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Sample records for center huntsville alabama

  1. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE STUDENT POPULATION, UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA RESIDENT CENTER, HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FRANKLIN, ELTON

    THE MAIN PURPOSE OF THIS 1959 SURVEY WAS TO ANALYZE SOME OF THE BASIC CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA RESIDENT CENTER, HUNTSVILLE. FINDINGS WERE TABULATED IN SUMMARY FORM AND BY MAJOR FIELDS OF ACADEMIC INTEREST. OF THE STUDENTS (LARGELY YOUNG ADULTS), 51 PERCENT WERE IN ENGINEERING. ONLY 16 PERCENT WERE FEMALE. MOST…

  2. Monkey Baker at U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    On May 28, 1958, Jupiter Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile provided by U.S. Army team in Huntsville, Alabama, launched a nose cone carrying Baker, a South American squirrel monkey and Able, an American-born rhesus monkey. Baker, pictured here and commonly known as 'Miss Baker', was later given a home at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center until her death on November 29, 1984. Able died in 1958. (Photo - Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  3. An Overview of In-Stu Treatability Studies at Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElroy, Bill; Keith, Amy; Glasgow, J. K.; Dasappa, Srini; McCaleb, Rebecca (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is located in Huntsville, Alabama (north-central Alabama), on approximately 1,840 acres near the center of the U.S. Army's Redstone Arsenal (RSA). MSFC is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) principal propulsion development center. Its scientists, engineers, and support personnel play a major role in the National Space Transportation System by managing space shuttle mission activities, including the microgravity laboratory. In addition, MSFC will be a significant contributor to several of NASA's future programs, including the Reusable Launch Vehicle (X-33), International Space Station, and Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, as well as research on a variety of space science applications. MSFC has been used to develop, test and manufacture space vehicles and components since 1960, when civilian rocketry and missile activities were transferred from RSA to MSFC. In 1994, MSFC was placed on the National Priority List for the management of hazardous waste sites, under the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). One requirement of the CERCLA program is to evaluate the nature and extent of environmental contamination resulting from identified CERCLA sites, assess the public health and environmental risks associated with the identified contamination, and identify potential remedial actions. A CERCLA remedial investigation (RI) for the groundwater system has identified at least five major plumes of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) in the groundwater beneath the facility. These plumes are believed to be the result of former management practices at 14 main facility locations (termed "source areas") where CVOCs were released to the subsurface. Trichloroethene (TCE) is the predominant CVOC and is common to all the plumes. Perchloroethene (PCE) also exists in two of the plumes. In addition to TCE and PCE, carbon tetrachloride and 1

  4. Temporary Laboratory Office in Huntsville Industrial Center Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Temporary quarters in the Huntsville Industrial Center (HIC) building located in downtown Huntsville, Alabama, as Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) grew. This image shows drafting specialists from the Propulsion and Vehicle Engineering Laboratory at work in the HIC building.

  5. Solar heating and hot water system installed at the Senior Citizen Center, Huntsville, Alabama. [Includes engineering drawings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    Information is provided on the solar energy system installed at the Huntsville Senior Citizen Center. The solar space heating and hot water facility and the project involved in its construction are described in considerable detail and detailed drawings of the complete system and discussions of the planning, the hardware, recommendations, and other pertinent information are included. The facility was designed to provide 85 percent of the hot water and 85 percent of the space heating requirements. Two important factors concerning this project for commercial demonstration are the successful use of silicon oil as a heat transfer fluid and the architecturally aesthetic impact of a large solar energy system as a visual centerpoint. There is no overheat or freeze protection due to the characteristics of the silicon oil and the design of the system. Construction proceeded on schedule with no cost overruns. It is designed to be relatively free of scheduled maintenance, and has experienced practically no problems.

  6. Ground Breaking Ceremony for the Alabama Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Ground breaking ceremony for the Alabama Space Science Center, later renamed the U.S. Space and Rocket Center. Shown in this picture, left to right, are Edward O. Buckbee, Space Center Director; Jack Giles, Alabama State Senator of Huntsville; Dr. Wernher on Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director; Martin Darity, head of the Alabama Publicity Bureau (representing Governor Albert Brewer); James Allen, former Lieutenant governor, chairman of the Alabama Space Science Exhibit Commission; Major General Charles Eifler, commanding general of the Army Ordnance Missile Command; and Huntsville Mayor Glenrn Hearn. (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  7. 78 FR 35603 - Foreign-Trade Zone 83-Huntsville, Alabama; Application for Production Authority; Toray Carbon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 83--Huntsville, Alabama; Application for Production Authority; Toray Carbon Fibers America, Inc.; (Polyacrylonitrile Fiber/Carbon Fiber Production), Decatur, Alabama... Airport Authority, grantee of FTZ 83, requesting production authority on behalf of Toray Carbon...

  8. Cooperative Education: Entrepreneurial Development by Colleges and Universities. A Case Study of Oakwood College, Huntsville, Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Frank

    The entrepreneurial development and experiential education environments of Oakwood College, Huntsville, Alabama, are described. The college-owned industries of the dairy, farm, garment and linen service, bakery, food manufacturing, convenience store, and snack bar are discussed in terms of markets and marketing, permissions and protections,…

  9. Summertime elevation of sup 222 Rn levels in Huntsville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.L.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Saultz, R.J. )

    1991-02-01

    Indoor Rn concentrations and Rn in adjacent karst terrains were studied at four houses with crawlspaces in Huntsville, AL. In warm summertime weather, Rn-rich air may vent through limestone solution cavities exposed as holes at the surface of the properties. A probable interrelated-finding is that the indoor levels of {sup 222}Rn are distinctly higher in the summer than winter. The karst underlying the homes is structurally faulted and, in all probability, facilitates Rn transport from the solution cavities to the crawlspaces. Abrupt day-to-day changes in indoor Rn concentrations were recorded in addition to large seasonal changes. If the owners or residents of these particular homes had attempted to make, and interpret, short-term screening measurements for Rn during the fall season, problems, including false negatives, could have arisen because of order-of-magnitude changes in Rn concentration occurring over a few days. The best time of year to make screening measurements would be during the summer when indoor Rn concentrations are more likely to reach their maximum values.

  10. The Alabama Space and Rocket Center: The Second Decade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckbee, Edward O.

    1983-01-01

    The Alabama Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, the world's largest rocket and space museum, includes displays illustrating American rocket history, exhibits and demonstrations on rocketry principles and experiences, and simulations of space travel. A new project includes an integrated recreational-educational complex, described in the three…

  11. Comparison of Simulations of Preliminary Breakdown to Observations from the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. E.; Liang, C.; Bitzer, P. M.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Preliminary breakdown pulses in electric field change records are thought to be produced by sudden extensions of the lightning channel. We present detailed time domain electrodynamic simulations of extension of an existing lightning leader channel due to heating processes and compare the results to observations of a natural cloud-to-ground lightning discharge made with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array (HAMMA) at a variety of locations near the discharge. Varying the geometry and parameters of the simulations in an attempt to reproduce the data allows us to constrain the directionality and physical properties of the channel. We simulate a variety of leader step phenomena, including uniform heating over the entire step, connection with a space leader, and dart leader propagation onto a preconditioned channel. Results support the notion of impulsive channel extension as the mechanism for preliminary breakdown and shed light on the mechanics of the process.

  12. A GIS approach to urban heat island research: The case of Huntsville, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Chor Pong

    1994-01-01

    The urban heat island represents a case of inadvertent human modification of climate in an urban environment. Urbanization changes the nature of the surface and atmospheric properties of a region. As a result, radiation balance in the urban areas is altered and sensible heat is added to the point that urban areas are warmer than surrounding rural areas. At the boundary between the rural and urban area, a sharp rise in temperature occurs, culminating to a peak temperature at the central business district of the city, hence the name 'urban heat island'. The extent and intensity of the urban heat island are a function of population size, land use, and topography. Because the urban heat island exhibits spatial variations of temperatures, the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) is appropriate. The research on the urban heat island focuses on the acquisition of 15 bands of visible and thermal infrared data (ranging from 0.45 to 12.2 microns) from an aerial platform using NASA's ATLAS (Airborne Thermal/Visible Land Application Sensor) over Huntsville, Alabama. The research reported in this paper is an analysis of the impact of population, land use, and topography on the shape of the urban heat island that could be developed in Huntsville using the GIS approach. The outcome of this analysis can then be verified using the acquired remotely sensed data.

  13. Application of the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array to the Total Charge Transfer of Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchfield, J. C.; Bitzer, P. M.; Christian, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    Using the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array (HAMMA) to obtain measurements of the electric field changes due to lightning, we investigate the amount of charge neutralized by lightning flashes. Our analysis includes both cloud-to-ground and intracloud lightning. We compare two different models for each type of lightning: 1) the classic point (CG) or dipole (IC) charge models versus 2) models in which the neutralized charge is distributed along the lightning channel. In order to model the channel path we utilize VHF data taken by the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). The source locations determined by NALMA are supplemented with time-of-arrival locations determined from features of the electric field waveforms in HAMMA data as appropriate. For CG flashes, we assume that the channel proceeds vertically downwards from the initiation point. The channel is separated into two portions: an in-cloud part and the part extending from cloud to ground. Each of these segments is assumed to have a constant line charge density. For IC flashes, we follow a similar procedure except we now have a flash occurring between two charge regions of opposing polarity within the cloud. Having both VHF and LF measurements of lightning allows us to use the two data sets in conjunction with one another to investigate the charge structure of lightning. We present results from this analysis and discuss the differences between those derived from the classic models and those derived from the line charge models.

  14. A Comparison of the Societal Impacts and Warning Operations for the 1989 and 2010 Huntsville, Alabama Tornadoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt-Negron, A. M.; Coyne, M.; Scotten, K.; Lee, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    The city of Huntsville, Alabama lies within a region of the United States known as the Tennessee Valley, which is not traditionally associated with “Tornado Alley”. However, latest research indicates that most tornado fatalities occur in the lower Arkansas, Tennessee, and Mississippi River Valleys. Huntsville has had its share of tornadic events, including the two tornadoes in this study. On 15 November 1989, a large F4 tornado tracked through south Huntsville with little to no advance warning at the start of the evening rush hour. There were a total of 21 fatalities and 463 injuries. On 21 January 2010, an EF2 tornado moved through downtown Huntsville during peak evening rush hour, but this time there were no fatalities and only three injuries. The choices made by both the National Weather Service and core partners of the agency during these two tornadic events will be discussed, as well as how these choices either mitigated or amplified the environmental effects registered by the general populous of Huntsville. While the decision support services such as warning decisions and communications provided by National Weather Services' Huntsville are important, the resulting action taken by the public is just as crucial; an investigation into the societal impacts pertaining to these two tornadoes will be shared. Future National Weather Services' Huntsville decision support services and choices will be shaped by the present research in an effort to mitigate the impacts of another tornado striking Huntsville. This research was conducted as part of an internship for the NOAA Educational Partnership Program scholarship in which I participate.

  15. Apollo 11 Splashdown Celebration in Huntsville, AL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Apollo 11 splashdown celebration in Huntsville, Alabama, on July 24, 1969. Huntsville Alabama is the home of the Marshall Space Flight Center which developed the Saturn vehicles under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The photo shows Dr. von Braun speaking to the crowd at the Madison County Courthouse as Mayor Joe Davis, Madison County Commissioner James Record and City Council President Ken Johnson look on.

  16. Change Detection Analysis in Urban and Suburban Areas Using Landsat Thematic Mapper data: Case of Huntsville, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuan, Dana; Fahsi, A.; Steinfeld S.; Coleman, T.

    1998-01-01

    Two Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images, from July 1984 and July 1992, were used to identify land use/cover changes in the urban and suburban fringe of the city of Huntsville, Alabama. Image difference was the technique used to quantify the change between the two dates. The eight-year period showed a 16% change, mainly from agricultural lands to urban areas generated by the settlement of industrial, commercial, and residential areas. Visual analysis of the change map (i.e., difference image) supported this phenomenon by showing that most changes were occurring in the vicinity of the major roads and highways across the city.

  17. A comprehensive solar energy system analysis data base in Huntsville, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The history of a comprehensive solar energy system analysis data base developed by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama is presented, along with its current status. The Marshall Information Retrieval and Data Storage (MIRADS) system was chosen for the data base, and feedback systems were arranged to cope with changes in the needs of the program management for the type of data gathered. The final structure of the data base consists of 22 files divided into 6 topical sections: summaries, climatological, utility rates, architectural, equipment, and economics. The data base offers help to the solar industry in two ways: it provides information and it serves as a model for users trying to establish the climatic and socioeconomic variables they should take into account when they examine a potential market for solar energy equipment.

  18. Occurrence and distribution of selected metals in streams near Huntsville, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    German, E.R.; Knight, Alfred L.

    1973-01-01

    Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, and zinc are widely distributed around Huntsville, Ala. However, concentrations of these metals in streamflow in the vicinity of the Huntsville municipal water intake during June, August, and September 1971 did not exceed the limits recommended for a public drinking water supply. The occurrence of these metals in general is related to man's activities. Information gained during this study suggests that cadmium and the other metals are associated with and transported with suspended sediment, bed material, and airborne dust particles. Lead and zinc were the most abundant of the selected metals in streamflow, bed material, and rainwater samples. The highest concentration of cadmium was detected downstream from an industrial park in the Flint River basin; rainwater samples also contained a relatively high level of cadmium.

  19. Luminous electrical phenomena in Huntsville, Alabama, tornadoes on April 3, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, O. H., Jr.; Vonnegut, B.

    1976-01-01

    Unusual lightning and varicolored luminous phenomena were observed on the evening of April 3, 1974, when severe tornadoes passed through Madison County, Alabama. Photographs and eyewitness accounts of this electrical activity are related to the trajectories of the tornadoes and the damage areas they produced.

  20. Alternative-fuel production facility for City of Huntsville, Alabama. Volume I. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    The feasibility of a Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)-to-energy project in the Huntsville area was invetigated and found to be an environmentally attractive and cost effective method of MSW disposal. Of nine likely alternatives, that were developed for detailed evaluation and analysis. Alternative 1M surfaced as best for the City. It is described as follows: a MSW-To-Energy Plant, consisting of two 300 TPD Mass Burning Waterwall Furnace/Boiler Systems at Lowe Industrial Park to provide low pressure steam to industries in the park. A MSW Transfer Station at the existing landfill and MSW as well as residue transport rolling stock equipment is included to facilitate movement of the waste materials between the two locations that are some twelve miles apart.

  1. Activity in the Shuttle Action Center (SAC) of the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Launched on June 20, 1996, the STS-78 mission's primary payload was the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS), which was managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). During the 17 day space flight, the crew conducted a diverse slate of experiments divided into a mix of life science and microgravity investigations. In a manner very similar to future International Space Station operations, LMS researchers from the United States and their European counterparts shared resources such as crew time and equipment. Five space agencies (NASA/USA, European Space Agency/Europe (ESA), French Space Agency/France, Canadian Space Agency /Canada, and Italian Space Agency/Italy) along with research scientists from 10 countries worked together on the design, development and construction of the LMS. This photo was taken in the Shuttle Action Center (SAC) of the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at MSFC during the mission.

  2. Solar energy system performance evaluation: seasonal report for IBM System IA, Huntsville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The analysis used is based on instrumented system data monitored and collected for at least one full season of operation. The long-term field performance of the installed system is reported. The Solar Energy System, Sims Prototype System 1A, was designed by IBM to provide 50 to 60% of the space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) preheating load to a 2000 square foot floor space single faily residence in the Huntsville area. The load design temperature inside the building was to be maintained at 70 degrees fahrenheit with auxiliary energy for heating supplied by an electric heat pump assisted by an electric resistance strip heater. Auxiliary energy for domestic hot water is from a conventional 20-gallon DHW storage tank. The solar energy system, uses air as the heat transport medium, has a 720 square foot Solar Energy Products Collector Array, a 22-ton rock storage located within the office building, a pump, heat exchanger, air handler, pre-heat tank, fan and associated plumbing. The system has five different modes of operation.

  3. Solar energy system performance evaluation: Seasonal report for IBM system 1A, Huntsville, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The operational and thermal performance of the solar energy system, Sims Prototype System 1A, is described. The system was designed by IBM to provide 50 to 60 percent of the space heating and domestic hot water preheating load to a 2,000 square foot floor space single family residence in the Huntsville area. The load design temperature inside the building was to be maintained at 70 degrees fahrenheit with auxiliary energy for heating supplied by an electric heat pump assisted by an electric resistance strip heater. In general the disappointing operation of this system is attributed to the manner in which it was used. The system was designed for residential application and used to satisfy the demands of an office environment. The differences were: (1) inside temperature was not maintained at 70 F as expected; and (2) hot water usage was much lower than expected. The conclusion is that the solar energy system must be designed for the type of application in which it is used. Misapplication usually will have an adverse affect on system performance.

  4. Characterization and applications of VLF/LF source locations from lightning using the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitzer, Phillip M.; Christian, Hugh J.; Stewart, Mike; Burchfield, Jeff; Podgorny, Scott; Corredor, David; Hall, John; Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Franklin, Veronica

    2013-04-01

    Arrays that detect and locate the four-dimensional spacetime positions of radiation sources from lightning have largely utilized sensors sensitive to the very high frequency (VHF) regime with ˜ 15 km baselines or very low frequency/low frequency (VLF/LF) regime with ˜ 100 km baselines. This paper details initial results from the newly developed Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array (HAMMA), consisting of Marx meters (electric field change meters) sensitive to a frequency band ˜ 1 Hz to 400 kHz. The arrival time of HAMMA waveforms due to radiation sources from lightning are used to determine the spacetime position of these sources. The locations are compared with two well-documented and operational arrays, the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). The standard deviation of the difference between HAMMA and NLDN locations of return strokes is 305 and 266 m in x and y, respectively, while the standard deviation of the difference between HAMMA and NALMA sources is 237, 226, and 688 m in x, y and z, respectively. We further show that NLDN intracloud locations differ in horizontal distance from the corresponding HAMMA locations by a median value of 479 m. In addition, we use HAMMA source locations to map several lightning flashes in the VLF/LF and show HAMMA sources largely map out the same electrical extent as VHF sources and provide unique insights to the properties of the discharges occurring. Finally, we show that VLF/LF sources can determine the leader polarity in several example flashes but not necessarily whether a flash comes to ground. Copyright 2013 American Geophysical Union. All rights reserved.

  5. Constraining lightning channel growth dynamics by comparison of time domain electromagnetic simulations to Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. E.; Bitzer, P. M.; Burchfield, J.

    2015-12-01

    Major unknowns in lightning research include the mechanism and dynamics of lightning channel extension. Such processes are most simple during the initial growth of the channel, when the channel is relatively short and has not yet branched extensively throughout the cloud. During this initial growth phase, impulsive electromagnetic emissions (preliminary breakdown pulses) can be well-described as produced by current pulses generated as the channel extends, but the overall growth rate, channel geometry, and degree of branching are not known. We approach such issues by examining electric field change measurements made with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array (HAMMA) during the first few milliseconds of growth of a lightning discharge. We compare HAMMA observations of electromagnetic emissions and overall field change to models of lightning channel growth and development and attempt to constrain channel growth rate, degree of branching, channel physical properties, and uniformity of thunderstorm electric field. Preliminary comparisons suggest that the lightning channel branches relatively early in the discharge, though more complete and detailed analysis will be presented.

  6. Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Spacelab-3 launched aboard STS-51B, with the major science objective being to perform engineering tests on two new facilities: the rodent animal holding facility and the primate animal holding facility. In addition, scientists observed the animals to obtain first hand knowledge of the effects of launch and reentry stresses and behavior. The need for suitable animal housing to support research in space led to the development of the Research Animal Holding Facility at the Ames Research Center. Scientists often study animals to find clues to human physiology and behavior. Rats, insects, and microorganisms had already been studied aboard the Shuttle on previous missions. On Spacelab-3, scientists had a chance to observe a large number of animals living in space in a specially designed and independently controlled housing facility. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) had management responsibility for the Spacelab-3 mission. This photograph depicts activities during the mission at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at MSFC.

  7. Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Spacelab-3 launched aboard STS-51B, with the major science objective being to perform engineering tests on two new facilities: the rodent animal holding facility and the primate animal holding facility. In addition, scientists observed the animals to obtain first hand knowledge of the effects of launch and reentry stresses and behavior. The need for suitable animal housing to support research in space led to the development of the Research Animal Holding Facility at the Ames Research Center. Scientists often study animals to find clues to human physiology and behavior. Rats, insects, and microorganisms had already been studied aboard the Shuttle on previous missions. On Spacelab-3, scientists had a chance to observe a large number of animals living in space in a specially designed and independently controlled housing facility. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) had management responsibility for the Spacelab 3 mission. This photograph depicts activities during the mission at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at MSFC.

  8. 75 FR 67077 - Television Broadcasting Services; Huntsville, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ... Local TV Alabama License, LLC (``Local TV''), the licensee of WHNT- TV, channel 46, Huntsville, Alabama. Local TV requests the substitution of channel 46 for channel 19 at Huntsville. DATES: Comments must...

  9. Huntsville Arsenal for Sale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1940-01-01

    In the years following World War II, the Army directed that the Huntsville, Alabama Arsenal be advertised for sale. The decision was reversed because the Army found it needed this land for the new missile work that would occur at Redstone Arsenal.

  10. System analysis for the Huntsville Operation Support Center distributed computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingels, F. M.

    1986-01-01

    A simulation model of the NASA Huntsville Operational Support Center (HOSC) was developed. This simulation model emulates the HYPERchannel Local Area Network (LAN) that ties together the various computers of HOSC. The HOSC system is a large installation of mainframe computers such as the Perkin Elmer 3200 series and the Dec VAX series. A series of six simulation exercises of the HOSC model is described using data sets provided by NASA. The analytical analysis of the ETHERNET LAN and the video terminals (VTs) distribution system are presented. An interface analysis of the smart terminal network model which allows the data flow requirements due to VTs on the ETHERNET LAN to be estimated, is presented.

  11. System analysis for the Huntsville Operational Support Center distributed computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingels, F. M.; Mauldin, J.

    1984-01-01

    The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) is a distributed computer system used to provide real time data acquisition, analysis and display during NASA space missions and to perform simulation and study activities during non-mission times. The primary purpose is to provide a HOSC system simulation model that is used to investigate the effects of various HOSC system configurations. Such a model would be valuable in planning the future growth of HOSC and in ascertaining the effects of data rate variations, update table broadcasting and smart display terminal data requirements on the HOSC HYPERchannel network system. A simulation model was developed in PASCAL and results of the simulation model for various system configuraions were obtained. A tutorial of the model is presented and the results of simulation runs are presented. Some very high data rate situations were simulated to observe the effects of the HYPERchannel switch over from contention to priority mode under high channel loading.

  12. Joint Spacelab-J (SL-J) Activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Featured together in joint ground activities during the SL-J mission are NASA/NASDA personnel at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  13. Data Management Coordinators Monitor STS-78 Mission at the Huntsville Operations Support Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Launched on June 20, 1996, the STS-78 mission's primary payload was the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS), which was managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). During the 17 day space flight, the crew conducted a diverse slate of experiments divided into a mix of life science and microgravity investigations. In a manner very similar to future International Space Station operations, LMS researchers from the United States and their European counterparts shared resources such as crew time and equipment. Five space agencies (NASA/USA, European Space Agency/Europe (ESA), French Space Agency/France, Canadian Space Agency /Canada, and Italian Space Agency/Italy) along with research scientists from 10 countries worked together on the design, development and construction of the LMS. This photo represents Data Management Coordinators monitoring the progress of the mission at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at MSFC. Pictured are assistant mission scientist Dr. Dalle Kornfeld, Rick McConnel, and Ann Bathew.

  14. Alternate NASDA Payload Specialists in the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Pictured in the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are NASDA alternate payload specialists Dr. Doi and Dr. Mukai.

  15. Alternate NASDA Payload Specialists in the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Pictured along with George Norris in the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are NASDA alternate payload specialists Dr. Doi and Dr. Mukai.

  16. Urban Expansion Dynamic and its Impact on Water Infiltration and Stream-flow in Huntsville City, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagaw, M. F.; Gabre, T.; Kebede, G.; Wilson, C.; Davis, C.

    2010-12-01

    A rapid change of land use from prime agricultural and forest covered land into housing units, manufacturing, retail and office space development is observed especially in the East-West, and North areas of the Huntsville city. This permanent land use change entails a change in surface moisture, hydrodynamics pattern and flush-runoff behavior of the surrounding streams and rivers on the receiving side of the stream network. This by itself leads to change in hydrologic runoff and infiltration properties leading to a completely new set of micro-hydrologic pattern. In this study we are going to assess the impact of the land use change on the future water infiltration and stremflow change of land surface using Landsat TM images from 1980 to year 2006 and map the increase of the proportion of impervious surfaces as a result of the above activities, and meteorological data over the past 100 years. Different image enhancing and classification technologies based on statistical, Adaptive Neural Network, and Fuzzy Logic Models will be used. Different handling approaches at the pixel level will be implemented. The result will be compiled into a collection of maps and discussed by correlating with the ground truth in the investigation area. As a result of this investigation the economic, ecologic, and institutional impacts over the coming three and decades will be modeled.

  17. ISS Update: Huntsville Control Center Celebrates 12 Years – 03/07/13

    NASA Video Gallery

    From Mission Control Center, JSC Public Affairs Officer Josh Byerly commemorates 12 years of continuous space station science operations at the Payload Operations Center (POC) at Marshall Space Fli...

  18. Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storing thermal energy such as winter chill, summer heat, and industrial waste heat for future use in heat and/or cooling buildings or for industrial processes. Widespread development and implementation of STES would significantly reduce the need to generate primary energy in the United States. Recent data indicate that STES is technically suitable for providing 5% to 10% of the nation's energy, with major contributions in the commercial and industrial sectors and in district heating and cooling applications. This report describes aquifer characterization at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The purpose of the testing is to provide design data for the University's use in modifying and expanding an existing ATES well field. The aquifer characterization work was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program) in cooperation with the University of Alabama as part of efforts to assess the use of chill ATES for space cooling.

  19. University of South Alabama Dialect Tape Center: Audio Tape Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mele, Joseph C.

    Intended for use by teachers, actors, linguists, sociologists, and others interested in dialect study, this catalog lists the holdings of the Dialect Tape Center at the University of South Alabama (Mobile), an organization that was founded to provide ready access to tape recordings of representative American English as it is currently spoken…

  20. Historical Sign at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This sign, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the designation of the Redstone Test Site as a National Historic Landmark. The site was inducted into the National Register of Historical Places in 1976.

  1. System Analysis for the Huntsville Operation Support Center, Distributed Computer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingels, F. M.; Massey, D.

    1985-01-01

    HOSC as a distributed computing system, is responsible for data acquisition and analysis during Space Shuttle operations. HOSC also provides computing services for Marshall Space Flight Center's nonmission activities. As mission and nonmission activities change, so do the support functions of HOSC change, demonstrating the need for some method of simulating activity at HOSC in various configurations. The simulation developed in this work primarily models the HYPERchannel network. The model simulates the activity of a steady state network, reporting statistics such as, transmitted bits, collision statistics, frame sequences transmitted, and average message delay. These statistics are used to evaluate such performance indicators as throughout, utilization, and delay. Thus the overall performance of the network is evaluated, as well as predicting possible overload conditions.

  2. Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storing thermal energy such as winter chill, summer heat, and industrial waste heat for future use in heat and/or cooling buildings or for industrial processes. Widespread development and implementation of STES would significantly reduce the need to generate primary energy in the United States. Recent data indicate that STES is technically suitable for providing 5% to 10% of the nation`s energy, with major contributions in the commercial and industrial sectors and in district heating and cooling applications. This report describes aquifer characterization at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The purpose of the testing is to provide design data for the University`s use in modifying and expanding an existing ATES well field. The aquifer characterization work was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program) in cooperation with the University of Alabama as part of efforts to assess the use of chill ATES for space cooling.

  3. Bridging the Gap Between Research and Operations in the National Weather Service: The Huntsville Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C.; Carroll, B.; Lapenta, W.; Jedlovec, G.; Goodman, S.; Bradshaw, T.; Gordon, J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The National Weather Service Office (WFO) in Huntsville, Alabama (HUN) is slated to begin full-time operations in early 2003. With the opening of the Huntsville WFO, a unique opportunity has arisen for close and productive collaboration with scientists at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH). As a part of the collaboration effort, NASA has developed the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center. The mission of the SPoRT center is to incorporate NASA earth science technology and research into the NWS operational environment. Emphasis will be on improving mesoscale and short-term forecasting in the first 24 hours of the forecast period. As part of the collaboration effort, the NWS and NASA will develop an implementation and evaluation plan to streamline the integration of the latest technologies and techniques into the operational forecasting environment. The desire of WFO HUN, NASA, and UAH is to provide a model for future collaborative activities between research and operational communities across the country.

  4. Access and Finance Issues: The University of Alabama's Education Policy Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsinas, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    Established in the 1920s, the Education Policy Center (EPC) is the oldest center or institute at The University of Alabama. Our work centers on four interrelated areas: (a) access and finance of public higher education, (b) college completion, (c) Pell Grants, and (d) rural community colleges. As place-based institutions with service delivery…

  5. Description and Status of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard J.; Christian, Hugh J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Hall, John M.; McCaul, Eugene W.; Stano, Geoffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is a network LMA detectors that detects and maps lightning using VHF radiation (TV Channel 5) in a region centered about Huntsville, Alabama that includes North Alabama, Central Tennessee and parts of Georgia and Mississippi. The North Alabama LMA has been in operation since late 2001, and has been providing real time data to regional National Weather Service (NSF) Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) since mid 2003 through the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) center. Data from this network (as well as other from other LMA systems) are now being used to create proxy Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data sets for GOES-R risk reduction and algorithm development activities. In addition, since spring 2009 data are provided to the Storm Prediction Center in support of Hazardous Weather Testbed and GOES-R Proving Ground activities during the Spring Program. Description, status and plans will be discussed.

  6. Monitoring Land Surface Soil Moisture from Space with in-Situ Sensors Validation: The Huntsville Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Steve Shih-Tseng

    1997-01-01

    Based on recent advances in microwave remote sensing of soil moisture and in pursuit of research interests in areas of hydrology, soil climatology, and remote sensing, the Center for Hydrology, Soil Climatology, and Remote Sensing (HSCARS) conducted the Huntsville '96 field experiment in Huntsville, Alabama from July 1-14, 1996. We, researchers at the Global Hydrology and Climate Center's MSFC/ES41, are interested in using ground-based microwave sensors, to simulate land surface brightness signatures of those spaceborne sensors that were in operation or to be launched in the near future. The analyses of data collected by the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) and the C-band radiometer, which together contained five frequencies (6.925,10.7,19.35, 37.1, and 85.5 GHz), and with concurrent in-situ collection of surface cover conditions (surface temperature, surface roughness, vegetation, and surface topology) and soil moisture content, would result in a better understanding of the data acquired over land surfaces by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I), the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager (TMI), and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR), because these spaceborne sensors contained these five frequencies. This paper described the approach taken and the specific objective to be accomplished in the Huntsville '97 field experiment.

  7. Dr. von Braun Visits Huntsville Boys Club

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Dr. von Braun, Director of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and chairman of this year's United Givers Fund (UGF) drive at MSFC, takes time out from the problems of sending a man to the Moon to talk baseball with 11-year-old Randy Smith at the Huntsville Boys Club.

  8. The Hydrologic Cycle Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Danny M.; Goodman, H. Michael

    1995-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center in Huntsville, Alabama supports the acquisition, production, archival and dissemination of data relevant to the study of the global hydrologic cycle. This paper describes the Hydrologic Cycle DAAC, surveys its principle data holdings, addresses future growth, and gives information for accessing the data sets.

  9. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - UNITED STATES COAST GUARD AVIATION TRAINING CENTER, MOBILE, ALABAMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes a pollution prevention opportunity assessment of the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Aviation Training Center (ATC) in Mobile, Alabama. he ATC maintains the readiness and airworthiness of Dauphin and Jayhawk Helicopters and Falcon Jets used in training and search a...

  10. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment United States Coast Guard Aviation Training Center, Mobile, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, B.; Memon, A.

    1994-09-01

    The report summarizes work conducted at the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Aviation Training Center (ATC) in Mobile, Alabama under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) Program. Several waste generating processes were initially screened including flight simulators, aircraft maintenance, aircraft fuel management, and aircraft cleaning. Opportunities to reduce wastes in each area were identified and evaluated.

  11. Report on the remedial action to isolate DDT from people and the environment in the Huntsville Spring Branch, Indian Creek System, Wheeler Reservoir, Alabama: Review panel activities, (United States v. Olin Corporation consent decree), May 31, 1983-June 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    The Consent Decree requires the Olin Corporation to develop and implement a remedial plan that will meet a performance standard of 5 parts per million (ppM) of DDT in fillets of channel catfish, largemouth bass, and smallmouth buffalo in specified reaches of the HSB-IC System. This performance standard is to be achieved by a remedy that is consistent with the goals and objectives of the Consent Decree. A Review Panel, consisting of members from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), the Department of the Army (DA), the State of Alabama (ADEM), and nonvoting participants from the town of Triana, Alabama (Triana), and the Olin Corporation (Olin), was established by the Consent Decree. Review Panel responsibilities include technical overview and approval of Olin's proposals to achieve the requirements of the Consent Decree. This report summarizes the activities of the Review Panel associated with implementation of Consent Decree requirements from May 31, 1983 through June 30, 1986.

  12. Initiating Sustainable Operations at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Daniel E.; Orrell, Josh

    2003-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a preliminary sustainability assessment to identify sustainable projects for potential implementation at its facility in Huntsville, Alabama. This presentation will discuss the results of that assessment, highlighting current and future initiatives aimed at integrating sustainability into daily operations.

  13. Survey Plan For Characterization of the Subsurface Underlying the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Volume 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Topic considered include: survey objectives; technologies for non-Invasive imaging of subsurface; cost; data requirements and sources; climatic condition; hydrology and geology; chemicals; magnetometry; electrical(resistivity, potential); optical-style imaging; reflection/refraction seismics; gravitometry; photo-acoustic activation;well drilling and borehole analysis; comparative assessment matrix; ground sensors; choice of the neutron sources; logistic of operations; system requirements; health and safety plans.

  14. Space Science Research and Technology at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles L.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation will summarize the various projects and programs managed in the Space Science Programs and Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Projects in the portfolio include NASA's Chandra X-Ray telescope, Hinode solar physics satellite, various advanced space propulsion technologies, including solar sails and tethers, as well as NASA's Discovery and New Frontiers Programs.

  15. NASA's National Center for Advanced Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John H.; Frazier, Michael K.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An investment in the future, NASA has designated a new initiative where government, industry, and academia collaborate to meet the manufacturing needs of future space systems. The Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama has the principal responsibility for implementation of the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCAM). The mission of the NCAM is to build partnerships that will jointly conduct program planning and develop strategies to perform manufacturing research and technology development for critical national missions.

  16. Helpful Hints in Teaching Adult Basic Education for the Mid-Alabama Adult and Vocational Education Demonstration and Training Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, James E.; Sparks, Peggy F.

    Designed for use with "A Curriculum Guide for the Mid-Alabama Adult and Vocational Education Demonstration Center," this booklet contains material intended for graduate students and administrators who are engaged in the preparation, teaching, and/or who are conducting research in Adult Basic Education. The document is divided into three sections.…

  17. The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), located in Huntsville, Alabama, is a laboratory for cutting-edge research in selected scientific and engineering disciplines. The major objectives of the NSSTC are to provide multiple fields of expertise coming together to solve solutions to science and technology problems, and gaining recognition as a world-class science research organization. The center, opened in August 2000, focuses on space science, Earth sciences, information technology, optics and energy technology, biotechnology and materials science, and supports NASA's mission of advancing and communicating scientific knowledge using the environment of space for research. In addition to providing basic and applied research, NSSTC, with its student participation, also fosters the next generation of scientists and engineers. NSSTC is a collaborated effort between NASA and the state of Alabama through the Space Science and Technology alliance, a group of six universities including the Universities of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH),Tuscaloosa (UA), and Birmingham (UAB); the University of South Alabama in Mobile (USA);Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (AM) in Huntsville; and Auburn University (AU) in Auburn. Participating federal agencies include NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy. Industries involved include the Space Science Research Center, the Global Hydrology and Climate Center, the Information Technology Research Center, the Optics and Energy Technology Center, the Propulsion Research Center, the Biotechnology Research Center, and the Materials Science Research Center. This photo shows the completed center with the additional arnex (right of building) that added an additional 80,000 square feet (7,432 square meters) to the already existent NSSTC, nearly doubling the size of the core facility. At

  18. The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), located in Huntsville, Alabama, is a laboratory for cutting-edge research in selected scientific and engineering disciplines. The major objectives of the NSSTC are to provide multiple fields of expertise coming together to solve solutions to science and technology problems, and gaining recognition as a world-class science research organization. The center, opened in August 2000, focuses on space science, Earth sciences, information technology, optics and energy technology, biotechnology and materials science, and supports NASA's mission of advancing and communicating scientific knowledge using the environment of space for research. In addition to providing basic and applied research, NSSTC, with its student participation, also fosters the next generation of scientists and engineers. NSSTC is a collaborated effort between NASA and the state of Alabama through the Space Science and Technology alliance, a group of six universities including the Universities of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH),Tuscaloosa (UA), and Birmingham (UAB); the University of South Alabama in Mobile (USA); Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (AM) in Huntsville; and Auburn University (AU) in Auburn. Participating federal agencies include NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy. Industries involved include the Space Science Research Center, the Global Hydrology and Climate Center, the Information Technology Research Center, the Optics and Energy Technology Center, the Propulsion Research Center, the Biotechnology Research Center, and the Materials Science Research Center. An arnex, scheduled for completion by summer 2002, will add an additional 80,000 square feet (7,432 square meters) to NSSTC nearly doubling the size of the core facility. At full capacity, the completed NSSTC will top 200

  19. Alabama SEP Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, Elizabeth M.

    2014-06-30

    audit and home energy rating tool; emphasis on community based coordination and partnerships; marketing and outreach to increase homeowner participation; training for market actors; access to financing options including rebates, incentives, and loan products; and an in depth process evaluation to support continual program improvement and analysis. In Alabama, Nexus Energy Center operated energy efficiency retrofit programs in Huntsville and Birmingham. In the Huntsville community the AlabamaWISE program was available in five Alabama counties: Cullman, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, and Morgan. In Birmingham, the program was available to residents in Jefferson and Shelby Counties. In both communities, the program was similar in terms of program design but tailored marketing and partnerships to address the unique local conditions and population of each community. ADECA and the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) provided overall project management services and common resources to the local program administrator Nexus Energy Center, including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection and reporting, and compliance. The fundamental components of the AlabamaWISE program included a vertical contractor-based business model; comprehensive energy assessments; third-party quality assurance; rebates for installation of energy saving measures; accessible, low-interest financing; targeted and inbound marketing; Energy Performance Score (EPS) tool to engage and educate homeowners; training for auditors, contractors, and real estate professionals; and online resources for education and program enrollment. Program participants were eligible to receive rebates or financing toward the assessments and upgrades to their home provided they reached at least 20 percent deemed or modeled energy savings. The design of each program focused on addressing several known barriers including: limited homeowner knowledge on the benefits of energy

  20. Demography of Disadvantage in Alabama. Tuskegee Institute, Center for Rural Development Publication 1-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lewis W.; Williamson, Handy, Jr.

    Designed to illustrate the extent of disadvantage found in the state of Alabama between 1950 and the early 1970's, this statistical source book presents data (of use to policymakers, researchers, and the general public) on the following demographic indicators: (1) Families Below Poverty Level; (2) Per Capita Income; (3) Youth Dependency Ratio; (4)…

  1. The GLOBE Program in Alabama: A Mentoring Approach to State-wide Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, G. N.

    2003-12-01

    Established in 1997, the GLOBE in Alabama (GIA) partnership has trained more than 1,000 teachers in almost 500 schools - over 25% of the total number of K-12 schools in Alabama. Over those five years, GIA has strived to achieve recognition of GLOBE as the "glue" to Alabama's new education program, the Alabama Math, Science and Technology Initiative (AMSTI). In 2003, GIA trained over 370 AMSTI K-8 teachers at two AMSTI hub sites in north Alabama. As the AMSTI program grows with the addition of future hub sites (eleven are planned), GIA must ready itself to train thousands of AMSTI teachers during the two-week summer professional development institutes that are part of AMSTI. A key component of AMSTI is a mentoring program conducted by math and science specialists - classroom educators loaned to the AMSTI hub sites by the school systems each hub site serves. The AMSTI mentoring program mirrors the GIA mentoring model begun in 1999 that originally funded regional GLOBE master teachers to provide technical assistance, feedback, and coaching for other GLOBE teachers. In schools where GIA mentor teachers were working, nearly a 100% increase in GLOBE student data reporting was noted. The GIA mentors now work within the hub site framework to ensure implementation of GLOBE as an integrated part of AMSTI. With the continued support of the State of Alabama, GIA will establish a network of mentors who work with the AMSTI hub site specialists in providing support for all AMSTI teachers. GIA is administered by the National Space Science and Technology Center, a partnership between NASA and the State of Alabama's seven research universities. Operational funding for GIA has been provided by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's Earth System Science Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the Alabama Space Grant Consortium, The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, the Alabama State Department of Education, and Legacy. GIA has been able to build on these

  2. DIAL Measurements of Free-Tropospheric Ozone Profiles in Huntsville, AL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Burris, John; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve

    2007-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, developed jointly by NASA and the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH), measures free-tropospheric ozone profiles between 4-10 km. Located at 192 meters altitude in the Regional Atmospheric Profiling Laboratory for Discovery (RAPCD) on the UAH campus in Huntsville, AL, USA, this tropospheric ozone lidar operates under both daytime and nighttime conditions. Frequent coincident ozonesonde flights and theoretical calculations provide evidence to indicate the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 8% at 4km to 40%-60% at 10 kin with 750-m vertical resolution and 30-minute integration. With anticipated improvements to allow retrievals at both higher and lower altitudes, this ozone lidar, along with co-located aerosol and Doppler Wind Lidars, will provide a unique 18 dataset for investigations of PBL and free-tropospheric chemical and dynamic processes.

  3. Implementation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Elementary Science Study of Nature (LESSON) in North Alabama elementary and middle schools

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, S.Y. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-01-01

    The Alabama A M University - Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Elementary Science Study of Nature (ALALESSON) was designed to improve elementary and middle school science in North Alabama by involving teachers in two-week summer workshop as well as other follow-up activities. The purpose of the activities was to increase the science knowledge of the teachers and to provide them with materials and activities for hands-on science lessons. The summer workshops, conducted during the summers of 1984 and 1985, provided instruction and materials for activities in the area of biology, chemistry, physics, and electricity and magnetism. The materials included equipment thats total value was over $400.00. Additionally, a manual containing 43 lessons which induced background information, experiments and activities for classroom and home use was provided to each teacher. During the course of the project activities, the teachers interacted with fourteen scientists from Alabama A M University, four scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, eight staff members from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, three staff members from the University of Alabama at Huntsville Johnson Environmental Education Center, two North Alabama teachers who served as presenters, and one NASA Teacher in Space Finalist, Kathleen Beres. This report will thus detail activities during the period July 1984--June 1989.

  4. Taking a Stand as a Student-Centered Research University: Active and Collaborative Learning Meets Scholarship of Teaching at the University of Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonner, Judy

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces the University of Alabama, outlines efforts in the scholarship of teaching and active and collaborative learning, and describes plans for continuing the instructional focus as a student-centered research university, where teaching is viewed as a scholarly activity and students are actively engaged in their learning.

  5. EXPERIMENTAL AND DEMONSTRATION MANPOWER PROJECT FOR TRAINING AND PLACEMENT OF YOUTHFUL INMATES OF DRAPER CORRECTIONAL CENTER AT ELMORE, ALABAMA. SIXTH PROGRESS REPORT, JULY 1-SEPTEMBER 1, 1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCKEE, JOHN M.; AND OTHERS

    AFTER RECEIVING VOCATIONAL TRAINING AT THE CENTER, 36 YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS WERE PAROLED AND PLACED ON JOBS. THOSE WORKING IN ALABAMA WERE BEING VISITED IN THEIR HOMES BY THE PLACEMENT OFFICER AND PERSONNEL COUNSELOR TO DETERMINE PAROLEE SUCCESS IN ADJUSTING TO SOCIETY. THE INSTRUCTORS WERE PLEASED WITH THE PROGRESS OF THE SECOND GROUP OF TRAINEES…

  6. Proceedings of the Southeastern Writing Center Conference (2nd, University of Alabama, February 6, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Gary A., Comp.

    Included in these proceedings are 11 essays by 12 specialists in the field of writing center administration. The first essay is the keynote address; the other essays are printed in the order in which they were presented at the conference. The papers discuss the following: (1) the writing center: a vision revisited; (2) from thought to word:…

  7. Project LASER Volunteer, Marshall Space Flight Center Education Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Through Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Education Department, over 400 MSFC employees have volunteered to support educational program during regular work hours. Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering, and Research) provides support for mentor/tutor requests, education tours, classroom presentations, and curriculum development. This program is available to teachers and students living within commuting distance of the NASA/MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama (approximately 50-miles radius). This image depicts students viewing their reflections in an x-ray mirror with Marshall optic engineer Vince Huegele at the Discovery Laboratory, which is an onsite MSFC laboratory facility that provides hands-on educational workshop sessions for teachers and students learning activities.

  8. 76 FR 5290 - Television Broadcasting Services; Huntsville, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Huntsville, AL AGENCY: Federal Communications... Part 73 Television, Television broadcasting. For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the...

  9. Power to Explore: A History of the Marshall Space Flight Center, 1960-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunar, Andrew J.; Waring, Stephen P.

    1999-01-01

    This scholarly study of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center places the institution in social, political, scientific and technological context. It traces the evolution of Marshall, located in Huntsville, Alabama, from its origins as an Army missile development organization to its status in 1990 as one of the most diversified of NASA's field Center. Chapters discuss military rocketry programs in Germany and the United States, Apollo-Saturn, Skylab, Space shuttle, Spacelab, the Space Station, and various scientific and technical projects including the Hubble Space Telescope. It sheds light not only on the history of space technology, science and exploration, but also on the Cold War, federal politics and complex organizations.

  10. The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA): A Network Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J.; Buechler, D.; Goodman, S. J.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.; Hall, J.

    2005-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is s a 3-D VHF regional lightning detection system that provides on-orbit algorithm validation and instrument performance assessments for the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor, as well as information on storm kinematics and updraft evolution that offers the potential to improve severe storm warning lead time by up t o 50% and decrease te false alarm r a t e ( for non-tornado producing storms). In support of this latter function, the LMA serves as a principal component of a severe weather test bed to infuse new science and technology into the short-term forecasting of severe and hazardous weather, principally within nearby National Weather Service forecast offices. The LMA, which became operational i n November 2001, consists of VHF receivers deployed across northern Alabama and a base station located at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), which is on t h e campus of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The LMA system locates the sources of impulsive VHF radio signals s from lightning by accurately measuring the time that the signals aririve at the different receiving stations. Each station's records the magnitude and time of the peak lightning radiation signal in successive 80 ms intervals within a local unused television channel (channel 5, 76-82 MHz in our case ) . Typically hundreds of sources per flash can be reconstructed, which i n t u r n produces accurate 3-dimensional lightning image maps (nominally <50 m error within 150 la. range). The data are transmitted back t o a base station using 2.4 GHz wireless Ethernet data links and directional parabolic grid antennas. There are four repeaters in the network topology and the links have an effective data throughput rate ranging from 600 kbits s -1 t o 1.5 %its s -1. This presentation provides an overview of t h e North Alabama network, the data processing (both real-time and post processing) and network statistics.

  11. Ozone entrainment flux using ozone DIAL and Compact Wind Aerosol Lidar (CWAL) in Huntsville AL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, G.; Newchurch, M.; kuang, S.; Wang, L.; Cantrell, W.

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have proved that the impact of high ozone amounts in the residual layer can account for up to 80% of the surface ozone maxima during the following day. This high ozone in the residual layer mixes into to the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) through the entrainment processes as the growth of PBL occurs in the morning. Conversely, anthropogenic pollutants emitted from the surface mix into the Free Troposphere (FT) and are transported to other places. Therefore, entrainment flux is one of the important connections between the local-scale/urban-scale and the regional scale. In this study, we will present a study of ozone entrainment fluxes using continuous observation by co-located ozone DIAL and Compact Wind Aerosol Lidar (CWAL) at the campus of University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). As a part of Tropospheric Ozone Lidar NETwork (TOLNET), UAH ozone DIAL can provide continuous ozone observation at the range of 125 m AGL to 12 km, with 10-min temporal resolution and 150 - 550 m vertical resolution [Kuang et al., 2013]. We also perform an ozone budget study using Dutch Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulation (DALES), reasonable approximations of dry deposition, in conjunction with ozone entrainment flux observations. We work towards building a comprehensive understanding of the quantitative impacts of ozone entrainment processes on surface ozone amounts in a medium-sized urban area like Huntsville AL. Shi Kuang, Michael J. Newchurch, John Burris, and Xiong Liu, "Ground-based lidar for atmospheric boundary layer ozone measurements," Appl. Opt. 52, 3557-3566 (2013)

  12. NASA University Research Centers Technical Advances in Aeronautics, Space Sciences and Technology, Earth Systems Sciences, Global Hydrology, and Education. Volumes 2 and 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Tommy L. (Editor); White, Bettie (Editor); Goodman, Steven (Editor); Sakimoto, P. (Editor); Randolph, Lynwood (Editor); Rickman, Doug (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This volume chronicles the proceedings of the 1998 NASA University Research Centers Technical Conference (URC-TC '98), held on February 22-25, 1998, in Huntsville, Alabama. The University Research Centers (URCS) are multidisciplinary research units established by NASA at 11 Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCU's) and 3 Other Minority Universities (OMU's) to conduct research work in areas of interest to NASA. The URC Technical Conferences bring together the faculty members and students from the URC's with representatives from other universities, NASA, and the aerospace industry to discuss recent advances in their fields.

  13. The Use of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) in the Real-Time Operational Warning Environment During the March 2nd, 2012 Severe Weather Outbreak in Northern Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Kristopher; Carcione, Brian; Schultz, Christopher J.; Stano, Geoffrey T.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2012-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) is a three-dimensional very high frequency (VHF) detection network consisting of 11 sensors spread across north central Alabama and two sensors located in the Atlanta, Georgia region. The primary advantage of this network is that it detects total lightning, or the combination of both cloud-to-ground and intra-cloud lightning, instead of cloud-to-ground lightning alone. This helps to build a complete picture of storm evolution and development, and can serve as a proxy for storm updraft strength, particularly since intra-cloud lightning makes up the majority of all lightning in a typical thunderstorm. While the NALMA data do not directly indicate severe weather, they can indirectly indicate when a storm is strengthening (weakening) due to increases (decreases) in updraft strength, as the updraft is responsible for charging mechanisms within the storm. Data output are VHF radiation sources, which are produced during lightning breakdown processes. These sources are made into 2x2 km source density grids and are ported into the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) for National Weather Service (NWS) offices in Huntsville, AL, Nashville, TN, Morristown, TN, and Birmingham, AL, in near real-time. An increase in sources, or source densities, correlates to increased lightning activity and trends in updraft magnitude as long as the storm is within about 125 km of the center of the LMA network. Operationally, these data have been used at the Huntsville NWS office since early 2003 through a collaborative effort with NASA s Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center. Since then, total lightning observations have become an essential tool for forecasters during real-time warning operations. One of the operational advantages of the NALMA is the two-minute temporal resolution of the data. This provides forecasters with two to three updates during a typical volume scan of the WSR-88D radar.

  14. Dial Measurements of Free-Tropospheric Ozone Profiles in Huntsville, AL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newchurch, Mike; Kuang, Shi; Burris, John; Johnson, Steve; Long, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system has been developed jointly by NASA and the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH). Two separated Nd:YAG pumped dye laser systems produce the laser pulses with wavelengths of 285 and 291 nm at 20 Hz frequency. The receiver is a Newtonian telescope with a 40 cm primary and a two-channel aft optics unit. The detection system currently uses photon counting to facilitate operations at the maximum achievable altitude. This lidar measures free-tropospheric ozone profiles between 4-10 km at Regional Atmospheric Profiling Laboratory for Discovery (RAPCD) in UAH campus (ASL 206 m) under both daytime and nighttime conditions. Frequent coincident ozonesonde flights and theoretical calculations provide evidence to indicate the retrieval accuracy ranges from approx.5% at 4 km to approx.60% at 10 km with 750-m vertical resolution and 30-minute integration. Three Hamamatsu 7400 PMTs and analog detection technique will be added on the current system to extend the measurement to approx.100 m above ground to monitor the PBL and lower tropospheric ozone variations.

  15. Huntsville Area Students Appear in Episode of NASA CONNECT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Students at Williams Technology Middle School in Huntsville were featured in a new segment of NASA CONNECT, a video series aimed to enhance the teaching of math, science, and technology to middle school students. The segment premiered nationwide May 15, 2003, and helped viewers understand Sir Isaac Newton's first, second, and third laws of gravity and how they relate to NASA's efforts in developing the next generation of space transportation.

  16. Applications of Meteorological Tower Data at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altino, Karen M.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) design and operation communities rely on meteorological information collected at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), located near Cape Canaveral, Florida, to correctly apply the ambient environment to various tasks. The Natural Environments Branch/EV44, located at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, is responsible for providing its NASA customers with meteorological data using various climatological data sources including balloons, surface stations, aircraft, hindcast models, and meteorological towers. Of the many resources available within the KSC region, meteorological towers are preferred for near-surface applications because they record data at regular, frequent intervals over an extensive period of record at a single location. This paper discusses the uses of data measured at several different meteorological towers for a common period of record and how the data can be applied to various engineering decisions for the new Constellation Program Ares and Orion space vehicles.

  17. Hydrology of the Tertiary-Cretaceous aquifer system in the vicinity of Fort Rucker Aviation Center, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, J.C.; Law, L.R.; Cobb, Riley

    1984-01-01

    Fort Rucker Aviation Center, built in 1941-42, uses ground water for its water supply. The demand for water began to exceed the capacity of the well field in 1976. The Tertiary-Cretaceous aquifer system in the Fort Rucker area consists of an upper and lower aquifer. The upper aquifer consists of the basal part of the Tuscahoma Sand, the Nanafalia and Clayton Formations, and the upper part of the Providence Sand. The lower aquifer consists of the lower part of the Providence Sand and the Ripley Formation. Most large capacity (greater than 100 gal/min (gallons per minute)) wells in the Fort Rucker area are developed in one of these aquifers, and produce 500 gal/min or more. An aquifer test made at Fort Rucker during the study indicates that the transmissivity of the upper aquifer is about 7,000 ft sq/d (feet squared per day). This test and a potentiometric map of the area indicate that wells spaced too closely together is a major problem at pumping centers in the study area. (USGS)

  18. Staffing the ISS Control Centers: Lessons Learned from Long-Duration Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Carrie D.; Horvath, Timothy J.; Davis, Sally P.

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has been in operation with a permanent human presence in space for over five years, and plans for continued operations stretch ten years into the future. Ground control and support operations are, likewise, a 15-year enterprise. This long-term, 24-hour per day, 7 day per week support has presented numerous challenges in the areas of ground crew training, initial and continued certification, and console staffing. The Mission Control Center in Houston, Texas and the Payload Operations Center in Huntsville, Alabama have both tackled these challenges, with similar, yet distinct, approaches. This paper describes the evolution of the staffing and training policies of both control centers in a chronological progression. The relative merits and shortcomings of the various policies employed are discussed and a summary of "lessons learned" is presented. Finally, recommendations are made as best practices for future long-term space missions.

  19. EXPERIMENTAL AND DEMONSTRATION MANPOWER PROJECT, TRAINING AND PLACEMENT OF YOUTHFUL INMATES, DRAPER CORRECTIONAL CENTER, ELMORE, ALABAMA. 10TH PROGRESS REPORT, APRIL 1-JUNE 1, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCKEE, JOHN M.; AND OTHERS

    INITIATED AS AN EXPERIMENTAL EFFORT TO HELP REDUCE THE HIGH RATE OF RECIDIVISM TO ALABAMA'S PRISONS, THE MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING PROJECT HAS GRADUATED 173 YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS AS ENTRY-LEVEL TRADESMEN. JOBS WERE SECURED FOR 142 GRADUATES AS THEY BECAME ELIGIBLE FOR PAROLE, SIX GRADUATES WERE RELEASED TO FACE OTHER CHARGES, AND 25 AWAIT…

  20. Aeromonas hydrophila in 2010: Characteristics of Alabama outbreaks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For a second year, epidemics associated with a virulent strain of Aeromonas hydrophila resulted in losses of hundreds of thousands of pounds of market size Alabama (AL) catfish. During this period, the Alabama Fish Farming Center diagnosed outbreaks of this strain of A. hydrophila on 25% (28/113) o...

  1. Inservice Education at a Distance: A Rural Consortium in Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addleton, Robert L.; Edmonds, Charles; Gamble, Lanny; Watkins, J. Foster

    1983-01-01

    The articles describes the efforts of seven rural systems in northeast Alabama to respond in a cooperative manner to new initiatives from the State Department of Education to improve their inservice/staff development programs. The University of Alabama, primarily through its Gadsden Center, provided professional support and coordinating…

  2. Oak Mountain High School, Shelby County, Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Design Cost Data, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents design features of the Oak Mountain High School (Alabama) consisting of an academic side of classrooms, administration, and media center; and an activity side consisting of cafeteria, gymnasium, practice gym, and a theater. The school's floor plan and photos are included. (GR)

  3. The University of Alabama's Integrated Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainey, Larry; Mitrook, Kim

    This program, supported by the Center for Communication and Educational Technology at the University of Alabama, incorporates the perspectives of biology, earth/space science, chemistry, and physics into an innovative science curriculum for the middle grades. Students are engaged for 20 minutes 3 times a week by an on-air instructor who is doing…

  4. Conference on the Meteorological and Oceanographic Uses of Satellites in Molniya Orbits, Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, May 3, 1991, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The present conference discusses the characteristics of the Molniya orbit, design considerations for an imaging radiometer, polar flows, and the impact of temporal resolution on the estimation of mesoscale precipitation. Also discussed are Arctic applications of satellites in Molniya orbit, the use of satellite data in Arctic forecasting, high latitude meteorological studies of Antarctica with frequent NOAA polar orbiting satellite data, and mid- and high-latitude total ozone observations from over three earth radii measured from Dynamics Explorer I.

  5. Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This document is a quick look at general information about Alabama schools. The document contains 11 sections: (1) state statistics; (2) Alabama public schools, 2006-07; (3) Alabama state board of education members; (4) financial data; (5) school size and enrollment; (6) transportation and school meals; (7) graduation requirements; (8) additional…

  6. Use of data from space for earth resources exploration and management in Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamoreaux, P. E.; Henry, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The University of Alabama, the Geological Survey of Alabama, and the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center are involved in an interagency, interdisciplinary effort to use remotely sensed, multispectral observations to yield improved and timely assessment of earth resources and environmental quality in Alabama. It is the goal of this effort to interpret these data and provide them in a format which is meaningful to and readily usable by agencies, industries, and individuals who are potential users throughout the State.

  7. Alabama Water Use, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutson, Susan S.; Littlepage, Thomas M.; Harper, Michael J.; Tinney, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Water is one of Alabama's most precious natural resources. It is a vital component of human existence and essential to the overall quality of life. Wise stewardship of this valuable resource depends on a continuing assessment of water availability and water use. Population growth in many parts of the State has resulted in increased competition for available water resources. This competition includes offstream uses, such as residential, agricultural, and industrial, and instream uses for maintenance of species habitat and diversity, navigation, power generation, recreation, and water quality. Accurate water-use information is required for sound management decisions within this competitive framework and is necessary for a more comprehensive understanding of the link between water use, water supply, and overall water availability. A study of water use during 2005 was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, Office of Water Resources, Water Management Branch (ADECA-OWR), to provide water-use data for local and State water managers. The results of the study about the amount of water used, how it was used, and where it was used in Alabama have been published in 'Estimated use of water in Alabama in 2005' by Hutson and others, 2009, and is accessible on the Web at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5163 and available upon request as a CD-ROM through USGS and ADECA-OWR.

  8. Alabama and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Alabama and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead Goals for Education", which call for the region to lead the…

  9. Homonegativity among Alabama Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satcher, Jamie; Leggett, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Alabama Counseling Association were surveyed to examine the extent to which they demonstrate homonegativity (prejudicial attitudes toward homosexuality). The majority of the counselors did not appear to approach homosexuality from traditional prejudices, although almost one-third believed homosexuality to be immoral. The counselors…

  10. Alabama's Decree of Difficulty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evelyn, Jamilah

    1998-01-01

    Nearly 30 years after the official end of de jure segregation, Alabama is struggling to level educational opportunities for both black and white citizens. Critics say this goal will be difficult to reach unless the state hires and retains more black faculty. Only recently, because of a court decree, are state black institutions getting equal…

  11. Academic Standards in Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    A+ Education Partnership, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Education policymakers and educators in Alabama are committed to improving the state's public education system to ensure that students gain the knowledge and skills they need to graduate from high school ready for real life. The state is on the path to implementing higher academic standards--the College and Career Ready Standards--which lay a…

  12. Giles, Petrone, and Garriott Chat at Apollo 16 Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Huntsville's Jack Giles, Alabama State Senator (left), and Dr. Rocco Petrone, Marshall Space Flight Center Director (Middle), speak with Astronaut Owen Garriott who is inside the Apollo 16 Command Module on display at the Alabama Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The successful Apollo 16 manned lunar landing mission took place April 16, 1972 through April 27, 1972. (Photograph courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  13. First report of soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) on Florida beggarweed (Desmodium tortuosum) in Alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean rust, caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, was detected on Florida Beggarweed (Desmodium tortuosum) for the first time in Alabama in November, 2009. The pathogen was observed on plants collected from a field at the Wiregrass Research and Extension Center in Headland, Alabama located i...

  14. EXPERIMENTAL AND DEMONSTRATION MANPOWER PROJECT FOR TRAINING AND PLACEMENT OF YOUTHFUL INMATES OF DRAPER CORRECTIONAL CENTER, ELMORE, ALABAMA. 16TH PROGRESS REPORT, MAY 1-JULY 1, 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCKEE, JOHN M.

    PROGRESS IN THE AREAS OF EMPLOYMENT, PUBLIC RELATIONS, THE CORRECTIONAL SYSTEM, COOPERATING AGENCIES, AND RECIDIVISM ARE ILLUSTRATED BY FOUR CASE STUDIES OF PAROLEE GRADUATES FROM THE CENTER'S EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM. OF THE 980 INMATES WHO APPLIED FOR TRAINING DURING 33 MONTHS OF PROJECT OPERATION, 271 COMPLETED TRAINING, AND 74 WERE PRESENTLY…

  15. System analysis for the Huntsville Operational Support Center distributed computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingels, E. M.

    1983-01-01

    A simulation model was developed and programmed in three languages BASIC, PASCAL, and SLAM. Two of the programs are included in this report, the BASIC and the PASCAL language programs. SLAM is not supported by NASA/MSFC facilities and hence was not included. The statistical comparison of simulations of the same HOSC system configurations are in good agreement and are in agreement with the operational statistics of HOSC that were obtained. Three variations of the most recent HOSC configuration was run and some conclusions drawn as to the system performance under these variations.

  16. Von Braun's Dream: Space Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the "Space Camp" program for boys and girls at the Alabama Space and Rocket Center (Huntsville, Alabama), including typical activities. Includes address for obtaining information on participation in the program. (JN)

  17. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  18. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  19. Alabama Education News. Volume 32, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  20. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  1. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  2. Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  3. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama," as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  4. Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  5. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  6. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  7. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  8. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  9. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  10. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  11. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  12. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama," as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  13. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  14. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  15. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  16. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  17. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  18. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  19. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  20. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  1. Alabama State Lodging Tax: A Lesson for All Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieckmann, Amy

    2003-01-01

    A dispute between an Alabama business conference center and a nearby camp prompted the state's revenue department to charge camps an old lodging tax that had never been applied to them before. The state camping association members worked together to have the tax law and regulations amended so that nonprofit camps were exempt from the tax in most…

  2. View of the 200ton derrick from west showing the center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the 200-ton derrick from west showing the center mast, one stiff leg, the boom and the boom angle reeving. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn V Dynamic Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  3. Soil Sampling Techniques For Alabama Grain Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. N.; Shaw, J. N.; Mask, P. L.; Touchton, J. T.; Rickman, D.

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial variability of nutrients facilitates precision soil sampling. Questions exist regarding the best technique for directed soil sampling based on a priori knowledge of soil and crop patterns. The objective of this study was to evaluate zone delineation techniques for Alabama grain fields to determine which method best minimized the soil test variability. Site one (25.8 ha) and site three (20.0 ha) were located in the Tennessee Valley region, and site two (24.2 ha) was located in the Coastal Plain region of Alabama. Tennessee Valley soils ranged from well drained Rhodic and Typic Paleudults to somewhat poorly drained Aquic Paleudults and Fluventic Dystrudepts. Coastal Plain s o i l s ranged from coarse-loamy Rhodic Kandiudults to loamy Arenic Kandiudults. Soils were sampled by grid soil sampling methods (grid sizes of 0.40 ha and 1 ha) consisting of: 1) twenty composited cores collected randomly throughout each grid (grid-cell sampling) and, 2) six composited cores collected randomly from a -3x3 m area at the center of each grid (grid-point sampling). Zones were established from 1) an Order 1 Soil Survey, 2) corn (Zea mays L.) yield maps, and 3) airborne remote sensing images. All soil properties were moderately to strongly spatially dependent as per semivariogram analyses. Differences in grid-point and grid-cell soil test values suggested grid-point sampling does not accurately represent grid values. Zones created by soil survey, yield data, and remote sensing images displayed lower coefficient of variations (8CV) for soil test values than overall field values, suggesting these techniques group soil test variability. However, few differences were observed between the three zone delineation techniques. Results suggest directed sampling using zone delineation techniques outlined in this paper would result in more efficient soil sampling for these Alabama grain fields.

  4. Libraries in Alabama: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/alabama.html Libraries in Alabama To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Birmingham American Sports Medicine Institute Sports Medicine LIBRARY 833 St. Vincent's Drive Suite 205 Birmingham, AL ...

  5. Dr. von Braun, Mayor Searcy, and General Medaris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the U.S. Army Ballistic Missile Agency's (ABMA) Development Operations Division, talks to Huntsville Mayor R. B. 'Speck' Searcy, center, and Army Ordnance Missile Command (ARMC) Major General John B. Medaris, right, during 'Moon Day' celebrations in downtown Huntsville, Alabama. (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  6. Alabama Public Library Service: 1998 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) is responsible for receiving and administering federal and state funds for the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. This document represents the annual report for the Alabama Public Library Service for fiscal year 1998. Information is reported under the following categories: Evaluation and Research;…

  7. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  8. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  9. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  10. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  11. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  12. Alabama Public Library Service 1996 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service is charged with improving library services throughout Alabama to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. The agency is responsible for administering federal and state funds for the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. Building renovations were completed in April…

  13. Fast, Affordable, Science and Technology Satellite (FASTSAT) Huntsville-01 (HSV-01) Spacecraft Lessons Learned Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    The Fast Affordable Science and Technology Satellite (FASTSAT) project is a path finding effort to produce reliable satellite busses for different applications at an unprecedented speed and low cost. The project is designed to be a generational project and the first satellite produced is the Huntsville -01 (HSV-01) spacecraft. The subject of this report is the lessons learned gained during the development, testing, and up to the delivery of the FASTSAT HSV -01 spacecraft. The purpose of this report is to capture the major findings that will greatly benefit the future FASTSAT satellites and perhaps other projects interested in pushing the boundaries for cost and schedule. The FASTSAT HSV -01 primary objectives, success criteria, and team partners are summarized to give a frame of reference to the lessons learned.

  14. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, R. Joel, II, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" published during 1996. The focus of the journal is on communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling. Issue number 1 includes the following articles: "Commitment through…

  15. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Gypsy, Ed.; Elliott, Glenda R., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling is the purpose of this journal. The first issue in volume 21 contains the following articles: "Policies and Procedures for Reporting Child Abuse in Alabama: Considerations for Counselors, Teachers, and School…

  16. Alabama's Child Nutrition Certification Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery. Div. of Administration and Finance.

    This handbook presents the plan for the Alabama computerized certification program for school food service employees. The first section contains the following information and materials pertaining to the child nutrition certification program: rationale; position titles (Child Nutrition Program Director or Supervisor, Child Nutrition Program…

  17. Capabilities of the Impact Testing Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finchum, Andy; Nehls, Mary; Young, Whitney; Gray, Perry; Suggs, Bart; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2011-01-01

    The test and analysis capabilities of the Impact Testing Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center are described. Nine different gun systems accommodate a wide range of projectile and target sizes and shapes at velocities from subsonic through hypersonic, to accomplish a broad range of ballistic and hypervelocity impact tests. These gun systems include ballistic and microballistic gas and powder guns, a two-stage light gas gun, and specialty guns for weather encounter studies. The ITF "rain gun" is the only hydrometeor impact gun known to be in existence in the United States that can provide single impact performance data with known raindrop sizes. Simulation of high velocity impact is available using the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic Code. The Impact Testing Facility provides testing, custom test configuration design and fabrication, and analytical services for NASA, the Department of Defense, academic institutions, international space agencies, and private industry in a secure facility located at Marshall Space Flight Center, on the US Army's Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. This facility performs tests that are subject to International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and DoD secret classified restrictions as well as proprietary and unrestricted tests for civil space agencies, academic institutions, and commercial aerospace and defense companies and their suppliers.

  18. Dr. von Braun at 'Wernher von Braun Day' Celebration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    In 1970 Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director Dr. Wernher von Braun (right) was reassigned to NASA Headquarters to serve as Deputy Associate Administrator for Plarning. Prior to his transfer, Dr. von Braun was honored for his career in Huntsville, Alabama, with the celebration of 'Wernher von Braun Day.' Among those participating were Alabama Governor Albert Brewer (left) and Alabama Senator John Sparkman (center). (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public library)

  19. Finite element analysis in fluids; Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Finite Element Methods in Flow Problems, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Apr. 3-7, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, T. J.; Karr, Gerald R.

    Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics are examined in reviews and reports, with an emphasis on finite-element methods. Sections are devoted to adaptive meshes, atmospheric dynamics, combustion, compressible flows, control-volume finite elements, crystal growth, domain decomposition, EM-field problems, FDM/FEM, and fluid-structure interactions. Consideration is given to free-boundary problems with heat transfer, free surface flow, geophysical flow problems, heat and mass transfer, high-speed flow, incompressible flow, inverse design methods, MHD problems, the mathematics of finite elements, and mesh generation. Also discussed are mixed finite elements, multigrid methods, non-Newtonian fluids, numerical dissipation, parallel vector processing, reservoir simulation, seepage, shallow-water problems, spectral methods, supercomputer architectures, three-dimensional problems, and turbulent flows.

  20. Finite element analysis in fluids; Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Finite Element Methods in Flow Problems, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Apr. 3-7, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J. (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics are examined in reviews and reports, with an emphasis on finite-element methods. Sections are devoted to adaptive meshes, atmospheric dynamics, combustion, compressible flows, control-volume finite elements, crystal growth, domain decomposition, EM-field problems, FDM/FEM, and fluid-structure interactions. Consideration is given to free-boundary problems with heat transfer, free surface flow, geophysical flow problems, heat and mass transfer, high-speed flow, incompressible flow, inverse design methods, MHD problems, the mathematics of finite elements, and mesh generation. Also discussed are mixed finite elements, multigrid methods, non-Newtonian fluids, numerical dissipation, parallel vector processing, reservoir simulation, seepage, shallow-water problems, spectral methods, supercomputer architectures, three-dimensional problems, and turbulent flows.

  1. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Vols. 37A & 37B - Proceedings of the 1991 Cryogenic Engineering Conference, Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, June 11-14, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, Ronald W. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on advances in cryogenic engineering discusses heat and mass transfer in helium, heat transfer in cryogenic fluids, thermoacoustic oscillations, and insulation. Attention is given to applications of superconductivity with reference to magnetic stability and coil protection, cryogenic techniques, and refrigeration for electronics and superconducting systems. Topics addressed include compressors, expanders, and pumps for liquid helium, magnetic refrigerators, pulse tube refrigerators, and cryocoolers. Also examined are properties of cryogenic fluids, cryogenic applications in transportion and space science and technology, and cryogenic instrumentation.

  2. International Conference on Finite Elements in Flow Problems, 7th, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Apr. 3-7, 1989, Selected Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-10-01

    Topics presented include the finite element analysis of confined turbulent swirling flows, compressible viscous flow calculations using compatible finite element approximations, the equilibrium and stability of Tokamaks, and a coupled finite element solution of biharmonic problems for vector potentials. Also presented are the Godunov-mixed methods for immiscible displacement, the iterative adaptive implicit-explicit methods for flow problems, finite element methods for one-dimensional combustion problems, and a technique for analyzing finite element methods for viscous incompressible flow.

  3. Dual-Polarimetric Radar-Based Tornado Debris Signatures and Paths Associated with Tornadoes Over Northern Alabama During the Historic Outbreak of 27 April 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Schultz, Elise V.; Petersen, Walter A.; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Knupp, Kevin R.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Jedloved, Gary J.; Carcione, Brian C.; Darden, Christopher B.; Crowe, Christina C.

    2012-01-01

    A historic tornado and severe weather outbreak devastated much of the southeastern United States between 25 and 28 April 2011. On 27 April 2011, northern Alabama was particularly hard hit by 40 tornadoes, including 6 that reached EF-4 to EF-5 on the Enhanced Fujita damage scale. In northern Alabama alone, there were approximately 100 fatalities and hundreds of people who were injured or lost their homes during the havoc caused by these violent tornadic storms. Many of these tornadoes occurred within range of the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville) Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR, C-band dual-polarimetric). A unique capability of dual-polarimetric radar is the near-real time identification of lofted debris associated with ongoing tornadoes. The focus of this paper is to analyze the dual-polarimetric radar-inferred tornado debris signatures in 6 tornadoes in North Alabama on April 27, 2011. Several of these debris signatures were disseminated in real-time to the NWS Huntsville and local media to confirm storm spotter reports, confidence to enhance wording within warnings, and accurately pinpoint the locations of tornadoes for residents downstream of the storm. Also, the debris signature locations were used in post-event storm surveys to help locate areas of damage in regions where damage went unreported, or to help separate tornado tracks that were in close proximity to each other. Furthermore, the relative locations of the debris and damage paths for long track EF-4 and EF-5 tornadoes will be ascertained by careful comparison of the ARMOR analysis with NASA MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) satellite imagery of the tornado damage scenes and the National Weather Service tornado damage surveys.

  4. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center: A Collaborative Model for Accelerating Research into Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Lapenta, W.; Jedlovec, G.; Dodge, J.; Bradshaw, T.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center in Huntsville, Alabama was created to accelerate the infusion of NASA earth science observations, data assimilation and modeling research into NWS forecast operations and decision-making. The principal focus of experimental products is on the regional scale with an emphasis on forecast improvements on a time scale of 0-24 hours. The SPoRT Center research is aligned with the regional prediction objectives of the US Weather Research Program dealing with 0-1 day forecast issues ranging from convective initiation to 24-hr quantitative precipitation forecasting. The SPoRT Center, together with its other interagency partners, universities, and the NASA/NOAA Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, provides a means and a process to effectively transition NASA Earth Science Enterprise observations and technology to National Weather Service operations and decision makers at both the global/national and regional scales. This paper describes the process for the transition of experimental products into forecast operations, current products undergoing assessment by forecasters, and plans for the future.

  5. Water EducaTion for Alabama's Black Belt (WET Alabama): Facilitating Scientific Understanding of the Hydrologic Cycle in Low-Resource Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, L. W.; Lee, M.; Stone, K.

    2008-12-01

    Youth, as future citizens, play an important role in obtaining and maintaining water resources. Water EducaTion for Alabama's Black Belt (WET Alabama) provides off-campus environmental and water-education activities designed to increase the appreciation, knowledge, conservation, and protection of water resources by middle-school teachers and children from predominantly African-American families in some of Alabama's poorest counties. The project is structured around a variety of indoor and outdoor activities held at two field sites, Auburn University's E. V. Smith Center in Macon County and the Robert G. Wehle Nature Center in Bullock County located in Alabama's "Black Belt" region, a region in which the prosperity of local communities is low. The educational activities provide an engaging laboratory and field experience for children from rural schools that lack scientific facilities and equipment. Both hosting centers have easy access to surface water (ponds, wetlands, streams) and offer facilities for basic hydrologic experiments (e.g., aquifer models, permeameter, water quality). The E.V. Smith site has access to groundwater through pairs of nested wells. Educational activities are designed to help students and teachers visualize groundwater flow and its interaction with surface water in an aquifer tank model; compare the hydrologic properties (porosity and permeability) of different aquifer materials (sands, gravels, and clays); learn about groundwater purging and sampling; and assess water quality and flow direction in the field. Simple exercises demonstrate (1) the balance of recharge and discharge, (2) the effects of flooding, drought and pumping, and (3) movement of contaminants through aquifers. A set of ready-to-teach laboratory exercises and tutorials address goals specified by the State of Alabama science curriculum for grades 6 to 8. The ultimate goal of Project WET Alabama is to help students and teachers from resource-poor schools become knowledgeable

  6. Climate Variability and Impact at NASA's Marshal Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, James L.; Jedlovec, Gary; Williams, Brett

    2013-01-01

    Climate analysis for the Southeast U. S. has indicated that inland regions have experienced an average temperature increase of 2F since 1970. This trend is generally characterized by warmer winters with an indication of increased precipitation in the Fall season. Extended periods of limited rainfall in the Spring and Summer periods have had greater areal coverage and, at other times the number of precipitation events has been increasing. Climate model projections for the next 10-70 years indicate warmer temperatures for the Southeast U.S., particularly in the Spring and Summer, with some indication of more extremes in temperature and precipitation as shown in the table below. The realization of these types of regional climate changes in the form of extended heat waves and droughts and their subsequent stress on facilities, infrastructure, and workforce could have substantial impact on the activities and functions of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This presentation will present the results of an examination of the 100 year temperature and precipitation record for MSFC. Local warming has cause an increase in daily maximum and minimum temperatures by nearly 3F, with a substantial increase in the number of maximum temperatures exceeding 90F and a decrease in the number of days with minimum temperatures below freezing. These trends have substantial impact of the number of heating / cooling degree days for the area. Yearly precipitation totals are inversely correlated with the change in mean temperature and the frequency of heavy rain events has remain consistent with the changes in yearly totals. An extended heat wave index was developed which shows an increase in frequency of heat waves over the last 35 years and a subsequent reduction in precipitation during the heat waves. This trend will contribute to more intense drought conditions over the northern Alabama region, increasing the potential of destructive wildfires in and around

  7. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This annual report highlights the accomplishments of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) during 1989. Introductory materials include a map of Alabama's Congressional districts, photographs of the executive board of APLS, and comments from the chairman of the executive board and from APLS' director. The following accomplishments are then…

  8. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alabama. 81.301 Section 81.301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.301 Alabama. Alabama—TSP Designated area Does not...

  9. Alabama Allied Health Needs Assessment Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Libby V.

    This study assessed the supply of and demand for allied health professionals in Alabama, focusing on the relationship between supply and demand in various workplace settings in the context of Alabama's demographics, current educational programs, and projected changes in health care. The health care professions included in the study were all fields…

  10. Accountability in Alabama Schools. Report 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Education Study Commission, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Education Study Commission conducted a five-year project to find adequate measures of accountability for schools. The result, developed, implemented, and tested in 11 school districts in Alabama, was a Program Management and Budgeting (PMB) system combining elements of zero-base budgeting and management by objectives. PMB has the…

  11. Alabama Public Library Service: 1997 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) serves the information needs of Alabama public libraries. As a state agency, APLS is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. The agency is responsible for receiving and administering federal and state…

  12. Alabama Education Highlights. Bulletin 1979, No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This booklet provides a chronology of public education in Alabama from 1799 to 1979. Objectives are to provide an abbreviated educational history to interested Alabamans and citizens of other states and to inspire researchers to investigate local school systems and other educational topics throughout Alabama. The document is presented in three…

  13. 76 FR 30008 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22057). You can also find later actions..., 2011, Federal Register (76 FR 9700). In the same document, we opened the public comment period and... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 901 Alabama Regulatory Program...

  14. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1998-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Sandy, Ed.; Norem, Ken, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" that make up volume 24. Articles in Issue 1 include: (1) "Learning Comes in Many Forms" (Holly Forester-Miller); (2) "Legislative, Legal, and Sociological Aspects of Alabama's Mental Health System" (David Gamble; Jamie S. Satcher); (3) "Peer Supervision: A…

  15. Federal Public Library Programs in Alabama, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. Part of this charge includes the responsibility for receiving and administering federal funds to the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. Federal…

  16. Federal Public Library Programs in Alabama, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. Part of this charge includes the responsibility for receiving and administering federal funds to the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. Federal…

  17. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This annual report highlights the accomplishments of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) during 1990. Introductory materials include a map of Alabama's Congressional districts, photographs of the executive board of APLS, and comments from the chairman of the executive board and from APLS' director. Accomplishments are reported under the…

  18. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. The agency is responsible for receiving and administering federal and state funds for the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. Information is reported…

  19. 2008-2009 Alabama Education Report Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Year after year, the goal of educators, parents, and concerned citizens throughout Alabama is to provide this state's children with the highest level of quality education possible. The future of Alabama's businesses, industries, commerce, labor force, arts, humanities, and countless other areas are determined by the education that is provided to…

  20. 78 FR 4967 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00046

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00046 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of ALABAMA dated...

  1. 76 FR 27141 - Alabama Disaster # AL-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00036 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alabama...

  2. 78 FR 22361 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00049

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00049 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Alabama dated...

  3. 75 FR 26813 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00029

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00029 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alabama...

  4. 77 FR 7227 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alabama...

  5. 75 FR 1420 - Alabama Disaster # AL-00025

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Alabama dated...

  6. 78 FR 26100 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00050

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00050 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Alabama dated...

  7. AWARE (Alabama Working at Reading Excellence).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Univ., Tuscaloosa. Coll. of Education.

    The selected material from the Right-to-Read Institute consists of: (1) Goals of the Institute and Specific Objectives, (2) Alabama Working at Reading Excellence Program, (3) What is the Right to Read?, (4) Objectives, (5) Activities - Studies, (6) Inventory, (7) Recommendations, (8) Alabama Population Characteristics and (9) Sounds and Light for…

  8. 77 FR 54490 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... approval of the Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 901 Alabama Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule; public...

  9. Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics; Alabama public schools 2009-10; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data; public school size and enrollment, 2009-10 school year; transportation; school meals; school personnel, 2009-2010; graduation requirements; student assessment; additional enrollment; and dropouts in school year 2008-09.

  10. Alabama Department of Education Quick Facts, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics; Alabama public schools 2007-08; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data; public school size and enrollment; transportation; school meals; school personnel, 2007-2008; graduation requirements; student assessment; additional enrollment; and dropouts, 2006-07.

  11. Alabama Education Quick Facts: Plan 2020

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics for the following categories; Alabama public schools, 2012-13; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data, FY 2012; public school size and enrollment, 2012-13 school year; transportation, 2012-13; school meals, 2011-12; school personnel, 2012-13; graduation rates, 2010-11; graduation…

  12. Alabama's Appalachian overthrust amid exploratory drilling resurgence

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.D. ); Epsman, M.L.

    1991-06-24

    Oil and gas exploration has been carried out sporadically in the Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama for years, but recently interest in the play has had a major resurgence. The Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama is best exposed in the valley and ridge physiographic province in the northeast part of the state. Resistant ridges of sandstone and chert and valleys of shales and carbonate have been thrust toward the northwest. Seismic data show that this structural style continues under the Cretaceous overlap. The surface and subsurface expression of the Alabama overthrust extends for more than 4,000 sq miles. Oil and gas have been produced for many years from Cambro-Ordovician, Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian rocks in the nearby Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi and the Cumberland plateau in Tennessee. The same zones are also potential producing horizons in the Alabama overthrust region.

  13. Final Technical Report. Upgrades to Alabama Power Company Hydroelectric Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Crew, James F.; Johnson, Herbie N.

    2015-03-31

    From 2010 to 2014, Alabama Power Company (“Alabama Power”) performed upgrades on four units at three of the hydropower developments it operates in east-central Alabama under licenses issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC”). These three hydropower developments are located on the Coosa River in Coosa, Chilton, and Elmore counties in east-central Alabama.

  14. 5. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., after bridge collapsed in 1973. Shows broken turn span and overturned center pier. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  15. 6. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17 Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., 192. Shows center turn span and part of one fixed span. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  16. A mesoscale analysis of the pre-storm environment on the 17 June 1986 COHMEX day. [Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, Henry E.; Schudalla, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    The study presented utilized special mesoscale Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment (COHMEX) data to understand the evolution of the preconvective environment on June 17, 1986. Using the special mesoscale COHMEX data, several mechanisms for triggering the convection are investigated. Afternoon heating probably was a major factor as observed noontime temperatures were near the sounding-derived convection temperatures. The special surface network revealed a quasi-stationary area of convergence not aligned with the front that may be associated with the orography of the area. This study demonstrates that rapid, small scale atmospheric variations preceded convective development on June 17, 1986.

  17. Alabama Magnet School Races toward Job Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Morgan

    2002-01-01

    Describes Alabama's Brewbaker Technology Magnet High School, which was built for only $70 per square foot. Explores the relationship between its school-to-work, collaborative-learning approach and the building's design. (EV)

  18. Women@NASA 2015 Rosalind Cylar

    NASA Video Gallery

    Rosalind Cylar serves as an attorney and advisor in the Office of Chief Counsel at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Cylar supports NASA by providing legal support to all ...

  19. Women@NASA 2015 Cindy Stemple

    NASA Video Gallery

    Cindy Stemple is the acting project manager for the SERVIR project, working in the coordination office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, in Huntsville, Alabama. SERVIR -- a Spanish word meani...

  20. Women@NASA 2015 Seunghee Lee

    NASA Video Gallery

    Seunghee Lee works as the program senior integration engineer in the Space Launch System Program Chief Safety Mission Assurance Office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, in Huntsville, Alabama...

  1. Supporting Multiple Programs and Projects at NASA's Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Camiren L.

    2014-01-01

    With the conclusion of the shuttle program in 2011, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) had found itself at a crossroads for finding transportation of United States astronauts and experiments to space. The agency would eventually hand off the taxiing of American astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) that orbits in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) about 210 miles above the earth under the requirements of the Commercial Crew Program (CCP). By privatizing the round trip journey from Earth to the ISS, the space agency has been given the additional time to focus funding and resources to projects that operate beyond LEO; however, adding even more stress to the agency, the premature cancellation of the program that would succeed the Shuttle Program - The Constellation Program (CxP) -it would inevitably delay the goal to travel beyond LEO for a number of years. Enter the Space Launch System (SLS) and the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, the SLS is under development at NASA's Marshall Spaceflight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, while the Orion Capsule, built by government contractor Lockheed Martin Corporation, has been assembled and is currently under testing at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. In its current vision, SLS will take Orion and its crew to an asteroid that had been captured in an earlier mission in lunar orbit. Additionally, this vehicle and its configuration is NASA's transportation to Mars. Engineers at the Kennedy Space Center are currently working to test the ground systems that will facilitate the launch of Orion and the SLS within its Ground Services Development and Operations (GSDO) Program. Firing Room 1 in the Launch Control Center (LCC) has been refurbished and outfitted to support the SLS Program. In addition, the Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) is the underlying control system for monitoring and launching manned launch vehicles. As NASA finds itself at a junction, so does all of its

  2. The Performance of Alabama College System Students on the Alabama Basic Skills Test. Chancellor's Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Postsecondary Education, Montgomery.

    This study investigated the performance of Alabama College System (ACS) students on a Basic Skills Test (BST) and compared it with non-ACS students' scores to determine whether there were significant differences in achievement. The Alabama Basic Skills Test is required of all students seeking admission to teacher education programs at Alabama…

  3. EXPERIMENTAL AND DEMONSTRATION MANPOWER PROJECT FOR TRAINING AND PLACEMENT OF YOUTHFUL INMATES OF DRAPER CORRECTIONAL CENTER AT ELMORE, ALABAMA. 8TH PROGRESS REPORT, NOVEMBER 1, 1965-FEBRUARY 1, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCKEE, JOHN M.; SEAY, DONNA M.

    SEVENTY-EIGHT PAROLEES IN THE CENTER'S DEMONSTRATION PROJECT SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED VOCATIONAL COURSES AND WERE EMPLOYED. OF 83 INMATES IN TRAINING AT PRESENT, 21 HAD A LOW READING ABILITY WHICH PREVENTED THEIR COMPREHENDING THE SHOP RELATED STUDIES, BUT SPECIALLY DESIGNED MATERIALS OF VARYING LEVELS ARE BEING INTRODUCED INTO COURSES, AND OTHERS…

  4. 26. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) WITH SAILS SET Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) WITH SAILS SET Original 2-3/4'x2-1/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  5. 2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL PURIFICATION TANK IN DISTANCE FOR KEEPING DOWN GROWTH OF ALGAE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, Alabama Gates, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. ATM Coastal Topography-Alabama 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Alabama coastline, acquired October 3-4, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface, and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for pre-survey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create maps that

  7. Northern Alabama colonies of the endangered grey bat Myotis grisescens: Organochlorine contamination and mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R., Jr.; Bagley, F.M.; Johnson, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    From 1976 to 1986, dead and dying grey bats Myotis grisescens and grey bat guano were collected from caves along the Tennessee River in northern Alabama to determine the possible role of organochlorine chemicals.sbd.in particular wastes from a former DDT manufacturing plant near Huntsville.sbd.in the mortalities. Concentrations of chemical residues in brains were less than known lethal levels: certain observations and analyses did indicate the possibility of past organochlorine-induced bat deaths. Levels of contaminants in bats declined slowly during the 10-year sampling period, but heavy residue burdens persist. The high ratio of DDD to DDE in residue from the former DDT plant made them identifiable as far as 140 km downriver. Grey bats concentrated chemical rsidues to higher levels and demonstrated the presence of these residues over much greater distances than did red-winged blackbirds Agelaius phoeniceus. Grey bats may be the most sensitive indicator available for monitoring the contamination from this former DDT manufacturing site.

  8. The "Nuevo" New South: Hispanic Immigration to Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohl, Raymond A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes Hispanic migration trends in Alabama, discussing how Alabama's demographic and cultural transformation and recent changes in the global economy are connected. The new Hispanic labor force has become an essential ingredient in Alabama's rural and urban economies. However, anti-immigrant sentiments have surfaced in some areas. Adjustment…

  9. Alabama's Education Report Card, 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Educational progress has been moving in the right direction for several years in Alabama. Now, with the implementation of Alabama's own Plan 2020, an even higher level of accountability for students, teachers, administrators, support systems, and schools/school systems, Alabama is poised to experience unprecedented growth. Add to that, the…

  10. 40 CFR 282.50 - Alabama State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... administered by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42 U.S.C... RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Alabama obtains approval for the revised... obtained from the Ground Water Branch, Alabama Department of Environmental Management, 1751 W.L....

  11. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  12. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  13. Graptemys pulchra Baur 1893: Alabama Map Turtle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Godwin, James C.; McCoy, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    The Alabama Map Turtle, Graptemys pulchra (Family Emydidae), is a moderately large riverine species endemic to the Mobile Bay drainage system of Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi. Sexual size dimorphism is pronounced, with adult females (carapace length [CL] to 273 mm) attaining more than twice the size of adult males (CL to 117 mm). The species is an inhabitant of relatively large, swift creeks and rivers, often with wide sandbars. Stream sections open to the sun and with abundant basking sites in the form of logs and brush are preferred. Six to seven clutches of 4–7 eggs are laid each year on river sandbars. Although the species is locally abundant, populations are threatened by habitat destruction, declines in their prey base, commercial collection, and vandalism. It is listed as a Species of Special Concern in Alabama.

  14. Magnitude and frequency of floods in Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkins, J. Brian

    1996-01-01

    Methods of estimating flood magnitudes for recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 500 years are described for rural streams in Alabama that are not affected by regulation or urbanization. Flood-frequency characteristics are presented for 198 gaging stations in Alabama having 10 or more years of record through September 1991, that are used in the regional analysis. Regression relations were developed using generalized least-squares regression techniques to estimate flood magnitude and frequency on ungaged streams as a function of the drainage area of a basin. Sites on gaged streams should be weighted with gaging station data that are presented in the report. Graphical relations of peak discharges to drainage areas are also presented for sites along the Alabama, Black Warrior, Cahaba, Choctawhatchee, Conecub, and Tombigbee Rivers. Equations for estimating flood magnitudes on ungaged urban streams (taken from a previous report) that use drainage area and percentage of impervious cover as independent variables also are given.

  15. Triassic/Jurassic faulting patterns of Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Hutley, J.K.

    1985-02-01

    Two major fault systems influenced Jurassic structure and deposition on the Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama. Identification and dating of these fault systems are based on seismic-stratigraphic interpretation of a 7-township grid in Monroe and Conecuh Counties. Relative time of faulting is determined by fault geometry and by formation isopachs and isochrons. Smackover and Norphlet Formations, both Late Jurassic in age, are mappable seismic reflectors and are thus reliable for seismicstratigraphic dating. The earlier of the 2 fault systems is a series of horsts and grabens that trends northeast-southwest and is Late Triassic to Early Jurassic in age. The system formed in response to tensional stress associated with the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The resulting topography was a series of northeast-southwest-trending ridges. Upper Triassic Eagle Mills and Jurassic Werner Formations were deposited in the grabens. The later fault system is also a series of horsts and grabens trending perpendicular to the first. This system was caused by tensional stress related to a pulse in the opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Faulting began in Early Jurassic and continued into Late Jurassic, becoming progressively younger basinward. At the basin margin, faulting produced a very irregular shoreline. Submerged horst blocks became centers for shoaling or carbonate buildups. Today, these blocks are exploration targets in southwest Alabama.

  16. Spend a Day in Outer Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Describes the Alabama Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama as stimulating experience for students in aerospace education. The center has the largest collection of space-age hardware assembled under one roof, a Space Flight simulator, a Skylab space station mock-up and many more interesting exhibits. (BR)

  17. Assessment of the geothermal/geopressure potential of the Gulf Coastal Plan of Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.V.; Wang, G.C.; Mancini, E.A.; Benson, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Geothermal and geopressure as well as geologic and geophysical data were studied to evaluate the potential for future development of geothermal resources underlying the Alabama Coastal Plain. Wire-line log data compiled and interpreted from more than 1300 oil and gas test wells included maximum recorded temperatures, mud weights, rock resistivities as related to geopressure, formation tops, fault locations, and depths to basement rock. The Alabama Coastal Plain area is underlain by a conduction dominated, deep sedimentary basin where geothermal gradients are low to moderate (1.0 to 1.8/sup 0/F/100 feet). In some areas of southwest Alabama, abnormally high temperatures are found in association with geopressured zones within the Haynesville Formation of Jurassic age; however, rocks of poor reservoir quality dominate this formation, with the exception of a 200-square-mile area centered in southernmost Clarke County where a porous and permeable sand unit is encased within massive salt deposits of the lower Haynesville. The results of a petrograhic study of the Smackover Formation, which underlies the Haynesville, indicate that this carbonate rock unit has sufficient porosity in some areas to be considered a potential geothermal reservoir. Future development of geothermal resources in south Alabama will be restricted to low or moderate temperature, non-electric applications, which constitute a significant potential energy source for applications in space heating and cooling and certain agricultural and industrial processes.

  18. Space Grant Undergraduate Remote Sensing Research in Urban Growth near Mobile Bay, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolins, M. J.; Keen, J.; Wilcox, P.; Sheehan, A.; Dial, S.

    2010-12-01

    During late 2009, four Tennessee Space Grant undergraduate researchers began a remote sensing investigation of urban growth southeast of Mobile Bay, Alabama. They selected the study area in consultation with the Marshall Space Flight Center Earth Science Office, and they share the study area with a multi-institution NASA-funded project exploring the application of remotely sensed data and related models to conservation and restoration along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast. In the first phase of the Space Grant investigation, four undergraduate researchers used a November 7, 2009 Landsat scene to map developed land near Mobile, Alabama. They used supervised and unsupervised classification to map developed land in two areas: 10 miles southeast of Mobile along U.S. Route 98 between Daphne and Fairhope, Alabama, and 25 miles southeast of Mobile near Foley, Alabama. Visual comparison of their map with the circa 2001 National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) revealed urban growth in both areas. In the year ahead, Space Grant undergraduates will explore ways to improve their map by incorporating ancillary vector data and images. They will also collect reference data on the ground, and then they will use ground-based reference data and air photos to assess map accuracy. As an ultimate goal, the Space Grant undergraduates seek to compare their results with those of the larger multi-institution project. The Space Grant investigation will lead to a better understanding of the potential for undergraduate interaction with a large NASA-funded remote sensing applications project.

  19. Doppler radar observations of the evolution of a small convective storm during Cohmex. [Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Patrick D.; Ray, Peter S.

    1989-01-01

    Doppler radar observations of a deep convection that developed along the Alabama-Tennesse border on July 14, 1986 are analyzed. The evolution and structure of the convective storm are examined. Two convective cores are observed and both having a radius of about 1 km and maximum reflectivities of about 5 dBz; a third cell is also detected later in the region between the northern and southern cells. It is noted that the northern cell is the most dominant possessing an updraft through the region of maximum reflectivity. Diagrams of the vertical structure of the cells are provided.

  20. Financial Reporting for Alabama Public Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    Guidelines for preparing year-end financial reports are provided for Alabama public university staff to insure that reporting formats produce comparable financial reports and to keep up with recent developments in college accounting and financial reporting. The public institutions comply with two publications issued by the American Institute of…

  1. RCP Local School Projects in Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Curriculum Project, Atlanta, GA.

    One of 6 state reports generated by the Regional Curriculum Project (funded under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act), the document describes 4 specific projects implemented through the Alabama State Superintendent's Office beginning in 1966. All 4 projects were designed to improve instructional leadership by defining the role(s) of the…

  2. State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Key, Logan

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Alabama. The state is home to 1,538 public schools distributed across 67 county school systems and 64 city school systems. State spending is allocated via two separate budgets, "the general fund" for all noneducation related expenditures and the Education Trust Fund (ETF)…

  3. Alabama Kids Count 2001 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

    This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being for Alabama's children. The statistical portrait is based on 17 indicators in the areas of health, education, safety, and security. The indicators are: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention;…

  4. Alabama Citizens on Postsecondary Education: Survey '76.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owings, Thomas G.

    During the summer of 1976, the Institute conducted a public opinion poll. From a random sample of 1,251 individuals, age 16 and over, 680 persons responded to and returned a 44-item questionnaire about various aspects of postsecondary education in Alabama. The survey results are analyzed from four perspectives: (1) previous national and regional…

  5. 76 FR 9642 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find later actions... the proposed amendment in the September 30, 2010, Federal Register (75 FR 60371). In the same document... protect society and the environment from the adverse effects of surface coal mining operations.''...

  6. 78 FR 11577 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find later actions... initiative. We announced receipt of the proposed amendment in the September 5, 2012, Federal Register (77 FR... protect society and the environment from the adverse effects of surface coal mining operations.''...

  7. New technology N products in alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of high fertilizer N prices, growers are interested in using less expensive sources of N and using fertilizer additives to reduce ammonia volatilization losses from urea sources. An experiment on a Lucedale fine sandy loam in Central Alabama (Prattville Research Unit) was conducted in 2007 ...

  8. 40 CFR 81.401 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alabama. 81.401 Section 81.401 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... manager Sipsey Wild 12,646 93-622 USDA-FS...

  9. 40 CFR 81.401 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alabama. 81.401 Section 81.401 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... manager Sipsey Wild 12,646 93-622 USDA-FS...

  10. 40 CFR 81.401 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alabama. 81.401 Section 81.401 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... manager Sipsey Wild 12,646 93-622 USDA-FS...

  11. 40 CFR 81.401 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alabama. 81.401 Section 81.401 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... manager Sipsey Wild 12,646 93-622 USDA-FS...

  12. Exploratory Programs in Alabama Middle Grades Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Louis L.; Allen, Michael G.; McKenna, Beverly

    Many educators believe that middle grades schools have a responsibility to capitalize on the natural curiosity of young adolescents through the use of an exploratory curriculum to help students understand the world in which they live. This study examined the status of middle grades exploratory programs in Alabama. A 22-item questionnaire was sent…

  13. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) lists its duties, goals, and recent accomplishments in this 1988 annual report. Some of these duties and goals are: (1) administering grants for library development and state aid; (2) providing consultation for library automation; (3) researching and answering reference questions; (4) lending books from…

  14. Alabama Public Library Service, 1987 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    Designed to provide an overview of the range and quality of services provided by the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS), this annual report focuses on the 1987 activities of APLS. A report on the activities of the Library Development Division shows the allocation of state aid and Library Services and Construction Act (LCSA) Titles I and III…

  15. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Birmingham area is a maintenance area for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Alabama... affecting § 81.301 see the List of CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... County Blount County Bullock County Butler County Calhoun County Chambers County Cherokee County...

  16. Significance of selected lineaments in Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drahovzal, J. A.; Neathery, T. L.; Wielchowsky, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    Four lineaments in the Alabama Appalachians that appear on ERTS-1 imagery have been geologically analysed. Two of the lineaments appear to have regional geologic significance, showing relationships to structural and stratigraphic frameworks, water and mineral resources, geophysical anomalies, and seismicity. The other two lineaments are of local geologic significance, but, nevertheless, have important environmental implications.

  17. 75 FR 60371 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find later actions concerning the Alabama program and program... hearing until 4 p.m., c.d.t. on October 15, 2010. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by SATS No. AL-075-FOR by any of the following methods: E-mail: swilson@osmre.gov . Include ``SATS No....

  18. 76 FR 9700 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find later actions.... on March 9, 2011. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by SATS No. AL-076-FOR by any of the following methods: E-mail: swilson@osmre.gov . Include ``SATS No. AL-076-FOR'' in the subject line of...

  19. The Alabama School of Fine Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifted Child Quarterly, 1979

    1979-01-01

    The article describes the Alabama School of Fine Arts, a public secondary school offering, in addition to basic academics, intensive training in the areas of music, dance, drama, creative writing, and visual arts to talented and motivated junior and senior high school students in Birmingham. (Author/DLS)

  20. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Alabama students showed gains across the board in reading and math--at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for all racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. Progress was made in narrowing achievement gaps between racial/ethnic…

  1. New technology N products in alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of high fertilizer N prices, growers are interested in using less expensive sources of N and using fertilizer additives to reduce ammonia volatilization losses from urea sources. An experiment on a Lucedale fine sandy loam in Central Alabama (Prattville Research Unit) was conducted in 2007 t...

  2. Alabama Kids Count 2002 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

    This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being of Alabamas children. The statistical portrait is based on 18 indicators in the areas of child health, education, safety, and security: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention; (6) school…

  3. 75 FR 26814 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00031

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00031 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  4. 76 FR 29810 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  5. 75 FR 474 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00026

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00026 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  6. 77 FR 60003 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00044

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00044 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  7. Chemical Technician Manpower Survey: State of Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Donald; And Others

    The study was undertaken to assess the needs of Alabama's industry for chemical technicians and to determine the kinds and levels of skills required by major employers. Of the 75 organizations responding to the questionnaire with usable data, 62 were private industries, 6 were testing laboratories, and 7 were federal agencies. Generally, the study…

  8. Implementation of Alabama Resources Information System, ARIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, B. E.

    1978-01-01

    Development of ARIS - Alabama Resources Information System is summarized. Development of data bases, system simplification for user access, and making information available to personnel having a need to use ARIS or in the process of developing ARIS type systems are discussed.

  9. A Decade of Friction Stir Welding R and D at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and a Glance into the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jeff; Carter, Bob; Lawless, Kirby; Nunes, Arthur; Russell, Carolyn; Suites, Michael; Schneider, Judy

    2006-01-01

    Welding at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, Alabama, has taken a new direction through the last 10 years. Fusion welding processes, namely variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) were once the corner stone of welding development in the Space Flight Center's welding laboratories, located in the part of MSFC know as National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCM). Developed specifically to support the Shuttle Program's External Tank and later International Space Station manufacturing programs, was viewed as the paragon of welding processes for joining aluminum alloys. Much has changed since 1994, however, when NASA's Jeff Ding brought the FSW process to the NASA agency. Although, at that time, FSW was little more than a "lab curiosity", NASA researchers started investigating where the FSW process would best fit NASA manufacturing programs. A laboratory FSW system was procured and the first welds were made in fall of 1995. The small initial investment NASA made into the first FSW system has certainly paid off for the NASA agency in terms of cost savings, hardware quality and notoriety. FSW is now a part of Shuttle External Tank (ET) production and the preferred weld process for the manufacturing of components for the new Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) and Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) that will take this country back to the moon. It is one of the solid state welding processes being considered for on-orbit space welding and repair, and is of considerable interest for Department of Defense @OD) manufacturing programs. MSFC involvement in these and other programs makes NASA a driving force in this country's development of FSW and other solid state welding technologies. Now, a decade later, almost the entire on-going welding R&D at MSFC now focuses on FSW and other more advanced solid state welding processes.

  10. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    More than 2,000 children and adults from Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama recently build a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled 'Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  11. Center for Macromolecular Crystallography, University of Alabama in Birmingham

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navia, Manuel A.

    1991-01-01

    Porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) crystals grown under microgravity conditions on mission STS-26 of the Space Shuttle Discovery were shown to diffract to considerably higher resolution than the best PPE crystals grown by us on the ground. We have now independently refined both the microgravity and ground-based data. Preliminary results of these refinements are summarized. These results show nearly a doubling of experimental diffraction data for this structure, exceeding 1.3 A resolution. Improved phase information derived from the refined structure of PPE based on this microgravity data has allowed us to interpret previously-uninterpretable electron density obtained from ground-based crystals of a complex of PPE with a chemically-reactive inhibitor. Intermediate stages in the enzyme-inhibitor reaction mechanism in the crystal can now be directly observed. Further refinement of PPE structures is in progress.

  12. COMPUTATION OF UNSTEADY FLOWS IN THE ALABAMA RIVER.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jeffcoat, Hillary H.; Jennings, Marshall E.

    1987-01-01

    An application is described of the branch-network flow model, BRANCH, to the upper Alabama River system in central Alabama. The model is used to simulate one-dimensional unsteady flows and water surface elevations in approximately 60 river miles of the Alabama River system. Preliminary calibration was made using 72 hours of observed data. Simulated discharges are about 10 percent lower than observed discharges at higher discharge rates and computer flows lag observed flows by about 30 minutes.

  13. Development of Alabama Resources Information System (ARIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, B. E.; Vachon, R. I.

    1976-01-01

    A formal, organized set of information concerning the development status of the Alabama Resources Information System (ARIS) as of September 1976 is provided. A series of computer source language programs, and flow charts related to each of the computer programs to provide greater ease in performing future change are presented. Listings of the variable names, and their meanings, used in the various source code programs, and copies of the various user manuals which were prepared through this time are given.

  14. Parameters of triggered-lightning flashes in Florida and Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.J.; Schnetzer, G.H.; Thottappillil, R.; Rakov, V.A.; Uman, M.A.; Goldberg, J.D.

    1993-12-20

    Channel base currents from triggered lightning were measured at the NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during summer 1990 and at Fort McClellan, Alabama, during summer 1991. Additionally, 16-mm cinematic records with 3- or 5-ms resolution were obtained for all flashes, and streak camera records were obtained for three of the Florida flashes. The 17 flashes analyzed contained 69 strokes, all lowering negative charge from cloud to ground. Statistics on interstroke interval, no-current interstroke interval, total stroke duration, total stroke charge, total stroke action integral ({integral}i{sup 2}dt), return stroke current wave front characteristics, time to half peak value, and return stroke peak current are presented. Return stroke current pulses, characterized by rise times of the order of a few microseconds or less and peak values in the range of 4 to 38 kA, were found not to occur until after any preceding current at the bottom of the lightning channel fell below the noise level of less than 2 A. A relatively strong positive correlation was found between return stroke current average rate of rise and current peak. There was essentially no correlation between return stroke current peak and 10-90% rise time or between return stroke peak and the width of the current waveform at half of its peak value. Parameters of the lightning flashes triggered in Florida and Alabama are similar to each other but are different from those of triggered lightning recorded in New Mexico during the 1981 Thunderstorm Research International Program. Continuing currents that follow return stroke current peaks and last for more than 10 ms exhibit a variety of wave shapes that the authors have subdivided into four categories. All such continuing currents appear to start with a current pulse presumably associated with an M component. A brief summary of lightning parameters important for lightning protection, is presented in an appendix. 43 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Can Third Graders Make Learning Centers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Frances

    1979-01-01

    The article describes the Tuscaloosa County class for 16 primary gifted students in Northport, Alabama. It is explained that the students designed learning centers based on their own interests. Outlined is the sequential plan developed for researching and developing the learning centers. (SBH)

  16. Dual-Polarimetric Radar-Based Tornado Debris Paths Associated with EF-4 and EF-5 Tornadoes over Northern Alabama During the Historic Outbreak of 27 April 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Schultz, Elise V.; Petersen, Walter A.; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Knupp, Kevin R.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Darden, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    An historic tornado and severe weather outbreak devastated much of the southeastern United States between 25 and 28 April 2011. On 27 April 2011, northern Alabama was particularly hard hit by a large number of tornadoes, including several that reached EF-4 and EF-5 on the Enhanced Fujita damage scale. In northern Alabama alone, there were approximately 100 fatalities and hundreds of more people who were injured or lost their homes during the havoc caused by these violent tornadic storms. Two long-track and violent (EF-4 and EF-5) tornadoes occurred within range of the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville) Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR, C-band dual-polarimetric). A unique capability of dual-polarimetric radar is the near-real time identification of lofted debris associated with ongoing tornadoes on the ground. The focus of this paper is to analyze the dual-polarimetric radar-inferred tornado debris signatures and identify the associated debris paths of the long-track EF-4 and EF-5 tornadoes near ARMOR. The relative locations of the debris and damage paths for each tornado will be ascertained by careful comparison of the ARMOR analysis with NASA MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) satellite imagery of the tornado damage scenes and the National Weather Service tornado damage surveys. With the ongoing upgrade of the WSR-88D (Weather Surveillance Radar - 1988 Doppler) operational network to dual-polarimetry and a similar process having already taken place or ongoing for many private sector radars, dual-polarimetric radar signatures of tornado debris promise the potential to assist in the situational awareness of government and private sector forecasters and emergency managers during tornadic events. As such, a companion abstract (Schultz et al.) also submitted to this conference explores "The use of dual-polarimetric tornadic

  17. Dual-Polarimetric Radar-Based Tornado Debris Paths Associated with EF-4 and EF-5 Tornadoes over Northern Alabama During the Historic Outbreak of 27 April 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Chrstopher J.; Schultz, Elise V.; Petersen, Walter A.; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Knupp, Kevin R.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Darden, Christopher B.

    2012-01-01

    An historic tornado and severe weather outbreak devastated much of the southeastern United States between 25 and 28 April 2011. On 27 April 2011, northern Alabama was particularly hard hit by a large number of tornadoes, including several that reached EF-4 and EF-5 on the Enhanced Fujita damage scale. In northern Alabama alone, there were approximately 100 fatalities and hundreds of more people who were injured or lost their homes during the havoc caused by these violent tornadic storms. Two long-track and violent (EF-4 and EF-5) tornadoes occurred within range of the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville) Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR, C-band dual-polarimetric). A unique capability of dual-polarimetric radar is the near-real time identification of lofted debris associated with ongoing tornadoes on the ground. The focus of this paper is to analyze the dual-polarimetric radar-inferred tornado debris signatures and identify the associated debris paths of the long-track EF-4 and EF-5 tornadoes near ARMOR. The relative locations of the debris and damage paths for each tornado will be ascertained by careful comparison of the ARMOR analysis with NASA MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) satellite imagery of the tornado damage scenes and the National Weather Service tornado damage surveys. With the ongoing upgrade of the WSR-88D (Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 Doppler) operational network to dual-polarimetry and a similar process having already taken place or ongoing for many private sector radars, dual-polarimetric radar signatures of tornado debris promise the potential to assist in the situational awareness of government and private sector forecasters and emergency managers during tornadic events. As such, a companion abstract (Schultz et al.) also submitted to this conference explores The use of dual-polarimetric tornadic debris

  18. The Testing Behind The Test Facility: The Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC?s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA?s space exploration program. T he large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world?s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada?s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic de-sign and subsequent on-going construction.

  19. The Testing Behind The Test Facility: The Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada's acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  20. The Testing Behind the Test Facility: the Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, U.S.A. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, U.S.A. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent ongoing construction.

  1. JPSS Proving Ground Activities with NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, L. A.; Smith, M. R.; Fuell, K.; Stano, G. T.; LeRoy, A.; Berndt, E.

    2015-12-01

    Instruments aboard the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of satellites will provide imagery and other data sets relevant to operational weather forecasts. To prepare current and future weather forecasters in application of these data sets, Proving Ground activities have been established that demonstrate future JPSS capabilities through use of similar sensors aboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, and the S-NPP mission. As part of these efforts, NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center in Huntsville, Alabama partners with near real-time providers of S-NPP products (e.g., NASA, UW/CIMSS, UAF/GINA, etc.) to demonstrate future capabilities of JPSS. This includes training materials and product distribution of multi-spectral false color composites of the visible, near-infrared, and infrared bands of MODIS and VIIRS. These are designed to highlight phenomena of interest to help forecasters digest the multispectral data provided by the VIIRS sensor. In addition, forecasters have been trained on the use of the VIIRS day-night band, which provides imagery of moonlit clouds, surface, and lights emitted by human activities. Hyperspectral information from the S-NPP/CrIS instrument provides thermodynamic profiles that aid in the detection of extremely cold air aloft, helping to map specific aviation hazards at high latitudes. Hyperspectral data also support the estimation of ozone concentration, which can highlight the presence of much drier stratospheric air, and map its interaction with mid-latitude or tropical cyclones to improve predictions of their strengthening or decay. Proving Ground activities are reviewed, including training materials and methods that have been provided to forecasters, and forecaster feedback on these products that has been acquired through formal, detailed assessment of their applicability to a given forecast threat or task. Future opportunities for collaborations around the delivery of training are proposed

  2. AL State Profile. Alabama: Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE), 3rd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about Alabama High School Graduation Exam, 3rd Edition, a comprehensive standards-based exam. The purpose of the exam is to: (1) Provide schools with student academic diagnostic information; (2) Determine prospective high school graduates' mastery of the state curriculum; (3) Increase alignment of local curriculum…

  3. 77 FR 41132 - Air Quality Implementation Plans; Alabama; Attainment Plan for the Alabama Portion of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... studies to evaluate specific atmospheric chemistry in an area. See PM 2.5 Implementation Rule, 72 FR 20596... portion of the Chattanooga Area on February 8, 2012 (77 FR 6469). EPA has determined that Alabama's PM 2.5... for EPA's proposed action? A. Designation History On July 18, 1997 (62 FR 38652), EPA established...

  4. Alabama Bound: Identifying Factors Associated with Secondary Education Students' Choice of Attending The University of Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Jon Charles; Hughes, William W.; Fendley, William R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Alabama's primary competitor in recruiting is in-state rival Auburn University which lures away roughly one in eight of UA's admitted students. Two factors stand above all others in attracting students to UA--academic reputation and social activities reputation. Factors following distantly are a visit to the UA campus, financial assistance and the…

  5. 76 FR 32982 - Alabama; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Alabama; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of the Presidential declaration of an emergency for the State of Alabama (FEMA-3319-EM), dated April 27, 2011, and...

  6. Management Audit of Selected Alabama Local School Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffenhagen-Kroeger, Inc., San Francisco, CA.

    This combined management audit and personnel staffing survey of a sample of Alabama schools reports recommendations for policy changes to the Alabama Education Study Commission. Policy changes in educational management are suggested with respect to school organization, state fund apportionment procedures, curriculum development, test scoring,…

  7. Alabama's Education Report Card, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In a more consistent and viable manner than ever before, education in Alabama is moving toward its ultimate goal of providing every student with a quality education, thereby preparing them for work, college, and life after high school. Alabama's graduation rates from 2002 to 2008 increased significantly, tripling the national average increase…

  8. The Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeper, J. D.; And Others

    The impact of the Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program was evaluated in relation to prenatal care, birth outcome measures, and several child health and home environment outcomes. Begun in 1983, RAPIH targets poor rural blacks in three of west-central Alabama's poorest counties, where economic conditions and infant mortality…

  9. Trends in Tobacco Use by Alabama Youth (1995-1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Feng; Bruess, Clint

    To examine changes in tobacco use among high school students in Alabama from 1995 to 1999, Alabama Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBS) survey data were analyzed. The survey has been used since 1990 to examine the health practices of adolescents and to monitor priority health-risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of…

  10. 14. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Southern RR at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Southern RR at Epes Alabama Great Southern RR bridge. View from S. Copy of photo taken in 1922 by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms., Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL