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of two types of resin cements , conventional dual and dual self adhesive, through in vitro and in situ experiments. For the in vitro assay were selected two resin cements that were handled and dispensed over a mylar strip supported by a glass plate. The Bragg grating sensors were positioned and another portion of cement. was placed, covered by another mylar strip. For the in situ experiment 16 single-rooted teeth were selected who were divided into 2 groups: group 1 - conventional dual resin cement Relyx ARC and group 2 - dual self adhesive resin cement Relyx U200 ( 3M/ESPE ). The teeth were treated and prepared to receive the intracanal posts. Two Bragg grating sensors were recorded and introduced into the root canal at different apical and coronal positions. The results showed that the in vitro experiment presented similar values of polymerization shrinkage that the in situ experiment made in cervical position; whereas Relyx ARC resulted lower values compared to Relyx U200; and cervical position showed higher shrinkage than the apical.

  8. Effect of Pressurized Cement Insertion on Cardiopulmonary Parameters during Cemented Hip Hemiarthroplasty: A Randomized Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Woo Suk; Kim, Tae Hyun; Oh, Sang Hoon; Park, Sub Ri; Park, Byoung Hark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to investigate the cardiopulmonary effects of pressurized cement insertion in elderly patients undergoing cemented hip hemiarthroplasty. Materials and Methods We conducted a randomized prospective study on elderly patients undergoing cemented hip hemiarthroplasty. Patients were divided into pressurized and non-pressurized groups based on the pressure application during cement insertion. We measured mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), arterial blood gases and serotonin concentration in blood. These variables were measured before bone cement insertion, and 3 and 5 minute after insertion. They were also measured immediately and 15 minutes after reduction. Results In cemented hip hemiarthroplasty, there were no significant change in MAP (P=0.92), SBP (P=0.85), DBP (P=0.98), HR (P=0.97) and serotonin concentration over time. There were no statistically significant difference between the two groups in MAP, SBP, DBP, HR, PO2, PaCO2, SaO2 and serotonin concentration, though three minutes after cement insertion, both groups showed decreases in SBP, DBP and MBP. Conclusion The pressurization method in cemented hip hemiarthroplasty was not found to be related with development of bone cement syndromes in elderly patients.

  9. Enamel fluoride levels after orthodontic band cementation with glass ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Akkaya, S; Uner, O; Alaçam, A; Değim, T

    1996-02-01

    The aim of this investigation was to examine the fluoride uptake by enamel after application of glass ionomer cement for orthodontic band cementation compared with zinc phosphate cement. The study was conducted on 21 children whose mean age was 14 years. All the children were reared in the Middle Anatolian cities where the water fluoride concentration was below the level of 0.50 ppm. The subjects were randomly divided into three groups. The first experimental group, had seven subjects whose teeth were topically fluoridated with 2 per cent NaF solution, before orthodontic band cementation with zinc phosphate cement. The second experimental group also had seven subjects whose orthodontic bands were cemented with glass ionomer cement. The third group, consisted of seven control subjects and no dental procedures were performed in this group. All the participants were followed for 3 months and at the end of this period maxillary first premolars, which were in the ninth developmental stage according to Nolla (1960), were extracted for orthodontic purposes. The enamel fluoride concentrations were determined on the left maxillary first premolars at three successive etch depths by means of a fluor ion electrode, whereas the calcium concentrations were determined with an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results of this investigation showed that in both cementation groups enamel fluoride concentrations at three successive etch depths were highly increased compared with the control group. However, the difference between the cementation groups was not statistically significant. PMID:8746180

  10. Influence of the temperature on the cement disintegration in cement-retained implant restorations.

    PubMed

    Linkevicius, Tomas; Vindasiute, Egle; Puisys, Algirdas; Linkeviciene, Laura; Svediene, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the average disintegration temperature of three dental cements used for the cementation of the implant-supported prostheses. One hundred and twenty metal frameworks were fabricated and cemented on the prosthetic abutments with different dental cements. After heat treatment in the dental furnace, the samples were set for the separation to test the integration of the cement. Results have shown that resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RGIC) exhibited the lowest disintegration temperature (p<0.05), but there was no difference between zinc phosphate cement (ZPC) and dual cure resin cement (RC) (p>0.05). Average separation temperatures: RGIC - 306 ± 23 °C, RC - 363 ± 71 °C, it could not be calculated for the ZPC due to the eight unseparated specimens. Within the limitations of the study, it could be concluded that RGIC cement disintegrates at the lowest temperature and ZPC is not prone to break down after exposure to temperature. PMID:23455980

  11. Radiopacity Evaluation of Contemporary Luting Cements by Digitization of Images

    PubMed Central

    Reis, José Maurício dos Santos Nunes; Jorge, Érica Gouveia; Ribeiro, João Gustavo Rabelo; Pinelli, Ligia Antunes Pereira; Abi-Rached, Filipe de Oliveira; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of two conventional cements (Zinc Cement and Ketac Cem Easymix), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RelyX Luting 2) and six resin cements (Multilink, Bistite II DC, RelyX ARC, Fill Magic Dual Cement, Enforce and Panavia F) by digitization of images. Methods. Five disc-shaped specimens (10 × 1.0 mm) were made for each material, according to ISO 4049. After setting of the cements, radiographs were made using occlusal films and a graduated aluminum stepwedge varying from 1.0 to 16 mm in thickness. The radiographs were digitized, and the radiopacity of the cements was compared with the aluminum stepwedge using the software VIXWIN-2000. Data (mmAl) were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Results. The Zinc Cement was the most radiopaque material tested (P < 0.05). The resin cements presented higher radiopacity (P < 0.05) than the conventional (Ketac Cem Easymix) or resin-modified glass ionomer (RelyX Luting 2) cements, except for the Fill Magic Dual Cement and Enforce. The Multilink presented the highest radiopacity (P < 0.05) among the resin cements. Conclusion. The glass ionomer-based cements (Ketac Cem Easymix and RelyX Luting 2) and the resin cements (Fill Magic Dual Cement and Enforce) showed lower radiopacity values than the minimum recommended by the ISO standard. PMID:23008777

  12. Increased Antibiotic Release from a Bone Cement Containing Bacterial Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Takahisa; Enomoto, Koichi; Uchio, Yuji; Yoshino, Katsumi

    2010-01-01

    Background Major disadvantages of antibiotic bone cements include limited drug release and reduced strength resulting from the addition of high doses of antibiotics. Bacterial cellulose, a three-dimensional hydrophilic mesh, may retain antibiotics and release them gradually. We hypothesized that the addition of cellulose to antibiotic bone cement would improve mechanical strength and antibiotic release. Questions/purposes We therefore examined the mechanical strength and antibiotic release of cellulose antibiotic cement. Methods A high dose of antibiotics (5 g per 40 g cement powder) was incorporated into bacterial cellulose and then mixed with bone cement. We compared the compression strength, fracture toughness, fatigue life, and elution kinetics of this formulation with those of plain cement and a traditional antibiotic cement. Results The average values for compression strength, fracture toughness, and fatigue life of the cellulose antibiotic cement were 97%, 97%, and 78% of the values obtained for plain cement, respectively. The corresponding values for the traditional antibiotic cement were 79%, 82%, and 17%, respectively. The cumulative elution over 35 days was 129% greater from the cellulose antibiotic cement than from the traditional antibiotic cement. Conclusions With a high dose of antibiotics, incorporating cellulose into the bone cement prevented compression and fracture fragility, improved fatigue life, and increased antibiotic elution. Clinical Relevance Antibiotic cements containing cellulose may have applications in clinical situations that require high levels of antibiotic release and preservation of the mechanical properties of the cement. PMID:20945120

  13. Calcium phosphate cement scaffolds with PLGA fibers.

    PubMed

    Vasconcellos, Letícia Araújo; dos Santos, Luís Alberto

    2013-04-01

    The use of calcium phosphate-based biomaterials has revolutionized current orthopedics and dentistry in repairing damaged parts of the skeletal system. Among those biomaterials, the cement made of hydraulic grip calcium phosphate has attracted great interest due to its biocompatibility and hardening "in situ". However, these cements have low mechanical strength compared with the bones of the human body. In the present work, we have studied the attainment of calcium phosphate cement powders and their addition to poly (co-glycolide) (PLGA) fibers to increase mechanical properties of those cements. We have used a new method that obtains fibers by dripping different reagents. PLGA fibers were frozen after lyophilized. With this new method, which was patented, it was possible to obtain fibers and reinforcing matrix which furthered the increase of mechanical properties, thus allowing the attainment of more resistant materials. The obtained materials were used in the construction of composites and scaffolds for tissue growth, keeping a higher mechanical integrity. PMID:23827539

  14. Fluid loss control in oil field cements

    SciTech Connect

    Sedillo, L.P.; Newlove, J.C.; Portnoy, R.C.

    1987-04-21

    An aqueous slurry is described which consists essentially of: (a) a cement; (b) about 0.05 to 5.0 wt% of a copolymer of N-vinylpyrrolidone and a salt of styrenesulfonic acid and based on the dry weight of the cement; (c) about 0.05 to 5.0 wt% of a dispersant of a metal salt of formaldehyde condensed naphthalenesulfonic acid base on the dry weight of the cement the ratio of the copolymer to dispersant ranging from 3:1 to 1:3 by weight; and (d) water, the cement, the copolymer and the dispersant being dispersed in the water to form the aqueous slurry and the wt% being based on the total weight of the slurry.

  15. A modified technique for extraoral cementation of implant retained restorations for preventing excess cement around the margins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The major drawback of cement-retained restorations is the extrusion of the excess cement into the peri-implant sulcus, with subsequent complications. Insufficient removal of the excess cement may initiate a local inflammatory process, which may lead to implant failure. This article presents a method of controlling cement flow on implant abutments, minimizing the excess cement around implant-retained restorations. PMID:24843401

  16. Physicochemical and microbiological characterization of cement kiln dust for potential reuse in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Salem, W M; Sayed, W F; Halawy, S A; Elamary, R B

    2015-09-01

    Cement kiln dust (CKD), a byproduct of cement manufacturing process, was collected from Misr Cement Co. at Qena, Egypt. CKD was characterized by X-ray diffraction and FTIR analysis. This byproduct was investigated for its physical-chemical characters, antibacterial activities on sewage water and the presence of nematode, parasites and algae in the treated water. The efficiency of CKD-treated water was also examined on Hibiscus sabdarriffa seed germination. Total bacteria, total and fecal coliform, as well as fecal streptococci were completely inhibited by CKD. Interestingly, zinc, manganese, iron, nickel and lead were completely absent from sewage water as these metals precipitated after treatment with 10gl(-1) CKD. On the other hand, among all the tested plant criteria, only root length was significantly reduced by 55% and 15% after zero and 3 days of CKD addition respectively compared to control. Furthermore, plant lipid peroxidation showed no significant differences between treated sewage water and control after zero and 3 days time addition of CKD. Catalase enzyme activity showed significant decrease by 56% and 64%, while peroxidase activity significantly increased up to 49% and 63% compared to untreated sewage after zero and 3 days of treatment, respectively. The absorption of lead, iron and copper by treated and untreated plants showed no significant differences. Chromium ions were highly absorbed (0.075mgl(-1)) by plants irrigated only with treated sewage water at zero time, and decreased gradually to 0.018mgl(-1) after 3 days of CKD addition. This study highlighted the efficiency of cement kiln dust as an antibacterial agent and its ability of scavenging heavy metals leading to the use of treated sewage water in activities such as crop irrigation. PMID:26004355

  17. Respiratory effects of portland cement dust

    SciTech Connect

    Abrons, H.L.; Sanderson, W.T.; Petersen, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of the respiratory effects of Portland cement dust was conducted. The cohort consisted of 2,736 cement workers at 16 facilities in the United States. The comparisons consisted of 2,213 individuals in activities not involving dust exposure. Spirometry testing was performed. Respiratory-symptom questionnaires were administered. Chest x-rays were taken and examined. Personal sampling for total and respirable dust, quartz, and oxides of sulfur and nitrogen was performed. Cement workers had a significantly elevated adjusted-odds ratio for dyspnea, rounded and irregular small x-ray opacities, and pleural abnormalities. None of the ventilatory-function variables were significantly different between cement workers and the comparisons. The authors conclude that cement dust exerts little adverse effect on respiratory symptoms and ventilatory function. To determine whether the increase in x-ray abnormalities represents pneumoconiosis or another pathological process would require histological study. There is insufficient evidence to suggest a change in the exposure limit for cement dust.

  18. Case Study of the California Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

    2005-05-01

    California is the largest cement producing state in theU.S., accounting for between 10 percent and 15 percent of U.S. cementproduction and cement industry employment. The cement industry inCalifornia consists of 31 sites that consume large amounts of energy,annually: 1,600 GWh of electricity, 22 million therms of natural gas, 2.3million tons of coal, 0.25 tons of coke, and smaller amounts of wastematerials, including tires. The case study summarized in this paperfocused on providing background information, an assessment ofenergy-efficiency opportunities and barriers, and program recommendationsthat can be used by program planners to better target products to thecement industry. The primary approach to this case study involvedwalk-through surveys of customer facilities and in depth interviews withcustomer decision makers and subsequent analysis of collected data. Inaddition, a basic review of the cement production process was developed,and summary cement industry energy and economic data were collected, andanalyzed. The analysis of secondary data provides background informationon the cement industry and identification of potential energy-efficiencyopportunities. The interviews provide some understanding of the customerperspective about implementation of energy-efficiencyprojects.

  19. Color stability of composite resin cements.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darrell S; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Whisler, Gerry

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to determine the difference in color stability of resin cements after one year of storage in water. Three commercial resin cements (Nexus 3, Calibra, Variolink 2) were evaluated under three different curing conditions (photo-, dual-, and self-cure) over three storage time periods (3, 6, and 12 months). A plastic mold was used to prepare cylindrical specimens of each of the three resin cements. For the phototcured specimens, only the base component of the resin cement was cured. For the dual- and self-cure specimens, the base and catalyst of the cements were mixed according to the manufacturer's instructions, syringed into the mold, and either photocured as before (dual-cure) or allowed to chemically set (self-cure). The total amount of color change (delta E) was calculated using a spectrophotometer after 24 hours (baseline) and after 3, 6, and 12 months of storage in distilled water. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures ANOVA and a Tukey test. After one year of storage, Nexus 3 demonstated the lowest color change values (delta E) under all curing conditions, although it was not significantly different from Variolink 2 when photocured or Calibra when self-cured. New resin cements without a traditional benzoyl peroxide/amine redox initiator system, such as Nexus 3, could be more color-stable over time. PMID:22313825

  20. A realistic molecular model of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Kushima, Akihiro; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Despite decades of studies of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H), the structurally complex binder phase of concrete, the interplay between chemical composition and density remains essentially unexplored. Together these characteristics of C-S-H define and modulate the physical and mechanical properties of this “liquid stone” gel phase. With the recent determination of the calcium/silicon (C/S = 1.7) ratio and the density of the C-S-H particle (2.6 g/cm3) by neutron scattering measurements, there is new urgency to the challenge of explaining these essential properties. Here we propose a molecular model of C-S-H based on a bottom-up atomistic simulation approach that considers only the chemical specificity of the system as the overriding constraint. By allowing for short silica chains distributed as monomers, dimers, and pentamers, this C-S-H archetype of a molecular description of interacting CaO, SiO2, and H2O units provides not only realistic values of the C/S ratio and the density computed by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation of water adsorption at 300 K. The model, with a chemical composition of (CaO)1.65(SiO2)(H2O)1.75, also predicts other essential structural features and fundamental physical properties amenable to experimental validation, which suggest that the C-S-H gel structure includes both glass-like short-range order and crystalline features of the mineral tobermorite. Additionally, we probe the mechanical stiffness, strength, and hydrolytic shear response of our molecular model, as compared to experimentally measured properties of C-S-H. The latter results illustrate the prospect of treating cement on equal footing with metals and ceramics in the current application of mechanism-based models and multiscale simulations to study inelastic deformation and cracking. PMID:19805265

  1. Aspirin, lysine, mifepristone and doxycycline combined can effectively and safely prevent and treat cancer metastasis: prevent seeds from gemmating on soil

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huo; Ma, Ji; Zhu, Yewei; Lu, Yusheng; Wang, Jichuang; Zhang, Ting; Li, Tao; Xie, Jingjing; Xu, Bo; Xie, Fangwei; Gao, Yu; Shao, Jingwei; Tu, Xiaohuang; Jia, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Recent scientific advances have increased our understanding of the cancer metastatic complexities and provided further impetus for new combination therapies to prevent cancer metastasis. Here, we demonstrated that a combination (HAMPT) of aspirin, lysine, mifepristone and doxycycline can effectively and safely prevent cancer metastasis. The pharmaceutically-formulated HAMPT inhibited adhesion of cancer cells to either endothelial cells or extracellular matrix via down-regulating cell adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and α4-integrin. HAMPT inhibited the cloak effect by activated platelets on cancer cells, thereby interfering adhesion and invasion of cancer cells to the underlying stroma. At the effective concentration, HAMPT induced cancer cells into dormancy with minor inhibition on cell viability. Four-day pretreatment followed by 30-day oral administration of HAMPT (33.5-134 mg/kg) to the mice inoculated with cancer cells produced significant inhibition on cancer metastasis dose-dependently without marked side effects. Fifty-day rat toxicity study with HAMPT at doses (335-1340 mg/kg) 20-fold higher than its therapeutic dose produced no significant toxicity. Interestingly, the acute toxic death could not be reached at the maximum administrable dose (5 g/kg). This proof-of-concept study provides the first conceptual evidence that cancer metastasis can be controlled by using affordable old drugs to restrain circulating tumor cells from gemmating on the metastatic soil without the need for cytotoxicity. PMID:26459390

  2. Aspirin, lysine, mifepristone and doxycycline combined can effectively and safely prevent and treat cancer metastasis: prevent seeds from gemmating on soil.

    PubMed

    Wan, Liyuan; Dong, Haiyan; Xu, Huo; Ma, Ji; Zhu, Yewei; Lu, Yusheng; Wang, Jichuang; Zhang, Ting; Li, Tao; Xie, Jingjing; Xu, Bo; Xie, Fangwei; Gao, Yu; Shao, Jingwei; Tu, Xiaohuang; Jia, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Recent scientific advances have increased our understanding of the cancer metastatic complexities and provided further impetus for new combination therapies to prevent cancer metastasis. Here, we demonstrated that a combination (HAMPT) of aspirin, lysine, mifepristone and doxycycline can effectively and safely prevent cancer metastasis. The pharmaceutically-formulated HAMPT inhibited adhesion of cancer cells to either endothelial cells or extracellular matrix via down-regulating cell adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and α4-integrin. HAMPT inhibited the cloak effect by activated platelets on cancer cells, thereby interfering adhesion and invasion of cancer cells to the underlying stroma. At the effective concentration, HAMPT induced cancer cells into dormancy with minor inhibition on cell viability. Four-day pretreatment followed by 30-day oral administration of HAMPT (33.5-134 mg/kg) to the mice inoculated with cancer cells produced significant inhibition on cancer metastasis dose-dependently without marked side effects. Fifty-day rat toxicity study with HAMPT at doses (335-1340 mg/kg) 20-fold higher than its therapeutic dose produced no significant toxicity. Interestingly, the acute toxic death could not be reached at the maximum administrable dose (5 g/kg). This proof-of-concept study provides the first conceptual evidence that cancer metastasis can be controlled by using affordable old drugs to restrain circulating tumor cells from gemmating on the metastatic soil without the need for cytotoxicity. PMID:26459390

  3. Mammalian cell-line based toxicological evaluation of paper mill black liquor treated in a soil microcosm by indigenous alkalo-tolerant Bacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Monika; Das, Mihir Tanay; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2014-02-01

    Organic pollutants present in the soil of a microcosm containing pulp and paper mill black liquor were extracted with hexane/acetone (1:1 v/v) to study the biodegradation and detoxification potential of a Bacillus sp. gas chromatography-mass spectroscopic (GC-MS) analysis performed after biodegradation showed formation of simpler compounds like p-hydroxyhydrocinnamic acid (retention time [RT] 19.3 min), homovanillic acid methyl ester (RT 21.6 min) and 3,5-dimethoxy-p-coumaric alcohol (RT 24.7 min). The methyltetrazolium (MTT) assay for cytotoxicity, 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay for dioxin-like behavior and alkaline comet assay for genotoxicity were carried out in the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HuH-7 before and after bacterial treatment. Bioremediation for 15 days reduced toxicity, as shown by a 139-fold increase in black liquor's LC50 value, a 343-fold reduction in benzo(a)pyrene equivalent value and a 5-fold reduction in olive tail moment. The EROD assay positively correlated with both the MTT and comet assays in post biodegradation toxicity evaluation. PMID:24170500

  4. Thermal Analysis of the Tibial Cement Interface with Modern Cementing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Vertullo, Christopher J.; Zbrojkiewicz, David; Vizesi, Frank; Walsh, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The major cause of cemented Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) failure is aseptic loosening of the tibial component necessitating revision surgery. Recently, multiple techniques have been described to maximize cement penetration depth and density in the proximal tibia during TKA to potentially avoid early loosening. While cement polymerisation is an exothermic reaction, minimal investigation into the proximal tibial thermal safety margin during cement polymerisation has been undertaken. In animal models osseous injury occurs at temperatures greater than 47 °C when applied for one minute. The aim of this study was to investigate the cement bone interface temperatures in TKA using modern tibial cementing techniques with a cadaveric tibial tray model. Methods: Eight adult cadavers were obtained with the proximal tibial surface prepared by a fellowship trained arthroplasty surgeon. Third generation cementation techniques were used and temperatures during cement polymerization on cadaveric knee arthroplasty models were recorded using thermocouples. Results: The results showed that no tibial cement temperature exceeded 44 °C for more than 1 minute. Two of the eight cadaveric tibias recorded maximum temperatures greater than 44 °C for 55 seconds and 33 seconds, just less than the 60 seconds reported to cause thermal injury. Average maximum polymerization temperatures did not correlate with deeper cement penetration or tray material. Maximum mantle temperatures were not statistically different between metal and all polyethylene tibial trays. Conclusion: Our investigation suggests that modern cementing techniques result in maximum mantle temperatures that are less than previously recorded temperatures required to cause thermal osseous injury, although this thermal injury safety margin is quite narrow at an average of 4.95 °C (95% confidence interval ± 4.31). PMID:27073585

  5. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    Background. Little is known about the long-term clinical bonding effectiveness of the Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts cemented with self-etch adhesive systems. Bond stability and longevity of the cemented post are adversely affected by physical and chemical factors over time, such as expansion and contraction stresses caused by thermal changes and occlusal load. This clinical condition can be simulated in vitro by thermocyclic loading; and bonding effectiveness can be evaluated by applying the micropush out test. Therefore, more in vitro studies are needed to evaluate the bond strength of the fiber posts cemented with different resin cement systems after simulating the artificial aging induced by thermocycling. The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two different resin cement systems (total etch, and self-etch resin cement system) used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite posts in three different aging periods using thermocycling. Methods. Following IRB approval, sixty freshly extracted bicuspid single rooted natural teeth were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were prepared to receive a fiber-post cemented with either a total etch resin cement (Rely-X Ultimate) or with a self-etch resin cement (Rely-X Unicem). No thermocycling, 20,000 and 40,000 cycles was used to age the specimens. Teeth were randomly allocated into six different groups: G1 - Control: Rely-X Ultimate cement with no thermocycling. G2: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 20,000 thermocycling. G3: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 40,000 thermocycling. G4: Rely-X Unicem cement. G5: Rely-X Unicem cement. G6: Rely-X Unicem cement. Microtensile bond strength determined using a micropush out test on a universal testing machine (MTS). Additionally, the failure mode of each specimen was observed under a stereomicroscope (Olympus) at 40x magnification. Finally, one representative sample was randomly selected from each of the five failure modes for scanning

  6. Comparing the effect of a resin based sealer on crown retention for three types of cements: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pankaj; Thummar, Mansukh; Shah, Dipti; Pitti, Varun

    2013-09-01

    To determine the effect of resin based sealer on retention of casting cemented with three different luting agents. 55 extracted molar teeth were prepared with a flat occlusal surface, 20° taper and 4 mm axial height. The axial surface of each specimen was determined. The specimen were then distributed into five groups based on decreasing surface area, so each cementation group contained 11 specimens with similar mean axial surface area. A two-step, single bottle universal adhesive system (One-Step-Resinomer, Bisco) was used to seal dentin after the tooth preparation. Sealer was not used on the control specimens except for the modified-resin cement (Resinomer, Bisco) specimens that required use of adhesive with cementation. Using ceramometal (Wirobond(®), BEGO), a casting was produced for each specimen and cemented with either zinc phosphate (Harvard), glass ionomer (Vivaglass) or modified resin cement (Resinomer) with single bottle adhesive. All the castings were cemented with a force of 20 kg. Castings were thermal cycled at 5 and 55 °C for 2,500 cycles and were then removed along the path of insertion using a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. A single-factor ANOVA was used with a = 0.05. The nature of failure was also recorded. The mean stress removal for non sealed zinc phosphate, sealed zinc phosphate, non sealed glass ionomer, sealed glass ionomer and modified resin cement was found to be 3.56, 1.92, 2.40, 4.26, 6.95 MPa respectively. Zinc phosphate cement remained principally on the castings when the tooth surface was treated with the sealer and was found on both the tooth and the casting when the sealer was not used. Fracture of root before dislodgement was seen in 9 of 11 specimens with modified resin cement. Resin sealer decreases the retention of the castings when used with zinc phosphate and increases it when used with glass ionomer cement. The highest mean dislodgement force was measured with modified resin cement. PMID:24431752

  7. Effects of Different Surface Treatment Methods and MDP Monomer on Resin Cementation of Zirconia Ceramics an In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akçaboy, Cihan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Resin cements are generally preferred for cementation of zirconia ceramics. Resin bonding of zirconia ceramics cannot be done with the same methods of traditional ceramics because zirconia is a silica-free material. In recent years, many methods have been reported in the literature to provide the resin bonding of zirconia ceramics. The purpose of this in vitro study is to evaluate effects of different surface treatments and 10-metacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) monomer on shear bond strength between zirconia and resin cement. Methods: 120 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: sandblasting, group II: sandblasting + tribochemical silica coating + silane, group III: sandblasting + Nd:YAG (neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser. One specimen from each group was evaluated under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Specimens in each group were bonded either with conventional resin cement Variolink II or with a MDP containing resin cement Panavia F2.0. Subgroups of bonded specimens were stored in distilled water (37°C) for 24 hours or 14 days. Following water storage shear bond strength test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min in a universal test machine. Then statistical analyses were performed. Results: Highest shear bond strength values were observed in group II. No significant difference between group I and III was found when Panavia F2.0 resin cement was used. When Variolink II resin cement was used group III showed significantly higher bond strength than group I. In group I, Panavia F2.0 resin cement showed statistically higher shear bond strength than Variolink II resin cement. In group II no significant difference was found between resin cements. No significant difference was found between specimens stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours and 14 days. In group I surface irregularities with sharp edges and grooves were observed. In group II less roughened surface was observed with silica particles. In group

  8. Use of antibiotic-loaded cement in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hinarejos, Pedro; Guirro, Pau; Puig-Verdie, Lluis; Torres-Claramunt, Raul; Leal-Blanquet, Joan; Sanchez-Soler, Juan; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2015-01-01

    Bone cement has the capacity to release antibiotic molecules if any antibiotic is included in it, and these elution properties are improved as cement porosity is increased. In vitro studies have shown high local antibiotic concentration for many hours or few days after its use. Antibiotic loaded bone cement (ALBC) is helpful when treating an infection in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revision surgery. The purpose of this paper was to review the evidence for the routine use of ALBC in TKA in the literature, its pros and cons. Many authors have recommended the use of ALBC also in primary TKA for infection prophylaxis, but the evidence based on data from National Registries, randomized clinical trials and meta-analysis suggest a protective effect of ALBC against infection when used in hips, but not (or only mild) in knees. A possible explanation to this finding is that the duration and quantity of locally elevated antibiotic levels after surgery are smaller in TKA, due to the smaller amount of cement used for fixation in TKA-only a layer in the bone surface. There are some concerns about the routine use of ALBC in primary TKA as prophylaxis against infection: Firstly, there is a risk of hypersensivity or toxicity even when the chance is highly improbable. Secondly, there is a reduction in the mechanical properties of the cement, but this can be probably neglected if the antibiotic is used in low doses, not more than 1 g per 40 g cement package. Another significant concern is the increased economic cost, which could be overlooked if there were enough savings in treating fewer prosthetic infections. Finally, there is also a risk of selection of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria and this could be the main concern. If used, the choice of the antibiotic mixed in ALBC should consider microbiological aspects (broad antimicrobial spectrum and low rate of resistant bacteria), physical and chemical aspects (thermal stability, high water solubility), pharmacological

  9. Brownfield reuse of dredged New York Harbor sediment by cement-based solidification/stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Loest, K.; Wilk, C.M.

    1998-12-31

    Newly effective federal regulations restrict the ocean disposal of sediments dredged from the harbors of New York and Newark. The New York Port Authority is faced with a critical situation: find land-based disposal/uses for 10`s of millions cubic yards of sediments or lose standing as a commercial port for ocean-going ships. One of the technologies now being employed to manage the sediments is portland cement-based solidification/stabilization (S/S) treatment. At least 4 million cubic yards of the sediments will undergo cement-based S/S treatment. This treatment will immobilize heavy metals, dioxin, PCBs and other organic contaminants in the sediment. The treatment changes the sediment from a environmental liability into a valuable structural fill. This structural fill is being used at two properties. The first property is an old municipal landfill in Port Newark, New Jersey. The treated sediments are being used as structural fill to cover about 20 acres of the landfill. This will allow planned redevelopment of the landfill property into a shopping mall. The second property called the Seaboard site, was the location of a coal gasification facility and later a wood preservation facility. This 160-acre property has been designated for brownfield redevelopment. Over 4 million cubic yards of treated sediments will eventually cover this site. Portland cement is the selected S/S binding reagent. Nearly 500,000 tons of cement will eventually be used to treat the sediments. Cement was selected for its ability to (a) change the peanut butter-like consistency of the sediments into a structural material and (b) to physically and chemically immobilize hazardous constituents in the sediment.

  10. Cementing oil and gas wells using converted drilling fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.N.; Miles, L.H.; Boyd, B.H.; Carpenter, R.B.

    1989-11-28

    This patent describes a method for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a conduit extends. The wellbore having a space occupied by a drilling fluid to be converted to cement for cementing the space to form a seal between spaced apart points in the formation. The method comprising the steps of: providing means for adding cement material and a dispersant to the fluid, circulating the fluid and adding the cement material and the dispersant to a quantity of the fluid in predetermined proportions to form a settable cement composition; circulating the cement composition into the space to fill the space with the cement composition; and recirculating a quantity of the cement composition through the space.

  11. Utilization of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash in blended cement Part 2. Mechanical strength of mortars and environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Aubert, J E; Husson, B; Sarramone, N

    2007-07-19

    This second of two articles dealing with the utilization of MSWI fly ash in blended cement studies the effects of two variants of the stabilization process on the behavior of the treated fly ash (TFA) introduced into cement-based mortars. From a technological point of view, the modifications of the process are very efficient and eliminate the swelling produced by the introduction of MSWI fly ash in cement-based mortars. TFA has a significant activity in cement-based mortars and can also advantageously replace a part of the cement in cement-based material. From an environmental point of view, the results of traditional leaching tests on monolithic and crushed mortars highlight a poor stabilization of some harmful elements such as antimony and chromium. The use of a cement rich in ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) with a view to stabilizing the chromium is not efficient. Since neither adequate tests nor quality criteria exist to evaluate the pollutant potential of a waste with a view to reusing it, it is difficult to conclude on the environmental soundness of such a practice. Further experiments are necessary to investigate the environmental impact of TFA introduced in cement-based mortars depending on the reuse scenario. PMID:17182180

  12. Investigation of Possible Wellbore Cement Failures During Hydraulic Fracturing Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George

    2014-11-01

    We model and assess the possibility of shear failure, using the Mohr-Coulomb model ? along the vertical well by employing a rigorous coupled flow-geomechanic analysis. To this end, we vary the values of cohesion between the well casing and the surrounding cement to representing different quality levels of the cementing operation (low cohesion corresponds to low-quality cement and/or incomplete cementing). The simulation results show that there is very little fracturing when the cement is of high quality.. Conversely, incomplete cementing and/or weak cement can causes significant shear failure and the evolution of long fractures/cracks along the vertical well. Specifically, low cohesion between the well and cemented areas can cause significant shear failure along the well, but the same cohesion as the cemented zone does not cause shear failure. When the hydraulic fracturing pressure is high, low cohesion of the cement can causes fast propagation of shear failure and of the resulting fracture/crack, but a high-quality cement with no weak zones exhibits limited shear failure that is concentrated near the bottom of the vertical part of the well. Thus, high-quality cement and complete cementing along the vertical well appears to be the strongest protection against shear failure of the wellbore cement and, consequently, against contamination hazards to drinking water aquifers during hydraulic fracturing operations.

  13. The Role of Bone Cement Augmentation in the Treatment of Chronic Symptomatic Osteoporotic Compression Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeun Sung; Kim, Sung Hoon; Ju, Chang Il; Lee, Sung Myung; Shin, Ho

    2010-01-01

    Objective Bone cement augmentation procedures such as percutaneous vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty have been shown to be effective treatment for acute or subacute osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of bone cement augmentation procedures for long standing osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture with late vertebral collapse and persistent back pain. Methods Among 278 single level osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures that were treated by vertebral augmentation procedures at our institute, 18 consecutive patients were included in this study. Study inclusion was limited to initially, minimal compression fractures, but showing a poor prognosis due to late vertebral collapse, intravertebral vacuum clefts and continuous back pain despite conservative treatment for more than one year. The subjects included three men and 15 women. The mean age was 70.7 with a range from 64 to 85 years of age. After postural reduction for two days, bone cement augmentation procedures following intraoperative pressure reduction were performed. Imaging and clinical findings, including the level of the vertebra involved, vertebral height restoration, injected cement volume, local kyphosis, clinical outcome and complications were analyzed. Results The mean follow-up period after bone cement augmentation procedures was 14.3 months (range 12-27 months). The mean injected cement volume was 4.1 mL (range 2.4-5.9 mL). The unipedicular approach was possible in 15 patients. The mean pain score (visual analogue scale) prior to surgery was 7.1, which decreased to 3.1 at 7 days after the procedure. The pain relief was maintained at the final follow up. The kyphotic angle improved significantly from 21.2 ± 4.9° before surgery to 10.4 ± 3.8° after surgery. The fraction of vertebral height increased from 30% to 60% after bone cement augmentation, and the restored vertebral height was maintained at the final follow up

  14. Treating Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ways to treat bacterial meningitis. 1 They compared steroids (dexamethasone) with pla- cebo. The doctors gave medication ( ... compared anti- biotics by themselves with antibiotics plus steroids. Dr. Fritz and colleagues compared the mortality (deaths) ...

  15. Leaching of Contamination from Stabilization/Solidification Remediated Soils of Different Texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlakovs, Juris; Kasparinskis, Raimonds; Klavins, Maris

    2012-09-01

    Development of soil and groundwater remediation technologies is a matter of great importance to eliminate historically and currently contaminated sites. Stabilization/solidification (S/S) refers to binding of waste contaminants to a more chemically stable form and thus diminishing leaching of contamination. It can be performed using cement with or without additives in order to stabilize and solidify soil with the contamination in matrix. A series of experiments were done to determine leaching properties of spiked soils of different texture bound with cement. Results of experiments showed, that soil texture (content of sand, silt and clay particles) affects the leaching of heavy metals from stabilized soils.

  16. EVALUATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION IN CEMENT KILNS AT SAN JUAN CEMENT COMPANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cement kiln incineration of chlorinated liquid organic wastes was investigated in a 5-month demonstration program at San Juan Cement Company in Puerto Rico. Chlorinated monocarbon compounds (POHC's) were monitored in the waste and emissions, and the fate of added chlorine in ceme...

  17. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... review. Background The Commission instituted this review on May 2, 2011 (76 FR 24519) and determined on August 5, 2011 that it would conduct an expedited review (76 FR 50252, August 12, 2011). The Commission... COMMISSION Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan Determination On the basis of the record...

  18. Low fluid leakoff cementing compositions and filtration control additive for cement

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, G.T.

    1993-07-20

    A cementing composition is described, for cementing oil or gas wells penetrating subterranean formations, capable of forming a fluid slurry when mixed with water comprising: dry hydraulic cement; and a filtration control additive of from about 0.2 to 5.0 percent by weight, based upon dry hydraulic cement, of finely ground peanut hulls, wherein 10 percent or more of the finely ground peanut hulls is in the particle size range of less than 20 standard sieve mesh and greater than 500 standard sieve mesh. In a process for cementing a casing in an oil or gas well penetrating a subterranean formation wherein a cement slurry, formed by mixing water and hydraulic cement, is pumped down the well to flow upwardly between the casing and the subterranean formation, the improvement is described comprising: utilizing as a filtration control additive of from about 0.2 to 5.0 percent by weight, based upon dry hydraulic cement, of finely ground peanut hulls, and utilizing finely ground peanut hulls wherein 10 percent or more of the finely ground peanut hulls is in the particle size range of less than 20 standard sieve mesh and greater than 500 standard sieve mesh.

  19. Thermal reactions of brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Bohner, M; Gbureck, U

    2008-02-01

    The thermal reactions of a brushite cement made of beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), and an aqueous solution were followed in situ with an isothermal calorimeter at 37 degrees C. The investigated parameters were the beta-TCP/MCPM weight ratio, the liquid-to-powder ratio, the synthesis route and milling duration of the beta-TCP powder, as well as the presence of sulfate, citrate, and pyrophosphate ions in the mixing liquid. The thermograms were complex, particularly for mixtures containing an excess of MCPM or additives in the mixing solution. Results suggested that the endothermic MCPM dissolution and the highly exothermic beta-TCP dissolution occurred simultaneously, thereby leading to the formation of a large exothermic peak at early reaction time. Both reactions were followed by the exothermic crystallization of brushite and in the presence of an excess of MCPM by the endothermic crystallization of monetite. Additives generally widened the main exothermic reaction peak, or in some cases with pyrophosphate ions postponed the main exothermic peak at late reaction time. Generally, the results could be well explained and understood based on thermodynamic and solubility data. PMID:17618509

  20. Bone Marrow Nails Created by Percutaneous Osteoplasty for Long Bone Fracture: Comparisons Among Acrylic Cement Alone, Acrylic-Cement-Filled Bare Metallic Stent, and Acrylic-Cement-Filled Covered Metallic Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Kouhei; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Cao, Guang; Sahara, Shinya; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Takasaka, Isao; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to compare the strength among bone marrow nails created to treat long bone fractures using interventional procedures. Methods: Twelve resected intact tibiae of healthy swine were used. A circumferential bone fracture was made in nine tibiae and restored with the following created bone marrow nails: acrylic cement alone (ACA) (n = 3), acrylic-cement-filled bare metallic stent (AC-FBMS) (n = 3), and acrylic-cement-filled covered metallic (AC-FCMS) stent (n = 3). The remaining intact tibiae (n = 3) were used as controls. Results: A bone marrow nail was successfully achieved within 30 min in all swine. The maximum injection volume of acrylic cement for creating ACA, AC-FBMS, and AC-FCMS was 1.7 {+-} 0.3, 3.2 {+-} 0.4, and 2.9 {+-} 0.4 mL, respectively. The thickness of bone marrow nail created in the ACA, AC-FBMS, and AC-FCMS groups was 3.6 {+-} 1.0, 10.3 {+-} 0.26, and 9.6 {+-} 0.32 mm, respectively (AC-FBMS group versus AC-FCMS group, p = 0.038), probably because of leakage of acrylic cement surrounding the interstices. The maximum bending power (kilonewton) and bending strength (newton/mm{sup 2}) in the normal long bone, ACA, AC-FBMS, and AC-FCMS groups were: 1.70 {+-} 0.25 and 79.2 {+-} 16.1; 0.21 {+-} 0.11 and 8.8 {+-} 2.8; 0.46 {+-} 0.06 and 18.2 {+-} 1.6; and 0.18 {+-} 0.04 and 7.8 {+-} 2.7, respectively. Conclusions: Although the maximum bending power and bending strength of AC-FBMS were not satisfactory, it was the most robust of the three marrow nails for restoring fractured long bone.