Sample records for center huntsville alabama

  1. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE STUDENT POPULATION, UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA RESIDENT CENTER, HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FRANKLIN, ELTON

    THE MAIN PURPOSE OF THIS 1959 SURVEY WAS TO ANALYZE SOME OF THE BASIC CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA RESIDENT CENTER, HUNTSVILLE. FINDINGS WERE TABULATED IN SUMMARY FORM AND BY MAJOR FIELDS OF ACADEMIC INTEREST. OF THE STUDENTS (LARGELY YOUNG ADULTS), 51 PERCENT WERE IN ENGINEERING. ONLY 16 PERCENT WERE FEMALE. MOST…

  2. Solar heating and hot water system installed at the Senior Citizen Center, Huntsville, Alabama. [Includes engineering drawings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    Information is provided on the solar energy system installed at the Huntsville Senior Citizen Center. The solar space heating and hot water facility and the project involved in its construction are described in considerable detail and detailed drawings of the complete system and discussions of the planning, the hardware, recommendations, and other pertinent information are included. The facility was designed to provide 85 percent of the hot water and 85 percent of the space heating requirements. Two important factors concerning this project for commercial demonstration are the successful use of silicon oil as a heat transfer fluid and the architecturally aesthetic impact of a large solar energy system as a visual centerpoint. There is no overheat or freeze protection due to the characteristics of the silicon oil and the design of the system. Construction proceeded on schedule with no cost overruns. It is designed to be relatively free of scheduled maintenance, and has experienced practically no problems.

  3. The Celebration for Freedom 7 at Huntsville, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Dr. von Braun addresses a crowd celebrating in front of the Madison County Alabama Courthouse following the successful launch of Astronaut Alan Shepard (America's first astronaut in space) into space on a Mercury-Redstone Launch Vehicle, Freedom 7. Shepard's Mercury Spacecraft, was launched from Cape Canaveral. He reached a speed of 5200 mph. His flight lasted 15-1/2 minutes. May 5, 1961 (Photo: Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  4. Ground Breaking Ceremony for the Alabama Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Ground breaking ceremony for the Alabama Space Science Center, later renamed the U.S. Space and Rocket Center. Shown in this picture, left to right, are Edward O. Buckbee, Space Center Director; Jack Giles, Alabama State Senator of Huntsville; Dr. Wernher on Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director; Martin Darity, head of the Alabama Publicity Bureau (representing Governor Albert Brewer); James Allen, former Lieutenant governor, chairman of the Alabama Space Science Exhibit Commission; Major General Charles Eifler, commanding general of the Army Ordnance Missile Command; and Huntsville Mayor Glenrn Hearn. (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  5. The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Office of Sponsored Programs Institutional Prior Approval System (IPAS)

    E-print Network

    Fork, Richard

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Office of Sponsored Programs Institutional Prior Approval System (IPAS) Research and training awards normally require prior sponsor approvals for certain types of expenditures and transactions. Some federal agencies have delegated certain approval authorities to grant

  6. Cooperative Education: Entrepreneurial Development by Colleges and Universities. A Case Study of Oakwood College, Huntsville, Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Frank

    The entrepreneurial development and experiential education environments of Oakwood College, Huntsville, Alabama, are described. The college-owned industries of the dairy, farm, garment and linen service, bakery, food manufacturing, convenience store, and snack bar are discussed in terms of markets and marketing, permissions and protections,…

  7. Summertime elevation of sup 222 Rn levels in Huntsville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.L.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Saultz, R.J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Indoor Rn concentrations and Rn in adjacent karst terrains were studied at four houses with crawlspaces in Huntsville, AL. In warm summertime weather, Rn-rich air may vent through limestone solution cavities exposed as holes at the surface of the properties. A probable interrelated-finding is that the indoor levels of {sup 222}Rn are distinctly higher in the summer than winter. The karst underlying the homes is structurally faulted and, in all probability, facilitates Rn transport from the solution cavities to the crawlspaces. Abrupt day-to-day changes in indoor Rn concentrations were recorded in addition to large seasonal changes. If the owners or residents of these particular homes had attempted to make, and interpret, short-term screening measurements for Rn during the fall season, problems, including false negatives, could have arisen because of order-of-magnitude changes in Rn concentration occurring over a few days. The best time of year to make screening measurements would be during the summer when indoor Rn concentrations are more likely to reach their maximum values.

  8. The Alabama Space and Rocket Center: The Second Decade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckbee, Edward O.

    1983-01-01

    The Alabama Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, the world's largest rocket and space museum, includes displays illustrating American rocket history, exhibits and demonstrations on rocketry principles and experiences, and simulations of space travel. A new project includes an integrated recreational-educational complex, described in the three…

  9. A comprehensive solar energy system analysis data base in Huntsville, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The history of a comprehensive solar energy system analysis data base developed by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama is presented, along with its current status. The Marshall Information Retrieval and Data Storage (MIRADS) system was chosen for the data base, and feedback systems were arranged to cope with changes in the needs of the program management for the type of data gathered. The final structure of the data base consists of 22 files divided into 6 topical sections: summaries, climatological, utility rates, architectural, equipment, and economics. The data base offers help to the solar industry in two ways: it provides information and it serves as a model for users trying to establish the climatic and socioeconomic variables they should take into account when they examine a potential market for solar energy equipment.

  10. Luminous electrical phenomena in Huntsville, Alabama, tornadoes on April 3, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, O. H., Jr.; Vonnegut, B.

    1976-01-01

    Unusual lightning and varicolored luminous phenomena were observed on the evening of April 3, 1974, when severe tornadoes passed through Madison County, Alabama. Photographs and eyewitness accounts of this electrical activity are related to the trajectories of the tornadoes and the damage areas they produced.

  11. Alternative-fuel production facility for City of Huntsville, Alabama. Volume I. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    The feasibility of a Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)-to-energy project in the Huntsville area was invetigated and found to be an environmentally attractive and cost effective method of MSW disposal. Of nine likely alternatives, that were developed for detailed evaluation and analysis. Alternative 1M surfaced as best for the City. It is described as follows: a MSW-To-Energy Plant, consisting of two 300 TPD Mass Burning Waterwall Furnace/Boiler Systems at Lowe Industrial Park to provide low pressure steam to industries in the park. A MSW Transfer Station at the existing landfill and MSW as well as residue transport rolling stock equipment is included to facilitate movement of the waste materials between the two locations that are some twelve miles apart.

  12. AFFILIATIONS: LOBL--National Space Science and Technology Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville,

    E-print Network

    Kummerow, Christian

    , Tallahassee, Florida; WILHEIT--Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Elena S length scales of precipitation [beam filling (BF)], freezing- level retrieval (FL), radiative transfer. Based at Nagoya Airport was the cloud physics­instrumented FIG. 1. Wakasa Bay campaign geography. TABLE

  13. High resolution microburst outflow vertical profile data from Huntsville, Alabama, and Denver, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biron, P. J.; Isaminger, M. A.

    1991-04-01

    Detailed data is presented on microburst outflows recorded by the TDWR testbed radar (FL-2). Whenever possible, a microburst detected within 10 km of the radar was scanned in a vertical direction (RHI) at 1 to 2 degree azimuthal intervals about the center of divergence. The vertical profile of the outflow is pertinent to the detection capability and siting strategy of a single Doppler radar observing the microburst from a horizontal viewing angle. Additionally, outflow features are important in assessing the hazard associated with microbursts as well as the capability of other wind shear detection (LLWAS or ASR). Of particular interest is the variability of outflow depths from case to case and site to site. If the depth across the maximum velocity differential is shallow, an outflow might go undetected or underestimated by a radar, the beam of which was not viewing the axis of peak divergence. Previous research projects in Denver reported the highest winds in a microburst typically occur near the surface with an average outflow depth (1/2 peak velocity) ranging between 500 and 600 meters; however, the vertical resolution of these data was fairly crude due to the scan strategies utilized. Detailed high resolution microburst outflow vertical profile data is provided which is pertinent to TDWR system studies based on RHI and closely spaced PPI scans.

  14. Huntsville Arsenal for Sale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1940-01-01

    In the years following World War II, the Army directed that the Huntsville, Alabama Arsenal be advertised for sale. The decision was reversed because the Army found it needed this land for the new missile work that would occur at Redstone Arsenal.

  15. Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Spacelab-3 launched aboard STS-51B, with the major science objective being to perform engineering tests on two new facilities: the rodent animal holding facility and the primate animal holding facility. In addition, scientists observed the animals to obtain first hand knowledge of the effects of launch and reentry stresses and behavior. The need for suitable animal housing to support research in space led to the development of the Research Animal Holding Facility at the Ames Research Center. Scientists often study animals to find clues to human physiology and behavior. Rats, insects, and microorganisms had already been studied aboard the Shuttle on previous missions. On Spacelab-3, scientists had a chance to observe a large number of animals living in space in a specially designed and independently controlled housing facility. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) had management responsibility for the Spacelab-3 mission. This photograph depicts activities during the mission at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at MSFC.

  16. Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Spacelab-3 launched aboard STS-51B, with the major science objective being to perform engineering tests on two new facilities: the rodent animal holding facility and the primate animal holding facility. In addition, scientists observed the animals to obtain first hand knowledge of the effects of launch and reentry stresses and behavior. The need for suitable animal housing to support research in space led to the development of the Research Animal Holding Facility at the Ames Research Center. Scientists often study animals to find clues to human physiology and behavior. Rats, insects, and microorganisms had already been studied aboard the Shuttle on previous missions. On Spacelab-3, scientists had a chance to observe a large number of animals living in space in a specially designed and independently controlled housing facility. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) had management responsibility for the Spacelab 3 mission. This photograph depicts activities during the mission at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at MSFC.

  17. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Redstone Test Stand as an Alabama Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. The site was desinated as such in 1979.

  18. System analysis for the Huntsville Operation Support Center distributed computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingels, F. M.

    1986-01-01

    A simulation model of the NASA Huntsville Operational Support Center (HOSC) was developed. This simulation model emulates the HYPERchannel Local Area Network (LAN) that ties together the various computers of HOSC. The HOSC system is a large installation of mainframe computers such as the Perkin Elmer 3200 series and the Dec VAX series. A series of six simulation exercises of the HOSC model is described using data sets provided by NASA. The analytical analysis of the ETHERNET LAN and the video terminals (VTs) distribution system are presented. An interface analysis of the smart terminal network model which allows the data flow requirements due to VTs on the ETHERNET LAN to be estimated, is presented.

  19. Data Management Coordinators Monitor STS-78 Mission at the Huntsville Operations Support Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Launched on June 20, 1996, the STS-78 mission's primary payload was the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS), which was managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). During the 17 day space flight, the crew conducted a diverse slate of experiments divided into a mix of life science and microgravity investigations. In a manner very similar to future International Space Station operations, LMS researchers from the United States and their European counterparts shared resources such as crew time and equipment. Five space agencies (NASA/USA, European Space Agency/Europe (ESA), French Space Agency/France, Canadian Space Agency /Canada, and Italian Space Agency/Italy) along with research scientists from 10 countries worked together on the design, development and construction of the LMS. This photo represents Data Management Coordinators monitoring the progress of the mission at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at MSFC. Pictured are assistant mission scientist Dr. Dalle Kornfeld, Rick McConnel, and Ann Bathew.

  20. Marshall Small Business Alliance Meeting February 21, 2013 Davidson Center in Huntsville 7:00 a.m. 12:30 p.m.

    E-print Network

    Marshall Small Business Alliance Meeting ­ February 21, 2013 Davidson Center in Huntsville ­ 7 Acquisition Update Kim Whitson, Director, Office of Procurement 08:50 Space Launch System (SLS) Update Jody

  1. Consortium for Alabama Regional Center for Automotive Manufacturing (CARCAM)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Consortium for Alabama Regional Center for Automotive Manufacturing's (CARCAM) mission is "to promote, develop and deliver effective training programs in Automotive Manufacturing." CARCAM is an educational resource for those looking to enter the automotive industry. It is also useful tool for the professional development of those already working in the industry. Their site provides information on training programs, events and news about the automotive industry.

  2. Description and Status of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard J.; Christian, Hugh J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Hall, John M.; McCaul, Eugene W.; Stano, Geoffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is a network LMA detectors that detects and maps lightning using VHF radiation (TV Channel 5) in a region centered about Huntsville, Alabama that includes North Alabama, Central Tennessee and parts of Georgia and Mississippi. The North Alabama LMA has been in operation since late 2001, and has been providing real time data to regional National Weather Service (NSF) Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) since mid 2003 through the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) center. Data from this network (as well as other from other LMA systems) are now being used to create proxy Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data sets for GOES-R risk reduction and algorithm development activities. In addition, since spring 2009 data are provided to the Storm Prediction Center in support of Hazardous Weather Testbed and GOES-R Proving Ground activities during the Spring Program. Description, status and plans will be discussed.

  3. Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    NASA's George C Marshall Space Flight Center is located in Huntsville, Alabama. It is the agency's leading center for space transportation and propulsion development. The Saturn launch vehicles used in the Apollo Moon program were designed and developed here. Today, it provides the solid rocket boosters, main engines and external tank for the Space Shuttle. Apart from upgrades to these systems, M...

  4. The Hydrologic Cycle Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Danny M.; Goodman, H. Michael

    1995-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center in Huntsville, Alabama supports the acquisition, production, archival and dissemination of data relevant to the study of the global hydrologic cycle. This paper describes the Hydrologic Cycle DAAC, surveys its principle data holdings, addresses future growth, and gives information for accessing the data sets.

  5. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment United States Coast Guard Aviation Training Center, Mobile, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, B.; Memon, A.

    1994-09-01

    The report summarizes work conducted at the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Aviation Training Center (ATC) in Mobile, Alabama under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) Program. Several waste generating processes were initially screened including flight simulators, aircraft maintenance, aircraft fuel management, and aircraft cleaning. Opportunities to reduce wastes in each area were identified and evaluated.

  6. Space Science Research and Technology at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles L.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation will summarize the various projects and programs managed in the Space Science Programs and Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Projects in the portfolio include NASA's Chandra X-Ray telescope, Hinode solar physics satellite, various advanced space propulsion technologies, including solar sails and tethers, as well as NASA's Discovery and New Frontiers Programs.

  7. Survey Plan For Characterization of the Subsurface Underlying the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Volume 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Topic considered include: survey objectives; technologies for non-Invasive imaging of subsurface; cost; data requirements and sources; climatic condition; hydrology and geology; chemicals; magnetometry; electrical(resistivity, potential); optical-style imaging; reflection/refraction seismics; gravitometry; photo-acoustic activation;well drilling and borehole analysis; comparative assessment matrix; ground sensors; choice of the neutron sources; logistic of operations; system requirements; health and safety plans.

  8. NASA's National Center for Advanced Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John H.; Frazier, Michael K.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An investment in the future, NASA has designated a new initiative where government, industry, and academia collaborate to meet the manufacturing needs of future space systems. The Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama has the principal responsibility for implementation of the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCAM). The mission of the NCAM is to build partnerships that will jointly conduct program planning and develop strategies to perform manufacturing research and technology development for critical national missions.

  9. The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), located in Huntsville, Alabama, is a laboratory for cutting-edge research in selected scientific and engineering disciplines. The major objectives of the NSSTC are to provide multiple fields of expertise coming together to solve solutions to science and technology problems, and gaining recognition as a world-class science research organization. The center, opened in August 2000, focuses on space science, Earth sciences, information technology, optics and energy technology, biotechnology and materials science, and supports NASA's mission of advancing and communicating scientific knowledge using the environment of space for research. In addition to providing basic and applied research, NSSTC, with its student participation, also fosters the next generation of scientists and engineers. NSSTC is a collaborated effort between NASA and the state of Alabama through the Space Science and Technology alliance, a group of six universities including the Universities of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH),Tuscaloosa (UA), and Birmingham (UAB); the University of South Alabama in Mobile (USA);Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (AM) in Huntsville; and Auburn University (AU) in Auburn. Participating federal agencies include NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy. Industries involved include the Space Science Research Center, the Global Hydrology and Climate Center, the Information Technology Research Center, the Optics and Energy Technology Center, the Propulsion Research Center, the Biotechnology Research Center, and the Materials Science Research Center. This photo shows the completed center with the additional arnex (right of building) that added an additional 80,000 square feet (7,432 square meters) to the already existent NSSTC, nearly doubling the size of the core facility. At full capacity, the NSSTC tops 200,000 square feet (18,580 square meters) and houses approximately 550 employees.

  10. The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), located in Huntsville, Alabama, is a laboratory for cutting-edge research in selected scientific and engineering disciplines. The major objectives of the NSSTC are to provide multiple fields of expertise coming together to solve solutions to science and technology problems, and gaining recognition as a world-class science research organization. The center, opened in August 2000, focuses on space science, Earth sciences, information technology, optics and energy technology, biotechnology and materials science, and supports NASA's mission of advancing and communicating scientific knowledge using the environment of space for research. In addition to providing basic and applied research, NSSTC, with its student participation, also fosters the next generation of scientists and engineers. NSSTC is a collaborated effort between NASA and the state of Alabama through the Space Science and Technology alliance, a group of six universities including the Universities of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH),Tuscaloosa (UA), and Birmingham (UAB); the University of South Alabama in Mobile (USA); Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (AM) in Huntsville; and Auburn University (AU) in Auburn. Participating federal agencies include NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy. Industries involved include the Space Science Research Center, the Global Hydrology and Climate Center, the Information Technology Research Center, the Optics and Energy Technology Center, the Propulsion Research Center, the Biotechnology Research Center, and the Materials Science Research Center. An arnex, scheduled for completion by summer 2002, will add an additional 80,000 square feet (7,432 square meters) to NSSTC nearly doubling the size of the core facility. At full capacity, the completed NSSTC will top 200,000 square feet (18,580 square meters) and house approximately 550 employees.

  11. DIAL Measurements of Free-Tropospheric Ozone Profiles in Huntsville, AL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Burris, John; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve

    2007-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, developed jointly by NASA and the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH), measures free-tropospheric ozone profiles between 4-10 km. Located at 192 meters altitude in the Regional Atmospheric Profiling Laboratory for Discovery (RAPCD) on the UAH campus in Huntsville, AL, USA, this tropospheric ozone lidar operates under both daytime and nighttime conditions. Frequent coincident ozonesonde flights and theoretical calculations provide evidence to indicate the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 8% at 4km to 40%-60% at 10 kin with 750-m vertical resolution and 30-minute integration. With anticipated improvements to allow retrievals at both higher and lower altitudes, this ozone lidar, along with co-located aerosol and Doppler Wind Lidars, will provide a unique 18 dataset for investigations of PBL and free-tropospheric chemical and dynamic processes.

  12. Project LASER Volunteer, Marshall Space Flight Center Education Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Through Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Education Department, over 400 MSFC employees have volunteered to support educational program during regular work hours. Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering, and Research) provides support for mentor/tutor requests, education tours, classroom presentations, and curriculum development. This program is available to teachers and students living within commuting distance of the NASA/MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama (approximately 50-miles radius). This image depicts students viewing their reflections in an x-ray mirror with Marshall optic engineer Vince Huegele at the Discovery Laboratory, which is an onsite MSFC laboratory facility that provides hands-on educational workshop sessions for teachers and students learning activities.

  13. Power to Explore: A History of the Marshall Space Flight Center, 1960-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunar, Andrew J.; Waring, Stephen P.

    1999-01-01

    This scholarly study of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center places the institution in social, political, scientific and technological context. It traces the evolution of Marshall, located in Huntsville, Alabama, from its origins as an Army missile development organization to its status in 1990 as one of the most diversified of NASA's field Center. Chapters discuss military rocketry programs in Germany and the United States, Apollo-Saturn, Skylab, Space shuttle, Spacelab, the Space Station, and various scientific and technical projects including the Hubble Space Telescope. It sheds light not only on the history of space technology, science and exploration, but also on the Cold War, federal politics and complex organizations.

  14. Control technology assessment for coal gasification and liquefaction processes, Tennessee Valley Authority, National Fertilizer Development Center, ammonia plant, Muscle Shoals, Alabama. Report for the site visit of September 1981. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Telesca

    1982-01-01

    A control technology survey was conducted at the ammonia synthesis facility operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority, National Fertilizer Development Center (SIC-2874), in Muscle Shoals, Alabama on September 1 and 2, 1981. The visit was made to identify processes or hazards similar to those found in coal conversion operations and to report control technologies that might be applicable to both

  15. Alabama Mosaic

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Designed as a collaborative statewide initiative, The Cornerstone Project is a way to make various historical treasures from Alabama's archives, libraries, museums, and other repositories accessible over the Web both to residents of the state and a diverse set of interested parties. The funding for this project came from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, and includes materials from 13 different organizations, including Auburn University, Spring Hill College, and the Birmingham Public Library. All of the collections may be accessed through a helpful search engine, or browsed by thematic category. The categories include education, folklife, literature, religion, and transportation. The cities and towns area offers a nice glimpse into urban life in the American South, and includes several dozen excellent images taken from the Birmingham Historical Photo Collection. Visitors with a penchant for steamboats will appreciate the rather interesting collection of digitized steamboat ephemera, most of which dates from the post-Civil War period.

  16. The Payload Operations Center (POC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Payload Operations Center (POC) is the science command post for the International Space Station (ISS). Located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, it is the focal point for American and international science activities aboard the ISS. The POC's unique capabilities allow science experts and researchers around the world to perform cutting-edge science in the unique microgravity environment of space. The POC is staffed around the clock by shifts of payload flight controllers. At any given time, 8 to 10 flight controllers are on consoles operating, plarning for, and controlling various systems and payloads. This photograph shows the Data Management Coordinators (DMC's) at a work station. The DMC configures on-board data systems to ensure payloads receive their downlinked science results and experiment telemetry in a timely manner.

  17. Encyclopedia of Alabama

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sponsored by the Alabama Humanities Foundation and Auburn University, the Encyclopedia of Alabama (EOA) is a veritable cornucopia of material about the Yellowhammer State. The EOA draws on the work of many trustworthy and learned authors, and as a statement of the homepage notes, "Alabama's problems are not glossed over, nor are its accomplishments and successes overlooked." Visitors who might not be familiar with the state in the least are encouraged to read historian Wayne Flynt's fine essay on Alabama featured on the homepage. After that, visitors can look over the entries alphabetically, or they can use of the thematic headings (such as "Peoples" and "Religion") to start their journey. The "Features" articles are a treat as well, and they include "Alabama and the Civil War" and "College Football in Alabama". The site also includes several photo galleries, a glossary, and some educational resources for teachers.

  18. STS-31 Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar array (SA) mockup at MSFC, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A close-up shot shows an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU)-suited astronaut inspecting a solar array (SA) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) mockup in the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. MSFC managed the design and development of the telescope. The weightlessness simulator was used to practice SA contingency procedures that might be used in space. Astronauts also practiced SA servicing missions in the simulator which they will perform on the telescope in space. The solar arrays which supply electrical power to the space telescope were developed and contributed by the European Space Agency (ESA). ESA's two prime contractors were British Aerospace in England and AEG in West Germany. The two wing-like solar arrays contain 48,000 solar cells. They convert the sun's energy to electricity during that portion of an orbit when they are exposed to sunlight. The power is stored in six batteries to support the telescope during

  19. EPIC FOR ALABAMA AND GULF COAST AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project provides an essential environmental analysis center to serve the Alabama coastal community and the regional community of the Gulf of Mexico as a member of the Gulf of Mexico Program's Virtual GIS team. The center provides GIS and information products that address e...

  20. Staffing the ISS Control Centers: Lessons Learned from Long-Duration Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Carrie D.; Horvath, Timothy J.; Davis, Sally P.

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has been in operation with a permanent human presence in space for over five years, and plans for continued operations stretch ten years into the future. Ground control and support operations are, likewise, a 15-year enterprise. This long-term, 24-hour per day, 7 day per week support has presented numerous challenges in the areas of ground crew training, initial and continued certification, and console staffing. The Mission Control Center in Houston, Texas and the Payload Operations Center in Huntsville, Alabama have both tackled these challenges, with similar, yet distinct, approaches. This paper describes the evolution of the staffing and training policies of both control centers in a chronological progression. The relative merits and shortcomings of the various policies employed are discussed and a summary of "lessons learned" is presented. Finally, recommendations are made as best practices for future long-term space missions.

  1. A Lightning Channel Retrieval Algorithm for the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new multi-station VHF time-of-arrival (TOA) antenna network is, at the time of this writing, coming on-line in Northern Alabama. The network, called the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), employs GPS timing and detects VHF radiation from discrete segments (effectively point emitters) that comprise the channel of lightning strokes within cloud and ground flashes. The network will support on-going ground validation activities of the low Earth orbiting Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) satellite developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. It will also provide for many interesting and detailed studies of the distribution and evolution of thunderstorms and lightning in the Tennessee Valley, and will offer many interesting comparisons with other meteorological/geophysical wets associated with lightning and thunderstorms. In order to take full advantage of these benefits, it is essential that the LMA channel mapping accuracy (in both space and time) be fully characterized and optimized. In this study, a new revised channel mapping retrieval algorithm is introduced. The algorithm is an extension of earlier work provided in Koshak and Solakiewicz (1996) in the analysis of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) system. As in the 1996 study, direct algebraic solutions are obtained by inverting a simple linear system of equations, thereby making computer searches through a multi-dimensional parameter domain of a Chi-Squared function unnecessary. However, the new algorithm is developed completely in spherical Earth-centered coordinates (longitude, latitude, altitude), rather than in the (x, y, z) cartesian coordinates employed in the 1996 study. Hence, no mathematical transformations from (x, y, z) into spherical coordinates are required (such transformations involve more numerical error propagation, more computer program coding, and slightly more CPU computing time). The new algorithm also has a more realistic definition of source altitude that accounts for Earth oblateness (this can become important for sources that are hundreds of kilometers away from the network). In addition, the new algorithm is being applied to analyze computer simulated LMA datasets in order to obtain detailed location/time retrieval error maps for sources in and around the LMA network. These maps will provide a more comprehensive analysis of retrieval errors for LMA than the 1996 study did of LDAR retrieval errors. Finally, we note that the new algorithm can be applied to LDAR, and essentially any other multi-station TWA network that depends on direct line-of-site antenna excitation.

  2. Homonegativity among Alabama Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satcher, Jamie; Leggett, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Alabama Counseling Association were surveyed to examine the extent to which they demonstrate homonegativity (prejudicial attitudes toward homosexuality). The majority of the counselors did not appear to approach homosexuality from traditional prejudices, although almost one-third believed homosexuality to be immoral. The counselors…

  3. Archive-In: Alabama

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Many states are working to craft digital archives of their online activities, leading some committed states to even include tweets, Facebook pages, and other alternative sources. This site from the Alabama Department of Archives & History contains everything from the online activities of the Alabama Legislature to the Twitter feeds of selected political parties in the state. All told, there are 31 different groups chronicled here and visitors can search each groups' activities individually or via an omnibus search engine. Additionally, users can search the archive by creator, language, publisher, and subject keywords. It's a great initiative and one that will be of interest to librarians, cataloguers, and others with an interest in modern history.

  4. Giles, Petrone, and Garriott Chat at Apollo 16 Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Huntsville's Jack Giles, Alabama State Senator (left), and Dr. Rocco Petrone, Marshall Space Flight Center Director (Middle), speak with Astronaut Owen Garriott who is inside the Apollo 16 Command Module on display at the Alabama Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The successful Apollo 16 manned lunar landing mission took place April 16, 1972 through April 27, 1972. (Photograph courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  5. Intl. J. Impact Engng. 23, 401-408, 1999. Proceedings of the 1998 Hypervelocity Impact Symposium, Huntsville, Alabama, November

    E-print Network

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    ionization calibration experiments using a light gas-gun launched microspheric particles, we have done are separated by 680 V between target and grid. The laser ionization produces charge of 4.6pC (mostly Al+1 on the particles is measured upon their passage through the two inclined grids at the entrance of the sensor

  6. Shared Memory And Distributed Shared Memory Systems: A Survey Krishna Kavi, Hyong-Shik Kim, University of Alabama in Huntsville

    E-print Network

    Lee, Ben

    Shared Memory And Distributed Shared Memory Systems: A Survey Krishna Kavi, Hyong-Shik Kim memory modules via a crossbar switch. This can be viewed as a Symmetric Multiprocessor (SMP) or a shared memory system. The next version of a multiprocessor system at CMU was known as Cm* and can be deemed

  7. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  8. Alabama Education News. Volume 32, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  9. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  10. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  11. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  12. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  13. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  14. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  15. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  16. Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  17. Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  18. Alabama Education News. Volume 32, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  19. Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  20. Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  1. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  2. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama," as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  3. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  4. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  5. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  6. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  7. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  8. Alabama Education News. Volume 32, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  9. The Source of Alabama’s Abundance of Arbitration Cases: Alabama’s Bizarre Law of Damages for Mental Anguish

    E-print Network

    Simpson, W. Scott; Ware, Stephen J.; Willard, Vickie M.

    2004-01-01

    This Article gives an overview of arbitration litigation in Alabama, including the evolution of mental anguish jurisprudence in contract cases, especially with regard to the automobile and home industries; a proposal to ...

  10. Problem: Computer Science not Taught in Most Alabama High Schools

    E-print Network

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    devices · Teaching true Computer Science offers much deeper insight into mathematical and scientific Youth · Computing will continue to be a dominant science on which every other science, engineering Science principles. This is important for Alabama, which is one of the major developing technology centers

  11. A University of Alabama Axial-Gap Electric Motor Developmenty

    E-print Network

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    CAVT A University of Alabama Axial-Gap Electric Motor Developmenty Research Center OBJECTIVE ­ Develop axial gap permanent-magnet electric Axial motor ­ Develop axial gap permanent-magnet electric motor topologies with high torque and power densities MOTIVATION ­ Axial-gap ("pancake") motors have

  12. Dr. von Braun with the Front Page of the Huntsville Times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Dr. von Braun is presented with the front page of the Huntsville Times arnouncing the launch of Explorer I, the first U.S. Earth satellite, which was boosted by the Jupiter-C launch vehicle developed by Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The occasion was the fifth Anniversary of the Explorer I launch in January 1958.

  13. GENERAL VIEW OF THE INTERIOR OF THE CENTER INSTRUMENTATION AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF THE INTERIOR OF THE CENTER INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL TANK, NOTE THE PASSAGE CUT TO THE EXTREME NORTH TANK. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  14. Soil Sampling Techniques For Alabama Grain Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. N.; Shaw, J. N.; Mask, P. L.; Touchton, J. T.; Rickman, D.

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial variability of nutrients facilitates precision soil sampling. Questions exist regarding the best technique for directed soil sampling based on a priori knowledge of soil and crop patterns. The objective of this study was to evaluate zone delineation techniques for Alabama grain fields to determine which method best minimized the soil test variability. Site one (25.8 ha) and site three (20.0 ha) were located in the Tennessee Valley region, and site two (24.2 ha) was located in the Coastal Plain region of Alabama. Tennessee Valley soils ranged from well drained Rhodic and Typic Paleudults to somewhat poorly drained Aquic Paleudults and Fluventic Dystrudepts. Coastal Plain s o i l s ranged from coarse-loamy Rhodic Kandiudults to loamy Arenic Kandiudults. Soils were sampled by grid soil sampling methods (grid sizes of 0.40 ha and 1 ha) consisting of: 1) twenty composited cores collected randomly throughout each grid (grid-cell sampling) and, 2) six composited cores collected randomly from a -3x3 m area at the center of each grid (grid-point sampling). Zones were established from 1) an Order 1 Soil Survey, 2) corn (Zea mays L.) yield maps, and 3) airborne remote sensing images. All soil properties were moderately to strongly spatially dependent as per semivariogram analyses. Differences in grid-point and grid-cell soil test values suggested grid-point sampling does not accurately represent grid values. Zones created by soil survey, yield data, and remote sensing images displayed lower coefficient of variations (8CV) for soil test values than overall field values, suggesting these techniques group soil test variability. However, few differences were observed between the three zone delineation techniques. Results suggest directed sampling using zone delineation techniques outlined in this paper would result in more efficient soil sampling for these Alabama grain fields.

  15. Dr. von Braun, Mayor Searcy, and General Medaris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the U.S. Army Ballistic Missile Agency's (ABMA) Development Operations Division, talks to Huntsville Mayor R. B. 'Speck' Searcy, center, and Army Ordnance Missile Command (ARMC) Major General John B. Medaris, right, during 'Moon Day' celebrations in downtown Huntsville, Alabama. (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  16. Rabies in Bats from Alabama

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura C. Hester; Troy L. Best; M. Keith Hudson

    2007-01-01

    Data on rabies virus infection in bats that were submitted to the Alabama Department of Public Health from 1995-2005 were analyzed. Demographic factors, such as species and sex, and temporal aspects, such as yearly and monthly trends, were investigated. Thirteen species of bats were submitted, and of those, individuals from seven species were rabid; prevalence was highest in Lasiurus borealis

  17. Alabama's Child Nutrition Certification Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery. Div. of Administration and Finance.

    This handbook presents the plan for the Alabama computerized certification program for school food service employees. The first section contains the following information and materials pertaining to the child nutrition certification program: rationale; position titles (Child Nutrition Program Director or Supervisor, Child Nutrition Program…

  18. Dual-Polarimetric Radar-Based Tornado Debris Signatures and Paths Associated with Tornadoes Over Northern Alabama During the Historic Outbreak of 27 April 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Schultz, Elise V.; Petersen, Walter A.; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Knupp, Kevin R.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Jedloved, Gary J.; Carcione, Brian C.; Darden, Christopher B.; Crowe, Christina C.

    2012-01-01

    A historic tornado and severe weather outbreak devastated much of the southeastern United States between 25 and 28 April 2011. On 27 April 2011, northern Alabama was particularly hard hit by 40 tornadoes, including 6 that reached EF-4 to EF-5 on the Enhanced Fujita damage scale. In northern Alabama alone, there were approximately 100 fatalities and hundreds of people who were injured or lost their homes during the havoc caused by these violent tornadic storms. Many of these tornadoes occurred within range of the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville) Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR, C-band dual-polarimetric). A unique capability of dual-polarimetric radar is the near-real time identification of lofted debris associated with ongoing tornadoes. The focus of this paper is to analyze the dual-polarimetric radar-inferred tornado debris signatures in 6 tornadoes in North Alabama on April 27, 2011. Several of these debris signatures were disseminated in real-time to the NWS Huntsville and local media to confirm storm spotter reports, confidence to enhance wording within warnings, and accurately pinpoint the locations of tornadoes for residents downstream of the storm. Also, the debris signature locations were used in post-event storm surveys to help locate areas of damage in regions where damage went unreported, or to help separate tornado tracks that were in close proximity to each other. Furthermore, the relative locations of the debris and damage paths for long track EF-4 and EF-5 tornadoes will be ascertained by careful comparison of the ARMOR analysis with NASA MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) satellite imagery of the tornado damage scenes and the National Weather Service tornado damage surveys.

  19. Dr. von Braun at 'Wernher von Braun Day' Celebration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    In 1970 Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director Dr. Wernher von Braun (right) was reassigned to NASA Headquarters to serve as Deputy Associate Administrator for Plarning. Prior to his transfer, Dr. von Braun was honored for his career in Huntsville, Alabama, with the celebration of 'Wernher von Braun Day.' Among those participating were Alabama Governor Albert Brewer (left) and Alabama Senator John Sparkman (center). (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public library)

  20. View of the 200ton derrick from west showing the center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the 200-ton derrick from west showing the center mast, one stiff leg, the boom and the boom angle reeving. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn V Dynamic Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  1. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Alabama

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Alabama BlueCross and BlueShield Medical Information Server, located and developed by the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Computer and Information Sciences, through a grant from Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Alabama for the express purpose of providing Internet access to medical information for all physicians and other health care providers in the state of Alabama. It provides links to a broad range of medical information resources located throughout the Internet. Menus provide information on diseases and disorders, patient care and medical practice, medical specialties, journals and newsletters, health care reform, and other medical information.

  2. Jun Wang1, Sundar A Christopher1, U. S. Nair1, Jeffrey S. Reid2, Elaine M. Prins3, Jim Szykman4 1Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL; 2Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey CA;

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jun

    are fully coupled and interact with meteorological fields at each time step and each model grid activities are usually unpredictable, traditional parameterization methods or pre-defined emission database radiative forcing and their feedbacks on the surface energy budget, temperature, boundary layer height

  3. Rabies in bats from Alabama.

    PubMed

    Hester, Laura C; Best, Troy L; Hudson, M Keith

    2007-04-01

    Data on rabies virus infection in bats that were submitted to the Alabama Department of Public Health from 1995-2005 were analyzed. Demographic factors, such as species and sex, and temporal aspects, such as yearly and monthly trends, were investigated. Thirteen species of bats were submitted, and of those, individuals from seven species were rabid; prevalence was highest in Lasiurus borealis and Pipistrellus subflavus and lowest in Eptesicus fuscus and Nycticeius humeralis. There was no difference in prevalence of rabies between sexes or years. Statistically, more rabid bats were submitted in August, September, and November; and fewer were submitted in March, June, and July. Results were similar to those from other regions of North America; these data from Alabama can help to present a more complete view of rabies in bats in North America. PMID:17495316

  4. 2008-2009 Alabama Education Report Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Year after year, the goal of educators, parents, and concerned citizens throughout Alabama is to provide this state's children with the highest level of quality education possible. The future of Alabama's businesses, industries, commerce, labor force, arts, humanities, and countless other areas are determined by the education that is provided to…

  5. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1998-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Sandy, Ed.; Norem, Ken, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" that make up volume 24. Articles in Issue 1 include: (1) "Learning Comes in Many Forms" (Holly Forester-Miller); (2) "Legislative, Legal, and Sociological Aspects of Alabama's Mental Health System" (David Gamble; Jamie S. Satcher); (3) "Peer Supervision: A…

  6. MMS 91-0062 Mississippi-Alabama

    E-print Network

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    Admk MMS 91-0062 Mississippi-Alabama Continental Shelf Ecosystem Study Data Summary and Synthesis of Mexico OCS Region #12;OCS Study MMS 91-0062 Mississippi-Alabama Continental Shelf Ecosystem Study Data under MMS Contract 14-12-0001-30346 by Texas A&M University Texas A&M Research Foundation College

  7. Alabama Allied Health Needs Assessment Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Libby V.

    This study assessed the supply of and demand for allied health professionals in Alabama, focusing on the relationship between supply and demand in various workplace settings in the context of Alabama's demographics, current educational programs, and projected changes in health care. The health care professions included in the study were all fields…

  8. Accountability in Alabama Schools. Report 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Education Study Commission, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Education Study Commission conducted a five-year project to find adequate measures of accountability for schools. The result, developed, implemented, and tested in 11 school districts in Alabama, was a Program Management and Budgeting (PMB) system combining elements of zero-base budgeting and management by objectives. PMB has the…

  9. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This annual report highlights the accomplishments of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) during 1990. Introductory materials include a map of Alabama's Congressional districts, photographs of the executive board of APLS, and comments from the chairman of the executive board and from APLS' director. Accomplishments are reported under the…

  10. Outdoor recreational opportunities in Alabama

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    adam smith

    2012-04-04

    What comes to mind when you think about outdoor recreational opportunities? Diagram of the recreational opportunities to enjoy First we will look at the forest services and recreational opportunities. Forest Services There is plenty of hunting opportunities in Alabama to enjoy. Hunting Opportunities Outdoor tips can be essential when enjoying the outdoors. Outdoor Tips What a better way to spend a weekend then going fishing with family and friends. Places to Fish A great way to spend a weekend could also consist of hiking. Hiking Now ...

  11. Capabilities of the Impact Testing Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finchum, Andy; Nehls, Mary; Young, Whitney; Gray, Perry; Suggs, Bart; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2011-01-01

    The test and analysis capabilities of the Impact Testing Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center are described. Nine different gun systems accommodate a wide range of projectile and target sizes and shapes at velocities from subsonic through hypersonic, to accomplish a broad range of ballistic and hypervelocity impact tests. These gun systems include ballistic and microballistic gas and powder guns, a two-stage light gas gun, and specialty guns for weather encounter studies. The ITF "rain gun" is the only hydrometeor impact gun known to be in existence in the United States that can provide single impact performance data with known raindrop sizes. Simulation of high velocity impact is available using the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic Code. The Impact Testing Facility provides testing, custom test configuration design and fabrication, and analytical services for NASA, the Department of Defense, academic institutions, international space agencies, and private industry in a secure facility located at Marshall Space Flight Center, on the US Army's Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. This facility performs tests that are subject to International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and DoD secret classified restrictions as well as proprietary and unrestricted tests for civil space agencies, academic institutions, and commercial aerospace and defense companies and their suppliers.

  12. Fast, Affordable, Science and Technology Satellite (FASTSAT) Huntsville-01 (HSV-01) Spacecraft Lessons Learned Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    The Fast Affordable Science and Technology Satellite (FASTSAT) project is a path finding effort to produce reliable satellite busses for different applications at an unprecedented speed and low cost. The project is designed to be a generational project and the first satellite produced is the Huntsville -01 (HSV-01) spacecraft. The subject of this report is the lessons learned gained during the development, testing, and up to the delivery of the FASTSAT HSV -01 spacecraft. The purpose of this report is to capture the major findings that will greatly benefit the future FASTSAT satellites and perhaps other projects interested in pushing the boundaries for cost and schedule. The FASTSAT HSV -01 primary objectives, success criteria, and team partners are summarized to give a frame of reference to the lessons learned.

  13. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center: A Collaborative Model for Accelerating Research into Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Lapenta, W.; Jedlovec, G.; Dodge, J.; Bradshaw, T.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center in Huntsville, Alabama was created to accelerate the infusion of NASA earth science observations, data assimilation and modeling research into NWS forecast operations and decision-making. The principal focus of experimental products is on the regional scale with an emphasis on forecast improvements on a time scale of 0-24 hours. The SPoRT Center research is aligned with the regional prediction objectives of the US Weather Research Program dealing with 0-1 day forecast issues ranging from convective initiation to 24-hr quantitative precipitation forecasting. The SPoRT Center, together with its other interagency partners, universities, and the NASA/NOAA Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, provides a means and a process to effectively transition NASA Earth Science Enterprise observations and technology to National Weather Service operations and decision makers at both the global/national and regional scales. This paper describes the process for the transition of experimental products into forecast operations, current products undergoing assessment by forecasters, and plans for the future.

  14. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Vols. 37A & 37B - Proceedings of the 1991 Cryogenic Engineering Conference, Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, June 11-14, 1991

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald W. Fast

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on advances in cryogenic engineering discusses heat and mass transfer in helium, heat transfer in cryogenic fluids, thermoacoustic oscillations, and insulation. Attention is given to applications of superconductivity with reference to magnetic stability and coil protection, cryogenic techniques, and refrigeration for electronics and superconducting systems. Topics addressed include compressors, expanders, and pumps for liquid helium, magnetic refrigerators,

  15. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Vols. 37A & 37B - Proceedings of the 1991 Cryogenic Engineering Conference, Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, June 11-14, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, Ronald W. (editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on advances in cryogenic engineering discusses heat and mass transfer in helium, heat transfer in cryogenic fluids, thermoacoustic oscillations, and insulation. Attention is given to applications of superconductivity with reference to magnetic stability and coil protection, cryogenic techniques, and refrigeration for electronics and superconducting systems. Topics addressed include compressors, expanders, and pumps for liquid helium, magnetic refrigerators, pulse tube refrigerators, and cryocoolers. Also examined are properties of cryogenic fluids, cryogenic applications in transportion and space science and technology, and cryogenic instrumentation.

  16. Finite element analysis in fluids; Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Finite Element Methods in Flow Problems, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Apr. 3-7, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J. (editor); Karr, Gerald R. (editor)

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics are examined in reviews and reports, with an emphasis on finite-element methods. Sections are devoted to adaptive meshes, atmospheric dynamics, combustion, compressible flows, control-volume finite elements, crystal growth, domain decomposition, EM-field problems, FDM/FEM, and fluid-structure interactions. Consideration is given to free-boundary problems with heat transfer, free surface flow, geophysical flow problems, heat and mass transfer, high-speed flow, incompressible flow, inverse design methods, MHD problems, the mathematics of finite elements, and mesh generation. Also discussed are mixed finite elements, multigrid methods, non-Newtonian fluids, numerical dissipation, parallel vector processing, reservoir simulation, seepage, shallow-water problems, spectral methods, supercomputer architectures, three-dimensional problems, and turbulent flows.

  17. 76 FR 30008 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ...license fees, annual license updates, and blaster certification fees. Alabama revised its program to improve operational efficiency. DATES: Effective Date: May 24, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Sherry Wilson, Director,...

  18. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS...a) The Alabama & Gulf Coast Railway Drawbridge, mile 105.3...Illinois Central railroad bridge, mile 277 near Montgomery...CSX Transportation Railroad bridge, mile 293.3 near...

  19. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS...a) The Alabama & Gulf Coast Railway Drawbridge, mile 105.3...and Bigbee Railroad (MNBR) Bridge, mile 205.9, at Selma...Illinois Central railroad bridge, mile 277 near...

  20. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS...a) The Alabama & Gulf Coast Railway Drawbridge, mile 105.3...Illinois Central railroad bridge, mile 277 near Montgomery...CSX Transportation Railroad bridge, mile 293.3 near...

  1. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS...a) The Alabama & Gulf Coast Railway Drawbridge, mile 105.3...Illinois Central railroad bridge, mile 277 near Montgomery...CSX Transportation Railroad bridge, mile 293.3 near...

  2. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS...a) The Alabama & Gulf Coast Railway Drawbridge, mile 105.3...and Bigbee Railroad (MNBR) Bridge, mile 205.9, at Selma...Illinois Central railroad bridge, mile 277 near...

  3. Preliminary geologic evaluation of the Alabama-Tennessee transverse seismic zone in Alabama

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. L. Neathery; W. E. Osborne; M. W. Szabo

    1986-01-01

    Historically Alabama is a region of moderate seismic activity. Since 1886 the state has experienced 65 recorded earthquakes whose epicenters are in or very near the state. Data obtained from a recently installed seven seismic-station network indicated that many greater than or equal toIII Mercalli scale earthquakes are occurring in north Alabama. The quakes occur within two principal seismic zones.

  4. Increasing Learning and Reducing Costs through Technology: The University of Alabama Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkowsky, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    Long known as a college-football powerhouse, the University of Alabama (UA) is now considered a model for institutions seeking to maintain or boost their academic quality even as enrollments increase and budgets are squeezed. According to Carol Twigg, president of the National Center for Academic Transformation (NCAT), which has been a significant…

  5. 6. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17 Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., 192. Shows center turn span and part of one fixed span. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  6. 5. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., after bridge collapsed in 1973. Shows broken turn span and overturned center pier. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  7. Preliminary geologic evaluation of the Alabama-Tennessee transverse seismic zone in Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Neathery, T.L.; Osborne, W.E.; Szabo, M.W.

    1986-08-01

    Historically Alabama is a region of moderate seismic activity. Since 1886 the state has experienced 65 recorded earthquakes whose epicenters are in or very near the state. Data obtained from a recently installed seven seismic-station network indicated that many greater than or equal toIII Mercalli scale earthquakes are occurring in north Alabama. The quakes occur within two principal seismic zones. One zone, the Southern Appalachian Seismic Zone, is associated with the tectonic grain of the Appalachian Mountain system and has been recognized for years. Another somewhat smaller seismic zone that extends from Montgomery, Alabama, to Nashville, Tennessee (Alabama-Tennessee Seismic zone) was identified only through recently interpreted seismic data. No surface manifestation of the earthquake activity in the Alabama-Tennessee Seismic Zone has been identified, but geophysical, lineament, and joint data suggest possible structures which may be related to previous earthquake activity.

  8. 26. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) WITH SAILS SET Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) WITH SAILS SET Original 2-3/4'x2-1/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  9. Northern Alabama colonies of the endangered grey bat Myotis grisescens: Organochlorine contamination and mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R., Jr.; Bagley, F.M.; Johnson, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    From 1976 to 1986, dead and dying grey bats Myotis grisescens and grey bat guano were collected from caves along the Tennessee River in northern Alabama to determine the possible role of organochlorine chemicals.sbd.in particular wastes from a former DDT manufacturing plant near Huntsville.sbd.in the mortalities. Concentrations of chemical residues in brains were less than known lethal levels: certain observations and analyses did indicate the possibility of past organochlorine-induced bat deaths. Levels of contaminants in bats declined slowly during the 10-year sampling period, but heavy residue burdens persist. The high ratio of DDD to DDE in residue from the former DDT plant made them identifiable as far as 140 km downriver. Grey bats concentrated chemical rsidues to higher levels and demonstrated the presence of these residues over much greater distances than did red-winged blackbirds Agelaius phoeniceus. Grey bats may be the most sensitive indicator available for monitoring the contamination from this former DDT manufacturing site.

  10. The "Nuevo" New South: Hispanic Immigration to Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohl, Raymond A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes Hispanic migration trends in Alabama, discussing how Alabama's demographic and cultural transformation and recent changes in the global economy are connected. The new Hispanic labor force has become an essential ingredient in Alabama's rural and urban economies. However, anti-immigrant sentiments have surfaced in some areas. Adjustment…

  11. Alabama's Education Report Card, 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Educational progress has been moving in the right direction for several years in Alabama. Now, with the implementation of Alabama's own Plan 2020, an even higher level of accountability for students, teachers, administrators, support systems, and schools/school systems, Alabama is poised to experience unprecedented growth. Add to that, the…

  12. Graptemys pulchra Baur 1893: Alabama Map Turtle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Godwin, James C.; McCoy, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    The Alabama Map Turtle, Graptemys pulchra (Family Emydidae), is a moderately large riverine species endemic to the Mobile Bay drainage system of Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi. Sexual size dimorphism is pronounced, with adult females (carapace length [CL] to 273 mm) attaining more than twice the size of adult males (CL to 117 mm). The species is an inhabitant of relatively large, swift creeks and rivers, often with wide sandbars. Stream sections open to the sun and with abundant basking sites in the form of logs and brush are preferred. Six to seven clutches of 4–7 eggs are laid each year on river sandbars. Although the species is locally abundant, populations are threatened by habitat destruction, declines in their prey base, commercial collection, and vandalism. It is listed as a Species of Special Concern in Alabama.

  13. ATM Coastal Topography-Alabama 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Alabama coastline, acquired October 3-4, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface, and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for pre-survey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create maps that represent submerged or first surface topography.

  14. Triassic/Jurassic faulting patterns of Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Hutley, J.K.

    1985-02-01

    Two major fault systems influenced Jurassic structure and deposition on the Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama. Identification and dating of these fault systems are based on seismic-stratigraphic interpretation of a 7-township grid in Monroe and Conecuh Counties. Relative time of faulting is determined by fault geometry and by formation isopachs and isochrons. Smackover and Norphlet Formations, both Late Jurassic in age, are mappable seismic reflectors and are thus reliable for seismicstratigraphic dating. The earlier of the 2 fault systems is a series of horsts and grabens that trends northeast-southwest and is Late Triassic to Early Jurassic in age. The system formed in response to tensional stress associated with the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The resulting topography was a series of northeast-southwest-trending ridges. Upper Triassic Eagle Mills and Jurassic Werner Formations were deposited in the grabens. The later fault system is also a series of horsts and grabens trending perpendicular to the first. This system was caused by tensional stress related to a pulse in the opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Faulting began in Early Jurassic and continued into Late Jurassic, becoming progressively younger basinward. At the basin margin, faulting produced a very irregular shoreline. Submerged horst blocks became centers for shoaling or carbonate buildups. Today, these blocks are exploration targets in southwest Alabama.

  15. Teacher Test Accountability: From Alabama to Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlow, Larry H.

    2001-01-01

    Highlights some of the psychometric results reported by National Evaluation Systems in their study of the Massachusetts Educator Certification Test and identifies characteristics of this test that are inconsistent with the "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing." Comments also on an Alabama class action lawsuit dealing with teacher…

  16. The Alabama School of Fine Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifted Child Quarterly, 1979

    1979-01-01

    The article describes the Alabama School of Fine Arts, a public secondary school offering, in addition to basic academics, intensive training in the areas of music, dance, drama, creative writing, and visual arts to talented and motivated junior and senior high school students in Birmingham. (Author/DLS)

  17. Alabama Public Library Service, 1987 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    Designed to provide an overview of the range and quality of services provided by the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS), this annual report focuses on the 1987 activities of APLS. A report on the activities of the Library Development Division shows the allocation of state aid and Library Services and Construction Act (LCSA) Titles I and III…

  18. State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Alabama edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality…

  19. Chemical Technician Manpower Survey: State of Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Donald; And Others

    The study was undertaken to assess the needs of Alabama's industry for chemical technicians and to determine the kinds and levels of skills required by major employers. Of the 75 organizations responding to the questionnaire with usable data, 62 were private industries, 6 were testing laboratories, and 7 were federal agencies. Generally, the study…

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essau, Cecilia A.; Sasagawa, Satoko; Frick, Paul J.

    2006-01-01

    We examined the psychometric properties of a German translation of the Child Global Report version of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire (APQ). A total of 1219 German school-children (644 boys and 575 girls), ages 10-14 years participated in the study. The APQ was subjected to exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Exploratory factor…

  1. Significance of selected lineaments in Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drahovzal, J. A.; Neathery, T. L.; Wielchowsky, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    Four lineaments in the Alabama Appalachians that appear on ERTS-1 imagery have been geologically analysed. Two of the lineaments appear to have regional geologic significance, showing relationships to structural and stratigraphic frameworks, water and mineral resources, geophysical anomalies, and seismicity. The other two lineaments are of local geologic significance, but, nevertheless, have important environmental implications.

  2. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1997-1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Sandy, Ed.; Norem, Ken, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" published during 1997. The focus of the journal is on communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling. The following articles are contained in issue 1: "Management and…

  3. Alabama Consolidated State Application Accountability Workbook. Final

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This workbook, submitted by the State of Alabama to the U.S. Department of Education, is for State Grants under Title IX, Part C, Section 9302 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (Public Law 107-110). By January 31, 2003, States must complete and submit to the Department this Consolidated State Application Accountability Workbook. The…

  4. Willis and Huntsville Tobacco Soils : A Preliminary Report Upon the Study of Texas Tobacco Soils and Texas Tobacco. 

    E-print Network

    Harrington, H. H. (Henry Hill); Tilson, P. S.

    1902-01-01

    application to the Director. k21 WlLLlS AND HUNTSVILLE TOBACCO SOILS. A Preliminary Report Upon the Study of Texas Tobacco Soils and Texas Tobacco, H. H. Harrington, an d P. S. Tilson. INTRODUCTION. The subject of soil study is one.of constant... is of vastly increased interest. How far any particu- lar type of soil affects the quality and type of tobacco which can be ' grown upon it has not been definitely determined. Still, the soil does exercise a most important influence. For example...

  5. 78 FR 47722 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Recovery Plan for Alabama Sturgeon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ...and Plants; Recovery Plan for Alabama Sturgeon AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service...recovery plan for the endangered Alabama sturgeon. The final plan includes specific recovery...INFORMATION: Background We listed the Alabama sturgeon (Scaphirhyncus suttkusi) as an...

  6. 40 CFR 81.199 - East Alabama Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... East Alabama Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.199 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.199 East Alabama Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The East Alabama...

  7. 75 FR 23264 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ...State of Alabama is revising its approved Public Water System Supervision Program. Alabama has adopted the following rules: Arsenic Rule, Lead and Copper Minor Revisions Rule, and Radionuclides Rule. EPA has determined that Alabama's rules are no...

  8. Photocopy of a Postcard, Alabama Archives: circa 1915. VIEW LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of a Postcard, Alabama Archives: circa 1915. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST - Louisville & Nashville Railroad, Union Station Train Shed, Water Street, opposite Lee Street, Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  9. U.S. Geological Survey: Water Resources of Alabama

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website contains water data, publications, and links to current weather in Alabama and weather radar and satellite images. The water streamflow data includes daily streamflow conditions of the United States, national water conditions, current streamflow conditions, current rain gauges of Alabama Power, a current river summary, and current drought conditions in Alabama. The publications are about water-resource activities in Alabama, the J.B. Converse Lake Watershed Assessment, the National Water-Quality Assessment Programs for the Lower-Tennessee and Mobile river basins, and water resource programs of the USGS.

  10. Dual-Polarimetric Radar-Based Tornado Debris Paths Associated with EF-4 and EF-5 Tornadoes over Northern Alabama During the Historic Outbreak of 27 April 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Chrstopher J.; Schultz, Elise V.; Petersen, Walter A.; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Knupp, Kevin R.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Darden, Christopher B.

    2012-01-01

    An historic tornado and severe weather outbreak devastated much of the southeastern United States between 25 and 28 April 2011. On 27 April 2011, northern Alabama was particularly hard hit by a large number of tornadoes, including several that reached EF-4 and EF-5 on the Enhanced Fujita damage scale. In northern Alabama alone, there were approximately 100 fatalities and hundreds of more people who were injured or lost their homes during the havoc caused by these violent tornadic storms. Two long-track and violent (EF-4 and EF-5) tornadoes occurred within range of the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville) Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR, C-band dual-polarimetric). A unique capability of dual-polarimetric radar is the near-real time identification of lofted debris associated with ongoing tornadoes on the ground. The focus of this paper is to analyze the dual-polarimetric radar-inferred tornado debris signatures and identify the associated debris paths of the long-track EF-4 and EF-5 tornadoes near ARMOR. The relative locations of the debris and damage paths for each tornado will be ascertained by careful comparison of the ARMOR analysis with NASA MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) satellite imagery of the tornado damage scenes and the National Weather Service tornado damage surveys. With the ongoing upgrade of the WSR-88D (Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 Doppler) operational network to dual-polarimetry and a similar process having already taken place or ongoing for many private sector radars, dual-polarimetric radar signatures of tornado debris promise the potential to assist in the situational awareness of government and private sector forecasters and emergency managers during tornadic events. As such, a companion abstract (Schultz et al.) also submitted to this conference explores The use of dual-polarimetric tornadic debris signatures in an operational setting.

  11. Dual-Polarimetric Radar-Based Tornado Debris Paths Associated with EF-4 and EF-5 Tornadoes over Northern Alabama During the Historic Outbreak of 27 April 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Schultz, Elise V.; Petersen, Walter A.; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Knupp, Kevin R.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Darden, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    An historic tornado and severe weather outbreak devastated much of the southeastern United States between 25 and 28 April 2011. On 27 April 2011, northern Alabama was particularly hard hit by a large number of tornadoes, including several that reached EF-4 and EF-5 on the Enhanced Fujita damage scale. In northern Alabama alone, there were approximately 100 fatalities and hundreds of more people who were injured or lost their homes during the havoc caused by these violent tornadic storms. Two long-track and violent (EF-4 and EF-5) tornadoes occurred within range of the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville) Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR, C-band dual-polarimetric). A unique capability of dual-polarimetric radar is the near-real time identification of lofted debris associated with ongoing tornadoes on the ground. The focus of this paper is to analyze the dual-polarimetric radar-inferred tornado debris signatures and identify the associated debris paths of the long-track EF-4 and EF-5 tornadoes near ARMOR. The relative locations of the debris and damage paths for each tornado will be ascertained by careful comparison of the ARMOR analysis with NASA MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) satellite imagery of the tornado damage scenes and the National Weather Service tornado damage surveys. With the ongoing upgrade of the WSR-88D (Weather Surveillance Radar - 1988 Doppler) operational network to dual-polarimetry and a similar process having already taken place or ongoing for many private sector radars, dual-polarimetric radar signatures of tornado debris promise the potential to assist in the situational awareness of government and private sector forecasters and emergency managers during tornadic events. As such, a companion abstract (Schultz et al.) also submitted to this conference explores "The use of dual-polarimetric tornadic debris signatures in an operational setting."

  12. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  13. The Integration of Total Lightning Information Into National Weather Service Operations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Darden; J. Burks; T. Bradshaw; D. Boccippio; S. Goodman; R. Blakeslee; E. McCaul; D. Buechler; J. Hall; J. Bailey

    2003-01-01

    The collocation of a National Weather Service (NWS) Forecast Office with atmospheric scientists from NASA\\/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) has afforded a unique opportunity for science sharing and technology transfer. One such technology transfer is the utilization of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) in daily forecast and warning operations. The

  14. TRANSMISSION OF EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS IN CENTRAL ALABAMA

    PubMed Central

    CUPP, EDDIE W.; KLINGLER, KIMBERLY; HASSAN, HASSAN K.; VIGUERS, LESLIE M.; UNNASCH, THOMAS R.

    2008-01-01

    A site near Tuskegee, Alabama was examined for vector activity of eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE) virus in 2001. More than 23,000 mosquitoes representing 8 genera and 34 species were collected during a 21-week period, and five species, Culiseta melanura, Aedes vexans, Coquillettidia perturbans, Culex erraticus, and Uranotaenia sapphirina, were examined for the presence of virus using a nested reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction for EEE virus. Each species was infected at various times of the mosquito season (May–September) with different minimum infection rates (MIRs). Culiseta melanura had the highest MIR (20.2) and positive pools were detected from late May to mid-September. Aedes vexans had an MIR of 2.2 and was infected early in the season (June), while Cq. perturbans exhibited a much higher field infection rate (9.9) with all positive pools collected in August. Culiseta melanura is a likely endemic vector in central Alabama, while Ae. vexans and Cq. perturbans probably function as bridge vectors. Culex erraticus, the most common mosquito in the habitat (54% of total collections), had an MIR of 3.2, and was persistently infected from mid-June to mid-September. This is the first report of high rates of EEE virus infection in this species, a member of the tropical subgenus Melanoconion. Uranotaenia sapphirina, considered to feed on amphibians and possibly reptiles, had an MIR of 5.6, with positive pools spanning a four-month period. This suggests that species other than birds may serve as a reservoir for EEE in hardwood swamps in the Southeastern United States and elsewhere. The lengthy period of mosquito infection with EEE virus, coupled with the diverse habits of the vectors and their proximity to a population center, indicate the importance of monitoring EEE virus activity in the Mid-South. PMID:12875303

  15. 24. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN); VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN); VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON STATION IN GULF OF MEXICO WITH MOTOR BOAT TIED AT STERN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  16. 23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted 3-1/2'x5-5/8' postcard; image taken on station in Gulf of Mexico, c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  17. 25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON STATION IN GULF OF MEXICO WITH MOTOR BOAT TIED AT STERN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  18. Alabama's Education Report Card 2010-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Public education in Alabama is moving in the right direction and is poised to be a national model for the college and career readiness of its students. Through some of the most challenging financial circumstances, public education in Alabama has continued to show great promise in many areas, including reading, math, and science. The success of…

  19. Alabama's Education Report Card, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In a more consistent and viable manner than ever before, education in Alabama is moving toward its ultimate goal of providing every student with a quality education, thereby preparing them for work, college, and life after high school. Alabama's graduation rates from 2002 to 2008 increased significantly, tripling the national average increase…

  20. A Study of School Size among Alabama's Public High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindahl, Ronald A.; Cain, Patrick M., Sr.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the size of Alabama's public high schools, selected school quality and financial indicators, and their students' performance on standardized exams. When the socioeconomic level of the student bodies is held constant, the size of high schools in Alabama has relatively little…

  1. Phorid Flies in Alabama: A tale of two species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two species of phorid fly have been released at 11 sites in Alabama and have been recovered from 9 sites. Pseudacteon tricuspis Borgmeier (Diptera: Phoridae) was released in South Alabama in populations of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), and Pseudacteon...

  2. 14. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Southern RR at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Southern RR at Epes Alabama Great Southern RR bridge. View from S. Copy of photo taken in 1922 by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms., Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  3. Alabama University Professor's View of the Birmingham Bombing Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents the views of Alabama university scholars regarding the historical significance of the 2001 trial of Thomas Blanton for his role in the Ku Klux Klan bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama thet killed four girls. Their discussions note the need to examine the American judicial system, the weak case against Mr.…

  4. Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1993-02-01

    The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

  5. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 1, August-September 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama," as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  6. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 1, August-September 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  7. Groundwater quality at Alabama Plating and Vincent Spring, Vincent, Alabama, 2007–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Michael W.; Gill, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    The former Alabama Plating site in Vincent, Alabama, includes the location where the Alabama Plating Company operated an electroplating facility from 1956 until 1986. The operation of the facility generated waste containing cyanide, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, zinc, and other heavy metals. Contamination resulting from the site operations was identified in groundwater, soil, and sediment. Vincent Spring, used as a public water supply by the city of Vincent, Alabama, is located about ½ mile southwest of the site. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted an investigation at Vincent Spring and the Alabama Plating site, Vincent, Alabama, during 2007–2008 to evaluate the groundwater quality and evaluate the potential effect of contaminated groundwater on the water quality of Vincent Spring. The results of the investigation will provide scientific data and information on the occurrence, fate, and transport of contaminants in the water resources of the area and aid in the evaluation of the vulnerability of the public water supply to contamination. Samples were analyzed to evaluate the water quality at the former plating site, investigate the presence of possible contaminant indicators at Vincent Spring, and determine the usefulness of stable isotopes and geochemical properties in understanding groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the area. Samples collected from 16 monitor wells near the plating site and Vincent Spring were analyzed for major constituents, trace metals, nutrients, and the stable isotopes for hydrogen (2H/H) and oxygen (18O/16O). Groundwater collected from Vincent Spring was characterized as a calcium-magnesium-bicarbonate water type with total dissolved solids concentrations ranging from 110 to 120 milligrams per liter and pH ranging from about 7.5 to 7.9 units. Groundwater chemistry at the monitor wells at the Alabama Plating site was highly variable by location and depth. Dissolved solids concentrations ranged from 28 to 2,880 milligrams per liter, and the water types varied from calcium-magnesium-bicarbonate-chloride, to calcium-sulfate or calcium-magnesium-sulfate, to sodium-chloride water types. The stable isotope ratios for hydrogen (2H/H) and oxygen (18O/16O) for water from the monitor wells and from Vincent Spring, based on a single sampling event, can be separated into three groups: (1) Vincent Spring, (2) monitor wells MW03 and MW28, and (3) the remaining Alabama Plating monitor wells. The geochemical and stable isotope analyses indicate that water from Vincent Spring is distinct from water from the Alabama Plating monitor wells; however, this evaluation is based on a single sampling event. Although the water from Vincent Spring, for this sampling event, is different and does not seem to be affected by contaminated groundwater from the Alabama Plating site, additional hydrologic and water-quality data are needed to fully identify flow paths, the potential for contaminant transport, and water-quality changes through time.

  8. Topobathymetric model of Mobile Bay, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Brock, John C.; Howard, Daniel M.; Gesch, Dean B.; Bonisteel-Cormier, Jamie M.; Travers, Laurinda J.

    2013-01-01

    Topobathymetric Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are a merged rendering of both topography (land elevation) and bathymetry (water depth) that provides a seamless elevation product useful for inundation mapping, as well as for other earth science applications, such as the development of sediment-transport, sea-level rise, and storm-surge models. This 1/9-arc-second (approximately 3 meters) resolution model of Mobile Bay, Alabama was developed using multiple topographic and bathymetric datasets, collected on different dates. The topographic data were obtained primarily from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Elevation Dataset (NED) (http://ned.usgs.gov/) at 1/9-arc-second resolution; USGS Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) data (2 meters) (http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/400/); and topographic lidar data (2 meters) and Compact Hydrographic Airborne Rapid Total Survey (CHARTS) lidar data (2 meters) from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) (http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/data/coastallidar/). Bathymetry was derived from digital soundings obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/geodas/geodas.html) and from water-penetrating lidar sources, such as EAARL and CHARTS. Mobile Bay is ecologically important as it is the fourth largest estuary in the United States. The Mobile and Tensaw Rivers drain into the bay at the northern end with the bay emptying into the Gulf of Mexico at the southern end. Dauphin Island (a barrier island) and the Fort Morgan Peninsula form the mouth of Mobile Bay. Mobile Bay is 31 miles (50 kilometers) long by a maximum width of 24 miles (39 kilometers) with a total area of 413 square miles (1,070 square kilometers). The vertical datum of the Mobile Bay topobathymetric model is the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88). All the topographic datasets were originally referenced to NAVD 88 and no transformations were made to these input data. The NGDC hydrographic, multibeam, and trackline surveys were transformed from mean low water (MLW) or mean lower low water (MLLW) to NAVD 88 using VDatum (http://vdatum.noaa.gov). VDatum is a tool developed by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) that performs transformations among tidal, ellipsoid-based, geoid-based, and orthometric datums using calibrated hydrodynamic models. The vertical accuracy of the input topographic data varied depending on the input source. Because the input elevation data were derived primarily from lidar, the vertical accuracy ranges from 6 to 20 centimeters in root mean square error (RMSE). he horizontal datum of the Mobile Bay topobathymetric model is the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83), geographic coordinates. All the topographic and bathymetric datasets were originally referenced to NAD 83, and no transformations were made to the input data. The bathymetric surveys were downloaded referenced to NAD 83 geographic, and therefore no horizontal transformations were required. The topbathymetric model of Mobile Bay and detailed metadata can be obtained from the USGS Web sites: http://nationalmap.gov/.

  9. Flood of April 13, 1980, Mobile, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hannum, Curtis H.; Nelson, George H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents basic data collected during the flood of April 13, 1980, in Mobile, Alabama. The data consists of high-water marks, accumulative rainfall, peak discharge at local gaging stations, hydrographs of discharge and rainfall, and photographs at various locations taken during and immediately after the flood. The report presented in map-series and lists data that are readily usable by local planners and developers. During th afternoon of April 13, 1980, the National Weather Service at Mobile recorded a total of 10.4 inches of rainfall. Immediately after the flood approximately 60 to 70 percent of the roads in the Mobile area were impassable. (USGS)

  10. Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind Biodiesel Project Green

    SciTech Connect

    Edmiston, Jessica L

    2012-09-28

    Through extensive collaboration, Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind (AIDB) is Alabama's first educational entity to initiate a biodiesel public education, student training and production program, Project Green. With state and national replication potential, Project Green benefits local businesses and city infrastructures within a 120-mile radius; provides alternative education to Alabama school systems and to schools for the deaf and blind in Appalachian States; trains students with sensory and/or multiple disabilities in the acquisition and production of biodiesel; and educates the external public on alternative fuels benefits.

  11. Miocene marine shelf-bar and deltaic petroleum reservoirs of coastal Alabama and Mississippi/Alabama shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Mink, R.M.; Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.

    1989-03-01

    Middle and upper Miocene gas reservoirs found in coastal Alabama and the Mississippi/Alabama shelf are predominantly inner to middle neritic shelf-bar or deltaic sands. A Miocene delta system prograded from the west-northwest in offshore Louisiana-Mississippi into coastal Alabama and the Mississippi/Alabama shelf. Deltaic sedimentation primarily affected the western portion of the Mississippi/Alabama shelf, while neritic sedimentation predominated in the northeastern portion of the region in coastal Alabama. Basinal clays are prevalent in the southeastern portion of the Mississippi/Alabama shelf. The productive Miocene reservoir sands occur between depths of 1100 and 5100 ft and generally are from 10 to 200 ft thick. The quartz-rich sands range from fine to coarse grained and have subangular to rounded and moderately to well-sorted quartz grains. Reservoir porosity is primary intergranular and generally ranges from 21% to 35%, with permeabilities that may exceed 2000 md. The natural gas in these shallow reservoirs is primarily biogenic in origin. Productivity of the reservoirs is highly variable and is often characterized by high water saturation. Reservoir pressures, which generally range from 550 to 2300 psi, are also a major factor controlling productivity of these reservoirs. Middle Miocene reservoirs are most common in coastal Alabama, and upper Miocene reservoirs are most common in the Mississippi/Alabama shelf. Petroleum traps are principally sandstone porosity and permeability pinch-outs against regional dip with subtle closure and anticlinal nosing as secondary factors in many of the traps. These middle and upper Miocene gas sands are best delineated with relative amplitude seismic reflection data no which gas-charged sands are apparent as bright spots.

  12. Topographic data of selected areas along the Alabama River near Montgomery, Alabama, collected using mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimbrow, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Topographic data at selected areas within the Alabama River flood plain near Montgomery, Alabama, were collected using a truck-mounted mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging system. These data were collected for inclusion in a flood inundation model developed by the National Weather Service in Birmingham, Alabama. Data are presented as ArcGIS point shapefiles with the extension .shp.

  13. Occurrence of the megatoothed sharks (Lamniformes: Otodontidae) in Alabama, USA

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The Otodontidae include some of the largest sharks to ever live in the world’s oceans (i.e., Carcharocles megalodon). Here we report on Paleocene and Eocene occurrences of Otodus obliquus and Carcharocles auriculatus from Alabama, USA. Teeth of Otodus are rarely encountered in the Gulf Coastal Plain and this report is one of the first records for Alabama. Carcharocles auriculatus is more common in the Eocene deposits of Alabama, but its occurrence has been largely overlooked in the literature. We also refute the occurrence of the Oligocene Carcharocles angustidens in the state. Raised awareness and increased collecting of under-sampled geologic formations in Alabama will likely increase sample sizes of O. obliquus and C. auriculatus and also might unearth other otodontids, such as C. megalodon and C. chubutensis. PMID:25332848

  14. 76 FR 32982 - Alabama; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency [Internal Agency Docket...Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Alabama; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION:...

  15. Occurrence of the megatoothed sharks (Lamniformes: Otodontidae) in Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Ehret, Dana J; Ebersole, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The Otodontidae include some of the largest sharks to ever live in the world's oceans (i.e., Carcharocles megalodon). Here we report on Paleocene and Eocene occurrences of Otodus obliquus and Carcharocles auriculatus from Alabama, USA. Teeth of Otodus are rarely encountered in the Gulf Coastal Plain and this report is one of the first records for Alabama. Carcharocles auriculatus is more common in the Eocene deposits of Alabama, but its occurrence has been largely overlooked in the literature. We also refute the occurrence of the Oligocene Carcharocles angustidens in the state. Raised awareness and increased collecting of under-sampled geologic formations in Alabama will likely increase sample sizes of O. obliquus and C. auriculatus and also might unearth other otodontids, such as C. megalodon and C. chubutensis. PMID:25332848

  16. Regional assessment of nonforestry related biomass resources: Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This document is a collection of spreadsheets detailing on a county by county basis the agricultural crop, agricultural wastes, municipal wastes and industrial wastes of Alabama that are potential biomass energy sources.

  17. Shallow Subsurface Stratigraphy of the Wetumpka Impact Structure, Alabama USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. T.; Ormo, J.; Petruny, L.; Markin, J. K.; Tabares Rodenas, P.; Johnson, R. C.; Neathery, T. L.

    2012-09-01

    Wetumpka impact structure is a small, marine target feature on the Coastal Plain of Alabama. Eight core holes have been drilled in Wetumpka and the resulting shallow subsurface stratigraphy is presented in summary here.

  18. Impactite Facies Within the Wetumpka Impact-Crater Fill, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. T., Jr.; Neathery, T. L.; Petruny, L. W.

    1999-03-01

    This paper summarizes initial findings from drilling two 190-m deep holes within the Late Cretaceous Wetumpka impact crater, Alabama. Five intercalated impactite facies from the crater fill unit are described: sands; sandy and cataclastic diamictites; breccias; and blocks.

  19. 8. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11, N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, from SW. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  20. 11. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, S tower. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, MS. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  1. Photocopy of a Photograph, Alabama Archives: circa 189798. VIEW LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of a Photograph, Alabama Archives: circa 1897-98. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Louisville & Nashville Railroad, Union Station Train Shed, Water Street, opposite Lee Street, Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  2. 76 FR 30225 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1971-DR), dated 05/10/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 and continuing. Effective Date:...

  3. 76 FR 27740 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1971-DR), dated 04/28/ 2011. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 and continuing. Effective Date:...

  4. 75 FR 27844 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00031

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1908-DR), dated 05/03/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/24/2010 through 04/25/2010. DATES: Effective...

  5. 76 FR 27139 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1971-DR), dated 04/28/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 and continuing. Effective Date:...

  6. Special Spotlight: The Alabama Project Celebrates Survivors and Their Communities

    Cancer.gov

    In recognition of cancer survivors and their families, CRCHD celebrates cancer survivorship this month. In this spotlight article, we focus in on The Alabama Project and its visual storytelling of the powerful impact of community in survivorship.

  7. 40 CFR 81.68 - Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...false Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi...68 Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi... The Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Gulfport...

  8. 40 CFR 81.68 - Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...false Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi...68 Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi... The Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Gulfport...

  9. 40 CFR 81.68 - Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...false Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi...68 Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi... The Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Gulfport...

  10. 40 CFR 81.68 - Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...false Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi...68 Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi... The Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Gulfport...

  11. 40 CFR 81.68 - Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...false Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi...68 Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi... The Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Gulfport...

  12. A study of oyster production in Alabama waters

    E-print Network

    Bell, Joe O

    1952-01-01

    A STUDY OF OYSTER PRODUCTION IN ALABAMA WATERS A Thesis By JOE O. BELL Approved as to style and content by: 0. ac in, hairman o omm ttee Dale F. Leipper, He o epartment August 1952 A STUDY OF OYSTER PRODUCTION IN ALABAMA WATERS JOE O... on Reef Oysters. D. Hydrographic Conditions E. Regional Studies F. Equipment and Boats 6. Personnel H. Establishment of Positions. I. Triangulation Procedure J. Procedure in Locating and Plotting Oyster Reefs or Beds. K. Mapping. L. Methods...

  13. A study of oyster production in Alabama waters 

    E-print Network

    Bell, Joe O

    1952-01-01

    A STUDY OF OYSTER PRODUCTION IN ALABAMA WATERS A Thesis By JOE O. BELL Approved as to style and content by: 0. ac in, hairman o omm ttee Dale F. Leipper, He o epartment August 1952 A STUDY OF OYSTER PRODUCTION IN ALABAMA WATERS JOE O... on Reef Oysters. D. Hydrographic Conditions E. Regional Studies F. Equipment and Boats 6. Personnel H. Establishment of Positions. I. Triangulation Procedure J. Procedure in Locating and Plotting Oyster Reefs or Beds. K. Mapping. L. Methods...

  14. Investigation using data in Alabama from ERTS-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, H. R. (principal investigator)

    1972-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Brief summaries are presented of accomplishments by the state of Alabama in the areas of: (1) investigation of environmental factors; (2) land use compilation; (3) data processing for land use compilation; (4) photo-reproduction and unsupervised land use classification from digital tape; (5) data collection buoys; and (6) activities of the Geological Survey of Alabama.

  15. 78 FR 57852 - Warrior Rosin Spill Superfund Site, Holt, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama ; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ...FRL-9901-24-Region 4; CERCLA-04-2013-3764] Warrior Rosin Spill Superfund Site, Holt, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama ; Notice...Alabama, Inc. addressing past costs concerning the Warrior Rosin Spill Superfund Site located in Holt, Tuscaloosa County,...

  16. 40 CFR 81.266 - Alabama and Tombigbee Rivers Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Tombigbee Rivers Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.266 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.266 Alabama and Tombigbee Rivers Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Alabama and...

  17. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.58 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.58 Columbus...City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus...

  18. 40 CFR 81.266 - Alabama and Tombigbee Rivers Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Tombigbee Rivers Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.266 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.266 Alabama and Tombigbee Rivers Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Alabama and...

  19. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.58 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.58 Columbus...City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus...

  20. University of Alabama 2 semesters college math 2 semesters college math

    E-print Network

    Hone, James

    Alabama University of Alabama 2 semesters college math 2 semesters college math Calculus is recommended Arkansas 2 semesters college math Calculus recommended Computer Science recommended California College math recommended Calculus recommended Computer Science recommended College math required

  1. Today's Students, Tomorrow's Citizens: Pathways for Learning, Science. Alabama High School Graduation Exam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery. Div. of Instructional Services.

    This document introduces the Alabama Graduation Examination Program (AGEP) which provides learning opportunities for high school students to meet the minimum competency requirements to earn a high school diploma in the state of Alabama. The Alabama High School Graduation Examination (AHSGE) content includes the subject areas of reading…

  2. Impacts of House Bill 56 on the Construction Economy in Alabama 

    E-print Network

    Bilbo, David; Escamilla, Edelmiro; Bigelow, Ben F.; Garcia, Jose

    2014-01-01

    to enact legislation intended to deter unauthorized immigration. South Carolina, Utah, and Alabama have all followed Arizona, which was the first state to enact such a law. This study evaluates House Bill (HB) 56, Alabama’s anti-unauthorized immigration...

  3. 77 FR 44238 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ...FRL-9705-1] Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama...revising its approved Public Water System Supervision Program. Alabama has adopted the following...State of Alabama's Public Water System Supervision Program. DATES: Any interested...

  4. 78 FR 70392 - Waiver of Requirement To Enter Into a Reciprocal Waiver of Claims Agreement With All Customers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ...of Florida, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, St. Louis...of Florida, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, St....

  5. Reporting on the Holocaust: the view from Jim Crow Alabama.

    PubMed

    Puckett, Dan J

    2011-01-01

    The press in Alabama covered major events taking place in Germany from the rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazis in 1933 through the Nuremberg Trials in 1946. Journalists in the state provided extensive coverage, and editors did not hesitate to opine on the persecution of the Jews in Europe. Yet, Alabama’s white-run press failed in the end to explain the events as a singularly Jewish tragedy. The state’s black-run press, for its part, used the news of the mass killings of the Jews to warn against the dangers of conceptions of racial superiority—a primary concern for black southerners living in the Jim Crow South. PMID:22073444

  6. Integrated Distribution Management System for Alabama Principal Investigator

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, Joe

    2013-03-31

    Southern Company Services, under contract with the Department of Energy, along with Alabama Power, Alstom Grid (formerly AREVA T&D) and others moved the work product developed in the first phase of the Integrated Distribution Management System (IDMS) from “Proof of Concept” to true deployment through the activity described in this Final Report. This Project – Integrated Distribution Management Systems in Alabama – advanced earlier developed proof of concept activities into actual implementation and furthermore completed additional requirements to fully realize the benefits of an IDMS. These tasks include development and implementation of a Distribution System based Model that enables data access and enterprise application integration.

  7. The Anthropology of Science Education Reform: An Alabama Model for Building an Integrated Stakeholder Systems Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denson, R. L.; Cox, G. N.

    2004-12-01

    Anthropologists are concerned with every aspect of the culture they are investigating. One of the five main branches of anthropology, socio-cultural anthropology, concerns itself with studying the relationship between behavior and culture. This paper explores the concept that changing the behavior of our culture - its beliefs and values - towards science is at the heart of science education reform. There are five institutions that socio-cultural anthropologists use to study the social organization of cultures: the educational system is only one of them. Its function - across all cultures - is to serve as a mechanism for implementing change in cultural beliefs and values. As leaders of science education reform, the Alabama model contends that we must stop the struggle with our purpose and get on with the business of leading culture change through an integrated stakeholder systems approach. This model stresses the need for the interaction of agencies other than education - including government, industry, the media and our health communities to operate in an integrated and systemic fashion to address the issues of living among a technically literate society. Twenty-five years of science education reform needs being voiced and programs being developed has not produced the desired results from within the educational system. This is too limited a focus to affect any real cultural change. It is when we acknowledge that students spend only an average of 12 percent of their life time in schools, that we can begin to ask ourselves what are our students learning the other 88 percent of their time - from their peers, their parents and the media - and what should we be doing to address this cultural crisis in these other arenas in addition to the educational system? The Alabama Math, Science and Technology Education Coalition (AMSTEC) is a non-profit 501c(3) organization operating in the state of Alabama to provide leadership in improving mathematics, science, and technology education through facilitating communication among education, business, and public policy organizations. Through the AMSTEC approach to systemic Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education reform, business and other aspects of our culture play a vital role as stakeholders in the development of the integrated stakeholder model. Using the STEMnet model developed by National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), each of the stakeholders has been working in support of the Alabama Department of Education's Math Science and Technology K-12 research-based Initiative (AMSTI) . In this respect, Alabama has the education aspects of science education reform underway. AMSTI continues to grow and strengthen its program now using an integrated stakeholder model. The integrated stakeholder approach enhances and strengthens Alabama's STEM educational activities in support of systemic K-12 education reform called for in our nation to meet the needs of the 21st century workforce. In addition, aspects of culture including the media, the health community, and local business and industry will also align messages and programs to work in support of systemic K-20 education reform. It truly "takes a village" of good communicating stakeholders who have created a shared vision and common language for discussing and aligning resources and strategies for changing the perceptions, feelings and teaching and learning of science in our society http://www.amstec.org, http://www.nsstc.org

  8. Dr. Wernher von Braun in his Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun is in his office, with an artist's concept of a lunar lander in background and models of Mercury-Redstone, Juno, and Saturn I. Dr. Wernher von Braun, the first MSFC Director, led a team of German rocket scientists, called the Rocket Team, to the United States, first to Fort Bliss/White Sands, later being transferred to the Army Ballistic Missile Agency at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. They were further transferred to the newly established NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama in 1960, and Dr. von Braun became the first Center Director.

  9. Reducing Tick-Borne Disease in Alabama: Linking Health Risk Perception with Spatial Analysis Using the NASA Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmings, S.; Renneboog, N.; Firsing, S.; Capilouto, E.; Harden, J.; Hyden, R.; Tipre, M.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD) accounts for most vector-borne disease reports in the U.S., and although its existence in Alabama remains controversial, other tick-borne illnesses (TBI) such as Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness (STARI) pose a health concern in the state. Phase One of the Marshall Space Flight Center-UAB DEVELOP study of TBI identified the presence of the chain of infection for LD (Ixodes scapularis ticks carrying Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria) and STARI (Amblyomma americanum ticks and an as-yet-unconfirmed agent) in Alabama. Both LD and STARI are associated with the development of erythema migrans rashes around an infected tick bite, and while treatable with oral antibiotics, a review of educational resources available to state residents revealed low levels of prevention information. To improve prevention, recognition, and treatment of TBI in Alabama, Phase Two builds a health communication campaign based on vector habitat mapping and risk perception assessment. NASA Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) satellite imagery identified likely tick habitats using remotely sensed measurements of vegetation vigor (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and soil moisture. Likely tick habitats, identified as those containing both high vegetation density and soil moisture, included Oak Mountain State Park, Bankhead National Forest, and Talladega National Forest. To target a high-risk group -- outdoor recreation program participants at Alabama universities -- the study developed a behavior survey instrument based on existing studies of LD risk factors and theoretical constructs from the Social Ecological Model and Health Belief Model. The survey instrument was amended to include geographic variables in the assessment of TBI knowledge, attitudes, and prevention behaviors, and the vector habitat model will be expanded to incorporate additional environmental variables and in situ data. Remotely sensed environmental data combined with risk perception assessments inform an ongoing outreach campaign consisting of stakeholder meetings and educational seminars.

  10. Mountain Brook High School Fine Arts Center: Moisture Control Case Study

    E-print Network

    Nunnelly, R. M.

    2002-01-01

    Upon returning to school in the fall, significant problems became evident in the Fine Arts Center of Mountain Brook High School, located near Birmingham, Alabama. In the band department, black mold was found on ceiling tiles, marching band uniforms...

  11. Mountain Brook High School Fine Arts Center: Moisture Control Case Study 

    E-print Network

    Nunnelly, R. M.

    2002-01-01

    Upon returning to school in the fall, significant problems became evident in the Fine Arts Center of Mountain Brook High School, located near Birmingham, Alabama. In the band department, black mold was found on ceiling tiles, marching band uniforms...

  12. Alabama Community College Presidents' Perceptions regarding Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nobles, Janina LaKeshea

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Alabama community college presidents' perceptions regarding distance education. Further, this study was intended to determine the adequacy of the training opportunities and support for faculty that teach distance education courses and what services are available for distance education students. This study…

  13. Psychometric Properties of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire-Preschool Revision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clerkin, Suzanne M.; Marks, David J.; Policaro, Katia L.; Halperin, Jeffrey M.

    2007-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire-Preschool Revision (APQ-PR) were explored in a sample of hyperactive-inattentive preschool children (N = 47) and nonimpaired controls (N = 113). A subset of parents completed the questionnaire on 2 occasions, approximately 1 year apart. Factor analysis revealed a 3-factor solution,…

  14. Factors Associated with Declining Hunting License Sales in Alabama

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sayeed Mehmood; Daowei Zhang; James Armstrong

    2003-01-01

    This article documents the magnitude of and factors associated with declining hunting license sales in Alabama. Respondents were classified as active hunters, former hunters, or nonhunters. Active hunters were relatively satisfied with their recent hunting experiences and the wildlife management programs conducted by the state. In addition, they were supportive of a modest increase of hunting fees. Reasons given by

  15. Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Capacities of Alabama – Grown Thornless Blackberries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming-Wei S. Kao; Floyd M. Woods; William A. Dozier; Robert C. Ebel; Monte Nesbitt; Junbae Jee; Deacue Fields

    2008-01-01

    Total phenolics (TPH), flavonoids (TF), monomeric anthocyanins (ACY), and Vitamin C Equivalent Antioxidant Capacities (VCEAC) utilizing ABTS and DPPH radical scavenging assays were determined for five fully ripened blackberries cultivars (‘Loch Ness’, ‘Navaho’, ‘Arapaho’, ‘Apache’, and ‘Triple Crown’) of Rubus spp. grown in Alabama. The ABTS and DPPH methods were highly correlated (R?=?0.897) and the ABTS method was better for

  16. The OOPSLA Trivia Show (TOOTS) University of Alabama at Birmingham

    E-print Network

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    The OOPSLA Trivia Show (TOOTS) Jeff Gray University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Computer participation. 1. Overview of the OOPSLA Trivia Show OOPSLA has one of the most diverse collections of attendees on topics related to OOPSLA. 2. The OOPSLA Trivia Show Rules The panel will follow the general rules

  17. Phase III Early Restoration Projects Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas

    E-print Network

    Phase III Early Restoration Projects Alabama · Florida · Louisiana · Mississippi · Texas NOAA-based) recirculating aquaculture systems that reduce water usage and effluent discharge. Effluent would flow through a small filtration marsh composed of native coastal wetland plant species (to be built as part

  18. Assessing Job Satisfaction among Alabama's Community College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howton, Russell Warren

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between selected demographic and educational variables of faculty members employed in the Alabama Community College System and their impact on job satisfaction. The variables included in the study are the demographic variables of age, gender, ethnicity, salary, and degree status, along with…

  19. TILLAGE EFFECTS ON INTERRILL ERODIBILITY OF TWO ALABAMA SOILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alabama soils have been managed under conventional tillage practices and most are considered highly erodible. Conservation tillage is effective in reducing soil loss. The objective of this study was to quantify soil loss and calculate interrill erodibilities (Ki) for loamy sand and silt loam soils m...

  20. Smoking, Sociodemographic Determinants, and Stress in the Alabama Black Belt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuaib, Faisal; Foushee, H. R.; Ehiri, John; Bagchi, Suparna; Baumann, Angela; Kohler, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In the Alabama Black Belt, poverty is high, and the educational level is low. Studies have found increased tobacco use among individuals exposed to high levels of stress. Few studies have been conducted in this region to measure smoking status, its sociodemographic determinants, and how smoking status relates to stressful environmental…

  1. Cardboard Houses with Wings: The Architecture of Alabama's Rural Studio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botz-Bornstein, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    The Rural Studio, an outreach program of Auburn University, designs innovative houses for poor people living in Alabama's Hale County by using "junk" such as car windshields, carpet tiles, baled cardboard, and old license plates. The article theorizes this particular architecture in terms of Critical Regionalism, developed by Tzonis/Lefaivre and…

  2. Federal Public Library Programs in Alabama for FY 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This document provides 11 extracts from Alabama state law and federal law concerning state implementation of federal public library programs under the Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA). These extracts are titled: (1) "Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA) State-Administered Program (34 CFR Part 770)"; (2) "Activities Allowable…

  3. Perspectives on Postsecondary Education: Alabama Citizens Survey '77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owings, Thomas G.

    A random sample of adults in Alabama were surveyed in 1977 to determine their opinions and attitudes about postsecondary education. A 51-item questionnaire was designed to reflect public feeling about several areas of postsecondary education, including finance; governance; faculty; teaching, research, and service functions; and admissions and…

  4. Role of the Vocational Education District Supervisor in Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Jim

    The purpose of this study was to describe the role of the Alabama vocational education district supervisor as perceived by local education administrators and teachers. (Applicability of the methodology and the findings may prove valuable to other state departments of vocational education as well.) Questionnaires were sent to 650 administrators and…

  5. Retention Issues: A Study of Alabama Special Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plash, Shawn; Piotrowski, Chris

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated issues that impact attrition, migration and retention of special education teachers in Alabama. The sample comprised 70 teachers designated as "highly-qualified" who responded to a job satisfaction instrument, with a focus on retention issues, developed by Levine (2001). The results indicated that the major reasons for…

  6. The Citizens' Viewpoint: Higher Education in Alabama, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owings, Thomas G.

    Results of a survey assessing public opinions and attitudes about higher education in Alabama are presented. A representative sample of 736 households was contacted by telephone, and 546 agreed to be interviewed. The survey was designed to evaluate public opinions and attitudes about higher education teaching, research, service, finance,…

  7. Back to the Basics: Birmingham, Alabama, Measurement and Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handley, Lawrence R.; Lockwood, Catherine M.; Handley, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    "Back to the Basics: Birmingham, Alabama" is the fourth in a series of workshops that focus on teaching foundational map reading and spatial differentiation skills. It is the second published exercise from the Back to the Basics series developed by the Wetland Education through Maps and Aerial Photography (WETMAAP) Program (see "Journal of…

  8. Forest resources of Alabama. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, W.H.

    1992-10-01

    The principal findings of the sixth forest inventory of Alabama (1990) and changes that have occurred since earlier inventories are presented in this report. Topics include the status and trends in forest area, biomass, timber volume, growth, removals, mortality, and timber products output.

  9. Four new species of Gyrodactylus from fishes of Alabama.

    PubMed

    Rogers, W A

    1975-02-01

    Four new species of Gyrodactylus are described from fishes of Alabama. Gyrodactylus dorosomae was collected from Dorosoma cepedianum (Le Sueur) and D. petenense (Gunther); G. parvicirrus from Notropis atherinoides Raf; G. lythruri from Notropis b. bellus Hay and N. atrapiculus Snelson; and G. nigrum from Etheostoma nigrum Raf. PMID:1117368

  10. Poverty in Alabama. A Barrier to Postsecondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Mary Lee Rice

    This study was undertaken with the belief that financial need is not an isolated barrier to postsecondary education and that it is frequently accompanied by distinct motivational, academic, and geographic factors. The distribution of Alabama's poverty on a county level is shown and evaluated. It is noted that all of the countries with a…

  11. The University of Alabama 1 Department of Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    The University of Alabama 1 Department of Computer Science Computer science is a multifaceted discipline that encompasses a broad range of topics. At one end of the spectrum, computer science focuses. At the other applications-oriented end of the spectrum, computer science deals with techniques for the design

  12. Marketing Education. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1990, No. 55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This course of study provides a framework for the content of a program in marketing education as part of the Alabama vocational education program. The course of study was designed to assist educators in developing and maintaining high quality vocational programs and to ensure uniformity of vocational programs. Following a description of the…

  13. 10. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 of Epes Wouthern RR. lift span, wide=angle view from SW. bank. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  14. 9. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, view from S approach. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  15. 12. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, wide angle side view from SE. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  16. Agribusiness Education. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1990, No. 60.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This course of study provides a framework for the content of a program in agribusiness education as part of the Alabama vocational education program. The course of study was designed to assist educators in developing and maintaining high quality vocational programs and to ensure uniformity of vocational programs. Following a description of the…

  17. 76 FR 39149 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1971-DR), dated 04/28/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 through 05/31/2011. Effective Date:...

  18. A transect through the Alabama and southwest Georgia Appalachians

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steltenpohl

    1994-01-01

    A transect across Alabama and southwest Georgia contains several occurrences that appear to be unique and are not accommodated in existing tectonic interpretations of the southern Appalachians. In the foreland, the Alleghanian orogeny was signaled by the Mississippian unconformity, Mississippian shelf collapse and flysch sedimentation followed by deposition of a >3,000 m thick Pennsylvanian molasse wedge. The Pottsville Formation itself

  19. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Alabama's Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Alabama is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures…

  20. ACT Profile Report: State. Graduating Class 2012. Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    This report provides information about the performance of Alabama's 2012 graduating seniors who took the ACT as sophomores, juniors, or seniors; and self-reported at the time of testing that they were scheduled to graduate in 2012 and tested under standard time conditions. This report focuses on: (1) Performance: student test performance in the…

  1. Seroprevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi in dogs in Alabama, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James C Wright; Margaret Chambers; Gary R Mullen; Larry J Swango; George H D'Andrea; Alicia J Boyce

    1997-01-01

    A random sample of private small-animal practices in Alabama submitted sera from dogs with known tick contact. A total of 579 samples from the three geographic regions of the state were collected (58% of the targeted sample size). Sera were screened for antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi using an indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test which had a sensitivity and specificity of

  2. Soil Sampling Techniques for Alabama, USA Grain Fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. N. Thompson; J. N. Shaw; P. L. Mask; J. T. Touchton; D. Rickman

    2004-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial variability of nutrients facilitates precision soil sampling. Questions exist regarding the best technique for directed soil sampling based on a priori knowledge of soil and crop patterns. The objective of this study was to evaluate zone delineation techniques for Alabama grain fields to determine which method best minimized the soil test variability. Site one (25.8 ha) and

  3. Alabama Children: A Matter of Commitment and Priority. Special Report to Governor Fob James and the Alabama Legislature. Volume I and Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Bobbie H.

    This report in two volumes is the product of a year-long needs assessment undertaken by the Governor of Alabama's Commission for the Alabama Year of the Child. Volume I, which contains an overview and recommendations to the governor and the legislature, includes position papers and letters from the commission and interested citizens. These…

  4. General George C. Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center, a NASA field installation, was established at Huntsville, Alabama, in 1960. The Center was named in honor of General George C. Marshall, the Army Chief of Staff during World War II, Secretary of State, and Nobel Prize Wirner for his world-renowned Marshall Plan.

  5. General George C. Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a portrait of General George C. Marshall in Army uniform. The Marshall Space Flight Center, a NASA field installation, was established in Huntsville, Alabama, in 1960. The Center was named in honor of General George C. Marshall, the Army Chief of Staff during World War II, Secretary of State, and Nobel Prize Wirner for his world-renowned Marshall Plan.

  6. 32. PORT PROFILE OF THE ALABAMA. Uncopyrighted 31/4'x5'photograph taken by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. PORT PROFILE OF THE ALABAMA. Uncopyrighted 3-1/4'x5'photograph taken by Thigpen Photography, c. 1965. Written on back of photo: 'This is what the vessel looked like when I bought her in 1966 R.S. Douglas.' Also, stamped on back is: Thigpen Photography 1442 So. Beltline Highway Mobile, Alabama 46609 to reorder specify no. M7062-1 - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  7. Correlation of the Eocene formations in Mississippi and Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooke, Wythe

    1925-01-01

    During Eocene time the site of the boundary between the States of Mississippi and Alabama fell within the transition zone between the Mississippi embayment and the open Gulf of Mexico. That different types of deposition proceeded simultaneously within these two regions may be inferred from the different facies which deposits of the same age exhibit on opposite sides of the State line. In general, much clay and carbonaceous material were laid down in Mississippi, while shell marl, laminated sand, and limestone were being formed in Alabama. The purpose of this paper is to point out the equivalences of formations of different facies in the two States. The formations of different facies in the two States. The correlation adopted in shown in the following table, all the formation names in which have been previously used, except Kosciusko sandstone, a new name proposed for a member of the Lisbon formation.

  8. Structural control of coalbed methane production in Alabama

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack C Pashin; Richard H Groshong

    1998-01-01

    Thin-skinned structures are distributed throughout the Alabama coalbed methane fields, and these structures affect the production of gas and water from coal-bearing strata. Extensional structures in Deerlick Creek and Cedar Cove fields include normal faults and hanging-wall rollovers, and area balancing indicates that these structures are detached in the Pottsville Formation. Compressional folds in Gurnee and Oak Grove fields, by

  9. ADAMS GAP AND SHINBONE CREEK ROADLESS AREAS, ALABAMA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, T.L.; Harrison, Donald K.

    1984-01-01

    The Adams Gap and Shinbone Creek Roadless Areas in Alabama were evaluated for their mineral potential. The only resource within the established boundary of the roadless area is quartzite suitable for crushed rock or refractory-grade aggregate. The quartzite contains deleterious impurities and is found in abundance outside the areas. Natural gas or petroleum may exist at depth. Detailed seismic studies and deep drilling tests are needed before a reasonable estimate of hydrocarbon potential can be made.

  10. Mississippi/Alabama Pinnacle Trend Ecosystem Monitoring Final Synthesis Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Continental Shelf Associates Inc.; Texas A&M University, Geochemical and Environmental Research Group

    2001-01-01

    This Final Synthesis Report summarizes a four-year program to characterize and monitor carbonate mounds on the Mississippi/Alabama outer continental shelf (OCS). The study area is shown in Fig.ES.1. The study was conducted by Continental Shelf Associates, Inc. and the Geochemical and Environmental Research Group (GERG) of Texas A&M University (TAMU), for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Biological Resources Division.

  11. Bottom Organisms in Fertilized and Unfertilized Fish Ponds in Alabama

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henry H. Howell

    1942-01-01

    A study was made of two experimental fish ponds located at the Agricultural Experiment Station at Auburn, Alabama. Bottom samples were taken from June to November, 1940, in a 1.5-acre fertilized pond and in a 1.8 acre unfertilized pond. Two methods of sampling were used, the Petersen dredge method and the stove-pipe method. The latter method consistently gave a better

  12. Community action in Alabama's Black Belt Timber-Dependent communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew A. Zekeri

    1996-01-01

    The current decline in the economic well-being of the residents of the Alabama's Black Belt communities is well documented. High poverty rates, limited job growth, falling real per capita income, and increased out-migration are signs of current economic problems. With the resurgence of interest in promulgating self-help and community action mechanism at the local, state, and national levels, the purpose

  13. Coastline development and change in Alabama and the Florida Panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, G.M.

    1987-09-01

    Although evidence of sea level rise has caused concern about erosion of the coasts, some coastal areas are accreting. As an investigator approaches a study of any particular stretch of coast, it soon becomes apparent that one problem in determining what is happening, or what has happened to a beach, is the problem of deciding upon a time frame. There are daily, seasonal, and much longer term changes that must be dealt with and understood. On the Alabama coast, there is evidence of both deposition and erosion over relatively long time periods, as well as evidence of cyclical changes. Maps over a 150-year period show steady growth of Perdido Key from Florida into Alabama. Aerial photographs over a 50-year period show an eroded portion of Dauphin Island being built up by deposition, and then eroding again. A prime factor that is pertinent, but seldom considered, is the slower movement associated with tectonics or isostatic adjustment. Previous studies cite evidence of modern up-arching of parts of the Gulf coastal plain accompanying the well-documented subsidence of the Mississippi delta area. First-order leveling reports indicated that many of the coastline areas that are the scenes of most extensive erosion are areas in which the land is subsiding. Other areas, which are neutral or possibly rising slightly, are relatively free from erosional problems. This latter point is particularly important in understanding the Gulf Coast of Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.

  14. 76 FR 9320 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Alabama Shad as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ...Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Alabama Shad...Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of 90-day petition finding...SUMMARY: We (NMFS) announce a 90-day finding on a petition to list Alabama...

  15. Southeast Regional Academic Center for Environmental Public Health

    E-print Network

    emergency preparedness as a health disparity issue #12;Where we hope to go from hereWhere we hope to go fromSoutheast Regional Academic Center for Environmental Public Health (SE-RAC) Southeast Regional Academic Center for Environmental Public Health (SE-RAC) School of Public Health University of Alabama

  16. Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Diane Schaub

    2007-03-05

    Since its inception, the University of Florida Industrial Assessment Center has successfully completed close to 400 energy assessments of small to medium manufacturing facilities in Florida, southern Georgia and southern Alabama. Through these efforts, recommendations were made that would result in savings of about $5 million per year, with an implementation rate of 20-25%. Approximately 80 engineering students have worked for the UF-IAC, at least 10 of whom went on to work in energy related fields after graduation. Additionally, through the popular course in Industrial Energy Management, many students have graduated from the University of Florida with a strong understanding and support of energy conservation methods.

  17. Economic Impacts of the Aquaculture Industry in Alabama in 2005 Tom Stevens, Alan Hodges, and David Mulkey

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    Economic Impacts of the Aquaculture Industry in Alabama in 2005 by Tom Stevens, Alan Hodges of Agriculture Economics and Rural Sociology. #12;i Economic Impacts of the Aquaculture Industry in Alabama, 2005. Executive Summary The positive economic impacts of aquaculture on the State of Alabama in 2005 were

  18. Project ROSE (recycled oil saves energy): Alabama's used oil recycling program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. C. April; S. D. Powell

    1994-01-01

    Project ROSE is a non-profit energy conservation program funded by the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, Science, Technology and Energy Division and sponsored by the University of Alabama. Project ROSE's goal is conserving energy, preserving a valuable natural resource and protecting the environment. To accomplish its purpose, Project ROSE educates the public about recycling used oil, helps establish

  19. THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THE MERCEDES BENZ INVESTMENT ON THE STATE OF ALABAMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ellene Kebede; Mudiayi Sylvain Ngandu

    1999-01-01

    As part of its strategy to attract new businesses, in 1994 the State of Alabama won the Mercedes Benz bid to establish an automobile assembly plant in Vance, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama at the cost of $222 to $253 million worth of incentives. The study assessed the economic impact of the Mercedes Benz investment using IMPLAN. The IMPLAN industry code 49,

  20. The State of Education in Alabama's K-12 Rural Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindahl, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare Alabama's rural school districts with its city, suburban, and town districts. Descriptive statistics were used for this population study, with effect sizes calculated using Cohen's d. Findings indicated Alabama's rural school districts serve slightly less affluent student populations, with a lower…

  1. Alabama Industrial Technician Education Cooperative Demonstration Program (I-TEC). Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John M. Patterson State Technical Coll., Montgomery, AL.

    A cooperative demonstration program between industry (General Electric) and education (John Patterson State Technical College, Alabama) designed and conducted a training program and competency assessment for individuals entering high technology positions related to industrial production in Alabama. The program was designed to develop employees as…

  2. 2014 NIST SURF Universities City State/Province University of Alabama Tuscaloosa AL

    E-print Network

    2014 NIST SURF Universities City State/Province University of Alabama Tuscaloosa AL Alabama State Univ (2 students) Montgomery AL Arizona State Univ (3 students) Tempe AZ University Cal. Berkeley West Haven CT Yale University New Haven CT American University Washington DC University District

  3. The Impact of Mentoring Relationships and Influences on the Career of Women Superintendents of Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Promisee-Bynum, Yvette

    2010-01-01

    Women make up the majority of personnel in today's school systems yet few hold the highest position of superintendent. According to the Digest of Education Statistics, in 2001, 79 percent of all public school teachers nationally were female. Today, 80 percent of Alabama's teachers are female (Alabama Education Quick Facts 2008). However, there are…

  4. Porosity and cementation in upper Cretaceous Mooreville and Demopolis Chalks, central Alabama

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Holston; D. T. Jr. King; E. Bittner

    1989-01-01

    Cyclically arranged chalky marl, marl, limestone, and sand facies comprise the Upper Cretaceous Mooreville and Demopolis Chalks, the lower two formation in the Selma Group, inner Coastal Plain of Alabama. In the central Alabama study area (Dallas, Lowndes, and Montgomery Counties), the Mooreville-Demopolis section is 305 m thick and the two main facies are chalky marl and marl. Chalky marl

  5. 4. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Western half of collapsed Alabama, Tenn. & Northern RR. Bridge Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., photographer, 1973. Copy by Sarcone Photography, Columbs, Ms Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  6. 3. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE AND FERRY 1.5 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE AND FERRY 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., 1927. West ferry landing ferry barge, andcar in foreground. Alabama, Tennessee & Northern (later Frisco) RR bridge in background. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  7. AlAbAmA Dune RestoRAtion PRoject General Project DescriPtion

    E-print Network

    , the Coastal Alabama Dune Restoration Cooperative (CADRC), to restore natural resources that were injured habitat by planting native dune vegetation and installing sand fencing. The project will help prevent, the Coastal Alabama Dune Restoration Cooperative (CADRC), to restore natural resources that were injured

  8. PLATO Use for Graduation Test Preparation, Piedmont High School, Piedmont, Alabama. PLATO Evaluation Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, David W.; Quinn, Nancy W.

    Piedmont High School is a small high school in rural Alabama, which serves a primarily white population and has a high dropout rate. PLATO computerized instruction has been used by almost 200 skill-deficient students, and 4 teachers have used it. After using PLATO, Piedmonts struggling students are much more likely to pass the Alabama High School…

  9. Experiencing Educational Leadership Preparation Program Redesign in Alabama: One University's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochan, Frances; Reames, Ellen H.

    2013-01-01

    Calls for changing educational leadership preparation have led many state policy makers to initiate program redesign efforts; the governor of Alabama constituted a working group to examine the situation and develop recommendations. This article details the school leadership preparation program redesign process in Alabama from the perspective of…

  10. Processor Units Reduce Satellite Construction Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    As part of the effort to build the Fast Affordable Science and Technology Satellite (FASTSAT), Marshall Space Flight Center developed a low-cost telemetry unit which is used to facilitate communication between a satellite and its receiving station. Huntsville, Alabama-based Orbital Telemetry Inc. has licensed the NASA technology and is offering to install the cost-cutting units on commercial satellites.

  11. STS-47 MS Davis trains at Payload Crew Training Complex at Marshall SFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist (MS) N. Jan Davis, wearing the Autogenic Feedback Training System 2 suit and lightweight headset, reviews a Payload Systems Handbook in the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) mockup during training at the Payload Crew Training Complex at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. View provided with alternate number 92P-137.

  12. "Ground Control to Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students...": Space Camp Provides Lessons in Science, Math, Teamwork, and Fun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Becky

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the Space Camp at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama, where deaf and hard of hearing students can pilot spaceships, conduct experiments, and dodge meteorites. Each year in the spring, students from schools all over the United States attend a one-week, hands-on learning experience in math,…

  13. Upper stage rocket guidance and control using discontinuous reaction control thrusters via sliding modes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Tournes; Y. B. Shtessel; E. Wells

    1997-01-01

    In spring 1995 a very significant academic project took place at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. This integrated project supported by NASA Marshal Flight Center and major aerospace, companies aimed at designing the MSLS upper stage, based on an hybrid rocket design. This project included the design of the avionics system, and of the guidance and control subsystem (G&C).

  14. The Daytime Mixed Layer Observed by Radiosonde, Profiler, and Lidar during MILAGRO

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. J. Shaw; M. S. Pekour; R. L. Coulter; T. J. Martin; J. Walters

    2007-01-01

    During the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign centered in the Mexico City area, scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) operated a variety of atmospheric profiling systems. The systems were located at the Mexican Petroleum Institute (IMP) in central Mexico City, at Tecámac University on the northeastern edge of

  15. Chaining Distributed Services for Mining, Fusion, and Visualization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Conover

    2002-01-01

    The Information Technology and Systems Center (ITSC) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, as a NASA Earth Science Information Partner (ESIP), is researching the use of distributed services for data mining, subsetting, image processing, image\\/map generation and other spatially oriented data applications. Many of these applications lend themselves well to being broken down into discrete processes that can be

  16. Semiconductor substrates in phased arrays: integration issues, challenges and laboratory results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janice C. Rock

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the ongoing research being conducted in the RF Technology Division of the Applied Sensors, Guidance, and Electronics Directorate, US Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) on the Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. The overall purpose of the research is to determine and overcome the technological barriers impinging upon enhancements to current phased array

  17. Integration of antenna elements onto semiconductor substrates for use in phased arrays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janice C. Rock

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the ongoing research being conducted in the RF Technology Division of the Applied Sensors, Guidance, and Electronics Directorate, US Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) on the Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. The overall purpose of the research is to determine and overcome the technological barriers impinging upon enhancements to current phased array

  18. THE HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER WIDE SWATH SIMULATION AND WIND SPEED RETRIEVALS

    E-print Network

    Ruf, Christopher

    THE HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER WIDE SWATH SIMULATION AND WIND SPEED RETRIEVALS Ruba A. Amarin1 Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 4 NOAA/AOML/Hurricane Research Division, Miami, Florida, USA ABSTRACT The knowledge of peak winds in hurricanes is critical to classification of hurricane intensity

  19. Ares I concept illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Shown is an illustration of the Ares I concept. The first stage will be a single, five-segment solid rocket booster derived from the space shuttle programs reusable solid rocket motor. The first stage is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama for NASA's Constellation program.

  20. Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1993-02-01

    The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

  1. Upward-shoaling cycles in Smackover carbonates of southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Mann, S.D. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Upper Smackover strata in Alabama commonly consist of one or more upward-shoaling cycles about 15 to 50 ft (3 to 16 m) in thickness. Multiple forcing functions (eustasy, regional tilting, salt halokinesis, and autogenic migration of facies) and varying water depths at the start and end of each upward-shoaling cycle generated an array of sedimentary responses. The Brittain No. 1 well, Permit No. 2478, Healing Springs field, Washington County, Alabama, illustrates nucleation of an offshore bar. Bar deposits are capped by anhydritic sabkha deposits, gradationally overlain by subtidal lagoonal strata. Varying rates (and directions ) of halokinesis controlled this succession. Locally varying rates of salt movement created as many as five sabkha-capped cycles in this area. The International Paper company 20-5 Mo. 1 well, Permit No. 5242, Blacksher field, Baldwin County, Alabama, contains three upward-shoaling cycles capped by evaporites. Limited aggradational potential of supratidal evaporitic settings permitted subsidence-caused immersion, which eventually permitted reactivation of the carbonate factory and formation of the next cycle. The Chatom Unit 20-14 No. 1-04 well, Permit No. 7044, Chatom field, Washington County, contains three different cycles. The lower cycle consists of subtidal lime mudstone, capped by a 5-ft (1.5-m) thick soil zone that contains multiple exposure surfaces, tepee structures, and anhydrite pseudomorphs after lenticular gypsum crystals. The soil zone underlies an intraclastic storm deposit followed by a deepening-upward lagoonal succession. A thin ooid grainstone containing exposure surfaces caps the middle cycle. In the upper cycle, peritidal carbonate strata underlie sabkha deposits.

  2. Empirical investigation of optimal severance taxation in Alabama. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Leathers, C.G.; Zumpano, L.V.

    1980-10-01

    The research develops a theoretical and empirical foundation for the analysis of severance taxation in Alabama. Primary emphasis was directed to delineating an optimal severance tax structure for the state of Alabama and, in the process, assess the economic and fiscal consequences of current severance tax usage. The legal and economic basis and justification for severance taxation, the amounts and distribution of severance tax revenues currently generated, the administration of the tax, and severance tax practices prevailing in other states were compared in Volume I. These data, findings, and quantitative analyses were used to ascertain the fiscal and economic effects of changes in the structure and utilization of severance taxation in Alabama. The actual and potential productivity of severance taxation in Alamama is discussed. The analysis estimates the state's severance tax revenue capacity relative to the nation and to regional neighbors. The analysis is followed by an intrastate fiscal examination of the state and local tax system. In the process, the relative revenue contribution of severance taxes to state and local revenues is quantified, as well as comparing the revenue capacity and utilization of severance taxes to other state and local levies. An examination is made of the question of who actually pays the severance taxes by an analysis of the shifting and incidence characteristics of taxes on natural resources. Serious doubt is raised that states can, under normal economic circumstances, export a large portion of the severance tax burden to out-of-state users. According to the analytical results of the study, profit margins will be affected; therefore, higher severance taxes should only be imposed after rational assessment of the consequences on business incentives and employment in the extractive inudstries, especially coal.

  3. Back to the basics: Birmingham, Alabama, measurement and scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Handley, L.R.; Lockwood, C.M.; Handley, N.

    2005-01-01

    Back to the Basics: Birmingham, Alabama is the fourth in a series of workshops that focus on teaching foundational map reading and spatial differentiation skills. It is the second published exercise from the Back to the Basics series developed by the Wetland Education through Maps and Aerial Photography (WETMAAP) Program (see Journal of Geography 103, 5: 226-230). Like its predecessor, the current exercise is modified from the Birmingham Back to the Basics workshop offered during the annual National Council for Geographic Education meeting. The focus of this exercise is on scale and measurement, foundational skills for spatial thinking and analysis. ?? 2005 National Council for Geographic Education.

  4. 1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING WEST OF 'THE BIRMINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER,' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING WEST OF 'THE BIRMINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER,' WITH HILLMAN HOSPITAL, THE FIVE-STORY BUILDING (CENTER RIGHT AT 20TH STREET AND SIXTH AVENUE SOUTH), JEFFERSON TOWER (CENTER LEFT AT 20TH STREET AND SEVENTH AVENUE SOUTH, AND THE MANY HOSPITALS AND TEACHING FACILITIES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA AT BIRMINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER. - Hillman Hospital, 600 Block Westside Twentieth Street South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  5. Middle and upper Miocene natural gas sands in onshore and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mink, R.M.; Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Smith, C.C.

    1988-09-01

    Thirty Miocene natural gas fields have been established in onshore and offshore Alabama since the discovery of Miocene gas in this area in 1979. These fields have produced over 16 bcf of natural gas from the middle Miocene Amos sand (24 fields) and upper Miocene Luce (3 fields), Escambia (1 field), and Meyer (3 fields) sands. Production from the Amos transgressive sands represents over 92% of the cumulative shallow Miocene natural gas produced in onshore and offshore Alabama. In addition, over 127 bcf of natural gas has been produced from upper Miocene sands in the Chandeleur area. The productive Miocene section in onshore and coastal Alabama is interpreted to present transgressive marine shelf and regressive shoreface sands. The middle Miocene Amos sand bars are the most productive reservoirs of natural gas in onshore and coastal Alabama, principally due to the porous and permeable nature of these transgressive sands and their stratigraphic relationship to the underlying basinal clays in this area. In offshore Alabama the upper Miocene sands become thicker and are generally more porous and permeable than their onshore equivalents. Because of their deeper burial depth in offshore Alabama, these upper Miocene sands are associated with marine clays that are thermally more mature. The combination of reservoir grade lithologies associated with moderately mature petroleum source rocks enhances the natural gas potential of the upper Miocene sands in offshore Alabama.

  6. Observation of suspended sediments in Mobile Bay, Alabama from satellite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumpf, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive geologic study of coastal Alabama and Mississippi, the U.S. Geological Survey is investigating coastal sediment transport in Mobile Bay and the adjacent shelf. Satellite imagery from the NOAA AVHRR is being used to provide data on the variability of spatial patterns in the near-surface suspended sediment concentration. This imagery is processed using atmospheric corrections to remove haze and Rayleigh radiance in order to obtain water reflectances; the reflectances are than converted to approximate sediment concentrations using standard relationships between water reflectance and in situ sediment concentrations. A series of images from early 1990 shows rapid changes in sediment concentrations in response to high river flow of the Alabama-Tombigbee river system. During these times, suspended sediment tends to flow out Mobile Bay without mixing into the eastern lobe of the Bay (Bon Secour Bay). The sediment concentration field also appears to be disturbed by the main ship channel. The sediment plume extends more than 60 km offshore after the peak flow event. One wind event in December 1989 was identified as increasing sediment concentration in the Bay. It is not believed that such an event has been previously observed from satellite.

  7. Anniston Museum of Natural History, Anniston Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center, Mobile

    E-print Network

    Makovicky, Peter

    ALABAMA Anniston Museum of Natural History, Anniston Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center, Mobile Science Center, Phoenix Flandrau: The UA Science Center/Mineral Museum, Tucson International Wildlife Science Museum, Chico Happy Hollow Park & Zoo, San Jose Humboldt State University Natural History Museum

  8. Anniston Museum of Natural History, Anniston Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center, Mobile

    E-print Network

    Westneat, Mark W.

    ALABAMA Anniston Museum of Natural History, Anniston Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center, Mobile Science Center, Phoenix Flandrau: The UA Science Center/Mineral Museum, Tucson International Wildlife Happy Hollow Park & Zoo, San Jose Humboldt State University Natural History Museum, Arcata Kern County

  9. Anniston Museum of Natural History, Anniston Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center, Mobile

    E-print Network

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    ALABAMA Anniston Museum of Natural History, Anniston Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center, Mobile Science Center, Phoenix Flandrau: The UA Science Center/Mineral Museum, Tucson International Wildlife & Zoo, San Jose Humboldt State University Natural History Museum, Arcata Kern County Museum, Bakersfield

  10. A lone biodetrital mound in the Chesterian (Carboniferous) of Alabama?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopaska-Merkel, D. C.; Haywick, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    A carbonate mound in the Chesterian Bangor Limestone of Lawrence County, Alabama, consists chiefly of packstone and grainstone dominated by echinoderm ossicles and fragments of fenestrate bryozoans. In-situ colonies of the rugose coral Caninia flaccida comprise about 8% of the mound by volume. The exposed portion of the mound is approximately 25 m wide, 1.6 m thick at the thickest point and roughly circular in plan. The mound developed on top of a shallow ooid shoal that had been cemented and stabilised during an earlier episode of sub-aerial exposure. Subsequent flooding of the exposed shoal surface permitted establishment of the mound biota. Lateral and vertical facies relationships suggest that the mound possessed about 45 cm of synoptic relief when fully developed. Rugose corals, fenestrate and ramose bryozoans, stalked echinoderms, and sessile soft-bodied organisms encrusted by foraminifera colonised the shoal, forming a mound. Baffling resulted in deposition of mixed-fossil packstone containing locally derived debris and coated grains from the surrounding sea floor. Strong currents within the mound are indicated by preferred orientation of corals and by coarse, commonly cross-stratified grainstone in channels between neighboring coral colonies. Corals are most abundant on the windward side of the mound, where they account for about 13% of the mound compared to 6- 10% in the central part of the mound, and 2-4% on the leeward flank. Biodetrital mounds such as the one described here are uncommon in upper Paleozoic strata and previously unknown in the Bangor Limestone. Of 10 carbonate buildups we examined in the Bangor in Alabama and Tennessee, only one is a biodetrital mound. Two are rugose coral-microbial reefs, one is a coral biostrome, and six are dominated by microbialite. The Bangor shelf, previously interpreted as sedimentologically simple, appears to contain many small mounds of quite varied characteristics. Also, the discovery of a biodetrital mound in the Chesterian of Alabama suggests that there may be more kinds of upper Paleozoic mounds than commonly acknowledged. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Launching an Energy-Efficient Future in Alabama: Weatherization Assistance Close-Up Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    D& R International

    2001-10-10

    Alabama demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

  12. 77 FR 36274 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ...Supervision Program. Alabama has adopted the following rules: Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule, Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule, and Stage 2 Disinfection/Disinfection Byproducts Rule. EPA has determined...

  13. 78 FR 44555 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ...Power Company, 600 18th Street North, Birmingham, Alabama, 35203 (205) 257-7116 i. FERC Contact: Jade Alvey, (202) 502-6864, jade.alvey@ferc.gov j. Deadline for filing comments, motions to intervene, and protests: August...

  14. Chemical fingerprinting of petroleum biomarkers in Deepwater Horizon oil spill samples collected from Alabama shoreline.

    PubMed

    Mulabagal, V; Yin, F; John, G F; Hayworth, J S; Clement, T P

    2013-05-15

    We compare the chromatographic signatures of petroleum biomarkers in Deepwater Horizon (DH) source oil, three other reference crude oils, DH emulsified mousse that arrived on Alabama's shoreline in June 2010, and seven tar balls collected from Alabama beaches from 2011 to 2012. Characteristic hopane and sterane fingerprints show that all the tar ball samples originated from DH oil. In addition, the diagnostic ratios of various hopanes indicate an excellent match. Quantitation data for C????-hopane concentration levels show that most of the weathering observed in DH-related tar balls found on Alabama's beaches is likely the result of natural evaporation and dissolution that occurred during transport across the Gulf of Mexico prior to beach deposition. Based on the physical and biomarker characterization data presented in this study we conclude that virtually all fragile, sticky, brownish tar balls currently found on Alabama shoreline originated from the DH oil spill. PMID:23523118

  15. 78 FR 54640 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission, Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ...an existing powerhouse containing 1 turbine with an installed capacity of 46,944-kilowatts...power is utilized within the applicant's electric utility system. Additionally, Alabama...according to the following preliminary Hydro Licensing Schedule. Revisions to...

  16. THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering Tenure/Tenure-Track Faculty Positions Available The Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering and water resources engineering, and one in transportation systems engineering. Candidates

  17. 13. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES HIGHWAY BRIDGE U.S. 11 N ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES HIGHWAY BRIDGE U.S. 11 N of Epes Gorgas Bridge from NW. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  18. 75 FR 28313 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00032 Declaration of Economic Injury

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ...Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) declaration for the State of Alabama, dated 05/13/2010. Incident: Deepwater BP Oil Spill. Incident Period: 04/20/2010 and continuing. DATES: Effective Date: 05/13/2010. EIDL Loan Application...

  19. Upper Carboniferous Insects from the Pottsville Formation of Northern Alabama (Insecta: Ephemeropterida, Palaeodictyopterida, Odonatoptera)

    E-print Network

    Beckemeyer, Roy J.; Engel, Michael S.

    2011-10-21

    New Upper Carboniferous (Pennsylvanian, Westphalian A) insects are described from localities in the Pottsville Formation of northern Alabama (including the Union Chapel Mine). Five species are recorded in five palaeopterous orders and comprising...

  20. Assessment, water-quality trends, and options for remediation of acidic drainage from abandoned coal mines near Huntsville, Missouri, 2003-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Eric D.

    2005-01-01

    Water from abandoned underground coal mines acidifies receiving streams in the Sugar Creek Basin and Mitchell Mine Basin near Huntsville, Missouri. A 4.35-kilometer (2.7-mile) reach of Sugar Creek has been classified as impaired based on Missouri's Water Quality Standards because of small pH values [< (less than) 6.5]. Samples collected from Sugar Creek from July 2003 to June 2004 did not have pH values outside of the specified range of 6.5 to 9.0. However, large concentrations of iron [416 to 2,320 mg/L (milligrams per liter)], manganese (8.36 to 33.5 mg/L), aluminum (0.870 to 428 mg/L), and sulfate (2,990 to 13,700 mg/L) in acidic mine drainage (AMD) from two mine springs as well as small and diffuse seeps were observed to have an effect on water quality in Sugar Creek. Metal and sulfate loads increased and pH decreased immediately downstream from Sugar Creek's confluence with the Calfee Slope and Huntsville Gob drainages that discharge AMD into Sugar Creek. Similar effects were observed in the Mitchell Mine drainage that receives AMD from a large mine spring. Comparisons of water-quality samples from this study and two previous studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1987-1988 and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources in 2000-2002 indicate that AMD generation in the Sugar Creek Basin and Mitchell Mine Basin is declining, but the data are insufficient to quantify any trends or time frame. AMD samples from the largest mine spring in the Calfee Slope subbasin indicated a modest but significant increase in median pH from 4.8 to 5.2 using the Wilcoxan rank-sum test (p <0.05) and a decrease in median specific conductance from 5,000 to 3,540 ?S/cm (microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius) during a 17-year period. AMD samples from the largest mine spring in the Mitchell Mine Basin indicated an increase in median pH values from 5.6 to 6.0 and a decrease in median specific conductance from 3,050 to 2,450 ?S/cm during the same period. Remediation of AMD at or near the sites of the three largest mine springs is geochemically feasible based on alkalinity addition rates and increased pH determined by cubitainer experiments and geochemical mixing experiments using the computer model PHREEQCI. Alkalinity values for seven cubitainer experiments conducted to simulate anoxic treatment options exceeded the targeted value for alkalinity [90 mg/L as calcium carbonate (CaCO3)] specified in Missouri's Total Maximum Daily Load program by 18 percent or more, but maximum pH values were between 6.2 and 6.3, which is less than the targeted pH value of 6.5. Treatment of AMD by mixing with stream water or sewage effluent can further increase pH as indicated by geochemical modeling, but will not totally achieve water-quality goals because of limited discharges. A combination of treatments including settling ponds, oxic or anoxic limestone drains, and possibly successive alkalinity producing systems to remediate AMD will likely be required in the Sugar Creek Basin and Mitchell Mine Basin to consistently meet Missouri's Water Quality Standards.

  1. High resolution geophysical mapping of the Mississippi-Alabama Outer Continental Shelf 

    E-print Network

    Laswell, Jay Scott

    1991-01-01

    HIGH RESOLUTION GEOPHYSICAL MAPPING OF THE MISSISSIPPI-ALABAMA OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF A Thesis by JAY SCOTT LASWELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Oceanography HIGH RESOLUTION GEOPHYSICAL MAPPING OF THE MISSISSIPPI-ALABAMA OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF A Thesis by JAY SCOTT LASWELL Approved as to style and content by: William W. Sager (Chair of Committee...

  2. Genetic distinction of pallid, shovelnose, and Alabama sturgeon: emerging species and the US Endangered Species Act

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald E. Campton; Anna L. Bass; Frank A. Chapman; Brian W. Bowen

    2000-01-01

    The sturgeon genus Scaphirhynchus consists of threerecognized species. Pallid and shovelnose sturgeon (S. albusand S. platorynchus, respectively) are sympatric in theMissouri and lower Mississippi Rivers of the central United States. TheAlabama sturgeon (S. suttkusi) is endemic to the nearby MobileRiver drainage and is isolated geographically from the other twospecies. Pallid sturgeon and the extremely rare Alabama sturgeon arelisted as endangered

  3. Thermal signatures of urban land cover types: High-resolution thermal infrared remote sensing of urban heat island in Huntsville, AL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Chor Pang

    1996-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to apply airborne high-resolution thermal infrared imagery for urban heat island studies, using Huntsville, AL, a medium-sized American city, as the study area. The occurrence of urban heat islands represents human-induced urban/rural contrast, which is caused by deforestation and the replacement of the land surface by non-evaporating and non-porous materials such as asphalt and concrete. The result is reduced evapotranspiration and more rapid runoff of rain water. The urban landscape forms a canopy acting as a transitional zone between the atmosphere and the land surface. The composition and structure of this canopy have a significant impact on the thermal behavior of the urban environment. Research on the trends of surface temperature at rapidly growing urban sites in the United States during the last 30 to 50 years suggests that significant urban heat island effects have caused the temperatures at these sites to rise by 1 to 2 C. Urban heat islands have caused changes in urban precipitation and temperature that are at least similar to, if not greater than, those predicted to develop over the next 100 years by global change models. Satellite remote sensing, particularly NOAA AVHRR thermal data, has been used in the study of urban heat islands. Because of the low spatial resolution (1.1 km at nadir) of the AVHRR data, these studies can only examine and map the phenomenon at the macro-level. The present research provides the rare opportunity to utilize 5-meter thermal infrared data acquired from an airplane to characterize more accurately the thermal responses of different land cover types in the urban landscape as input to urban heat island studies.

  4. Lead and mercury levels in raccoons from Macon County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.T.; Thompson, S.J. [Tuskegee Univ., AL (United States); Mieike, H.W. [Xavier Univ. of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Heavy metal contamination in the environment has become a major concern of the scientific community. The ubiquitous present of heavy metals such as lead, mercury, and cadmium in wildlife animals has been reported. Although the understanding of the full significance of these metals is incomplete, it is known that some species contain concentrations of metals proportional to the levels present in their environments. Thus, wild animals can be used as biological indicators of environmental concentrations of metals. The behavior, omnivorous feeding habits, and adaptability of raccoons (Procyon lotor) qualify this animal as a useful indicator of environmental pollution. The purpose of this paper was to report some preliminary observations on lead and mercury levels in raccoons from Macon County, Alabama, a potential indicator species for wildlife. 19 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. Sustainability analysis of groundwater resources in a coastal aquifer, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Rich, Kendall; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2008-03-01

    Fort Morgan Peninsula is an attached portion of a dynamic barrier complex in the northern Gulf of Mexico and is a large tourist area that brings in a significant amount of revenue for Alabama. Many of the hotels and tourist attractions depend on the groundwater as their water supply. The over-withdrawal of groundwater and saltwater intrustion will have a negative impact on the ecology, tourism and economy if groundwater resources are not properly monitored and managed. In this study a calibrated groundwater flow model was used to analyze the sustainability of groundwater resources at Fort Morgan Peninsula. Detailed flow budgets were prepared to check the various components of inflow and outflow under different water use and climatic conditions. The results indicated the locations where groundwater was over-pumped and subjected to saltwater intrusion, or will be subjected to saltwater intrusion under a range of projected water use and climatic conditions.

  6. Genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii in wildlife from Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Shen, Jilong; Su, Chunlei; Sundermann, Christine A

    2013-03-01

    The genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife is of interest to understand the transmission of this parasite in the environment. In the present study, we genetically characterized five T. gondii isolates from different wild animals including two isolates from a bobcat (Lynx rufus), one from a red-shouldered hawk (Buteo lineatus), one from a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and one from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Genotyping of these samples using 11 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism markers (SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico) revealed two types, including type I (ToxoDB#10) and type 12 (ToxoDB#5). This is the first report of genetic characterization of T. gondii strains in wildlife from Alabama and from a red-shouldered hawk. PMID:23160892

  7. Jurassic faults of southwest Alabama and offshore areas

    SciTech Connect

    Mink, R.M.; Tew, B.H.; Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Four fault groups affecting Jurassic strata occur in the southwest and offshore Alabama areas. They include the regional basement rift trend, the regional peripheral fault trend, the Mobile graben fault system, and the Lower Mobile Bay fault system. The regional basement system rift and regional peripheral fault trends are distinct and rim the inner margin of the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. The regional basement rift trend is genetically related to the breakup of Pangea and the opening of the Gulf of Mexico in the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic. This fault trend is thought to have formed contemporaneously with deposition of Late Triassic-Early Jurassic Eagle Mills Formation and to displace pre-Mesozoic rocks. The regional peripheral fault trend consists of a group of en echelon extensional faults that are parallel or subparallel to regional strike of Gulf Coastal Plain strata and correspond to the approximate updip limit of thick Louann Salt. Nondiapiric salt features are associated with the trend and maximum structural development is exhibited in the Haynesville-Smackover section. No hydrocarbon accumulations have been documented in the pre-Jurassic strata of southwest and offshore Alabama. Productive hydrocarbon reservoirs occur in Jurassic strata along the trends of the fault groups, suggesting a significant relationship between structural development in the Jurassic and hydrocarbon accumulation. Hydrocarbon traps are generally structural or contain a major structural component and include salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines, and extensional fault traps. All of the major hydrocarbon accumulations are associated with movement of the Louann Salt along the regional peripheral fault trend, the Mobile graben fault system, or the Lower Mobile Bay fault system.

  8. Shallow-marine impact origin of the Wetumpka structure (Alabama, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, David T.; Neathery, Thornton L.; Petruny, Lucille W.; Koeberl, Christian; Hames, Willis E.

    2002-09-01

    The Wetumpka structure, an arcuate, 7.6 km diameter, rimmed feature of the inner Coastal Plain, Alabama, is a Late Cretaceous shallow-marine impact crater. In this paper, we show unequivocal evidence of Wetumpka's impact origin. Within and about this structure, pre-existing Upper Cretaceous stratigraphy was resedimented and(or) deformed, thus creating distinctive intra-structure and extra-structure terrains. These terrains are located, respectively, within Wetumpka's crystalline-rim terrain and adjacent to the structure on the southern side. Core drilling near the structure's geographic center revealed that Wetumpka's basin-filling sequence has two distinctive units, suggestive of a two-stage filling process consisting of (1) fall-back plus resurge followed by (2) a later secondary seawater resurge event. Wetumpka's lower subsurface unit includes polymict impact breccias, which contain quartz grains displaying shock-characteristic multiple sets of planar deformation features. Selected subsurface samples of this breccia also contain elevated Ir, Co, Ni and Cr concentrations indicative of a minor extraterrestrial component.

  9. Hydrogeologic investigation of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, F.G.; Kearl, P.M.; Mumby, M.E.; Rogers, S.

    1996-09-01

    This document describes the geology and hydrogeology at the former Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development (ACLR&D) facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The work was conducted by personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Grand Junction office (ORNL/GJ) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Characterization information was requested by PETC to provide baseline environmental information for use in evaluating needs and in subsequent decision-making for further actions associated with the closeout of facility operations. The hydrogeologic conceptual model presented in this report provides significant insight regarding the potential for contaminant migration from the ACLR&D facility and may be useful during other characterization work in the region. The ACLR&D facility is no longer operational and has been dismantled. The site was characterized in three phases: the first two phases were an environmental assessment study and a sod sampling study (APCO 1991) and the third phase the hydraulic assessment. Currently, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation (RI) to address the presence of contaminants on the site is underway and will be documented in an RI report. This technical memorandum addresses the hydrogeologic model only.

  10. Pisoids in Jurassic Smackover Formation (Alabama-Florida) - evidence of marine vadose diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Melas, F.F.; Friedman, G.M.

    1987-09-01

    Pisoids in the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation of the Conecuh embayment (Alabama-Florida) exhibit textural characteristics of marine vadose diagenesis. They occur in prograding repetitive shoaling-upward sequences that are separated by truncations reflecting transgressive episodes. At least eight such prograding cycles recur. Each sequence consists of a lower unit composed of fenestral-textured pelletal mudstone and an upper unit of vadose pisolite. The pisoids exhibit features indicative of nonalgal, in-place accretionary growth, including isopachous multicoatings, directional growth, perched inclusions, reverse grading, leaching, and brecciation and fracturing interpreted as a result of subaerial exposure. The pisoids formed at the expense of preexisting pelletal mudstone as indicated by progressive alteration and replacement of the original mudstone texture. In interpisoid pores, a fibrous cement coats the pisoids (a first-generation cement). Equant crystals of dolomite line the fibrous cement, and the center of the former interparticle pore is filled with drusy crystals or megaspar of calcite. These textures recall Quaternary analogs in the Persian Gulf and the Permian Capitan reef complex of west Texas-New Mexico. In the Persian Gulf, these features form in a hypersaline vadose diagenetic setting. By comparison, origin in an arid Persian Gulf-type of environment is inferred.

  11. Estimates of the Lightning NOx Profile in the Vicinity of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Peterson, Harold S.; McCaul, Eugene W.; Blazar, Arastoo

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to August 2006 North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) data to estimate the (unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical source profile of lightning nitrogen oxides, NOx = NO + NO2. Data from the National Lightning Detection Network (Trademark) (NLDN) is also employed. This is part of a larger effort aimed at building a more realistic lightning NOx emissions inventory for use by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. Overall, special attention is given to several important lightning variables including: the frequency and geographical distribution of lightning in the vicinity of the NALMA network, lightning type (ground or cloud flash), lightning channel length, channel altitude, channel peak current, and the number of strokes per flash. Laboratory spark chamber results from the literature are used to convert 1-meter channel segments (that are located at a particular known altitude; i.e., air density) to NOx concentration. The resulting lightning NOx source profiles are discussed.

  12. Letha Margaret Hughes Etzkorn Computer Science Department

    E-print Network

    Alabama in Huntsville, University of

    Huntsville, AL 35899 Research Interests: Software Engineering (software metrics, program comprehension), Cybersecurity (Security Patterns, Reverse engineering for Cybersecurity), Team Collaboration Research (Mental Science), University of Alabama in Huntsville, 1997 Dissertation Title: A Metrics-Based Approach

  13. Hurricane Frederic tidal floods of September 12-13, 1979, along the Gulf Coast, Mobile quadrangle, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohman, Larry R.; Scott, John C.

    1980-01-01

    Shown on a topographic map are floodmark elevations and approximate areas flooded by Hurricane Frederic tides of September 12-13, 1979, along the western side of the Mobile River and Mobile Bay from Pritchard, Alabama, to the Forest Park section of Mobile, Alabama. Storm-tide frequency and records of annual maximum tides at Mobile, Alabama, since 1772, are presented. Offshore winds reached about 160 miles per hour. A wind-velocity of about 145 miles per hour was recorded near Dauphin Island, Alabama. Most of the waterfront improvements in Mobile Bay were either destroyed or heavily damaged. (USGS)

  14. State Education Activities to Support Mission Growth. NGA Center for Best Practices. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Tara A.

    2009-01-01

    The National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) leads a Mission Growth Working Group, which consists of states that are significantly impacted by the growth of military bases. The group includes state representatives appointed by the governors of Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana,…

  15. Environmental control technology survey of selected US strip mining sites. Volume 2B. Alabama. Water quality impacts and overburden chemistry of Alabama study site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Henricks; J. E. Bogner; R. D. Olsen; J. P. Schubert; A. A. Sobek; D. O. Johnson

    1980-01-01

    As part of a program to examine the ability of existing control technologies to meet federal guidelines for the quality of aqueous effluents from coal mines, an intensive study of water, coal, and overburden chemistry was conducted at a surface coal mine in Alabama from May 1976 through July 1977. Sampling sites included the pit sump, a stream downgrade from

  16. Transition in Alabama: A Profile of Commitment. Proceedings of the Annual Statewide Conference on Transition (1st, Auburn, Alabama, January 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Philip, Ed.

    This proceedings document provides the texts of 13 presentations given at a 2-day conference in 1991 which focused on policies, materials, programs, and activities being implemented in Alabama to foster the successful transition of youth with disabilities to adult life. Two papers address the national scene: "Transition: Old Wine in New Bottles"…

  17. Transition III in Alabama: A Profile of Commitment. Proceedings of the Annual Statewide Conference on Transition (3rd, Auburn, Alabama, January 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Philip, Ed.

    This proceedings document provides the texts of 18 presentations given at a 3-day conference in 1993 which focused on policies, materials, programs, and activities being implemented in Alabama to foster the successful transition of youth with disabilities to adult life. First, four individuals with learning disabilities (Travis Moore, Kim…

  18. Transition IV in Alabama: A Profile of Commitment. Proceedings of the Annual Statewide Conference on Transition (4th, Auburn, Alabama, January 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Philip, Ed.

    This proceedings document provides the texts of 23 presentations given at a conference in 1994 which focused on policies, materials, programs, and activities being implemented in Alabama to foster the successful transition of youth with disabilities to adult life. An initial paper compares the definition of transition developed by Andrew Halpern…

  19. Structural control of coalbed methane production in Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pashin, J.C.; Groshong, R.H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Thin-skinned structures are distributed throughout the Alabama coalbed methane fields, and these structures affect the production of gas and water from coal-bearing strata. Extensional structures in Deerlick Creek and Cedar Cove fields include normal faults and hanging-wall rollovers, and area balancing indicates that these structures are detached in the Pottsville Formation. Compressional folds in Gurnee and Oak Grove fields, by comparison, are interpreted to be detachment folds formed above decollements at different stratigraphic levels. Patterns of gas and water production reflect the structural style of each field and further indicate that folding and faulting have affected the distribution of permeability and the overall success of coalbed methane operations. Area balancing can be an effective way to characterize coalbed methane reservoirs in structurally complex regions because it constrains structural geometry and can be used to determine the distribution of layer-parallel strain. Comparison of calculated requisite strain and borehole expansion data from calliper logs suggests that strain in coalbed methane reservoirs is predictable and can be expressed as fracturing and small-scale faulting. However, refined methodology is needed to analyze heterogeneous strain distributions in discrete bed segments. Understanding temporal variation of production patterns in areas where gas and water production are influenced by map-scale structure will further facilitate effective management of coalbed methane fields.Thin-skinned structures are distributed throughout the Alabama coalbed methane fields, and these structures affect the production of gas and water from coal-bearing strata. Extensional structures in Deerlick Creek and Cedar Cove fields include normal faults and hanging-wall rollovers, and area balancing indicates that these structures are detached in the Pottsville Formation. Compressional folds in Gurnee and Oak Grove fields, by comparison, are interpreted to be detachment folds formed above decollements at different stratigraphic levels. Patterns of gas and water production reflect the structural style of each field and further indicate that folding and faulting have affected the distribution of permeability and the overall success of coalbed methane operations. Area balancing can be an effective way to characterize coalbed methane reservoirs in structurally complex regions because it constrains structural geometry and can be used to determine the distribution of layer-parallel strain. Comparison of calculated requisite strain and borehole expansion data from calliper logs suggests that strain in coalbed methane reservoirs is predictable and can be expressed as fracturing and small-scale faulting. However, refined methodology is needed to analyze heterogeneous strain distributions in discrete bed segments. Understanding temporal variation of production patterns in areas where gas and water production are influenced by map-scale structure will further facilitate effective management of coalbed methane fields.

  20. A plan for immediate immersion of computational thinking into the high school math classroom through a partnership with the Alabama math, science, and technology initiative

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet T. Jenkins; James A. Jerkins; Cynthia L. Stenger

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a design for an immediate immersion of computational thinking into current high school math classrooms in Alabama. Most schools in our region have eliminated computer science classes from the curriculum. Alabama has an existing state initiative to improve mathematics, science and technology education in K-12. The Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI) emphasizes learning by doing,

  1. Gray bats and pollution in Missouri and northern Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R., Jr.; Bunck, C.M.; Cromartie, E.; LaVal, R.K.; Tuttle, M.D.

    1981-01-01

    Gray bats died with lethal brain concentrations of dieldrin and rising levels of heptachlor epoxide in 1976, 1977, and 1978 at Bat Caves No. 2-3, Franklin County, Missouri. The colony disappeared in 1979. Dieldrin was banned in 1974 and 1981 was the last year for heptachlor use in Missouri. The State is recommendiing three organophosphates (chlorpyrifos or Dursban, dyfonate or Fonophos, and ethoprop or Mocap) as substitutes for heptachlor. All three compounds have excellent records in the environment. Analyses of insects collected where bats of this colony fed showed beetles, particularly rove beetles (Staphylinidae), to be the most heavily contaminated part of the bat's diet. Lactation concentrated these residues so that levels in milk were approximately 30 times those in the insect diet. Gray bats found dead in caves in northern Alabama showed DDD (a DDT derivative) contamination. Bats from the colony at Cave Springs Cave on the Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge contained up to 29 ppm DDD in their brains, but this is probably less than one-half the lethal level. Bats from other colonies contained less. The DDD contamination enters the Terinessee River just above the Wheeler Refuge and is seen in gray bat colonies as far as 60 miles downriver.

  2. Frisco City sandstone: Upper Jurassic play in southern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, S.L. [Petroleum Consultant, Seattle, WA (United States); Baria, L.R. [Jura-Search, Inc., Jackson, MS (United States); Handford, C.R. [Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The Frisco City sandstone play in southern Alabama is an example of hydrocarbon entrapment on the flanks of basement erosional features, with principal reservoirs occurring in proximal alluvial-fan to marine shoreface facies. Productive fields are developed on four-way closures of complex geometry, with reservoir sandstones showing maximum thickness along the margins of basement highs that are roughly 1.3-5.18 km{sup 2} in size and have 136-151 m of relief. Detailed analysis of sandstone facies indicates a downdip progression from alluvial-fan through wadi, eolian, beach, tidal-flat, and shoreface deposits. A sequence stratigraphic model based on identification of backstepping strata representing successive transgressive events is useful in predicting maximum reservoir occurrence in the vicinity of inselbergs. Reservoir quality in productive sandstones is high, with porosities ranging from 13 to 27% and permeabilities of 50 md to 5 d. Hydrocarbon occurrence is related to the distribution of high-quality source rock in the Smackover Formation and to maturation history.

  3. Prevalence of encysted Toxoplasma gondii in raptors from Alabama.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, D S; Smith, P C; Hoerr, F J; Blagburn, B L

    1993-12-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of encysted Toxoplasma gondii in wild birds. We examined the hearts and breast muscles from 101 raptors for encysted T. gondii. All of the raptors had been submitted for necropsy to the State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Auburn, Alabama. Tissues were digested in acid-pepsin solution and inoculated into groups of 3-5 laboratory mice. Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from 27 of 101 (26.7%) raptors: 8 of 12 (66.7%) red-shouldered hawks (Buteo lineatus), 13 of 27 (41.1%) red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), 1 of 4 (25%) Cooper's hawks (Accipiter cooperi), 1 of 5 (20%) great horned owls (Bubo virginianus), 4 of 15 (26.7%) barred owls (Strix varia), and 1 of 3 (33.3%) kestrels (Falco sparverius). Toxoplasma gondii was not isolated from 3 broad-winged hawks (Buteo platypterus), 3 sharp-shinned hawks (Accipiter striatus), 6 barn owls (Tyto alba), 9 screech owls (Asio otus), a Mississippi kite (Ictinia misisippiensis), 2 golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), 4 ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), 4 turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), or 2 black vultures (Coragyps atratus). No significant difference (P > 0.05) in prevalence was detected based on sex using chi-square analysis. Chi-square analysis of the data demonstrated that adult raptors had encysted stages of T. gondii significantly (P < 0.05) more often than did immature raptors. PMID:8277379

  4. Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report presents the results of Run 261 performed at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run started on January 12, 1991 and continued until May 31, 1991, operating in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode processing Illinois No. 6 seam bituminous coal (from Burning star No. 2 mine). In the first part of Run 261, a new bimodal catalyst, EXP-AO-60, was tested for its performance and attrition characteristics in the catalytic/catalytic mode of the CC-ITSL process. The main objective of this part of the run was to obtain good process performance in the low/high temperature mode of operation along with well-defined distillation product end boiling points. In the second part of Run 261, Criterion (Shell) 324 catalyst was tested. The objective of this test was to evaluate the operational stability and catalyst and process performance while processing the high ash Illinois No. 6 coal. Increasing viscosity and preasphaltenes made it difficult to operate at conditions similar to EXP-AO-60 catalyst operation, especially at lower catalyst replacement rates.

  5. Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report presents the results of Run 262 performed at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run started on July 10, 1991 and continued until September 30, 1991, operating in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode processing Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal (Wyodak-Anderson seam from Wyoming Powder River Basin). A dispersed molybdenum catalyst was evaluated for its performance. The effect of the dispersed catalyst on eliminating solids buildup was also evaluated. Half volume reactors were used with supported Criterion 324 1/16'' catalyst in the second stage at a catalyst replacement rate of 3 lb/ton of MF coal. The hybrid dispersed plus supported catalyst system was tested for the effect of space velocity, second stage temperature, and molybdenum concentration. The supported catalyst was removed from the second stage for one test period to see the performance of slurry reactors. Iron oxide was used as slurry catalyst at a rate of 2 wt % MF coal throughout the run (dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) was used as the sulfiding agent). The close-coupled reactor unit was on-stream for 1271.2 hours for an on-stream factor of 89.8% and the ROSE-SR unit was on-feed for 1101.6 hours for an on-stream factor of 90.3% for the entire run.

  6. A transect through the Alabama and southwest Georgia Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Steltenpohl, M.G. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    A transect across Alabama and southwest Georgia contains several occurrences that appear to be unique and are not accommodated in existing tectonic interpretations of the southern Appalachians. In the foreland, the Alleghanian orogeny was signaled by the Mississippian unconformity, Mississippian shelf collapse and flysch sedimentation followed by deposition of a >3,000 m thick Pennsylvanian molasse wedge. The Pottsville Formation itself is folded and faulted, documenting that deformation continued after Westphalian A deposition into the Late Pennsylvanian. The recent report of Early Mississippian plant fossils from the tectonically overlying, greenschist-facies Talladega slate belt indicates that metamorphism and deformation of these units occurred after ca. 360--352 m.y. and thus resulted from the Alleghanian event. To the south, a post-metamorphic thrust, he Hollins line fault system, emplaced amphibolite-facies eastern Blue Ridge units upon the slate belt. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar cooling dates from the eastern Blue Ridge are hornblende ca. 334 Ma and muscovite 329 Ma indicating transport of the already metamorphosed and cooled units during Alleghanian thrusting. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar metamorphic cooling dates from the sillimanite-zone rocks of the eastern Blue Ridge, Inner Piedmont, Pine Mountain, and Uchee belts document maintenance of 500 C temperatures from the Carboniferous into the Early Permian, contemporaneous with the Alleghanian orogeny recorded in the foreland and the Talladega slate belt.

  7. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI). Final Report. NCEE 2012-4008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Denis; Finney, Pamela B.; Bell, Steve; Turner, Herb; Jaciw, Andrew P.; Zacamy, Jenna L.; Gould, Laura Feagans

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the results of an experiment conducted in Alabama beginning in the 2006/07 school year, to determine the effectiveness of the Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI), which aims to improve mathematics and science achievement in the state's K-12 schools. This study is the first randomized controlled trial…

  8. Missed Opportunities: Origin, Growth, and Decline of Community College Fire Science Degree Programs in Alabama, 1977 to 2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, Jerry W.

    2007-01-01

    There was rapid growth of Alabama community colleges in the late 1960s. At the same time, there was rapid growth nationally of fire science associate degree programs. With these concurrent events, one would expect fire department personnel in Alabama to benefit from new community college opportunities in fire science and fire administration.…

  9. A Century of Change: The History of Two-Year Education in the State of Alabama, 1866-1963

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dustin P.

    2012-01-01

    Much has been written about two-year education in Alabama during the governorships of George C. Wallace, but little about two-year education prior to his first inauguration in 1963. Yet nearly a third of the forty-three junior, technical, and community college institutions that eventually formed the Alabama Community College System had been…

  10. 78 FR 57611 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Alabama Shad as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ...Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Alabama Shad...Commerce (DOC). ACTION: Notice of 90-day petition finding, request for information...SUMMARY: We (NMFS) announce a 90-day finding on a petition to list Alabama...

  11. Go to: https://www.geographicsolutions.com/clients_listing.asp?state=AL Click on Alabama's Comprehensive Labor Market Information System

    E-print Network

    ;· Scroll over Find a job and select Quick Job Search from the drop down menu · Type in your desired job://www.jobsinme.com/ · Scroll over ME Job Search and select Browse by category/city MARYLAND · Go to: https://mwe.dllr on Alabama's Comprehensive Labor Market Information System · Click on find a job · Search Alabama statewide

  12. Dr. Cooper Curtice - Unknown worker in interpreting the Cambrian of Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yochelson, E.L.; Osborne, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    Cooper Curtice was an assistant to C. D. Walcott from 1883-1886. In 1885, he spent four months, mostly in Alabama, measuring sections of Paleozoic rocks and searching for fossils, mainly in the Cambrian. In 1888, Walcott concurred with foreign authorities that the rocks called Middle Cambrian in North America were Early Cambrian in age and vice versa, requiring a new interpretation of Cambrian strata. Curtice returned to Alabama for geologic investigations in 1892, and again briefly with Walcott in 1895. Since that time Cambrian stratigraphy in the southeastern United States has remained virtually unchanged.

  13. Magnitude and frequency of floods for urban streams in Alabama, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedgecock, T.S.; Lee, K.G.

    2010-01-01

    Methods of estimating flood magnitudes for exceedance probabilities of 50, 20, 10, 4, 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.2 percent have been developed for urban streams in Alabama that are not significantly affected by dams, flood detention structures, hurricane storm surge, or substantial tidal fluctuations. Regression relations were developed using generalized least-squares regression techniques to estimate flood magnitude and frequency on ungaged streams as a function of the basin drainage area and percentage of basin developed. These methods are based on flood-frequency characteristics for 20 streamgaging stations in Alabama and 3 streamgaging stations in adjacent States having 10 or more years of record through September 2007.

  14. First Report of a Tylenchulus sp. on Peach in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, and South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Wehunt, E. J.; Golden, A. M.; Weaver, C. F.; Rodríguez-Kábana, R.

    1987-01-01

    A Tylenchulus sp. found in a Georgia peach orchard parasitized peach roots in the greenhouse. Citrus roots were not parasitized, indicating that the nematode was not the citrus nematode. Morphologically similar populations were found in one peach orchard in Alabama, two orchards in Arkansas, and one in South Carolina. Males were present in the Alabama populations and one of the Arkansas populations. A population was also found in an area of mixed hardwood and pine in Arkansas. The populations are morphologically different from the citrus nematode Tylenchulus semipenetrans. PMID:19290292

  15. The Extent of Salt Water Intrusion, Southern Baldwin County, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgulet, D.; Tick, G.; Zheng, C.

    2006-12-01

    Contamination of groundwater due to saltwater intrusion has become a major concern for coastal communities which rely on groundwater as their principal source of drinking water. With increasing development and tourism in these regions both groundwater resources and environmentally sensitive areas such as coastal wetlands and ecological coastal habitats will be at risk. As a result, the protection of groundwater resources from saltwater intrusion and groundwater overdraft has become and will continue to be a critical concern in these areas. A regional-scale study evaluating the extent of saltwater intrusion as a result of increased groundwater pumping was conducted for Baldwin County, Alabama, a region on the gulf coast which has experienced continuously increasing growth and development over the last decade. An extensive reconnaissance of groundwater wells that includes water supply wells, irrigation and agricultural wells, monitoring wells, and private wells was conducted for the study area. The wells were sampled and analyzed for chloride, salinity, and TDS to determine the extent of saltwater intrusion, chloride and salinity fluxes, and the location of the saltwater/freshwater interface in the region. Groundwater pumping rates in addition to critical well-point data including hydraulic head, construction details, and lithology (well logs) were collected to determine the hydrogeological conditions in the region. ArcGIS software was used to develop head contour maps and iso-concentration maps for chloride, TDS, and salinity. A variable-density flow model SEAWAT based on MODFLOW and MT3DMS was developed to test management scenarios incorporating current and predicted demands on groundwater pumping to evaluate changing freshwater/saltwater interface, salinity and chloride fluxes, and rates of saltwater encroachment. The study will provide scientific basis for effective management of the coastal aquifers in the study region.

  16. An evaluation of coding methodologies for potential use in the Alabama Resource Information System (ARIS)-transportation study for the state of Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, O. L.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures developed for digitizing the transportation arteries, airports, and dock facilities of Alabama and placing them in a computerized format compatible with the Alabama Resource Information System are described. The time required to digitize by the following methods: (a) manual, (b) Telereadex 29 with film reading and digitizing system, and (c) digitizing tablets was evaluated. A method for digitizing and storing information from the U. T. M. grid cell base which was compatible with the system was developed and tested. The highways, navigable waterways, railroads, airports, and docks in the study area were digitized and the data stored. The manual method of digitizing was shown to be best for small amounts of data, while the graphic input from the digitizing tablets would be the best approach for entering the large amounts of data required for an entire state.

  17. Wernher von Braun and Saturn IB on Launch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun stands in front of a Saturn IB launch vehicle at Kennedy Space Flight Center. Dr. von Braun led a team of German rocket scientists, called the Rocket Team, to the United States, first to Fort Bliss/White Sands, later being transferred to the Army Ballistic Missile Agency at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. They were further transferred to the newly established NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama in 1960, and Dr. von Braun became the first Center Director. Under von Braun's direction, MSFC developed the Mercury-Redstone, which put the first American in space; and later the Saturn rockets, Saturn I, Saturn IB, and Saturn V. The Saturn V launch vehicle put the first human on the surface of the Moon, and a modified Saturn V vehicle placed Skylab, the first United States' experimental space station, into Earth orbit. Dr. von Braun was MSFC Director from July 1960 to February 1970.

  18. Eisenhower Unveils Marshall Bust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Mrs. George C. Marshall unveil the bronze bust of General George C. Marshall during the dedication ceremony of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, on September 8, 1960. On October 21, 1959, President Eisenhower directed the transfer of personnel from the Redstone Arsenal's Army Ballistic Missile Agency Development Operations Division to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A new field installation of NASA was designated as George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and its complex was formed within the boundaries of Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. MSFC began its operation on July 1, 1960 after the transfer ceremony, with Dr. Werher von Braun as Center Director.

  19. Bilingual Education Multifunctional Resource Center. Service Area 4. Annual Performance Report, 1992-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma Univ., Norman. Bilingual Education Multifunctional Resource Center.

    The federally funded Bilingual Education Multifunctional Resource Center (BEMRC) provides support services to programs and individuals serving students of limited English proficiency (LEP) in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Tennessee. LEP students in the mostly rural areas come from…

  20. EFFECTS OF SECTION 404 PERMITTING ON FRESHWATER WETLANDS IN LOUISIANA, ALABAMA, AND MISSISSIPPI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Information was compiled on permits issued under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act for alteration of freshwater wetlands from January 1982-August 1987 in Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi. he location, area, wetland type, and other data describing the impacted and compensatory...

  1. Catfish disease cases in in-pond receway systems in Alabama: 2008-2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production systems such as in-pond raceway systems (IPRS) and split-pond production systems are providing an alternative to traditional pond culture for raising catfish. Currently, there are over 1,300 water acres of production in Mississippi, Arkansas, and Alabama utilizing split-pond production sy...

  2. Great Expectations: A Guide to Alabama's High School Graduation Exam. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2003

    2003-01-01

    State leaders, parents, and business people want to be sure that students truly learn what they are being taught in school. Today, basic skills are not sufficient to guarantee that children will find good jobs and become productive citizens. As a result, the Alabama State Legislature passed its Education Accountability Law in 1995. The new…

  3. The Zertifikat Deutsch als Fremdsprache (Certificate in German as a Foreign Language): An Alabama Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Oliver Finley

    1980-01-01

    Describes the benefits derived by the University of Alabama at a time of declining enrollment from offering the Goethe Institute exam for the "Certificate in German as a Foreign Language." Also mentions other innovations introduced by the German department: an intensive first year course and a German House on campus. (MES)

  4. Growth of Freshwater Drum from Lotic and Lentic Habitats in Alabama

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew L. Rypel; David R. Bayne; Justin B. Mitchell

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed variations in the age and growth of freshwater drum Aplodinotus grunniens in Alabama rivers and reservoirs. Lotic environments produced significantly more robust freshwater drum (associated with higher growth rates) than did lentic settings. Shorter reservoir retention times (more lotic reservoirs) also produced more robust and faster-growing freshwater drum, which supported the hypothesis that hydraulic-based habitat was an important

  5. Identification of unique DNA sequences present in highly virulent 2009 Alabama isolates of Aeromonas hydrophila

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2009, a disease outbreak caused by A. hydrophila occurred in 48 catfish farms in West Alabama, causing an estimated loss of more than 3 million pounds of food size channel catfish. Virulence studies have revealed that the 2009 isolates of A. hydrophila are at least 200-fold more virulent than a 1...

  6. Phase III Proposed Early Restoration Project Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas

    E-print Network

    Phase III Proposed Early Restoration Project Alabama · Florida · Louisiana · Mississippi · Texas-based) recirculating aquaculture systems that reduce water usage and effluent discharge. Effluent would flow through a small filtration marsh composed of native coastal wetland plant species (to be built as part

  7. Survey of Ice Plants in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, 1980-81

    E-print Network

    Survey of Ice Plants in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, 1980-81 JOHN M. WARD and JOHN R. POFFENBERGER Introduction Reports of ice shortages during the shrimp fishing season prompted a Na- tional closure regulation on ice plant production and sales. Like Texas, Louisiana controls the opening

  8. Leadership Frame Preferences of Elected and Appointed School District Superintendents in Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Cheri Lynne

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the leadership orientation frames of school district superintendents in Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi, which are the only three states in the United States with both elected and appointed school district superintendents. The theoretical framework for this study was developed by Bolman and Deal's (1997) four frame…

  9. Automating the Management of the Traceability Relation University of Alabama at Birmingham

    E-print Network

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    the system comprehensively. However, maintaining traceability relations is often a tedious and error proneAutomating the Management of the Traceability Relation Hyun Cho University of Alabama at Birmingham to the labor intensive and error prone nature of maintaining traceability relations. This poster introduces

  10. First report of Soybean Rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) on Florida Beggarweed (Desmodium tortuosum) in Alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean rust (SBR), caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, was detected on Florida Beggarweed (Desmodium tortuosum) for the first time in Alabama in November, 2009. The pathogen was not observed in 2010 or 2011, probably because of the exceptionally dry, hot weather in the region. The pathogen ...

  11. Recoverable natural gas reserves from Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Alabama coastal waters

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.; Hamilton, R.P.

    1987-09-01

    To date, 11 Norphlet gas fields have been established in offshore Alabama. These fields are part of a deep Jurassic gas trend that extends across southern Mississippi and Alabama into the Gulf of Mexico. Recoverable gas reserves of 4.9-8.1 tcf are estimated for the Norphlet Formation in Alabama's coastal waters. Proven gas reserves are estimated to be 3.7-4.6 tcf and potential reserves are estimated to be 1.2-3.5 tcf. The natural gas is trapped in a series of generally east-west-trending salt anticlines. The mechanism of structure formation appears to be salt flowage that has formed broad, low-relief anticlines, most of which are faulted, and many of which are related to small-scale growth faults. Salt movement is the critical factor in the formation of these petroleum traps. The primary Norphlet reservoir lithofacies are eolian dune and interdune sandstones that range in thickness from 140 to over 600 ft in Alabama's coastal waters. Gas pay can exceed 280 ft in thickness. Porosity is principally secondary, developed as a result of decementation and grain dissolution. Jurassic Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were the main source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons. The seal for the gas is the nonpermeable upper portion of the Norphlet Formation. The overlying lower Smackover carbonates are also nonpermeable and may serve as part of the seal.

  12. Factors that Facilitated an Alabama School Assistance Team's Success in a Low-Performing School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Virginia; Kochan, Frances

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the perceived factors that enabled an Alabama School Assistance Team (ASAT) to be effective in helping improve a low performing school. A case study was conducted with the ASATs and the Local Education Agency (LEA) site they served. Data were collected from interviews, documents and observations. The perceptions explored in…

  13. An Evaluation of a Three-Year Abstinence Education Program in Southeast Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gossett, Dianne; Hooten, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation of a three-year school-based abstinence education program that was taught in 21 public schools to eighth- and 10th grade students in Southeastern Alabama between 2003 and 2005. The abstinence education curricula utilized with the students were "Choosing the Best" and "Navigator" programs. A 76-item testing…

  14. Device Fabrication for Data Storage, Semiconductor and MEMS Applications at the University of Alabama Microfabrication Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Gupta; A. Highsmith; Xiao Li; Z. R. Tadisina; M. E. Brown; C. L. Guenther; S. Burkett; S. Kotru

    2008-01-01

    Over the past two years, a Class 100\\/1000 microfabrication facility set up at the University of Alabama for development of a meso-scale gyroscope has been turned into a central user facility for materials and device research. We will describe a wide range of processes and devices that are being researched, fabricated and optimized in this facility. These include a) a

  15. 77 FR 34288 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama; 110(a)(1) and (2) Infrastructure...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ...addressed all the required infrastructure elements for the 1997 annual and 2006 24-hour...of Contents I. Background II. What elements are required under sections 110(a...analysis of how Alabama addressed the elements of sections 110(a)(1) and...

  16. EAARL topography-Three Mile Creek and Mobile-Tensaw Delta, Alabama, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Clark, A.P.; Wright, C.W.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Fredericks, Xan

    2011-01-01

    This DVD contains lidar-derived first-surface (FS) and bare-earth (BE) topography GIS datasets of a portion of the Mobile-Tensaw Delta region and Three Mile Creek in Alabama. These datasets were acquired on March 6, 2010.

  17. Lessons Learned Planning a Statewide Conference: "Alabama's Choice--Tobacco or Health?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geiger, Brian F.

    This paper describes lessons learned while planning a statewide conference to increase the knowledge of tobacco control advocates and promote implementation of the Alabama Comprehensive Tobacco Use Prevention and Control Plan (Plan) within the state. The Plan has three overall goals: preventing youth from becoming tobacco users; promoting…

  18. 76 FR 14611 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama; 110(a)(1) and (2) Infrastructure...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ...addressed all the required infrastructure elements for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. DATES...of Contents I. Background II. What elements are required under Sections 110(a...analysis of how Alabama addressed the elements of Sections 110(a)(1) and...

  19. Educational Park, A Case Study Based on Planning and Design for Anniston, Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caudill, Rowlett and Scott, Architects, Houston, TX.

    A concentrated study undertaken by Caudill, Rowlett & Scott, and this report documents the findings and recommends master planning guidelines for an educational park in Anniston, Alabama. The park will encompass the spectrum of education from early school to two years of college. The proposed educational park will profit by the experience of its…

  20. Sentencing disparities by race of offender and victim: Women homicide offenders in Alabama, 1929–1985

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Penelope J. Hanke

    1995-01-01

    This study explores the issue of sentencing variations due to race among female offenders. Prison records of the population of women (N = 685) committed to Julia Tutwiler Prison in Alabama for homicide between 1929 and 1985 were examined. Despite the fact that few cases were interracial, sentencing patterns suggested that the race of both offender and victim did indeed

  1. Trade & Industrial Education. Preparing Today for Tomorrow's Workforce. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1996, No. 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This guide, which is intended for classroom teachers, supervisors, and administrators throughout Alabama, contains the minimum required content (core program) for public school instruction in trade and industrial education in grades 7-12. Presented first are the following: introduction examining the objectives and delivery of trade and industrial…

  2. Fact Book 1971-72: Alabama Institutions of Higher Education Universities and Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    This factbook provides four major categories of data concerning Alabama colleges and universities: institutional characteristics, student enrollments, degrees and other formal awards, and numbers of deans and faculty. All data are divided into three parts. Part one presents state, southeast, and national data. Summary data for all state…

  3. Maastrichtian ammonites chiefly from the Prairie Bluff Chalk in Alabama and Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobban, W.A.; Kennedy, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Prairie Bluff Chalk of Alabama and Mississippi yields a diverse ammonite fauna of Maastrichtian age. Twenty-eight species, of which three are new, are recorded. The bulk of the fauna can be referred to a Discoscaphites conradi assemblage zone, but some elements in the fauna are significantly older. -Authors

  4. The Cretaceous/Paleogene Boundary Events in the Gulf Coast: Comparisons between Alabama and Texas

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    The Cretaceous/Paleogene Boundary Events in the Gulf Coast: Comparisons between Alabama and Texas significance. In the period 2009­2012, M. B. Hart and co-workers have investigated a number of successions. B., P. J. Harries, and A. L. Cárdenas, 2013, The Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary events in the Gulf

  5. Catfish disease cases in in-pond raceway systems in Alabama: 2008-2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production systems such as in-pond raceway systems (IPRS) and split-pond aquaculture systems are providing an alternative to traditional pond culture for raising catfish. Currently, there are over 1,300 water acres of production in Mississippi, Arkansas, and Alabama utilizing split-pond production s...

  6. Investing in Alabama's Future: State-Level Strategic Objectives for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    This document represents a plan for educational improvement within Alabama, and proposes the following four goals for higher education (2- and 4-year postsecondary institutions) in the state: collaboration, access, quality instruction, and research and economic development. Each goal is followed by specific, measurable objectives which serve as…

  7. Zooplankton, Fish and Sport Fishing Quality Among Four Alabama and Georgia Reservoirs of Varying Trophic Status

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David R. Bayne; Michael J. Maceina; William C. Reeves

    1994-01-01

    Four mainstream river impoundments located in Alabama and Georgia were examined in 1989 and 1990 to determine the response of zooplankton and fish to trophic gradient. Mean chlorophyll a concentrations ranged from 2 ?g\\/L in the mesotrophic lake to 34 ?g\\/L in the highly eutrophic lake. Two of the lakes were moderately eutrophic with mean chlorophyll a concentrations of 13

  8. Diachronous ranges of benthonic Foraminifera in the Eocene of Alabama and South Carolina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. D. Willard; W. C. Fallaw; V. Price; D. S. Snipes

    1994-01-01

    Seventeen species of benthonic Foraminifera reported by Bandy (1949) from the Eocene of Little Stave Creek in Clarke County, Alabama were identified from the middle eocene Santee Limestone and the upper Eocene Dry Branch Formation in Aiken and Barnwell counties, South Carolina. Of the 17 species, seven occurred in South Carolina stratigraphically above or below the ranges listed by Bandy.

  9. THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering) that are administratively supported by the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering. In the last ten degrees in environmental engineering and architectural engineering. At the graduate level, the department

  10. Opportunities for and Limitations of Social and Economic Adjustments in an Alabama Rural County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nix, Harold L.

    The plights of southern farmers and the self-perceptions of their problems are the main topics of this study. Using U. S. Department of Agriculture criteria for determining low income and low level of living for rural areas, Fayette County, Alabama, was selected for this pilot study. Some 171 rural farm and nonfarm households, randomly selected,…

  11. 77 FR 59755 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama 110(a)(1) and (2) Infrastructure...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ...Implementation Plans; Alabama 110(a)(1) and (2) Infrastructure Requirements for the 1997...requirements of sections 110(a)(1) and (2) of the Clean Air Act (CAA or the Act...24-hour fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) national ambient air quality...

  12. The Freedom Quilting Bee Cooperative of Alabama: An Art Education Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Jeri Pamela

    Using an institution description taxonomy, this study surveyed the Freedom Quilting Bee Cooperative (FQB) of Alabama, comprised of Negro women who make and sell folk quilts. The history of the FQB and the area served was traced from slavery through the Depression, the New Deal, World War II, and postwar years up to Martin Luther King's movement.…

  13. Boron mineralization in Louann Salt and Norphlet Shale, Clarke County, Alabama

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1988-01-01

    A suite of unusual boron minerals is present in the upper Louann Salt and immediately overlying Norphlet Shale in Clarke County, Alabama. Core samples come from a depth of about 12,000 ft in a well located on the flank of a nonpiecement salt dome. The suite consists of calcium and magnesium borates similar to those occurring in the Zechstein salt

  14. The Alabama Counseling Association: A Legacy of Community and Professional Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Eddie, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The Alabama Counseling Association (ALCA) has an ongoing plan for professional growth and development reflective of the multiple counseling professions and the diversity of its members. Based on the development and history of the organization, this research project was designed to assess ALCA's progress toward achieving its stated outcome goals. A…

  15. Knocking at the College Door: Projections of High School Graduates. Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    National and regional trends mask important variation among states in the supply of high school graduates. This profile provides brief indicators for Alabama related to: current levels of educational attainment, projections of high school graduates into the future, and two common barriers to student access and success--insufficient academic…

  16. State of Alabama Annual Vocational Education Performance Report for Fiscal Year 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery. Div. of Vocational Education Services.

    During fiscal year 1994, enrollment in secondary-level vocational education (VE) in Alabama totaled 202,402. Secondary school districts provided VE to 17,037 adult students, and postsecondary institutions provided regular occupational/technical training to 80,764 adults and training for business/industry to 19,723 adults. Secondary and/or…

  17. A Study of Organization and Governance of Alabama State Library Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Administration Service, Washington, DC.

    In order to provide the citizens of Alabama with the best possible library service for a given level of funding, this study recommends a model for the organization and funding of multi-type library cooperation in the state, based on a review of past developments and current conditions, together with proposed changes in state library legislation…

  18. 7. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just off U.S. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just off U.S. 11, N of Epes Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms. 1922. Picture of earlier bridge: turn span and fixed spans. Ala. Great Southern RR. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  19. 1. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17 Aerial view of Milner bridge, from SW. David J. Kaminsky, Architectural Photography, Atlanta Ga. Aug 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  20. Attitudes of organized labor officials toward health care issues: an exploratory survey of Alabama labor officials.

    PubMed

    Fottler, M D; Johnson, R A; McGlown, K J; Ford, E W

    1999-01-01

    Delegates to the Alabama AFL-CIO Convention were surveyed concerning their attitudes toward their health benefits and various options for health care reform. Most are satisfied with their current health care coverage, but dissatisfied with its high costs. Participants attribute the high costs to providers' pricing policies and insurance companies' overhead. PMID:10358808

  1. Technology Education. Career Awareness & Technology Literacy. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1996, No. 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This guide, which is intended for classroom teachers, supervisors, and administrators throughout Alabama, contains the minimum required content (core program) for public school instruction in career awareness and technological literacy in grades 7-10. Presented first are the following: introduction examining the vision and goals of career…

  2. THE 2001 ALABAMA SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL PRODUCTIONS OF KING JOHN AND JULIUS CAESAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig Barrow

    n its thirtieth anniversary season, the Alabama Shakespeare Festival produced one play never before performed at the Festival, Shakespeare's King John; and Julius Caesar, last performed in 1991. King John was performed in the 250-seat Octagon Theatre, while Julius Caesar was performed in the larger 750-seat Festival Stage. While Howard Jensen of Indiana University directed King John and Kent Thompson,

  3. In-pond raceway systems and catfish disease related cases in west Alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production systems such as in-pond raceway systems (IPRS) and split-pond production systems are providing an alternative to traditional pond culture for raising catfish. Currently, there are over 1,300 water acres of production in Mississippi, Arkansas, and Alabama utilizing split-pond production sy...

  4. State Teacher Policy Yearbook: Progress on Teacher Quality, 2007. Alabama State Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" examines what is arguably the single most powerful authority over the teaching profession: state government. This Alabama edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the first of what will be an annual look at the status of state policies impacting the…

  5. 2. ALABAMA, PICKENS, CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ALABAMA, PICKENS, CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Aerial view of Milner bridge, from SE. David J. Kaminsky, Architecturl Photography, Atlanta Ga. Aug 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  6. From desegregation to diversity management in Alabama public universities: a narrative review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vickie Cox Edmondson; Louis Dale; Glenn Feldman; Annice Yarber

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate that history has much to teach leaders in understanding resistance to affirmative action and how a greater commitment to diversity can be fostered. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This narrative review provides a timeline of a case for resolution-by-agreement in the wake of the landmark Knight v. Alabama case. Findings – There have

  7. Barrier island evolution and reworking by inlet migration along the Mississippi-Alabama gulf coast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. B. Rucker; J. O. Snowden

    1990-01-01

    The five barrier islands along the Mississippi-Alabama coast are located 10 to 14 mi (16 to 23 km) offshore and separate Mississippi Sound from the Gulf of Mexico. The barrier islands in the chain are, from east to west: Dauphin Island, Petit Bois Island, Horn Island, Ship Island, and Cat Island. The islands are low sand bodies situated on a

  8. A University of Alabama Low-Cost Diamond-Coated Tools

    E-print Network

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    reinforcement (SiC or alumina) have t ti l f i i t b k t SEM photo of worn CVD-diamond insert Tool modelingCAVT A University of Alabama Low-Cost Diamond-Coated Tools for Metal-Matrix Composite Machiningy Tool holder Cutting insert durable diamond coating of tungsten tools by CVD MOTIVATION Metal matrix

  9. Concentrations, Distribution and Persistence of Perfluoroalkylates in Sludge-Applied Soils near Decatur, Alabama, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sludges generated at a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Decatur, Alabama have been applied to agricultural fields for more than a decade. Waste-stream sources to this WWTP during this period included industries that work with fluorotelomer compounds, and sludges from this fac...

  10. Controls on deposition of the Pratt seam, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Weisenfluh

    1982-01-01

    The study of regional, subregional and local variations in the Pratt seam of northern Alabama has generated a geological model which depicts the internal and external geometry of the coal seams and adjoining rocks of the Pratt group and suggests the controlling factors for deposistion of thick and thin coal. In addition to primary structural controls of peat accumulation, differential

  11. Smile Alabama! Initiative: Interim Results from a Program To Increase Children's Access to Dental Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene-McIntyre, Mary; Finch, Mary Hayes; Searcy, John

    2003-01-01

    An Alabama initiative aimed to improve access to oral health care for Medicaid-eligible children through four components: improved Medicaid claims processing, increased reimbursement for providers, outreach and educational activities to support providers, and parent and patient education about children's oral health. In the first 3 program years,…

  12. Home Schooling in Alabama: Perspectives of Public School Superintendents and Home Schooling Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozlowski, Anna T.

    This paper describes home schooling in Alabama from the perspectives of public-school superintendents and home-schooling families. It is based on a study that investigated the extent, causes, and experiences of home schooling; concerns about the practice of home schooling; and the relationship between home schoolers and public-school systems. Home…

  13. SAFETY ANALYSIS ON RAIL HIGHWAY AT-GRADE CROSSING IN ALABAMA

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Crossing Handbook (1986) ** Accident Prediction and Resource Allocation Procedure Normalizing Constants Administration (FRA) database · Highway-rail crossing inventory · Highway-rail crossing history file · Highway-rail crossing accident database Alabama Department of Transportation (ALDOT) database · Rail-highway at

  14. Development and Validation of a Short Form of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elgar, Frank J.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Dadds, Mark R.; Sigvaldason, Nadine

    2007-01-01

    Brief assessments of parenting practices can provide important information about the development of disruptive behavior disorders in children. We examined the factor structure of a widely used assessment of parenting practices, the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire, and produced a 9-item short scale around its three supported factors: Positive…

  15. Responses to Gizzard Shad Recovery following Selective Treatment in Walker County Lake, Alabama, 1996-1999

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian J. Irwin; Dennis R. DeVries; Gene W. Kim

    2003-01-01

    Gizzard shad Dorosoma cepedianum is an important prey fish that is capable of influencing both the upper and lower trophic levels in aquatic systems. Contrary to our predictions, during the 4 years after a selective reduction of gizzard shad in Walker County State Fishing Lake (WCL), Alabama, the sport fish population structure did not decline as gizzard shad abundance rebounded.

  16. Assessment of detecting minimum length limit changes for crappie in two Alabama reservoirs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Allen D Martin; Michael J Maceina

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare population metrics prior to and after the initiation of a minimum length limit for black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus and white crappie Pomoxis annularis in two reservoirs in Alabama, USA. In addition, we estimated recruitment variability and incorporated this stochastic component into a simulation model to assess the effects of three different minimum

  17. Law: The Language of Liberty. Supplemental Materials for Alabama Social Studies Teachers. Grade 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Administrative Office of Courts, Montgomery.

    Student activity pages, teacher background information, and lesson ideas for teaching about law in social studies classrooms are presented in this supplementary packet. Section I provides suggestions for using community resource persons and lists Alabama resources for teaching about law. Activities in Section II focus on the need for laws and…

  18. The History and Development of the Alabama Division of the American Rehabilitation Counseling Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templeton, Mary Anne

    2007-01-01

    The Alabama Division of the American Rehabilitation Association is an organization committed to representing those counselors who work in the field of rehabilitation across the state. The division is focused on offering leadership within the field of rehabilitation counseling, promoting professional development opportunities for counselors, and…

  19. Poison control centers: can their value be measured?

    PubMed

    King, W D; Palmisano, P A

    1991-06-01

    Most regions of the United States are served by poison control centers that provide 24-hour toxicologic guidance resulting in the home management of most poison exposures. It has been suggested that without public access to a poison control hotline the majority of poison-exposed patients would seek medical care in emergency departments or other outpatient visits. This study compares the patterns of community response to poison exposure in Louisiana before and after the discontinuance of the state poison control service, and also compares these patterns to the situation in Alabama, which maintained poison center services throughout the study period. After discontinuance of the poison control service in Louisiana, poison exposure cases had up to four times the rate of "self-referral" to health care facilities and less than half the rate of home management when compared to Alabama cases. Before the closing of the Louisiana center, Alabama and Louisiana triage patterns for poison exposures were nearly identical. The maximum annual cost attributable to unnecessary outpatient service utilization in Louisiana was estimated to be $1.4 million, an amount more than three times the annual poison control center state appropriation. PMID:2052960

  20. Evaluation of enhanced recovery operations in Smackover fields of southwest Alabama. Draft topical report on Subtasks 5 and 6

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D.R.

    1992-06-01

    This report contains detailed geologic and engineering information on enhanced-recovery techniques used in unitized Smackover fields in Alabama. The report also makes recommendations on the applicability of these enhanced-recovery techniques to fields that are not now undergoing enhanced recovery. Eleven Smackover fields in Alabama have been unitized. Three fields were unitized specifically to allow the drilling of a strategically placed well to recover uncontacted oil. Two fields in Alabama are undergoing waterflood projects. Five fields are undergoing gas-injection programs to increase the ultimate recovery of hydrocarbons. Silas and Choctaw Ridge fields were unitized but no enhanced-recovery operations have been implemented.

  1. Regional geological framework and petroleum geology of Miocene sandstones in coastal and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Mink, R.M.

    1987-05-01

    The Miocene natural gas trend of coastal and offshore Alabama is part of the regional Miocene oil and gas trend of the Gulf coastal area that extends from Texas into Alabama. The major Miocene productive area in Alabama is in southern Baldwin County and Mobile Bay. Since the discovery of Miocene gas in 1979, 28 natural gas fields have been established in coastal and offshore Alabama. The Miocene sandstones range in thickness from 10 to 200 ft, are very fine to coarse grained, are quartz rich, and have subangular to rounded and moderately to well-sorted quartz grains. The productive Miocene interval overlies upper Oligocene marine shelf deposits (Chickasawhay Limestone) and is overlain by Miocene fluvial clastics. The Miocene sandstones, which include the Amos, Escambia, Luce, and Meyer, are interpreted to represent a marine shelf-deltaic complex. A Miocene delta system prograded from the west in the area of offshore Louisiana-Mississippi into coastal and offshore Alabama. Reservoirs and potential reservoirs include highly constructive and highly destructive deltaic and marine shelf sandstones. Porosity in these sandstones is primary intergranular and generally ranges from 27 to 35%. Permeabilities may exceed 2000 md. Basinal Miocene marine clays and Oligocene marls are the probable petroleum source rocks. Petroleum traps are principally stratigraphic, typically involving lateral sandstone pinch-outs against regional dip. Seismic reflection is an excellent exploration tool for identifying potential Miocene fields. Miocene gas sands are best delineated with relative-amplitude seismic reflection data on which gas-charged sands are apparent as bright spots.

  2. Alabama Ground Operations during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence; Blakeslee, Richard; Koshak, William; Bain, Lamont; Rogers, Ryan; Kozlowski, Danielle; Sherrer, Adam; Saari, Matt; Bigelbach, Brandon; Scott, Mariana; Schultz, Elise; Schultz, Chris; Gatlin, Patrick; Wingo, Matt; Phillips, Dustin; Phillips, Chris; Peterson, Harold; Bailey, Jeff; Frederickson, Terryn; Hall, John; Bart, Nicole; Becker, Melissa; Pinkney, Kurtis; Rowe, Scott; Starzec, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign investigates the impact of deep, midlatitude convective clouds, including their dynamical, physical and lighting processes, on upper tropospheric composition and chemistry. DC3 science operations took place from 14 May to 30 June 2012. The DC3 field campaign utilized instrumented aircraft and ground ]based observations. The NCAR Gulfstream ]V (GV) observed a variety of gas ]phase species, radiation and cloud particle characteristics in the high ]altitude outflow of storms while the NASA DC ]8 characterized the convective inflow. Groundbased radar networks were used to document the kinematic and microphysical characteristics of storms. In order to study the impact of lightning on convective outflow composition, VHF ]based lightning mapping arrays (LMAs) provided detailed three ]dimensional measurements of flashes. Mobile soundings were utilized to characterize the meteorological environment of the convection. Radar, sounding and lightning observations were also used in real ]time to provide forecasting and mission guidance to the aircraft operations. Combined aircraft and ground ]based observations were conducted at three locations, 1) northeastern Colorado, 2) Oklahoma/Texas and 3) northern Alabama, to study different modes of deep convection in a variety of meteorological and chemical environments. The objective of this paper is to summarize the Alabama ground operations and provide a preliminary assessment of the ground ]based observations collected over northern Alabama during DC3. The multi ] Doppler, dual ]polarization radar network consisted of the UAHuntsville Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR), the UAHuntsville Mobile Alabama X ]band (MAX) radar and the Hytop (KHTX) Weather Surveillance Radar 88 Doppler (WSR ]88D). Lightning frequency and structure were observed in near real ]time by the NASA MSFC Northern Alabama LMA (NALMA). Pre ]storm and inflow proximity soundings were obtained with the UAHuntsville mobile sounding unit and the Redstone Arsenal (QAG) morning sounding.

  3. The Tenth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok (Compiler); McConnaughey, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Tenth Thermal arid Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 99) was held at the Bevill Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama, September 13-17, 1999. The theme for the hands-on training workshop and conference was "Tools and Techniques Contributing to Engineering Excellence". Forty-seven technical papers were presented in four sessions. The sessions were: (1) Thermal Spacecraft/Payloads, (2) Thermal Propulsion/Vehicles, (3) Interdisciplinary Paper, and (4) Fluids Paper. Forty papers were published in these proceedings. The remaining seven papers were not available in electronic format at the time of publication. In addition to the technical papers, there were (a) nine hands-on classes on thermal and flow analyses software, (b) twelve short courses, (c) thirteen product overview lectures, and (d) three keynote lectures. The workshop resulted in participation of 171 persons representing NASA Centers, Government agencies, aerospace industries, academia, software providers, and private corporations.

  4. Twelfth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    The Twelfth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 01) was held at the Bevill Center, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama, September 10-14, 2001. The theme for the hands-on training workshop and conference was "Engineering Excellence and Advances in the New Millenium." Forty-five technical papers were presented in four sessions: (1) Thermal Spacecraft/Payloads, (2) Thermal Propulsion/Vehicles, (3) Interdisciplinary Papers, and (4) Fluids Papers. Thirty-nine papers were published in these proceedings. The remaining six papers were not available in electronic format at the time of publication. In addition to the technical papers, there were (a) nine hands-on classes on thermal and flow analyses software, (b) thirteen short courses and product overview lectures, (c) five keynote lectures and, (d) panel discussions consisting of eight presentations. The workshop resulted in participation of 195 persons representing NASA Centers, Government agencies, aerospace industries, academia, software providers, and private corporations.

  5. Fate of Deepwater Horizon oil in Alabama's beach system: understanding physical evolution processes based on observational data.

    PubMed

    Hayworth, Joel S; Prabakhar Clement, T; John, Gerald F; Yin, Fang

    2015-01-15

    The impact of MC252 oil on northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) beaches from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) catastrophe was extensive along Alabama's beaches. While considerable amount of cleanup has occurred along these beaches, as of August 2014, DWH oil spill residues continue to be found as surface residual balls (SRBs), and also occasionally as submerged oil mats (SOMs). Four years of field observations informing the fate and transport of DWH SRBs in Alabama's beach system are presented here, along with a conceptual framework for describing their physical evolution processes. The observation data show that SRBs containing MC252 residues currently remain in Alabama's beach system, although their relationship to SOMs is not fully known. Based on our field observations we conclude that small DWH SRBs are likely to persist for several years along the Alabama shoreline. PMID:25496697

  6. Results of the Analyses of Screening Surface and Well Water Samples from Decatur, Alabama for Selected Perfluorinated Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has conducted testing of agricultural sites in Alabama where sewage sludge was applied from a local wastewater treatment plant that receives wastewater from numerous industrial sources, including facilities that manufacture and use perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and other perf...

  7. Marshall Space Flight Center solid waste characterization and recycling improvement study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eley, Michael H.; Crews, Lavonne; Johnston, Ben; Lee, David; Colebaugh, James

    1995-01-01

    The MSFC Facilities Office, which is responsible for disposing of all waste generated by MSFC, issued a delivery order to the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) to characterize current MSFC waste streams and to evaluate their existing recycling program. The purpose of the study was to define the nature, quantity, and types of waste produced and to generate ideas for improving the present recycling program. Specifically, the following tasks were to be performed: Identify various surplus and waste materials--as identified by the Contracting Officer's Technical Representative (COTR)--by source, location, and type; Analyze MSFC's current methods for handling, storage, transport, and disposition of waste and surplussed materials; Determine the composition of various surplus and waste materials as to type and quantities from various sources and locations; Analyze different methods for the disposition of various surplus and waste materials, including quality, quantity, preparation, transport cost, and value; Study possible alternatives to current methods of handling, storage, transport, and disposition of surplus and waste materials to improve the quality and quantities recycled or sold and to reduce and minimize the quantities of surplus and waste material currently being disposed of or stored; Provide recommendations for source and centralized segregation and aggregation of materials for recycling and/or disposition; and The analysis could include identification and laboratory level evaluation of methods and/or equipment, including capital costs, operating costs, maintenance requirements, life cycle and return on investment for systems to support the waste reduction program mission.

  8. Space Station Freedom Utilization Conference: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    From August 3-6, 1992, Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) representatives and prospective Space Station Freedom researchers gathered at the Von Braun Civic Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for NASA's first annual Space Station Freedom (SSF) Utilization Conference. The sessions presented are: (1) overview and research capabilities; (2) research plans and opportunities; (3) life sciences research; (4) technology research; (4) microgravity research and biotechnology; and (5) closing plenary.

  9. Evaluation of Convergent Spray Technology(TM) Spray Process for Roof Coating Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpa, J.; Creighton, B.; Hall, T.; Hamlin, K.; Howard, T.

    1998-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of(CST) Convergent Spray Technology (Trademark) for the roofing industry. This was accomplished by producing an environmentally compliant coating utilization recycled materials, a CST(Trademark) spray process portable application cart, and hand-held applicator with a CST(Trademark) spray process nozzle. The project culminated with application of this coating to a nine hundred sixty square foot metal for NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama.

  10. Method of using thin metallic foils to minimize thermal transients and photoelectric effects in pressure measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joel P. Booth; Robert W. Milton; Mark W. Kirkham

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a method to reduce the transient effects on piezoelectric pressure transducers used in the measurement of blast overpressure produced by non-conventional explosives. This method was developed during testing of high-energy and non-conventional explosives at the Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) on the Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. There are two

  11. Dallas Cotton Mills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Years before Huntsville, Alabama got its start in missiles and space, the community was known as the State's leading cotton producer. This is a historical photo of the Dallas Cotton Mills printed in 'The Huntsville Post' December 27, 1900. (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  12. EAARL Coastal Topography-Mississippi and Alabama Barrier Islands, Post-Hurricane Gustav, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Wright, C.W.; Sallenger, A.H.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.; Klipp, E.S.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Fredericks, Xan; Segura, Martha

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) and first-surface (FS) topography datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Mississippi and Alabama barrier islands, acquired post-Hurricane Gustav (September 2008 hurricane) on September 8, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is used routinely to create maps that represent submerged or sub-aerial topography. Specialized filtering algorithms have been implemented to determine the 'bare earth' under vegetation from a point cloud of last return elevations. For more information about similar projects, please visit the Decision Support for Coastal Science and Management website.

  13. Petroleum geology of the Norphlet formation (Upper Jurassic), S. W. and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-07-16

    Recent successful gas test in the Norphlet formation (up to 26 million CF/day) at depths exceeding 20,500 ft in the Mobile Bay area demonstrate a high potential for hydrocarbon production in the Alabama offshore area. In addition, wells drilled in the upper Mobile Bay area could encounter gas condensate in the Norphlet formation; gas condensate is being produced from wells in Hatter's Pond field about 14 miles north of Mobile Bay and 45 miles north of the Lower Mobile Bay-Mary Ann field. With continued petroleum exploration, additional Norphlet petroleum fields should be discovered in southwestern and offshore Alabama in the years ahead. In light of the recent discoveries in Escambia County and in the lower Mobile Bay area, Mobile, Baldwin, and Escambia counties and Mobile Bay appear to be the most prospective hydrocarbon areas.

  14. University of Oklahoma Bilingual Education Multifunctional Resource Center, Service Area 4. Final Performance Report, 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma Univ., Norman. Bilingual Education Multifunctional Resource Center.

    This report describes and assesses the 1993-94 (October 1, 1993 through September 1994) activities of the federally-funded Bilingual Education Multifunctional Resource Center based at the University of Oklahoma and serving a nine-state area (Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee).…

  15. Workforce Education and Training Requirements for Communication and Information Technologies at the United States Army Aviation Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cupples, Michael Wayne

    A research study identified the work force education and training requirements for communication and information technologies that form the key elements of a human resources development plan at the U.S. Army Aviation Center (USAAVNC), Fort Rucker, Alabama, for the 1990s. Qualitative data were collected from key personnel interviews, discussions by…

  16. Conserving energy through used oil recovery and recycle: a plan for metropolitan Alabama

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. C. April; G. J. Wilborn

    1977-01-01

    Used oil recycling in Alabama could result in the conservation of 17 million gallons per year of automotive and industrial oils or 2 x 10¹² Btu of equivalent energy. The non-commercial sources of used automotive oil and ways of conserving the associated energy value through a recycling program are discussed. Included are basic guidelines for the establishment of programs in

  17. A Lightning Channel Retrieval Algorithm for the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. J. Koshak

    2002-01-01

    A new multi-station VHF time-of-arrival (TOA) antenna network is, at the time of this writing, coming on-line in Northern Alabama. The network, called the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), employs GPS timing and detects VHF radiation from discrete segments (effectively point emitters) that comprise the channel of lightning strokes within cloud and ground flashes. The LMA will support on-going ground-validation activities

  18. Geologic framework of the Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation the Alabama coastal waters area

    SciTech Connect

    Tew, B.H.; Mancini, E.A. (Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)); Mink R.M.; Mann, S.D. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)); Mancini, E.A.

    1993-09-01

    The Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation is a prolific hydrocarbon-producing geologic unit in the onshore Gulf of Mexico area, including southwest Alabama. However, no Smackover strata containing commercial accumulations of oil or gas have thus far been discovered in the Alabama state coastal waters area (ACW). This study of the regional geologic framework of the Smackover Formation was done to characterize the unit in the ACW and to compare strata in the ACW with productive Smackover intervals in the onshore area. In the study area, the Smackover Formation was deposited on a highly modified carbonate associated with pre-Smackover topographic features. In the onshore Alabama, north of the Wiggins arch complex, an inner ramp developed in the area of the Mississippi interior salt basin and the Manila and Conecuh embayments. South of the Wiggins arch complex in extreme southern onshore Alabama and in the ACW, an outer ramp formed that was characterized by a much thicker Smackover section. In the outer ramp setting, four lithofacies associations are recognized: lower, middle, and upper outer ramp lithofacies (ORL) and the coastal dolostone lithofacies. The coastal dolostone lithofacies accounts for most of the reservoir-grade porosity in the outer ramp setting. The lower, middle, and upper ORL, for the most part, are nonporous. Volumetrically, intercrystalline porosity is the most important pore type in the coastal dolostone lithofacies. Numerous data in the ACW area indicate that halokinesis has created structural conditions favorable for accumulation and entrapment of oil and gas in the outer ramp lithofacies of the Smackover. Prolific hydrocarbon source rocks are present in the ACW, as evidenced by the significant natural gas accumulations in the Norphlet Formation. To date, however, reservoir quality rocks of the coastal dolostone lithofacies coincident with favorable structural conditions have not been encountered in the ACW.

  19. Effects of section 404 permitting on freshwater wetlands in Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean C. Sifneos; Edwin W. Cake; Mary E. Kentula

    1992-01-01

    Information was complied on permits issued under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act for alteration of freshwater wetlands\\u000a from January 1982-August 1987 in Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi. The location, area, wetland type, and other data describing\\u000a the impacted and compensatory (i.e., created, restored, and preserved) wetlands were compiled and analyzed. Trends in Louisiana,\\u000a the state with the most permits

  20. Coalbed methane development in Alabama: A bibliography. Topical report, December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Wieczner, B.; Irvin, M.

    1989-12-01

    The bibliography is an annotated listing of reports discussing coalbed methane development in Alabama. The entries are arranged by date of publication within the following sections: Geology and Methane Resource Assessments; Reservoir Engineering; Drilling, Completion, Stimulation, and Degasification; Hydrology; General; Legal and Economic Issues; and Environmental. The publication dates span the period from 1890 to the end of 1989. Information on the libraries where the reports may be found is included in the introduction.

  1. Chemical quality of bottled waters from three cities in eastern Alabama

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abua Ikem; Seyi Odueyungbo; Nosa O. Egiebor; Kafui Nyavor

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-five brands of bottled waters consisting of both purified and spring types collected randomly from three Alabama cities, USA were assessed for their suitability for human consumption. Water quality constituents analyzed include pH, conductivity, alkalinity, chloride, nitrate+nitrite, sulfate, phosphate, total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC), total organic carbon (TOC), and 27 elements on the inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES).

  2. Shallow-marine impact origin of the Wetumpka structure (Alabama, USA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David T. King Jr.; Thornton L. Neathery; Lucille W. Petruny; Christian Koeberl; Willis E. Hames

    2002-01-01

    The Wetumpka structure, an arcuate, 7.6 km diameter, rimmed feature of the inner Coastal Plain, Alabama, is a Late Cretaceous shallow-marine impact crater. In this paper, we show unequivocal evidence of Wetumpka’s impact origin. Within and about this structure, pre-existing Upper Cretaceous stratigraphy was resedimented and(or) deformed, thus creating distinctive intra-structure and extra-structure terrains. These terrains are located, respectively, within

  3. Shallow-marine impact origin of the Wetumpka structure (Alabama, USA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David T. King; Thornton L. Neathery; Lucille W. Petruny; Christian Koeberl; Willis E. Hames

    2002-01-01

    The Wetumpka structure, an arcuate, 7.6 km diameter, rimmed feature of the inner Coastal Plain, Alabama, is a Late Cretaceous shallow-marine impact crater. In this paper, we show unequivocal evidence of Wetumpka's impact origin. Within and about this structure, pre-existing Upper Cretaceous stratigraphy was resedimented and(or) deformed, thus creating distinctive intra-structure and extra-structure terrains. These terrains are located, respectively, within

  4. BIG SANDY, WEST ELLIOTTS CREEK, AND REED BRAKE ROADLESS AREAS, ALABAMA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, Sam H.; Armstrong, Michelle K.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral surveys done in the Big Sandy, West Elliotts Creek, and Reed Brake Roadless Areas, Alabama, indicate that the areas have little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. The three areas, however, have a probable potential for oil or gas. Probable coal resource potential exists in the Big Sandy and the West Elliotts Creek Roadless Areas. Clay and abundant sand resources occur in the roadless areas. Clayey sand has been used to stabilize roads and in road grade construction.

  5. Reconstruction of the Depositional Environments of the Devonian Chattanooga Shale in northeastern Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, M.; Lu, Y.; Ikejiri, T.; Cemen, I.

    2014-12-01

    The Chattanooga Shale is a hydrocarbon-rich, Devonian age, black shale well-exposed in several outcrops in Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia, and Kentucky. Although Devonian strata along the Atlantic Seaboard are thought to be deposited in marine environments, the depositional environments of the Chattanooga Shale remain controversial. In particular, it remains unknown why much fewer fossils have been found in outcrops located in northeastern Alabama relative to the outcrops elsewhere. We hypothesized that the fossil scarcity may be due to more depleted oxygen conditions during the shale deposition in Alabama than at other locations. We collected samples from two outcrops of the Chattanooga Shale which are respectively located near Fort Payne and Collinsville in northeastern Alabama, where nearly complete stratigraphic successions from the underlying Silurian Red Mountain Formation to the overlying Mississippian Maury Formation were found. These two outcrops share similar sedimentological features (e.g., thinly laminated fissile grayish and black shale layers in the lower part and nearly homogeneous black blocky shale in the upper part) which indicate a transition from shallow to deep water environments. Based on the TOC concentrations (2.8-12.0 wt%) and Rock-Eval pyrolysis data (HI: 19.5±13.5; OI: 6.5±2.5; S1: 0.24±0.06 mg HC/g; S2: 2.8±1.1 mg HC/g; S3: 2.1±0.4 mg CO2/g), kerogen in these outcrops is classified as type I-II, which may be found in lacustrine and marine settings. The ?13C values of total organic carbon varied from -30.7‰ to -27.7‰, a range indicative of lacustrine environments. We are presently examining a series of parameters derived from the distribution of normal and branched alkanes, steranes, and hopanes, which will offer important information about the sources of shale organic matter and the redox conditions of the depositional environments.

  6. Results of a test well in the Nanafalia Formation near Melvin, Choctaw County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, M.E.; Sparkes, A.K.; Peacock, B.S.

    1983-01-01

    Test drilling at Melvin, Choctaw County, Alabama, discloses that the Nanafalia Formation (Paleocene) contains freshwater in sand at a distance of 25 miles downdip from the outcrop area. A nearby fault on the north side of Gilberttown-Pickens fault zone does not appear to affect either the head or the water quality in sand of the Nanafalia. This presently undeveloped aquifer could be a source of water supply in this area. (USGS)

  7. Thirty Thousand Years of Vegetation Changes in the Alabama Hills, Owens Valley, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter A. Koehler; R. Scott Anderson

    1995-01-01

    Twenty packrat (Neotoma) middens recovered from three sites (1265-1535 m) in the Alabama Hills, Inyo County, California, provide a ca. 31,450-yr record of vegetation change. Located ca. 7 km east of the Sierra Nevada, the middens document that Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma), Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia), and bitterbush (Purshia tridentata) occupied the site between 31,450 and 19,070 yr B.P. Joshua

  8. Lake-sediment record of late Holocene hurricane activities from coastal Alabama

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kam-Biu Liu; Miriam L. Fearn

    1993-01-01

    Coastal lake sediments contain a stratigraphically and chronologically distinct record of major hurricane strikes during late Holocene time. Frederic---a category 3 hurricane that struck the Alabama coast on the Gulf of Mexico in 1979---left a distinct sand layer in the nearshore sediments of Lake Shelby as a result of storm-tide overwash of beaches and dunes. Sediment cores taken from the

  9. A University of Alabama Fuel Cell Electronic Integration

    E-print Network

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    the ability of hydrogen fuel cells to H2 tank Loads ­ Study the ability of hydrogen fuel cells to respond and operated with a variety of loads SPONSOR ­ Internal funds TIMELINE Center for Advanced Vehicle

  10. Sequence stratigraphy of middle and upper Jurassic strata of Southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, W.J.; Moore, C.H. Jr. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama differ from those of the western Gulf rim, showing: (1) profound influence of antecedent topography; (2) low early subsidence rates; and (3) greater clastic influx from adjacent uplands. Werner Anhydrite and Louann Salt represent the earliest marine incursion onto the Gulf rim following initial rifting; they onlap upper Paleozoic basement and garben-filling Eagle Mills red beds. Because basin-wide evaporative drawdowns overprint even higher order eustatic sea level changes, transgressive systems tracts (TST) and highstand systems tracts (HST) are indistinguishable. Anhydrite and shale caps accumulated via interstratal halite dissolution. Oxfordian Norphlet siliciclastics form a continental lowstand systems tract as illustrated by abrupt contact with underlying marine evaporites without intervening progradational marginal marine facies. Marine-reworked uppermost Norphlet sandstone marks the base of a subsequent TST, which includes overstepping lower Smackover lithofacies (laminated mudstone, algal-laminated mudstone, and pellet wackestone). The upper Smackover HST is characterized by formation of rimmed shelves upon which algal mounds and aggrading ooid grainstone parasequences accumulated. Shallow lagoonal carbonate and evaporite saltern deposition occurred behind ooid shoals; fine-grained siliciclastics accumulated in updip areas. Equivalents of Smackover A, Smackover B, Bossier, and Gilmer sequences are largely masked by influx of Haynesville and Cotton Valley continental clastics. Lack of biostratigraphic data, a consequence of restricted fauna, precludes useful age assignments for these sequences in Alabama. Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama are regionally atypical and cannot serve as a model for Gulf-wide sequences.

  11. Newcastle disease virus in double-crested cormorants in Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi.

    PubMed

    Farley, J M; Romero, C H; Spalding, M G; Avery, M L; Forrester, D J

    2001-10-01

    In order to understand the epidemiology of Newcastle disease (ND) outbreaks in double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus), a study was conducted on wintering migratory cormorants (P. a. auritus) in Alabama and Mississippi (USA) and non-migratory cormorants (P. a. floridanus) that breed in Florida (USA). Antibodies against ND virus were detected by the hemagglutination-inhibition method in sera from 86 of 183 (47%) migratory cormorants over-wintering in eight roosting sites in Alabama and Mississippi between November, 1997 and April, 1999. Titers ranged from 5 to 40. Antibody prevalences in sera collected from females in early winter (November and December) (26%) and late winter (February and March) (56%) were significantly different (P = 0.0007). None of 45 serum samples from 1- to 7-wk-old nestlings from 11 colonies in Florida during the 1997-98 and 1998-99 breeding seasons was positive. However, antibodies were detected in yolk samples from 98 of 126 (78%) eggs collected in these same colonies. Titers ranged from 4 to 256. The prevalence of antibodies in eggs collected from fresh-water colonies (63% prevalence, n = 30) and salt-water colonies (82% prevalence, n = 96) was significantly different (P = 0.041). ND virus was not isolated from tissues of 18 cormorants and cloacal and tracheal swabs from 202 cormorants collected in Alabama and Mississippi; virus was also not isolated from cloacal and tracheal swabs from 51 nestlings from Florida. PMID:11763745

  12. Bringing Global Climate Change Education to Alabama Middle School and High School Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Mitra, C.; Percival, E.; Thomas, A.; Lucy, T.; Hickman, E.; Cox, J.; Chaudhury, S. R.; Rodger, C.

    2013-12-01

    A NASA-funded Innovations in Climate Education (NICE) Program has been launched in Alabama to improve high school and middle school education in climate change science. The overarching goal is to generate a better informed public that understands the consequences of climate change and can contribute to sound decision making on related issues. Inquiry based NICE modules have been incorporated into the existing course of study for 9-12 grade biology, chemistry, and physics classes. In addition, new modules in three major content areas (earth and space science, physical science, and biological science) have been introduced to selected 6-8 grade science teachers in the summer of 2013. The NICE modules employ five E's of the learning cycle: Engage, Explore, Explain, Extend and Evaluate. Modules learning activities include field data collection, laboratory measurements, and data visualization and interpretation. Teachers are trained in the use of these modules for their classroom through unique partnership with Alabama Science in Motion (ASIM) and the Alabama Math Science Technology Initiative (AMSTI). Certified AMSTI teachers attend summer professional development workshops taught by ASIM and AMSTI specialists to learn to use NICE modules. During the school year, the specialists in turn deliver the needed equipment to conduct NICE classroom exercises and serve as an in-classroom resource for teachers and their students. Scientists are partnered with learning and teaching specialists and lead teachers to implement and test efficacy of instructional materials, models, and NASA data used in classroom. The assessment by professional evaluators after the development of the modules and the training of teachers indicates that the modules are complete, clear, and user-friendly. The overall teacher satisfaction from the teacher training was 4.88/5.00. After completing the module teacher training, the teachers reported a strong agreement that the content developed in the NICE modules should be included in the Alabama secondary curriculum. Eventually, the NICE program has the potential to reach over 200,000 students when the modules are fully implemented in every school in the state of Alabama. The project can give these students access to expertise and equipment, thereby strengthening the connections between the universities, state education administrators, and the community.

  13. Women's Center Women's Center

    E-print Network

    Malls, Oct. 20-24, 8:00am-5:00pm Body Positive James River Room, Webb Center, 12:30pm-1:30 pm Love Your Activists James River Room, Webb Center, 12:30pm-1:30pm December Women's Climb Night - Winter HolidayWomen's Center Fall 2014 Women's Center Fall 2014 August Women's Equality Day Front Lobby, Webb

  14. Assessment of water quality, benthic invertebrates, and periphyton in the Threemile Creek basin, Mobile, Alabama, 1999-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Ann K.; Gill, Amy C.; Moreland, Richard S.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 4-year investigation of water quality and aquatic-community structure in Threemile Creek, an urban stream that drains residential areas in Mobile, Alabama. Water-quality samples were collected between March 2000 and September 2003 at four sites on Threemile Creek, and between March 2000 and October 2001 at two tributary sites that drain heavily urbanized areas in the watershed. Stream samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, fecal-indicator bacteria, and selected organic wastewater compounds. Continuous measurements of dissolved-oxygen concentrations, water temperature, specific conductance, and turbidity were recorded at three sites on Threemile Creek during 1999?2003. Aquatic-community structure was evaluated by conducting one survey of the benthic invertebrate community and multiple surveys of the algal community (periphyton). Benthic invertebrate samples were collected in July 2000 at four sites on Threemile Creek; periphyton samples were collected at four sites on Threemile Creek and the two tributary sites during 2000 ?2003. The occurrence and distribution of chemical constituents in the water column provided an initial assessment of water quality in the streams; the structure of the benthic invertebrate and algal communities provided an indication of the cumulative effects of water quality on the aquatic biota. Information contained in this report can be used by planners and resource managers in the evaluation of proposed total maximum daily loads and other restoration efforts that may be implemented on Threemile Creek. The three most upstream sites on Threemile Creek had similar water chemistry, characterized by a strong calcium-bicarbonate component; the most downstream site on Threemile Creek was affected by tidal fluctuations and mixing from Mobile Bay and had a strong sodium-chloride component. The water chemistry at the tributary site on Center Street was characterized by a strong sodium-chloride component; the water chemistry at the second tributary site, Toulmins Spring Branch, was characterized by a strong calcium component without a dominant anionic species. The ratios of sodium to chloride at the tributary at Center Street were higher than typical values for seawater, indicating that sources other than seawater (such as leaking or overflowing sewer systems or industrial discharge) likely are contributors to the increased levels of sodium and chloride. Concentrations of fluoride and boron also were elevated at this site, indicating possible anthropogenic sources. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations were not always within levels established by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management; continuous monitors recorded dissolved-oxygen concentrations that were repeatedly less than the minimum criterion (3.0 milligrams per liter) at the most downstream site on Threemile Creek. Water temperature exceeded the recommended criterion (32.2 degrees Celsius) at five of six sites in the Threemile Creek basin. The pH values were within established criteria (6.0 ? 8.5) at sites on Threemile Creek; however, pH values ranged from 7.2 to 10.0 at the tributary at Center Street and from 6.6 to 9.9 at Toulmins Spring Branch. Nutrient concentrations in the Threemile Creek basin reflect the influences of both land use and the complex hydrologic systems in the lower part of the basin. Nitrite-plus-nitrate concentrations exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ecoregion nutrient criteria in 88 percent of the samples. In 45 percent of the samples, total phosphorus concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency goal of 0.1 milligram per liter for preventing nuisance aquatic growth. Ratios of nitrogen to phosphorus indicate that both nutrients have limiting effects. Median concentrations of enterococci and fecal coliform bacteria were highest at the two tributary sites and lowest at the most upstream site on Threemile Creek. In general, concentrations o

  15. Secure Remote Access Issues in a Control Center Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Lee; McNair, Ann R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ISS finally reached an operational state and exists for local and remote users. Onboard payload systems are managed by the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC). Users access HOSC systems by internet protocols in support of daily operations, preflight simulation, and test. In support of this diverse user community, a modem security architecture has been implemented. The architecture has evolved over time from an isolated but open system to a system which supports local and remote access to the ISS over broad geographic regions. This has been accomplished through the use of an evolved security strategy, PKI, and custom design. Through this paper, descriptions of the migration process and the lessons learned are presented. This will include product decision criteria, rationale, and the use of commodity products in the end architecture. This paper will also stress the need for interoperability of various products and the effects of seemingly insignificant details.

  16. Identification, virulence, and mass spectrometry of toxic ECP fractions of West Alabama isolates of Aeromonas hydrophila obtained from a 2010 disease outbreak

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In West Alabama, disease outbreaks in 2009 caused by Aeromonas hydrophila have led to an estimated loss of more than $3 million. In 2010, disease outbreak occurred again in West Alabama, causing losses of hundreds of thousands of pounds of market size channel catfish. During the 2010 disease outbrea...

  17. Evaluation of Skills Needed in College Education by Colleges of Agriculture Alumni from 1862 and 1890 Land Grant Universities in Alabama and Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zekeri, Andrew A.; Baba, Pauline A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine college skills Alumni from 1862 and 1890 Land-Grant universities in Alabama and Tennessee rated as essential to acquire in their college education. The data are from a survey of colleges of agriculture alumni who graduated from six land-grant universities in Alabama and Tennessee. IBM SPSS Statistical…

  18. Paleoenvironmental analysis of the lower Oligocene Mint Spring and Marianna Formations across Mississippi and southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Pettway, W.C.; Dunn, D.A. (Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Examination of calcareous nannoplankton floras from the Mint Spring Formation and the Marianna Limestone indicates that these formations are diachronous along their outcrop belt in Mississippi and southwest Alabama. In east-central Mississippi and Alabama, these strata correlate to the Ericsonia subdisticha Zone (NP21), while in west-central Mississippi they contain nannofossils of the younger Helicopontosphaera reticulata Zone (NP22). Quantitative species abundance data for samples from 12 outcrops were subjected to R-mode and Q-mode factor analysis, and to discriminant analysis. These multivariate techniques reveal that the Mint Spring Formation was deposited in a shallow-water, nearshore inner-shelf environment, while normal pelagic sedimentation resulted in the Marianna Limestone being deposited as a carbonate shelf across east-central Mississippi and southwest Alabama. In west-central Mississippi, these strata were less affected by the transgression of northern Gulf waters in the early Oligocene, as indicated by higher abundances of shallow-water species within these formations. Based on discriminant analysis, the Mint Spring Formation and the Marianna Limestone reflect similar paleoenvironments in western Mississippi, with the uppermost Mint Spring samples near the formational contact containing nannofossil species assemblages that are indistinguishable from the nannofossil assemblages from the lowermost Marianna samples immediately above the contact. Both these units were deposited during the first half of sea-level cycle TA4.4, and based on relatively constant species abundances throughout the extent of both formations, the Mint Spring Formation and the Marianna Limestone appear to have been deposited as part of a single continuous transgression.

  19. Regional biostratigraphy and paleoenvironmental history of Miocene of onshore and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.C. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Subsurface Miocene sediments of coastal Alabama and the adjoining state and federal waters consist of a clastic wedge varying in thickness from less than 1,000 ft in southern Alabama to a maximum of about 6,000 ft in the northeastern portion of the Main Pass area. Relatively deep-water and open-marine transgressive basal Miocene clays and shales unconformably overlie a gently southwestward-dipping late Oligocene-earliest Miocene carbonate platform. Middle and late Miocene sediments consist of a regressive offlapping sequence of sand and shale deposited in varying neritic paleoenvironments. Analysis of planktonic and benthonic foraminifera has resulted in a refined biostratigraphic zonation of these sediments, permitting the recognition of several regional time-equivalent datum levels, or biohorizons. These biohorizons are shown on a series of subsurface cross sections that show the dramatic southwestward thickening of middle and late Miocene sediments as well as illustrate the relationships of the producing intervals within the Cibicides carstensi and Discorbis 12 interval zones. The paleoenvironmental history of the Miocene has been reconstructed on a series of paleobathymetric maps drawn for selected regional biohorizons. Among other features, these maps have proven the existence and outlined the margins of previously unrecognized shallow-meritic deltaic sediments in southeastern Mobile County and in the Chandeleur and Viosca Knoll (north) areas. Analysis of sedimentation rates, which range from less than 25 to 1,370 ft/m.y., further aids in understanding the coastal shelf, deltaic, and open-marine depositional history of the Miocene of Alabama and the adjoining state and federal waters.

  20. Characterization and geochemistry of Devonian oil shale north Alabama - south central Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rheams, K.F.; Neathery, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    Based on the physical and chemical data obtained to date, the Devonian oil shale rock of north Alabama and south-central Tennessee appears to offer an attractive potential for future resource development. The shale rock appears to have formed in a restrictive marine environment which provided opportunity for the accumulation of marine organic matter to form sufficient kerogen. The shale contains approximately 18% to 22% organic matter which is primarily kerogen. The kerogen has a relatively high H:C ratio indicative of an alginite and/or exinite source (Type 1 and Type II kerogen) and a high proportion of alkane and saturated ring hydrocarbons. However, a few samples have low H:C ratio values and are interpreted to have been formed in a shallow water oxdizing environment. Also, there is a possibility that these low H:C values may represent mixtures of terrestrial and marine organic material suggesting lateral facies changes of the rock from marine to near shore depositional environments. Trace metal values for both the whole rock and the shale oil fraction indicate a generally high V:Ni ratio, also indicative of a marine environment. Other trace metal values are in good agreement with data from other Devonian shales. Throughout the north Alabama and south-central Tennessee study area, the average oil yield from the shale is 13.9 gallon per ton. The highest oil yield values were obtained from the middle and upper parts of the shale sequence. Based on the crude oil composition diagram, the Alabama-Tennessee shale oil is classified as a aromatic-intermediate oil. Estimated reserves of inplace shale oil resources in the principal study area, under less than 200 feet of overburden, exceeds 12.5 billion barrels.

  1. A subsurface study of the Denkman sandstone member, Norphlet Formation, hatters Pond field, Mobile County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.; Anderson, E.G.; Baria, L.R. (Northeast Louisiana Univ., Monroe (USA)); Higginbotham, R.S.

    1990-09-01

    Hatters Pond field is in east-central Mobile County in southwestern Alabama and it produces from both the Norphlet and Smackover formations. The structural trap involves salt movement along the west side of the Mobile Fault System that resulted in a faulted salt anticline. The Norphlet Formation of southwestern Alabama consists of red to gray siltstone and pinkish to gray sandstone with conglomerate layers. Three facies have been distinguished within the Norphlet Formation: a lower shale, a red siltstone sequence, and an upper quartzose unit. The thickness of the formation ranges from a feather edge to more than 800 ft (234.8 m) in southwestern Alabama. The Upper Jurassic Denkman Sandstone Member of the Norphlet Formation at Hatters Pond field is a medium- to fine-grained, well-sorted arkosic sandstone between the underlying Norphlet redbed lithofacies and the carbonates of the overlying Smackover Formation. Here, the Denkman Member can be subdivided into a massive upper unit and a low- to high-angle cross-stratified lower unit. The sandstones are quartz-rich with a high percentage of feldspars. The majority of the feldspar grains observed are potassium feldspar. Microcline is usually less altered when compared with other types of feldspar grains. The major types of feldspar replacement include illitization, hematitization, dolomitization, chloritization, calcitization, vacuolization, and anhydritization. Carbonate replacement of feldspars is very abundant, mostly by ferroan dolomite. Rock fragments are not abundant in the Denkman Member, although there is good evidence of a metamorphic/volcanic source area. The sandstones are cemented by dolomite, calcite, anhydrite, and quartz and feldspar overgrowths. The lower Denkman unit is slightly more porous than the upper Denkman unit. The pore-lining authigenic clay, illite, greatly reduces permeability and porosity in these sandstones.

  2. Regimes contributory to progressive loss of Alabama coastal shoreline and wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Coastal survey data from the 1700s to the present indicate progressive loss of Alabama coastal shoreline and wetlands. Alabama coastal shoreline/wetland environments include those of bays, estuaries, Mississippi Sound, lagoons, lakes, fluvial deltas, and Gulf barrier. Areas showing the highest rates of loss include Mississippi Sound north shoreline and islands, Mobile Bay west shoreline, Gulf shoreline of Dauphin Island, and north shoreline of Morgan Peninsula. Other areas showing progressive substantial loss are Mobile Bay east shoreline, Perdido Bay, and Perdido estuary. The relationship between erosional loss and accretionary gain of Gulf barrier shoreline in Baldwin County (from Mobile Point to Alabama Point) is complex, but this shoreline appears to be generally stable with isolated short segments of erosional as well as accretionary beach. Negative economic results of shoreline/wetland loss include shoreline property devaluation, costs associated with erosion protection, and loss of wetlands supportive of fishery species reproduction. Accretionary gain of land areas appears to be negligible. Although no new wetlands appear to be developing along Mississippi Sound shoreline exposed to erosional affects of waves and currents, it is postulated that subsidence and drowning of terrane adjacent to Mississippi Sound is resulting in some new upland swamp and bayou areas. The balance between loss and gain of wetlands has not been estimated. General descriptions are given for the unique combinations of factors postulated as contributory to loss of specific shoreline/wetland. Primary factors associated with shoreline loss are wave, current, and tidal parameters, local subsidence, sea-level rise, position and character of natural barriers, position and nature of shoreline protection structures, anthropogenic effects, local bathymetry, shoreline orientation, local sediment budgets, and morphological and physical character of shoreline/wetland.

  3. Microbial community analysis of an Alabama coastal salt marsh impacted by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beazley, M. J.; Martinez, R.; Rajan, S.; Powell, J.; Piceno, Y.; Tom, L.; Andersen, G. L.; Hazen, T. C.; Van Nostrand, J. D.; Zhou, J.; Mortazavi, B.; Sobecky, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial community responses of an Alabama coastal salt marsh environment to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill were studied by 16S rRNA (PhyloChip) and functional gene (GeoChip) microarray-based analysis. Oil and tar balls associated with the oil spill arrived along the Alabama coast in June 2010. Marsh and inlet sediment samples collected in June, July, and September 2010 from a salt marsh ecosystem at Point Aux Pines Alabama were analyzed to determine if bacterial community structure changed as a result of oil perturbation. Sediment total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations ranged from below detection to 189 mg kg-1 and were randomly dispersed throughout the salt marsh sediments. Total DNA extracted from sediment and particulates were used for PhyloChip and GeoChip hybridization. A total of 4000 to 8000 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were detected in marsh and inlet samples. Distinctive changes in the number of detectable OTUs were observed between June, July, and September 2010. Surficial inlet sediments demonstrated a significant increase in the total number of OTUs between June and September that correlated with TPH concentrations. The most significant increases in bacterial abundance were observed in the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia. Bacterial richness in marsh sediments also correlated with TPH concentrations with significant changes primarily in Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, Nitrospirae, and Proteobacteria. GeoChip microarray analysis detected 5000 to 8300 functional genes in marsh and inlet samples. Surficial inlet sediments demonstrated distinctive increases in the number of detectable genes and gene signal intensities in July samples compared to June. Signal intensities increased (> 1.5-fold) in genes associated with petroleum degradation. Genes related to metal resistance, stress, and carbon cycling also demonstrated increases in oiled sediments. This study demonstrates the value of applying phylogenetic and functional gene microarray technology to characterize the extensive microbial diversity of marsh environments. Moreover, this technology provides significant insight into bacterial community responses to anthropogenic oil events.

  4. Interaction of Hyperthermal Atoms on Surfaces in Orbit: the University of Alabama Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    The University of Alabama experiment which flew on the STS-8 mission had several objectives which were mostly of a speculative nature since so little was known of the processes of interest. The experiment provided original data on: (1) oxidation of metal surfaces; (2) reaction rates of atomic oxygen with carbon and other surfaces and the dependence of these rates on temperature; and (3) the angular distribution of 5 eV atoms scattered off a solid surface. A review of the results is provided.

  5. Biological and geochemical data of gravity cores from Mobile Bay, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richwine, Kathryn A.; Marot, Marci; Smith, Christopher G.; Osterman, Lisa E.; Adams, C. Scott

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to understand the marine-influenced environments of Mobile Bay, Alabama, by collecting a series of box cores and gravity cores. One gravity core in particular demonstrates a long reference for changing paleoenvironmental parameters in Mobile Bay. Due to lack of abundance of foraminifers and (or) lack of diversity, the benthic foraminiferal data for two of the three gravity cores are not included in the results. The benthic foraminiferal data collected and geochemical analyses in this study provide a baseline for recent changes in the bay.

  6. Magnitude and Frequency of Floods on Small Rural Streams in Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedgecock, Timothy S.

    2004-01-01

    Equations for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods for small rural streams in Alabama are presented for recurrence intervals ranging from 2 to 500 years. Floodfrequency characteristics are documented for 43 streamflow gaging stations included in the analysis. Each station used has a drainage area less than 15 square miles and at least 10 years of record prior to 2003. None of these stations were affected by regulation or urbanization. Regression relations were developed using generalized least-square techniques to estimate flood magnitude and frequency on ungaged streams as a function of the drainage area of a basin.

  7. Depositional environments of the Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horsey, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    The Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation of the Black Warrior Basin in Alabama comprises as much as 3000m of shale, sandstone and coal. The boundary between the informal units of the Lower Pottsville strata include orthoquartzitic sandstone, shale, and coal interpreted as having been deposited in a barrier/back-barrier setting. Upper Pottsville strata consist of lithic arenite, shale, coal, and minor amounts of orthoquartzite, and are interpreted as representing a lateral gradation from lower delta plain to barrier bar. The change in sedimentation patterns in the middle part of the Pottsville suggests introduction into the basin of sediments from an eastern source.-from Author

  8. Depositional environment of the upper Jurassic Norphlet and Smackover formations, Hatters Pond field, Mobile County, Alabama 

    E-print Network

    Curtis, Robert Frederick

    1982-01-01

    ard longest oil column yet found in the Norphlet sandstone was discovered in Batters Pond field in 1974 at a depth of 18, 000 ft (5486. 4 m). Until 1974, toe Smackover Formation was the principle reservoir in the deep trend of Mississippi. Alabama... to Mississippi was on a shallow shelf as opposed to a ramp. In Florida, the carbor- ates were deposited in a tidal flat complex. Westward into Missis- sippi, deposition was on a broad shallow shelf. In central ?!ississip- pi, Smackover sandstones, which...

  9. Truncation of the Appalachian Piedmont beneath the Coastal Plain of Alabama: Evidence from new magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright Morton, J., Jr.; Zietz, Isidore; Neathery, Thornton L.

    1984-01-01

    A new aeromagnetic survey of a part of southern Alabama reveals that magnetic signatures of the Appalachian Piedmont are truncated by a major magnetic lineament beneath the Gulf Coastal Plain. Mylonitic rocks have been recovered from a drillhole along this lineament, which is probably a fault zone of late Paleozoic and/or Triassic-Jurassic age. We suggest that this fault zone may initially have been the Alleghanian convergent suture between the North American craton and accreted terranes to the southeast. The zone may have been locally reactivated as part of an extensive buried Triassic-Jurassic graben system.

  10. Procedure for locating 10 km UTM grid on Alabama County general highway maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paludan, C. T. N.

    1975-01-01

    Each county highway map has a geographic grid of degrees and tens of minutes in both longitude and latitude in the margins and within the map as intersection crosses. These will be used to locate the universal transverse mercator (UTM) grid at 10 km intervals. Since the maps used may have stretched or shrunk in height and/or width, interpolation should be done between the 10 min intersections when possible. A table of UTM coordinates of 10 min intersections is required and included. In Alabama, all eastings are referred to a false easting of 500,000 m at 87 deg W longitude (central meridian, CM).

  11. Delineation of geological problems for use in urban planning. [in Alabama using remote sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, T. H.; Bloss, P.; Fambrough, R.; Stow, S. H.; Hooks, W. G.; Freehafer, D.; Sutley, D.

    1976-01-01

    Activities of the University of Alabama in support of state and local planning commissions are reported. Demonstrations were given of the various types of remotely sensed images available from U-2, Skylab, and LANDSAT; and their uses and limitations were discussed. Techniques to be used in determining flood prone areas were provided for environmental studies. A rapid, inexpensive method for study was developed by which imagery is copied on 35 mm film and projected on existing topographic maps for measuring delta volume and growth.

  12. Benthic foraminiferal census data from Mobile Bay, Alabama--counts of surface samples and box cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richwine, Kathryn A.; Osterman, Lisa E.

    2012-01-01

    A study was undertaken in order to understand recent environmental change in Mobile Bay, Alabama. For this study a series of surface sediment and box core samples was collected. The surface benthic foraminiferal data provide the modern baseline conditions of the bay and can be used as a reference for changing paleoenvironmental parameters recorded in the box cores. The 14 sampling locations were chosen in the bay to cover the wide diversity of fluvial and marine-influenced environments on both sides of the shipping channel.

  13. Mission Manager Area of the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-35 mission was round the clock observation of the celestial sphere in ultraviolet and X-Ray astronomy with the Astro-1 observatory which consisted of four telescopes: the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT); the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE); the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT); and the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT). The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Teams of controllers and researchers directed on-orbit science operations, sent commands to the spacecraft, received data from experiments aboard the Space Shuttle, adjusted mission schedules to take advantage of unexpected science opportunities or unexpected results, and worked with crew members to resolve problems with their experiments. Pictured is Jack Jones in the Mission Manager Area.

  14. Critical Point Facility (CPF) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Critical Point Facility (CPF) team in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

  15. Crystal Growth Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) During the STS-42

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Crystal Growth team in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  16. Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) team in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

  17. Critical Point Facility (CPE) Group in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Critical Point Facility (CPE) group in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  18. Activities in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) During the STS-42 IML-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured are activities in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  19. Assessing American black bear habitat in the Mobile-Tensaw Delta of southwestern Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hersey, K.R.; Edwards, A.S.; Clark, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    American black bears (Ursus americanus) have been extirpated from all but a few areas in southwestern Alabama, and the remaining habitat is being rapidly lost to development. Remnant bear populations exist near extensive (> 125,000 ha) bottomland hardwood forests in the Mobile-Tensaw Delta (MTD), but those bottomland areas are rarely used by bears. Reintroduction of black bears to the MTD may improve viability of the remaining bear populations in southwestern Alabama. To evaluate the suitability of this area for bears, we compared habitat conditions at the MTD with similar alluvial habitats at White River National Wildlife Refuge (White River NWR), where bears are numerous. We measured overstory, midstory, and understory vegetation in the MTD and on the North and South management units at White River NWR. We used principal components analysis and principal variable selection to identify 9 variables associated with 5 principal components (hard mast, soft mast, cavity tree availability, large tree availability, and total basal area) that best explained variation among study areas. Differences among the study areas were associated with hard mast, soft mast, and cavity tree availability (P ??? 0.001). Hard and soft mast production in the MTD was lower than at White River NWR, but we believe it was adequate. However, suitable den trees, which may be a critical habitat component given the duration and severity of winter flooding, appeared to be lacking in the MTD.

  20. Effects of Section 404 permitting on freshwater wetlands in Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Sifneos, J.C.; Cake, E.W.; Kentula, M.E.

    1992-01-01

    Information was compiled on permits issued under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act for alteration of freshwater wetlands from January 1982-August 1987 in Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi. The location, area, wetland type, and other data describing the impacted and compensatory (i.e., created, restored, and preserved) wetlands were compiled and analyzed. Trends in Louisiana, the state with the most permits issued, were emphasized, and a synopsis of the results from Alabama and Mississippi is presented for comparison. The objective of the study was to uncover patterns and trends in Section 404 permitting in the three states to document the effects of the permit decisions. Only the information contained in the permit record was compiled and analyzed. No judgment was made concerning compliance with the terms of the permits or whether the compensatory wetland replaced the ecological functions of the wetland destroyed. The Section 404 permitting program could be evaluated more effectively if record-keeping was standardized. The accuracy and thoroughness of the report was affected by poor record-keeping and inconcise permit language. Requirements for follow-up monitoring and increasing the specificity of the information contained in the permits would provide information on the impacts to wetlands and their functions to be considered in future permit decisions.

  1. Three new percid fishes (Percidae: Percina) from the Mobile Basin drainage of Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, J.D.; Neely, D.A.; Walsh, S.J.; Burkhead, N.M.

    2007-01-01

    Three new species of Percina are described from upland drainages of the Mobile Basin. Two of the three species are narrowly distributed: P. kusha, the Bridled Darter, is currently known only from the Conasauga River drainage in Georgia and Tennessee and Etowah River drainage in Georgia, both tributaries of the Coosa River, and P. sipsi, the Bankhead Darter, which is restricted to tributaries of Sipsey Fork of the Black Warrior River in northwestern Alabama. The third species, P. smithvanizi, the Muscadine Darter, occurs above the Fall Line in the Tallapoosa River drainage in eastern Alabama and western Georgia. In a molecular analysis using mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence data, P. kusha and P. smithvanizi were recovered as sister species, while Percina sipsi was recovered in a clade consisting of P. aurolineata (P. sciera + P. sipsi). Two of the three species, P. kusha and P. sipsi, are considered to be imperiled species and are in need of conservation actions to prevent their extinction. Description of these three darters increases the number of described species of Percina to 44. Sixteen are known to occur in the Mobile Basin, including nine that are endemic. Copyright ?? 2007 Magnolia Press.

  2. Radioisotopic data of sediment collected in Mobile and Bon Secour Bays, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marot, Marci E.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study was to determine the extent of natural and (or) anthropogenic impacts on the sedimentary records of Mobile and Bon Secour Bays, Alabama during the last 150 years. These bays are unique in that anthropogenic activities are generally widespread and span both the eastern and western shorelines. However, there is a clear distinction in the types of human development and infrastructure between the western and eastern shorelines. These activities and the differences in land-use and -change influence the overall supply and remobilization of sediment to and within the bay. These factors could subsequently threaten the health and integrity of these environments and their ability to mitigate against long-term processes associated with climate change. In an attempt to characterize long-term accretion rates within the Mobile Bay Estuarine System (MBES), seven box cores were collected and analyzed for excess lead-210 (210Pbxs, the difference between total and supported 210Pb) and cesium-137 (137Cs) activities. The MBES receives sediment and water from the Alabama and Tombigbee River watersheds, which converge into the Mobile-Tensaw River (MTR) system just prior to discharging into Mobile Bay. Riverine discharge from the MTR system to the bay is second only to the Mississippi River discharge to the Gulf of Mexico for the conterminous United States.

  3. Preliminary water table map of surficial aquifer, Birmingham-Bessemer, Alabama from ADEM environmental assessment database

    SciTech Connect

    Bearce, D.N.; Neilson, M.J. (Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States). Geology Dept.); Carter, S.A. (Alabama Dept. of Environmental Management, Montgomery, AL (United States))

    1994-03-01

    The Birmingham-Bessemer metropolitan area lies in the Birmingham-Big Canoe Valley physiographic district of the Alabama Valley and Ridge and is underlain mainly by a lower Paleozoic (Cambrian to Ordovician) sequence of folded and faulted carbonate and minor clastic sedimentary rocks. In the birmingham area, the valley is bounded to the southeast by Red Mountain, a NE-trending cuesta capped by SE-dipping middle Paleozoic shales and sandstones, and to the northwest by Sand Mountain, along the southeast side of which the lower Paleozoic carbonates are thrust-faulted northwestward over upper Paleozoic clastic rocks. The valley is drained by Village and Valley Creeks, which flow generally to the southwest. Previous studies of groundwater in the Birmingham area have dealt with flow within the carbonates and have described both water-table and confined aquifers. This study concentrates on the surficial aquifer, the clay-silt residual soil above carbonate rocks, in the Birmingham-Bessemer metropolitan area. A water table map covering approximately 50 square miles has been prepared from data contained in 66 individual contamination site reports submitted to the Alabama Department of Environmental Management by various geotechnical and environmental firms during the past 10 years. Water table data used in map preparation were collected during all seasons, and at many sites collections were one-time events. All water table data from each site were averaged for this study. Data from several sites show water table fluctuations of as much as 4 feet from summer to winter.

  4. HIV risk and healthcare attitudes among detained adolescents in rural Alabama.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, B

    2000-03-01

    This qualitative study explored the dynamics of adolescent HIV risk through focus group interviews of male and female adolescents at an Alabama juvenile detention facility, key informant interviews, and through interviews of HIV-positive and -negative adults in institutional settings and public health clinics in Alabama. The interviews revealed that commodified or unprotected sex with multiple partners was a common risk activity for male and female adolescents, with a related high risk of sexually transmitted disease. The adolescents were aversive to condom use and lacked knowledge of the dynamics of HIV transmission. Bisexually behaving males who engaged in same-sex prostitution for money or drugs viewed female partners as the source of HIV infection. Illicit drug activity and risky sexual behavior were highly related to economic and status anxiety. Experiences of healthcare were often coercive or were undermined by negative perceptions of health professionals. These negative perceptions and avoidance or lack of access to healthcare compounded the already high risk of sexually transmitted disease for this group of adolescents. PMID:10763540

  5. Arthrophycus in the Silurian of Alabama (USA) and the problem of compound trace fossils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rindsberg, A.K.; Martin, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Arthrophycus brongniartii (Harlan, 1832) is common in marginal-marine deposits in the Silurian Red Mountain Formation of Alabama. The ichnospecies, the second to be named in North America, is revived and emended after long disuse. Transitional forms to Rusophycus isp. and other morphologic evidence indicate that the maker of Arthrophycus was an arthropod, perhaps a trinucleine (raphiophorid?) trilobite. Interconnection of Arthrophycus and Nereites biserialis, as well as intergradation of Arthrophycus with Cruziana aff. quadrata, Phycodes flabellum, and Asterosoma ludwigae, indicate that these Red Mountain trace fossils were made by the same species of arthropod. Possible relationships with Arthrophycus alleghaniensis (Harlan, 1831) in the Silurian belt from Ontario to Tennessee are also explored. Ichnofamily Arthrophycidae Schimper, 1879 is emended. The ichnofamily is interpreted as chiefly the work of arthropods. Arthrophycus and other trace fossils from the Silurian of Alabama constitute a test case to build criteria for recognizing the members of complexes of trace fossils. In general, criteria such as interconnection of different forms, intergradation among unconnected forms, similarity of size, similarity of morphologic elements, and co-occurrence should be examined in order to determine the biologic and ethologic interrelationships of trace fossils. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Thirty Thousand Years of Vegetation Changes in the Alabama Hills, Owens Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Peter A.; Anderson, R. Scott

    1995-03-01

    Twenty packrat ( Neotoma) middens recovered from three sites (1265-1535 m) in the Alabama Hills, Inyo County, California, provide a ca. 31,450-yr record of vegetation change. Located ca. 7 km east of the Sierra Nevada, the middens document that Utah juniper ( Juniperus osteosperma), Joshua tree ( Yucca brevifolia), and bitterbush ( Purshia tridentata) occupied the site between 31,450 and 19,070 yr B.P. Joshua tree and bitterbush departed by ca. 17,760 yr B.P., with cliffrose ( Purshia mexicana) and joint-fir ( Ephedra viridis) appearing. By 13,350 yr B.P., blackbush ( Coleogyne ramosissima) and cholla ( Opuntia echinocarpa) entered the record. Between 9540 and 7990 yr B.P., Utah juniper and other species now extralocal to the sites departed and modern components such as wolfberry ( Lycium andersonii) and rubber rabbitbrush ( Chrysothamnus teretifolius) appeared. The middle Holocene records little variation in plant macrofossil composition; however, pollen analysis reflects an increase in aquatic pollen types which might suggest more-open conditions. The transition to the modern vegetation associations at the sites occurred after ca. 2800 yr B.P. The record from the Alabama Hills correlates well with that of other regional vegetation data but documents conditions of increasing aridity earlier than many other packrat midden sites. A shift in understory vegetation between 19,070 and 17,760 yr B.P. may reflect a transition from glacial maximum to post-maximum conditions in the eastern Sierra Nevada.

  7. Cost effectiveness of the US Geological Survey stream-gaging program in Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jeffcoat, H.H.

    1987-01-01

    A study of the cost effectiveness of the stream gaging program in Alabama identified data uses and funding sources for 72 surface water stations (including dam stations, slope stations, and continuous-velocity stations) operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alabama with a budget of $393,600. Of these , 58 gaging stations were used in all phases of the analysis at a funding level of $328,380. For the current policy of operation of the 58-station program, the average standard error of estimation of instantaneous discharge is 29.3%. This overall level of accuracy can be maintained with a budget of $319,800 by optimizing routes and implementing some policy changes. The maximum budget considered in the analysis was $361,200, which gave an average standard error of estimation of 20.6%. The minimum budget considered was $299,360, with an average standard error of estimation of 36.5%. The study indicates that a major source of error in the stream gaging records is lost or missing data that are the result of streamside equipment failure. If perfect equipment were available, the standard error in estimating instantaneous discharge under the current program and budget could be reduced to 18.6%. This can also be interpreted to mean that the streamflow data records have a standard error of this magnitude during times when the equipment is operating properly. (Author 's abstract)

  8. Economic-environmental modeling of point source pollution in Jefferson County, Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Ellene; Schreiner, Dean F; Huluka, Gobena

    2002-05-01

    This paper uses an integrated economic-environmental model to assess the point source pollution from major industries in Jefferson County, Northern Alabama. Industrial expansion generates employment, income, and tax revenue for the public sector; however, it is also often associated with the discharge of chemical pollutants. Jefferson County is one of the largest industrial counties in Alabama that experienced smog warnings and ambient ozone concentration, 1996-1999. Past studies of chemical discharge from industries have used models to assess the pollution impact of individual plants. This study, however, uses an extended Input-Output (I-O) economic model with pollution emission coefficients to assess direct and indirect pollutant emission for several major industries in Jefferson County. The major findings of the study are: (a) the principal emission by the selected industries are volatile organic compounds (VOC) and these contribute to the ambient ozone concentration; (b) the direct and indirect emissions are significantly higher than the direct emission by some industries, indicating that an isolated analysis will underestimate the emission by an industry; (c) while low emission coefficient industries may suggest industry choice they may also emit the most hazardous chemicals. This study is limited by the assumptions made, and the data availability, however it provides a useful analytical tool for direct and cumulative emission estimation and generates insights on the complexity in choice of industries. PMID:12173425

  9. Lightning Behavior and its Dependence on Storm Kinematic and Precipitation Processes in Northern Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Elsie V.; Petersen, W. A,

    2009-01-01

    Numerous case studies and recent modeling studies have found that various metrics of updraft intensity appear to be reasonably well correlated to lightning production in thunderstorms, particularly severe thunderstorms. Indeed, the relationship between updraft and lightning flash rate is hypothesized to be the physical connection between a lightning "jump" signature and manifestations of severe weather such as tornadic activity. This study further examines this connection using a combination of dual Doppler wind retrievals made with the UAH ARMOR dual polarimetric and KHTX WSR 88D Doppler radar pair, together with northern Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data. The dual Doppler data were used to construct three dimensional wind fields and the retrieved vertical velocity fields were subsequently compared to collocated total lightning flash rates observed by the LMA. Particular attention was paid to the timing of updraft pulses relative to changes in the flash rate, with the goal of assessing impacts on warning decision lead time. Results from the analysis of severe and non severe thunderstorms in Northern Alabama will be presented including the EF 4 tornado producing supercell on 6 February 2008.

  10. The University of South Carolina School of Medicine RESIDENCY APPOINTMENTS

    E-print Network

    Almor, Amit

    Birmingham, Alabama Amanda Davis Anesthesiology University of Alabama Medical Center Birmingham, Alabama-Diagnostic University Medical Center Nashville, Tennessee Todd Gandy Internal Medicine Carolinas Medical Center

  11. Student and Faculty Opinions on the Impact of Web-Enhanced Courses on the Educational Experience at Alabama Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smallwood, Audrey Bandy

    2010-01-01

    This quantitative study examined the perceptions of Alabama community college students and faculty toward Web-enhanced courses and the impact of these courses on the educational experience as defined by Chickering and Gamson's "Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education," an empirically based model. Secondarily, the study sought…

  12. Family and Consumer Sciences Education. Focusing on Families, Work, and Their Interrelationships. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1996, No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This guide, which is intended for classroom teachers, supervisors, and administrators throughout Alabama, contains the minimum required content (core program) for public school instruction in family and consumer sciences education in grades 7-12. Presented first are the following: introduction examining the objectives/delivery of family and…

  13. Three-Year Non-Tenure Track Visiting Assistant Professor Position Geophysics -The University of Alabama Department of Geological

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    a strong record of research and a Ph.D. in geophysics, geology, or a related field by the time of Alabama Department of Geological Sciences The Department of Geological Sciences at The University of appointment. The successful candidate will be expected to teach introductory geology courses and undergraduate

  14. The Alabama Superintendent's Report Card: An Analysis of Local Education Agency Characteristics and Success at Meeting State Defined Performance Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Jerry G.; Hackett, E. Raymond

    Thirty-two states now have some form of accountability legislation that requires the reporting of school and school system performance indicators. This study examined the Alabama State Report Card to determine whether its information is sufficient to inform the public, legislature, and the media about the achievement of each school and school…

  15. The Status of Science and Social Studies Education in Selected Rural Schools of Northeast Alabama and Northwest Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, Stanley E.; King, Franklin L.

    The status of science and social studies education in rural schools seems marginal. This study collected information on the issue by an interview survey. Nine public schools that enrolled 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students in rural northeast Alabama and northwest Georgia were randomly selected for the study. The principal, librarian, a science…

  16. Summer Enrichment Workshop (SEW): A Quality Component of the University of Alabama's Gifted Education Preservice Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Jane L.; Gregg, Madeleine; Dantzler, John

    2009-01-01

    Summer Enrichment Workshop (SEW) is a clinical experience in the teacher preservice training program for gifted and talented (GT) master's degree interns at the University of Alabama. This mixed design study investigated the effects of the SEW clinical experience on interns' preparation to teach. Quantitative analysis demonstrated a statistically…

  17. Biostratigraphic, chronostratigraphic, and stratigraphic sequence analysis of Lower Tertiary marine sediments of Alabama for indicators of sea-level change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. R. Thompson; G. R. Baum

    1991-01-01

    Early Eocene to late Oligocene marine sedimentary units in southwestern Alabama were sampled at closely spaced intervals to derive a precise time-stratigraphic framework and to determine the paleoecological and mineralogical responses to fluctuations in sea level. Paleontologic control consisted of planktonic, smaller and larger benthonic foraminifera, calcareous nannofossils, dinoflagellates, and megafossils. Paleomagnetic reversals were delineated in two boreholes which, when

  18. An Assessment of Competencies Needed by Vocational Education Administrators in Alabama with Implications for Professional Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Richard A.; Selman, James W.

    One hundred vocational administrators in Alabama responded to a questionnaire designed to determine the following: (1) the administrative tasks performed by secondary-level vocational education administrators; (2) the administrator tasks performed by deans of instruction in teachnical colleges; (3) the perceived competency level of administrators…

  19. Dietary patterns and diet quality among diverse older adults: The University of Alabama at Birmingham study of aging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: To characterize dietary patterns among a diverse sample of older adults (= 65 years). Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Five counties in west central Alabama. Participants: Community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries (N=416; 76.8 ± 5.2 years, 56% female, 39% African American) in the Univer...

  20. Phytophthora species recovered from irrigation reservoirs in Mississippi and Alabama nurseries and pathogenicity of three new species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From a survey of containment ponds for Phytophthora spp. at one nursery each in Alabama and Mississippi, eight species and one taxon were recovered with P. gonapodyides dominant in cooler months and P. hydropathica in warmer months, accounting for 39.6% and 46.6% overall recovery, respectively. Amo...

  1. Hydraulic management in a soil moisture controlled SDI wastewater dispersal system in an Alabama black belt soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experimental field moisture controlled subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system was designed and installed as a field trial in a Vertisol in the Alabama Black Belt region for two years. The system was designed to start hydraulic dosing only when field moisture was below field capacity. Results sho...

  2. Role of water in the formation of the Late Cretaceous Wetumpka impact structure, inner Gulf Coastal Plain of Alabama, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David T. King; Jens Ormö; Lucille W. Petruny; Thornton L. Neathery

    2006-01-01

    The effect of shallow marine water (˜30-100 m deep) in the late excavation and early modification stages of a marine-target crater 5 km in diameter, as exemplified by the Late Cretaceous Wetumpka impact structure in Alabama, USA, is manifest in the early collapse of a weak part of the rim. Excavation flow and connate marine water are interpreted to be

  3. Plant-growth response to various combinations of mulches and spoil substrates on a Walker County, Alabama, surface coal mine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. A. Cross; F. C. Gabrielson; T. H. Hughes

    1982-01-01

    In 1978-1979, Walker County, Alabama, was the site of an experiment designed to assess plant growth and soil erosion. The experiment utilized 6 mulch treatments applied to each of 3 coal surface mine substrates. The mulches (wood fiber, hardwood bark, pine bark, waste compost, paper-slag, and no mulch application) were randomly combined with either A + B horizon soil, shale,

  4. Issues Related to the Quality of Life in West Alabama. Proceedings and Transcripts of a Public Forum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knopke, Harry J., Ed.

    A public forum on community water quality was conducted by tenth grade students participating in the University of Alabama's Biomedical Sciences Preparatory Program (BioPrep). BioPrep was designed to provide rural high school students with an intensified education concentrating on mathematics, science, communication, rural life, health, and…

  5. The Policies for the Evaluation of Tenured Faculty in Alabama's Public Colleges. ASHE Annual Meeting 1981 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolden, Samuel H.

    Post-tenure faculty evaluation policies in all public four-year colleges and universities in Alabama were studied. A total of 420 tenured and nontenured full-time faculty and tenured and nontenured administrators were administered questionnaires. A total of 68.8 percent of administrator respondents revealed that they had written policies to…

  6. USING LIDAR AND COLOR INFRARED IMAGERY TO SUCCESSFULLY MEASURE STAND CHARACTERISTICS ON THE WILLIAM B. BANKHEAD NATIONAL FOREST, ALABAMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey Stephens; Luben Dimov; Callie Schweitzer; Wubishet Tadesse

    Light detection and ranging (Lidar) and color infrared imagery (CIR) were used to quantify forest structure and to distinguish deciduous from coniferous trees for selected stands on the William B. Bankhead National Forest in Alabama. Lidar bare ground and vegetation point clouds were used to determine tree heights and tree locations. Lidar accuracy was assessed by comparing Lidar-derived tree heights

  7. EFFECT OF CROP ROTATION/TILLAGE SYSTEMS ON COTTON YIELD IN THE TENNESSEE VALLEY AREA OF ALABAMA, 1980-2001

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A replicated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) rotation experiment has been conducted for 22 years on a Decatur silt loam (fine, kaolinitic, thermic, Rhodic Paleudults) in the Tennessee Valley of northern Alabama. The highly productive soil with little disease and nematode problems resulted in cotton ...

  8. Inventory of Academic Programs. Volume Four. Public Technical Colleges. A Planning Document of the Alabama Commission on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    An inventory of academic programs offered for credit and leading to an academic award offered by Alabama's public technical colleges as of June 1, 1985, is presented. For each college and program, charts indicate program titles, levels of degrees offered, and accreditation status. Included are summary charts of degrees offered by program, i.e.,…

  9. Agriscience Technology Education. Preparing for Careers in Agricultural Science, Business, and Technology. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1996, No. 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This guide, which is intended for classroom teachers, supervisors, and administrators in Alabama, contains the minimum required content (core program) for public school instruction in agriscience technology in grades 7-12. Presented first are the following: introduction examining the mission, purpose, goals, and structure of agriscience technology…

  10. Angling vulnerability of black crappies, white crappies, and their naturally produced hybrid in Weiss Reservoir, Alabama, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vincent H. Travnichek; Michael J. Maceina; Rex A. Dunham

    1997-01-01

    We examined differences in angling vulnerability among black crappies Pomoxis nigromaculatus, white crappies Pomoxis annularis, and their naturally produced hybrid offspring in Weiss Reservoir, Alabama, USA, during spring and fall of 1992 and 1993. Proportions of crappie phenotypes (determined by starch-gel electrophoresis) in the reservoir were estimated from trapnet and electrofishing collections. We collected angled crappies from local resort owners

  11. A Brief Report on the Direct and Indirect Cost of Prison Incarceration in the State of Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulmer, John L.

    1995-01-01

    The costs for housing inmates were extrapolated from a survey of inmates and recidivists and from 1990 Alabama census data on family size and income and welfare recipients. Incarceration appeared to have hidden costs, and correctional education seemed the best known solution for reducing recidivism and decreasing the size of the prison population.…

  12. Business Education. Preparing Students for Employment in Business Occupations. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1996, No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This guide, which is intended for classroom teachers, supervisors, and administrators in Alabama, contains the minimum required content (core program) for public school instruction in business education in grades 7-12. Presented first are the following: introduction examining the mission, purpose, goals, and structure of business education;…

  13. Career Center Career Center

    E-print Network

    Stanford, Kyle

    Library Career Center Events R easons to get an internship 1. Test drive different career options 2. Gain network 5. Increase your marketability for future jobs and graduate school H ow to land an internship 1. Research Your Career Interests Narrow your career interests before you begin your internship search

  14. Heat Waves and Health Outcomes in Alabama (USA): The Importance of Heat Wave Definition

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Shia T.; McClure, Leslie A.; Zaitchik, Benjamin F.; Smith, Tiffany T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: A deeper understanding of how heat wave definition affects the relationship between heat exposure and health, especially as a function of rurality, will be useful in developing effective heat wave warning systems. Objective: We compared the relationships between different heat wave index (HI) definitions and preterm birth (PTB) and nonaccidental death (NAD) across urban and rural areas. Methods: We used a time-stratified case-crossover design to estimate associations of PTB and NAD with heat wave days (defined using 15 HIs) relative to non–heat wave control days in Alabama, USA (1990–2010). ZIP code–level HIs were derived using data from the North American Land Data Assimilation System. Associations with heat wave days defined using different HIs were compared by bootstrapping. We also examined interactions with rurality. Results: Associations varied depending on the HI used to define heat wave days. Heat waves defined as having at least 2 consecutive days with mean daily temperatures above the 98th percentile were associated with 32.4% (95% CI: 3.7, 69.1%) higher PTB, and heat waves defined as at least 2 consecutive days with mean daily temperatures above the 90th percentile were associated with 3.7% (95% CI: 1.1, 6.3%) higher NAD. Results suggest that significant positive associations were more common when relative—compared with absolute—HIs were used to define exposure. Both positive and negative associations were found in each rurality stratum. However, all stratum-specific significant associations were positive, and NAD associations with heat waves were consistently positive in urban strata but not in middle or rural strata. Conclusions: Based on our findings, we conclude that a relative mean-temperature-only heat wave definition may be the most effective metric for heat wave warning systems in Alabama. Citation: Kent ST, McClure LA, Zaitchik BF, Smith TT, Gohlke JM. 2014. Heat waves and health outcomes in Alabama (USA): the importance of heat wave definition. Environ Health Perspect 122:151–158;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307262 PMID:24273236

  15. Computer integrated manufacturing and technology transfer for improving aerospace productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrington, P. A.; Sica, J.

    1992-03-01

    This paper reviews a cooperative effort, between the Alabama Industial Development Training Institute and the University of Alabama in Huntsville, to implement a prototype computer integrated manufacturing system. The primary use of this system will be to educate Alabama companies on the organizational and technological issues involved in the implementation of advanced manufacturing systems.

  16. UA HUNTSVILLE PERSONAL DATA SHEET MSFC Remote

    E-print Network

    Alabama in Huntsville, University of

    of Birth (Mo./Day/Yr.) Place of Birth (City) State Country Height (In Inches) Weight (In Pounds) Hair Color Eye Color Male ____ Female____ Name of Emergency Contact Relationship to You Phone No. UAH Job Title

  17. Reservoir Simulation and Evaluation of the Upper Jurassic Smackover Microbial Carbonate and Grainstone-Packstone Reservoirs in Little Cedar Creek Field, Conecuh County, Alabama 

    E-print Network

    Mostafa, Moetaz Y

    2013-04-25

    This thesis presents an integrated study of mature carbonate oil reservoirs (Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation) undergoing gas injection in the Little Cedar Creek Field located in Conecuh County, Alabama. This field ...

  18. Aachen RWTH Aarhus University Aberdeen University Adelaide University Alabama University Alberta University Amsterdam University Arizona University Auckland University Australian National University Bath University Beijing

    E-print Network

    Tisdell, Chris

    Aachen RWTH Aarhus University Aberdeen University Adelaide University Alabama University Alberta University Amsterdam University Arizona University Auckland University Australian National University Bath University Beijing University Birmingham University Bologna University Bonn University Boston University

  19. The impact of cost on the availability of fruits and vegetables in the homes of schoolchildren in Birmingham, Alabama. — Measures of the Food Environment

    Cancer.gov

    Ard JD, Fitzpatrick S, Desmond RA, Sutton BS, Pisu M, Allison DB, Franklin F, Baskin ML. The impact of cost on the availability of fruits and vegetables in the homes of schoolchildren in Birmingham, Alabama.

  20. Student Pave Way for First Microgravity Experiments on International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Chemist Arna Holmes, left, from the University of Alabama in Huntsville, teaches NaLonda Moorer, center, and Maricar Bana, right, both from Terry Parker High School in Jacksonville, Fl, procedures for preparing protein crystal growth samples for flight aboard the International Space Station (ISS). NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, is a sponsor for this educational activity. The proteins are placed in plastic tubing that is heat-sealed at the ends, then flash-frozen and preserved in a liquid nitrogen Dewar. Aborad the ISS, the nitrogen will be allowed to evaporated so the samples thaw and then slowly crystallize. They will be analyzed after return to Earth. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  1. Ourcrop characterization of sandstone heterogeneity in Carboniferous reservoirs, Black Warrior basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Pashin, J.C.; Osborne, E.W.; Rindsberg, A.K.

    1991-08-01

    Where production is currently declining, improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling may be used to increase production of liquid hydrocarbons from reservoir sandstone in the Black Warrior basin. Characterizing reservoir heterogeneity provides information regarding how those strategies can best be applied, and exceptional exposures of asphaltic sandstone in north Alabama enable first-hand observation of such heterogeneity. This report identifies heterogeneity in Carboniferous strata of the Black Warrior basin on the basis of vertical variations, lithofacies analysis. Results of lithofacies analysis and depositional modeling were synthesized with existing models of sandstone heterogeneity to propose methods which may improve hydrocarbon recovery in Carboniferous sandstone reservoirs of the Black Warrior basin. 238 refs., 89 figs. 2 tabs.

  2. Freshwater mussels (Unionidae) in the headwaters of Chipola River, Houston County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garner, J.T.; McGregor, S.W.; Tarpley, T.A.; Buntin, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Big and Cowarts creeks lie in extreme southeastern Alabama and form the headwaters of Chipola River. Qualitative and quantitative sampling for freshwater mussels in these reaches during 2006 and 2007 revealed an intact fauna, relative to historical reports. A cumulative total of 17 species, including federally protected Elliptio chipolaensis (Chipola Slabshell), Lampsilis subangulata (Shinyrayed Pocketbook), Medionidus penicillatus (Gulf Moccasinshell), and Pleurobema pyriforme (Oval Pigtoe), was encountered. A total of 3382 mussels (density 5.84 per m2) was estimated for one 65-m reach of Big Creek and 9627 mussels (density 8.09 per m2) were estimated to occur in one 170-m reach of Cowarts Creek. Tributaries had depauperate faunas, apparently due to substrate instability.

  3. Flood-depth frequency relations for rural streams in Alabama, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, K.G.; Hedgecock, T.S.

    2010-01-01

    Drainage area was the most statistically significant independent variable tested. Addition of other significant variables did not decrease the standard error of prediction by more than 2 percent. Regression relations, for four different hydrologic regions, were developed to estimate flood depth for rural, ungaged streams as a function of the basin drainage area. These relations are based on computed depths that correspond to the flood magnitude and frequency for 164 streamgages in Alabama and 42 streamgages in adjacent States having at least 10 years of consecutive record. These relations utilize observed flood data collected through 2003. The geologic, physiographic, and climatic variability affecting flood depth is reflected in the constant (intercept) and exponent (slope) for each regional regression equation. Average standard errors of prediction for these regression equations range from 18 to 38 percent.

  4. Wind and tidal forcing of a buoyant plume, Mobile Bay, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumpf, R.P.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Pennock, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    AVHRR satellite imagery and in situ observations were combined to study the motion of a buoyant plume at the mouth of Mobile Bay, Alabama. The plume extended up to 30 km from shore, with a thickness of about 1 m. The inner plume, which was 3-8 m thick, moved between the Bay and inner shelf in response to tidal forcing. The tidal prism could be identified through the movement of plume waters between satellite images. The plume responded rapidly to alongshore wind, with sections of the plume moving at speeds of more than 70 cm s-1, about 11% of the wind speed. The plume moved predominantly in the direction of the wind with a weak Ekman drift. The enhanced speed of the plume relative to normal surface drift is probably due to the strong stratification in the plume, which limits the transfer of momentum into the underlying ambient waters. ?? 1993.

  5. Alabama Department of Archives and History: Online Multi-Media Collection

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-02-17

    Over the past few years, the Alabama Department of Archives and History has embarked on an ambitious project to make their public programs available to members of the web-browsing public. This site offers access to these programs, and visitors are welcome to look over the various selections here. Some of the recent programs include "Tecumseh at Tuckabatchee: Fact and Fiction," "My Father, Hank Williams," "The Coming of the Creek War," and "Civil War Pharmacy." Visitors can browse the programs by type from a drop-down menu that includes categories like Children's Activities and Book Talks. The site also contains links to relevant digital and print resources that are available through the Department, along with lists of suggest readings.

  6. Serosurveillance of Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus in Amphibians and Reptiles from Alabama, USA

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Sean P.; Hassan, Hassan K.; Chapman, Taryn; White, Gregory; Guyer, Craig; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is among the most medically important arboviruses in North America, and studies suggest a role for amphibians and reptiles in its transmission cycle. Serum samples collected from 351 amphibians and reptiles (27 species) from Alabama, USA, were tested for the presence of antibodies against EEEV. Frogs, turtles, and lizards showed little or no seropositivity, and snakes had high seropositivity rates. Most seropositive species were preferred or abundant hosts of Culex spp. mosquitoes at Tuskegee National Forest, that target ectothermic hosts. The cottonmouth, the most abundant ectotherm sampled, displayed a high prevalence of seropositivity, indicating its possible role as an amplification and/or over-wintering reservoir for EEEV. PMID:22403333

  7. Dr. Rocco A. Petrone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Dr. Rocco A. Petrone served at director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from January 26, 1973 to March 15, 1974. Prior to his tenure at Marshall, Petrone served as director of the Apollo program and director of launch operations at Kennedy Space Center. His career in rocket development and space programs began with his participation in the development of the Redstone missiles at the Army's Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. Upon his departure from Marshall, Petrone served as NASA Associate Administrator for Center Operations.

  8. Petroleum source rock potential of Mesozoic condensed section deposits in southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A; Tew, B.H.; Mink, R.M. (Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Because condensed section deposits in carbonates and siliclastics are generally fine-grained lithologies often containing relatively high concentrations of organic matter, these sediments have the potential to be petroleum source rocks if buried under conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation. In the Mesozoic deposits of southwestern Alabama, only the Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonate mudstones of the condensed section of the LZAGC-4.1 cycle have realized their potential as hydrocarbon source rocks. These carbonate mudstones contain organic carbon concentrations of algal and amorphous kerogen of up to 1.7% and have thermal alteration indices of 2- to 3+. The Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa marine claystones of the condensed section of the UZAGC-2.5 cycle are rich (up to 2.9%) in herbaceous and amorphous organic matter but have not been subjected to burial conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation. The Jurassic Pine Hill/Norphlet black shales of the condensed section of the LZAGC-3.1 cycle and the Upper Jurassic Haynesville carbonate mudstones of the condensed section of the LZAGC-4.2 cycle are low (0.1%) in organic carbon. Although condensed sections within depositional sequences should have the highest source rock potential, specific environmental, preservational, and/or burial history conditions within a particular basin will dictate whether or not the potential is realized as evidenced by the condensed sections of the Mesozoic depositional sequences in southwestern Alabama. Therefore, petroleum geologists can use sequence stratigraphy to identify potential source rocks; however, only through geochemical analyses can the quality of these potential source rocks be determined.

  9. Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic oil reservoirs of the updip basement structure play: Southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mink, R.M.; Mancini, E.A. [Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Exploration for Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic reservoirs associated with updip basement structures currently is the most active exploratory oil play in Alabama. High initial flow rates, on the order of hundreds to thousands of barrels of oil per day, are commonly encountered at depths between 8,200 and 14,500 feet. Fifty-one fields have been established and 25 million barrels of oil have been produced from these fields developed in Lower Cretaceous Hosston and Upper Jurassic Haynesville, Smackover, and Norphlet reservoirs. Production from Smackover carbonates began at Toxey field in 1967 and from Haynesville sandstones at Frisco City field in 1986. As of September 1994, Smackover wells averaged 88 barrels of oil per day and Haynesville wells averaged 284 barrels of oil per day. In 1994, production was established in the Norphlet at North Excel field and in the Hosston at Pleasant Home field. Reservoirs in the updip basement structure play cluster in three distinct areas; (1) a western area on the Choctaw ridge complex, (2) a central area on the Conecuh ridge complex, and (3) an eastern area in the Conecuh embayment. Reservoir lithologies include Smackover limestones and dolostones and Hosston, Haynesville, Smackover, and Norphlet sandstones. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps where reservoirs occur on the flanks or over the crests of basement palohighs. An understanding of the complex reservoir properties and trap relationships is the key to successful discovery and development of Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic oil reservoirs of the updip basement structure play of southwest Alabama.

  10. Porosity and cementation in upper Cretaceous Mooreville and Demopolis Chalks, central Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Holston, I.; King, D.T. Jr.; Bittner, E. (Auburn Univ., AL (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Cyclically arranged chalky marl, marl, limestone, and sand facies comprise the Upper Cretaceous Mooreville and Demopolis Chalks, the lower two formation in the Selma Group, inner Coastal Plain of Alabama. In the central Alabama study area (Dallas, Lowndes, and Montgomery Counties), the Mooreville-Demopolis section is 305 m thick and the two main facies are chalky marl and marl. Chalky marl consists of 50-70% carbonate (nannofossil component plus isopachous cement) and is relatively impermeable (average permeability is 0.9 md). The marl has 30-50% carbonate (mainly nannofossil component) and has an average permeability of 0.13 md. Helium-calibrated porosity values range from 31 to 35% in chalky marl and 36 to 41% in the marl. Scanning-electron microscopy (SEM) of chalky marl and marl shows a relatively poor alignment of phyllosilicate grains in both facies. Under SEM, the calcareous nannofossil component, mainly coccoliths and rhabdoliths, shows pristine to cement-coated exterior surfaces. The cement coating is most common in the chalky marl. Sampling throughout the Mooreville-Demopolis section shows no apparent vertical (stratigraphic) trends in facies-specific petrologic characteristics such as permeability, helium-calibrated porosity, phyllosilicate grain alignment, nannofossil content, and extent of cementation. The most parsimonious explanation of the development and evolution of porosity and cementation in the study area is as follows. First, simple mechanical compaction from burial under a few hundred meters of sediment can readily explain the reduction in porosity to less than 40% in most samples from the Mooreville-Demopolis section. Secondary (facies-selective) cementation is a further cause for porosity reduction in chalky marl. Cementation is likely the result of calcareous nannofossil dissolution during compaction and carbonate solution-transfer via groundwater movement.

  11. Nanotechnology Center for Learning and Teaching

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-07-13

    The Nanotechnology Center for Learning and Teaching (NCLT) was conceived "to serve students, teachers, faculty, researchers, parents and professionals who are engaged in the learning, teaching, research & development of nanotechnology." On NCLT's well-designed homepage, visitors can take advantage of sections that include Higher Education, K-12 Teachers, and Events. In the Higher Education area, visitors can look through lesson plans, research posters, and seminars that deal with various aspects of nanotechnology research and development. The online lessons here are quite good and include subjects such as "Nanopatterning: The science of making things small from the top-down" and "Optical Tweezers." Visitors shouldn't miss the Featured News area which includes updates from the world of nanotechnology from the U.S. Army, Alabama A&M University, and other organizations. Finally, visitors can use the Community area to find out about resources developed by other partner institutions.

  12. Exploring a Physically Based Tool for Lightning Cessation: A Preliminary Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Elise V.; Petersen, Walter a.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Deierling, Wiebke

    2010-01-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UA Huntsville) and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center are collaborating with the 45th Weather Squadron (45WS) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) to enable improved nowcasting of lightning cessation. The project centers on use of dual-polarimetric radar capabilities, and in particular, the new C-band dual-polarimetric weather radar acquired by the 45WS. Special emphasis is placed on the development of a physically based operational algorithm to predict lightning cessation. While previous studies have developed statistically based lightning cessation algorithms, we believe that dual-polarimetric radar variables offer the possibility to improve existing algorithms through the inclusion of physically meaningful trends reflecting interactions between in-cloud electric fields and microphysics. Specifically, decades of polarimetric radar research using propagation differential phase has demonstrated the presence of distinct phase and ice crystal alignment signatures in the presence of strong electric fields associated with lightning. One question yet to be addressed is: To what extent can these ice-crystal alignment signatures be used to nowcast the cessation of lightning activity in a given storm? Accordingly, data from the UA Huntsville Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR) along with the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array are used in this study to investigate the radar signatures present before and after lightning cessation. A summary of preliminary results will be presented.

  13. Comparative Licensing Study: Profiles of State Day Care Licensing Requirements. Day Care Centers. Volume 1: Alabama - Illinois. Revised Edition 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson (Lawrence) and Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Updating the Administration for Children, Youth and Families' 1978 "Comparative Licensing Study," a study was conducted to provide a common framework for assessing state activities in critical child care licensing areas and to record the status of child care licensing as of March 1981 in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico,…

  14. Full-Scale Evaluation of Mercury Control with Sorbent Injection and COHPAC at Alabama Power E.C. Gaston

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Jean Bustard; Michael Durham; Charles Lindsey; Travis Starns; Ken Baldrey; Cameron Martin; Richard Schlager; Sharon Sjostrom; Rick Slye; Scott Renninger; Larry Monroe; Richard Miller; Ramsay Chang

    2002-01-01

    The overall objective of this project was to determine the cost and impacts of Hg control using sorbent injection into a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC) at Alabama Power’s Gaston Unit 3. This test is part of a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to obtain the necessary information to assess the costs

  15. Time-of-travel and reaeration data for seven small streams in Alabama, June 1983 to August 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Time-of-travel and reaeration data were collected between June 1983 and August 1984 for seven small streams in Alabama. Rhodamine WT was used as a tracer for all the studies and propane was used in the reaeration studies. Mean velocities through the study reaches ranged from 0.06 to 0.67 ft/sec. Computed reaeration coefficients, corrected to 20 C, ranged from 1.7 to 45.8 days-1. (USGS)

  16. Program in Functional Genomics of Autoimmunity and Immunology of yhe University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Alan M Kaplan

    2012-10-12

    This grant will be used to augment the equipment infrastructure and core support at the University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama particularly in the areas of genomics/informatics, molecular analysis and cell separation. In addition, we will promote collaborative research interactions through scientific workshops and exchange of scientists, as well as joint exploration of the role of immune receptors as targets in autoimmunity and host defense, innate and adaptive immune responses, and mucosal immunity in host defense.

  17. Effect of Native American ancestry on iron-related phenotypes of Alabama hemochromatosis probands with HFE C282Y homozygosity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James C Barton; Ellen H Barton; Ronald T Acton

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In age-matched cohorts of screening study participants recruited from primary care clinics, mean serum transferrin saturation values were significantly lower and mean serum ferritin concentrations were significantly higher in Native Americans than in whites. Twenty-eight percent of 80 Alabama white hemochromatosis probands with HFE C282Y homozygosity previously reported having Native American ancestry, but the possible effect of this ancestry

  18. Effect of watershed parameters on mercury distribution in different environmental compartments in the Mobile Alabama River Basin, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimberly A. Warner; Jean-Claude J. Bonzongo; Eric E. Roden; G. Milton Ward; Adrian C. Green; Indrajeet Chaubey; W. Berry Lyons; D. Albrey Arrington

    2005-01-01

    Total mercury (THg) and mono-methylmercury (MeHg) levels in water, sediment, and largemouth bass (LMB) (Micropterus salmoides) were investigated at 52 sites draining contrasting land use\\/land cover and habitat types within the Mobile Alabama River Basin (MARB). Aqueous THg was positively associated with iron-rich suspended particles and highest in catchments impacted by agriculture. Sediment THg was positively associated with sediment organic

  19. Preliminary engineering for a 50MW compressed-air energy storage plant for Alabama Electric Cooperative, Inc

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. R. Clausen; M. Nakhamkin; E. C. Swensen

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary engineering results for a 50-MW compressed-air energy storage (CAES) plant for the Alabama Electric Cooperative, Inc. (AEC). The CAES plant would improve AEC's power generation mix in two ways: (a) it would provide needed peaking\\/intermediate power (otherwise purchased) and (b) it would increase the load factor of economical baseload units. This paper presents the following: (1)

  20. Analysis of T-105 Fractionation Column failure at the Wilsonville, Alabama, Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) pilot plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. B. Baylor; J. R. Keiser; B. C. Leslie; M. D. Allen; R. W. Swindeman

    1980-01-01

    The T-105 Fractionation Column at the Wilsonville, Alabama, Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) pilot plant was removed from service in February 1979, when corrosion had exceeded design limits. Inspection revealed general thinning of vessel walls and internal components as well as pitting and localized attack in weld heat-affected zones. On-site metallography also revealed some intergranular attack of the vessel wall. Metallographic