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1

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE STUDENT POPULATION, UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA RESIDENT CENTER, HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE MAIN PURPOSE OF THIS 1959 SURVEY WAS TO ANALYZE SOME OF THE BASIC CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA RESIDENT CENTER, HUNTSVILLE. FINDINGS WERE TABULATED IN SUMMARY FORM AND BY MAJOR FIELDS OF ACADEMIC INTEREST. OF THE STUDENTS (LARGELY YOUNG ADULTS), 51 PERCENT WERE IN ENGINEERING. ONLY 16 PERCENT WERE FEMALE. MOST…

FRANKLIN, ELTON

2

Monkey Baker at U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On May 28, 1958, Jupiter Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile provided by U.S. Army team in Huntsville, Alabama, launched a nose cone carrying Baker, a South American squirrel monkey and Able, an American-born rhesus monkey. Baker, pictured here and commonly known as 'Miss Baker', was later given a home at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center until her death on November 29, 1984. Able died in 1958. (Photo - Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

1958-01-01

3

An Overview of In-Stu Treatability Studies at Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is located in Huntsville, Alabama (north-central Alabama), on approximately 1,840 acres near the center of the U.S. Army's Redstone Arsenal (RSA). MSFC is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) principal propulsion development center. Its scientists, engineers, and support personnel play a major role in the National Space Transportation System by managing space shuttle mission activities, including the microgravity laboratory. In addition, MSFC will be a significant contributor to several of NASA's future programs, including the Reusable Launch Vehicle (X-33), International Space Station, and Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, as well as research on a variety of space science applications. MSFC has been used to develop, test and manufacture space vehicles and components since 1960, when civilian rocketry and missile activities were transferred from RSA to MSFC. In 1994, MSFC was placed on the National Priority List for the management of hazardous waste sites, under the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). One requirement of the CERCLA program is to evaluate the nature and extent of environmental contamination resulting from identified CERCLA sites, assess the public health and environmental risks associated with the identified contamination, and identify potential remedial actions. A CERCLA remedial investigation (RI) for the groundwater system has identified at least five major plumes of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) in the groundwater beneath the facility. These plumes are believed to be the result of former management practices at 14 main facility locations (termed "source areas") where CVOCs were released to the subsurface. Trichloroethene (TCE) is the predominant CVOC and is common to all the plumes. Perchloroethene (PCE) also exists in two of the plumes. In addition to TCE and PCE, carbon tetrachloride and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane are contained in one of the plumes. The CVOCs are believed to exist as dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) beneath many of the source areas.

McElroy, Bill; Keith, Amy; Glasgow, J. K.; Dasappa, Srini; McCaleb, Rebecca (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

4

Solar heating and hot water system installed at the Senior Citizen Center, Huntsville, Alabama. [Includes engineering drawings  

SciTech Connect

Information is provided on the solar energy system installed at the Huntsville Senior Citizen Center. The solar space heating and hot water facility and the project involved in its construction are described in considerable detail and detailed drawings of the complete system and discussions of the planning, the hardware, recommendations, and other pertinent information are included. The facility was designed to provide 85 percent of the hot water and 85 percent of the space heating requirements. Two important factors concerning this project for commercial demonstration are the successful use of silicon oil as a heat transfer fluid and the architecturally aesthetic impact of a large solar energy system as a visual centerpoint. There is no overheat or freeze protection due to the characteristics of the silicon oil and the design of the system. Construction proceeded on schedule with no cost overruns. It is designed to be relatively free of scheduled maintenance, and has experienced practically no problems.

Not Available

1980-02-01

5

78 FR 35603 - Foreign-Trade Zone 83-Huntsville, Alabama; Application for Production Authority; Toray Carbon...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Foreign-Trade Zone 83--Huntsville, Alabama; Application for Production Authority; Toray Carbon Fibers America, Inc.; (Polyacrylonitrile Fiber/Carbon Fiber Production), Decatur, Alabama An application has been submitted to the...

2013-06-13

6

Sounding rocket instrument development at Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville/NASA MSFC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an overview of solar sounding rocket instruments developed jointly by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) is an EUV (19.3 nm) imaging telescope which was flown successfully in July 2012. The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a Lyman Alpha (121.6 nm) spectropolarimeter developed jointly with the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and scheduled for launch in 2015. The Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrograph is a soft X-ray (0.5-1.2 keV) stigmatic spectrograph designed to achieve 5 arcsecond spatial resolution along the slit.

Kobayashi, Ken; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Savage, Sabrina; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig; DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan; Podgorski, William; Kano, Ryouhei; Narukage, Noriyuki; Trujillo-Bueno, Javier

2013-09-01

7

Cooperative Education: Entrepreneurial Development by Colleges and Universities. A Case Study of Oakwood College, Huntsville, Alabama.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The entrepreneurial development and experiential education environments of Oakwood College, Huntsville, Alabama, are described. The college-owned industries of the dairy, farm, garment and linen service, bakery, food manufacturing, convenience store, and snack bar are discussed in terms of markets and marketing, permissions and protections,…

Kramer, Frank

8

The Alabama Space and Rocket Center: The Second Decade.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Alabama Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, the world's largest rocket and space museum, includes displays illustrating American rocket history, exhibits and demonstrations on rocketry principles and experiences, and simulations of space travel. A new project includes an integrated recreational-educational complex, described in the three…

Buckbee, Edward O.

1983-01-01

9

A GIS approach to urban heat island research: The case of Huntsville, Alabama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The urban heat island represents a case of inadvertent human modification of climate in an urban environment. Urbanization changes the nature of the surface and atmospheric properties of a region. As a result, radiation balance in the urban areas is altered and sensible heat is added to the point that urban areas are warmer than surrounding rural areas. At the boundary between the rural and urban area, a sharp rise in temperature occurs, culminating to a peak temperature at the central business district of the city, hence the name 'urban heat island'. The extent and intensity of the urban heat island are a function of population size, land use, and topography. Because the urban heat island exhibits spatial variations of temperatures, the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) is appropriate. The research on the urban heat island focuses on the acquisition of 15 bands of visible and thermal infrared data (ranging from 0.45 to 12.2 microns) from an aerial platform using NASA's ATLAS (Airborne Thermal/Visible Land Application Sensor) over Huntsville, Alabama. The research reported in this paper is an analysis of the impact of population, land use, and topography on the shape of the urban heat island that could be developed in Huntsville using the GIS approach. The outcome of this analysis can then be verified using the acquired remotely sensed data.

Lo, Chor Pong

1994-01-01

10

A Comparison of the Societal Impacts and Warning Operations for the 1989 and 2010 Huntsville, Alabama Tornadoes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The city of Huntsville, Alabama lies within a region of the United States known as the Tennessee Valley, which is not traditionally associated with “Tornado Alley”. However, latest research indicates that most tornado fatalities occur in the lower Arkansas, Tennessee, and Mississippi River Valleys. Huntsville has had its share of tornadic events, including the two tornadoes in this study. On 15 November 1989, a large F4 tornado tracked through south Huntsville with little to no advance warning at the start of the evening rush hour. There were a total of 21 fatalities and 463 injuries. On 21 January 2010, an EF2 tornado moved through downtown Huntsville during peak evening rush hour, but this time there were no fatalities and only three injuries. The choices made by both the National Weather Service and core partners of the agency during these two tornadic events will be discussed, as well as how these choices either mitigated or amplified the environmental effects registered by the general populous of Huntsville. While the decision support services such as warning decisions and communications provided by National Weather Services' Huntsville are important, the resulting action taken by the public is just as crucial; an investigation into the societal impacts pertaining to these two tornadoes will be shared. Future National Weather Services' Huntsville decision support services and choices will be shaped by the present research in an effort to mitigate the impacts of another tornado striking Huntsville. This research was conducted as part of an internship for the NOAA Educational Partnership Program scholarship in which I participate.

Betancourt-Negron, A. M.; Coyne, M.; Scotten, K.; Lee, J. L.

2010-12-01

11

Change Detection Analysis in Urban and Suburban Areas Using Landsat Thematic Mapper data: Case of Huntsville, Alabama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images, from July 1984 and July 1992, were used to identify land use/cover changes in the urban and suburban fringe of the city of Huntsville, Alabama. Image difference was the technique used to quantify the change between the two dates. The eight-year period showed a 16% change, mainly from agricultural lands to urban areas generated by the settlement of industrial, commercial, and residential areas. Visual analysis of the change map (i.e., difference image) supported this phenomenon by showing that most changes were occurring in the vicinity of the major roads and highways across the city.

Kuan, Dana; Fahsi, A.; Steinfeld S.; Coleman, T.

1998-01-01

12

The University of Alabama in Huntsville Business Interruption Insurance (BII) Usage Policy  

E-print Network

in Huntsville qualify for administrative, jury duty, bereavement leave, and military leave. Employees budgeted external agencies for administrative leave, jury duty, bereavement leave, or military leave taken by ledger-5 employees. It has been the general practice at the University to pay full salary to ledger-5

Alabama in Huntsville, University of

13

Luminous electrical phenomena in Huntsville, Alabama, tornadoes on April 3, 1974  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Unusual lightning and varicolored luminous phenomena were observed on the evening of April 3, 1974, when severe tornadoes passed through Madison County, Alabama. Photographs and eyewitness accounts of this electrical activity are related to the trajectories of the tornadoes and the damage areas they produced.

Vaughan, O. H., Jr.; Vonnegut, B.

1976-01-01

14

Alternative-fuel production facility for City of Huntsville, Alabama. Volume I. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of a Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)-to-energy project in the Huntsville area was invetigated and found to be an environmentally attractive and cost effective method of MSW disposal. Of nine likely alternatives, that were developed for detailed evaluation and analysis. Alternative 1M surfaced as best for the City. It is described as follows: a MSW-To-Energy Plant, consisting of two 300 TPD Mass Burning Waterwall Furnace/Boiler Systems at Lowe Industrial Park to provide low pressure steam to industries in the park. A MSW Transfer Station at the existing landfill and MSW as well as residue transport rolling stock equipment is included to facilitate movement of the waste materials between the two locations that are some twelve miles apart.

Not Available

1982-10-01

15

Solar energy system performance evaluation: Seasonal report for IBM system 1A, Huntsville, Alabama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The operational and thermal performance of the solar energy system, Sims Prototype System 1A, is described. The system was designed by IBM to provide 50 to 60 percent of the space heating and domestic hot water preheating load to a 2,000 square foot floor space single family residence in the Huntsville area. The load design temperature inside the building was to be maintained at 70 degrees fahrenheit with auxiliary energy for heating supplied by an electric heat pump assisted by an electric resistance strip heater. In general the disappointing operation of this system is attributed to the manner in which it was used. The system was designed for residential application and used to satisfy the demands of an office environment. The differences were: (1) inside temperature was not maintained at 70 F as expected; and (2) hot water usage was much lower than expected. The conclusion is that the solar energy system must be designed for the type of application in which it is used. Misapplication usually will have an adverse affect on system performance.

1980-01-01

16

Characterization and applications of VLF/LF source locations from lightning using the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Arrays that detect and locate the four-dimensional spacetime positions of radiation sources from lightning have largely utilized sensors sensitive to the very high frequency (VHF) regime with ˜ 15 km baselines or very low frequency/low frequency (VLF/LF) regime with ˜ 100 km baselines. This paper details initial results from the newly developed Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array (HAMMA), consisting of Marx meters (electric field change meters) sensitive to a frequency band ˜ 1 Hz to 400 kHz. The arrival time of HAMMA waveforms due to radiation sources from lightning are used to determine the spacetime position of these sources. The locations are compared with two well-documented and operational arrays, the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). The standard deviation of the difference between HAMMA and NLDN locations of return strokes is 305 and 266 m in x and y, respectively, while the standard deviation of the difference between HAMMA and NALMA sources is 237, 226, and 688 m in x, y and z, respectively. We further show that NLDN intracloud locations differ in horizontal distance from the corresponding HAMMA locations by a median value of 479 m. In addition, we use HAMMA source locations to map several lightning flashes in the VLF/LF and show HAMMA sources largely map out the same electrical extent as VHF sources and provide unique insights to the properties of the discharges occurring. Finally, we show that VLF/LF sources can determine the leader polarity in several example flashes but not necessarily whether a flash comes to ground. Copyright 2013 American Geophysical Union. All rights reserved.

Bitzer, Phillip M.; Christian, Hugh J.; Stewart, Mike; Burchfield, Jeff; Podgorny, Scott; Corredor, David; Hall, John; Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Franklin, Veronica

2013-04-01

17

Activity in the Shuttle Action Center (SAC) of the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Launched on June 20, 1996, the STS-78 mission's primary payload was the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS), which was managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). During the 17 day space flight, the crew conducted a diverse slate of experiments divided into a mix of life science and microgravity investigations. In a manner very similar to future International Space Station operations, LMS researchers from the United States and their European counterparts shared resources such as crew time and equipment. Five space agencies (NASA/USA, European Space Agency/Europe (ESA), French Space Agency/France, Canadian Space Agency /Canada, and Italian Space Agency/Italy) along with research scientists from 10 countries worked together on the design, development and construction of the LMS. This photo was taken in the Shuttle Action Center (SAC) of the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at MSFC during the mission.

1996-01-01

18

Simulations of flooding on the Tennessee River in the vicinity of U.S. Highway 231 near Huntsville, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A two-dimensional finite-element surface-water model was used to study the effects of proposed modifications to the U.S. Highway 231 corridor on water-surface elevations and flow distributions during flooding in the Tennessee River Basin south of Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama. Flooding was first simulated for the March 19, 1973, flood for the existing conditions in order to calibrate the model to measured data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during and after the flood. After model calibration, the effects of flooding were simulated for two scenarios---existing and proposed conditions----for the 100-year and 500-year recurrence intervals. The first scenario was to simulate the existing bridge and highway configuration for the U.S. Highway 231 crossing of the Tennessee River flood plain. The second scenario was to simulate the proposed modifications to this bridge and highway configuration. The simulation of floodflow for the Tennessee River flood of March 19, 1973, in the study reach compared closely to discharge measurement and flood profile data obtained during and after the flood. The flood of March 19, 1973, had an estimated peak discharge of 323,000 cubic feet per second and was estimated to be about 50-year flood event. Simulation of the 100-year floodflow for the Tennessee River for the existing conditions at U.S. Highway 231 indicates that of the peak flow, 92.1 percent (316,500 cubic feet per second) was conveyed by the main channel bridge, 4.0 percent (13,800 cubic feet per second) by the northernmost relief bridge, and 3.8 percent (13,200 cubic feet per second) by the southernmost relief bridge. The water-surface elevation predicted in the vicinity of the USGS gaging station was 576.91 feet. No overtopping of U.S. Highway 231 occurrec. For the 500-year flood, the simulation indicates that of the peak flow, 89.2 percent (359,000) cubic feet per second) was conveyed by the main channel bridge, 5.6 percent (22,600 cubic feet per second) by the northernmost relieft bridge, and 5.2 percent (20,900 cubic feet per second) by the southernmost relief bridge. The water-surface elevation predicted in the vicinity of the USGS gaging station was 580.91 feet. No overtopping of U.S. Highway 231 occurred; however, the girders of both relief bridges were partially submerged. Simulation of the 100-year floodflow for the Tennessee River for the proposed conditions indicates that of the peak flow, 93.2 percent (319,800 cubic feet per second) was conveyed by the proposed main channel bridge, 3.3 percent (11,400 cubic feet per second) by the proposed northernmost relief bridge, and 3.4 percent (11,800 cubic feet per second) by the proposed southernmost relief bridge. The water-surface elevation predicted in the vicinity of the USGS gaging station was 576.93 feet. No overtopping of U.S. Highway 231 occurred. For the 500-year flood, the simulation indicates that of the peak flow, 90.9 percent (365,400 cubic feet per second) was conveyed by the proposed main channel bridge, 4.3 percnet (17,300 cubic feet per second) by the proposed northernmost relief bridge, and 4.8 percent (19,400 cubic feet per second) by the proposed southernmost relief bridge. The water-surface elevation predicted in the vidinity of the USGS gaging station was 580.93 feet. No overtopping of U.S. Highway 231 occurred; however, the girders of both relief bridges were partially submerged.

Hedgecock, T. Scott

2001-01-01

19

System analysis for the Huntsville Operational Support Center distributed computer system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) is a distributed computer system used to provide real time data acquisition, analysis and display during NASA space missions and to perform simulation and study activities during non-mission times. The primary purpose is to provide a HOSC system simulation model that is used to investigate the effects of various HOSC system configurations. Such a model would be valuable in planning the future growth of HOSC and in ascertaining the effects of data rate variations, update table broadcasting and smart display terminal data requirements on the HOSC HYPERchannel network system. A simulation model was developed in PASCAL and results of the simulation model for various system configuraions were obtained. A tutorial of the model is presented and the results of simulation runs are presented. Some very high data rate situations were simulated to observe the effects of the HYPERchannel switch over from contention to priority mode under high channel loading.

Ingels, F. M.; Mauldin, J.

1984-01-01

20

System analysis for the Huntsville Operation Support Center distributed computer system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A simulation model of the NASA Huntsville Operational Support Center (HOSC) was developed. This simulation model emulates the HYPERchannel Local Area Network (LAN) that ties together the various computers of HOSC. The HOSC system is a large installation of mainframe computers such as the Perkin Elmer 3200 series and the Dec VAX series. A series of six simulation exercises of the HOSC model is described using data sets provided by NASA. The analytical analysis of the ETHERNET LAN and the video terminals (VTs) distribution system are presented. An interface analysis of the smart terminal network model which allows the data flow requirements due to VTs on the ETHERNET LAN to be estimated, is presented.

Ingels, F. M.

1986-01-01

21

Training and Jobs: Keys to Rural Economic Development. A Regional Rural Revitalization Conference (Huntsville, Alabama, April 5-6, 1990).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The conference brought Southern state and local leaders together to discuss ways to revitalize depressed rural areas and to improve citizens' quality of life. Papers discussed: (1) goals for rural educational improvement; (2) human resource barriers to community and economic development in the South; (3) survey results indicating that Alabama

Hall, Jean M. Ed.

22

Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Redstone Test Stand as an Alabama Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. The site was desinated as such in 1979.

2002-01-01

23

Alternate NASDA Payload Specialists in the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Pictured along with George Norris in the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are NASDA alternate payload specialists Dr. Doi and Dr. Mukai.

1992-01-01

24

Alternate NASDA Payload Specialists in the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Pictured in the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are NASDA alternate payload specialists Dr. Doi and Dr. Mukai.

1992-01-01

25

Joint Spacelab-J (SL-J) Activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Featured together in joint ground activities during the SL-J mission are NASA/NASDA personnel at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1999-01-01

26

Urban Expansion Dynamic and its Impact on Water Infiltration and Stream-flow in Huntsville City, Alabama  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A rapid change of land use from prime agricultural and forest covered land into housing units, manufacturing, retail and office space development is observed especially in the East-West, and North areas of the Huntsville city. This permanent land use change entails a change in surface moisture, hydrodynamics pattern and flush-runoff behavior of the surrounding streams and rivers on the receiving side of the stream network. This by itself leads to change in hydrologic runoff and infiltration properties leading to a completely new set of micro-hydrologic pattern. In this study we are going to assess the impact of the land use change on the future water infiltration and stremflow change of land surface using Landsat TM images from 1980 to year 2006 and map the increase of the proportion of impervious surfaces as a result of the above activities, and meteorological data over the past 100 years. Different image enhancing and classification technologies based on statistical, Adaptive Neural Network, and Fuzzy Logic Models will be used. Different handling approaches at the pixel level will be implemented. The result will be compiled into a collection of maps and discussed by correlating with the ground truth in the investigation area. As a result of this investigation the economic, ecologic, and institutional impacts over the coming three and decades will be modeled.

Wagaw, M. F.; Gabre, T.; Kebede, G.; Wilson, C.; Davis, C.

2010-12-01

27

Center for Business and Economic Research: University of Alabama  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Based at the University of Alabama, the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) works on crafting key policy updates and research briefs to provide information about business in the state. On the homepage, visitors will find sections that include News, Research Briefs, Publications, and Economic Forecasting. The Research Briefs cover timely reports like "Alabama: Rural or Urban? 'It Depends'" and "A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the New Alabama Immigration Law." In the Publications area, visitors can look over the "Alabama Business" quarterly report, which publishes information on population and other socioeconomic issues. The Alabama Indicators area includes population estimates, income and poverty levels, and detailed tables about the gross domestic product.

28

All about Huntsville  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Use these resources to help you learn more about Huntsville Read All about Huntsville Click on the words "click here" in the middle of the page of the Photo gallery. Put your headphones on and watch the videos to learn more about Huntsville. Read the Encyclopedia article on Huntsville to learn more about Huntsville. ...

Nunes-Bufford, Mrs.

2012-10-09

29

Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center, Tuscaloosa, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storing thermal energy such as winter chill, summer heat, and industrial waste heat for future use in heat and/or cooling buildings or for industrial processes. Widespread development and implementation of STES would significantly reduce the need to generate primary energy in the United States. Recent data indicate that STES is technically suitable for providing 5% to 10% of the nation's energy, with major contributions in the commercial and industrial sectors and in district heating and cooling applications. This report describes aquifer characterization at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The purpose of the testing is to provide design data for the University's use in modifying and expanding an existing ATES well field. The aquifer characterization work was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program) in cooperation with the University of Alabama as part of efforts to assess the use of chill ATES for space cooling.

Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.

1992-02-01

30

Alabama  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What can we learn about Alabama?s economy, bodies of water, population, and residents? First, use the Idea Wheel and label each section of the circle as the following: Population, Famous Alabamian, Economy, and Bodies of Water. Now go to Information on Economy and find out about Alabama's economy. Locate where it says "Agriculture " and " Industry." List in your Idea Wheel a few of the items that Alabama produces. Next, ...

Msblackmon

2012-04-05

31

Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center, Tuscaloosa, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storing thermal energy such as winter chill, summer heat, and industrial waste heat for future use in heat and/or cooling buildings or for industrial processes. Widespread development and implementation of STES would significantly reduce the need to generate primary energy in the United States. Recent data indicate that STES is technically suitable for providing 5% to 10% of the nation`s energy, with major contributions in the commercial and industrial sectors and in district heating and cooling applications. This report describes aquifer characterization at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The purpose of the testing is to provide design data for the University`s use in modifying and expanding an existing ATES well field. The aquifer characterization work was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program) in cooperation with the University of Alabama as part of efforts to assess the use of chill ATES for space cooling.

Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.

1992-02-01

32

System Analysis for the Huntsville Operation Support Center, Distributed Computer System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

HOSC as a distributed computing system, is responsible for data acquisition and analysis during Space Shuttle operations. HOSC also provides computing services for Marshall Space Flight Center's nonmission activities. As mission and nonmission activities change, so do the support functions of HOSC change, demonstrating the need for some method of simulating activity at HOSC in various configurations. The simulation developed in this work primarily models the HYPERchannel network. The model simulates the activity of a steady state network, reporting statistics such as, transmitted bits, collision statistics, frame sequences transmitted, and average message delay. These statistics are used to evaluate such performance indicators as throughout, utilization, and delay. Thus the overall performance of the network is evaluated, as well as predicting possible overload conditions.

Ingels, F. M.; Massey, D.

1985-01-01

33

Bridging the Gap Between Research and Operations in the National Weather Service: The Huntsville Model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Weather Service Office (WFO) in Huntsville, Alabama (HUN) is slated to begin full-time operations in early 2003. With the opening of the Huntsville WFO, a unique opportunity has arisen for close and productive collaboration with scientists at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH). As a part of the collaboration effort, NASA has developed the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center. The mission of the SPoRT center is to incorporate NASA earth science technology and research into the NWS operational environment. Emphasis will be on improving mesoscale and short-term forecasting in the first 24 hours of the forecast period. As part of the collaboration effort, the NWS and NASA will develop an implementation and evaluation plan to streamline the integration of the latest technologies and techniques into the operational forecasting environment. The desire of WFO HUN, NASA, and UAH is to provide a model for future collaborative activities between research and operational communities across the country.

Darden, C.; Carroll, B.; Lapenta, W.; Jedlovec, G.; Goodman, S.; Bradshaw, T.; Gordon, J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

34

THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA IN HUNTSVILLE  

E-print Network

. . . . . . . . . . . 4 Professional Certificate in C++ Developer . . 4 JAVA PROGRAMMING Intro to Java Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Java Programming Advanced Features . . . . 5 Professional Certificate in Java Developer . . 5 we offer Certificate Programs in Engineering, Management, and Information Technology with options

Fork, Richard

35

Description and Status of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is a network LMA detectors that detects and maps lightning using VHF radiation (TV Channel 5) in a region centered about Huntsville, Alabama that includes North Alabama, Central Tennessee and parts of Georgia and Mississippi. The North Alabama LMA has been in operation since late 2001, and has been providing real time data to regional National Weather Service (NSF) Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) since mid 2003 through the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) center. Data from this network (as well as other from other LMA systems) are now being used to create proxy Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data sets for GOES-R risk reduction and algorithm development activities. In addition, since spring 2009 data are provided to the Storm Prediction Center in support of Hazardous Weather Testbed and GOES-R Proving Ground activities during the Spring Program. Description, status and plans will be discussed.

Blakeslee, Richard J.; Christian, Hugh J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Hall, John M.; McCaul, Eugene W.; Stano, Geoffrey T.

2011-01-01

36

The Hydrologic Cycle Distributed Active Archive Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Marshall Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center in Huntsville, Alabama supports the acquisition, production, archival and dissemination of data relevant to the study of the global hydrologic cycle. This paper describes the Hydrologic Cycle DAAC, surveys its principle data holdings, addresses future growth, and gives information for accessing the data sets.

Hardin, Danny M.; Goodman, H. Michael

1995-01-01

37

POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - UNITED STATES COAST GUARD AVIATION TRAINING CENTER, MOBILE, ALABAMA  

EPA Science Inventory

This report summarizes a pollution prevention opportunity assessment of the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Aviation Training Center (ATC) in Mobile, Alabama. he ATC maintains the readiness and airworthiness of Dauphin and Jayhawk Helicopters and Falcon Jets used in training and search a...

38

Sci-Quest, the North Alabama Science Center, Inc  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sci-Quest is a hands-on science center with more than 125 permanent, interactive exhibits in seven different subject areas. The Immersive Theater is an interactive, 3D experience featuring touch-screen computer monitors enabling audience members to have an individually customized adventure, allowing visitors to journey through deep space and create their own planet, explore the earth's ecosystems, and examine the ancient world. In addition to permanent and traveling exhibits, Sci-Quest offers public education programs for children, age four through sixth grade. Programming is available for groups both onsite and offsite. Online activities include Build a Rollercoaster and Explore Solar Power.

39

Survey Plan For Characterization of the Subsurface Underlying the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Volume 1 and 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Topic considered include: survey objectives; technologies for non-Invasive imaging of subsurface; cost; data requirements and sources; climatic condition; hydrology and geology; chemicals; magnetometry; electrical(resistivity, potential); optical-style imaging; reflection/refraction seismics; gravitometry; photo-acoustic activation;well drilling and borehole analysis; comparative assessment matrix; ground sensors; choice of the neutron sources; logistic of operations; system requirements; health and safety plans.

1996-01-01

40

Space Science Research and Technology at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation will summarize the various projects and programs managed in the Space Science Programs and Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Projects in the portfolio include NASA's Chandra X-Ray telescope, Hinode solar physics satellite, various advanced space propulsion technologies, including solar sails and tethers, as well as NASA's Discovery and New Frontiers Programs.

Johnson, Charles L.

2007-01-01

41

NASA's National Center for Advanced Manufacturing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investment in the future, NASA has designated a new initiative where government, industry, and academia collaborate to meet the manufacturing needs of future space systems. The Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama has the principal responsibility for implementation of the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCAM). The mission of the NCAM is to build partnerships that will jointly conduct program planning and develop strategies to perform manufacturing research and technology development for critical national missions.

Vickers, John H.; Frazier, Michael K.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

42

THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA IN HUNTSVILLE FINANCIAL DATA SHEET  

E-print Network

are verified through the established payroll system and after-the-fact certification of effort. (For leave loaded rates see reverse of this sheet.) Note that a full time graduate student appointment and administrative cost rate. Fringe benefits are charged as a direct expense. They include State Teachers

Alabama in Huntsville, University of

43

The University of Alabama in Huntsville Professional and Continuing Studies  

E-print Network

for their networking technicians. Benefit from hands-on exercises and exam question practice in a lab environment technician, network installer, help desk technician and IT cable installer. The certification applies to DoD 8570 Information Assurance Technician (IAT) Level I. Go to www.comptia.org for complete certification

Fork, Richard

44

THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA IN HUNTSVILLE EXPORT COMPLIANCE PROGRAM  

E-print Network

, the Principal Investigator will be asked to review the ITAR and EAR lists of controlled technologies Department of Commerce DOD Department of Defense DSS Defense Security Service DTSA Defense Technology Control OSP Office of Sponsored Projects PI Principal Investigator SDN List Specially Designated Nationals

Alabama in Huntsville, University of

45

The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), located in Huntsville, Alabama, is a laboratory for cutting-edge research in selected scientific and engineering disciplines. The major objectives of the NSSTC are to provide multiple fields of expertise coming together to solve solutions to science and technology problems, and gaining recognition as a world-class science research organization. The center, opened in August 2000, focuses on space science, Earth sciences, information technology, optics and energy technology, biotechnology and materials science, and supports NASA's mission of advancing and communicating scientific knowledge using the environment of space for research. In addition to providing basic and applied research, NSSTC, with its student participation, also fosters the next generation of scientists and engineers. NSSTC is a collaborated effort between NASA and the state of Alabama through the Space Science and Technology alliance, a group of six universities including the Universities of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH),Tuscaloosa (UA), and Birmingham (UAB); the University of South Alabama in Mobile (USA);Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (AM) in Huntsville; and Auburn University (AU) in Auburn. Participating federal agencies include NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy. Industries involved include the Space Science Research Center, the Global Hydrology and Climate Center, the Information Technology Research Center, the Optics and Energy Technology Center, the Propulsion Research Center, the Biotechnology Research Center, and the Materials Science Research Center. This photo shows the completed center with the additional arnex (right of building) that added an additional 80,000 square feet (7,432 square meters) to the already existent NSSTC, nearly doubling the size of the core facility. At full capacity, the NSSTC tops 200,000 square feet (18,580 square meters) and houses approximately 550 employees.

2003-01-01

46

Marshall Small Business Alliance Meeting February 21, 2013 Davidson Center in Huntsville 7:00 a.m. 12:30 p.m.  

E-print Network

/STTR Manager 12:00 Special Announcements/Upcoming Events Debbie King, MTS, Chair, Small Business Executive David Brock, Small Business Specialist Housekeeping Debbie King, MTS, Chair, Small Business Executive of Strategic Analysis & Communications 11:15 Office of Center Operations Organizational Overview Robert Devlin

47

The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), located in Huntsville, Alabama, is a laboratory for cutting-edge research in selected scientific and engineering disciplines. The major objectives of the NSSTC are to provide multiple fields of expertise coming together to solve solutions to science and technology problems, and gaining recognition as a world-class science research organization. The center, opened in August 2000, focuses on space science, Earth sciences, information technology, optics and energy technology, biotechnology and materials science, and supports NASA's mission of advancing and communicating scientific knowledge using the environment of space for research. In addition to providing basic and applied research, NSSTC, with its student participation, also fosters the next generation of scientists and engineers. NSSTC is a collaborated effort between NASA and the state of Alabama through the Space Science and Technology alliance, a group of six universities including the Universities of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH),Tuscaloosa (UA), and Birmingham (UAB); the University of South Alabama in Mobile (USA); Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (AM) in Huntsville; and Auburn University (AU) in Auburn. Participating federal agencies include NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy. Industries involved include the Space Science Research Center, the Global Hydrology and Climate Center, the Information Technology Research Center, the Optics and Energy Technology Center, the Propulsion Research Center, the Biotechnology Research Center, and the Materials Science Research Center. An arnex, scheduled for completion by summer 2002, will add an additional 80,000 square feet (7,432 square meters) to NSSTC nearly doubling the size of the core facility. At full capacity, the completed NSSTC will top 200,000 square feet (18,580 square meters) and house approximately 550 employees.

2002-01-01

48

Implementation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Elementary Science Study of Nature (LESSON) in North Alabama elementary and middle schools  

SciTech Connect

The Alabama A M University - Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Elementary Science Study of Nature (ALALESSON) was designed to improve elementary and middle school science in North Alabama by involving teachers in two-week summer workshop as well as other follow-up activities. The purpose of the activities was to increase the science knowledge of the teachers and to provide them with materials and activities for hands-on science lessons. The summer workshops, conducted during the summers of 1984 and 1985, provided instruction and materials for activities in the area of biology, chemistry, physics, and electricity and magnetism. The materials included equipment thats total value was over $400.00. Additionally, a manual containing 43 lessons which induced background information, experiments and activities for classroom and home use was provided to each teacher. During the course of the project activities, the teachers interacted with fourteen scientists from Alabama A M University, four scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, eight staff members from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, three staff members from the University of Alabama at Huntsville Johnson Environmental Education Center, two North Alabama teachers who served as presenters, and one NASA Teacher in Space Finalist, Kathleen Beres. This report will thus detail activities during the period July 1984--June 1989.

McGuire, S.Y. (Alabama A and M Univ., Normal, AL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1989-01-01

49

DIAL Measurements of Free-Tropospheric Ozone Profiles in Huntsville, AL  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, developed jointly by NASA and the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH), measures free-tropospheric ozone profiles between 4-10 km. Located at 192 meters altitude in the Regional Atmospheric Profiling Laboratory for Discovery (RAPCD) on the UAH campus in Huntsville, AL, USA, this tropospheric ozone lidar operates under both daytime and nighttime conditions. Frequent coincident ozonesonde flights and theoretical calculations provide evidence to indicate the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 8% at 4km to 40%-60% at 10 kin with 750-m vertical resolution and 30-minute integration. With anticipated improvements to allow retrievals at both higher and lower altitudes, this ozone lidar, along with co-located aerosol and Doppler Wind Lidars, will provide a unique 18 dataset for investigations of PBL and free-tropospheric chemical and dynamic processes.

Kuang, Shi; Burris, John; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve

2007-01-01

50

75 FR 67077 - Television Broadcasting Services; Huntsville, AL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...substitution of channel 46 for channel 19 at Huntsville...ADDRESSES: Federal Communications Commission, Office...is amended by adding channel 19 and removing channel 46 at Huntsville. Federal Communications Commission. Clay...

2010-11-01

51

Polarization radar and electrical observations of microburst producing storms during Cohmex. [COoperative Huntsville Meteorological EXperiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The life cycles of two electrified, microburst-producing storms that occurred on July 19 and 20, 1986 near Huntsville, Alabama are described and compared. The kinematic and microphysical development of the storm clouds is examined. Lightning activity prior to the onset of the microburst is studied. It is observed that ice phase precipitation particles are important in the electrification of the storm and in the formation of the strong downdraft, and the vertical distribution and movement of mass have a role in determining the total lightning activity and type of flashes.

Goodman, Steven J.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Wright, Patrick D.; Rust, W. David; Nielsen, Kurt E.

1989-01-01

52

Library Outreach to the Alabama Black Belt: The Alabama Entrepreneurial Research Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Angelo Bruno Business Library at The University of Alabama is a collaborator in a University outreach project, the Alabama Entrepreneurial Research Network (AERN). Centered in the Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration, the purpose of AERN is to support entrepreneurship and small business development in rural, economically impoverished counties in central and south Alabama. AERN provides computing resources

Lee Pike; Karen Chapman; Paul Brothers; Todd Hines

2010-01-01

53

Project LASER Volunteer, Marshall Space Flight Center Education Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Through Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Education Department, over 400 MSFC employees have volunteered to support educational program during regular work hours. Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering, and Research) provides support for mentor/tutor requests, education tours, classroom presentations, and curriculum development. This program is available to teachers and students living within commuting distance of the NASA/MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama (approximately 50-miles radius). This image depicts students viewing their reflections in an x-ray mirror with Marshall optic engineer Vince Huegele at the Discovery Laboratory, which is an onsite MSFC laboratory facility that provides hands-on educational workshop sessions for teachers and students learning activities.

1999-01-01

54

Power to Explore: A History of the Marshall Space Flight Center, 1960-1990  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This scholarly study of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center places the institution in social, political, scientific and technological context. It traces the evolution of Marshall, located in Huntsville, Alabama, from its origins as an Army missile development organization to its status in 1990 as one of the most diversified of NASA's field Center. Chapters discuss military rocketry programs in Germany and the United States, Apollo-Saturn, Skylab, Space shuttle, Spacelab, the Space Station, and various scientific and technical projects including the Hubble Space Telescope. It sheds light not only on the history of space technology, science and exploration, but also on the Cold War, federal politics and complex organizations.

Dunar, Andrew J.; Waring, Stephen P.

1999-01-01

55

76 FR 5290 - Television Broadcasting Services; Huntsville, AL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...AL AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION...the substitution of channel 19 for channel 46 at...is amended by adding channel 19 and removing channel 46 at Huntsville. Federal Communications Commission....

2011-01-31

56

The Use of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) in the Real-Time Operational Warning Environment During the March 2nd, 2012 Severe Weather Outbreak in Northern Alabama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) is a three-dimensional very high frequency (VHF) detection network consisting of 11 sensors spread across north central Alabama and two sensors located in the Atlanta, Georgia region. The primary advantage of this network is that it detects total lightning, or the combination of both cloud-to-ground and intra-cloud lightning, instead of cloud-to-ground lightning alone. This helps to build a complete picture of storm evolution and development, and can serve as a proxy for storm updraft strength, particularly since intra-cloud lightning makes up the majority of all lightning in a typical thunderstorm. While the NALMA data do not directly indicate severe weather, they can indirectly indicate when a storm is strengthening (weakening) due to increases (decreases) in updraft strength, as the updraft is responsible for charging mechanisms within the storm. Data output are VHF radiation sources, which are produced during lightning breakdown processes. These sources are made into 2x2 km source density grids and are ported into the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) for National Weather Service (NWS) offices in Huntsville, AL, Nashville, TN, Morristown, TN, and Birmingham, AL, in near real-time. An increase in sources, or source densities, correlates to increased lightning activity and trends in updraft magnitude as long as the storm is within about 125 km of the center of the LMA network. Operationally, these data have been used at the Huntsville NWS office since early 2003 through a collaborative effort with NASA s Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center. Since then, total lightning observations have become an essential tool for forecasters during real-time warning operations. One of the operational advantages of the NALMA is the two-minute temporal resolution of the data. This provides forecasters with two to three updates during a typical volume scan of the WSR-88D radar.

White, Kristopher; Carcione, Brian; Schultz, Christopher J.; Stano, Geoffrey T.; Carey, Lawrence D.

2012-01-01

57

THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA IN HUNTSVILLE/OFFICE OF SPONSORED PROGRAMS AWARD REVIEW RECORD --EXPORT CONTROL  

E-print Network

any clause that: Clause reference a. references U.S. export regulations? YES SUCH CONSULTATION, IT MAY BE DETERMINED THAT NEGOTIATION WITH THE SPONSOR TO MODIFY OR DELETE SUCH CLAUSES by the Department of Commerce and/or State. A final determination of the application of those regulations

Alabama in Huntsville, University of

58

Special Study: Inadequate Structural Assembly of Schoolbus Bodies. The Accidents at Decatur and Huntsville, Alabama.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reviews some examples of injuries received in two school bus accidents; explains how the design of joints and fastenings in the buses was involved in the injuries and in the structural strength of schoolbuses; and compares schoolbus construction with construction of other types of buses that employ more efficient and complete…

National Transportation Safety Board (DOT), Washington, DC. Bureau of Surface Transportation Safety.

59

78 FR 59649 - Foreign-Trade Zone 83-Huntsville, Alabama, Application for Subzone, VF Jeanswear, Hackleburg...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...83. In accordance with the Board's regulations, Camille Evans of the FTZ Staff is designated examiner to review...trade.gov/ftz. For further information, contact Camille Evans at Camille.Evans@trade.gov or at (202) 482-2350....

2013-09-27

60

UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA IN HUNTSVILLE Interim Policy on Promoting Objectivity in Research  

E-print Network

or the appearance of a conflict of interest, and to properly manage or eliminate the potential conflict of interest by researchers enables the University to determine if a financial interest creates a conflict of interest of Ethics. This policy is intended to meet the requirements necessary to comply with the conflicts

Alabama in Huntsville, University of

61

Alabama Mosaic  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Designed as a collaborative statewide initiative, The Cornerstone Project is a way to make various historical treasures from Alabama's archives, libraries, museums, and other repositories accessible over the Web both to residents of the state and a diverse set of interested parties. The funding for this project came from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, and includes materials from 13 different organizations, including Auburn University, Spring Hill College, and the Birmingham Public Library. All of the collections may be accessed through a helpful search engine, or browsed by thematic category. The categories include education, folklife, literature, religion, and transportation. The cities and towns area offers a nice glimpse into urban life in the American South, and includes several dozen excellent images taken from the Birmingham Historical Photo Collection. Visitors with a penchant for steamboats will appreciate the rather interesting collection of digitized steamboat ephemera, most of which dates from the post-Civil War period.

62

Dial Measurements of Free-Tropospheric Ozone Profiles in Huntsville, AL  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A tropospheric ozone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system has been developed jointly by NASA and the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH). Two separated Nd:YAG pumped dye laser systems produce the laser pulses with wavelengths of 285 and 291 nm at 20 Hz frequency. The receiver is a Newtonian telescope with a 40 cm primary and a two-channel aft optics unit. The detection system currently uses photon counting to facilitate operations at the maximum achievable altitude. This lidar measures free-tropospheric ozone profiles between 4-10 km at Regional Atmospheric Profiling Laboratory for Discovery (RAPCD) in UAH campus (ASL 206 m) under both daytime and nighttime conditions. Frequent coincident ozonesonde flights and theoretical calculations provide evidence to indicate the retrieval accuracy ranges from approx.5% at 4 km to approx.60% at 10 km with 750-m vertical resolution and 30-minute integration. Three Hamamatsu 7400 PMTs and analog detection technique will be added on the current system to extend the measurement to approx.100 m above ground to monitor the PBL and lower tropospheric ozone variations.

Newchurch, Mike; Kuang, Shi; Burris, John; Johnson, Steve; Long, Stephanie

2008-01-01

63

The Paylod Operations Center (POC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Payload Operations Center (POC) is the science command post for the International Space Station (ISS). Located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, it is the focal point for American and international science activities aboard the ISS. The POC's unique capabilities allow science experts and researchers around the world to perform cutting-edge science in the unique microgravity environment of space. The POC is staffed around the clock by shifts of payload flight controllers. At any given time, 8 to 10 flight controllers are on consoles operating, plarning for, and controlling various systems and payloads. This photograph shows the Photo and TV Operations Manager (PHANTOM) at a work station. The PHANTOM configures all video systems aboard the ISS and ensures they are working properly, providing a video link from the ISS to the POC.

2001-01-01

64

Huntsville Area Students Appear in Episode of NASA CONNECT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Students at Williams Technology Middle School in Huntsville were featured in a new segment of NASA CONNECT, a video series aimed to enhance the teaching of math, science, and technology to middle school students. The segment premiered nationwide May 15, 2003, and helped viewers understand Sir Isaac Newton's first, second, and third laws of gravity and how they relate to NASA's efforts in developing the next generation of space transportation.

2003-01-01

65

Applications of Meteorological Tower Data at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Members of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) design and operation communities rely on meteorological information collected at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), located near Cape Canaveral, Florida, to correctly apply the ambient environment to various tasks. The Natural Environments Branch/EV44, located at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, is responsible for providing its NASA customers with meteorological data using various climatological data sources including balloons, surface stations, aircraft, hindcast models, and meteorological towers. Of the many resources available within the KSC region, meteorological towers are preferred for near-surface applications because they record data at regular, frequent intervals over an extensive period of record at a single location. This paper discusses the uses of data measured at several different meteorological towers for a common period of record and how the data can be applied to various engineering decisions for the new Constellation Program Ares and Orion space vehicles.

Altino, Karen M.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

2009-01-01

66

Alabama Special Days  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Today, we are going to look at special days in Alabama history. Today we are going to look at four special Alabama Days: 1) Boll Weevil Festival 2) Helen Keller Day 3) Mardi Gras 4) Shrimp Festival I am giving you videos to watch about each special day. I am ...

Lucky, Ms.

2012-04-04

67

Alabama Ferry Field  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since discovery in September 1983, nearly 200 wells have extended Alabama Ferry field to a surface area of approximately 70 mi². Located primarily in southeastern Leon County, east Texas, Alabama Ferry is oil productive from stratigraphically trapped carbonate reservoirs in the Lower Cretaceous upper Glen Rose D interval. Deposition within the field was the end result of a very large

1988-01-01

68

PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN RELATIVISTIC JETS DUE TO WEIBEL INSTABILITY K.-I. Nishikawa1  

E-print Network

Space Science and Technology Center, Huntsville, AL 35805; ken-ichi.nishikawa@nsstc.nasa.gov P. Hardee Space Science and Technology Center, Huntsville, AL 35805 R. Preece Department of Physics, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899; and National Space Science and Technology Center, Huntsville, AL 35805 H

Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

69

Hydrogeology, water chemistry, and subsidence of underground coal mines at Huntsville, Missouri, July 1987 to December 1988. Water Resources Investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Underground coal mining in and near Huntsville, in Randolph County in north-central Missouri, began soon after 1831. Mining in the Huntsville area was at its peak during 1903 and continued until 1966 when the last underground mine was closed and the economically recoverable coals under Huntsville had been mostly, if not completely, removed. The now abandoned mines are of concern

D. W. Blevins; A. C. Ziegler

1992-01-01

70

Sherhart and Head at Space and Rocket Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kirk M. Sherhart, high school student from Berkley, Michigan, discussed a his proposed Skylab experiment with Dr. Robert Head of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) during his visit to the center. The lunar surface scene in the background is one of many space exhibits at the Alabama Space and Rocket Center in nearby Huntsville, Alabama. Sherhart was among 25 winners of a contest in which some 3,500 high school students proposed experiments for the following year's Skylab mission. The nationwide scientific competition was sponsored by the National Science Teachers Association and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The winning students, along with their parents and sponsor teachers, visited MSFC where they met with scientists and engineers, participated in design reviews for their experiments, and toured MSFC facilities. Of the 25 students, 6 did not see their experiments conducted on Skylab because the experiments were not compatible with Skylab hardware and timelines. Of the 19 remaining, 11 experiments required the manufacture of additional equipment.

1972-01-01

71

ENERGYPROGRAM U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center  

E-print Network

://www.facebook.com/HuntsvilleCenter May 2014 The U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville employs more than 800 civilian and military personnel and manages nearly $1.7 billion of work annually. The multi-disciplinary experts include Contact ESPC The Energy Savings Performance Contracting (ESPC) program is a partnership between the Army

US Army Corps of Engineers

72

A Lightning Channel Retrieval Algorithm for the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new multi-station VHF time-of-arrival (TOA) antenna network is, at the time of this writing, coming on-line in Northern Alabama. The network, called the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), employs GPS timing and detects VHF radiation from discrete segments (effectively point emitters) that comprise the channel of lightning strokes within cloud and ground flashes. The network will support on-going ground validation activities of the low Earth orbiting Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) satellite developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. It will also provide for many interesting and detailed studies of the distribution and evolution of thunderstorms and lightning in the Tennessee Valley, and will offer many interesting comparisons with other meteorological/geophysical wets associated with lightning and thunderstorms. In order to take full advantage of these benefits, it is essential that the LMA channel mapping accuracy (in both space and time) be fully characterized and optimized. In this study, a new revised channel mapping retrieval algorithm is introduced. The algorithm is an extension of earlier work provided in Koshak and Solakiewicz (1996) in the analysis of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) system. As in the 1996 study, direct algebraic solutions are obtained by inverting a simple linear system of equations, thereby making computer searches through a multi-dimensional parameter domain of a Chi-Squared function unnecessary. However, the new algorithm is developed completely in spherical Earth-centered coordinates (longitude, latitude, altitude), rather than in the (x, y, z) cartesian coordinates employed in the 1996 study. Hence, no mathematical transformations from (x, y, z) into spherical coordinates are required (such transformations involve more numerical error propagation, more computer program coding, and slightly more CPU computing time). The new algorithm also has a more realistic definition of source altitude that accounts for Earth oblateness (this can become important for sources that are hundreds of kilometers away from the network). In addition, the new algorithm is being applied to analyze computer simulated LMA datasets in order to obtain detailed location/time retrieval error maps for sources in and around the LMA network. These maps will provide a more comprehensive analysis of retrieval errors for LMA than the 1996 study did of LDAR retrieval errors. Finally, we note that the new algorithm can be applied to LDAR, and essentially any other multi-station TWA network that depends on direct line-of-site antenna excitation.

Koshak, William; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

73

J. H. Kulick, J. M. Jarem, R. G. Lindquist, S. T. Kowel, and M. W. Friends are with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899.  

PubMed

The development and modeling of a liquid-crystal phase grating for real-time diffractive three-dimensional displays are discussed. The system being developed, which is called the ICVision system, utilizes a number of ideas that will result in a rugged, low-power three-dimensional display offering both vertical and horizontal parallax and eventually full color. Fringing fields created between interdigitated electrodes formed on top of VLSI die will induce a diffraction pattern in a thin layer of liquid crystal that will cover the die. A detailed electrostatic and diffraction analysis of liquid-crystal phase-grating regions that will make up the final display is given here. The electrostatic analysis is developed by use of the method of moments. The diffraction analysis is developed by use of rigorous coupled-wave diffraction theory. The numerical results obtrained from the mathematical model are compared with experimental diffraction results from preliminary LCD cells that have been assembled as prototype ICVision devices. PMID:21037737

Kulick, J H; Jarem, J M; Lindquist, R G; Kowel, S T; Friends, M W; Leslie, T M

1995-04-10

74

Gamma-ray bursts; Proceedings of the Workshop, Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, Oct. 16-18, 1991  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent developments in gamma-ray burst research are discussed with emphasis on new observations of gamma-ray bursts made by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, Granat, Ginga, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Prognoz, and Phobos. The papers are grouped under the following headings: general, historical, recent spacecraft observations; spatial and intensity distributions; galactic and extragalactic models; spectral observations; time profiles; and search for counterparts. Specific topics discussed include an upper limit on the luminosity of cosmological gamma-ray bursts; low-mass X-ray binaries and gamma-ray bursts; spectral evolution of gamma-ray bursts; ionization of gamma-ray-burst environments; and BATSE observations of bremsstrahlung from electron precipitation events.

Paciesas, William S. (editor); Fishman, Gerald J. (editor)

1992-01-01

75

Shared Memory And Distributed Shared Memory Systems: A Survey Krishna Kavi, Hyong-Shik Kim, University of Alabama in Huntsville  

E-print Network

Shared Memory And Distributed Shared Memory Systems: A Survey Krishna Kavi, Hyong-Shik Kim memory modules via a crossbar switch. This can be viewed as a Symmetric Multiprocessor (SMP) or a shared memory system. The next version of a multiprocessor system at CMU was known as Cm* and can be deemed

Lee, Ben

76

Historic Postcards of Alabama  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Historic Postcards of Alabama database was created by Diane Wade and the items are housed at the William Stanley Hoole Special Collections Library at the University of Alabama. The collection contains over 230 rare postcards that document life in this southern state between the years 1900 to 1920. Visitors can get started by using the Location Index to wander around different corners of the state, including Mobile, Selma, and Tuscaloosa. The Birmingham area is a great place to start as it features photos of various prominent buildings, churches, and geographical features.

Wade, Diane

77

Homonegativity among Alabama Counselors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Members of the Alabama Counseling Association were surveyed to examine the extent to which they demonstrate homonegativity (prejudicial attitudes toward homosexuality). The majority of the counselors did not appear to approach homosexuality from traditional prejudices, although almost one-third believed homosexuality to be immoral. The counselors…

Satcher, Jamie; Leggett, Mark

2006-01-01

78

Alabama Water Use, 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water is one of Alabama's most precious natural resources. It is a vital component of human existence and essential to the overall quality of life. Wise stewardship of this valuable resource depends on a continuing assessment of water availability and water use. Population growth in many parts of the State has resulted in increased competition for available water resources. This competition includes offstream uses, such as residential, agricultural, and industrial, and instream uses for maintenance of species habitat and diversity, navigation, power generation, recreation, and water quality. Accurate water-use information is required for sound management decisions within this competitive framework and is necessary for a more comprehensive understanding of the link between water use, water supply, and overall water availability. A study of water use during 2005 was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, Office of Water Resources, Water Management Branch (ADECA-OWR), to provide water-use data for local and State water managers. The results of the study about the amount of water used, how it was used, and where it was used in Alabama have been published in 'Estimated use of water in Alabama in 2005' by Hutson and others, 2009, and is accessible on the Web at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5163 and available upon request as a CD-ROM through USGS and ADECA-OWR.

Hutson, Susan S.; Littlepage, Thomas M.; Harper, Michael J.; Tinney, James O.

2009-01-01

79

Alabama and SREB  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Alabama and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead Goals for Education", which call for the region to lead the…

Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

2009-01-01

80

Payload Operations Center (POC) for the International Space Station (ISS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The International Space Station (ISS) Payload Operations Center (POC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, is the world's primary science command post for the International Space Station (ISS), the most ambitious space research facility in human history. The Payload Operations team is responsible for managing all science research experiments aboard the Station. The center is also home for coordination of the mission-plarning work of variety of international sources, all science payload deliveries and retrieval, and payload training and safety programs for the Station crew and all ground personnel. Within the POC, critical payload information from the ISS is displayed on a dedicated workstation, reading both S-band (low data rate) and Ku-band (high data rate) signals from a variety of experiments and procedures operated by the ISS crew and their colleagues on Earth. The POC is the focal point for incorporating research and experiment requirements from all international partners into an integrated ISS payload mission plan. This photograph is an overall view of the MSFC Payload Operations Center displaying the flags of the countries participating the ISS. The flags at the left portray The United States, Canada, France, Switzerland, Netherlands, Japan, Brazil, and Sweden. The flags at the right portray The Russian Federation, Italy, Germany, Belgium, Spain, United Kingdom, Denmark, and Norway.

2001-01-01

81

Payload Operations Center (POC) for the International Space Station (ISS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The International Space Station (ISS) Payload Operations Center (POC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, is the world's primary science command post for the (ISS), the most ambitious space research facility in human history. The Payload Operations team is responsible for managing all science research experiments aboard the Station. The center is also home for coordination of the mission-plarning work of variety of international sources, all science payload deliveries and retrieval, and payload training and safety programs for the Station crew and all ground personnel. Within the POC, critical payload information from the ISS is displayed on a dedicated workstation, reading both S-band (low data rate) and Ku-band (high data rate) signals from a variety of experiments and procedures operated by the ISS crew and their colleagues on Earth. The POC is the focal point for incorporating research and experiment requirements from all international partners into an integrated ISS payload mission plan. This photograph is an overall view of the MSFC Payload Operations Center displaying the flags of the countries participating in the ISS. The flags at the left portray The United States, Canada, France, Switzerland, Netherlands, Japan, Brazil, and Sweden. The flags at the right portray The Russian Federation, Italy, Germany, Belgium, Spain, United Kingdom, Denmark, and Norway.

2000-01-01

82

Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 5  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

2004-01-01

83

Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2008-01-01

84

Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 5  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

2006-01-01

85

Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 5  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

2005-01-01

86

Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 8  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

2006-01-01

87

Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2010-01-01

88

Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 5  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2007-01-01

89

Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2010-01-01

90

Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2007-01-01

91

Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 8  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2010-01-01

92

Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama," as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

2004-01-01

93

Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 9  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

2005-01-01

94

Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2011-01-01

95

Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama," as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2010-01-01

96

View of the 200ton derrick from west showing the center ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of the 200-ton derrick from west showing the center mast, one stiff leg, the boom and the boom angle reeving. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn V Dynamic Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

97

University of Alabama Biochemistry recommended University of South Alabama Biochemistry recommended  

E-print Network

Alabama University of Alabama Biochemistry recommended University of South Alabama Biochemistry recommended Arkansas University of Arkansas Biochemistry, genetics, Biology/Zoology are recommended California Loma Linda Biochemistry is recommended Stanford Biochemistry, genetics recommended UC Davis genetics

Hone, James

98

Parameters of triggered-lightning flashes in Florida and Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Channel base currents from triggered lightning were measured at the NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during summer 1990 and at Fort McClellan, Alabama, during summer 1991. Additionally, 16-mm cinematic records with 3- or 5-ms resolution were obtained for all flashes, and streak camera records were obtained for three of the Florida flashes. The 17 flashes analyzed contained 69 strokes, all

R. J. Fisher; G. H. Schnetzer; R. Thottappillil; V. A. Rakov; M. A. Uman; J. D. Goldberg

1993-01-01

99

A University of Alabama Axial-Gap Electric Motor Developmenty  

E-print Network

­ Develop axial gap permanent-magnet electric Axial motor ­ Develop axial gap permanent-magnet electric-speed operation with permanent magnet rotors and high- torque and power densities in a "pancake" package ­ ThortekCAVT A University of Alabama Axial-Gap Electric Motor Developmenty Research Center OBJECTIVE

Carver, Jeffrey C.

100

UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center  

Cancer.gov

Established in 1971, the University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center (UAB), received its NCI designation in the same year. The Center has grown to include a membership of more than 330 physicians and researchers.

101

System analysis for the Huntsville Operational Support Center distributed computer system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A simulation model was developed and programmed in three languages BASIC, PASCAL, and SLAM. Two of the programs are included in this report, the BASIC and the PASCAL language programs. SLAM is not supported by NASA/MSFC facilities and hence was not included. The statistical comparison of simulations of the same HOSC system configurations are in good agreement and are in agreement with the operational statistics of HOSC that were obtained. Three variations of the most recent HOSC configuration was run and some conclusions drawn as to the system performance under these variations.

Ingels, E. M.

1983-01-01

102

Soil Sampling Techniques For Alabama Grain Fields  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Characterizing the spatial variability of nutrients facilitates precision soil sampling. Questions exist regarding the best technique for directed soil sampling based on a priori knowledge of soil and crop patterns. The objective of this study was to evaluate zone delineation techniques for Alabama grain fields to determine which method best minimized the soil test variability. Site one (25.8 ha) and site three (20.0 ha) were located in the Tennessee Valley region, and site two (24.2 ha) was located in the Coastal Plain region of Alabama. Tennessee Valley soils ranged from well drained Rhodic and Typic Paleudults to somewhat poorly drained Aquic Paleudults and Fluventic Dystrudepts. Coastal Plain s o i l s ranged from coarse-loamy Rhodic Kandiudults to loamy Arenic Kandiudults. Soils were sampled by grid soil sampling methods (grid sizes of 0.40 ha and 1 ha) consisting of: 1) twenty composited cores collected randomly throughout each grid (grid-cell sampling) and, 2) six composited cores collected randomly from a -3x3 m area at the center of each grid (grid-point sampling). Zones were established from 1) an Order 1 Soil Survey, 2) corn (Zea mays L.) yield maps, and 3) airborne remote sensing images. All soil properties were moderately to strongly spatially dependent as per semivariogram analyses. Differences in grid-point and grid-cell soil test values suggested grid-point sampling does not accurately represent grid values. Zones created by soil survey, yield data, and remote sensing images displayed lower coefficient of variations (8CV) for soil test values than overall field values, suggesting these techniques group soil test variability. However, few differences were observed between the three zone delineation techniques. Results suggest directed sampling using zone delineation techniques outlined in this paper would result in more efficient soil sampling for these Alabama grain fields.

Thompson, A. N.; Shaw, J. N.; Mask, P. L.; Touchton, J. T.; Rickman, D.

2003-01-01

103

78 FR 11577 - Alabama Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...regulatory program (Alabama program) under the Surface...proposed revisions to its Program regarding revegetation success standards. Alabama intends to revise its program to improve operational...mining and reclamation operations on non- Federal...

2013-02-19

104

77 FR 54490 - Alabama Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...mining and reclamation operations on non- Federal and...demonstrating that its program includes, among other...mining and reclamation operations in accordance with the...approved the Alabama program effective May 20, 1982...Revegetation: Standards for Success Alabama 880-...

2012-09-05

105

The Corporate Headquarters for Alabama Power Company  

E-print Network

THE CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS FOR ALABAMA POWER COMPANY How One Utility is Promoting Cool Storage in a Big Way J. Gregory Reardon, P.E., Supervisor Alabama Power Company Birmingham, Alabama ABSTRACT In an era of increasing energy and construc... tion costs, utilities have initiated efforts to influence what happens "on the other side of the meter" in order to better match the supply and demand of electricity and hold costs down. The Corporate Headquarters for Alabama Power Company...

Reardon, J. G.; Penuel, K. M.

106

Alabama Public Library Service: 1998 Annual Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) is responsible for receiving and administering federal and state funds for the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. This document represents the annual report for the Alabama Public Library Service for fiscal year 1998. Information is reported under the following categories: Evaluation and Research;…

Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

107

Alabama Public Library Service 1996 Annual Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Alabama Public Library Service is charged with improving library services throughout Alabama to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. The agency is responsible for administering federal and state funds for the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. Building renovations were completed in April…

Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

108

Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1995.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling is the purpose of this journal. The first issue in volume 21 contains the following articles: "Policies and Procedures for Reporting Child Abuse in Alabama: Considerations for Counselors, Teachers, and School…

Abbott, Gypsy, Ed.; Elliott, Glenda R., Ed.

1995-01-01

109

Rabies in Bats from Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data on rabies virus infection in bats that were submitted to the Alabama Department of Public Health from 1995-2005 were analyzed. Demographic factors, such as species and sex, and temporal aspects, such as yearly and monthly trends, were investigated. Thirteen species of bats were submitted, and of those, individuals from seven species were rabid; prevalence was highest in Lasiurus borealis

Laura C. Hester; Troy L. Best; M. Keith Hudson

2007-01-01

110

General Achievement Trends: Alabama  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

Center on Education Policy, 2009

2009-01-01

111

Dual-Polarimetric Radar-Based Tornado Debris Signatures and Paths Associated with Tornadoes Over Northern Alabama During the Historic Outbreak of 27 April 2011  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A historic tornado and severe weather outbreak devastated much of the southeastern United States between 25 and 28 April 2011. On 27 April 2011, northern Alabama was particularly hard hit by 40 tornadoes, including 6 that reached EF-4 to EF-5 on the Enhanced Fujita damage scale. In northern Alabama alone, there were approximately 100 fatalities and hundreds of people who were injured or lost their homes during the havoc caused by these violent tornadic storms. Many of these tornadoes occurred within range of the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville) Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR, C-band dual-polarimetric). A unique capability of dual-polarimetric radar is the near-real time identification of lofted debris associated with ongoing tornadoes. The focus of this paper is to analyze the dual-polarimetric radar-inferred tornado debris signatures in 6 tornadoes in North Alabama on April 27, 2011. Several of these debris signatures were disseminated in real-time to the NWS Huntsville and local media to confirm storm spotter reports, confidence to enhance wording within warnings, and accurately pinpoint the locations of tornadoes for residents downstream of the storm. Also, the debris signature locations were used in post-event storm surveys to help locate areas of damage in regions where damage went unreported, or to help separate tornado tracks that were in close proximity to each other. Furthermore, the relative locations of the debris and damage paths for long track EF-4 and EF-5 tornadoes will be ascertained by careful comparison of the ARMOR analysis with NASA MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) satellite imagery of the tornado damage scenes and the National Weather Service tornado damage surveys.

Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Schultz, Elise V.; Petersen, Walter A.; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Knupp, Kevin R.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Jedloved, Gary J.; Carcione, Brian C.; Darden, Christopher B.; Crowe, Christina C.

2012-01-01

112

Fast, Affordable, Science and Technology Satellite (FASTSAT) Huntsville-01 (HSV-01) Spacecraft Lessons Learned Report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Fast Affordable Science and Technology Satellite (FASTSAT) project is a path finding effort to produce reliable satellite busses for different applications at an unprecedented speed and low cost. The project is designed to be a generational project and the first satellite produced is the Huntsville -01 (HSV-01) spacecraft. The subject of this report is the lessons learned gained during the development, testing, and up to the delivery of the FASTSAT HSV -01 spacecraft. The purpose of this report is to capture the major findings that will greatly benefit the future FASTSAT satellites and perhaps other projects interested in pushing the boundaries for cost and schedule. The FASTSAT HSV -01 primary objectives, success criteria, and team partners are summarized to give a frame of reference to the lessons learned.

Smith, Timothy A.

2012-01-01

113

Rabies in bats from Alabama.  

PubMed

Data on rabies virus infection in bats that were submitted to the Alabama Department of Public Health from 1995-2005 were analyzed. Demographic factors, such as species and sex, and temporal aspects, such as yearly and monthly trends, were investigated. Thirteen species of bats were submitted, and of those, individuals from seven species were rabid; prevalence was highest in Lasiurus borealis and Pipistrellus subflavus and lowest in Eptesicus fuscus and Nycticeius humeralis. There was no difference in prevalence of rabies between sexes or years. Statistically, more rabid bats were submitted in August, September, and November; and fewer were submitted in March, June, and July. Results were similar to those from other regions of North America; these data from Alabama can help to present a more complete view of rabies in bats in North America. PMID:17495316

Hester, Laura C; Best, Troy L; Hudson, M Keith

2007-04-01

114

Capabilities of the Impact Testing Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The test and analysis capabilities of the Impact Testing Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center are described. Nine different gun systems accommodate a wide range of projectile and target sizes and shapes at velocities from subsonic through hypersonic, to accomplish a broad range of ballistic and hypervelocity impact tests. These gun systems include ballistic and microballistic gas and powder guns, a two-stage light gas gun, and specialty guns for weather encounter studies. The ITF "rain gun" is the only hydrometeor impact gun known to be in existence in the United States that can provide single impact performance data with known raindrop sizes. Simulation of high velocity impact is available using the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic Code. The Impact Testing Facility provides testing, custom test configuration design and fabrication, and analytical services for NASA, the Department of Defense, academic institutions, international space agencies, and private industry in a secure facility located at Marshall Space Flight Center, on the US Army's Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. This facility performs tests that are subject to International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and DoD secret classified restrictions as well as proprietary and unrestricted tests for civil space agencies, academic institutions, and commercial aerospace and defense companies and their suppliers.

Finchum, Andy; Nehls, Mary; Young, Whitney; Gray, Perry; Suggs, Bart; Lowrey, Nikki M.

2011-01-01

115

The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center: A Collaborative Model for Accelerating Research into Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center in Huntsville, Alabama was created to accelerate the infusion of NASA earth science observations, data assimilation and modeling research into NWS forecast operations and decision-making. The principal focus of experimental products is on the regional scale with an emphasis on forecast improvements on a time scale of 0-24 hours. The SPoRT Center research is aligned with the regional prediction objectives of the US Weather Research Program dealing with 0-1 day forecast issues ranging from convective initiation to 24-hr quantitative precipitation forecasting. The SPoRT Center, together with its other interagency partners, universities, and the NASA/NOAA Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, provides a means and a process to effectively transition NASA Earth Science Enterprise observations and technology to National Weather Service operations and decision makers at both the global/national and regional scales. This paper describes the process for the transition of experimental products into forecast operations, current products undergoing assessment by forecasters, and plans for the future.

Goodman, S. J.; Lapenta, W.; Jedlovec, G.; Dodge, J.; Bradshaw, T.

2003-01-01

116

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Alabama  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Alabama BlueCross and BlueShield Medical Information Server, located and developed by the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Computer and Information Sciences, through a grant from Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Alabama for the express purpose of providing Internet access to medical information for all physicians and other health care providers in the state of Alabama. It provides links to a broad range of medical information resources located throughout the Internet. Menus provide information on diseases and disorders, patient care and medical practice, medical specialties, journals and newsletters, health care reform, and other medical information.

1997-01-01

117

Finite element analysis in fluids; Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Finite Element Methods in Flow Problems, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Apr. 3-7, 1989  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics are examined in reviews and reports, with an emphasis on finite-element methods. Sections are devoted to adaptive meshes, atmospheric dynamics, combustion, compressible flows, control-volume finite elements, crystal growth, domain decomposition, EM-field problems, FDM/FEM, and fluid-structure interactions. Consideration is given to free-boundary problems with heat transfer, free surface flow, geophysical flow problems, heat and mass transfer, high-speed flow, incompressible flow, inverse design methods, MHD problems, the mathematics of finite elements, and mesh generation. Also discussed are mixed finite elements, multigrid methods, non-Newtonian fluids, numerical dissipation, parallel vector processing, reservoir simulation, seepage, shallow-water problems, spectral methods, supercomputer architectures, three-dimensional problems, and turbulent flows.

Chung, T. J. (editor); Karr, Gerald R. (editor)

1989-01-01

118

Advances in cryogenic engineering. Vols. 37A & 37B - Proceedings of the 1991 Cryogenic Engineering Conference, Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, June 11-14, 1991  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present volume on advances in cryogenic engineering discusses heat and mass transfer in helium, heat transfer in cryogenic fluids, thermoacoustic oscillations, and insulation. Attention is given to applications of superconductivity with reference to magnetic stability and coil protection, cryogenic techniques, and refrigeration for electronics and superconducting systems. Topics addressed include compressors, expanders, and pumps for liquid helium, magnetic refrigerators, pulse tube refrigerators, and cryocoolers. Also examined are properties of cryogenic fluids, cryogenic applications in transportion and space science and technology, and cryogenic instrumentation.

Fast, Ronald W. (editor)

1991-01-01

119

The effect of health and nutrition management classes on nutrition choices: a case study on diabetics in huntsville, alabama, United States.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the effectiveness of a one-day nutrition education seminar utilizing a sample of 26 confirmed diabetics who had at least once before, participated in nutrition classes. The participants were exposed to a seminar that promoted, evaluated, and rewarded good nutrition choices in an effort to educate this group about coping with diabetes through nutrition management. A 24-hour food recall was used as a pre-test, meal plans constructed by trained graduate-level diet interns were used as the standard by which proper nutrition was judged, and participants' choices were used as the post-test evaluation. Significant differences were found between the 24-hour recall and the ideal meal plans in all of the three nutrient measured (energy, protein and fat). Participants showed a preference for personally constructed meal plans as opposed to those constructed by the interns. However, significant diet adjustments were shown in the short term. Discussion focused on the need for repeated involvement in diet interventions, and the challenges faced in changing diet habits of a group of middle-aged individuals who are even slightly obese. PMID:22691752

Cort, Malcolm A; Sovyanhadi, Marta

2007-09-01

120

Investigation of several aspects of LANDSAT 4/5 data quality. [California, Texas, Arkansas, Alabama, and Pacific Ocean  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A second quadrant from the Sacramento, CA scene 44/33 acquired by LANDSAT-4 was tested for band to band resolution. Results show that all measured misregistrations are within 0.03 pixels for similar band pairs. Two LANDSAT-5 scenes (one from Corpus Christi, TX and the other from Huntsville, AL) were also tested for band to band resolution. All measured misregistrations in the Texas scene are less than 0.03 pixels. The across scan misregistration Alabama scene is -0.66 pixels and thus needs correction. A 512 x 512 pixel area of the Pacific Ocean was corrected for the pixel offsets. Modulation transfer function analysis of the San Mateo Bridge using data from the San Francisco scene was accomplished.

Wrigley, R. C. (principal investigator)

1984-01-01

121

The Source of Alabama’s Abundance of Arbitration Cases: Alabama’s Bizarre Law of Damages for Mental Anguish  

E-print Network

326 (1945); Kentucky Traction & Terminal Co. v. Roman’s Guardian, 232 Ky. 285, 23 S.W.2d 272 (1919); Chappetta v. Bowman Transp., 415 So. 2d 1019 (La. Ct. App. 1982); Spade v. Lynn P. Boston R.R., 168 Mass. 285, 47 N.E. 88 (1897); Bass v. Nooney Co... harmonized Taylor with other Alabama decisions, and held that the Taylor decision is consistent with the zone of danger doctrine. Francis, 716 So. 2d at 1147. 224 Ala. 655, 141 So. 630 (1932).50 Murphy, 141 So. at 631.51 Id. at 632.52 Id. at 631 (quoting 8 R...

Simpson, W. Scott; Ware, Stephen J.; Willard, Vickie M.

2004-01-01

122

Important People in Alabama History  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

After completing this project you will be able to identify who Helen Keller was and discuss what makes her a significant part of Alabama history. Meet Helen Keller Click here to read about Hellen Keller. After you have read the page, answer the questions below on your own sheet of paper. 1. When was Helen Keller born? 2. Where was Helen Keller born? 3. What happened to Helen Keller when she was 1 1/2 years old? 4. Who was Anne Sullivan? 5. ...

Harmon, Ms.

2009-07-07

123

Outdoor recreational opportunities in Alabama  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What comes to mind when you think about outdoor recreational opportunities? Diagram of the recreational opportunities to enjoy First we will look at the forest services and recreational opportunities. Forest Services There is plenty of hunting opportunities in Alabama to enjoy. Hunting Opportunities Outdoor tips can be essential when enjoying the outdoors. Outdoor Tips What a better way to spend a weekend then going fishing with family and friends. Places to Fish A great way to spend a weekend could also consist of hiking. Hiking Now ...

Smith, Adam

2012-04-04

124

Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. The agency is responsible for receiving and administering federal and state funds for the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. Information is reported…

Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

125

Alabama Public Library Service: 1997 Annual Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) serves the information needs of Alabama public libraries. As a state agency, APLS is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. The agency is responsible for receiving and administering federal and state…

Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

126

2008-2009 Alabama Education Report Card  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Year after year, the goal of educators, parents, and concerned citizens throughout Alabama is to provide this state's children with the highest level of quality education possible. The future of Alabama's businesses, industries, commerce, labor force, arts, humanities, and countless other areas are determined by the education that is provided to…

Alabama Department of Education, 2010

2010-01-01

127

Federal Public Library Programs in Alabama, 1996.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Alabama Public Library Service is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. Part of this charge includes the responsibility for receiving and administering federal funds to the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. Federal Library…

Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

128

Climate Variability and Impact at NASA's Marshal Space Flight Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Climate analysis for the Southeast U. S. has indicated that inland regions have experienced an average temperature increase of 2F since 1970. This trend is generally characterized by warmer winters with an indication of increased precipitation in the Fall season. Extended periods of limited rainfall in the Spring and Summer periods have had greater areal coverage and, at other times the number of precipitation events has been increasing. Climate model projections for the next 10-70 years indicate warmer temperatures for the Southeast U.S., particularly in the Spring and Summer, with some indication of more extremes in temperature and precipitation as shown in the table below. The realization of these types of regional climate changes in the form of extended heat waves and droughts and their subsequent stress on facilities, infrastructure, and workforce could have substantial impact on the activities and functions of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This presentation will present the results of an examination of the 100 year temperature and precipitation record for MSFC. Local warming has cause an increase in daily maximum and minimum temperatures by nearly 3F, with a substantial increase in the number of maximum temperatures exceeding 90F and a decrease in the number of days with minimum temperatures below freezing. These trends have substantial impact of the number of heating / cooling degree days for the area. Yearly precipitation totals are inversely correlated with the change in mean temperature and the frequency of heavy rain events has remain consistent with the changes in yearly totals. An extended heat wave index was developed which shows an increase in frequency of heat waves over the last 35 years and a subsequent reduction in precipitation during the heat waves. This trend will contribute to more intense drought conditions over the northern Alabama region, increasing the potential of destructive wildfires in and around the Center. MSFC has begun using this climate change information to adapt short-term and long-term plans for Center operations.

Smoot, J. L.; Jedlovec, G.; Williams, B.

2013-12-01

129

Increasing Learning and Reducing Costs through Technology: The University of Alabama Story  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Long known as a college-football powerhouse, the University of Alabama (UA) is now considered a model for institutions seeking to maintain or boost their academic quality even as enrollments increase and budgets are squeezed. According to Carol Twigg, president of the National Center for Academic Transformation (NCAT), which has been a significant…

Witkowsky, Kathy

2008-01-01

130

Space Grant Undergraduate Remote Sensing Research in Urban Growth near Mobile Bay, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

During late 2009, four Tennessee Space Grant undergraduate researchers began a remote sensing investigation of urban growth southeast of Mobile Bay, Alabama. They selected the study area in consultation with the Marshall Space Flight Center Earth Science Office, and they share the study area with a multi-institution NASA-funded project exploring the application of remotely sensed data and related models to

M. J. Abolins; J. Keen; P. Wilcox; A. Sheehan; S. Dial

2010-01-01

131

76 FR 30008 - Alabama Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations...environment from the adverse effects of surface coal mining operations.'' Section...exploration and surface coal mining and reclamation operations...Alabama program has no effect on...

2011-05-24

132

Alabama Magnet School Races toward Job Market.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes Alabama's Brewbaker Technology Magnet High School, which was built for only $70 per square foot. Explores the relationship between its school-to-work, collaborative-learning approach and the building's design. (EV)

Jones, Morgan

2002-01-01

133

50 CFR 32.20 - Alabama.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.20 Alabama. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing, and are listed in...

2013-10-01

134

50 CFR 32.20 - Alabama.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.20 Alabama. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing, and are listed in...

2011-10-01

135

50 CFR 32.20 - Alabama.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.20 Alabama. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing, and are listed in...

2012-10-01

136

Small Particles in Fluid Concepts and Objectives: Designing and Experiment for Microgravity (SHIVA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This clearance is for a poster presentation on the Spaceflight Holographic Investigation in a Virtual Apparatus made at the Microgravity Science Materials Conference at the Von Braun Center in Huntsville, Alabama June 25 - 26.

Witherow, W.; Trolinger, J. D.; Smith, D. D.; Sibille, L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

137

NASA Technology Benefits Orthotics.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama have designed a knee brace to aid in the rehabilitation of medical patients. The device, called the Selectively Lockable Knee Brace, was designed for knee injury and stroke pat...

M. Shadoan, N. Myers

1998-01-01

138

2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL PURIFICATION TANK IN DISTANCE FOR KEEPING DOWN GROWTH OF ALGAE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, Alabama Gates, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

139

40 CFR 282.50 - Alabama State-Administered Program.  

...2014-07-01 false Alabama State-Administered Program. 282.50 Section 282.50 Protection of...CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.50 Alabama State-Administered...

2014-07-01

140

Graptemys pulchra Baur 1893: Alabama Map Turtle  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alabama Map Turtle, Graptemys pulchra (Family Emydidae), is a moderately large riverine species endemic to the Mobile Bay drainage system of Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi. Sexual size dimorphism is pronounced, with adult females (carapace length [CL] to 273 mm) attaining more than twice the size of adult males (CL to 117 mm). The species is an inhabitant of relatively large, swift creeks and rivers, often with wide sandbars. Stream sections open to the sun and with abundant basking sites in the form of logs and brush are preferred. Six to seven clutches of 4–7 eggs are laid each year on river sandbars. Although the species is locally abundant, populations are threatened by habitat destruction, declines in their prey base, commercial collection, and vandalism. It is listed as a Species of Special Concern in Alabama.

Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Godwin, James C.; McCoy, C. J.

2014-01-01

141

The "Nuevo" New South: Hispanic Immigration to Alabama.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes Hispanic migration trends in Alabama, discussing how Alabama's demographic and cultural transformation and recent changes in the global economy are connected. The new Hispanic labor force has become an essential ingredient in Alabama's rural and urban economies. However, anti-immigrant sentiments have surfaced in some areas. Adjustment…

Mohl, Raymond A.

2002-01-01

142

Triassic/Jurassic faulting patterns of Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Two major fault systems influenced Jurassic structure and deposition on the Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama. Identification and dating of these fault systems are based on seismic-stratigraphic interpretation of a 7-township grid in Monroe and Conecuh Counties. Relative time of faulting is determined by fault geometry and by formation isopachs and isochrons. Smackover and Norphlet Formations, both Late Jurassic in age, are mappable seismic reflectors and are thus reliable for seismicstratigraphic dating. The earlier of the 2 fault systems is a series of horsts and grabens that trends northeast-southwest and is Late Triassic to Early Jurassic in age. The system formed in response to tensional stress associated with the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The resulting topography was a series of northeast-southwest-trending ridges. Upper Triassic Eagle Mills and Jurassic Werner Formations were deposited in the grabens. The later fault system is also a series of horsts and grabens trending perpendicular to the first. This system was caused by tensional stress related to a pulse in the opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Faulting began in Early Jurassic and continued into Late Jurassic, becoming progressively younger basinward. At the basin margin, faulting produced a very irregular shoreline. Submerged horst blocks became centers for shoaling or carbonate buildups. Today, these blocks are exploration targets in southwest Alabama.

Hutley, J.K.

1985-02-01

143

Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1994.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This annual report summarizes activities of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) for the fiscal year 1994. It begins with a letter from the director who gives an overview of the report. Technology activities included installation of a new phone system, purchase of a digitized fax microform reader-printer, new booking/cataloging system for the…

Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

144

Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1992.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This annual report summarizes activities of the Alabama Public Library Service for the fiscal year 1992. The following general areas are discussed: (1) agency services, including agency restructuring and personnel lay-offs, children's summer library program, the state union list of serials, automated systems, and production of a second edition of…

Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

145

Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1993.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This annual report summarizes activities of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) for the fiscal year (FY) 1993. It begins with a letter from the director who gives an overview of the report and a listing of the Library Service Executive Board. The following general areas are then discussed: (1) agency services including the summer reading…

Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

146

Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1991.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This annual report summarizes activities of the Alabama Public Library Service for the fiscal year 1991. The following general areas are discussed: (1) agency services, including the effects of money shortages, children's programs, automated systems, the new state union list of serials, acquisitions, audiovisual services, and staffing; (2)…

Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

147

Psychometric Properties of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined the psychometric properties of a German translation of the Child Global Report version of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire (APQ). A total of 1219 German school-children (644 boys and 575 girls), ages 10-14 years participated in the study. The APQ was subjected to exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Exploratory factor…

Essau, Cecilia A.; Sasagawa, Satoko; Frick, Paul J.

2006-01-01

148

Significance of selected lineaments in Alabama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Four lineaments in the Alabama Appalachians that appear on ERTS-1 imagery have been geologically analysed. Two of the lineaments appear to have regional geologic significance, showing relationships to structural and stratigraphic frameworks, water and mineral resources, geophysical anomalies, and seismicity. The other two lineaments are of local geologic significance, but, nevertheless, have important environmental implications.

Drahovzal, J. A.; Neathery, T. L.; Wielchowsky, C. C.

1974-01-01

149

RCP Local School Projects in Alabama.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of 6 state reports generated by the Regional Curriculum Project (funded under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act), the document describes 4 specific projects implemented through the Alabama State Superintendent's Office beginning in 1966. All 4 projects were designed to improve instructional leadership by defining the role(s) of the…

Regional Curriculum Project, Atlanta, GA.

150

State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Alabama  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Alabama edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

2009-01-01

151

Chemical Technician Manpower Survey: State of Alabama.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study was undertaken to assess the needs of Alabama's industry for chemical technicians and to determine the kinds and levels of skills required by major employers. Of the 75 organizations responding to the questionnaire with usable data, 62 were private industries, 6 were testing laboratories, and 7 were federal agencies. Generally, the study…

Watkins, Donald; And Others

152

Alabama Kids Count 2001 Data Book.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being for Alabama's children. The statistical portrait is based on 17 indicators in the areas of health, education, safety, and security. The indicators are: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention;…

Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

153

Alabama Kids Count 2002 Data Book.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being of Alabamas children. The statistical portrait is based on 18 indicators in the areas of child health, education, safety, and security: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention; (6) school…

Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

154

Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1997-1998.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" published during 1997. The focus of the journal is on communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling. The following articles are contained in issue 1: "Management and…

Magnuson, Sandy, Ed.; Norem, Ken, Ed.

1998-01-01

155

Auburn University Auburn, Alabama 36849-5412  

E-print Network

Auburn University Auburn, Alabama 36849-5412 Agronomy and Soils 334-844-4100 201 Funchess Hall Fax, Thailand, Peru, and Brazil, 3) I was elected Fellow of the American Society of Agronomy before I was 40 and DOE grant and program review committees, 8) I was the Soil Science Technical Editor for the Agronomy

Jawitz, James W.

156

University of South Alabama Faculty Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Concerned primarily with policies, procedures, regulations, channels of communication, and benefits for the faculty, the 1974 faculty handbook of the University of South Alabama discusses: (1) organization and administration; (2) colleges, divisions, departments, and programs; (3) university facilities and services; (4) student-related…

University of South Alabama, Mobile.

157

Alabama Mathematics Course of Study: Assessment Correlation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is designed to show the connection between the required state-written curriculum (courses of study) and the state-tested curriculum (the Alabama High School Graduation Examination and the Stanford Achievement Test, Ninth Edition [Stanford 9]) in Mathematics. The document illustrates that courses of study content standards embody both…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

158

Alabama Science Course of Study: Assessment Correlation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is designed to show the connection between the required state-written curriculum (courses of study) and the state-tested curriculum (the Alabama High School Graduation Examination and the Stanford Achievement Test, Ninth Edition [Stanford 9]) in Science. The document illustrates that courses of study content standards embody both…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

159

The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

2011-01-01

160

The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

2011-01-01

161

Assessment of the geothermal/geopressure potential of the Gulf Coastal Plan of Alabama. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal and geopressure as well as geologic and geophysical data were studied to evaluate the potential for future development of geothermal resources underlying the Alabama Coastal Plain. Wire-line log data compiled and interpreted from more than 1300 oil and gas test wells included maximum recorded temperatures, mud weights, rock resistivities as related to geopressure, formation tops, fault locations, and depths to basement rock. The Alabama Coastal Plain area is underlain by a conduction dominated, deep sedimentary basin where geothermal gradients are low to moderate (1.0 to 1.8/sup 0/F/100 feet). In some areas of southwest Alabama, abnormally high temperatures are found in association with geopressured zones within the Haynesville Formation of Jurassic age; however, rocks of poor reservoir quality dominate this formation, with the exception of a 200-square-mile area centered in southernmost Clarke County where a porous and permeable sand unit is encased within massive salt deposits of the lower Haynesville. The results of a petrograhic study of the Smackover Formation, which underlies the Haynesville, indicate that this carbonate rock unit has sufficient porosity in some areas to be considered a potential geothermal reservoir. Future development of geothermal resources in south Alabama will be restricted to low or moderate temperature, non-electric applications, which constitute a significant potential energy source for applications in space heating and cooling and certain agricultural and industrial processes.

Wilson, G.V.; Wang, G.C.; Mancini, E.A.; Benson, D.J.

1980-01-01

162

A record thirty-two collegiate teams competed in the MAA SE-2011 Math Jeopardy Contest on April 1-2, 2011 at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, AL. Teams that  

E-print Network

in the Bryant Center at the University of Alabama. This year a second preliminary round was added to the contest Geng, Mike Stonewall, Steven Carter, Nino YuTiamco Georgia College and State University, Rodica Cazacu

Berry, Michael W.

163

Trapping styles in Mississippi, Alabama Haynesville reservoirs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Jurassic Haynesville formation of Mississippi and Alabama has historically been just another stratigraphic unit to be penetrated before the underlying Smackover-Norphlet potential could be evaluated. But with recent production tests at rates in excess of 3,000 b\\/d of oil and individual wells that have produced more than 3 million bbl of oil equivalent, assuming a 6 Mcf\\/bbl ratio, many

Sticker

1994-01-01

164

COMPUTATION OF UNSTEADY FLOWS IN THE ALABAMA RIVER.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An application is described of the branch-network flow model, BRANCH, to the upper Alabama River system in central Alabama. The model is used to simulate one-dimensional unsteady flows and water surface elevations in approximately 60 river miles of the Alabama River system. Preliminary calibration was made using 72 hours of observed data. Simulated discharges are about 10 percent lower than observed discharges at higher discharge rates and computer flows lag observed flows by about 30 minutes.

Jeffcoat, Hillary, H.; Jennings, Marshall, E.

1987-01-01

165

40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

... false Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control...81.58 Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control...Region. The Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air...

2014-07-01

166

75 FR 23264 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...State of Alabama is revising its approved Public Water System Supervision Program. Alabama has adopted the following rules: Arsenic Rule, Lead and Copper Minor Revisions Rule, and Radionuclides Rule. EPA has determined that Alabama's rules are no...

2010-05-03

167

78 FR 75306 - Television Broadcasting Services; Birmingham, Alabama  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...RM-11707; DA 13-2129] Television Broadcasting Services; Birmingham...rulemaking filed by Alabama Educational Television Commission (``AETC...petitions for rulemaking by television stations seeking channel...

2013-12-11

168

TRANSMISSION OF EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS IN CENTRAL ALABAMA  

PubMed Central

A site near Tuskegee, Alabama was examined for vector activity of eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE) virus in 2001. More than 23,000 mosquitoes representing 8 genera and 34 species were collected during a 21-week period, and five species, Culiseta melanura, Aedes vexans, Coquillettidia perturbans, Culex erraticus, and Uranotaenia sapphirina, were examined for the presence of virus using a nested reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction for EEE virus. Each species was infected at various times of the mosquito season (May–September) with different minimum infection rates (MIRs). Culiseta melanura had the highest MIR (20.2) and positive pools were detected from late May to mid-September. Aedes vexans had an MIR of 2.2 and was infected early in the season (June), while Cq. perturbans exhibited a much higher field infection rate (9.9) with all positive pools collected in August. Culiseta melanura is a likely endemic vector in central Alabama, while Ae. vexans and Cq. perturbans probably function as bridge vectors. Culex erraticus, the most common mosquito in the habitat (54% of total collections), had an MIR of 3.2, and was persistently infected from mid-June to mid-September. This is the first report of high rates of EEE virus infection in this species, a member of the tropical subgenus Melanoconion. Uranotaenia sapphirina, considered to feed on amphibians and possibly reptiles, had an MIR of 5.6, with positive pools spanning a four-month period. This suggests that species other than birds may serve as a reservoir for EEE in hardwood swamps in the Southeastern United States and elsewhere. The lengthy period of mosquito infection with EEE virus, coupled with the diverse habits of the vectors and their proximity to a population center, indicate the importance of monitoring EEE virus activity in the Mid-South. PMID:12875303

CUPP, EDDIE W.; KLINGLER, KIMBERLY; HASSAN, HASSAN K.; VIGUERS, LESLIE M.; UNNASCH, THOMAS R.

2008-01-01

169

Doppler radar observations of the evolution of a small convective storm during Cohmex. [Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Doppler radar observations of a deep convection that developed along the Alabama-Tennesse border on July 14, 1986 are analyzed. The evolution and structure of the convective storm are examined. Two convective cores are observed and both having a radius of about 1 km and maximum reflectivities of about 5 dBz; a third cell is also detected later in the region between the northern and southern cells. It is noted that the northern cell is the most dominant possessing an updraft through the region of maximum reflectivity. Diagrams of the vertical structure of the cells are provided.

Moore, Patrick D.; Ray, Peter S.

1989-01-01

170

THE SIGNALTHE SIGNAL University Transportation Center for Alabama  

E-print Network

activities such as seminars, work- shops and the UTCA annual symposium that will highlight work from both-Technology Transfer 2-3 On-Line Survey 2 Who-Technology Transfer 3 UTCA Projects and Website 3 1st Annual UTCA and promote its activities throughout the State, region, and nation. Project activities will be developed

Carver, Jeffrey C.

171

Center for Macromolecular Crystallography, University of Alabama in Birmingham  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) crystals grown under microgravity conditions on mission STS-26 of the Space Shuttle Discovery were shown to diffract to considerably higher resolution than the best PPE crystals grown by us on the ground. We have now independently refined both the microgravity and ground-based data. Preliminary results of these refinements are summarized. These results show nearly a doubling of experimental diffraction data for this structure, exceeding 1.3 A resolution. Improved phase information derived from the refined structure of PPE based on this microgravity data has allowed us to interpret previously-uninterpretable electron density obtained from ground-based crystals of a complex of PPE with a chemically-reactive inhibitor. Intermediate stages in the enzyme-inhibitor reaction mechanism in the crystal can now be directly observed. Further refinement of PPE structures is in progress.

Navia, Manuel A.

1991-01-01

172

University Transportation Center for Alabama 2011 Annual Report  

E-print Network

-6862 utca@eng.ua.edu http://utca.eng.ua.edu 2011 Annual Report Compiled by Jay K. Lindly, PhD Joseph Walsh row. See page 22. Right: Dr. Jay Lindly teaches a pavements class to stu- dents at UA and UAH using the Intercampus Interactive Television System. See page 27. #12;3 Mission and Theme The University Transportation

Carver, Jeffrey C.

173

Topobathymetric model of Mobile Bay, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Topobathymetric Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are a merged rendering of both topography (land elevation) and bathymetry (water depth) that provides a seamless elevation product useful for inundation mapping, as well as for other earth science applications, such as the development of sediment-transport, sea-level rise, and storm-surge models. This 1/9-arc-second (approximately 3 meters) resolution model of Mobile Bay, Alabama was developed using multiple topographic and bathymetric datasets, collected on different dates. The topographic data were obtained primarily from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Elevation Dataset (NED) (http://ned.usgs.gov/) at 1/9-arc-second resolution; USGS Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) data (2 meters) (http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/400/); and topographic lidar data (2 meters) and Compact Hydrographic Airborne Rapid Total Survey (CHARTS) lidar data (2 meters) from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) (http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/data/coastallidar/). Bathymetry was derived from digital soundings obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/geodas/geodas.html) and from water-penetrating lidar sources, such as EAARL and CHARTS. Mobile Bay is ecologically important as it is the fourth largest estuary in the United States. The Mobile and Tensaw Rivers drain into the bay at the northern end with the bay emptying into the Gulf of Mexico at the southern end. Dauphin Island (a barrier island) and the Fort Morgan Peninsula form the mouth of Mobile Bay. Mobile Bay is 31 miles (50 kilometers) long by a maximum width of 24 miles (39 kilometers) with a total area of 413 square miles (1,070 square kilometers). The vertical datum of the Mobile Bay topobathymetric model is the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88). All the topographic datasets were originally referenced to NAVD 88 and no transformations were made to these input data. The NGDC hydrographic, multibeam, and trackline surveys were transformed from mean low water (MLW) or mean lower low water (MLLW) to NAVD 88 using VDatum (http://vdatum.noaa.gov). VDatum is a tool developed by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) that performs transformations among tidal, ellipsoid-based, geoid-based, and orthometric datums using calibrated hydrodynamic models. The vertical accuracy of the input topographic data varied depending on the input source. Because the input elevation data were derived primarily from lidar, the vertical accuracy ranges from 6 to 20 centimeters in root mean square error (RMSE). he horizontal datum of the Mobile Bay topobathymetric model is the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83), geographic coordinates. All the topographic and bathymetric datasets were originally referenced to NAD 83, and no transformations were made to the input data. The bathymetric surveys were downloaded referenced to NAD 83 geographic, and therefore no horizontal transformations were required. The topbathymetric model of Mobile Bay and detailed metadata can be obtained from the USGS Web sites: http://nationalmap.gov/.

Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Brock, John C.; Howard, Daniel M.; Gesch, Dean B.; Bonisteel-Cormier, Jamie M.; Travers, Laurinda J.

2013-01-01

174

Characterization of dredged river sediments in 10 upland disposal sites of Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The US Bureau of Mines, Tuscaloosa Research Center in cooperation with the US Army Corps of Engineers under interagency Agreement No. 14-09-0078-1510, conducted a comprehensive sampling program of 10 upland disposal sites along the Alabama, Black Warrior, and Tombigbee River systems in Alabama. Samples from each site were characterized according to particle size, chemical analysis, mineralogical content, and potential end use. Additionally, samples were subjected to the Toxic Characteristic Leachate Procedure to determine the presence of potentially harmful heavy metals. Based on the results of these studies, each sample was determined to have properties amenable for use as aggregate in general-purpose portland cement concretes and certain asphalt concrete applications.

Smith, C.W.

1995-09-01

175

Bear Creek, Alabama - Teachers' Workshop in Environmental Education (Hodges, Alabama, June 14-18, 1971).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An outdoor education workshop, initiated at the request of teachers in the Bear Creek Watershed area (Alabama), was conducted through a cooperative effort of local agencies and offices of the Tennessee Valley Authority. The purpose of the workshop was to demonstrate to the teachers how the outdoors can be utilized to introduce, strengthen, and…

Tennessee Valley Authority (Land Between the Lakes), Golden Pond, KY.

176

Alabama Bound: Identifying Factors Associated with Secondary Education Students' Choice of Attending The University of Alabama  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Alabama's primary competitor in recruiting is in-state rival Auburn University which lures away roughly one in eight of UA's admitted students. Two factors stand above all others in attracting students to UA--academic reputation and social activities reputation. Factors following distantly are a visit to the UA campus, financial assistance and the…

Acker, Jon Charles; Hughes, William W.; Fendley, William R., Jr.

2004-01-01

177

Groundwater quality at Alabama Plating and Vincent Spring, Vincent, Alabama, 2007–2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The former Alabama Plating site in Vincent, Alabama, includes the location where the Alabama Plating Company operated an electroplating facility from 1956 until 1986. The operation of the facility generated waste containing cyanide, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, zinc, and other heavy metals. Contamination resulting from the site operations was identified in groundwater, soil, and sediment. Vincent Spring, used as a public water supply by the city of Vincent, Alabama, is located about ½ mile southwest of the site. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted an investigation at Vincent Spring and the Alabama Plating site, Vincent, Alabama, during 2007–2008 to evaluate the groundwater quality and evaluate the potential effect of contaminated groundwater on the water quality of Vincent Spring. The results of the investigation will provide scientific data and information on the occurrence, fate, and transport of contaminants in the water resources of the area and aid in the evaluation of the vulnerability of the public water supply to contamination. Samples were analyzed to evaluate the water quality at the former plating site, investigate the presence of possible contaminant indicators at Vincent Spring, and determine the usefulness of stable isotopes and geochemical properties in understanding groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the area. Samples collected from 16 monitor wells near the plating site and Vincent Spring were analyzed for major constituents, trace metals, nutrients, and the stable isotopes for hydrogen (2H/H) and oxygen (18O/16O). Groundwater collected from Vincent Spring was characterized as a calcium-magnesium-bicarbonate water type with total dissolved solids concentrations ranging from 110 to 120 milligrams per liter and pH ranging from about 7.5 to 7.9 units. Groundwater chemistry at the monitor wells at the Alabama Plating site was highly variable by location and depth. Dissolved solids concentrations ranged from 28 to 2,880 milligrams per liter, and the water types varied from calcium-magnesium-bicarbonate-chloride, to calcium-sulfate or calcium-magnesium-sulfate, to sodium-chloride water types. The stable isotope ratios for hydrogen (2H/H) and oxygen (18O/16O) for water from the monitor wells and from Vincent Spring, based on a single sampling event, can be separated into three groups: (1) Vincent Spring, (2) monitor wells MW03 and MW28, and (3) the remaining Alabama Plating monitor wells. The geochemical and stable isotope analyses indicate that water from Vincent Spring is distinct from water from the Alabama Plating monitor wells; however, this evaluation is based on a single sampling event. Although the water from Vincent Spring, for this sampling event, is different and does not seem to be affected by contaminated groundwater from the Alabama Plating site, additional hydrologic and water-quality data are needed to fully identify flow paths, the potential for contaminant transport, and water-quality changes through time.

Bradley, Michael W.; Gill, Amy C.

2014-01-01

178

Flood of April 13, 1980, Mobile, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents basic data collected during the flood of April 13, 1980, in Mobile, Alabama. The data consists of high-water marks, accumulative rainfall, peak discharge at local gaging stations, hydrographs of discharge and rainfall, and photographs at various locations taken during and immediately after the flood. The report presented in map-series and lists data that are readily usable by local planners and developers. During th afternoon of April 13, 1980, the National Weather Service at Mobile recorded a total of 10.4 inches of rainfall. Immediately after the flood approximately 60 to 70 percent of the roads in the Mobile area were impassable. (USGS)

Hannum, Curtis H.; Nelson, George H., Jr.

1980-01-01

179

Trapping styles in Mississippi, Alabama Haynesville reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The Jurassic Haynesville formation of Mississippi and Alabama has historically been just another stratigraphic unit to be penetrated before the underlying Smackover-Norphlet potential could be evaluated. But with recent production tests at rates in excess of 3,000 b/d of oil and individual wells that have produced more than 3 million bbl of oil equivalent, assuming a 6 Mcf/bbl ratio, many operators have reclassified the objectives status of the Haynesville from secondary to primary. The paper describes the structure and stratigraphy, the simple anticline, a complexly faulted anticline, a salt-breached anticline, depositional termination, and production projections.

Sticker, E.E. (Office of Geology, Jackson, MI (United States))

1994-04-11

180

Alabama's Education Report Card 2010-11  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Public education in Alabama is moving in the right direction and is poised to be a national model for the college and career readiness of its students. Through some of the most challenging financial circumstances, public education in Alabama has continued to show great promise in many areas, including reading, math, and science. The success of…

Alabama Department of Education, 2012

2012-01-01

181

Alabama Linkage: An Innovative Higher Education Consortium Maximizing Statewide Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the late 1960's and early 1970's, attracting physicians to areas of rural Alabama was virtually impossible because of the lack of professional health care workers available to become part of the necessary health care team. To address this problem, the University of Alabama (UA) adopted a plan to create a consortium of higher education…

Joiner, Charles L.; And Others

182

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Dentistry  

E-print Network

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Dentistry 7 Day Hawaiian Cruise Aboard Norwegian Dentists and currently serves as a professor in the Department of Restorative Sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Dentistry. Jodi Murphy, Managing Member Cruise and Travel Partners P: 1

Cui, Yan

183

A Study of School Size among Alabama's Public High Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the size of Alabama's public high schools, selected school quality and financial indicators, and their students' performance on standardized exams. When the socioeconomic level of the student bodies is held constant, the size of high schools in Alabama has relatively little…

Lindahl, Ronald A.; Cain, Patrick M., Sr.

2012-01-01

184

Availability and feasibility of the recovery of Alabama lignite resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Oak Hill member of the Naheola Formation in Southwest Alabama contains commercial lignite deposits of sufficient quantity and quality to support a surface mining operation. The site embracing Sumter, Marengo, and Wilcox counties, Alabama, chosen for a conceptual surface mine operation, is underlain by lignite reserves of about 282 million short tons. The deposits range in thickness from 1

T. A. Simpson; E. Anoma

1979-01-01

185

Alabama Ferry field: study of a lower Cretaceous stratigraphic trap  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since discovery in September 1983, nearly 200 wells have extended Alabama Ferry field to a surface area of approximately 70 mi². Located primarily in southeastern Leon County, east Texas, Alabama Ferry is oil productive from stratigraphically trapped carbonate reservoirs in the Lower Cretaceous upper Glen Rose D interval. Deposition within the field was the end result of a very large

1988-01-01

186

Problem: Computer Science not Taught in Most Alabama High Schools  

E-print Network

Problem: Computer Science not Taught in Most Alabama High Schools · According to the Alabama; this is not Computer Science! · Within Jefferson county, less than a handful of high schools teach Computer Science will involve computing. · High school graduates in the 21st century cannot afford to be ignorant of Computer

Gray, Jeffrey G.

187

Water Resources Data, Alabama, Water Year 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2005 water year for Alabama consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stages and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels in wells. This report includes records on both surface and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 131 streamflow-gaging stations and 23 partial-record or miscellaneous streamflow stations; (2) stage and content records for 14 lakes and reservoirs and stage at 44 stations; (3) water-quality records for 125 streamflow-gaging stations and 67 ungaged streamsites; (4) water temperature at 179 surface-water stations; (5) specific conductance at 180 stations; (6) dissolved oxygen at 17 stations; (7) turbidity at 52 stations; (8) sediment data at 2 stations; (9) water-level records for 2 recording observation wells; and (10) water-quality records for 6 ground-water stations. Also included are lists of active and discontinued continuous-record surface-water-quality stations, and partial-record and miscellaneous surface- water-quality stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Alabama.

Psinakis, W. L.; Lambeth, D. S.; Stricklin, V. E.; Treece, M. W.

2006-01-01

188

Water Resources Data, Alabama, Water Year 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2002 water year for Alabama consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stages and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels in wells. This report includes records on both surface and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 131 streamflow-gaging stations, for 41 partial-record or miscellaneous streamflow stations; (2) stage and content records for 14 lakes and reservoirs and stage at 47 stations; (3) water-quality records for 12 streamflow-gaging stations, for 17 ungaged streamsites, and for 2 precipitation stations; (4) water temperature at 14 surfacewater stations; (5) specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at 12 stations; (6) turbidity at 3 stations; (7) sediment data at 6 stations; (8) water-level records for 2 recording observation wells; and (9) water-quality records for 21 ground-water stations. Also included are lists of active and discontinued continuous-record surface-water-quality stations, and partial-record and miscellaneous surface-water-quality stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Alabama.

Pearman, J. L.; Stricklin, V. E.; Psinakis, W. L.

2003-01-01

189

Water Resources Data, Alabama, Water Year 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Alabama consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stages and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels in wells. This report includes records on both surface and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 130 streamflow-gaging stations, for 29 partial-record or miscellaneous streamflow stations; (2) stage and content records for 14 lakes and reservoirs and stage at 46 stations; (3) water-quality records for 12 streamflow-gaging stations, for 29 ungaged streamsites, and for 1 precipitation stations; (4) water temperature at 12 surfacewater stations; (5) specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at 12 stations; (6) turbidity at 3 stations; (7) sediment data at 6 stations; (8) water-level records for 2 recording observation wells; and (9) water-quality records for 9 ground-water stations. Also included are lists of active and discontinued continuous-record surface-water-quality stations, and partial-record and miscellaneous surface-water-quality stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Alabama.

Psinakis, W. L.; Lambeth, D. S.; Stricklin, V. E.; Treece, M. W.

2004-01-01

190

Water Resources Data, Alabama, Water Year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2004 water year for Alabama consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stages and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels in wells. This report includes records on both surface and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 131 streamflow-gaging stations, for 19 partial-record or miscellaneous streamflow stations; (2) stage and content records for 16 lakes and reservoirs and stage at 44 stations; (3) water-quality records for 21 streamflow-gaging stations, for 11 ungaged streamsites, and for 1 precipitation stations; (4) water temperature at 20 surface-water stations; (5) specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at 20 stations; (6) turbidity at 5 stations; (7) sediment data at 6 stations; (8) water-level records for 2 recording observa-tion wells; and (9) water-quality records for 6 ground-water stations. Also included are lists of active and discontinued continuous-record surface-water-quality stations, and partial-record and miscellaneous sur-face-water-quality stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Alabama.

Psinakis, W. L.; Lambeth, D. S.; Stricklin, V. E.; Treece, M. W.

2005-01-01

191

Water quality of the Flint River basin, Alabama and Tennessee, 1999-2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey monitored eight stream sites in the Flint River Basin during the period January 1999 through May 2000, to characterize patterns in the occurrence of pesticides, fecal-indicator bacteria, and nutrients in relation to season and streamflow conditions and to land-use patterns. This study is part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program, which was designed to assess water quality as it relates to various land uses. Every water sample collected from the Flint River Basin had detectable levels of at least two pesticides; 64 percent of the samples contained mixtures of at least five pesticides. In general, pesticides detected most frequently and at highest concentrations in streams corresponded to the pesticides with the highest rates of use in the watersheds. Detections of fluometuron, norflurazon, and atrazine were more frequent (by a margin of 15 percent or more) in samples from the Flint River when compared with the frequencies of pesticide detections at 62 agricultural stream sites across the Nation. Detections of fluometuron in the Flint River were more frequent even when compared with a cotton-cultivation subset of the 62 sites. For most pesticides, maximum concentrations did not exceed criteria to protect aquatic life; however, maximum concentrations of atrazine, cyanazine, and malathion exceeded aquaticlife criteria in at least one sample. Concentrations near or exceeding the aquatic-life criteria occurred only during the spring and summer (April-July), and generally occurred during storm flows. Less than 5 percent of the estimated mass of pesticides applied annually to agricultural areas in the Flint River Basin was transported to the stream at the monitoring points on the Flint River near Brownsboro, Alabama, and on Hester Creek near Plevna, Alabama. The pesticides with the highest ratios (greater than 3 percent) of the amount transported instream to the amount applied?atrazine, metolachlor, fluometuron, and norflurazon?are preemergent herbicides applied to the soil before the crops have emerged, which increases the probability of transport in surface runoff. Concentrations of the fecal-bacteria indicator Escherichia coli (E. coli) in the Flint River and Hester Creek exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency criterion for recreation in almost all storm samples, and in many samples collected up to 6 days following a storm. Concentrations in the Flint River were strongly correlated with sample turbidity, suggesting that turbidity might be useful as a surrogate for estimating E. coli concentrations. Concentrations of the nutrients nitrogen and phosphorus in samples from the Flint River generally exceeded thresholds indicating eutrophic potential, whereas concentrations in samples from Hester Creek were generally below the thresholds. When compared with nutrient data from a set of 24 agricultural basins across the southeastern region of the United States, concentrations in the Flint River and Hester Creek were slightly above the regional median. Base-flow concentrations of certain pesticides, nutrients, and E. coli were compared to land-use information for eight sites in the Flint River Basin. The highest base-flow concentrations of aldicarb sulfoxide, fluometuron, and phosphorus were found in the tributaries with the greatest density of cotton acreage in the watershed. Similarly, high base-flow concentrations of total nitrogen were correlated with a high percentage of cultivated land in the watershed. Lack of information about distribution of stream access by livestock weakened the analysis of correlation between livestock and base-flow concentrations of E. coli and nutrients. Input of dissolved and suspended chemicals from the Flint River during storms influences water quality in the reach of the Tennessee River from which the City of Huntsville, Alabama, withdraws about 40 percent of its drinking water. During the storm of April 2-5, 2000, concentrations of several pesticides were

Hoos, Anne B.; Garrett, Jerry W.; Knight, Rodney R.

2002-01-01

192

Visitors Center activities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

More than 2,000 children and adults from Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama recently build a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled 'Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

1997-01-01

193

Occurrence of the megatoothed sharks (Lamniformes: Otodontidae) in Alabama, USA.  

PubMed

The Otodontidae include some of the largest sharks to ever live in the world's oceans (i.e., Carcharocles megalodon). Here we report on Paleocene and Eocene occurrences of Otodus obliquus and Carcharocles auriculatus from Alabama, USA. Teeth of Otodus are rarely encountered in the Gulf Coastal Plain and this report is one of the first records for Alabama. Carcharocles auriculatus is more common in the Eocene deposits of Alabama, but its occurrence has been largely overlooked in the literature. We also refute the occurrence of the Oligocene Carcharocles angustidens in the state. Raised awareness and increased collecting of under-sampled geologic formations in Alabama will likely increase sample sizes of O. obliquus and C. auriculatus and also might unearth other otodontids, such as C. megalodon and C. chubutensis. PMID:25332848

Ehret, Dana J; Ebersole, Jun

2014-01-01

194

Alabama: A Successful Home-Based Business Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Alabama Cooperative Extension Service transformed a traditional textile/clothing program into a home-based business program. It was delivered by multiple methods including meetings, printed materials, audiovisual resources, and, in the second phase, videoconferencing. (SK)

Centrallo, Carol B.

1999-01-01

195

Occurrence of the megatoothed sharks (Lamniformes: Otodontidae) in Alabama, USA  

PubMed Central

The Otodontidae include some of the largest sharks to ever live in the world’s oceans (i.e., Carcharocles megalodon). Here we report on Paleocene and Eocene occurrences of Otodus obliquus and Carcharocles auriculatus from Alabama, USA. Teeth of Otodus are rarely encountered in the Gulf Coastal Plain and this report is one of the first records for Alabama. Carcharocles auriculatus is more common in the Eocene deposits of Alabama, but its occurrence has been largely overlooked in the literature. We also refute the occurrence of the Oligocene Carcharocles angustidens in the state. Raised awareness and increased collecting of under-sampled geologic formations in Alabama will likely increase sample sizes of O. obliquus and C. auriculatus and also might unearth other otodontids, such as C. megalodon and C. chubutensis. PMID:25332848

Ebersole, Jun

2014-01-01

196

40 CFR 282.50 - Alabama State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State...administer and enforce an underground storage tank program in lieu of the...on the approved Alabama underground storage tank program concurrently...

2012-07-01

197

40 CFR 282.50 - Alabama State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State...administer and enforce an underground storage tank program in lieu of the...on the approved Alabama underground storage tank program concurrently...

2011-07-01

198

40 CFR 282.50 - Alabama State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State...administer and enforce an underground storage tank program in lieu of the...on the approved Alabama underground storage tank program concurrently...

2013-07-01

199

40 CFR 282.50 - Alabama State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State...administer and enforce an underground storage tank program in lieu of the...on the approved Alabama underground storage tank program concurrently...

2010-07-01

200

In "Proceedings of the 1993 AIAA Conference on Space Programs and Technologies," Sept. 21-23, 1993, Huntsville, Alabama. A HUMAN-MACHINE INTERFACE FOR RECONFIGURABLE SENSOR-BASED  

E-print Network

be exe- cuted independently on the underlying real-time operating system. Onika can retrieve and use integrated with the Chimera real-time operating system in order to control several different ro- botic

201

Investigation using data in Alabama from ERTS-A  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Brief summaries are presented of accomplishments by the state of Alabama in the areas of: (1) investigation of environmental factors; (2) land use compilation; (3) data processing for land use compilation; (4) photo-reproduction and unsupervised land use classification from digital tape; (5) data collection buoys; and (6) activities of the Geological Survey of Alabama.

Henry, H. R. (principal investigator)

1972-01-01

202

LARVAL SURVEY OF TIRE-BREEDING MOSQUITOES IN ALABAMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

A state-wide survey of tire-breeding mosquitoes in Alabama was conducted in 2004 and 2005. Tire sites in all 67 counties in the state of Alabama were sampled for mosquito larvae. A total of 13,022 mosquito larvae, representing 12 species in 7 genera, was collected. The most frequently collected species were Aedes albopictus (70.4%), Culex territans (8.0%), and Ochlerotatus triseriatus (7.1%).

WHITNEY A. QUALLS; GARY R. MULLEN

2006-01-01

203

Topographic data of selected areas along the Alabama River near Montgomery, Alabama, collected using mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) technology  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Topographic data at selected areas within the Alabama River flood plain near Montgomery, Alabama, were collected using a truck-mounted mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging system. These data were collected for inclusion in a flood inundation model developed by the National Weather Service in Birmingham, Alabama. Data are presented as ArcGIS point shapefiles with the extension .shp.

Kimbrow, D.R.

2014-01-01

204

40 CFR 81.68 - Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City...Quality Control Regions § 81.68 Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City...Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama...

2010-07-01

205

An achievement of professional, public, and patient education: the design and evaluation of a comprehensive cancer control plan for Alabama.  

PubMed

This Alabama statewide cancer control plan for 2011-2015 seeks to build on the successes of two previous 5-year plans while developing new objectives that address cancer disparities and cancer prevention over the entire lifespan. The approach to defining objectives for this Plan was systematic and sought input from all members of the Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalition (ACCCC). The Plan that was fashioned is based on input from academic medical centers, private physicians, government agencies, regulatory agencies, health societies, private citizens, and cancer survivors, all of whom are active Coalition members who exchange information, opinions, and knowledge from their respective points of view. The Plan could not have taken shape without the full input of health professionals, statisticians, graduate students, former patients, and concerned citizens; it is truly an example of the synergy of professional, public, and patient education. PMID:22528631

Litton, Allison; Waterbor, John W; Chapman, Kathryn; Abdullah, Farhan; Thomas, Scott; Desmond, Renee A

2012-06-01

206

77 FR 38796 - Alabama Power Company; Holt Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Revised Restricted Service List for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Alabama] Alabama Power Company; Holt Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Revised Restricted...issuance of a new license for the Holt Hydroelectric Project No. 2203. The programmatic...restricted service list for the Holt Hydroelectric Project. On June 21, 2012, the...

2012-06-29

207

University of Alabama 2 semesters college math 2 semesters college math  

E-print Network

Alabama University of Alabama 2 semesters college math 2 semesters college math Calculus is recommended Arkansas 2 semesters college math Calculus recommended Computer Science recommended California College math recommended Calculus recommended Computer Science recommended College math required

Hone, James

208

Reporting on the Holocaust: the view from Jim Crow Alabama.  

PubMed

The press in Alabama covered major events taking place in Germany from the rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazis in 1933 through the Nuremberg Trials in 1946. Journalists in the state provided extensive coverage, and editors did not hesitate to opine on the persecution of the Jews in Europe. Yet, Alabama’s white-run press failed in the end to explain the events as a singularly Jewish tragedy. The state’s black-run press, for its part, used the news of the mass killings of the Jews to warn against the dangers of conceptions of racial superiority—a primary concern for black southerners living in the Jim Crow South. PMID:22073444

Puckett, Dan J

2011-01-01

209

Geomorphology of coastal sand dunes, Baldwin County, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Alabama's coastal eolian deposits are primarily vegetated dunes that are exemplified by sand ridges with flat to undulating upper surfaces and continuous irregular crests. Dune fields occur along Morgan peninsula between the foredune line and Little Lagoon and the Mobile Bay area. These dune fields consist primarily of one or more continuous ridges that parallel the coast and are generally vegetaed to grassy. Washover of the beach and backshore during Hurricane Frederic (1979) and subsequent smaller scale storms resulted in significant erosion of many of Alabama's dune fields. The primary dunes or foredunes are beginning to recover from the effects of these storms; however, numerous breaks in the primary dune line are present. Sand dunes in coastal Alabama provide protection against storm-generated waves and washover. The foredunes are protected by adherence to a Coastal Construction Control Line (CCCL) or construction setback line identified by markers along coastal Baldwin County.

Bearden, Bennett L.; Hummell, Richard L.; Mink, Robert M.

1989-01-01

210

Magnitude and Frequency of Floods in Alabama, 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Methods of estimating flood magnitudes for recurrence intervals of 1.5, 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 500 years have been developed for rural streams in Alabama that are not affected by regulation or urbanization. Regression relations were developed using generalized least-squares regression techniques to estimate flood magnitude and frequency on ungaged streams as a function of the basin drainage area. These methods are based on flood-frequency characteristics for 169 gaging stations in Alabama and 47 gaging stations in adjacent states having 10 or more years of record through September 2003. Graphical relations of peak flows to drainage areas are presented for sites along the Alabama, Coosa, Tallapoosa, Tennessee, Tombigbee, and Black Warrior Rivers. Equations that account for drainage area and percentage of impervious cover as independent variables also are provided for estimating flood magnitudes on ungaged urban streams (taken from a previous report).

Hedgecock, T. S.; Feaster, Toby D.

2007-01-01

211

Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological state of the oil contaminated beach system. In this paper, we present our understanding of what is known and known to be unknown with regard to the current state of Alabama's beaches in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Motivated by our observations of the evolving distribution of oil in Alabama's beaches and BP's clean-up activities, we offer our thoughts on the lessons learned from this oil spill disaster.

Hayworth, J. S.; Clement, T. P.; Valentine, J. F.

2011-12-01

212

Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological state of the oil contaminated beach system. In this paper, we present our understanding of what is known and known to be unknown with regard to the current state of Alabama's beaches in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Motivated by our observations of the evolving distribution of oil in Alabama's beaches and BP's clean-up activities, we offer our thoughts on the lessons learned from this oil spill disaster.

Hayworth, J. S.; Clement, T. P.; Valentine, J. F.

2011-07-01

213

Today's Students, Tomorrow's Citizens: Pathways for Learning, Science. Alabama High School Graduation Exam.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document introduces the Alabama Graduation Examination Program (AGEP) which provides learning opportunities for high school students to meet the minimum competency requirements to earn a high school diploma in the state of Alabama. The Alabama High School Graduation Examination (AHSGE) content includes the subject areas of reading…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery. Div. of Instructional Services.

214

30 CFR 901.25 - Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. 901.25 Section 901...STATE ALABAMA § 901.25 Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The following is a...

2014-07-01

215

State Plan for Alabama Higher Education, 2003-04 to 2008-09.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The State Plan for Alabama Higher Education is intended to focus public attention on important strategic issues facing Alabama higher education and the state and to articulate Alabamas needs and its vision for higher education. It is designed to commit resources necessary to provide high quality teaching, scholarship, research, and public service…

Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

216

The Anthropology of Science Education Reform: An Alabama Model for Building an Integrated Stakeholder Systems Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anthropologists are concerned with every aspect of the culture they are investigating. One of the five main branches of anthropology, socio-cultural anthropology, concerns itself with studying the relationship between behavior and culture. This paper explores the concept that changing the behavior of our culture - its beliefs and values - towards science is at the heart of science education reform. There are five institutions that socio-cultural anthropologists use to study the social organization of cultures: the educational system is only one of them. Its function - across all cultures - is to serve as a mechanism for implementing change in cultural beliefs and values. As leaders of science education reform, the Alabama model contends that we must stop the struggle with our purpose and get on with the business of leading culture change through an integrated stakeholder systems approach. This model stresses the need for the interaction of agencies other than education - including government, industry, the media and our health communities to operate in an integrated and systemic fashion to address the issues of living among a technically literate society. Twenty-five years of science education reform needs being voiced and programs being developed has not produced the desired results from within the educational system. This is too limited a focus to affect any real cultural change. It is when we acknowledge that students spend only an average of 12 percent of their life time in schools, that we can begin to ask ourselves what are our students learning the other 88 percent of their time - from their peers, their parents and the media - and what should we be doing to address this cultural crisis in these other arenas in addition to the educational system? The Alabama Math, Science and Technology Education Coalition (AMSTEC) is a non-profit 501c(3) organization operating in the state of Alabama to provide leadership in improving mathematics, science, and technology education through facilitating communication among education, business, and public policy organizations. Through the AMSTEC approach to systemic Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education reform, business and other aspects of our culture play a vital role as stakeholders in the development of the integrated stakeholder model. Using the STEMnet model developed by National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), each of the stakeholders has been working in support of the Alabama Department of Education's Math Science and Technology K-12 research-based Initiative (AMSTI) . In this respect, Alabama has the education aspects of science education reform underway. AMSTI continues to grow and strengthen its program now using an integrated stakeholder model. The integrated stakeholder approach enhances and strengthens Alabama's STEM educational activities in support of systemic K-12 education reform called for in our nation to meet the needs of the 21st century workforce. In addition, aspects of culture including the media, the health community, and local business and industry will also align messages and programs to work in support of systemic K-20 education reform. It truly "takes a village" of good communicating stakeholders who have created a shared vision and common language for discussing and aligning resources and strategies for changing the perceptions, feelings and teaching and learning of science in our society http://www.amstec.org, http://www.nsstc.org

Denson, R. L.; Cox, G. N.

2004-12-01

217

General George C. Marshall  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Marshall Space Flight Center, a NASA field installation, was established at Huntsville, Alabama, in 1960. The Center was named in honor of General George C. Marshall, the Army Chief of Staff during World War II, Secretary of State, and Nobel Prize Wirner for his world-renowned Marshall Plan.

2004-01-01

218

General George C. Marshall  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a portrait of General George C. Marshall in Army uniform. The Marshall Space Flight Center, a NASA field installation, was established in Huntsville, Alabama, in 1960. The Center was named in honor of General George C. Marshall, the Army Chief of Staff during World War II, Secretary of State, and Nobel Prize Wirner for his world-renowned Marshall Plan.

2004-01-01

219

Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) Agency Introduction: The FY 2012 budget request for NASA is $18.7 billion, the FY 2010 enacted  

E-print Network

in direct support of the manufacturing process. Additionally, the facility houses the USDA National Finance facility of the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Michoud provides manufacturing capability with 37 machine shops, advanced fiber placement machines, multi axis machining centers, advanced

220

X-ray source system at the MSFC x-ray calibration facility J. J. Kolodziejczak, R. A. Austin  

E-print Network

.F. Eisner, M. K. Joy, M. Suikanen NASA ES-84, Marshall Space Flight Center Huntsville, Alabama 35812 E. M (XRCF) at Marshall Space Flight Center. It is a part of NASA's Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility resolution and energy ,2 The metrology performed by Hughes-Danbury Optical Systems on the 4 parabolic and 4

Wargelin, Bradford J.

221

Reducing Tick-Borne Disease in Alabama: Linking Health Risk Perception with Spatial Analysis Using the NASA Earth Observing System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lyme disease (LD) accounts for most vector-borne disease reports in the U.S., and although its existence in Alabama remains controversial, other tick-borne illnesses (TBI) such as Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness (STARI) pose a health concern in the state. Phase One of the Marshall Space Flight Center-UAB DEVELOP study of TBI identified the presence of the chain of infection for LD (Ixodes scapularis ticks carrying Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria) and STARI (Amblyomma americanum ticks and an as-yet-unconfirmed agent) in Alabama. Both LD and STARI are associated with the development of erythema migrans rashes around an infected tick bite, and while treatable with oral antibiotics, a review of educational resources available to state residents revealed low levels of prevention information. To improve prevention, recognition, and treatment of TBI in Alabama, Phase Two builds a health communication campaign based on vector habitat mapping and risk perception assessment. NASA Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) satellite imagery identified likely tick habitats using remotely sensed measurements of vegetation vigor (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and soil moisture. Likely tick habitats, identified as those containing both high vegetation density and soil moisture, included Oak Mountain State Park, Bankhead National Forest, and Talladega National Forest. To target a high-risk group -- outdoor recreation program participants at Alabama universities -- the study developed a behavior survey instrument based on existing studies of LD risk factors and theoretical constructs from the Social Ecological Model and Health Belief Model. The survey instrument was amended to include geographic variables in the assessment of TBI knowledge, attitudes, and prevention behaviors, and the vector habitat model will be expanded to incorporate additional environmental variables and in situ data. Remotely sensed environmental data combined with risk perception assessments inform an ongoing outreach campaign consisting of stakeholder meetings and educational seminars.

Hemmings, S.; Renneboog, N.; Firsing, S.; Capilouto, E.; Harden, J.; Hyden, R.; Tipre, M.; Zhang, Y.

2010-01-01

222

UTCA Review of Research Centers and Institutes Page 1 University Transportation Center for Alabama  

E-print Network

/1/2012 12401 Natural Gas Encasement for Highway Crossings Awarded Lindly, J. UA 128,428 6/19/2012 12402 Safety Status Faculty Campus Award Amount Initial Start Date 12101 ALDOT ITS Strategic Vision UTC Jones, S. UA/26/2012 12410 ALDOT Economic Sustainability Awarded Batson, R. UA 50,384 8/16/2012 12411 Revision of the Traffic

Carver, Jeffrey C.

223

Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological

J. S. Hayworth; T. P. Clement; J. F. Valentine

2011-01-01

224

Back to the Basics: Birmingham, Alabama, Measurement and Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Back to the Basics: Birmingham, Alabama" is the fourth in a series of workshops that focus on teaching foundational map reading and spatial differentiation skills. It is the second published exercise from the Back to the Basics series developed by the Wetland Education through Maps and Aerial Photography (WETMAAP) Program (see "Journal of…

Handley, Lawrence R.; Lockwood, Catherine M.; Handley, Nathan

2005-01-01

225

78 FR 56980 - Muscle Shoals Reservation Redevelopment, Colbert County, Alabama  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...public meeting on February 3, 2011, in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. TVA received 146 comment...manage the property consistent with its 1996 Muscle Shoals/Wilson Dam Reservation Land Use...Preservation Officer to mitigate for the loss of properties eligible for inclusion...

2013-09-16

226

The University of Alabama 1 Department of Computer Science  

E-print Network

The University of Alabama 1 Department of Computer Science Computer science is a multifaceted discipline that encompasses a broad range of topics. At one end of the spectrum, computer science focuses. At the other applications-oriented end of the spectrum, computer science deals with techniques for the design

Carver, Jeffrey C.

227

Four new species of Gyrodactylus from fishes of Alabama.  

PubMed

Four new species of Gyrodactylus are described from fishes of Alabama. Gyrodactylus dorosomae was collected from Dorosoma cepedianum (Le Sueur) and D. petenense (Gunther); G. parvicirrus from Notropis atherinoides Raf; G. lythruri from Notropis b. bellus Hay and N. atrapiculus Snelson; and G. nigrum from Etheostoma nigrum Raf. PMID:1117368

Rogers, W A

1975-02-01

228

Smoking, Sociodemographic Determinants, and Stress in the Alabama Black Belt  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: In the Alabama Black Belt, poverty is high, and the educational level is low. Studies have found increased tobacco use among individuals exposed to high levels of stress. Few studies have been conducted in this region to measure smoking status, its sociodemographic determinants, and how smoking status relates to stressful environmental…

Shuaib, Faisal; Foushee, H. R.; Ehiri, John; Bagchi, Suparna; Baumann, Angela; Kohler, Connie

2011-01-01

229

Agribusiness Education. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1990, No. 60.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This course of study provides a framework for the content of a program in agribusiness education as part of the Alabama vocational education program. The course of study was designed to assist educators in developing and maintaining high quality vocational programs and to ensure uniformity of vocational programs. Following a description of the…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

230

Assessing Job Satisfaction among Alabama's Community College Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between selected demographic and educational variables of faculty members employed in the Alabama Community College System and their impact on job satisfaction. The variables included in the study are the demographic variables of age, gender, ethnicity, salary, and degree status, along with…

Howton, Russell Warren

2009-01-01

231

Sea-Level Rise Visualization for Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an interactive map that illustrates the scale of potential flooding in Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida due to projected sea level rise. It is a collaborative project of NOAA Sea Grant Consortium and U.S.G.S. It is a pilot project, so there is some possibility that the resource may not be maintained over time.

Center, Noaa C.; Consortium, Mississippi-Alabama S.; Survey, U. S.; Usgs

232

Three Alabama Teen Parent Programs: Perspectives from Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although there are many programs that concentrate on reducing the overall rate of teen pregnancy, there are few programs designed to assist teen parents. The purpose of this study was to determine how and to what extent three teen parenting programs in Alabama met the needs of teen parents with a positive environment and assisted them in…

Stewart, Cynthia Ivey

2009-01-01

233

The Citizens' Viewpoint: Higher Education in Alabama, 1981.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of a survey assessing public opinions and attitudes about higher education in Alabama are presented. A representative sample of 736 households was contacted by telephone, and 546 agreed to be interviewed. The survey was designed to evaluate public opinions and attitudes about higher education teaching, research, service, finance,…

Owings, Thomas G.

234

EFFECTS OF ALTERNATIVE ACREAGE RESTRICTION PROVISIONS ON ALABAMA COTTON FARMS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1985 Farm Bill departs from recent farm bills in moving toward more restrictive acreage control. The change from a two- to a five-year average in calculating base acreage and enforcement of limited cross-compliance appear to significantly alter crop mix decisions on representative Alabama cotton farms.

Anne M. Mims; Patricia A. Duffy; George J. Young

1989-01-01

235

Tin mineralization and related geology, Coosa County, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The Alabama tin belt was studied to determine the relationship of the tin mineralization to the deformational history and igneous intrusives of the area. Studies included thin section modal analyses, polished section observations, biotite and feldspar mineral separate analyses, whole rock major- and minor-element analyses, quantitative Sn determination in rock and mineral samples, and electron-microprobe mineral analyses. (ACR)

Schrader, E.L.; Tull, J.F.; Stow, S.H.

1981-02-01

236

Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Shannon Golden, Alabama DOT  

E-print Network

be measured by weight. The substitution of each mineral admixture (GGBFS, Fly Ash, Silica Fume) for Portland* (Maximum % Substitution) Fly Ash (Maximum % Substutution) Silica Fume (Maximum % Substitution) 50 % 0 % 0Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Shannon Golden, Alabama DOT PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT

237

Jurassic faults of southwest Alabama and offshore areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four fault groups affecting Jurassic strata occur in the southwest and offshore Alabama areas. They include the regional basement rift trend, the regional peripheral fault trend, the Mobile graben fault system, and the Lower Mobile Bay fault system. The regional basement system rift and regional peripheral fault trends are distinct and rim the inner margin of the eastern Gulf Coastal

R. M. Mink; B. H. Tew; B. L. Bearden; E. A. Mancini

1991-01-01

238

Haynesville sandstone reservoirs in the Updip Jurassic trend of Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Subsequent to the 1986 drilling of the 1 Carolyn McCollough Unit 1-13 well, which initiated production from the Frisco City sand of the Haynesville Formation in Monroe County, Alabama, seven Haynesville fields have been established in Covington, Escambia, and Monroe counties. Initial flow rates of several hundred BOPD are typical for wells in these fields, and maximum rates exceed 2000

R. L. Kugler; R. M. Mink

1994-01-01

239

National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Alabama.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Alabama. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

240

Laboratory Safety Manual for Alabama Schools. Bulletin 1975. No. 20.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents the Alabama State Department of Education guidelines for science laboratory safety, equipment, storage, chemical safety, rocket safety, electrical safety, safety with radioisotopes, and safety with biologicals. Also included is a brief bibliography, a teacher's checklist, a listing of laser facts and regulations, and a…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

241

SCIENTIFIC NOTE DISTRIBUTION EXPANSION OF CULEX CORONATOR IN ALABAMA  

E-print Network

. Here we provide new collection records for Cx. coronator in east-central Alabama. In October 2007, 2 larvae of Cx. coronator were collected from an artificial container in Tuskegee National Forest in Macon and Knab is a mosquito species common to the American tropics and subtropics that breeds in rain

Behmer, Spencer T.

242

Arts Education. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1998, No. 17.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide provides the framework for K-12 arts education program in Alabama's public schools. Content standards in the guide are minimum and required, and fundamental and specific but not exhaustive. School systems may include additional content standards and add implementation guidelines, resources, and/or activities. In response to…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

243

Marketing Education. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1990, No. 55.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This course of study provides a framework for the content of a program in marketing education as part of the Alabama vocational education program. The course of study was designed to assist educators in developing and maintaining high quality vocational programs and to ensure uniformity of vocational programs. Following a description of the…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

244

The OOPSLA Trivia Show (TOOTS) University of Alabama at Birmingham  

E-print Network

The OOPSLA Trivia Show (TOOTS) Jeff Gray University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Computer on questions and answers related to OOPSLA themes. The goal of the panel is to provide an educational participation. 1. Overview of the OOPSLA Trivia Show OOPSLA has one of the most diverse collections of attendees

Gray, Jeffrey G.

245

The Object-Oriented Trivia Show (TOOTS) University of Alabama  

E-print Network

The Object-Oriented Trivia Show (TOOTS) Jeff Gray University of Alabama Department of Computer that conforms to the concept of a game show that is focused on questions and answers related to SPLASH, OOPSLA, Languages. Keywords Objects, Game Show. 1. Overview of the OOPSLA Trivia Show OOPSLA (and now SPLASH) has

Gray, Jeffrey G.

246

Alabama School Board Presidents' Perceptions of Community Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of Alabama School Board Presidents about community engagement in school board decision making. An exploratory research design was used and data were collected by survey. The survey was mailed to 128 school board presidents representing the 128 school districts statewide (as of 2006). Sixty…

Starnes, Tammy Hallman

2010-01-01

247

Psychometric Properties of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire-Preschool Revision  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The psychometric properties of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire-Preschool Revision (APQ-PR) were explored in a sample of hyperactive-inattentive preschool children (N = 47) and nonimpaired controls (N = 113). A subset of parents completed the questionnaire on 2 occasions, approximately 1 year apart. Factor analysis revealed a 3-factor solution,…

Clerkin, Suzanne M.; Marks, David J.; Policaro, Katia L.; Halperin, Jeffrey M.

2007-01-01

248

Alabama English Language Course of Study: Assessment Correlation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is designed to show the connection between the required state-written curriculum (courses of study) and the state-tested curriculum (the Alabama High School Graduation Examination and the Stanford Achievement Test, Ninth Edition [Stanford 9]) in English Language Arts. The document illustrates that courses of study content standards…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

249

Alabama Social Studies Course of Study: Assessment Correlation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is designed to show the connection between the required state-written curriculum (courses of study) and the state-tested curriculum (the Alabama High School Graduation Examination and the Stanford Achievement Test, Ninth Edition [Stanford 9]) in Social Studies. The document illustrates that courses of study content standards embody…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

250

Cardboard Houses with Wings: The Architecture of Alabama's Rural Studio  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Rural Studio, an outreach program of Auburn University, designs innovative houses for poor people living in Alabama's Hale County by using "junk" such as car windshields, carpet tiles, baled cardboard, and old license plates. The article theorizes this particular architecture in terms of Critical Regionalism, developed by Tzonis/Lefaivre and…

Botz-Bornstein, Thorsten

2010-01-01

251

Retention Issues: A Study of Alabama Special Education Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated issues that impact attrition, migration and retention of special education teachers in Alabama. The sample comprised 70 teachers designated as "highly-qualified" who responded to a job satisfaction instrument, with a focus on retention issues, developed by Levine (2001). The results indicated that the major reasons for…

Plash, Shawn; Piotrowski, Chris

2006-01-01

252

Southeast Regional Academic Center for Environmental Public Health  

E-print Network

emergency preparedness as a health disparity issue #12;Where we hope to go from hereWhere we hope to go fromSoutheast Regional Academic Center for Environmental Public Health (SE-RAC) Southeast Regional Academic Center for Environmental Public Health (SE-RAC) School of Public Health University of Alabama

253

Industrial Assessment Center  

SciTech Connect

Since its inception, the University of Florida Industrial Assessment Center has successfully completed close to 400 energy assessments of small to medium manufacturing facilities in Florida, southern Georgia and southern Alabama. Through these efforts, recommendations were made that would result in savings of about $5 million per year, with an implementation rate of 20-25%. Approximately 80 engineering students have worked for the UF-IAC, at least 10 of whom went on to work in energy related fields after graduation. Additionally, through the popular course in Industrial Energy Management, many students have graduated from the University of Florida with a strong understanding and support of energy conservation methods.

Dr. Diane Schaub

2007-03-05

254

1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING WEST OF 'THE BIRMINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER,' ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING WEST OF 'THE BIRMINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER,' WITH HILLMAN HOSPITAL, THE FIVE-STORY BUILDING (CENTER RIGHT AT 20TH STREET AND SIXTH AVENUE SOUTH), JEFFERSON TOWER (CENTER LEFT AT 20TH STREET AND SEVENTH AVENUE SOUTH, AND THE MANY HOSPITALS AND TEACHING FACILITIES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA AT BIRMINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER. - Hillman Hospital, 600 Block Westside Twentieth Street South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

255

Alabama Children: A Matter of Commitment and Priority. Special Report to Governor Fob James and the Alabama Legislature. Volume I and Volume II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report in two volumes is the product of a year-long needs assessment undertaken by the Governor of Alabama's Commission for the Alabama Year of the Child. Volume I, which contains an overview and recommendations to the governor and the legislature, includes position papers and letters from the commission and interested citizens. These…

Ames, Bobbie H.

256

Larval survey of tire-breeding mosquitoes in Alabama.  

PubMed

A state-wide survey of tire-breeding mosquitoes in Alabama was conducted in 2004 and 2005. Tire sites in all 67 counties in the state of Alabama were sampled for mosquito larvae. A total of 13,022 mosquito larvae, representing 12 species in 7 genera, was collected. The most frequently collected species were Aedes albopictus (70.4%), Culex territans (8.0%), and Ochlerotatus triseriatus (7.1%). The following species were also collected: Cx. restuans (6.0%), Cx. salinarius (2.7%), Orthopodomyia signifera (2.4%), and Cx. quinquefasciatus (1.4%). Ochlerotatus atropalpus, Toxorhynchites rutilus, Anopheles punctipennis, An. quadrimaculatus, and Psorophora columbiae each represented <1.0% of the total larval collections. No Ae. aegypti or Oc. japonicus were collected from tires during this survey. The first known collection of Ps. columbiae breeding in water-filled tires is reported. PMID:17304924

Qualls, Whitney A; Mullen, Gary R

2006-12-01

257

Mississippi/Alabama Pinnacle Trend Ecosystem Monitoring Final Synthesis Report  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This Final Synthesis Report summarizes a four-year program to characterize and monitor carbonate mounds on the Mississippi/Alabama outer continental shelf (OCS). The study area is shown in Fig.ES.1. The study was conducted by Continental Shelf Associates, Inc. and the Geochemical and Environmental Research Group (GERG) of Texas A&M University (TAMU), for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Biological Resources Division.

Texas A&M University, Geochemical and Environmental Research Group

2001-01-01

258

Frisco City sand: New Jurassic reservoir in southwest Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first commercial production of hydrocarbons from the Jurassic Haynesville Formation in southwestern Alabama was from the Frisco City field. The field currently produces 57.8° API gravity oil on 160-ac well spacing from a depth of approximately 12,000 ft. Perforations are in the Frisco City sand interval, in the lower part of the Haynesville Formation. Average porosity is 15% and

S. D. Mann; R. M. Mink; B. L. Bearden; R. D. Jr. Schneeflock

1989-01-01

259

Sustainability analysis of groundwater resources in a coastal aquifer, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fort Morgan Peninsula is an attached portion of a dynamic barrier complex in the northern Gulf of Mexico and is a large tourist\\u000a area that brings in a significant amount of revenue for Alabama. Many of the hotels and tourist attractions depend on the\\u000a groundwater as their water supply. The over-withdrawal of groundwater and saltwater intrustion will have a negative

Jie Liu; Kendall Rich; Chunmiao Zheng

2008-01-01

260

ADAMS GAP AND SHINBONE CREEK ROADLESS AREAS, ALABAMA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Adams Gap and Shinbone Creek Roadless Areas in Alabama were evaluated for their mineral potential. The only resource within the established boundary of the roadless area is quartzite suitable for crushed rock or refractory-grade aggregate. The quartzite contains deleterious impurities and is found in abundance outside the areas. Natural gas or petroleum may exist at depth. Detailed seismic studies and deep drilling tests are needed before a reasonable estimate of hydrocarbon potential can be made.

Klein, T. L.; Harrison, Donald, K.

1984-01-01

261

The isolation of spiroplasmas from mosquitoes in Macon County, Alabama.  

PubMed

During the summer months of 1985, 1,298 adult mosquitoes comprising 21 species and 7 genera were collected in Macon County, Alabama. Mosquitoes were collected from four sections of the county with CO2-baited light traps. Spiroplasma cultures were isolated from two pools of 24 and 25 Aedes fulvus pallens, one pool of 22 Anopheles punctipennis and one pool of 7 Culex nigripalpus. Electron microscopic studies of the isolates revealed helical, wall-less cells. PMID:2904950

Shaikh, A A; Johnson, W E; Stevens, C; Tang, A Y

1987-06-01

262

The Search for Job Satisfaction: A Survey of Alabama Policing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines police job satisfaction and its association with general occupational attraction. Police officers from\\u000a sixteen municipal departments (n?=?1,114) across one southern state (Alabama) were found to possess moderate-high overall\\u000a job satisfaction, with regression analysis supporting the conclusions of prior studies that demographics are of little value\\u000a to understanding job satisfaction. The findings convey that 25% of job satisfaction

Philip E. Carlan

2007-01-01

263

Effects of the Boll Weevil Eradication Program on Alabama Cotton Farms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five-year, 0-1 mixed integer programming models of two representative Alabama farms were developed for analyzing the effects of the Boll Weevil Eradication (BWE) program on farm program participation and crop-mix decisions by Alabama cotton farmers. In previous research the BWE program was found to increase yields by approximately 100 pounds per acre in Georgia and southern Alabama where the program

Patricia A. Duffy; Danny L. Cain; George J. Young; Michael E. Wetzstein

1994-01-01

264

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 12, PAGES 1703-1706, JUNE 15, 2000 Comparison of ground-based 3-dimensional lightning  

E-print Network

-based 3-dimensional lightning mapping observations with satellite-based LIS observations in Oklahoma and Climate Center, Huntsville, Alabama Abstract. 3-dimensional lightning mapping observations obtained in central Oklahoma by the New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) have been compared with optical

Thomas, Ronald J.

265

NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission  

E-print Network

to the defense and intelligence communities. The framework extends work previously funded by NASA, NSF, DOE, DOD to both defense and intelligence communities for risk assessment and predicting regional instability, Steve Tanner Information Technology and Systems Center (ITSC) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville

Miami, University of

266

THE HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER WIDE SWATH SIMULATION AND WIND SPEED RETRIEVALS  

E-print Network

THE HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER WIDE SWATH SIMULATION AND WIND SPEED RETRIEVALS Ruba A. Amarin1 Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 4 NOAA/AOML/Hurricane Research Division, Miami, Florida, USA ABSTRACT The knowledge of peak winds in hurricanes is critical to classification of hurricane intensity

Ruf, Christopher

267

Processor Units Reduce Satellite Construction Costs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of the effort to build the Fast Affordable Science and Technology Satellite (FASTSAT), Marshall Space Flight Center developed a low-cost telemetry unit which is used to facilitate communication between a satellite and its receiving station. Huntsville, Alabama-based Orbital Telemetry Inc. has licensed the NASA technology and is offering to install the cost-cutting units on commercial satellites.

2014-01-01

268

Processing of mercurous chloride in reduced gravity  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a joint experiment between the Northrop-Grumman Science and Technology Center and the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Consortium for Materials Development in Space, single crystals of mercurous chloride were grown in the Space Experiment Facility (SEF) transparent furnace that was flown on Spacehab 4 in May 1996. Mercurous chloride is an acousto-optical material with an unusually low acoustic velocity

C. Watson; N. B. Singh; A. Thomas; A. E. Nelson; T. O. Rolin; J. Griffin; G. Haulenbeek; N. Daniel; J. Seaquist; C. Cacioppo; J. Weber; Maria I. Zugrav; R. J. Naumann

1996-01-01

269

Second Workshop on Spacecraft Glow  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Various aspects of space glow were considered. Results of a workshop held on May 6 to 7, 1985, at the Space Science Laboratory of NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama are presented. The topics of discussion are divided as follows: (1) in situ observations; (2) theoretical calculations; (3) laboratory measurements; and (4) future experiments.

Waite, J. H., Jr. (editor); Moorehead, T. W. (editor)

1985-01-01

270

SPACE SHUTTLE PROGRAM Space Shuttle Projects Office (MSFC)  

E-print Network

of LO2 Feedline Insulation · Readiness Statement #12;SPACE SHUTTLE PROGRAM Space Shuttle Projects OfficeSPACE SHUTTLE PROGRAM Space Shuttle Projects Office (MSFC) NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama September 17, 2002 1 STS-112/ET-115 Flight Readiness Review External Tank Project #12

Christian, Eric

271

Ascent thrust vector control system test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Testing of the Ascent Thrust Vector Control System in support of the Ares 1-X program at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. This image is extracted from a high definition video file and is the highest resolution available

2008-01-01

272

The Daytime Mixed Layer Observed by Radiosonde, Profiler, and Lidar during MILAGRO  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign centered in the Mexico City area, scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) operated a variety of atmospheric profiling systems. The systems were located at the Mexican Petroleum Institute (IMP) in central Mexico City, at Tecámac University on the northeastern edge of

W. J. Shaw; M. S. Pekour; R. L. Coulter; T. J. Martin; J. Walters

2007-01-01

273

Pesticide occurrence in groundwater in areas of high-density row crop production in Alabama, 2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

High-density row crop production occurs in three areas of Alabama that are underlain by productive aquifers, northern Alabama, southeastern Alabama, and Baldwin County in southwestern Alabama. The U.S. Geological Survey collected five groundwater samples from each of these three areas during 2009 for analysis of selected pesticides. Results of these analyses showed detections for 37 of 152 analytes. The three most frequently detected compounds were atrazine, 2-Chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-triazine (CIAT), and metolachlor. The highest concentration for any analyte was 4.08 micrograms per liter for metolachlor.

Moreland, Richard S.

2011-01-01

274

Thermal signatures of urban land cover types: High-resolution thermal infrared remote sensing of urban heat island in Huntsville, AL  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main objective of this research is to apply airborne high-resolution thermal infrared imagery for urban heat island studies, using Huntsville, AL, a medium-sized American city, as the study area. The occurrence of urban heat islands represents human-induced urban/rural contrast, which is caused by deforestation and the replacement of the land surface by non-evaporating and non-porous materials such as asphalt and concrete. The result is reduced evapotranspiration and more rapid runoff of rain water. The urban landscape forms a canopy acting as a transitional zone between the atmosphere and the land surface. The composition and structure of this canopy have a significant impact on the thermal behavior of the urban environment. Research on the trends of surface temperature at rapidly growing urban sites in the United States during the last 30 to 50 years suggests that significant urban heat island effects have caused the temperatures at these sites to rise by 1 to 2 C. Urban heat islands have caused changes in urban precipitation and temperature that are at least similar to, if not greater than, those predicted to develop over the next 100 years by global change models. Satellite remote sensing, particularly NOAA AVHRR thermal data, has been used in the study of urban heat islands. Because of the low spatial resolution (1.1 km at nadir) of the AVHRR data, these studies can only examine and map the phenomenon at the macro-level. The present research provides the rare opportunity to utilize 5-meter thermal infrared data acquired from an airplane to characterize more accurately the thermal responses of different land cover types in the urban landscape as input to urban heat island studies.

Lo, Chor Pang

1996-01-01

275

33 CFR 334.783 - Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area. 334.783...783 Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area....

2010-07-01

276

Empirical investigation of optimal severance taxation in Alabama. Volume II  

SciTech Connect

The research develops a theoretical and empirical foundation for the analysis of severance taxation in Alabama. Primary emphasis was directed to delineating an optimal severance tax structure for the state of Alabama and, in the process, assess the economic and fiscal consequences of current severance tax usage. The legal and economic basis and justification for severance taxation, the amounts and distribution of severance tax revenues currently generated, the administration of the tax, and severance tax practices prevailing in other states were compared in Volume I. These data, findings, and quantitative analyses were used to ascertain the fiscal and economic effects of changes in the structure and utilization of severance taxation in Alabama. The actual and potential productivity of severance taxation in Alamama is discussed. The analysis estimates the state's severance tax revenue capacity relative to the nation and to regional neighbors. The analysis is followed by an intrastate fiscal examination of the state and local tax system. In the process, the relative revenue contribution of severance taxes to state and local revenues is quantified, as well as comparing the revenue capacity and utilization of severance taxes to other state and local levies. An examination is made of the question of who actually pays the severance taxes by an analysis of the shifting and incidence characteristics of taxes on natural resources. Serious doubt is raised that states can, under normal economic circumstances, export a large portion of the severance tax burden to out-of-state users. According to the analytical results of the study, profit margins will be affected; therefore, higher severance taxes should only be imposed after rational assessment of the consequences on business incentives and employment in the extractive inudstries, especially coal.

Leathers, C.G.; Zumpano, L.V.

1980-10-01

277

Back to the basics: Birmingham, Alabama, measurement and scale  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Back to the Basics: Birmingham, Alabama is the fourth in a series of workshops that focus on teaching foundational map reading and spatial differentiation skills. It is the second published exercise from the Back to the Basics series developed by the Wetland Education through Maps and Aerial Photography (WETMAAP) Program (see Journal of Geography 103, 5: 226-230). Like its predecessor, the current exercise is modified from the Birmingham Back to the Basics workshop offered during the annual National Council for Geographic Education meeting. The focus of this exercise is on scale and measurement, foundational skills for spatial thinking and analysis. ?? 2005 National Council for Geographic Education.

Handley, L.R.; Lockwood, C.M.; Handley, N.

2005-01-01

278

High oil rates gauged from Haynesville in Alabama  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that oil wells with among the highest flowing capacities in the onshore U.S. are being completed in Alabama as operators press development of North Frisco City field. Five wells have been completed in the Monroe County field. A sixth well will be drilled in September, and four more locations have been identified on the 2,100 acre leasehold. The area is 4 miles west of Monroeville, Ala. Nuevo Energy Co., Houston, completed the field's most recent well earlier this month.

Not Available

1992-08-24

279

PLATO Use for Graduation Test Preparation, Piedmont High School, Piedmont, Alabama. PLATO Evaluation Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Piedmont High School is a small high school in rural Alabama, which serves a primarily white population and has a high dropout rate. PLATO computerized instruction has been used by almost 200 skill-deficient students, and 4 teachers have used it. After using PLATO, Piedmonts struggling students are much more likely to pass the Alabama High School…

Quinn, David W.; Quinn, Nancy W.

280

A Decade Review of Selected Risky Behaviors and Attitudes of Alabama Adolescents. Summary Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report examines the behaviors and attitudes of Alabama adolescents and provides insights into changes and trends in the selected areas. Relatively few meaningful changes on risky behaviors were found. Risky health behaviors remained a serious, immediate, and future threat to the well-being of Alabama's teens. Changes were extremely modest in…

Nagy, Stephen; Adcock, Anthony G.; Leaver-Dunn, Deidre; Elder, Craig; Jacobs, Donna P.

281

Long-Term COHPAC Baghouse Performance at Alabama Power Company's E. C. Gaston Units 2 & 3  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following a successful pilot-scale baghouse testing program and after reviewing the performance of Luminant's COHPAC (EPRI's patented COmpact Hybrid PArticulate Collector technology) baghouse installation at its Big Brown Station, Alabama Power Company (APCO) decided to install a COHPAC baghouse on Unit 3 at its E. C. Gaston Steam Plant located near Wilsonville, Alabama in late 1996. A second COHPAC baghouse

Kenneth M. Cushing; W. Theron Grubb; Byron V. Corina; Ramsay L. Chang

282

Perceptions of Alabama School Personnel of Research-based Instructional Strategies to Improve Student Achievement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to explore the perceptions of school personnel concerning the use of research-based instructional strategies as outlined in School Improvement Plans of selected Alabama school districts to improve student achievement. The principal and School Improvement Chairperson at 281 Alabama public secondary schools, identified for School Improvement as mandated by NCLB, composed the population. All subjects received a

Christopher Glenn Pritchett

2007-01-01

283

Analysis of Mutation Testing Tools Johnathan Snyder, Department of Computer Science, University of Alabama  

E-print Network

of Alabama Adviser: Jeff Gray, Department of Computer Science, University of Alabama Contact: jrsnyder@crimson.ua if there are any faults in the software and if the software meets its requirements. Research in software testing of mutants were generated, and how well they could integrate with other testing tools such as JUnit. Operator

Gray, Jeffrey G.

284

Correlation Between Precipitation and Crop Yield for Corn and Cotton Produced in Alabama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this study, variations in precipitation during the time of corn silking are compared to Alabama corn yields. Also, this study compares precipitation variations during bloom to Alabama cotton yield. The goal is to obtain mathematical correlations between rainfall during the crop's critical period and the crop amount harvested per acre.

Hayes, Carol E.; Perkey, Donald J.

1998-01-01

285

Illicit Drug Use and the Social Context of HIV/AIDS in Alabama's Black Belt  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: The rural Black Belt of Alabama is among the poorest areas of the nation. Poverty, lack of health infrastructure, and health disparities involving HIV/AIDS and other diseases reflect the lower life expectancy of people in the region. The Black Belt region has the highest HIV rates in rural America. Purpose: Using Alabama as a case…

Lichtenstein, Bronwen

2007-01-01

286

CONTACT INFORMATION FOR STUDENT COMPLAINT PROCESSES* Alabama Commission on Higher Education  

E-print Network

CONTACT INFORMATION FOR STUDENT COMPLAINT PROCESSES* ALABAMA Alabama Commission on Higher Education http://azppse.state.az.us/student_info/compliance.asp ARKANSAS Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board Arkansas Department of Higher Education 114 East Capitol Ave Little Rock, AR 72201 ADHE

Shahriar, Selim

287

Alabama Renaissance Technology Academy (ARTA) for School Leaders Survey Report (Pre & Post Data).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on a study conducted for the Alabama State Department of Education. The study's purpose was to provide a clear perspective on the current abilities of school leaders to provide technology leadership in schools and school districts. All district superintendents and school principals who attended (N=341) the Alabama Renaissance…

Parks, Shannon; Sun, Feng; Collins, Blanche C.

288

Experiencing Educational Leadership Preparation Program Redesign in Alabama: One University's Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Calls for changing educational leadership preparation have led many state policy makers to initiate program redesign efforts; the governor of Alabama constituted a working group to examine the situation and develop recommendations. This article details the school leadership preparation program redesign process in Alabama from the perspective of…

Kochan, Frances; Reames, Ellen H.

2013-01-01

289

Public Librarians and the Civil Rights Movement: Alabama, 1955-1965.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relates the experiences of three public librarians in Alabama during the Civil Rights movement who challenged the resistance to integration. Discusses conflicts between professional and regional values; local racial customs; the ethics of librarianship; and the roles of the American Library Association and the Alabama Library Association.…

Graham, Patterson Toby

2001-01-01

290

Law: The Language of Liberty. Supplemental Materials for Alabama Social Studies Teachers. Grade 9.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student activity pages, teacher background information, and lesson ideas for teaching about law in social studies classrooms are presented. The first section, "Law and Alabama History," focuses on law at the state level. Included are a brief history of Alabama's court system and prison system, a summary of rules for safe driving, a law enforcement…

Alabama Administrative Office of Courts, Montgomery.

291

Alabama High-Risk Youth Resource Directory. Tools for Prevention: Building Healthy Youths.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Like many other southern states, Alabama faces serious social and economic challenges. The 1993 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, undertaken to assess the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among students grades 9 through 12 across the United States, found that of all Alabama students: 18.2% reported that someone had offered, sold or given them illegal…

Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Washington, DC. School Improvement Programs.

292

Alabama Commission on Higher Education Annual Report, October 1, 1999-September 30, 2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Alabama Commission on Higher Education has the statutory responsibility for the overall statewide planning and coordination of higher education in Alabama, the administration of various student aid programs, and the performance of designated regulatory functions. This annual report provides information about all of these responsibilities and…

Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

293

SAFETY ANALYSIS ON RAIL HIGHWAY AT-GRADE CROSSING IN ALABAMA  

E-print Network

SAFETY ANALYSIS ON RAIL HIGHWAY AT-GRADE CROSSING IN ALABAMA Jing Li, Post-doc Researcher Gaurav-lane divided highways, urban/suburban arterials, highway bridges, and rail highway at-grade crossings, based Alabama Total Highway-Rail Incidents 1980 2012 82% reduction 70% reduction What can make RHGCs safer

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

294

Helen Conover and Kathryn Regner InformationTechnology & Systems Center  

E-print Network

-weekly telecons Science team and ground systems meetings Status and metrics reporting Aqua Mission OperationsHelen Conover and Kathryn Regner InformationTechnology & Systems Center University of Alabama Product Delivery Record Server (PDRS) NASA FDS NASA EDOS Level-2 A user community AMSR-E 25-km Daily Sea

Christian, Eric

295

Local NASA Scientists Discover New Species of Organism in Mars-Like Environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Microbiologist Dr. Elena V. Pikuta, and Astrobiologist Richard Hoover culture extremophiles, microorganisms that can live in extreme environments, in the astrobiology laboratory at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC) in Huntsville, Alabama. The scientists recently discovered a new species of extremophiles, Spirochaeta Americana. The species was found in Northern California's Mono Lake, an alkaline, briny oxygen-limited lake in a closed volcanic crater that Hoover believes may offer new clues to help identify sites to research for potential life on Mars. Hoover is an astrobiologist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and Pikuta is a microbiologist with the Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomy Research Laboratory at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The NSSTC is a partnership with MSFC, Alabama universities, industry, research institutes, and federal agencies.

2003-01-01

296

The Alabama State Board of Education...Leadership for the 21st Century. The 1997-98 Chancellor's Special Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1998, the Alabama State Board of Education established itself as the sole governing authority for the 2-year colleges under its supervision. In this 1997-98 Chancellor's Special Report, representatives from Alabama's eight districts are introduced by current term, occupation, and highlighted achievements. Responsibilities of the Alabama State…

Gainous, Fred; Romine, Robert J.; Culverhouse, Renee; Dahl, Debbie; Kuzmicic, Jorge

297

Observation of suspended sediments in Mobile Bay, Alabama from satellite  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As part of a comprehensive geologic study of coastal Alabama and Mississippi, the U.S. Geological Survey is investigating coastal sediment transport in Mobile Bay and the adjacent shelf. Satellite imagery from the NOAA AVHRR is being used to provide data on the variability of spatial patterns in the near-surface suspended sediment concentration. This imagery is processed using atmospheric corrections to remove haze and Rayleigh radiance in order to obtain water reflectances; the reflectances are than converted to approximate sediment concentrations using standard relationships between water reflectance and in situ sediment concentrations. A series of images from early 1990 shows rapid changes in sediment concentrations in response to high river flow of the Alabama-Tombigbee river system. During these times, suspended sediment tends to flow out Mobile Bay without mixing into the eastern lobe of the Bay (Bon Secour Bay). The sediment concentration field also appears to be disturbed by the main ship channel. The sediment plume extends more than 60 km offshore after the peak flow event. One wind event in December 1989 was identified as increasing sediment concentration in the Bay. It is not believed that such an event has been previously observed from satellite.

Stumpf, Richard P.

1991-01-01

298

Tick infestations of birds in coastal Georgia and Alabama.  

PubMed

Mist-netted birds were examined for ticks on Jekyll Island, Glynn Co., Georgia (32 bird species) in 1996-1998, and at Fort Morgan, Baldwin Co., Alabama (36 species) in 1998 during fall migration. Sixty-two (14.7%) of 423 birds from Jekyll Island and 22 (13.3%) of 165 birds from Fort Morgan were infested with ticks. The mean number of ticks per infested bird was 2.0 on Jekyll Island and 6.3 at Fort Morgan. Ten species of birds were infested with ticks on Jekyl1 Island where 87% of all ticks were recovered from 3 species: the common yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas), gray catbird (Dumetella carolinensis), and northern waterthrush (Seiurus noveboracensis). Eight species of birds were infested with ticks at Fort Morgan where 83% of all ticks were recovered from 3 species: the brown thrasher (Toxostoma rufum), swamp sparrow (Melospiza georgiana), and common yellowthroat. Six species of ticks (Amblyomma americanum, Amblyomma maculatum, Haemaphysalis leporispalustris, Ixodes brunneus, Ixodes minor, and Ixodes scapularis) were recovered from the Georgia birds, whereas 3 species (A. maculatum, H. leporispalustris, and Ixodes dentatus) were recovered from the Alabama birds. Attempts to isolate Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, the etiologic agent of Lyme borreliosis, from Ixodes spp. ticks recovered from birds were unsuccessful. PMID:10780541

Kinsey, A A; Durden, L A; Oliver, J H

2000-04-01

299

Secret encounters: black men, bisexuality, and AIDS in Alabama.  

PubMed

Black men suffer the highest rates of HIV infection in Alabama. However, little is known about the HIV risks of this sector of the population, primarily because the current public health focus is on women and children. The dearth of research on HIV risk among black men in Alabama is addressed by drawing on focus group, elicitation, and key informant data from an ongoing epidemiologic study on AIDS in that state. These hypothesis-generating qualitative interviews were used to identify three high-risk scenarios: "sex for money or drugs"; "prison sex"; and "sneaky sex" by married or nominally heterosexual men. It was found that covert and unprotected sex among bisexually active black men was commonplace for reasons that included prostitution, habituation to same-sex relations during incarceration, and the desire to maintain a facade of heterosexuality in homophobic communities. It was concluded that bisexual activity is highly correlated with secrecy and unprotected sex. The risks of bisexuality among black men are exacerbated by incarceration, homophobia, drug use, and the prison and public health focus on surveillance rather than prevention. PMID:11036584

Lichtenstein, B

2000-09-01

300

Dupuytren’s Contracture in Alabama HFE Hemochromatosis Probands  

PubMed Central

Background Dupuytren’s contracture (DC) and HFE hemochromatosis occur in some of the same at-risk populations and present with similar comorbid conditions. Methods We estimated DC prevalence in two cohorts of white Alabama hemochromatosis probands (294 C282Y homozygotes, 67 C282Y/H63D compound heterozygotes) in a retrospective study. We performed logistic regressions on DC using the following independent variables: age, body mass index, heavy ethanol consumption, serum ferritin, elevated serum AST/ALT, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and diabetes. Results One man and two women with C282Y homozygosity had DC (prevalence 1.02%; 95% CI 0.35%–2.96%). A man with C282Y/H63D had DC (prevalence 1.49%; 95% CI 0.26%–7.98%). DC occurred as an autosomal dominant trait in his kinship. In regression analyses, no single variable predicted DC. We observed no new DC cases after the diagnosis of hemochromatosis (mean follow-up 12.9 ± 7.5 years (1 SD), and 9.0 ± 5.1 years, respectively). Conclusions Our prevalence estimates of DC in white Alabama hemochromatosis probands are similar to those found in the white US population cohorts. DC risk was unrelated to the variables we studied. PMID:22952417

Barton, James C.; Barton, J. Clayborn

2012-01-01

301

State Education Activities to Support Mission Growth. NGA Center for Best Practices. Issue Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) leads a Mission Growth Working Group, which consists of states that are significantly impacted by the growth of military bases. The group includes state representatives appointed by the governors of Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana,…

Butler, Tara A.

2009-01-01

302

Marshall Space Flight Center solid waste characterization and recycling improvement study: General office and laboratory waste, scrap metal, office and flight surplus  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary objectives of the study were to characterize the solid waste stream for MSFC facilities in Huntsville, Alabama, and to evaluate their present recycling program. The purpose of the study was to determine if improvements could be made in terms of increasing quantities of the present commodities collected, adding more recyclables to the program, and streamlining or improving operational efficiency. In conducting the study, various elements were implemented. These included sampling and sorting representative samples of the waste stream; visually inspecting each refuse bin, recycle bin, and roll-off; interviewing employees and recycling coordinators of other companies; touring local material recycling facilities; contacting experts in the field; and performing a literature search.

Eley, Michael H.; Crews, Lavonne; Johnston, Ben; Lee, David; Colebaugh, James

1995-01-01

303

Assessment of aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in the Autauga Creek watershed, Autauga County, Alabama, 2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Only four families within the Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera orders were found during a 1999 survey of aquatic macroinvertebrates in Autauga Creek, Autauga County, Alabama, by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management. The low number of taxa of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera families indicated that the aquatic macroinvertebrate community was in poor condition, and the creek was placed on the Alabama Department of Environmental Management 303(d) list. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in 2009 to provide data for the Alabama Department of Environmental Management and other water management agencies to re-evaluate aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in Autauga Creek to see if they meet Alabama Department of Environmental Management water-quality criteria. Aquatic macroinvertebrate communities were evaluated at three sites in the Autauga Creek watershed. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at two sites on Autauga Creek and one on Bridge Creek, the largest tributary to Autauga Creek. Water-quality field parameters were assessed at 11 sites. During the 2009 sampling, 12 families within the orders of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera were found at the Alabama Department of Environmental Management's assessment site whereas only four were found in 1999. The upstream site on Autauga Creek had consistently higher numbers of taxa than the Bridge Creek site and the lower site on Autauga Creek which is the Alabama Department of Environmental Management's assessment site. Chironomid richness was noticeably higher on the two Autauga Creek sites than the Bridge Creek site.

Mooty, Will S.; Gill, Amy C.

2011-01-01

304

North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA): VHF Source Retrieval Algorithm and Error Analyses  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two approaches are used to characterize how accurately the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is able to locate lightning VHF sources in space and in time. The first method uses a Monte Carlo computer simulation to estimate source retrieval errors. The simulation applies a VHF source retrieval algorithm that was recently developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and that is similar, but not identical to, the standard New Mexico Tech retrieval algorithm. The second method uses a purely theoretical technique (i.e., chi-squared Curvature Matrix Theory) to estimate retrieval errors. Both methods assume that the LMA system has an overall rms timing error of 50 ns, but all other possible errors (e.g., multiple sources per retrieval attempt) are neglected. The detailed spatial distributions of retrieval errors are provided. Given that the two methods are completely independent of one another, it is shown that they provide remarkably similar results. However, for many source locations, the Curvature Matrix Theory produces larger altitude error estimates than the (more realistic) Monte Carlo simulation.

Koshak, W. J.; Solakiewicz, R. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Goodman, S. J.; Christian, H. J.; Hall, J.; Bailey, J.; Krider, E. P.; Bateman, M. G.; Boccippio, D.

2003-01-01

305

Estimates of the Lightning NOx Profile in the Vicinity of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to August 2006 North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) data to estimate the (unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical source profile of lightning nitrogen oxides, NOx = NO + NO2. Data from the National Lightning Detection Network (Trademark) (NLDN) is also employed. This is part of a larger effort aimed at building a more realistic lightning NOx emissions inventory for use by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. Overall, special attention is given to several important lightning variables including: the frequency and geographical distribution of lightning in the vicinity of the NALMA network, lightning type (ground or cloud flash), lightning channel length, channel altitude, channel peak current, and the number of strokes per flash. Laboratory spark chamber results from the literature are used to convert 1-meter channel segments (that are located at a particular known altitude; i.e., air density) to NOx concentration. The resulting lightning NOx source profiles are discussed.

Koshak, William J.; Peterson, Harold S.; McCaul, Eugene W.; Blazar, Arastoo

2010-01-01

306

Estimates of the Lightning NOx Profile in the Vicinity of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to August 2006 North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning nitrogen oxides, NOx = NO + NO 2 . This is part of a larger effort aimed at building a more realistic lightning NOx emissions inventory for use by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. Data from the National Lightning Detection Network TM (NLDN) is also employed. Overall, special attention is given to several important lightning variables including: the frequency and geographical distribution of lightning in the vicinity of the LMA network, lightning type (ground or cloud flash), lightning channel length, channel altitude, channel peak current, and the number of strokes per flash. Laboratory spark chamber results from the literature are used to convert 1-meter channel segments (that are located at a particular known altitude; i.e., air density) to NOx concentration. The resulting raw NOx profiles are discussed.

Koshak, William J.; Peterson, Harold

2010-01-01

307

Sustainability analysis of groundwater resources in a coastal aquifer, Alabama  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fort Morgan Peninsula is an attached portion of a dynamic barrier complex in the northern Gulf of Mexico and is a large tourist area that brings in a significant amount of revenue for Alabama. Many of the hotels and tourist attractions depend on the groundwater as their water supply. The over-withdrawal of groundwater and saltwater intrustion will have a negative impact on the ecology, tourism and economy if groundwater resources are not properly monitored and managed. In this study a calibrated groundwater flow model was used to analyze the sustainability of groundwater resources at Fort Morgan Peninsula. Detailed flow budgets were prepared to check the various components of inflow and outflow under different water use and climatic conditions. The results indicated the locations where groundwater was over-pumped and subjected to saltwater intrusion, or will be subjected to saltwater intrusion under a range of projected water use and climatic conditions.

Liu, Jie; Rich, Kendall; Zheng, Chunmiao

2008-03-01

308

Lead and mercury levels in raccoons from Macon County, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Heavy metal contamination in the environment has become a major concern of the scientific community. The ubiquitous present of heavy metals such as lead, mercury, and cadmium in wildlife animals has been reported. Although the understanding of the full significance of these metals is incomplete, it is known that some species contain concentrations of metals proportional to the levels present in their environments. Thus, wild animals can be used as biological indicators of environmental concentrations of metals. The behavior, omnivorous feeding habits, and adaptability of raccoons (Procyon lotor) qualify this animal as a useful indicator of environmental pollution. The purpose of this paper was to report some preliminary observations on lead and mercury levels in raccoons from Macon County, Alabama, a potential indicator species for wildlife. 19 refs., 3 tabs.

Khan, A.T.; Thompson, S.J. [Tuskegee Univ., AL (United States); Mieike, H.W. [Xavier Univ. of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States)

1995-06-01

309

Load shape and demand forecasting at Alabama Electric Cooperative  

SciTech Connect

Alabama Electric cooperative`s (AEC) load forecasting process has historically been based on long-term econometric energy sales forecasts, with peak demand being forecast through load factor and coincidence factor analysis. The adequacy of this approach was brought into question after extreme weather conditions in the winter of 1989 and the summer of 1992 resulted in peak demands that exceeded the forecasts. Burns & McDonnell and AEC developed a PC-based computer program called UtiliSHAPE{trademark} that was used to develop a long-term hourly demand and load shape forecast for AEC for the different seasons and days of the week. This paper describes the forecast developed for AEC with the UtiliSHAPE{trademark} software.

Sullivan, J.J. [Burns & McDonnell, Kansas City, MO (United States); Schussler, R.P. [Alabama Electric Cooperative, Andalusia, AL (United States)

1995-05-01

310

Scour at selected bridge sites in Alabama, 1991-94  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Scour data were collected at 15 sites on streams in Alabama during high flow conditions. The recurrence intervals of the streamflows ranged from less than 2 to 10 years. Scour depths measured near bridge piers ranged from 0.3 to 5.8 feet. The Colorado State University (CSU) local scour equation recommended in the Federal Highway Administration Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18 was used to estimate scour depths at the study sites. Estimated scour depths based on the CSU equation ranged from 2.5 to 12.7 feet with residuals (measured scour depth minus estimated scour depth) ranging from -8.1 to -1.4 feet. A comparison of the residuals with the estimated scour depths indicated that the CSU equation overestimated the measured scour depths throughout the range of measured data by an average of 434 percent.

Atkins, J. Brian; Hedgecock, T. Scott

1996-01-01

311

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Alabama.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1998-02-01

312

Genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii in wildlife from Alabama, USA.  

PubMed

The genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife is of interest to understand the transmission of this parasite in the environment. In the present study, we genetically characterized five T. gondii isolates from different wild animals including two isolates from a bobcat (Lynx rufus), one from a red-shouldered hawk (Buteo lineatus), one from a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and one from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Genotyping of these samples using 11 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism markers (SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico) revealed two types, including type I (ToxoDB#10) and type 12 (ToxoDB#5). This is the first report of genetic characterization of T. gondii strains in wildlife from Alabama and from a red-shouldered hawk. PMID:23160892

Yu, Li; Shen, Jilong; Su, Chunlei; Sundermann, Christine A

2013-03-01

313

Mussel remains from prehistoric salt works, clarke county, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Archaeological research at salt springs in Clarke County, AL (Tombigbee River drainage), documented bivalve mollusk exploitation by late prehistoric American Indians. A total of 582 valves representing 19 species of freshwater mussels (Unionidae) and an estuarine clam (Mactridae) from the Lower Salt Works Site (ca. A.D. 900-1550) and 41 valve fragments representing 6 mussel species from the Stimpson Site (ca. A.D. 1200-1550) were documented. The Lower Salt Works fauna was dominated numerically by Fusconaia ebena and Quadrula asperata, the dominant species reported during recent local surveys. The mussel species represented are known from medium to large streams in sand and gravel habitats and include four federally protected species and other species of conservation concern in Alabama. Results offer comparative data for other archaeological and ecological studies in the region.

McGregor, S.W.; Dumas, A.A.

2010-01-01

314

The Trans-Alabama Superbolide of 5 December 1999  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several dozen very bright superbolides enter Earth's atmosphere each year, usually terminating with an explosion of the incoming meteoritic body. Coordinated camera set-ups have captured images of a very few meteorites, which led to their recovery. But most bright meteoritic events are seen by eyewitnesses who are in the right place at the right time, or by security cameras, which are typically not pointed at the sky. The superbolide that is reported on here was seen by many and recorded on such security cameras. Careful collection and analysis of eyewitness data allowed a trajectory to be estimated, which is at odds with data of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) on this event. A few meteoritic events result in an ``impossible'' effect; that is, they apparently start ground fires. The superbolide that is the subject of this article was one of them. At approximately 04:18 AM CST (10:18 UT) on 5 December 1999, light from an exceptionally bright bolide (i.e., a superbolide) was seen across part of the southeastern United States. This superbolide was witnessed, heard, and(or) felt by hundreds of individuals who called local and state police, fire departments, and the state emergency management agency. According to newspaper and television accounts, the superbolide's light was seen within a 300-km radius of its flight path. This area included most of the state of Alabama, and parts of adjacent Tennessee, Georgia, and Florida. This incident was widely reported in regional and local newspapers and on local television news programs. Surveillance camera videos made in two Alabama towns, Weogufka (33.02° N, 86.31° W) and Pell City (33.16° N, 86.28° W), recorded direct light, reflected light, and shadows from this superbolide event.

King, David T., Jr.; Petruny, Lucille W.

315

Quantitative Pediatric Vision Screening in Primary Care Settings in Alabama  

PubMed Central

Purpose Alabama Medicaid reimburses “objective” vision screening (VS), i.e, by acuity or similar quantitative method, and well child checks (WCCs) separately. We analyzed the frequency each service was obtained. Methods Claims for WCC and VS provided between 10/1/2002 and 9/30/2003 for children ages 3-18 years, and summary data for all enrolled children, were obtained from Alabama Medicaid. We used univariate analysis followed by logistic regression to explore the potential influence of factors (patient age, provider type, and provider’s volume of WCCs) on the receipt of VS at preschool ages. Results Children receiving WCCs were 55% African-American, 40% white, and 5% other. Percentages of children with WCC claims were highest at 4 years (57%) and thereafter declined to 30% at 6-14 years and to less than 10% at 18 years. Nearly all VS (>98% at each age) occurred the same day as the WCC. Pediatricians provided 68% of all WCCs. Multivariate analysis, after adjusting for nesting of preschool patients within provider, showed the odds of VS were increased by patient age (5 years vs. 3 years OR=3.57, p<0.0001), non-physician provider type (non-physician vs. pediatrician OR=1.80, p=0.0004) and high WCC volume (at or above vs. below the median number (N=8) of WCC per provider per year (OR=7.11, p<0.0001)). Because VS rates were high when attendance to WCC visits was low, few enrolled children received vision screening at any age (6% at age 3, 13% at age 4, and a maximum of 20% at age 5). Conclusions National efforts to reduce preventable vision loss from amblyopia are hampered because children are not available for screening and because providers miss many opportunities to screen vision at preschool age. Efforts to improve vision screening should target pediatrician-led practices, since these serve greater numbers of children. PMID:18772721

Marsh-Tootle, Wendy L.; Wall, Terry C.; Tootle, John S.; Person, Sharina D.; Kristofco, Robert E.

2009-01-01

316

Jurassic faults of southwest Alabama and offshore areas  

SciTech Connect

Four fault groups affecting Jurassic strata occur in the southwest and offshore Alabama areas. They include the regional basement rift trend, the regional peripheral fault trend, the Mobile graben fault system, and the Lower Mobile Bay fault system. The regional basement system rift and regional peripheral fault trends are distinct and rim the inner margin of the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. The regional basement rift trend is genetically related to the breakup of Pangea and the opening of the Gulf of Mexico in the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic. This fault trend is thought to have formed contemporaneously with deposition of Late Triassic-Early Jurassic Eagle Mills Formation and to displace pre-Mesozoic rocks. The regional peripheral fault trend consists of a group of en echelon extensional faults that are parallel or subparallel to regional strike of Gulf Coastal Plain strata and correspond to the approximate updip limit of thick Louann Salt. Nondiapiric salt features are associated with the trend and maximum structural development is exhibited in the Haynesville-Smackover section. No hydrocarbon accumulations have been documented in the pre-Jurassic strata of southwest and offshore Alabama. Productive hydrocarbon reservoirs occur in Jurassic strata along the trends of the fault groups, suggesting a significant relationship between structural development in the Jurassic and hydrocarbon accumulation. Hydrocarbon traps are generally structural or contain a major structural component and include salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines, and extensional fault traps. All of the major hydrocarbon accumulations are associated with movement of the Louann Salt along the regional peripheral fault trend, the Mobile graben fault system, or the Lower Mobile Bay fault system.

Mink, R.M.; Tew, B.H.; Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

1991-03-01

317

Ground-water quality beneath an urban residential and commercial area, Montgomery, Alabama, 1999-2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Black Warrior River aquifer, which is composed of the Coker, Gordo, and Eutaw Formations, supplies more than 50 percent of the ground water used for public water supply in the Mobile River Basin. The city of Montgomery, Alabama, is partially built upon a recharge area for the Black Warrior River aquifer, and is one of many major population centers that depend on the Black Warrior River aquifer for public water supply. To represent the baseline ground-water quality in the Black Warrior River aquifer, water samples were collected from 30 wells located in a low-density residential or rural setting; 9 wells were completed in the Coker Formation, 9 wells in the Gordo Formation, and 12 wells in the Eutaw Formation. To describe the ground-water quality beneath Montgomery, Alabama, water samples also were collected from 30 wells located in residential and commercial areas of Montgomery, Alabama; 16 wells were completed in the Eutaw Formation, 8 wells in alluvial deposits, and 6 wells in terrace deposits. The alluvial and terrace deposits directly overlie the Eutaw Formation with little or no hydraulic separation. Ground-water samples collected from both the rural and urban wells were analyzed for physical properties, major ions, nutrients, metals, volatile organic compounds, and pesticides. Samples from the urban wells also were analyzed for bacteria, chlorofluorocarbons, dissolved gases, and sulfur hexafluoride. Ground-water quality beneath the urban area was compared to baseline water quality in the Black Warrior River aquifer.Compared to the rural wells, ground-water samples from urban wells contained greater concentrations or more frequent detections of chloride and nitrate, and the trace metals aluminium, chromium, cobalt, copper, nickel, and zinc. Pesticides and volatile organic compounds were detected more frequently and in greater concentrations in ground-water samples collected from urban wells than in ground-water samples from rural wells.The Spearman rho test was used to check for statistically significant covariance among urban ground-water quality and land-use type. The number of pesticides and volatile organic compounds detected and concentrations of nickel increased as the percentage of residential land use increased. Greater nickel concentrations also were associated with a greater number of volatile organic compounds detected. As the percentage of commercial land use increased, the numbers of pesticides and volatile organic compounds detected decreased. The number of pesticides detected in the urban ground-water samples increased as concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate increased; the number of pesticides detected and the concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate decreased as the age of the ground water increased. These correlations may indicate that, with time, pesticides and nitrate are removed from the ground-water system by physical, chemical, or biological processes.The effects of surficial geology on the occurrence of pesticides and volatile organic compounds was investigated by calculating frequencies of detection. The detection frequency for pesticides was greater for urban samples collected from wells where the surficial geology is sand than for urban samples collected from wells where the surficial geology is clay. The frequency of detection of volatile organic compounds did not show this relation.

Robinson, James L.

2002-01-01

318

The Impact of Water Pollution Abatement on Competition and Pricing in the Alabama Textile Industry.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In order to access the impact of water pollution abatement on competition and pricing in the Alabama textile industry, three questions were answered. (1) How much is water pollution abatement costing the textile industry. (2) How is the intermediate consu...

A. C. Rucks

1973-01-01

319

Archaeological Reconnaissance of the Oliver Lock and Dam Project Area, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. Phase I.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A documentary and literature search and archaeological reconnaissance of 1,100 acres on the Black Warrior River located in Alabama. This document summarizes the prehistory, ethnohistory, and history of the region and includes a consideration of the partic...

L. S. Alexander, V. J. Knight

1982-01-01

320

40 CFR 81.267 - Southeast Alabama Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Alabama: Barbour County, Coffee County, Covington County, Dale County, Geneva County, Henry County, Houston...

2014-07-01

321

Chemical fingerprinting of petroleum biomarkers in Deepwater Horizon oil spill samples collected from Alabama shoreline.  

PubMed

We compare the chromatographic signatures of petroleum biomarkers in Deepwater Horizon (DH) source oil, three other reference crude oils, DH emulsified mousse that arrived on Alabama's shoreline in June 2010, and seven tar balls collected from Alabama beaches from 2011 to 2012. Characteristic hopane and sterane fingerprints show that all the tar ball samples originated from DH oil. In addition, the diagnostic ratios of various hopanes indicate an excellent match. Quantitation data for C????-hopane concentration levels show that most of the weathering observed in DH-related tar balls found on Alabama's beaches is likely the result of natural evaporation and dissolution that occurred during transport across the Gulf of Mexico prior to beach deposition. Based on the physical and biomarker characterization data presented in this study we conclude that virtually all fragile, sticky, brownish tar balls currently found on Alabama shoreline originated from the DH oil spill. PMID:23523118

Mulabagal, V; Yin, F; John, G F; Hayworth, J S; Clement, T P

2013-05-15

322

75 FR 28313 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00032 Declaration of Economic Injury  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) declaration for the State of Alabama, dated 05/13/2010. Incident: Deepwater BP Oil Spill. Incident Period: 04/20/2010 and continuing. DATES: Effective Date: 05/13/2010. EIDL Loan Application...

2010-05-20

323

77 FR 14516 - Alabama Power Company, Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Proposed Revised Restricted...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Alabama Power Company, Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Proposed Revised...of Historic Places at the Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project. The Programmatic Agreement...pursuant to section 106 for the Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project would be fulfilled...

2012-03-12

324

33 CFR 165.836 - Security Zone; Escorted Vessels, Mobile, Alabama, Captain of the Port.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the Captain of the Port Zone, Mobile, Alabama, as described in 33...request the permission of the COTP Mobile or a designated representative...Contact information . The COTP Mobile may be reached via phone at (251) 441-6211. Any...

2010-07-01

325

Integrated reservoir study of the Appleton Oil Field, Escambia County, Alabama  

E-print Network

The objective of this study is the development of a reservoir characterization of the Appleton Oil Field, Escambia County, Alabama, using petrophysical data, reservoir performance data and reservoir simulation. Appleton Field is comprised of two...

Chijuka, Ekene F

2012-06-07

326

Upper Carboniferous Insects from the Pottsville Formation of Northern Alabama (Insecta: Ephemeropterida, Palaeodictyopterida, Odonatoptera)  

E-print Network

New Upper Carboniferous (Pennsylvanian, Westphalian A) insects are described from localities in the Pottsville Formation of northern Alabama (including the Union Chapel Mine). Five species are recorded in five palaeopterous orders and comprising...

Beckemeyer, Roy J.; Engel, Michael S.

2011-10-21

327

40 CFR 81.266 - Alabama and Tombigbee Rivers Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

...outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Alabama: Choctaw County, Clarke County, Conecuh County, Dallas County, Marengo County, Monroe County, Perry County, Washington County, Wilcox...

2014-07-01

328

University of Alabama at Birmingham pathway activation discovery could lead to new cancer drugs:  

Cancer.gov

A discovery by University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers about a how a common cell pathway that helps regulate cell survival and production is turned on could lead to new treatments for autoimmune diseases and cancer.

329

Reducing Aquatic Rodent Damage through an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management Program in the State of Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to analyze the potential environmental effects of the proposed Alabama WS beaver (Castor canadensis), nutria (Myocastor coypus), and muskrat (Ondatra zibethica) (hereafter referred to as aquatic rodents...

2002-01-01

330

The Yearling Disadvantage in Alabama Deer: Effect of Birth Date on Development  

E-print Network

(Odocoileus virginianus) harvested on 23 Alabama Wildlife manage- ment Areas (WMAs) during the 1998. Southeast. Assoc. Fish and Wildl. Agencies 56:255­264 Most white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus

Ditchkoff, Steve

331

Physical and Biological Effects of Sand Mining Offshore Alabama, U.S.A  

Microsoft Academic Search

BYRNES, M.R.; HAMMER, R.M.; THIBAUT, T.D., and SNYDER, D.B., 2004. Potential physical and biological effects of sand mining offshore Alabama, U.S.A. Journal of Coastal Research, 20(1), 6-24. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Physical processes and biological data were collected and analyzed at five sand resource areas offshore Alabama to address environmental concerns raised by potential sand dredging for beach

Mark R. Byrnes; Richard M. Hammer; Tim D. Thibaut; David B. Snyder

2004-01-01

332

Genetic distinction of pallid, shovelnose, and Alabama sturgeon: emerging species and the US Endangered Species Act  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sturgeon genus Scaphirhynchus consists of threerecognized species. Pallid and shovelnose sturgeon (S. albusand S. platorynchus, respectively) are sympatric in theMissouri and lower Mississippi Rivers of the central United States. TheAlabama sturgeon (S. suttkusi) is endemic to the nearby MobileRiver drainage and is isolated geographically from the other twospecies. Pallid sturgeon and the extremely rare Alabama sturgeon arelisted as endangered

Donald E. Campton; Anna L. Bass; Frank A. Chapman; Brian W. Bowen

2000-01-01

333

Ground water in rocks of the Alabama Piedmont--A preliminary evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A recently-developed ground-water database of bedrock wells drilled in crystalline rocks of Alabama's Piedmont is used to map yield distribution and to statistically evaluate the effects of well construction and geologic variables on well yield. The average well in the Alabama Piedmont is drilled for domestic purposes in felsic gneiss on a slope and yields a median of 10 gallons\\/minute

G. M. Guthrie; S. S. DeJarnette; M. J. Neilson

1993-01-01

334

Depositional environment of the upper Jurassic Norphlet and Smackover formations, Hatters Pond field, Mobile County, Alabama  

E-print Network

DEPOSITIONAL FIB/IRONMENT OF THE 'JFPER JURASSiC NORPHLET AND SMACKOVER FORMATIONS, BATTERS POND FIELD, MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA A Thesis ROBERT FPZDERICK C -R:IS Submitted to the Graduate College of Tertas ABM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 19B2 Major SubJec: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OP THE UPPER JURASSIC NORPHLET AND SMACKOXVR FORMATIONS, YJ(TTERS POND FIELD, FIOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA A Thesis ROBERT...

Curtis, Robert Frederick

2012-06-07

335

Groundwater and microbial processes of Alabama coastal plain aquifers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We integrate groundwater geochemistry, microbiology, and numerical modeling techniques to study the origin of elevated salinity and chemical evolution of groundwaters in the coastal plain aquifers of Alabama. Our field data indicate that chemical composition of groundwater evolves by various geochemical and microbial processes as it moves deeper into the subsurface. Sequential peaks of Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, and Na+ along flow paths indicate that separation of ions may be driven by cation exchange. Microbial-mediated reactions are important for the formation of several discrete hydrochemical zones containing Fe2+, Mn2+, Sr2+, and SO42- rich groundwaters. Elevated Fe2+, Mn2+, and Sr2+ concentrations may be derived from bacterial iron and manganese reduction. High sulfate concentrations observed a short distance from the recharge may be partly explained by microbial sulfur oxidation and nitrate reduction (denitrification). The presence of denitrifying and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in water further supports these reactions. Major ion compositions and ?D and ?18O values are used to determine the source of salinity and the nature of mixing of different groundwaters. Three water types were identified; these include carbonate groundwater, brines associated with evaporites, and groundwater of meteoric origin. Groundwater age differences and flow velocities were calculated using the 36Cl/Cl ratios. Calculated groundwater flow velocities within the Eutaw and Tuscaloosa aquifers are about 0.20 m/yr and 0.15 m/yr, respectively. We modeled basin-scale hydrologic and solute transport processes in a cross section extending from the aquifer outcrops to the Gulf Coast. The modeling result shows that the buried Jurassic Louann Salt can significantly increase groundwater salinity in the overlying coastal plain aquifers by density-driven advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. The modeling results are consistent with Cl/Br ratios and O/H isotope signatures, which indicate that salinity of the groundwater could be derived from seawater that has been evaporated beyond halite saturation. The predicted groundwater flow pattern reveals the mixing of meteoric water, carbonate groundwater (from the Ordovician Knox Group), and saline brines associated with the Louann Salt. The hydrologic model is consistent with the hydrochemical facies distribution in the Alabama coastal plain.

Penny, Elizabeth; Lee, Ming-Kuo; Morton, Cynthia

2003-11-01

336

Center on Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom areas organized into centers for specific study purposes are discussed. These centers are used for individual or small group work. The physical arrangement of the area used for a study center is described, including the organization of furniture, materials, and preferred locations. Suggestions are made for the management and stocking of…

Utah System Approach to Individualized Learning Project.

337

Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers  

Cancer.gov

Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers Map of Cancer Centers Data Tables Benchmark Home > Cancer Centers Cancer Centers NCI-designated cancer centers are characterized by scientific excellence and the capability to integrate a diversity of

338

EXTERIOR VIEW FROM 21ST STREET VIADUCT WITH RAILROAD TRACKS (CENTER), ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

EXTERIOR VIEW FROM 21ST STREET VIADUCT WITH RAILROAD TRACKS (CENTER), SHEDS FOR L. & N. STATION (CENTER TO RIGHT), BANK FOR SAVINGS BUILDINGS (RIGHT) AT THE 20TH STREET UNDERPASS (CENTER) AND ALABAMA POWER COMPANY-POWELL AVENUE POWER PLANT (TOP LEFT). - Railroad Reservation, Bounded by Thirty-eighth Street on the east, Sixteenth Street on the west, First Avenue on the north, & First Avenue on the south, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

339

Hurricane Frederic tidal floods of September 12-13, 1979, along the Gulf Coast, Coden-Bellefontaine quadrangles, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Floodmark elevations and approximate areas flooded by Hurricane Frederic tides of September 12-13, 1979, along coastal areas of Mobile Bay between Bellefontaine and Point Judith, Alabama, are shown on a topographic map. Storm-tide frequency and records of annual maximum tides at Mobile, Alabama, since 1772, are presented. Offshore winds reached about 160 miles per hour. A wind-velocity of about 145 miles per hour was recorded near Dauphin Island, Alabama. Most of the waterfront improvements in Mobile Bay were either destroyed or heavily damaged. The town of Bayou La Batre, Alabama, was extensively flooded. (USGS)

Bohman, Larry R.; Scott, John C.

1980-01-01

340

Hurricane Frederic tidal floods of September 12-13, 1979, along the Gulf Coast, Mobile quadrangle, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Shown on a topographic map are floodmark elevations and approximate areas flooded by Hurricane Frederic tides of September 12-13, 1979, along the western side of the Mobile River and Mobile Bay from Pritchard, Alabama, to the Forest Park section of Mobile, Alabama. Storm-tide frequency and records of annual maximum tides at Mobile, Alabama, since 1772, are presented. Offshore winds reached about 160 miles per hour. A wind-velocity of about 145 miles per hour was recorded near Dauphin Island, Alabama. Most of the waterfront improvements in Mobile Bay were either destroyed or heavily damaged. (USGS)

Bohman, Larry R.; Scott, John C.

1980-01-01

341

Gunshot injuries in Mobile County, Alabama: 1985-1987.  

PubMed

Although much information about firearm fatalities has been published, few articles have characterized all types of gunshot victims, the weapons used, and the injuries sustained in a well-defined geopolitical unit. This study of 597 persons sustaining gunshot injuries serious enough to cause death or hospitalization in Mobile County Alabama during 1985-1987, addresses that deficit. The overall rate of these 597 seriously gunshot-injured victims was 53/100,000 population per annum. Of the 597 victims, 215 died, resulting in a rate of 18.9 per 100,000 population per annum. Demographic characteristics of the homicide victims, predominantly young black men, and the suicide victims, predominantly middle-aged and elderly white men, are similar to those reported from other parts of the country. Assault victims accounted for the largest (316) number of victims: again, young black men also constituted the largest demographic group among assault victims. Handguns accounted for 71% of the weapons used. No assault type weapons were employed. Head, neck, and chest wounds led with the greatest fatality rates. Information about nonfatally wounded victims, particularly data about the weapons, proved difficult to obtain. This was one of the many problems encountered in this type of project and, consequently, is discussed at some length. Additional population-based studies using prospective methods and a variety of investigators, including persons knowledgeable of firearms, are needed. PMID:8311053

Riddick, L; Wanger, G P; Fackler, M L; Carter, R D; Hoff, C J; Jinks, J M; Becker, J A

1993-09-01

342

Prevalence of encysted Toxoplasma gondii in raptors from Alabama.  

PubMed

Little is known about the prevalence of encysted Toxoplasma gondii in wild birds. We examined the hearts and breast muscles from 101 raptors for encysted T. gondii. All of the raptors had been submitted for necropsy to the State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Auburn, Alabama. Tissues were digested in acid-pepsin solution and inoculated into groups of 3-5 laboratory mice. Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from 27 of 101 (26.7%) raptors: 8 of 12 (66.7%) red-shouldered hawks (Buteo lineatus), 13 of 27 (41.1%) red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), 1 of 4 (25%) Cooper's hawks (Accipiter cooperi), 1 of 5 (20%) great horned owls (Bubo virginianus), 4 of 15 (26.7%) barred owls (Strix varia), and 1 of 3 (33.3%) kestrels (Falco sparverius). Toxoplasma gondii was not isolated from 3 broad-winged hawks (Buteo platypterus), 3 sharp-shinned hawks (Accipiter striatus), 6 barn owls (Tyto alba), 9 screech owls (Asio otus), a Mississippi kite (Ictinia misisippiensis), 2 golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), 4 ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), 4 turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), or 2 black vultures (Coragyps atratus). No significant difference (P > 0.05) in prevalence was detected based on sex using chi-square analysis. Chi-square analysis of the data demonstrated that adult raptors had encysted stages of T. gondii significantly (P < 0.05) more often than did immature raptors. PMID:8277379

Lindsay, D S; Smith, P C; Hoerr, F J; Blagburn, B L

1993-12-01

343

Gray bats and pollution in Missouri and northern Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Gray bats died with lethal brain concentrations of dieldrin and rising levels of heptachlor epoxide in 1976, 1977, and 1978 at Bat Caves No. 2-3, Franklin County, Missouri. The colony disappeared in 1979. Dieldrin was banned in 1974 and 1981 was the last year for heptachlor use in Missouri. The State is recommendiing three organophosphates (chlorpyrifos or Dursban, dyfonate or Fonophos, and ethoprop or Mocap) as substitutes for heptachlor. All three compounds have excellent records in the environment. Analyses of insects collected where bats of this colony fed showed beetles, particularly rove beetles (Staphylinidae), to be the most heavily contaminated part of the bat's diet. Lactation concentrated these residues so that levels in milk were approximately 30 times those in the insect diet. Gray bats found dead in caves in northern Alabama showed DDD (a DDT derivative) contamination. Bats from the colony at Cave Springs Cave on the Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge contained up to 29 ppm DDD in their brains, but this is probably less than one-half the lethal level. Bats from other colonies contained less. The DDD contamination enters the Terinessee River just above the Wheeler Refuge and is seen in gray bat colonies as far as 60 miles downriver.

Clark, D. R., Jr.; Bunck, C. M.; Cromartie, E.; LaVal, R. K.; Tuttle, M. D.

1981-01-01

344

Frisco City sand: New Jurassic reservoir in southwest Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The first commercial production of hydrocarbons from the Jurassic Haynesville Formation in southwestern Alabama was from the Frisco City field. The field currently produces 57.8{degree} API gravity oil on 160-ac well spacing from a depth of approximately 12,000 ft. Perforations are in the Frisco City sand interval, in the lower part of the Haynesville Formation. Average porosity is 15% and average permeability is 45 md. Currently, the field has two producing wells with cumulative production of over 138,876 bbl of oil and 213,144 mcf of gas. The hydrocarbon trap in the Frisco City field is a combination structural-stratigraphic trap. The Frisco City sand reservoir is located on a faulted anticline. The stratigraphic trap is produced by a permeability barrier near the crest of the structure and termination against a basement high. The lower part of the Haynesville Formation in this area is comprised of (in ascending order) the Buckner Anhydrite Member, the Frisco City sand, and interbedded shale and anhydrite. Sandstones of the Frisco City sand interval were deposited in a shallow marine setting and have a sheetlike morphology. The sandstones are poorly to moderately sorted, angular to rounded arkose, and contain angular to rounded pebbles. The sandstones are interbedded with thin, sandy, mudstones that contribute, along with patchy carbonate and anhydrite cement, to considerable reservoir heterogeneity. Porosity is predominantly primary intergranular with a small amount of framework grain dissolution and decementation.

Mann, S.D.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA)); Schneeflock, R.D. Jr. (Paramount Petroleum Co., Inc., Jackson, MS (USA))

1989-09-01

345

Error Analyses of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two approaches are used to characterize how accurately the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is able to locate lightning VHF sources in space and in time. The first method uses a Monte Carlo computer simulation to estimate source retrieval errors. The simulation applies a VHF source retrieval algorithm that was recently developed at the NASA-MSFC and that is similar, but not identical to, the standard New Mexico Tech retrieval algorithm. The second method uses a purely theoretical technique (i.e., chi-squared Curvature Matrix theory) to estimate retrieval errors. Both methods assume that the LMA system has an overall rms timing error of 50ns, but all other possible errors (e.g., multiple sources per retrieval attempt) are neglected. The detailed spatial distributions of retrieval errors are provided. Given that the two methods are completely independent of one another, it is shown that they provide remarkably similar results, except that the chi-squared theory produces larger altitude error estimates than the (more realistic) Monte Carlo simulation.

Koshak, W. J.; Solokiewicz, R. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Goodman, S. J.; Christian, H. J.; Hall, J. M.; Bailey, J. C.; Krider, E. P.; Bateman, M. G.; Boccippio, D. J.

2003-01-01

346

Frisco City sandstone: Upper Jurassic play in southern Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The Frisco City sandstone play in southern Alabama is an example of hydrocarbon entrapment on the flanks of basement erosional features, with principal reservoirs occurring in proximal alluvial-fan to marine shoreface facies. Productive fields are developed on four-way closures of complex geometry, with reservoir sandstones showing maximum thickness along the margins of basement highs that are roughly 1.3-5.18 km{sup 2} in size and have 136-151 m of relief. Detailed analysis of sandstone facies indicates a downdip progression from alluvial-fan through wadi, eolian, beach, tidal-flat, and shoreface deposits. A sequence stratigraphic model based on identification of backstepping strata representing successive transgressive events is useful in predicting maximum reservoir occurrence in the vicinity of inselbergs. Reservoir quality in productive sandstones is high, with porosities ranging from 13 to 27% and permeabilities of 50 md to 5 d. Hydrocarbon occurrence is related to the distribution of high-quality source rock in the Smackover Formation and to maturation history.

Montgomery, S.L. [Petroleum Consultant, Seattle, WA (United States); Baria, L.R. [Jura-Search, Inc., Jackson, MS (United States); Handford, C.R. [Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-10-01

347

Potential vectors of Dirofilaria immitis in Macon County, Alabama.  

PubMed

A study was conducted in Macon County, Alabama (east-central) during the mosquito breeding seasons of 1978 and 1979 to determine the potential vector(s) of Dirofilaria immitis. Live mosquitoes were collected with CO2-baited, miniature light traps, and small hand aspirators. These mosquitoes were subsequently dissected to determine whether immature stages of the heartworm were present. Specific communities were selected based on their having at least 4 known cases of D immitis infection present in the local dog population. All positive collections were made between the months of May and September. Of 326 Anopheles punctipennis females dissected, 34 were positive, and of 84 Aedes vexans 6 were positive for infective (L3) larvae. Of 520 Culex quinquefasciatus females tested, 14 contained 2nd-stage larvae only. Immature stages of D immitis were collected during most of the mosquito breeding season. Data collected during the survey indicate that An punctipennis and to a lesser extent, Ae vexans are probably the principal vectors of D immitis in Macon County, Ala. PMID:6129822

Tolbert, R H; Johnson, W E

1982-11-01

348

Lead poisoning among battery reclamation workers in Alabama.  

PubMed

Lead exposures were evaluated at a battery reclamation facility in Alabama. A questionnaire obtained work and health information. Medical tests included blood lead, zinc protoporphyrin, hematocrit, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and uric acid. An investigation of workers' family members and neighborhood residents was conducted. Fourteen of 15 workers had blood lead levels greater than 50 micrograms/dL. Zinc protoporphyrin was > 79 micrograms/dL in 14 workers. Four workers had hematocrit < 40%; six had elevated serum creatinine (> 1.3 mg/dL). Workers' blood lead levels increased significantly over 2 years (beta = 1.004 micrograms/dL per month). Ten workers had elevated air lead levels. Twelve of 16 employee children had blood lead levels > 10 micrograms/dL; 3 were greater than 40 micrograms/dL. Workers' children had significantly higher blood lead levels than did neighborhood comparison children. Reclamation of lead batteries unaccompanied by smelting poses a health hazard to workers and their children. PMID:8027877

Gittleman, J L; Engelgau, M M; Shaw, J; Wille, K K; Seligman, P J

1994-05-01

349

Leadership lessons in global nursing and health from the Nightingale Letter Collection at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.  

PubMed

This article analyzes the components of Florence Nightingale's visionary leadership for global health and nursing within the historical context of Great Britain's colonization of India. The descriptive study used the qualitative approach of narrative analysis to analyze selected letters in the Nightingale Letter Collection at the University of Alabama at Birmingham that Nightingale wrote to or about Dr. Thomas Gillham Hewlett, a physician and health officer in Bombay, India. The authors sought to increase understanding of Nightingale's visionary leadership for global nursing and health through a study of the form and content of the letters analyzed as temporally contextualized data, focusing on how the narratives are composed and what is conveyed. Several recurring themes central to Nightingale's leadership on global nursing and health emerge throughout these letters, including health and sanitation reform, collaborative partnerships, data-driven policy development, and advocacy for public health. These themes are illustrated through her letters to and testimony about Dr. Thomas Gillham Hewlett in her vivid descriptions of health education and promotion, data-driven policy documents, public health and sanitation advice, and collaboration with citizens, medicine, policy makers, and governments to improve the health and welfare of the people of India. The focus on leadership in nursing as a global construct highlights the lessons learned from University of Alabama at Birmingham's Nightingale Letter Collection that has relevance for the future of nursing and health care, particularly Nightingale's collaboration with policy leaders, her analysis of data to set policy agendas, and public health reform centered on improving the health and well-being of underserved populations. PMID:23926214

Harper, Doreen C; Davey, Kimberly S; Fordham, Pamela N

2014-03-01

350

Transition IV in Alabama: A Profile of Commitment. Proceedings of the Annual Statewide Conference on Transition (4th, Auburn, Alabama, January 1995).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This proceedings document provides the texts of 23 presentations given at a conference in 1994 which focused on policies, materials, programs, and activities being implemented in Alabama to foster the successful transition of youth with disabilities to adult life. An initial paper compares the definition of transition developed by Andrew Halpern…

Browning, Philip, Ed.

351

A description of the hydrologic system and the effects of coal mining on water quality in the East Fork Little Chariton River and the alluvial aquifer between Macon and Huntsville, north-central Missouri  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The quality of surface and groundwater has been affected by abandoned strip mines and by abandoned underground mines in a 110-sq mi subbasin of the East Fork Little Chariton River. More than 14% of the area was strip mined for coal before 1979. The hydrologic system in the area was investigated and the effects of coal mining on quality of water in the river and alluvial aquifer were analyzed, with major emphasis on defining strip-mining effects. The groundwater gradient was from glacial drift or coal spring to alluvium to the East Fork Little Chariton River, and was greatest in spring and least in fall. Seepage from alluvium to the East Fork Little Chariton River occurs throughout the year, except during drought conditions when the only river flow is water released from Long Branch Lake. In the East Fork Little Chariton River median dissolved-solids concentrations increased from 153 mg/L near Macon to 630 mg/L near Huntsville and median sulfate concentrations increased from 36 mg/L near Macon to 360 mg/L near Huntsville. The median dissolved-solids concentration in water from the alluvium increased from 408 mg/L upstream from the strip mines to 641 mg/L near the mines and median dissolved-sulfate concentration increased from 140 to 350 mg/L. The sulfate-to-chloride ratio, used as the most sensitive indicator of strip-mining effects, increased markedly downstream in the East Fork Little Chariton River and nearby Middle Fork Little Chariton River, which also is affected by strip mining. There were no significant increases in sulfate-to-chloride ratio and dissolved-solids concentrations in comparable nearby subbasins of the Grand, Thompson, and Chariton Rivers where there was no mining. (Author 's abstract)

Hall, D. C.

1986-01-01

352

The arc cloud complex: a case study  

E-print Network

and the Air Force Institute of Technology for making this study possible. I am also grateful to the members of the Atmospheric Science Division, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama, who helped procure and process data via McIDAS ~ Thanks go.... Determination of when and where convective development or dissipation was occurring. 7. The Man-Computer Interactive Data Access System (McIDAS) of the Atmospheric Sciences Division of the Systems Dynamics Laboratory, Marshall Space Flight Center, provided...

Miller, Robert Loren

2012-06-07

353

National Center for Environmental Health Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services  

E-print Network

Administration). · Potable Water (Joe Cotruvo, Joseph Cotruvo & Associates; Mike Herring, CDC/NCEH/EEHS/EHSB). · Wastewater (Allen Tartt, AOWA Training Center, University of West Alabama). · Solid and Hazardous Waste and Wellness). · Radiation Protection (Norman Bolus, UAB School of Health Professions Nuclear Med Tech Program

354

Climate Change Recorded in Aragonite Speleothems from Central Alabama  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The driving forces of global climate change are poorly understood in part due to the lack of high-resolution terrestrial climatic records. The study of carbonate cave formations (stalagmites) often provides uninterrupted annual to millennial records of past terrestrial climate conditions. It is well documented that the growth and isotopic composition of stalagmites are primarily controlled by climatic factors including air temperature, soil microbial activity, and rainfall. Stable isotope analysis of an aragonitic speleothem from DeSoto Caverns (Childersburg, AL) suggests the cave deposits reflect historic and prehistoric climate variations. The stalagmite provides approximately 350 years (determined by annual couplet counting) of climate record for central Alabama with ? 18O values ranging from ˜ - 2 to - 5 (‰ PDB) and ? 13C ranging from ˜ -4 to - 10 (‰ PDB). High-resolution micro-sampling ( ˜ 200 ? m) along the growth axis reveals a significant negative shift at about 1850 AD in both ? 18O and ? 13C proxy records suggestive of changing land practices and increased air temperature. The proximity of the cave to the laboratory allows for detailed study of temperature, relative humidity, and ? CO2 both inside and outside the cave allowing for a more complete understanding of the relationship between local climate factors and cave deposits. Future stalagmite analysis in DeSoto Caverns may reveal climate conditions for the southeastern United States during the Little Ice Age, Medieval Warm Period, and the 8200-year cold event. Additionally, the location of the study site may provide valuable information regarding the source of moisture (Gulf of Mexico) for the buildup and starvation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet during the last glacial maximum and the subsequent deglaciation.

Lambert, W. J.; Aharon, P.

2004-12-01

355

Haynesville sandstone reservoirs in the Updip Jurassic trend of Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Subsequent to the 1986 drilling of the 1 Carolyn McCollough Unit 1-13 well, which initiated production from the Frisco City sand of the Haynesville Formation in Monroe County, Alabama, seven Haynesville fields have been established in Covington, Escambia, and Monroe counties. Initial flow rates of several hundred BOPD are typical for wells in these fields, and maximum rates exceed 2000 BOPD in North Frisco City field. As of August 1993, these fields produced more than 3,400,000 bbl of oil and 4,000,000 mcf of gas from depths of 12,000 to 13,000 ft. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs are concentrated in two distinct areas: (1) an eastern area (Hickory Branch, North Rome, and West Falco fields; API oil gravity = 40{degrees}) in the Conecuh embayment and (2) a western area (Frisco City, North Frisco City, southeast Frisco City, and Megargel fields; API oil gravity = 58-59{degrees}) on the Conecuh ridge complex. Eastern fields are productive from Haynesville sandstone, which is not continuous with the two distinct, productive sandstone bodies in western fields, the Frisco City sand and the Megargel sand. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps associated with basement paleohighs. Reservoir bodies generally consist of conglomerate (igneous clasts in western fields; limestone clasts in eastern fields), sandstone (subarkose-arkose), and shale (some of which is red) in stacked fining-upward sequences. Shale at the tops of these sequences is bioturbated. These marine strata were deposited in shoal-water braid-delta fronts. Petrophysical properties differ between the two areas. Maximum and average permeability in western fields (k{sub max} = 2000 md; k{sub ave} = 850-1800 md) is an order of magnitude higher than in eastern fields. The distribution of diagenetic components, including a variety of carbonate minerals, evaporate minerals (anhydrite and halite in western fields), and carbonate-replaced pseudomatrix, commonly is related to depositional architecture.

Kugler, R.L.; Mink, R.M. [Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

1994-09-01

356

Aquifer characterization at the Veterans Administration Hospital, Tuscaloosa, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The Veterans Administration (VA) is studying the feasibility of aquifer thermal storage (ATES) at their Tuscaloosa, Alabama, facility. To determine the characteristics of the aquifer underlying the facility, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory gathered information about the environment of the aquifer and conducted tests to estimate the aquifer's transmissivity, ground-water flow direction, and velocity. Seven wells were drilled at the VA site. It was found that ground-water flow direction at the site is generally toward the southwest. The magnitude of the gradient is approximately 2.5 {times} 10{sup -3} to 3 {times} 10{sup -3} ft/ft. For six of the seven wells, clay lenses or thick clay layers appear to be acting locally as confining or semi-confining layers. Three types of test were conducted at the site: a step drawdown test, a constant discharge and recover test, and a single-well tracer test. The data yielded responses suggesting leaky confined or delayed yield models for the aquifer. Drawdown and recovery versus time were matched type curves for delayed yield to obtain estimates of transmissivity and storage. This recovery method gave the best fit to the drawdown-versus-time curves. Using this method it was found that transmissivity ranged from 500 to 9000 ft{sup 2}/day and storage ranged from 1.5 {times} 10{sup -4} to 4.5 {times} 10{sup -2} for the wells tested. Using the results of the pump and tracer tests simultaneously, ground-water velocity was estimated to be approximately 0.8 ft/day, with an effective porosity of approximately 12%. 4 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Cronin, W.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Hall, S.H.

1989-10-01

357

NASA InterCenter Collaboration Increases ROI  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Funding for National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) space mission operations is tighter than ever in the current environment of federal government deficit reductions. Conventional wisdom would expect this environment to drive increasing competition between NASA centers for the limited available funds. However, recent inter-center activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center emphasize collaboration rather than competition and demonstrate the value of partnerships to increase the return on shrinking investments. These efforts cover a variety of activities and potential returns. To facilitate sharing data from test and verification through operations without levying requirements on data format or software tools, the HOSC is working with multiple centers on an evolutionary path toward a distributed data architecture and archive. The approach reduces the required investment by allowing the partners to reuse their existing formats and tools, while facilitating gone ]stop h user visibility into and controlled access to the full complement of data regardless of user or data location. The HOSC is also working on two activities to promote sharing operations implementations and leveraging the experts and expertise across multiple NASA sites. In one, the use of Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) standards for the message abstraction layer provides an interoperability layer on top of existing ground data system communication architectures. This allows missions to select the most appropriate solutions for their requirements with a minimal investment in rehosting the components in a coherent operational environment. The other emphasizes shared tools and increased remote access to minimize travel for tests and critical activities and reduce the floor space required for a dedicated operations center. This paper summarizes these and other inter-center collaboration activities at the HOSC and the benefits that each can bring, not just to the participants, but to the broader operations community.

Lankford, Kimberly; Best, Susan; Felton, Larry; Newhouse, Marilyn

2012-01-01

358

Student and Parent Perceptions of Barriers to and Benefits of the School Breakfast Program in Elementary Schools in Southeast Alabama  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the factors impacting participation in the School Breakfast Program (SBP) for elementary school students in southeast Alabama. Methods: Focus groups were used to gather qualitative data from southeastern Alabama public school fourth and fifth grade students and their parents. Six student…

Sabol, Alexis; Struempler, Barbara J.; Zizza, Claire A.

2011-01-01

359

Q UICK R ESPONSE R EPORT Community Impacts of Hurricane Ivan: A Case Study of Orange Beach, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

On September 15 and 16, 2004, Hurricane Ivan struck the Alabama\\/Florida coast with sustained winds at 130 mph. Severe destruction occurred in the small, coastal community of Orange Beach, Alabama, which has experienced increased tourism and rapid population growth over the last 20 years. Disaster research has revealed that natural disasters, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods, affect communities not

J. Steven Picou; Cecelia G. Martin

360

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI). Final Report. NCEE 2012-4008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents the results of an experiment conducted in Alabama beginning in the 2006/07 school year, to determine the effectiveness of the Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI), which aims to improve mathematics and science achievement in the state's K-12 schools. This study is the first randomized controlled trial…

Newman, Denis; Finney, Pamela B.; Bell, Steve; Turner, Herb; Jaciw, Andrew P.; Zacamy, Jenna L.; Gould, Laura Feagans

2012-01-01

361

77 FR 6780 - Designation for the State of Alabama; Saginaw, TX; Essex, IL; Springfield, IL; Savage, MN; and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

GIPSA is announcing the designation of the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (Alabama); Gulf Country Grain Inspection Service, Inc. (Gulf Country); Kankakee Grain Inspection, Inc. (Kankakee); Springfield Grain Inspection, Inc. (Springfield); State Grain Inspection, Inc. (State Grain); and Washington Department of Agriculture (Washington) to provide official services under the......

2012-02-09

362

Missed Opportunities: Origin, Growth, and Decline of Community College Fire Science Degree Programs in Alabama, 1977 to 2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

There was rapid growth of Alabama community colleges in the late 1960s. At the same time, there was rapid growth nationally of fire science associate degree programs. With these concurrent events, one would expect fire department personnel in Alabama to benefit from new community college opportunities in fire science and fire administration. Instead, participation in fire science degree programs has

Jerry W. Laughlin

2007-01-01

363

Sustaining the “Societal and Scriptural Fence”: Cultural, Social, and Political Topographies of Same-Sex Marriage in Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

In June 2006, voters in Alabama overwhelmingly approved a statewide referendum that added a prohibition against same-sex marriage to the state's constitution. This research examines the Alabama vote by “placing” the politics of sexuality within the state's multifaceted web of cultural and social space. We fuse a traditional electoral geography approach with an overall postpositivist cultural and social perspective, beginning

Gerald R. Webster; Thomas Chapman; Jonathan Leib

2010-01-01

364

A survey of Alabama eye care providers in 2010-2011  

PubMed Central

Background State level information regarding eye care resources can provide policy makers with valuable information about availability of eye care services. The current study surveyed ophthalmologists, optometrists and vision rehabilitation providers practicing in Alabama. Methods Three mutually exclusive provider groups were identified, i.e., all ophthalmologists, optometrists, and vision rehabilitation providers working in Alabama in 2010. Eligible providers were contacted in 2010 and 2011 and information was requested regarding provider demographics and training, practice type and service characteristics, and patient characteristics. Descriptive statistics (e.g., means, proportions) were used to characterize provider groups by their demographic and training characteristics, practice characteristics, services provided and patients or clients served. In addition, county level figures demonstrate the numbers and per capita ophthalmologists and optometrists. Results Ophthalmologists were located in 24 of Alabama’s 67 counties, optometrists in 56, and 10 counties had neither an ophthalmologist nor an optometrist. Overall, 1,033 vision care professionals were identified as eligible to participate in the survey: 217 ophthalmologists, 638 optometrists, and 178 visual rehabilitation providers. Of those, 111 (51.2%) ophthalmologists, 246 (38.6%) optometrists, and 81 (45.5%) rehabilitation providers participated. Most participating ophthalmologists, optometrists, and vision rehabilitation providers identified themselves as non-Hispanic White. Ophthalmologists and optometrists estimated that 27% and 22%, respectively, of their patients had diabetes but that the proportion that adhered to eye care guidelines was 61% among ophthalmology patients and 53% among optometry patients. Conclusions A large number of Alabama communities are isolated from eye care services. Increased future demand for eye care is anticipated nationally given the aging of the population and decreasing numbers of providers; however, Alabama also has a high and growing prevalence of diabetes which will result in greater numbers at risk for diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and cataracts. PMID:24708636

2014-01-01

365

Magnitude and frequency of floods for urban streams in Alabama, 2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Methods of estimating flood magnitudes for exceedance probabilities of 50, 20, 10, 4, 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.2 percent have been developed for urban streams in Alabama that are not significantly affected by dams, flood detention structures, hurricane storm surge, or substantial tidal fluctuations. Regression relations were developed using generalized least-squares regression techniques to estimate flood magnitude and frequency on ungaged streams as a function of the basin drainage area and percentage of basin developed. These methods are based on flood-frequency characteristics for 20 streamgaging stations in Alabama and 3 streamgaging stations in adjacent States having 10 or more years of record through September 2007.

Hedgecock, T. S.; Lee, K. G.

2010-01-01

366

Dr. Cooper Curtice - Unknown worker in interpreting the Cambrian of Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Cooper Curtice was an assistant to C. D. Walcott from 1883-1886. In 1885, he spent four months, mostly in Alabama, measuring sections of Paleozoic rocks and searching for fossils, mainly in the Cambrian. In 1888, Walcott concurred with foreign authorities that the rocks called Middle Cambrian in North America were Early Cambrian in age and vice versa, requiring a new interpretation of Cambrian strata. Curtice returned to Alabama for geologic investigations in 1892, and again briefly with Walcott in 1895. Since that time Cambrian stratigraphy in the southeastern United States has remained virtually unchanged.

Yochelson, E.L.; Osborne, W.E.

1999-01-01

367

75 FR 27844 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00031  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S....

2010-05-18

368

Twelfth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Twelfth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 01) was held at the Bevill Center, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama, September 10-14, 2001. The theme for the hands-on training workshop and conference was "Engineering Excellence and Advances in the New Millenium." Forty-five technical papers were presented in four sessions: (1) Thermal Spacecraft/Payloads, (2) Thermal Propulsion/Vehicles, (3) Interdisciplinary Papers, and (4) Fluids Papers. Thirty-nine papers were published in these proceedings. The remaining six papers were not available in electronic format at the time of publication. In addition to the technical papers, there were (a) nine hands-on classes on thermal and flow analyses software, (b) thirteen short courses and product overview lectures, (c) five keynote lectures and, (d) panel discussions consisting of eight presentations. The workshop resulted in participation of 195 persons representing NASA Centers, Government agencies, aerospace industries, academia, software providers, and private corporations.

Majumdar, Alok (Compiler)

2002-01-01

369

The Tenth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Tenth Thermal arid Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 99) was held at the Bevill Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama, September 13-17, 1999. The theme for the hands-on training workshop and conference was "Tools and Techniques Contributing to Engineering Excellence". Forty-seven technical papers were presented in four sessions. The sessions were: (1) Thermal Spacecraft/Payloads, (2) Thermal Propulsion/Vehicles, (3) Interdisciplinary Paper, and (4) Fluids Paper. Forty papers were published in these proceedings. The remaining seven papers were not available in electronic format at the time of publication. In addition to the technical papers, there were (a) nine hands-on classes on thermal and flow analyses software, (b) twelve short courses, (c) thirteen product overview lectures, and (d) three keynote lectures. The workshop resulted in participation of 171 persons representing NASA Centers, Government agencies, aerospace industries, academia, software providers, and private corporations.

Majumdar, Alok (Compiler); McConnaughey, Paul (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

370

Activities in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) During the STS-42 IML-1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured are activities in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

1992-01-01

371

Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) team in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

1992-01-01

372

Critical Point Facility (CPE) Group in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Critical Point Facility (CPE) group in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

1992-01-01

373

Critical Point Facility (CPF) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Critical Point Facility (CPF) team in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

1982-01-01

374

Crystal Growth Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) During the STS-42  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Crystal Growth team in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

1992-01-01

375

Marshall Space Flight Center solid waste characterization and recycling improvement study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The MSFC Facilities Office, which is responsible for disposing of all waste generated by MSFC, issued a delivery order to the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) to characterize current MSFC waste streams and to evaluate their existing recycling program. The purpose of the study was to define the nature, quantity, and types of waste produced and to generate ideas for improving the present recycling program. Specifically, the following tasks were to be performed: Identify various surplus and waste materials--as identified by the Contracting Officer's Technical Representative (COTR)--by source, location, and type; Analyze MSFC's current methods for handling, storage, transport, and disposition of waste and surplussed materials; Determine the composition of various surplus and waste materials as to type and quantities from various sources and locations; Analyze different methods for the disposition of various surplus and waste materials, including quality, quantity, preparation, transport cost, and value; Study possible alternatives to current methods of handling, storage, transport, and disposition of surplus and waste materials to improve the quality and quantities recycled or sold and to reduce and minimize the quantities of surplus and waste material currently being disposed of or stored; Provide recommendations for source and centralized segregation and aggregation of materials for recycling and/or disposition; and The analysis could include identification and laboratory level evaluation of methods and/or equipment, including capital costs, operating costs, maintenance requirements, life cycle and return on investment for systems to support the waste reduction program mission.

Eley, Michael H.; Crews, Lavonne; Johnston, Ben; Lee, David; Colebaugh, James

1995-01-01

376

New insights into lightning processes gained from triggered-lightning experiments in Florida and Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analyses of electric and magnetic fields measured at distances from tens to hundreds of meters from the ground strike point of triggered lightning at Camp Blanding, Florida, and at 10 and 20 m at Fort McClellan, Alabama, in conjunction with currents measured at the lightning channel base and with optical observations, allow us to make new inferences on several aspects

V. A. Rakov; M. A. Uman; K. J. Rambo; M. I. Fernandez; R. J. Fisher; G. H. Schnetzer; R. Thottappillil; A. Eybert-Berard; J. P. Berlandis; P. Lalande; A. Bonamy; P. Laroche; A. Bondiou-Clergerie

1998-01-01

377

Adult Basic Education in Alabama State University: A Five Year Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report describes the development of the ABE project at Alabama State University (ASU) and the project's transition to a graduate program during the five-year period 1969-74. Part one discusses the initiation of the project, describing the initial, the developmental, the operational, and the crucial tasks and project procedures. Part two…

Morrison, Marshall L.; Bronaugh, Jacob H.

378

North Blowhorn Creek oil field - a stratigraphic trap in Black Warrior basin of Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama contains shallow oil and gas prospects. To date more than 1000 wells have been drilled in the region and more than 90 petroleum fields and pools have been discovered. Mississippian sandstone reservoirs are the most productive horizons for hydrocarbons in the basin, and the Carter sandstone is the most prolific. Identification of stratigraphic

B. L. Bearden; E. A. Mancini; P. R. Reeves

1984-01-01

379

76 FR 14611 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama; 110(a)(1) and (2) Infrastructure...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...addressed all the required infrastructure elements for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. DATES...of Contents I. Background II. What elements are required under Sections 110(a...analysis of how Alabama addressed the elements of Sections 110(a)(1) and...

2011-03-17

380

Alabama Education Report Card, 2012-2013: A Year in Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Beginning in January of 2012, the Alabama State Board of Education embarked on a bold and transformation plan for K-12 public education known as PLAN 2020. Foundational to this plan was a new definition of a successful and prepared high school graduate informed by community colleges, institutions of higher education, and business and industry,…

Alabama Department of Education, 2014

2014-01-01

381

Lessons Learned Planning a Statewide Conference: "Alabama's Choice--Tobacco or Health?"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes lessons learned while planning a statewide conference to increase the knowledge of tobacco control advocates and promote implementation of the Alabama Comprehensive Tobacco Use Prevention and Control Plan (Plan) within the state. The Plan has three overall goals: preventing youth from becoming tobacco users; promoting…

Geiger, Brian F.

382

Trade & Industrial Education. Preparing Today for Tomorrow's Workforce. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1996, No. 21.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide, which is intended for classroom teachers, supervisors, and administrators throughout Alabama, contains the minimum required content (core program) for public school instruction in trade and industrial education in grades 7-12. Presented first are the following: introduction examining the objectives and delivery of trade and industrial…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

383

Assessment of detecting minimum length limit changes for crappie in two Alabama reservoirs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this study were to compare population metrics prior to and after the initiation of a minimum length limit for black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus and white crappie Pomoxis annularis in two reservoirs in Alabama, USA. In addition, we estimated recruitment variability and incorporated this stochastic component into a simulation model to assess the effects of three different minimum

Allen D Martin; Michael J Maceina

2004-01-01

384

ENVIRONMENTAL ATTITUDES OF ALABAMA COASTAL RESIDENTS: PUBLIC OPINION POLLS AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY  

EPA Science Inventory

Given these conclusions at the national level, it follows that the continued health and vitality of the Alabama coastal zone is associated with the current environmental knowledge of Mobile and Baldwin county residents. In this research, we collected information from coa...

385

Aquifer characterization at the General Motors Harrison Division Plant, Tuscaloosa, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

The General Motors corporation is studying the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) for cooling purposes at its Harrison Division plant Tuscaloosa, Alabama. To determine the characteristics of the aquifer underlying the plant, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) gathered information about the environment of the aquifer and conducted tests to determine the aquifer's transmissivity and flow. From these tests,

S. P. Luttrell; W. E. Cronin; S. H. Hall

1989-01-01

386

Fish Assemblage Responses to Urban Intensity Gradients in Contrasting Metropolitan Areas: Birmingham, Alabama and Boston, Massachusetts  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined fish assemblage responses to urban intensity gradients in two contrasting metropolitan areas: Birmingham, Alabama (BIR) and Boston, Massachusetts (BOS). Urbanization was quantified by using an urban intensity index (UII) that included multiple stream buffers and basin land uses, human population density, and road density variables. We evaluated fish assemblage responses by using species richness metrics and detrended correspondence

MICHAEL R. MEADOR; HUMBERT ZAPPIA

387

EAARL topography-Three Mile Creek and Mobile-Tensaw Delta, Alabama, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This DVD contains lidar-derived first-surface (FS) and bare-earth (BE) topography GIS datasets of a portion of the Mobile-Tensaw Delta region and Three Mile Creek in Alabama. These datasets were acquired on March 6, 2010.

Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Clark, A.P.; Wright, C.W.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Fredericks, Xan

2011-01-01

388

Today's Students, Tomorrow's Citizens: Pathways for Learning, Language and Reading Comprehension. Alabama High School Graduation Exam.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is designed to assist classroom teachers in preparing students to complete successfully the "Alabama High School Graduation Exam" (AHSGE). The document describes the content for the language and reading comprehension portion of the AHSGE. The teaching strategies, activities, and resources contained in the document were developed to…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

389

Renee Rivas Is So Sharp, TUSCALOOSA, ALABAMA 35487 | (205) 348-6010 | UA.EDU  

E-print Network

Renee Rivas Is So Sharp, TUSCALOOSA, ALABAMA 35487 | (205) 348-6010 | UA.EDU » As an undergraduate. UA's graduates and students include 15 Rhodes Scholars, 26 Goldwater Scholars, 11 Truman Scholars, 11 would have been great. But sharing her with the world is a better idea. Visit ua.edu to learn how

Caldwell, Guy

390

Waste disposal costs of two coal mines in Kentucky and Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bureau of Mines studied waste disposal methods at a coal mine in Kentucky and another in Alabama to develop cost estimates, to provide better knowledge of current practices, and to guide consideration of alternate disposal methods. Costs of the existing waste disposal systems at each mine were estimated using present-day costs of equipment and labor. Costs of waste disposal

V. A. Danielson; D. H. Jr. White

1969-01-01

391

Development and Validation of a Short Form of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Brief assessments of parenting practices can provide important information about the development of disruptive behavior disorders in children. We examined the factor structure of a widely used assessment of parenting practices, the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire, and produced a 9-item short scale around its three supported factors: Positive…

Elgar, Frank J.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Dadds, Mark R.; Sigvaldason, Nadine

2007-01-01

392

Report of an Econometric Study of the Energy Sector of Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purposes of the research project are: the collection of enrgy-related economic data, the estimation of relationships among energy demand and supply and the Alabama economy, and the development of the capability to simulate the effects of alternative d...

D. L. Hooks, D. C. Cheng

1979-01-01

393

78 FR 47722 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Recovery Plan for Alabama Sturgeon  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...The Alabama sturgeon is one of the rarest species of fish in the nation and may be close to extinction. Restoring an endangered or threatened animal or plant to the point where it is again a secure, self-sustaining member of its...

2013-08-06

394

Leadership Frame Preferences of Elected and Appointed School District Superintendents in Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the leadership orientation frames of school district superintendents in Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi, which are the only three states in the United States with both elected and appointed school district superintendents. The theoretical framework for this study was developed by Bolman and Deal's (1997) four frame…

Landry, Cheri Lynne

2009-01-01

395

AlAbAmA Dune RestoRAtion PRoject General Project DescriPtion  

E-print Network

by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill response efforts. Dune habitat in Alabama has been affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, including response efforts. The Trustees plan to restore 55 acres of primary dune of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, including response efforts. The project will help restore an area of the beach

396

An Evaluation of a Three-Year Abstinence Education Program in Southeast Alabama  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper summarizes an evaluation of a three-year school-based abstinence education program that was taught in 21 public schools to eighth- and 10th grade students in Southeastern Alabama between 2003 and 2005. The abstinence education curricula utilized with the students were "Choosing the Best" and "Navigator" programs. A 76-item testing…

Gossett, Dianne; Hooten, Mary Ann

2006-01-01

397

Growth of Freshwater Drum from Lotic and Lentic Habitats in Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyzed variations in the age and growth of freshwater drum Aplodinotus grunniens in Alabama rivers and reservoirs. Lotic environments produced significantly more robust freshwater drum (associated with higher growth rates) than did lentic settings. Shorter reservoir retention times (more lotic reservoirs) also produced more robust and faster-growing freshwater drum, which supported the hypothesis that hydraulic-based habitat was an important

Andrew L. Rypel; David R. Bayne; Justin B. Mitchell

2006-01-01

398

Petroleum system evolution in the Conecuh Embayment southwest Alabama U.S. Gulf Coast  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analyses of hydrocarbon maturation trends in Smackover reservoirs of southwest Alabama indicates that crude oils in updip reservoirs of the Conecuh Embayment are anomalously mature for their present temperature-depth regimes. It is inferred that these mature oils equilibrated to depth-temperature conditions in deeper reservoirs downdip, and subsequently remigrated to their present positions. Burial history reconstructions, regional structure, and reservoir distributions

Wade

1996-01-01

399

Sequence stratigraphy of middle and upper Jurassic strata of Southwestern Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama differ from those of the western Gulf rim, showing: (1) profound influence of antecedent topography; (2) low early subsidence rates; and (3) greater clastic influx from adjacent uplands. Werner Anhydrite and Louann Salt represent the earliest marine incursion onto the Gulf rim following initial rifting; they onlap upper Paleozoic basement and

W. J. Wade; C. H. Jr. Moore

1993-01-01

400

Upper Jurassic carbonate\\/evaporite shelf, south Alabama and west Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

The association of Upper Jurassic carbonates and evaporites in south Alabama and west Florida defines a brining upward and inward sequence that is indicative of deposition on an increasingly evaporitic marine shelf. Structural features that bound this evaporitic shelf were the Pensacola arch, the South Mississippi platform, and the State Line flexure. Paleo-drainage of the surrounding highlands also affected shelf

1986-01-01

401

Assessment of the geothermal\\/geopressure potential of the Gulf Coastal Plan of Alabama. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geothermal and geopressure as well as geologic and geophysical data were studied to evaluate the potential for future development of geothermal resources underlying the Alabama Coastal Plain. Wire-line log data compiled and interpreted from more than 1300 oil and gas test wells included maximum recorded temperatures, mud weights, rock resistivities as related to geopressure, formation tops, fault locations, and depths

G. V. Wilson; G. C. Wang; E. A. Mancini; D. J. Benson

1980-01-01

402

A subsurface study of the North Frisco City field, Monroe County, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1991 discovery of the North Frisco City field has led to a resurgence of industry activity in the updip Jurassic trend of Monroe County, Alabama. Six wells in the field are presently delivering 6,000 BOPD and 5 MMJCFGP out of the Frisco City Sand Member of the lower Haynesville Formation. The North Frisco City field is a combination structural-stratigraphic

J. G. Cox; M. Harmount; L. Bruno

1993-01-01

403

Jurassic sequence stratigraphy in the Mississippi interior salt basin of Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three depositional sequences associated with cycles of eustatic sea-level change and coastal onlap can be identified in the Mississippi Interior Salt basin of Alabama. In the Mississippi Interior Salt basin, the lower depositional sequence is bounded by a basal unconformity and an upper Type 2 unconformity in the Callovian. This sequence includes Louann evaporites, Pine Hill anhydrites and shales, and

E. A. Mancini; B. H. Tew; R. M. Mink

1990-01-01

404

Depositional history of the Smackover Formation, Appleton Field, Escambia County, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Appleton Field is a Smackover field situated above two pre-Mesozoic paleohighs near the updip limit of the Smackover in the Conecuh Embayment of southwestern Alabama, Smackover deposition in Appleton Field was influenced by both pre-Smackover paleotopography and sea level fluctuation. Fourteen lithofacies were identified in the Smackover and the overlying Buckner Anhydrite Member of the Haynesville Formation. These lithofacies were

D. J. Benson; L. M. Pultz; D. D. Bruner; G. Lu

1996-01-01

405

Subaqueous evaporites of Buckner member, Haynesville Formation, northeastern Mobile County, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lower part of the Buckner anhydrite member of the Haynesville Formation (Upper Jurassic) was deposited as shallowing upward cycles of subaqueous to subaerial deposits on the north flank of the Wiggins arch in northeastern Mobile County, Alabama. The unit studied conformably overlies the Smackover Formation and is generally evaporite dominated. The Buckner anhydrite averages about 35 m (115 ft)

Steven D. Mann

1988-01-01

406

Smile Alabama! Initiative: Interim Results from a Program To Increase Children's Access to Dental Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An Alabama initiative aimed to improve access to oral health care for Medicaid-eligible children through four components: improved Medicaid claims processing, increased reimbursement for providers, outreach and educational activities to support providers, and parent and patient education about children's oral health. In the first 3 program years,…

Greene-McIntyre, Mary; Finch, Mary Hayes; Searcy, John

2003-01-01

407

In Defense of Field Trips: A Conversation with Educators from an Extraordinary Alabama Public School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

People looking for a public school Cinderella story need look no further than George Hall Elementary in Mobile, Alabama. The once struggling school, which serves mostly low-income children, now boasts state math and reading test scores most wealthy suburban schools would be proud of. George Hall did not have to sacrifice all but the basics to get…

von Zastrow, Claus

2010-01-01

408

Transforming the Spirit of Teaching through Wise Practice: Observations of Two Alabama Social Studies Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the teaching styles and approaches of two different social studies teachers working in urban schools in Alabama. Aims at providing examples of wise teaching practice in social studies by examining what these teachers see as essential to becoming effective teachers in a challenging context. (CMK)

Riley, Karen Lea; Wilson, Elizabeth K.; Fogg, Terry

2000-01-01

409

PIXE analysis of rain water collected in Montgomery, Alabama for a five-year period  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concentrations of trace elements in 297 rain samples were determined using PIXE. These rain samples were collected at every rainfall occurrence in Montgomery, Alabama over a period of almost five years between January 1985 and November 1989. The measured pH values indicated that, with only a few exceptions, the northern rains were more acidic than the southern rains. Also, a

S. K. Ghorai; O. Tekyi-Mensah; J. F. Sims; J. R. Williams; W. L. Alford

1993-01-01

410

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 86-015-1871, Uniroyal-Goodrich, Opelika, Alabama,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In response to a request from the United Rubber Workers, an evaluation was made of an apparent excess of heart disease among workers at the Uniroyal-Goodrich Company, (SIC-3011), Opelika, Alabama. Heat stress was evaluated in the Tire Curing Department. E...

A. T. Fidler, M. Singal, S. A. Lee

1988-01-01

411

Evaluation of Alabama's Mandatory Continuing Education Program for Reasonableness, Access, and Value.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A majority of 255 registered nurses and 146 licensed practical nurses surveyed felt the mandatory contact hours for license renewal in Alabama were reasonable. They had concerns about the cost, access, and quality of continuing education; most believed in continuing education's value and applicability to practice. (SK)

Lazarus, Jean B.; Permaloff, Anne; Dickson, Charlie J.

2002-01-01

412

Trade and Industrial Education. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1990, [No.] 57.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This course of study provides a framework for the content of a program in trade and industrial education as part of the Alabama vocational education program. The course of study was designed to assist educators in developing and maintaining high quality vocational programs and to ensure uniformity of vocational programs. Following a description of…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

413

Proration--Its Effects on Two-Year Postsecondary Educational Institutions in Alabama.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Under Alabama law, the State Department of Revenues maintains a trust fund from which all allocations to state educational institutions are made. In the event of a shortfall in the trust fund, the governor is required to prorate payments to educational institutions by the percentage of that shortfall. Since 1938, proration of the funds for public…

Searcy, Robert Dexter; Seymour, John

414

Alabama Moments in American History: Supplemental Materials for High School Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The broad themes of U.S. history usually have specific expressions in Alabama. Specific examples of history close by can enrich the teaching of U.S. history. This packet of materials was prepared to assist teachers in establishing the link between national issues and the local examples. The packet contains supplemental information about each of…

1999

415

77 FR 34288 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama; 110(a)(1) and (2) Infrastructure...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...addressed all the required infrastructure elements for the 1997 annual and 2006 24-hour...of Contents I. Background II. What elements are required under sections 110(a...analysis of how Alabama addressed the elements of sections 110(a)(1) and...

2012-06-11

416

THE 2001 ALABAMA SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL PRODUCTIONS OF KING JOHN AND JULIUS CAESAR  

Microsoft Academic Search

n its thirtieth anniversary season, the Alabama Shakespeare Festival produced one play never before performed at the Festival, Shakespeare's King John; and Julius Caesar, last performed in 1991. King John was performed in the 250-seat Octagon Theatre, while Julius Caesar was performed in the larger 750-seat Festival Stage. While Howard Jensen of Indiana University directed King John and Kent Thompson,

Craig Barrow

417

An Assessment of Student Development Programs at Public Community, Junior, and Technical Colleges in Alabama.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to determine the differences in the perceptions of administrators, student development practitioners, faculty, and students with respect to the effectiveness of selected student services in two-year colleges in Alabama. A survey instrument, requesting respondents to express their agreement or disagreement with 57 statements…

Deavers, Ken; Halpin, Gerald

418

Technical report series: North Alabama water quality assessment: Volume 9, Fiscal year 1985 summary report  

SciTech Connect

The North Alabama Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) was initiated in order to more clearly define the current state of water quality in the Muscle Shoals area. This report summarizes impacts on surface water quality, surface water quality data, sediment data, aquatic biological data, water quality modeling, and groundwater.

Mulkey, C.E.

1986-07-01

419

Technical report series: North Alabama water quality assessment: Volume 9, Fiscal year 1985 summary report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The North Alabama Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) was initiated in order to more clearly define the current state of water quality in the Muscle Shoals area. This report summarizes impacts on surface water quality, surface water quality data, sediment data, aquatic biological data, water quality modeling, and groundwater.

Mulkey

1986-01-01

420

Assessing the Quality of Life in Rural Alabama: Results of High School Students' Community Investigation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rural Alabama high school freshmen and sophomores collected and analyzed data about community drinking water supplies in a social science research project designed to acquaint them with health care issues in their communities. Students interviewed government and business leaders, health care professionals, and residents in three rural counties. In…

Knopke, Harry J.; And Others

421

Great Expectations: A Guide to Alabama's High School Graduation Exam. Revised  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

State leaders, parents, and business people want to be sure that students truly learn what they are being taught in school. Today, basic skills are not sufficient to guarantee that children will find good jobs and become productive citizens. As a result, the Alabama State Legislature passed its Education Accountability Law in 1995. The new…

Alabama Department of Education, 2003

2003-01-01

422

Nutritional Status of New Orleans, Mississippi and Alabama Head Start Children. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three purposes guided compilation of this final report on the nutritional status of New Orleans, Mississippi, and Alabama Head Start children: (1) to evaluate the causes of anemia through detailed studies of urban New Orleans preschool children and their mothers, (2) to study the effect of dietary supplementation of school feeding programs upon…

Smith, Jack L.

423

Middle and upper Miocene natural gas sands in onshore and offshore Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirty Miocene natural gas fields have been established in onshore and offshore Alabama since the discovery of Miocene gas in this area in 1979. These fields have produced over 16 bcf of natural gas from the middle Miocene Amos sand (24 fields) and upper Miocene Luce (3 fields), Escambia (1 field), and Meyer (3 fields) sands. Production from the Amos

R. M. Mink; E. A. Mancini; B. L. Bearden; C. C. Smith

1988-01-01

424

Low head, micro-hydro demonstration project, Coker, Alabama. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Project objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of using a crossflow (Banki) turbine in a low head, run-of-steam application. Project consisted of construction of small dam across Big Creek at Coker, Alabama. Design, construction and installation of a crossflow turbine with appurtenant feed water structures and control devices. Design of crossflow turbine was for 6 ft net head at 15

1983-01-01

425

A University of Alabama Low-Cost Diamond-Coated Tools  

E-print Network

­ Diamond-coated tools made from chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are an economical solution, but issuesCAVT A University of Alabama Low-Cost Diamond-Coated Tools for Metal-Matrix Composite Machiningy Tool holder Cutting insert durable diamond coating of tungsten tools by CVD MOTIVATION Metal matrix

Carver, Jeffrey C.

426

Responses to Gizzard Shad Recovery following Selective Treatment in Walker County Lake, Alabama, 1996-1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gizzard shad Dorosoma cepedianum is an important prey fish that is capable of influencing both the upper and lower trophic levels in aquatic systems. Contrary to our predictions, during the 4 years after a selective reduction of gizzard shad in Walker County State Fishing Lake (WCL), Alabama, the sport fish population structure did not decline as gizzard shad abundance rebounded.

Brian J. Irwin; Dennis R. DeVries; Gene W. Kim

2003-01-01

427

The Tides of Tradition: Culture and Reform at the University of Alabama.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection serves as an interpretation of traditions, rituals, legacies, and the historical challenges associated with the University of Alabama. As such, it is a consolidated historical record of the cultural history of the university. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction" (Chad Caples, Lillie Hagood, Kurt Johnson, Anne Kanga, Julie Griffin…

Alabama Univ., Birmingham.

428

The health and economic consequences of cigarette smoking in alabama, 2009-2010.  

PubMed

While CDC reports on the health and economic burden of smoking in the United States, state-specific data are not readily available. We estimated the health and economic consequences of cigarette smoking in Alabama to provide the state legislature with the state-specific data that reveal the direct impact of smoking on their constituents. We estimated that in 2009, almost 7,900 adult deaths (18% of all adult deaths) and approximately 121,000 years of potential life lost among Alabama adults aged 35 years and older were attributable to cigarette smoking. Productivity losses due to premature death and smoking-attributable illness were estimated at $2.84 billion and $941 million, respectively. Our findings support a strong need for tobacco control and prevention programs to decrease the health and economic burden of smoking in Alabama. These results are being used by the State Health Officer to illustrate the real costs of smoking in Alabama and to advocate for improved tobacco control policies. PMID:25364049

Fosson, Gabriel H; McCallum, Debra M; Beeson, Diane H

2014-11-01

429

Dr. von Braun Briefing Walt Disney  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. von Braun began his association with Walt Disney in the 1950s when the rocket scientist appeared in three Disney television productions related to the exploration of space. Years later, Dr. von Braun invited Disney and his associates to tour the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This photograph is dated April 13, 1965. From left are R.J. Schwinghamer from the MSFC, Disney, B.J. Bernight, and Dr. von Braun.

1965-01-01

430

Space Station Freedom Utilization Conference: Executive summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

From August 3-6, 1992, Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) representatives and prospective Space Station Freedom researchers gathered at the Von Braun Civic Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for NASA's first annual Space Station Freedom (SSF) Utilization Conference. The sessions presented are: (1) overview and research capabilities; (2) research plans and opportunities; (3) life sciences research; (4) technology research; (4) microgravity research and biotechnology; and (5) closing plenary.

1992-01-01

431

Intercomparison of candidate methods for mineral dust aerosol classification using MODIS infrared and visible channels  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Geoinformatics Group at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) Information Technology and Systems Center (ITSC) conducts a broad range of informatics research including data mining, metadata development, and ontology\\/semantics modeling. Within the data mining arena, an automated dust storm detection system is under development using ITSC's remote sensing data visualization and analysis tool, ADaM-IVICS. In this study, a

Aleta Duvall; Rahul Ramachandran

2009-01-01

432

Current Collection from Space Plasmas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The First Workshop on Current Collection from Space Plasmas was held at the Tom Bevil Center on the campus of The University of Alabama in Huntsville on April 24 to 25, 1989. The intent of the workshop was to assemble experts on various topics related to the problem of current collection for deliberations that would elucidate the present understanding of the overall current collection problem. Papers presented at the workshop are presented.

Singh, Nagendra (editor); Wright, K. H., Jr. (editor); Stone, Nobie H. (editor)

1990-01-01

433

Radioactivities of Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) materials: Baggage and bonanzas  

SciTech Connect

Radioactivities in materials onboard the returned Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite have been studied by a variety of techniques. Among the most powerful is low-background Ge-semiconductor detector gamma-ray spectrometry, illustrated here by results obtained at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) Low Bakground Facilities, in a multi-laboratory collaboration coordinated by Dr. Thomas Parnell's team at the Marshall Spacecraft Center, Huntsville, Alabama.

Smith, A.R.; Hurley, D.L.

1991-08-01

434

Canadian 'Handshake in Space'  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Canadian 'handshake' in space occurred on April 28, 2001, as the Canadian-built space station robotic arm (Canadarm-2) transferred its launch cradle over to Endeavor's robotic arm. Marning the controls from the shuttle's aft flight deck, Canadian Mission Specialist Chris A. Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) was instrumental in the activity. The Spacelab pallet that carried the Canadarm2 robotic arm to the station was developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama.

2001-01-01

435

5 CFR Appendix III to Part 1201 - Approved Hearing Locations By Regional Office  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Part 1201—Approved Hearing Locations By Regional Office Atlanta Regional Office Birmingham, Alabama Huntsville, Alabama...Tallahassee, Florida Tampa/St. Petersburg, Florida Atlanta, Georgia Augusta, Georgia Macon, Georgia...

2012-01-01

436

5 CFR Appendix III to Part 1201 - Approved Hearing Locations By Regional Office  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Part 1201—Approved Hearing Locations By Regional Office Atlanta Regional Office Birmingham, Alabama Huntsville, Alabama...Tallahassee, Florida Tampa/St. Petersburg, Florida Atlanta, Georgia Augusta, Georgia Macon, Georgia...

2011-01-01

437

Women's Center Women's Center  

E-print Network

-Defense Workshop Norfolk Karate Academy 814 West 45th St. Norfolk, VA, 7:30pm-9:30pm RSVP to womenctr@odu.edu by 9 Karate Academy 814 West 45th St. Norfolk, VA, 1:00pm-3:00pm RSVP to womenctr@odu.edu by 10/24 Big Blue & Activism Virginia Beach Room, Webb Center 12:30pm-1:30pm Self-Defense Workshop Norfolk Karate Academy 814

438

Vet Center  

MedlinePLUS

... Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Performance and Accountability Report Budget Submission Recovery ... Winter Sports Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Contact ...

439

Operating and Managing a Backup Control Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Due to the criticality of continuous mission operations, some control centers must plan for alternate locations in the event an emergency shuts down the primary control center. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is the Mission Control Center (MCC) for the International Space Station (ISS). Due to Houston s proximity to the Gulf of Mexico, JSC is prone to threats from hurricanes which could cause flooding, wind damage, and electrical outages to the buildings supporting the MCC. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the capability to be the Backup Control Center for the ISS if the situation is needed. While the MSFC Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) does house the BCC, the prime customer and operator of the ISS is still the JSC flight operations team. To satisfy the customer and maintain continuous mission operations, the BCC has critical infrastructure that hosts ISS ground systems and flight operations equipment that mirrors the prime mission control facility. However, a complete duplicate of Mission Control Center in another remote location is very expensive to recreate. The HOSC has infrastructure and services that MCC utilized for its backup control center to reduce the costs of a somewhat redundant service. While labor talents are equivalent, experiences are not. Certain operations are maintained in a redundant mode, while others are simply maintained as single string with adequate sparing levels of equipment. Personnel at the BCC facility must be trained and certified to an adequate level on primary MCC systems. Negotiations with the customer were done to match requirements with existing capabilities, and to prioritize resources for appropriate level of service. Because some of these systems are shared, an activation of the backup control center will cause a suspension of scheduled HOSC activities that may share resources needed by the BCC. For example, the MCC is monitoring a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico. As the threat to MCC increases, HOSC must begin a phased activation of the BCC, while working resource conflicts with normal HOSC activities. In a long duration outage to the MCC, this could cause serious impacts to the BCC host facility s primary mission support activities. This management of a BCC is worked based on customer expectations and negotiations done before emergencies occur. I.

Marsh, Angela L.; Pirani, Joseph L.; Bornas, Nicholas

2010-01-01

440

Analysis of the Winds (1974-1984) and Sea Level Elevations (1973-1983) in Coastal Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Monthly and annual wind roses, constructed from 10.5 years of data collected on Dauphin Island, Alabama, exhibit a high degree of variability. However, monthly composite roses present a recognizable seasonal pattern: northerly winter winds; easterly to so...

W. W. Schroeder, W. J. Wiseman

1985-01-01

441

76 FR 48941 - Alabama & Florida Railway Co., Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-in Geneva, Coffee, and Covington...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Railway Co., Inc.--Abandonment Exemption--in Geneva, Coffee, and Covington Counties, Ala. Alabama & Florida Railway Co...at Geneva, Ala., a distance of 42.9 miles, in Geneva, Coffee and Covington Counties, Ala. The line constitutes...

2011-08-09

442

Results of the Analyses of Screening Surface and Well Water Samples from Decatur, Alabama for Selected Perfluorinated Compounds  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA has conducted testing of agricultural sites in Alabama where sewage sludge was applied from a local wastewater treatment plant that receives wastewater from numerous industrial sources, including facilities that manufacture and use perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and other perf...

443

75 FR 34735 - Adequacy Status of the Alabama Portion (Jackson County) of the Chattanooga, Tennessee Tri-State...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Chattanooga 1997 annual PM 2.5 nonattainment area is comprised of a portion of Jackson County, Alabama; Catoosa and Walker Counties, Georgia; and Hamilton County, Tennessee. As a result of EPA's finding, the portion of Jackson County...

2010-06-18

444

Potential for CO2 Sequestration and Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production, Blue Creek Field, NW Black Warrior Basin, Alabama  

E-print Network

basin, Alabama. It considered the injection and production rate, the components of injected gas, coal dewatering, permeability anisotropy, various CO2 soak times, completion of multiple reservoir layers and pressure constraints at the injector...

He, Ting

2011-02-22

445

76 FR 31580 - Opportunity for Designation in the State of Alabama; Saginaw, TX; Essex, IL; Springfield, IL...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Stockyards Administration Opportunity for Designation in the State of Alabama; Saginaw, TX; Essex, IL; Springfield, IL; Savage, MN; and State of Washington Areas; Request for Comments on the Official Agencies Servicing These Areas AGENCY: Grain...

2011-06-01

446

Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers List  

Cancer.gov

Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers List Map of Cancer Centers Center Addresses(text file) Cancer Center Profiles Benchmark Data Home > Cancer Centers > Cancer Centers List Cancer Centers List View By: Name | State | State Map

447

The Alabama Drug Discovery Alliance: A Collaborative Partnership to Facilitate Academic Drug Discovery  

PubMed Central

The Alabama Drug Discovery Alliance is a collaboration between the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Southern Research Institute that aims to support the discovery and development of therapeutic molecules that address an unmet medical need. The alliance builds on the expertise present at both institutions and has the dedicated commitment of their respective technology transfer and intellectual property offices to guide any commercial opportunities that may arise from the supported efforts. Although most projects involve high throughput screening, projects at any stage in the drug discovery and development pathway are eligible for support. Irrespective of the target and stage of any project, well-functioning interdisciplinary teams are crucial to a project’s progress. These teams consist of investigators with a wide variety of expertise from both institutions to contribute to the program’s success. PMID:21448756

Everts, Maaike; Knight, W. Blaine; Harris, David R.; Secrist, John A.; Whitley, Richard J.

2011-01-01

448

BIG SANDY, WEST ELLIOTTS CREEK, AND REED BRAKE ROADLESS AREAS, ALABAMA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mineral surveys done in the Big Sandy, West Elliotts Creek, and Reed Brake Roadless Areas, Alabama, indicate that the areas have little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. The three areas, however, have a probable potential for oil or gas. Probable coal resource potential exists in the Big Sandy and the West Elliotts Creek Roadless Areas. Clay and abundant sand resources occur in the roadless areas. Clayey sand has been used to stabilize roads and in road grade construction.

Patterson, Sam H.; Armstrong, Michelle K.

1984-01-01

449

Geochemical Characterization of Shallow Ground Water in the Eutaw Aquifer, Montgomery, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ground water samples were collected from 30 wells located in, or directly down gradient from, recharge areas of the Eutaw aquifer in Montgomery, Alabama. The major ion content of the water evolves from calcium-sodium-chloride-dominated type in the recharge area to calcium-bicarbonate-dominated type in the confined portion of the aquifer. Ground water in the recharge area was undersaturated with respect to

James L. Robinson; Celeste A. Journey

2004-01-01

450

Biotic, geochemical, and paleomagnetic changes across the Cretaceous\\/Tertiary boundary at Braggs, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exposed near Braggs, Alabama, is one of the few well-studied, nearly continuous shallow-marine Cretaceous\\/Tertiary boundary sections; it allows a glimpse of the biotic and environmental changes that occurred in the latest Cretaceous to earliest Paleocene. Paleomagnetic, strontium isotopic, and biostratigraphic data closely constrain the age of a series of lithologic, geochemical, and biotic variations and suggest that no more than

Douglas S. Jones; Paul A. Mueller; Jonathan R. Bryan; Jon P. Dobson; James E. T. Channell; James C. Zachos; Michael A. Arthur

1987-01-01

451

Summary of selected water-quality data for the Warrior coal field, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A summary is presented of selected water quality data collected from 1976 to 1984 at 75 surface water sites and 28 test wells in the Warrior coal field in northwestern Alabama. The minimum, maximum, mean or median, standard deviation, and number of determinations are given for each site for discharge, pH, alkalinity, specific conductance, hardness, dissolved and suspended solids, sulfate, and total and dissolved iron and manganese. Twelve quadrangles are included in the report showing the location of each site. (USGS)

Mooty, W.S.

1985-01-01

452

Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic oil reservoirs of the updip basement structure play: Southwest Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exploration for Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic reservoirs associated with updip basement structures currently is the most active exploratory oil play in Alabama. High initial flow rates, on the order of hundreds to thousands of barrels of oil per day, are commonly encountered at depths between 8,200 and 14,500 feet. Fifty-one fields have been established and 25 million barrels of

R. M. Mink; E. A. Mancini

1995-01-01

453

Where Communism Was Black: Race, Culture and Radicalism in Depression Alabama.  

E-print Network

find grass roots interest in pan-African struggles to have been overwhelming. While the Soviet Union was at times termed the "new Ethiopia" (100), the Birmingham campaign to defend the real Ethiopia against invasion by Italy was undramatic... of African-American Communism in Alabama or that the agency of black workers proved entirely useless in the longer run. Intense repression, popularly supported with special zeal becausc Communism was associated with "social equality" and "nigger unions...

Roediger, David

1992-03-01

454

Thirty Thousand Years of Vegetation Changes in the Alabama Hills, Owens Valley, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty packrat (Neotoma) middens recovered from three sites (1265-1535 m) in the Alabama Hills, Inyo County, California, provide a ca. 31,450-yr record of vegetation change. Located ca. 7 km east of the Sierra Nevada, the middens document that Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma), Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia), and bitterbush (Purshia tridentata) occupied the site between 31,450 and 19,070 yr B.P. Joshua

Peter A. Koehler; R. Scott Anderson

1995-01-01

455

Developing GIS-based eastern equine encephalitis vector-host models in Tuskegee, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: A site near Tuskegee, Alabama was examined for vector-host activities of eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus (EEEV). Land cover maps of the study site were created in ArcInfo 9.2® from QuickBird data encompassing visible and near-infrared (NIR) band information (0.45 to 0.72 ?m) acquired July 15, 2008. Georeferenced mosquito and bird sampling sites, and their associated land cover attributes from

Benjamin G Jacob; Nathan D Burkett-Cadena; Jeffrey C Luvall; Sarah H Parcak; Christopher JW McClure; Laura K Estep; Geoffrey E Hill; Eddie W Cupp; Robert J Novak; Thomas R Unnasch

2010-01-01

456

Relationships between Economic Benefit and Sport-Fishing Effort on West Point Reservoir, Alabama-Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

A roving creel survey was used to collect information on county of origin and fishing-trip expenses for anglers visiting West Point Reservoir, Georgia-Alabama, during the first five fishing seasons after impoundment, February-October, 1976–1980. Use-prediction models were developed to explain variation in attendance of various user-segments (bank, boat, bass, and crappie anglers) from participating counties on the basis of county population

Roger C. Palm Jr; Stephen P. Malvestuto

1983-01-01

457

Assessment of water quality, benthic invertebrates, and periphyton in the Threemile Creek basin, Mobile, Alabama, 1999-2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 4-year investigation of water quality and aquatic-community structure in Threemile Creek, an urban stream that drains residential areas in Mobile, Alabama. Water-quality samples were collected between March 2000 and September 2003 at four sites on Threemile Creek, and between March 2000 and October 2001 at two tributary sites that drain heavily urbanized areas in the watershed. Stream samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, fecal-indicator bacteria, and selected organic wastewater compounds. Continuous measurements of dissolved-oxygen concentrations, water temperature, specific conductance, and turbidity were recorded at three sites on Threemile Creek during 1999?2003. Aquatic-community structure was evaluated by conducting one survey of the benthic invertebrate community and multiple surveys of the algal community (periphyton). Benthic invertebrate samples were collected in July 2000 at four sites on Threemile Creek; periphyton samples were collected at four sites on Threemile Creek and the two tributary sites during 2000 ?2003. The occurrence and distribution of chemical constituents in the water column provided an initial assessment of water quality in the streams; the structure of the benthic invertebrate and algal communities provided an indication of the cumulative effects of water quality on the aquatic biota. Information contained in this report can be used by planners and resource managers in the evaluation of proposed total maximum daily loads and other restoration efforts that may be implemented on Threemile Creek. The three most upstream sites on Threemile Creek had similar water chemistry, characterized by a strong calcium-bicarbonate component; the most downstream site on Threemile Creek was affected by tidal fluctuations and mixing from Mobile Bay and had a strong sodium-chloride component. The water chemistry at the tributary site on Center Street was characterized by a strong sodium-chloride component; the water chemistry at the second tributary site, Toulmins Spring Branch, was characterized by a strong calcium component without a dominant anionic species. The ratios of sodium to chloride at the tributary at Center Street were higher than typical values for seawater, indicating that sources other than seawater (such as leaking or overflowing sewer systems or industrial discharge) likely are contributors to the increased levels of sodium and chloride. Concentrations of fluoride and boron also were elevated at this site, indicating possible anthropogenic sources. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations were not always within levels established by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management; continuous monitors recorded dissolved-oxygen concentrations that were repeatedly less than the minimum criterion (3.0 milligrams per liter) at the most downstream site on Threemile Creek. Water temperature exceeded the recommended criterion (32.2 degrees Celsius) at five of six sites in the Threemile Creek basin. The pH values were within established criteria (6.0 ? 8.5) at sites on Threemile Creek; however, pH values ranged from 7.2 to 10.0 at the tributary at Center Street and from 6.6 to 9.9 at Toulmins Spring Branch. Nutrient concentrations in the Threemile Creek basin reflect the influences of both land use and the complex hydrologic systems in the lower part of the basin. Nitrite-plus-nitrate concentrations exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ecoregion nutrient criteria in 88 percent of the samples. In 45 percent of the samples, total phosphorus concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency goal of 0.1 milligram per liter for preventing nuisance aquatic growth. Ratios of nitrogen to phosphorus indicate that both nutrients have limiting effects. Median concentrations of enterococci and fecal coliform bacteria were highest at the two tributary sites and lowest at the most upstream site on Threemile Creek. In general, concentrations o

McPherson, Ann K.; Gill, Amy C.; Moreland, Richard S.

2005-01-01

458

Environmental control technology survey of selected US strip mining sites. Volume 2B. Alabama. Water quality impacts and overburden chemistry of Alabama study site  

SciTech Connect

As part of a program to examine the ability of existing control technologies to meet federal guidelines for the quality of aqueous effluents from coal mines, an intensive study of water, coal, and overburden chemistry was conducted at a surface coal mine in Alabama from May 1976 through July 1977. Sampling sites included the pit sump, a stream downgrade from the mine, the discharge from the water treatment facility, and a small stream outside the mine drainage. Water samples were collected every two weeks by Argonne subcontractors at the Alabama Geological Survey and analysed for the following parameters: specific conductance, pH, temperature, acidity, bicarbonate, carbonate, chloride, total dissolved solids, suspended solids, sulfate, and 20 metals. Analysis of the coal and overburden shows that no potential acid problem exists at this mine. Water quality is good in both streams sampled, and high levels of dissolved elements are found only in water collected from the pit sump. The mine effluent is in compliance with Office of Surface Mining water quality standards.

Henricks, J D; Bogner, J E; Olsen, R D; Schubert, J P; Sobek, A A; Johnson, D O

1980-05-01

459

Newcastle disease virus in double-crested cormorants in Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi.  

PubMed

In order to understand the epidemiology of Newcastle disease (ND) outbreaks in double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus), a study was conducted on wintering migratory cormorants (P. a. auritus) in Alabama and Mississippi (USA) and non-migratory cormorants (P. a. floridanus) that breed in Florida (USA). Antibodies against ND virus were detected by the hemagglutination-inhibition method in sera from 86 of 183 (47%) migratory cormorants over-wintering in eight roosting sites in Alabama and Mississippi between November, 1997 and April, 1999. Titers ranged from 5 to 40. Antibody prevalences in sera collected from females in early winter (November and December) (26%) and late winter (February and March) (56%) were significantly different (P = 0.0007). None of 45 serum samples from 1- to 7-wk-old nestlings from 11 colonies in Florida during the 1997-98 and 1998-99 breeding seasons was positive. However, antibodies were detected in yolk samples from 98 of 126 (78%) eggs collected in these same colonies. Titers ranged from 4 to 256. The prevalence of antibodies in eggs collected from fresh-water colonies (63% prevalence, n = 30) and salt-water colonies (82% prevalence, n = 96) was significantly different (P = 0.041). ND virus was not isolated from tissues of 18 cormorants and cloacal and tracheal swabs from 202 cormorants collected in Alabama and Mississippi; virus was also not isolated from cloacal and tracheal swabs from 51 nestlings from Florida. PMID:11763745

Farley, J M; Romero, C H; Spalding, M G; Avery, M L; Forrester, D J

2001-10-01

460

Reservoir heterogeneity in Carter Sandstone, North Blowhorn Creek oil unit and vicinity, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

This report presents accomplishments made in completing Task 3 of this project which involves development of criteria for recognizing reservoir heterogeneity in the Black Warrior basin. The report focuses on characterization of the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone reservoir in North Blowhorn Creek and adjacent oil units in Lamar County, Alabama. This oil unit has produced more than 60 percent of total oil extracted from the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The Carter sandstone in North Blowhorn Creek oil unit is typical of the most productive Carter oil reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report synthesizes data derived from geophysical well logs and cores from North Blowhorn Creek oil unit to develop a depositional model for the Carter sandstone reservoir. The second part of the report describes the detrital and diagenetic character of Carter sandstone utilizing data from petrographic and scanning electron microscopes and the electron microprobe. The third part synthesizes porosity and pore-throat-size-distribution data determined by high-pressure mercury porosimetry and commercial core analyses with results of the sedimentologic and petrographic studies. The final section of the report discusses reservoir heterogeneity within the context of the five-fold classification of Moore and Kugler (1990).

Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.

1992-05-01

461

Sequence stratigraphy of middle and upper Jurassic strata of Southwestern Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama differ from those of the western Gulf rim, showing: (1) profound influence of antecedent topography; (2) low early subsidence rates; and (3) greater clastic influx from adjacent uplands. Werner Anhydrite and Louann Salt represent the earliest marine incursion onto the Gulf rim following initial rifting; they onlap upper Paleozoic basement and garben-filling Eagle Mills red beds. Because basin-wide evaporative drawdowns overprint even higher order eustatic sea level changes, transgressive systems tracts (TST) and highstand systems tracts (HST) are indistinguishable. Anhydrite and shale caps accumulated via interstratal halite dissolution. Oxfordian Norphlet siliciclastics form a continental lowstand systems tract as illustrated by abrupt contact with underlying marine evaporites without intervening progradational marginal marine facies. Marine-reworked uppermost Norphlet sandstone marks the base of a subsequent TST, which includes overstepping lower Smackover lithofacies (laminated mudstone, algal-laminated mudstone, and pellet wackestone). The upper Smackover HST is characterized by formation of rimmed shelves upon which algal mounds and aggrading ooid grainstone parasequences accumulated. Shallow lagoonal carbonate and evaporite saltern deposition occurred behind ooid shoals; fine-grained siliciclastics accumulated in updip areas. Equivalents of Smackover A, Smackover B, Bossier, and Gilmer sequences are largely masked by influx of Haynesville and Cotton Valley continental clastics. Lack of biostratigraphic data, a consequence of restricted fauna, precludes useful age assignments for these sequences in Alabama. Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama are regionally atypical and cannot serve as a model for Gulf-wide sequences.

Wade, W.J.; Moore, C.H. Jr. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States))

1993-09-01

462

Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers List  

Cancer.gov

Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers List Map of Cancer Centers Center Addresses(text file) Cancer Center Profiles Benchmark Data Home > Cancer Centers > Region Map Cancer Centers List View By: Name | State | State

463

EASTERN SNOW CONFERENCE Huntsville, Ontario, Canada 2013  

E-print Network

The synoptic-scale influences on snowfall event characteristics (e.g., total snowfall, liquid equivalent contributed 30% of the total snowfall and 23% of the total liquid equivalent during the study period. New-scale influences on snowfall event characteristics (e.g., total snowfall, liquid equivalent, density, vertical

Yuter, Sandra

464

Characterization and geochemistry of Devonian oil shale North Alabama - South Central Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Based on the physical and chemical data obtained to date, the Devonian oil shale rock of north Alabama and south-central Tennessee appears to offer an attractive potential for future resource development. The shale rock appears to have formed in a restrictive marine environment which provided opportunity for the accumulation of marine organic matter to form sufficient kerogen. The shale contains approximately 18% to 22% organic matter which is primarily kerogen. The kerogen has a relatively high H:C ratio indicative of an alginite and/or exinite source (Type 1 and Type II kerogen) and a high proportion of alkane and saturated ring hydrocarbons. However, a few samples have low H:C ratio values and are interpreted to have been formed in a shallow water oxidizing environment. Also, there is a possibility that these low H:C values may represent mixtures of terrestrial and marine organic material suggesting lateral facies changes of the rock from marine to near shore depositional environments. Trace metal values for both the whole rock and the shale oil fraction indicate a generally high V:Ni ratio, also indicative of a marine environment. Other trace metal values are in good agreement with data from other Devonian shales. Throughout the north Alabama and south-central Tennessee study area, the average oil yield from the shale is 13.9 gallon per ton. The highest oil yield values were obtained from the middle and upper parts of the shale sequence. Based on the crude oil composition diagram (11), the Alabama-Tennessee shale oil is classified as a aromatic-intermediate oil Estimated reserves of inplace shale oil resources in the principal study area, under less than 200 feet of overburden, exceeds 12.5 billion barrels.

Rheams, K.F.; Neathery, T.L.

1984-01-01

465

Regional biostratigraphy and paleoenvironmental history of Miocene of onshore and offshore Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Subsurface Miocene sediments of coastal Alabama and the adjoining state and federal waters consist of a clastic wedge varying in thickness from less than 1,000 ft in southern Alabama to a maximum of about 6,000 ft in the northeastern portion of the Main Pass area. Relatively deep-water and open-marine transgressive basal Miocene clays and shales unconformably overlie a gently southwestward-dipping late Oligocene-earliest Miocene carbonate platform. Middle and late Miocene sediments consist of a regressive offlapping sequence of sand and shale deposited in varying neritic paleoenvironments. Analysis of planktonic and benthonic foraminifera has resulted in a refined biostratigraphic zonation of these sediments, permitting the recognition of several regional time-equivalent datum levels, or biohorizons. These biohorizons are shown on a series of subsurface cross sections that show the dramatic southwestward thickening of middle and late Miocene sediments as well as illustrate the relationships of the producing intervals within the Cibicides carstensi and Discorbis 12 interval zones. The paleoenvironmental history of the Miocene has been reconstructed on a series of paleobathymetric maps drawn for selected regional biohorizons. Among other features, these maps have proven the existence and outlined the margins of previously unrecognized shallow-meritic deltaic sediments in southeastern Mobile County and in the Chandeleur and Viosca Knoll (north) areas. Analysis of sedimentation rates, which range from less than 25 to 1,370 ft/m.y., further aids in understanding the coastal shelf, deltaic, and open-marine depositional history of the Miocene of Alabama and the adjoining state and federal waters.

Smith, C.C. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA))

1989-09-01

466

Simulation of Flood Profiles for Catoma Creek near Montgomery, Alabama, 2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A one-dimensional step-backwater model was used to simulate flooding conditions for Catoma Creek near Montgomery, Alabama. A peak flow of 50,000 cubic feet per second was computed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the March 1990 flood at the Norman Bridge Road gaging station. Using this estimated peak flow, flood-plain surveys with associated roughness coefficients, and surveyed high-water marks for the March 1990 flood, a flow model was calibrated to closely match the known event. The calibrated model then was used to simulate flooding for the 10-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year recurrence-interval floods. The 100-year flood stage for the Alabama River also was computed in the vicinity of the Catoma Creek confluence using observed high-water profiles from the 1979 and 1990 floods and gaging-station data. The results indicate that the 100-year flood profile for Catoma Creek within the 15-mile study reach is about 2.5 feet higher, on average, than the profile published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The maximum and minimum differences are 6.0 feet and 0.8 foot, respectively. All water-surface elevations computed for the 100-year flood are higher than those published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The 100-year flood stage computed for the Alabama River in the vicinity of the Catoma Creek confluence was about 4.5 feet lower than the elevation published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The results of this study provide the community with flood-profile information that can be used for flood-plain mitigation, future development, and safety plans for the city.

Lee, K. G.; Hedgecock, T. S.

2008-01-01

467

The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array: Recent Severe Storm Observations and Future Prospects  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array became operational in November 2001 as a principal component of a severe weather test bed to infuse new science and technology into the short-term forecasting of severe and hazardous weather, principally within nearby National Weather Service forecast offices. Since the installation of the LMA, it has measured the total lightning activity of a large number of severe weather events, including three supercell tornado outbreaks, two supercell hailstorm events, and numerous microburst-producing storms and ordinary non-severe thunderstorms. The key components of evolving storm morphology examined are the time rate-of-change (temporal trending) of storm convective and precipitation characteristics that can be diagnosed in real-time using NEXRAD WSR-88D Doppler radar (echo growth and decay, precipitation structures and velocity features, outflow boundaries), LMA (total lightning flash rate and its trend) and National Lightning Detection Network (cloud-to- ground lightning, its polarity and trends). For example, in a transitional season supercell tornado outbreak, peak total flash rates for typical supercells in Tennessee reached 70-100/min, and increases in the total flash rate occurred during storm intensification as much as 20-25 min prior to at least some of the tornadoes. The most intense total flash rate measured during this outbreak (over 800 flashes/min) occurred in a storm in Alabama. In the case of a severe summertime pulse thunderstorm in North Alabama, the peak total flash rate reached 300/min, with a strong increase in total lightning evident some 9 min before damaging winds were observed at the surface. In this paper we provide a sampling of LMA observations and products during severe weather events to illustrate the capability of the system, and discuss the prospects for improving the short-term forecasting of convective weather using total lightning data.

Goodman, S. J.; Blakeslee, R.; Christian, H.; Koshak, W.; Bailey, J.; Hall, J.; McCaul, E.; Buechler, D.; Darden, C.; Burks, J.

2004-01-01

468

Regimes contributory to progressive loss of Alabama coastal shoreline and wetlands  

SciTech Connect

Coastal survey data from the 1700s to the present indicate progressive loss of Alabama coastal shoreline and wetlands. Alabama coastal shoreline/wetland environments include those of bays, estuaries, Mississippi Sound, lagoons, lakes, fluvial deltas, and Gulf barrier. Areas showing the highest rates of loss include Mississippi Sound north shoreline and islands, Mobile Bay west shoreline, Gulf shoreline of Dauphin Island, and north shoreline of Morgan Peninsula. Other areas showing progressive substantial loss are Mobile Bay east shoreline, Perdido Bay, and Perdido estuary. The relationship between erosional loss and accretionary gain of Gulf barrier shoreline in Baldwin County (from Mobile Point to Alabama Point) is complex, but this shoreline appears to be generally stable with isolated short segments of erosional as well as accretionary beach. Negative economic results of shoreline/wetland loss include shoreline property devaluation, costs associated with erosion protection, and loss of wetlands supportive of fishery species reproduction. Accretionary gain of land areas appears to be negligible. Although no new wetlands appear to be developing along Mississippi Sound shoreline exposed to erosional affects of waves and currents, it is postulated that subsidence and drowning of terrane adjacent to Mississippi Sound is resulting in some new upland swamp and bayou areas. The balance between loss and gain of wetlands has not been estimated. General descriptions are given for the unique combinations of factors postulated as contributory to loss of specific shoreline/wetland. Primary factors associated with shoreline loss are wave, current, and tidal parameters, local subsidence, sea-level rise, position and character of natural barriers, position and nature of shoreline protection structures, anthropogenic effects, local bathymetry, shoreline orientation, local sediment budgets, and morphological and physical character of shoreline/wetland.

Smith, E. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA))

1990-09-01

469

Ancestry reported by white adults with cutaneous melanoma and control subjects in central Alabama  

PubMed Central

Background We sought to evaluate the hypothesis that the high incidence of cutaneous melanoma in white persons in central Alabama is associated with a predominance of Irish and Scots descent. Methods Frequencies of country of ancestry reports were tabulated. The reports were also converted to scores that reflect proportional countries of ancestry in individuals. Using the scores, we computed aggregate country of ancestry indices as estimates of group ancestry composition. HLA-DRB1*04 allele frequencies and relationships to countries of ancestry were compared in probands and controls. Results were compared to those of European populations with HLA-DRB1*04 frequencies. Results Ninety evaluable adult white cutaneous melanoma probands and 324 adult white controls reported countries of ancestry of their grandparents. The respective frequencies of Ireland, and Scotland and "British Isles" reported countries of ancestry were significantly greater in probands than in controls. The respective frequencies of Wales, France, Italy and Poland were significantly greater in controls. 16.7% of melanoma probands and 23.8% of controls reported "Native American" ancestry; the corresponding "Native American" country of ancestry index was not significantly different in probands and controls. The frequency of HLA-DRB1*04 was significantly greater in probands, but was not significantly associated with individual or aggregate countries of ancestry. The frequency of DRB1*04 observed in Alabama was compared to DRB1*04 frequencies reported from England, Wales, Ireland, Orkney Island, France, Germany, and Australia. Conclusion White adults with cutaneous melanoma in central Alabama have a predominance of Irish, Scots, and "British Isles" ancestry and HLA-DRB1*04 that likely contributes to their high incidence of cutaneous melanoma. PMID:15310399

Acton, Ronald T; Barton, Ellen H; Hollowell, William W; Dreibelbis, Amy L; Go, Rodney CP; Barton, James C

2004-01-01

470

Remote sensing of strippable coal reserves and mine inventory in part of the Warrior Coal Field in Alabama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Methods by which estimates of the remaining reserves of strippable coal in Alabama could be made were developed. Information acquired from NASA's Earth Resources Office was used to analyze and map existing surface mines in a four-quadrangle area in west central Alabama. Using this information and traditional methods for mapping coal reserves, an estimate of remaining strippable reserves was derived. Techniques for the computer analysis of remotely sensed data and other types of available coal data were developed to produce an estimate of strippable coal reserves for a second four-quadrangle area. Both areas lie in the Warrior coal field, the most prolific and active of Alabama's coal fields. They were chosen because of the amount and type of coal mining in the area, their location relative to urban areas, and the amount and availability of base data necessary for this type of study.

Joiner, T. J.; Copeland, C. W., Jr.; Russell, D. D.; Evans, F. E., Jr.; Sapp, C. D.; Boone, P. A.

1978-01-01

471

Analysis of Summer Thunderstorms in Central Alabama Using the NASA Land Information System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Forecasters have difficulty predicting "random" afternoon thunderstorms during the summer months. Differences in soil characteristics could be a contributing factor for storms. The NASA Land Information System (LIS) may assist forecasters in predicting summer convection by identifying boundaries in land characteristics. This project identified case dates during the summer of 2009 by analyzing synoptic weather maps, radar, and satellite data to look for weak atmospheric forcing and disorganized convective development. Boundaries in land characteristics that may have lead to convective initiation in central Alabama were then identified using LIS.

James, Robert; Case, Jonathan; Molthan, Andrew; Jedloved, Gary

2010-01-01

472

Benthic foraminiferal census data from Mobile Bay, Alabama--counts of surface samples and box cores  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study was undertaken in order to understand recent environmental change in Mobile Bay, Alabama. For this study a series of surface sediment and box core samples was collected. The surface benthic foraminiferal data provide the modern baseline conditions of the bay and can be used as a reference for changing paleoenvironmental parameters recorded in the box cores. The 14 sampling locations were chosen in the bay to cover the wide diversity of fluvial and marine-influenced environments on both sides of the shipping channel.

Richwine, Kathryn A.; Osterman, Lisa E.

2012-01-01

473

Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plan for the Alabama District of the U. S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, has a policy that requires each District office to prepare a Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plan. The plan for each District describes the policies and procedures that ensure high quality in the collection, processing, analysis, computer storage, and publication of surface-water data. The Alabama District Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the District for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of surface-water data.

Hedgecock, T. Scott; Pearman, J. Leroy; Stricklin, Victor E.

2002-01-01

474

Subaqueous evaporites of Buckner member, Haynesville Formation, northeastern Mobile County, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The lower part of the Buckner anhydrite member of the Haynesville Formation (Upper Jurassic) was deposited as shallowing upward cycles of subaqueous to subaerial deposits on the north flank of the Wiggins arch in northeastern Mobile County, Alabama. The unit studied conformably overlies the Smackover Formation and is generally evaporite dominated. The Buckner anhydrite averages about 35 m (115 ft) thick and has been buried to depths of 5.5 km (> 18,000 ft). Despite this deep burial, the unit has suffered little deformation since alteration of gypsum to anhydrite.

Mann, S.D.

1988-09-01

475

Interaction of Hyperthermal Atoms on Surfaces in Orbit: the University of Alabama Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The University of Alabama experiment which flew on the STS-8 mission had several objectives which were mostly of a speculative nature since so little was known of the processes of interest. The experiment provided original data on: (1) oxidation of metal surfaces; (2) reaction rates of atomic oxygen with carbon and other surfaces and the dependence of these rates on temperature; and (3) the angular distribution of 5 eV atoms scattered off a solid surface. A review of the results is provided.

Gregory, J. C.

1987-01-01

476

Depositional environments of the Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation of the Black Warrior Basin in Alabama comprises as much as 3000m of shale, sandstone and coal. The boundary between the informal units of the Lower Pottsville strata include orthoquartzitic sandstone, shale, and coal interpreted as having been deposited in a barrier/back-barrier setting. Upper Pottsville strata consist of lithic arenite, shale, coal, and minor amounts of orthoquartzite, and are interpreted as representing a lateral gradation from lower delta plain to barrier bar. The change in sedimentation patterns in the middle part of the Pottsville suggests introduction into the basin of sediments from an eastern source.-from Author

Horsey, C. A.

1981-01-01

477

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies Tasks 3 & 4 Report; Economic, Energy, and Environmental Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options in Select Alabama Markets: Preliminary Case Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report documents a set of case studies developed to estimate the cost of producing, storing, delivering, and dispensing hydrogen for light-duty vehicles for several scenarios involving metropolitan areas in Alabama. While the majority of the scenarios focused on centralized hydrogen production and pipeline delivery, alternative delivery modes were also examined. Although Alabama was used as the case study for

Fouad H. Fouad; Robert W. Peters; Virginia P. Sisiopiku; Sullivan Andrew J; Jerry Gillette; Amgad Elgowainy; Marianne Mintz

2007-01-01

478

Home area geology and Alabama earth science teachers: A resource to improve the understanding and use of the state's rocks to supplement textbook concepts in earth history  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies have suggested that teachers of earth science in Alabama secondary schools are undertrained in the content areas of the subject. A survey of academic training and certification of active earth science teachers (Hall, 1985) was replicated as part of a study of the current inservice needs of Alabama earth science teachers (Logue & Lacefield, 1995). Only one-third of

James Anderson Lacefield

1998-01-01

479

Evaluation of Skills Needed in College Education by Colleges of Agriculture Alumni from 1862 and 1890 Land Grant Universities in Alabama and Tennessee  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to examine college skills Alumni from 1862 and 1890 Land-Grant universities in Alabama and Tennessee rated as essential to acquire in their college education. The data are from a survey of colleges of agriculture alumni who graduated from six land-grant universities in Alabama and Tennessee. IBM SPSS Statistical…

Zekeri, Andrew A.; Baba, Pauline A.

2014-01-01

480

Nanotechnology Center for Learning and Teaching  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Nanotechnology Center for Learning and Teaching (NCLT) was conceived "to serve students, teachers, faculty, researchers, parents and professionals who are engaged in the learning, teaching, research & development of nanotechnology." On NCLT's well-designed homepage, visitors can take advantage of sections that include Higher Education, K-12 Teachers, and Events. In the Higher Education area, visitors can look through lesson plans, research posters, and seminars that deal with various aspects of nanotechnology research and development. The online lessons here are quite good and include subjects such as "Nanopatterning: The science of making things small from the top-down" and "Optical Tweezers." Visitors shouldn't miss the Featured News area which includes updates from the world of nanotechnology from the U.S. Army, Alabama A&M University, and other organizations. Finally, visitors can use the Community area to find out about resources developed by other partner institutions.

2012-07-13

481

Skills Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The services of the Living Skills Center for the Visually Handicapped, a habilitative service for blind young adults, are described. It is explained that the Center houses its participants in their own apartments in a large complex and has served over 70 young people in 4 years. The evaluation section describes such assessment instruments as an…

Canter, Patricia; And Others

482

Assessing needs and resources for the home visiting system in Alabama: a mixed methods approach.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to describe the initial assessment for the development of a home visiting (HV) system in a state with no existing system. We outline a mixed methods process where the quantitative component was used to identify the communities that possess "at-risk" profiles, and the qualitative component explored the resources and gaps in existing HV services. We employed a mixed methods approach, using six categories of indicators from quantitative secondary data sources to identify "at-risk" profiles for Alabama's 67 counties. A weighted score for each indicator was calculated and counties were ranked. Surveys and focus groups were conducted to further define resources and gaps of existing HV programs. The composite indicator scores identified 13 counties as having the highest level of risk. Five of these 13 communities had no HV home visitation services. Areas of focus for future HV system development include trust, communication, availability, cost, and timeliness. In this assessment related to the Alabama HV system, we used quantitative data to apply criteria to the indicators being measured and qualitative data to supplement the quantitative findings. We examined resources, gaps, program quality, and capacity of the existing HV programs in order to assist in the future development of the HV system and early childhood system. The methods presented in this paper have potential applications beyond HV programs and systems, including broader examinations of complex systems for service provision to the maternal and child health populations. PMID:23922159

Wingate, Martha S; Fifolt, Matthew; Preskitt, Julie; Mulvihill, Beverly; Pass, Mary Ann; Wallace, Lauren; Sims, Dianne; McKim, Susan

2014-07-01

483

Lightning Behavior and its Dependence on Storm Kinematic and Precipitation Processes in Northern Alabama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Numerous case studies and recent modeling studies have found that various metrics of updraft intensity appear to be reasonably well correlated to lightning production in thunderstorms, particularly severe thunderstorms. Indeed, the relationship between updraft and lightning flash rate is hypothesized to be the physical connection between a lightning "jump" signature and manifestations of severe weather such as tornadic activity. This study further examines this connection using a combination of dual Doppler wind retrievals made with the UAH ARMOR dual polarimetric and KHTX WSR 88D Doppler radar pair, together with northern Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data. The dual Doppler data were used to construct three dimensional wind fields and the retrieved vertical velocity fields were subsequently compared to collocated total lightning flash rates observed by the LMA. Particular attention was paid to the timing of updraft pulses relative to changes in the flash rate, with the goal of assessing impacts on warning decision lead time. Results from the analysis of severe and non severe thunderstorms in Northern Alabama will be presented including the EF 4 tornado producing supercell on 6 February 2008.

Johnson, Elsie V.; Petersen, W. A,

2009-01-01

484

Three new percid fishes (Percidae: Percina) from the Mobile Basin drainage of Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Three new species of Percina are described from upland drainages of the Mobile Basin. Two of the three species are narrowly distributed: P. kusha, the Bridled Darter, is currently known only from the Conasauga River drainage in Georgia and Tennessee and Etowah River drainage in Georgia, both tributaries of the Coosa River, and P. sipsi, the Bankhead Darter, which is restricted to tributaries of Sipsey Fork of the Black Warrior River in northwestern Alabama. The third species, P. smithvanizi, the Muscadine Darter, occurs above the Fall Line in the Tallapoosa River drainage in eastern Alabama and western Georgia. In a molecular analysis using mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence data, P. kusha and P. smithvanizi were recovered as sister species, while Percina sipsi was recovered in a clade consisting of P. aurolineata (P. sciera + P. sipsi). Two of the three species, P. kusha and P. sipsi, are considered to be imperiled species and are in need of conservation actions to prevent their extinction. Description of these three darters increases the number of described species of Percina to 44. Sixteen are known to occur in the Mobile Basin, including nine that are endemic. Copyright ?? 2007 Magnolia Press.

Williams, J.D.; Neely, D.A.; Walsh, S.J.; Burkhead, N.M.

2007-01-01

485

Nutrient mass balance and trends, Mobile River Basin, Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A nutrient mass balance - accounting for nutrient inputs from atmospheric deposition, fertilizer, crop nitrogen fixation, and point source effluents; and nutrient outputs, including crop harvest and storage - was calculated for 18 subbasins in the Mobile River Basin, and trends (1970 to 1997) were evaluated as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Agricultural nonpoint nitrogen and phosphorus sources and urban nonpoint nitrogen sources are the most important factors associated with nutrients in this system. More than 30 percent of nitrogen yield in two basins and phosphorus yield in eight basins can be attributed to urban point source nutrient inputs. The total nitrogen yield (1.3 tons per square mile per year) for the Tombigbee River, which drains a greater percentage of agricultural (row crop) land use, was larger than the total nitrogen yield (0.99 tons per square mile per year) for the Alabama River. Decreasing trends of total nitrogen concentrations in the Tombigbee and Alabama Rivers indicate that a reduction occurred from 1975 to 1997 in the nitrogen contributions to Mobile Bay from the Mobile River. Nitrogen concentrations also decreased (1980 to 1995) in the Black Warrior River, one of the major tributaries to the Tombigbee River. Total phosphorus concentrations increased from 1970 to 1996 at three urban influenced sites on the Etowah River in Georgia. Multiple regression analysis indicates a distinct association between water quality in the streams of the Mobile River drainage basin and agricultural activities in the basin.

Harned, D.A.; Atkins, J.B.; Harvill, J.S.

2004-01-01

486

Radioisotopic data of sediment collected in Mobile and Bon Secour Bays, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The focus of this study was to determine the extent of natural and (or) anthropogenic impacts on the sedimentary records of Mobile and Bon Secour Bays, Alabama during the last 150 years. These bays are unique in that anthropogenic activities are generally widespread and span both the eastern and western shorelines. However, there is a clear distinction in the types of human development and infrastructure between the western and eastern shorelines. These activities and the differences in land-use and -change influence the overall supply and remobilization of sediment to and within the bay. These factors could subsequently threaten the health and integrity of these environments and their ability to mitigate against long-term processes associated with climate change. In an attempt to characterize long-term accretion rates within the Mobile Bay Estuarine System (MBES), seven box cores were collected and analyzed for excess lead-210 (210Pbxs, the difference between total and supported 210Pb) and cesium-137 (137Cs) activities. The MBES receives sediment and water from the Alabama and Tombigbee River watersheds, which converge into the Mobile-Tensaw River (MTR) system just prior to discharging into Mobile Bay. Riverine discharge from the MTR system to the bay is second only to the Mississippi River discharge to the Gulf of Mexico for the conterminous United States.

Marot, Marci E.; Smith, Christopher G.

2012-01-01

487

HIV risk and healthcare attitudes among detained adolescents in rural Alabama.  

PubMed

This qualitative study explored the dynamics of adolescent HIV risk through focus group interviews of male and female adolescents at an Alabama juvenile detention facility, key informant interviews, and through interviews of HIV-positive and -negative adults in institutional settings and public health clinics in Alabama. The interviews revealed that commodified or unprotected sex with multiple partners was a common risk activity for male and female adolescents, with a related high risk of sexually transmitted disease. The adolescents were aversive to condom use and lacked knowledge of the dynamics of HIV transmission. Bisexually behaving males who engaged in same-sex prostitution for money or drugs viewed female partners as the source of HIV infection. Illicit drug activity and risky sexual behavior were highly related to economic and status anxiety. Experiences of healthcare were often coercive or were undermined by negative perceptions of health professionals. These negative perceptions and avoidance or lack of access to healthcare compounded the already high risk of sexually transmitted disease for this group of adolescents. PMID:10763540

Lichtenstein, B

2000-03-01

488

The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array: Recent Results and Future Prospects  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array became operational in November 2001 as a principal component of a severe weather test bed to infuse new science and technologies into the short-term forecasting of severe and hazardous weather and the warning decision-making process. The LMA project is a collaboration among NASA scientists, National Weather Service (NWS) weather forecast offices (WFOs), emergency managers, and other partners. The time rate-of-change of storm characteristics and life-cycle trending are accomplished in real-time through the second generation Lightning Imaging Sensor Data Applications Display (LISDAD II) system, initially developed in T997 through a collaboration among NASA/MSFC, MIT/Lincoln Lab and the Melbourne, FL WFO. LISDAD II is now a distributed decision support system with a JAVA-based display application that allows anyone, anywhere to track individual storm histories within the Tennessee Valley region of the southeastern U.S. Since the inauguration of the LMA there has been an abundance of severe weather. During 23-24 November 2001, a major tornado outbreak was monitored by LMA in its first data acquisition effort (36 tornadoes in Alabama). Since that time the LMA has collected a vast amount of data on hailstorms and damaging wind events, non-tornadic supercells, and ordinary non-severe thunderstorms. In this paper we provide an overview of LMA observations and discuss future prospects for improving the short-term forecasting of convective weather.

Goodman, S. J.; Blakeslee, R.; Christian, H.; Boccippio, D.; Koshak, W.; Bailey, J.; Hall, J.; Bateman, M.; McCaul, E.; Buechler, D.

2002-01-01

489

Nutrient Mass Balance and Trends, Mobile River Basin, Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A nutrient mass balance -- accounting for nutrient inputs from atmospheric deposition, fertilizer, crop nitrogen fixation, and point source effluents; and nutrient outputs, including crop harvest and storage -- was calculated for 18 subbasins in the Mobile River Basin, and trends (1970 to 1997) were evaluated as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Agricultural nonpoint nitrogen and phosphorus sources and urban nonpoint nitrogen sources are the most important factors associated with nutrients in this system. More than 30 percent of nitrogen yield in two basins and phosphorus yield in eight basins can be attributed to urban point source nutrient inputs. The total nitrogen yield (1.3 tons per square mile per year) for the Tombigbee River, which drains a greater percentage of agricultural (row crop) land use, was larger than the total nitrogen yield (0.99 tons per square mile per year) for the Alabama River. Decreasing trends of total nitrogen concentrations in the Tombigbee and Alabama Rivers indicate that a reduction occurred from 1975 to 1997 in the nitrogen contributions to Mobile Bay from the Mobile River. Nitrogen concentrations also decreased (1980 to 1995) in the Black Warrior River, one of the major tributaries to the Tombigbee River. Total phosphorus concentrations increased from 1970 to 1996 at three urban influenced sites on the Etowah River in Georgia. Multiple regression analysis indicates a distinct association between water quality in the streams of the Mobile River drainage basin and agricultural activities in the basin.

Harned, Douglas A.; Atkins, J. Brian; Harvill, John S.

2004-06-01

490

New geological studies of the most southern part of the Brevard zone, Alabama: Tectonic implications  

SciTech Connect

Mapping in east-central Alabama documents connection of Brevard zone lithologies (i.e., Jacksons Gap Group) with rocks of the Opelika Complex (previously assigned to the Inner Piedmont) through the hinge zone of the Tallassee synform, requiring a re-evaluation of the structural configuration of the southern end of the Brevard zone. Distinctive quartzite marker units of the Opelika Complex (Saugahatchee Quartzite) on the east limb of the synform have been mapped westward into quartzites previously assigned to the Jacksons Gap Group (Tallassee or Devils Backbone) along the west limb. The quartzites occur together with structurally interleaved garnet-kyanite schist, graphite schist, and felsic gneiss. This lithologic package is bounded above by the Ropes Creek Amphibolite of the Inner Piedmont's Dadeville Complex but below gives way to Eastern Blue Ridge units. Retrogressive, greenschist-facies, right-slip mylonite zones that characterize the Brevard zone along much of its trace north of this area do not accompany the Jacksons Gap/Opelika Complex lithologies eastward through the Tallassee synform hinge zone. Higher-temperature, amphibolite-facies metamorphic and annealed mylonitic fabrics characterize these units in the hinge zone and the eastern limb. The otherwise linear, retrogressive Brevard structural zone therefore does not simply bend south near Jacksons Gap, Alabama, as was previously thought, but rather diverges from the Jacksons Gap Group lithologies and continues southwestward through several narrow right-slip splays which appear to merge with the Alexander City fault.

Grimes, J.E.; Steltenpohl, M.G.; Keefer, W.D.; Cook, R.B. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1993-03-01

491

Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers List  

Cancer.gov

 Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers List Map of Cancer Centers Data Tables Benchmark Home > Cancer Centers > Region Map Cancer Centers List View By: Name | State | State Map | Region Map Click on geographical

492

Alabama Disasters: Leveraging NASA EOS to Explore the Environmental and Economic Impact of the April 27 Tornado Outbreak.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The disastrous tornado outbreak in Alabama on April 27, 2011 greatly impacted the economy of the state. On record, the tornado outbreak was the second deadliest tornado outbreak in U.S. When considering the agricultural and value-added activities such as ...

B. Barrick, C. Herdy, J. Brenton, J. Luvall, K. Cooksey, S. Padgett-Vasquez

2012-01-01

493

Reducing Tick-Borne Disease in Alabama: Linking Health Risk Perception with Spatial Analysis Using the NASA Earth Observing System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Lyme disease (LD) accounts for most vector-borne disease reports in the U.S., and although its existence in Alabama remains controversial, other tick-borne illnesses (TBI) such as Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness (STARI) pose a health concern in the ...

E. Capilouto, J. Harden, M. Tipre, N. Renneboog, R. Hyden, S. Firsing, S. Hemmings, Y. Zhang

2010-01-01

494

Pseudorhombodinium lisbonense gen. et sp. nov., a new dinoflagellate fossil from the Lisbon formation (middle Eocene), Little Stave Creek, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Specimens of Pseudorhombodinium lisbonense gen. et sp. nov., the type species of the new fossil dinoflagellate genus Pseudorhombodinium gen. nov., were recovered from an outcrop of the lower part of the Lisbon Formation (middle Eocene) in Little Stave Creek, Clarke County, Alabama. The sample containing P. lisbonense gen. et sp. nov. is a calcareous glauconitic sand bed located approximately 104

John H. Wrenn

1996-01-01

495

Unethical Leadership in Higher Education and the Precarious Journey to Recovery: A Case Study of the Alabama Community College System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent events of the Alabama Community College System are examined as an historical organizational case study. Critical events are noted along with associated professional literature related to those events and actions. While the study attempts to explain the organizational culture that allowed the rise of unethical leadership, the primary focus…

Kelly, Donald L.

2009-01-01

496

An evaluation of cassava, sweet potato and field corn as potential carbohydrate sources for bioethanol production in Alabama and Maryland  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent emphasis on corn production to meet the increasing demand for bioethanol has resulted in trepidation regarding the sustainability of the global food supply. To assess the potential of alternative crops as sources of bioethanol production, we grew sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and cassava (Manihot esculentum) at locations near Auburn, Alabama and Beltsville, Maryland in order to measure root

Lewis H. Ziska; G. Brett Runion; Martha Tomecek; Stephen A. Prior; H. Allen Torbet; Richard Sicher

2009-01-01

497

Angling vulnerability of black crappies, white crappies, and their naturally produced hybrid in Weiss Reservoir, Alabama, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined differences in angling vulnerability among black crappies Pomoxis nigromaculatus, white crappies Pomoxis annularis, and their naturally produced hybrid offspring in Weiss Reservoir, Alabama, USA, during spring and fall of 1992 and 1993. Proportions of crappie phenotypes (determined by starch-gel electrophoresis) in the reservoir were estimated from trapnet and electrofishing collections. We collected angled crappies from local resort owners

Vincent H. Travnichek; Michael J. Maceina; Rex A. Dunham

1997-01-01

498

Socio-political structure and concerns of offshore charter and party boat operators in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas  

E-print Network

In the summer of 1998, 117 person to person interviews were conducted from a random sample of charter boats and from an entire population of party boats operating in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. Due to the single ownership of multiple...

Norris-Raynbird, Carla

2012-06-07

499

Comparing Children's Fears in Alabama: An Investigation Using Post-9/11 and Post-Invasion of Iraq Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to investigate the fears of children and adolescents in Alabama in the aftermath of 9/11 and after the initial invasion of Iraq in 2003. The American Fear Survey Schedule for Children (FSSC-AM; Burnham, 1995, 2005) was utilized to measure the fears of youth in Grades 2-12. (Contains 4 tables.)

Burnham, Joy J.

2006-01-01

500

Teacher and Student Perceived Reasons for Dropping out of High School in an Urban Alabama City between 2004-2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study was to explore the lived experiences of African American urban high school students that dropped out of school in an urban Alabama city and their teachers that taught the students between 2004 and 2008. In addition, the purpose of this study focused on the dropout phenomenon by interviewing students and their former…

Collins, Jerry D.

2010-01-01