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Sample records for center mskcc experience

  1. Options for Breast Reconstruction after Mastectomy for Carcinoma of the Breast: An Observational Experience at MSKCC, New York under UICC Fellowship.

    PubMed

    Das, Prafulla Kumar; Cordeiro, Peter G

    2015-12-01

    The first Author went to visit The Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), New York, USA on UICC ICRETT Fellowship to observe as many clinical situations of options of breast reconstruction after mastectomy for carcinoma breast during a period of 1 month in June 2014. The second Author was the Supervisor for such clinical observation at the Plastic and Reconstructive Service, Department of Surgery at MSKCC. The main objective of this project was to gain a deeper understanding of the various options for reconstruction and specific operative skills and techniques needed for reconstruction after surgical resections for breast carcinoma. The gained experience would benefit our Regional Cancer Center's physicians, patients, and families. All patients treated by the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) who underwent surgical resection and reconstruction of their breast mounds were observed during the period between June 1, 2014 and June 30, 2014. It was observed that a vast majority of patients who underwent a mastectomy at MSKCC were offered primary breast reconstruction. They underwent thorough counseling and teaching about the various options, and feasibility with regard to their specific case. Patients eventually made the final choice on type of reconstruction, type of implant, and type of nipple/areola reconstruction. A majority of patients underwent implant reconstruction at MSKCC. This was partly related to the high rate of bilateral mastectomies (close to 50 %) as well as a significant rate of post mastectomy radiation (15 to 20 %). PMID:27065656

  2. Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Inoperable Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sura, Sonal; Gupta, Vishal; Yorke, Ellen; Jackson, Andrew; Amols, Howard; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an advanced treatment delivery technique that can improve the therapeutic dose ratio. Its use in the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been well studied. This report reviews our experience with IMRT for patients with inoperable NSCLC. Methods and Materials We performed a retrospective review of fifty-five patients with stage I–IIIB inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT at our institution between 2001–2005. The study endpoints were toxicity, local control, and overall survival. Results With a median follow-up of 26 months, the 2-year local control and overall survival rates for stage I/II patients were 50% and 55% respectively. For the stage III patients, 2-year local control and overall survival rates were 58% and 58% respectively with median survival time of 25 months. Six patients (11%) experienced grade 3 acute pulmonary toxicity. There were no acute treatment-related deaths. Two patients (4%) had grade 3 or worse late treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Conclusions IMRT treatment resulted in promising outcomes for inoperable NSCLC patients. PMID:18343515

  3. Contemporary Management of Penile Cancer: Greater than 15-Year MSKCC Experience

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Kelvin A.; Winer, Andrew; Sfakianos, John P.; Poon, Stephen A.; Kent, Matthew; Bernstein, Melanie; Russo, Paul; Dalbagni, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Penile cancer is a rare malignancy, and few guidelines are available to define treatment paradigms. For greater understanding of the natural history of surgically treated penile cancer, we analyzed experience at our institution. Materials and Methods Using an institutional database, we identified 127 patients treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the penis from 1995 – 2011. Cancer-specific survival (CSS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Survival data were compared using the log-rank test. The difference in risk of cancer-specific death by lymph node status and histological grade was determined by univariate Cox regression analysis. Results Five-year CSS for pTis, pT1, pT2, and pT3/4 was 100%, 84% (95% CI 58%-95%), 54% (95% CI 33%-71%), and 54% (95% CI 25%-76%), respectively (P ≤ .005). Three-year CSS for patients with N0, N+, and Nx disease was 90% (95% CI 47%-99%), 65% (95% CI 47%-79%), and 86% (95% CI 73%-93%), respectively (P = .03). The receipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy did not change per 5 year period over the 16 years of our study. Median follow-up was 2.8 years. Conclusions Penile cancer patients with advanced disease had poor survival. Tumor stage and nodal status were significant predictors of CSS. Penis-sparing approaches may be considered for most patients; however, pathological stage and grade dictate the management and ultimate outcome. Further studies are necessary to clarify the benefits of chemotherapy in this disease. PMID:24775572

  4. Treatment of nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer with modern radiotherapy techniques in the postoperative setting-the MSKCC experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Stegman, Lauren D.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Patel, Snehal G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Lee, Nancy Y. . E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective analysis of patients with paranasal sinus (PNS) cancer treated with postoperative radiotherapy (RT) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: Between January 1987 and July 2005, 85 patients with PNS and nasal cavity cancer underwent postoperative RT. Most patients had squamous cell carcinoma (49%; n = 42), T4 tumors (52%; n = 36), and the maxillary sinus (53%; n = 45) as the primary disease site. The median radiation dose was 63 Gy. Of the 85 patients, 76 underwent CT simulation and 53 were treated with either three-dimensional conformal RT (27%; n = 23) or intensity-modulated RT (35%; n = 30). Acute and late toxicities were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Results: With a median follow-up for surviving patients of 60 months, the 5-year estimates of local progression-free, regional progression-free, distant metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival rates were 62%, 87%, 82%, 55%, and 67%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, squamous cell histology and cribriform plate involvement predicted for an increased likelihood of local recurrence, and squamous cell histologic features predicted for worse overall survival. None of the patients who underwent CT simulation and were treated with modern techniques developed a Grade 3-4 late complication of the eye. Conclusion: Complete surgical resection followed by adjuvant RT is an effective and safe approach in the treatment of PNS cancer. Emerging tools, such as three-dimensional conformal treatment and, in particular, intensity-modulated RT for PNS tumors, may minimize the occurrence of late complications associated with conventional RT techniques. Local recurrence remains a significant problem.

  5. A Personal Reflection on the History of Radiation Oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Florence C.H.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To provide a historical and personal narrative of the development of radiation oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), from its founding more than 100 years ago to the present day. Methods and Materials: Historical sources include the Archives of MSKCC, publications by members of MSKCC, the author's personal records and recollections, and her communications with former colleagues, particularly Dr. Basil Hilaris, Dr. Zvi Fuks, and Dr. Beryl McCormick. Conclusions: The author, who spent 38 years at MSKCC, presents the challenges and triumphs of MSKCC's Radiation Oncology Department and details MSKCC's breakthroughs in radiation oncology. She also describes MSKCC's involvement in the founding of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.

  6. Chemical & RNAi screening at MSKCC: a collaborative platform to discover & repurpose drugs to fight disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Bhavneet; Antczak, Christophe; Shum, David; Radu, Constantin; Mahida, Jeni P.; Liu-Sullivan, Nancy; Ibáñez, Glorymar; Raja, Balajee Somalinga; Calder, Paul A.; Djaballah, Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) has implemented the creation of a full service state-of-the-art High-throughput Screening Core Facility (HTSCF) equipped with modern robotics and custom-built screening data management resources to rapidly store and query chemical and RNAi screening data outputs. The mission of the facility is to provide oncology clinicians and researchers alike with access to cost-effective HTS solutions for both chemical and RNAi screening, with an ultimate goal of novel target identification and drug discovery. HTSCF was established in 2003 to support the institution’s commitment to growth in molecular pharmacology and in the realm of therapeutic agents to fight chronic diseases such as cancer. This endeavor required broad range of expertise in technology development to establish robust and innovative assays, large collections of diverse chemical and RNAi duplexes to probe specific cellular events, sophisticated compound and data handling capabilities, and a profound knowledge in assay development, hit validation, and characterization. Our goal has been to strive for constant innovation, and we strongly believe in shifting the paradigm from traditional drug discovery towards translational research now, making allowance for unmet clinical needs in patients. Our efforts towards repurposing FDA-approved drugs fructified when digoxin, identified through primary HTS, was administered in the clinic for treatment of stage Vb retinoblastoma. In summary, the overall aim of our facility is to identify novel chemical probes, to study cellular processes relevant to investigator’s research interest in chemical biology and functional genomics, and to be instrumental in accelerating the process of drug discovery in academia. PMID:24661215

  7. Advanced Unilateral Retinoblastoma: The Impact of Ophthalmic Artery Chemosurgery on Enucleation Rate and Patient Survival at MSKCC

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, David H.; Fabius, Armida W. M.; Issa, Reda; Francis, Jasmine H.; Marr, Brian P.; Dunkel, Ira J.; Gobin, Y. Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report on the influence of ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) on enucleation rates, ocular and patient survival from metastasis and impact on practice patterns at Memorial Sloan Kettering for children with advanced intraocular unilateral retinoblastoma. Patients and Methods Single-center retrospective review of all unilateral retinoblastoma patients with advanced intraocular retinoblastoma treated at MSKCC between our introduction of OAC (May 2006) and December 2014. End points were ocular survival, patient survival from metastases and enucleation rates. Results 156 eyes of 156 retinoblastoma patients were included. Primary enucleation rates have progressively decreased from a rate of >95% before OAC to 66.7% in the first year of OAC use to the present rate of 7.4%. The percent of patients receiving OAC has progressively increased from 33.3% in 2006 to 92.6% in 2014. Overall, ocular survival was significantly better in eyes treated with OAC in the years 2010–2014 compared to 2006–2009 (p = 0.023, 92.7% vs 68.0% ocular survival at 48 months). There have been no metastatic deaths in the OAC group but two patients treated with primary enucleation have died of metastatic disease. Conclusion OAC was introduced in 2006 and its impact on patient management is profound. Enucleation rates have decreased from over 95% to less than 10%. Our ocular survival rate has also significantly and progressively improved since May 2006. Despite treating more advanced eyes rather then enucleating them patient survival has not been compromised (there have been no metastatic deaths in the OAC group). In our institution, enucleation is no longer the most common treatment for advanced unilateral retinoblastoma. PMID:26709699

  8. Patient Experience in Health Center Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Cook, Nicole; Hollar, Lucas; Isaac, Emmanuel; Paul, Ludmilla; Amofah, Anthony; Shi, Leiyu

    2015-12-01

    The Human Resource and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care Health Center program was developed to provide comprehensive, community-based quality primary care services, with an emphasis on meeting the needs of medically underserved populations. Health Centers have been leaders in adopting innovative approaches to improve quality care delivery, including the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model. Engaging patients through patient experience assessment is an important component of PCMH evaluation and a vital activity that can help drive patient-centered quality improvement initiatives. A total of 488 patients from five Health Center PCMHs in south Florida were surveyed in order to improve understanding of patient experience in Health Center PCMHs and to identify quality improvement opportunities. Overall patients reported very positive experience with patient-centeredness including being treated with courtesy and respect (85 % responded "always") and communication with their provider in a way that was easy to understand (87.7 % responded "always"). Opportunities for improvement included patient goal setting, referrals for patients with health conditions to workshops or educational programs, contact with the Health Center via phone and appointment availability. After adjusting for patient characteristics, results suggest that some patient experience components may be modified by educational attainment, years of care and race/ethnicity of patients. Findings are useful for informing quality improvement initiatives that, in conjunction with other patient engagement strategies, support Health Centers' ongoing transformation as PCMHs. PMID:26026275

  9. Intermediate load-center photovoltaic application experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    A total of nine intermediate load-center photovoltaic systems were carried into the construction phase this year. These nine systems range in size from 20 to 225 kW/sub p/ electrical output and total almost 1 MW/sub p/. They are being installed in a diverse set of applications and locations and represent the bulk of the photovoltaic initial system evaluation experiments (ISEE) for the intermediate load-center sector. Each of these experiments are briefly described and the status of the construction phase is given for each project.

  10. NASA Lewis Research Center photovoltaic application experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratajczak, A.; Bifano, W.; Martz, J.; Odonnell, P.

    1978-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has installed 16 geographically dispersed terrestrial photovoltaic systems as part of the DOE National Photovoltaic Program. Four additional experiments are in progress. Currently, operating systems are powering refrigerators, a highway warning sign, forest lookout towers, remote weather stations, a water chiller and insect survey traps. Experiments in progress include the world's first village power system, an air pollution monitor and seismic sensors. Under a separate activity, funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, a PV-powered water pump and grain grinder is being prepared for an African village. System descriptions and status are included in this report.

  11. NASA Lewis Research Center combustion MHD experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The MHD power generation experiments were conducted in a high field strength cryomagnet which was adapted from an existing facility. In its original construction, it consisted of 12 high purity aluminum coils pool cooled in a bath of liquid neon. In this configuration, a peak field of 15 tesla was produced. For the present experiments, the center four coils were removed and a 23 cm diameter transverse warm bore tube was inserted to allow the placement of the MHD experiment between the remaining eight coils. In this configuration, a peak field of 6 tesla should be obtainable. The time duration of the experiment is limited by the neon supply which allows on the order of 1 minute of total operating time followed by an 18-hour reliquefaction period. As a result, the experiments are run in a pulsed mode. The run duration for the data presented here was 5 sec. The magnetic field profile along the MHD duct is shown. Since the working fluid is in essence superheated steam, it is easily water quenched at the exit of the diffuser and the components are designed vacuum tight so that the exhaust pipe and demister an be pumped down to simulate the vacuum of outer space.

  12. The Deep Impact Network Experiment Operations Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgerson, J. Leigh; Clare, Loren; Wang, Shin-Ywan

    2009-01-01

    Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) promises solutions in solving space communications challenges arising from disconnections as orbiters lose line-of-sight with landers, long propagation delays over interplanetary links, and other phenomena. DTN has been identified as the basis for the future NASA space communications network backbone, and international standardization is progressing through both the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) and the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). JPL has developed an implementation of the DTN architecture, called the Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION). ION is specifically implemented for space use, including design for use in a real-time operating system environment and high processing efficiency. In order to raise the Technology Readiness Level of ION, the first deep space flight demonstration of DTN is underway, using the Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft. Called the Deep Impact Network (DINET), operations are planned for Fall 2008. An essential component of the DINET project is the Experiment Operations Center (EOC), which will generate and receive the test communications traffic as well as "out-of-DTN band" command and control of the DTN experiment, store DTN flight test information in a database, provide display systems for monitoring DTN operations status and statistics (e.g., bundle throughput), and support query and analyses of the data collected. This paper describes the DINET EOC and its value in the DTN flight experiment and potential for further DTN testing.

  13. Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers in hairy cell leukaemia: a Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results population analysis and the 30-year experience at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Watts, Justin M; Kishtagari, Ashwin; Hsu, Meier; Lacouture, Mario E; Postow, Michael A; Park, Jae H; Stein, Eytan M; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Devlin, Sean M; Tallman, Martin S

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have examined melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) incidence rates after a diagnosis of hairy cell leukaemia (HCL). We assessed 267 HCL patients treated at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) and Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data for melanoma and NMSC incidence rates after HCL. Incidence data from MSKCC patients demonstrated a 10-year combined melanoma and NMSC skin cancer rate of 11·3%, melanoma 4·4% and NMSC 6·9%. Molecular analysis of skin cancers from MSKCC patients revealed activating RAS mutations in 3/9 patients, including one patient with melanoma. Of 4750 SEER patients with HCL, 55 (1·2%) had a subsequent diagnosis of melanoma. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) did not show that melanoma was more common in HCL patients versus the general population (SIR 1·3, 95% CI 0·78-2·03). Analysis of SEER HCL patients diagnosed before and after 1990 (approximately before and after purine analogue therapy was introduced) showed no evidence of an increased incidence after 1990. A better understanding of any potential association between HCL and skin cancer is highly relevant given ongoing trials using BRAF inhibitors, such as vemurafenib, for relapsed HCL, as RAS-mutant skin cancers could be paradoxically activated in these patients. PMID:26115047

  14. Implementing Teacher Education Centers: The Florida Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Fleet, Alanson A.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This monograph is an historical document portraying the problems of starting Florida's first ten teacher education centers (1974-75). Its aim is to provide information to individuals and groups considering active participation in teacher education centers. The document is organized as four sections followed by a bibliography and appendix. The…

  15. Increasing Counseling Center Utilization: Yeshiva University's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Victor; Nissel, Chaim; Eisenberg, Daniel; Kay, Jerald; Brown, Joshua T.

    2012-01-01

    Yeshiva University established a counseling center during the 2004-2005 academic year. As a religiously based institution, the administration recognized that there would likely be significant impediments to utilization of on-campus mental health services as a result of negative attitudes about mental illness and its treatment--stigma. To combat…

  16. Pregnancy during hemodialysis: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Bahadi, Abdelali; El Kabbaj, Driss; Guelzim, Khalid; Kouach, Jaouad; Hassani, Mohammed; Maoujoud, Omar; Aattif, Mohammed; Kadiri, Mouncif; Montassir, Dina; Zajjari, Yassir; Alayoud, Ahmed; Benyahia, Mohammed; Elallam, Mostapha; Oualim, Zouhir

    2010-07-01

    Successful pregnancy outcome is an uncommon occurrence in women requiring chronic dialysis treatment. We reviewed the course and outcome of 9 pregnancies occurred in women on chronic hemodialysis in our center from 1999-2007; 5 of them ended with delivery of alive newborns, 2 with fetal deaths in-utero, and 2 with abortions. The average age of patients was 34 years. The etiology of the original kidney disease was unknown in 44.4% of the cases, and only 22.2% of the patients maintained diuresis. Dialysis started in 8 cases before the diagnosis of pregnancy. The average gestational age at diagnosis was 14 weeks. We modified the prescription of dialysis in 4 patients by increasing the frequency of the dialysis sessions to 6 per week and in 3 by increasing the duration of each session to 6 hours. Anemia was present in all the cases; 3 patients received erythropoietin and 4 patients required transfusion. The pregnancy was com-plicated in 44% of the cases by a polyhydramnios. The average time at delivery was 33 weeks and it was achieved in 80% of pregnancies through vaginal route. The average weight of newborns was to 2380 g. We conclude that pregnancy in women on hemodialysis is possible. The success of pregnancy may be influenced by the residual diuresis and early diagnosis to improve the quality of dialysis by increasing the dialysis dose. PMID:20587867

  17. Prior Experiences Shaping Family Science Conversations at a Nature Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Lucy R.; Zimmerman, Heather Toomey

    2014-01-01

    Using families as the analytical focus, this study informs the field of informal science education with a focus on the role of prior experiences in family science conversations during nature walks at an outdoor-based nature center. Through video-based research, the team analyzed 16 families during walks at a nature center. Each family's prior…

  18. Ambulatory laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Tiryaki, Cagri; Bayhan, Zülfü; Kargi, Ertugrul; Alponat, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the demographic and clinical parameters affecting the outcomes of ambulatory laparoscopic cholecystectomy (ALC) in terms of pain, nausea, anxiety level, and satisfaction of patients in a tertiary health center. MATERIALS AND METHODS: ALC was offered to 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria. Follow-up (questioning for postoperative pain or discomfort, nausea or vomiting, overall satisfaction) was done by telephone contact on the same day at 22:00 p.m. and the first day after surgery at 8: 00 a.m. and by clinical examination one week after operation. STAI I and II data were used for proceeding to the level of anxiety of patients before and/or after the operation. RESULTS: Sixty consecutive patients, with a mean age of 40.6 ± 8.1 years underwent ALC. Fifty-five (92%) patients could be sent to their homes on the same day but five patients could not be sent due to anxiety, pain, or social indications. Nausea was reported in four (6.7%) cases and not associated with any demographic or clinical features of patients. On the other hand, pain has been reported in 28 (46.7%) cases, and obesity and shorter duration of gallbladder disease were associated with the increased pain perception (P = 0.009 and 0.004, respectively). Preopereative anxiety level was significantly higher among patients who could not complete the ALC procedure (P = 0.018). CONCLUSION: Correct management of these possible adverse effects results in the increased satisfaction of patients and may encourage this more cost-effective and safe method of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:26917919

  19. Johnson Space Center Flight Medicine Clinic Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, Trela

    2006-01-01

    Being a member of the Flight Medicine Clinic (FMC) Staff is a great experience. I joined the FMC staff 2 years ago when I became part of the Kelsey-Seybold team. The FMC staff consists of Flight Surgeons, Family Clinic Physician, Nursing staff, Wellness Coordinator and Support staff. We serve as the Primary Care Physicians for the astronauts and their families and provide annual physicals for the retired astronauts. We have approximately 800 patients in the FMC. As the Family Clinic Physician, I care for the astronaut spouses and children and provide annual physicals for the retired astronauts. Since we have a small patient population, we have the opportunity to spend increased personal time with our patients, which I enjoy. We have a pretty healthy patient population, who are very interested in their overall health and preventive care. In preparation for a shuttle launch, our nursing staff assists the flight surgeons with the astronaut physical exams, which occur 10 days prior to launch and again 3 days after their return. We also provide Primary Contact physicals for the families and guests, who will be in close contact with shuttle crew members. During these physicals, we provide education, emphasizing the importance of preventing the spread of communicable diseases to shuttle crew members. Being a part of the Space Medicine Program is an honor. To know that you contribute in some way to our nation s Space Program is very special. (This article was prepared by Dr. Trela Landry, M.D. for inclusion in a Kelsey-Seybold newsletter on 25 OCT 2006.)

  20. New Counselors' Experiences of Community Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freadling, Amy H.; Foss-Kelly, Louisa L.

    2014-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored 6 new counselors' experiences working in community mental health centers and their experiences of the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs-accredited training received in preparation for such work. Three themes from the interviews were identified to provide implications…

  1. NASA Glenn Research Center Experience with "LENR Phenomenon"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1989 NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has performed some small-scale limited experiments that show evidence of effects claimed by some to be evidence of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR). The research at GRC has involved observations and work on measurement techniques for observing the temperature effects in reactions of isotopes of hydrogen with palladium hydrides. The various experiments performed involved loading Pd with gaseous H2 and D2, and exposing Pd thin films to multi-bubble sonoluminescence in regular and deuterated water. An overview of these experiments and their results will be presented.

  2. NASA Glenn Research Center Experience with LENR Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1989 NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has performed some small-scale limited experiments that show evidence of effects claimed by some to be evidence of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR). The research at GRC has involved observations and work on measurement techniques for observing the temperature effects in reactions of isotopes of hydrogen with palladium hydrides. The various experiments performed involved loading Pd with gaseous H2 and D2, and exposing Pd thin films to multi-bubble sonoluminescence in regular and deuterated water. An overview of these experiments and their results will be presented.

  3. Simulations of Validation Platform Experiments by the PSI-Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. A.; Akcay, C.; Glasser, A. H.; Hansen, C. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Kim, C. C.; Marklin, G. J.; Milroy, R. D.; Shumlak, U.; Sovinec, C. R.; O'Bryan, J. B.; Held, E.; Ji, J.-Y.; Lukin, V. S.

    2012-10-01

    The Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center - http://www.psicenter.org) assists collaborating validation platform experiments with extended MHD simulations. Collaborators include the Bellan Plasma Group (Caltech), CTH (Auburn U), FRX-L (Los Alamos National Laboratory), HIT-SI (U Wash - UW), LDX (M.I.T.), MST & Pegasus (U Wisc-Madison), PHD (UW), PFRC (PPPL), SSX (Swarthmore College), TCS (UW), and ZaP (UW). Modifications have been made to the NIMROD, HiFi, and PSI-Tet codes to specifically model these experiments, including mesh generation/refinement, appropriate boundary conditions (external fields, insulating BCs, etc.), and kinetic and neutral particle interactions. The PSI-Center is planning to add neutrals to NIMROD. When implemented in NIMROD, these results will be compared to the neutral particle physics in the 2D version of HiFi. Coaxial helicity injection BCs will be specified in HiFi to simulate the Caltech co-planar experiment, for verification with previous and ongoing NIMROD simulations. Results from these simulations, as well as an overview of the PSI-Center status will be presented.

  4. PSI-Center Simulations of Validation Platform Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. A.; Akcay, C.; Glasser, A. H.; Hansen, C. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Marklin, G. J.; Milroy, R. D.; Morgan, K. D.; Norgaard, P. C.; Shumlak, U.; Victor, B. S.; Sovinec, C. R.; O'Bryan, J. B.; Held, E. D.; Ji, J.-Y.; Lukin, V. S.

    2013-10-01

    The Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center - http://www.psicenter.org) supports collaborating validation platform experiments with extended MHD simulations. Collaborators include the Bellan Plasma Group (Caltech), CTH (Auburn U), FRX-L (Los Alamos National Laboratory), HIT-SI (U Wash - UW), LTX (PPPL), MAST (Culham), Pegasus (U Wisc-Madison), PHD/ELF (UW/MSNW), SSX (Swarthmore College), TCSU (UW), and ZaP/ZaP-HD (UW). Modifications have been made to the NIMROD, HiFi, and PSI-Tet codes to specifically model these experiments, including mesh generation/refinement, non-local closures, appropriate boundary conditions (external fields, insulating BCs, etc.), and kinetic and neutral particle interactions. The PSI-Center is exploring application of validation metrics between experimental data and simulations results. Biorthogonal decomposition is proving to be a powerful method to compare global temporal and spatial structures for validation. Results from these simulation and validation studies, as well as an overview of the PSI-Center status will be presented.

  5. Simulations of ICC Experiments by the PSI-Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Brian; Glasser, A. H.; Jarboe, T. R.; Kim, C. C.; Marklin, G. J.; Lowrie, W.; Meier, E. T.; Milroy, R. D.; Shumlak, U.; Sovinec, C. R.; O'Bryan, J. B.; Held, E.; Ji, J.-Y.; Lukin, V. S.

    2011-10-01

    The Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center - http://www.psicenter.org) assists collaborating innovative confinement concept (ICC) experiments with extended MHD simulations. Collaborators include the Bellan Plasma Group (Caltech), CTH (Auburn U), FRX-L (Los Alamos National Laboratory), HIT-SI (U Wash - UW), LDX (M.I.T.), MST & Pegasus (U Wisc-Madison), PHD (UW), PFRC (PPPL), SSX (Swarthmore College), TCS (UW), and ZaP (UW). Modifications have been made to the NIMROD, HiFi, and PSI-Tet codes to specifically model these ICC experiments, including mesh generation/refinement, appropriate boundary conditions (external fields, insulating BCs, etc.), and kinetic and neutral particle interactions. Interfaces of these codes to the powerful 3-D visualization program, VisIt (http://www.llnl.gov/visit) have been developed and implemented. Results from these simulations, as well as an overview of the Interfacing Group status will be presented.

  6. Legacy data center integration into distributed data federations: The World Data Center for Climate (WDCC) experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindermann, Stephan; Berger, Katharina; Toussaint, Frank

    2014-05-01

    The integration of well-established legacy data centers into newly developed data federation infrastructures is a key requirement to enhance climate data access based on widely agreed interfaces. We present the approach taken to integrate the ICSU World Data Center for Climate (WDCC) located in Hamburg, Germany into the European ENES climate data Federation which is part of the international ESGF data federation. The ENES / ESGF data federation hosts petabytes of climate model data and provides scalable data search and access services across the worldwide distributed data centers. Parts of the data provided by the ENES / ESGF data federation is also long term archived and curated at the WDCC data archive, allowing e.g. for DOI based data citation. An integration of the WDCC into the ENES / ESGF federation allows end users to search and access WDCC data using consistent interfaces worldwide. We will summarize the integration approach we have taken for WDCC legacy system and ESGF infrastructure integration. On the technical side we describe the provisioning of ESGF consistent metadata and data interfaces as well as the security infrastructure adoption. On the non-technical side we describe our experiences in integrating a long-term archival center with costly quality assurance procedures with an integrated distributed data federation putting emphasis on providing early and consistent data search and access services to scientists. The experiences were gained in the process of curating ESGF hosted CMIP5 data at the WDCC. Approximately one petabyte of CMIP5 data which was used for the IPCC climate report is being replicated and archived at the WDCC.

  7. The Dresden Apheresis Center - experience with LDL apheresis and immunoadsorption.

    PubMed

    Julius, Ulrich; Tselmin, Sergey; Fischer, Sabine; Passauer, Jens; Bornstein, Stefan R

    2009-12-29

    The first apheresis center in former German Democratic Republic was established in Dresden November 1990 following the reunification of Germany. We here summarize the activities of this center to date. From the center's establishment until the end of July 2009 13,291 sessions of therapeutic apheresis have been performed. Four LDL apheresis methods, namely DALI, Therasorb LDL, HELP and lipidfiltration, are available and several comparative studies of these methods have been published. In addition, we have established the Therasorb IG method and two rheophoresis methods (Rheofilter SR 20; TheraSorb-Rheo Adsorber). Currently we treat 53 high-risk patients with LDL apheresis, including 6 post- heart transplant patients and 5 patients with immunoadsorption. Since November 1990 we have seen a marked reduction in the number of new cardiovascular events by apheresis intervention, but they could not be totally prevented and 2 patients died despite LDL apheresis treatment. In our clinical experience all 4 LDL apheresis methods appear equally effective. However, it is an advantage to have the ability to switch methods in patients in whom one method was less effective or less well tolerated. We also successfully treated patients suffering from Evans' syndrome, pemphigus, urticaria vasculitis with monoclonal gammopathy IgM Type Kappa, lichen myxoedematosus or lupus erythematodes with immunoadsorption. The rheophoresis approach has been used in patients with age-dependent degeneration of the macula, sudden hearing loss, leg ulcers, and diabetic foot syndrome. PMID:20129367

  8. National Criticality Experiments Research Center: Capability and Status

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, David K.; Myers, William L.

    2012-07-12

    After seven years, the former Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF), or Pajarito Site, has reopened for business as the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Four critical assembly machines (Comet, Planet, Flat-Top, and Godiva-IV) made the journey from Los Alamos to the NNSS. All four machines received safety system upgrades along with new digital control systems. Between these machines, systems ranging from the thermal through the intermediate to the fast spectrum may be assembled. Steady-State, transient, and super-prompt critical conditions may be explored. NCERC is the sole remaining facility in the United States capable of conducting general-purpose nuclear materials handling including the construction and operation of high-multiplication assemblies, delayed critical assemblies, and prompt critical assemblies. Reconstitution of the unique capabilities at NCERC ensures the viability of (1) The Nuclear Renaissance, (2) Stockpile Stewardship, and (3) and the next generation of criticality experimentalists.

  9. Mars Pathfinder Rover-Lewis Research Center Technology Experiments Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Steven M.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Mars Pathfinder Program is given and the development and role of three technology experiments from NASA's Lewis Research Center and carried on the Mars Pathfinder rover is described. Two recent missions to Mars were developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and launched late last year: Mars Global Surveyor in November 1996 and Mars Pathfinder in December 1996. Mars Global Surveyor is an orbiter which will survey the planet with a number of different instruments, and will arrive in September 1997, and Mars Pathfinder which consists of a lander and a small rover, landing on Mars July 4, 1997. These are the first two missions of the Mars Exploration Program consisting of a ten year series of small robotic martian probes to be launched every 26 months. The Pathfinder rover will perform a number of technology and operational experiments which will provide the engineering information necessary to design and operate more complex, scientifically oriented surface missions involving roving vehicles and other machinery operating in the martian environment. Because of its expertise in space power systems and technologies, space mechanisms and tribology, Lewis Research Center was asked by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is heading the Mars Pathfinder Program, to contribute three experiments concerning the effects of the martian environment on surface solar power systems and the abrasive qualities of the Mars surface material. In addition, rover static charging was investigated and a static discharge system of several fine Tungsten points was developed and fixed to the rover. These experiments and current findings are described herein.

  10. Installation of center disk baffle into Madison Dynamo Experiment vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, M. M.; Nornberg, M. D.; Taylor, N. Z.; Wallace, J. P.; Forest, C. B.

    2013-10-01

    The Madison Dynamo Experiment (MDE) comprises a 1 m diameter spherical chamber that contains a turbulent flow of liquid sodium driven by two counter rotating impellers. One of the goals of the MDE is to observe a magnetic field grow at the expense of kinetic energy in the liquid sodium flow. It has been found that turbulence in the MDE plays a significant and solely detrimental role in the generation of magnetic fields. The installation of an equatorial baffle and the three rotatable vanes in each hemisphere resulted in a reduction of large scale eddies in the flow and enhanced field generation. However, no self-excited field was observed. This Poster will present recent modifications made to the experiment consisting of installing a copper disk baffle in the center of the spherical vessel. The design and installation of the structure will be illustrated and discussed. Results from before and after the center disk baffle installation will be shown. Supported by NSF and DoE.

  11. Advanced Life Support Project: Crop Experiments at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, John C.; Stutte, Gary W.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Yorio, Neil

    2004-01-01

    Crop production systems provide bioregenerative technologies to complement human crew life support requirements on long duration space missions. Kennedy Space Center has lead NASA's research on crop production systems that produce high value fresh foods, provide atmospheric regeneration, and perform water processing. As the emphasis on early missions to Mars has developed, our research focused on modular, scalable systems for transit missions, which can be developed into larger autonomous, bioregenerative systems for subsequent surface missions. Components of these scalable systems will include development of efficient light generating or collecting technologies, low mass plant growth chambers, and capability to operate in the high energy background radiation and reduced atmospheric pressures of space. These systems will be integrated with air, water, and thermal subsystems in an operational system. Extensive crop testing has been done for both staple and salad crops, but limited data is available on specific cultivar selection and breadboard testing to meet nominal Mars mission profiles of a 500-600 day surface mission. The recent research emphasis at Kennedy Space Center has shifted from staple crops, such as wheat, soybean and rice, toward short cycle salad crops such as lettuce, onion, radish, tomato, pepper, and strawberry. This paper will review the results of crop experiments to support the Exploration Initiative and the ongoing development of supporting technologies, and give an overview of capabilities of the newly opened Space Life Science (SLS) Lab at Kennedy Space Center. The 9662 square m (104,000 square ft) SLS Lab was built by the State of Florida and supports all NASA research that had been performed in Hanger-L. In addition to NASA research, the SLS Lab houses the Florida Space Research Institute (FSRI), responsible for co-managing the facility, and the University of Florida (UF) has established the Space Agriculture and Biotechnology Research and

  12. Joint Langley Research Center/Jet Propulsion Laboratory CSI experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neat, Gregory W.; O'Brien, John F.; Lurie, Boris J.; Garnica, Angel; Belvin, W. K.; Sulla, Jeff; Won, John

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a joint Control Structure Interaction (CSI) experiment in which Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) damping devices were incorporated into the Langley Research Center (LaRC) Phase 0 Testbed. The goals of the effort were twofold: (1) test the effectiveness of the JPL structural damping methods in a new structure and (2) assess the feasibility of combining JPL local control methods with the LaRC multiple input multiple output global control methods. Six dampers (2 piezoelectric active members, 4 viscous dampers), placed in three different regions of the structure, produced up to 26 dB attenuation in target modes. The combined control strategy in which the JPL damping methods contributed local control action and the LaRC control scheme provided global control action, produced and overall control scheme with increased stability margins and improved performance. This paper presents an overview of the technologies contributed from the two centers, the strategies used to combine them, and results demonstrating the success of the damping and cooperative control efforts.

  13. CCSDS telemetry systems experience at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carper, Richard D.; Stallings, William H., III

    1990-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) designs, builds, manages, and operates science and applications spacecraft in near-earth orbit, and provides data capture, data processing, and flight control services for these spacecraft. In addition, GSFC has the responsibility of providing space-ground and ground-ground communications for near-earth orbiting spacecraft, including those of the manned spaceflight programs. The goal of reducing both the developmental and operating costs of the end-to-end information system has led the GSFC to support and participate in the standardization activities of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS), including those for packet telemetry. The environment in which such systems function is described, and the GSFC experience with CCSDS packet telemetry in the context of the Gamma-Ray Observatory project is discussed.

  14. Single-center experience in double kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fontana, I; Magoni Rossi, A; Gasloli, G; Santori, G; Giannone, A; Bertocchi, M; Piaggio, F; Bocci, E; Valente, Umberto

    2010-05-01

    Use of organs from marginal donors for transplantation is a current strategy to expand the organ donor pool. Its efficacy is universally accepted among data from multicenter studies. Herein, we have reviewed outcomes of double kidney transplantation (DKT) over an 9-year experience in our center. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible important differences between a monocenter versus multicenter studies. Between 1999 and 2008, we performed 59 DKT. Recipient mean age was 63 +/- 5 years. Mean HLA-A, -B, and -DR mismatches were 3.69 +/- 0.922. Donor mean age was 69 +/- 7 years and mean creatinine clearance was 69.8 +/- 30.8 mL/min. Proteinuria was detected in three donors (5%). Mean cold ischemia and warm ischemia times were 1130 +/- 216 and 48 +/- 11 minutes, respectively. The right and left kidney scores were 4.18 +/- 2 and 4.21 +/- 2, respectively. Thirty patients (51%) displayed good postoperative renal function; 22 (37%), acute tubular necrosis with postoperative dialysis; 3 (5%), acute rejection episodes; 4 (7%), single-graft transplantectomy due to vascular thrombosis; 1 (2%), a retransplantation; 5 (8%), a lymphocele; 3 (5%) vescicoureteral reflux or stenosis requiring surgical correction. Cytomegalovirus infection was detected in five patients (8%). In three patients (5%) displayed de novo neoplasia. Three patients showed chronic rejection (5%), whereas we observed a cyclosporine-related toxicity in 7 (12%). Nine patients (15%) developed iatrogenic diabetes. Patient and graft survivals after 3 years from DKT were 93% and 86.3%, respectively. In this study, we applied successfully a widespread score to allocate organs to single kidney transplantation or DKT. In our experience, the score is suitable for the organ allocation but it may be overprotective, excluding potentially suitable organs for a single transplantation. PMID:20534235

  15. Penile lichen sclerosus: An urologist's nightmare! - A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jitendra Pratap; Priyadarshi, Vinod; Goel, Hemant Kumar; Vijay, Mukesh Kumar; Pal, Dilip Kumar; Chakraborty, Sudip; Kundu, Anup Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Penile lichen sclerosus (LS) is a nagging condition and its progression result in devastating urinary and sexual problems and reduction in the quality-of-life. This study has been carried out to present our experience about this disease with simultaneous review of the available literature. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study has been done at a tertiary care center of eastern India. The data of 306 patients affected with LS were analyzed for clinical presentation, physical examination, investigations, and treatment offered. Results: Presenting symptoms were non-specific. The prepuce was most commonly involved location followed by glans and meatus. Urethral involvement was not isolated as the primary site. Circumcision was done in 237 patients, while 63 patients underwent meatotomy. Thirty-six of 39 cases of LS induced stricture were treated with buccal mucosal graft (BMG) either in one stage or in two stages. Conclusion: LS varies from being a highly aggressive disease of the penis and anterior urethra to a burnt out condition affecting just the meatus and surrounding glans. Early diagnosis and treatment are required to prevent its complication and associated morbidity. Management depends on the anatomical location of lesion, extent of involvement, rapidity of progression and its severity. Use of BMG in LS induced urethral stricture has shown encouraging results. PMID:26229314

  16. Railgun experiments at the University of Texas Center for Electromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, R. J.

    1991-05-01

    The Center for Electromechanics at the University of Texas at Austin (CEM-UT) presently has five experimental electromagnetic (e.m.) launchers or railguns in operation. An additional ten fully operational railguns are presently decommissioned and five new launchers are being fabricated. Several different parallel rail configurations and geometries are being studied as well as augmented rails and coaxial launchers. Recent tests utilizing the magnetic flux generated in a coil have produced promising results for work with coilgun launchers. Electromagnetic launchers at CEM-UT have been used in a wide variety of experiments. Particles of 50-500 μm in diameter have been accelerated up to 11 km/s to determine the effects of micrometeorite impacts on materials used in space applications and 2.5-kg packages have been launched to 2.6 km/s (8.1 MJ muzzle energy) in ballistic tests. Paper studies on launching 100-kg payloads at 10 km/s have also been conducted to determine the feasibility of launching satellites with e.m. launchers.

  17. Endovascular Treatment of Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas: Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Oh, Hyuk-Jin; Shim, Jai-Joon; Bae, Hack-Gun; Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective Treatment of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) remains a challenge. However, after introduction of Onyx, transarterial approach is the preferred treatment option in many centers. We report our experience of dAVFs embolization with special emphasis on transarterial approach. Methods Seventeen embolization procedures were performed in 13 patients with dAVFs between Jan 2009 and Oct 2014. Clinical symptoms, location and type of fistulas, embolization methods, complications, radiological and clinical outcomes were evaluated using charts and PACS images. Results All 13 patients had symptomatic lesions. The locations of fistulas were transverse-sigmoid sinus in 6, middle fossa dura in 4, cavernous sinus in 2, and superior sagittal sinus in 1 patient. Cognard types were as follows : I in 4, IIa in 2, IIa+IIb in 5, and IV in 2. Embolization procedures were performed ≥2 times in 3 patients. Nine patients were treated with transarterial Onyx embolization alone. One of these required direct surgical puncture of middle meningeal artery. Complete obliteration of fistulas was achieved in 11/13 (85%) patients. There were no complications except for 1 case of Onyx migration in cavernous dAVF. Modified Rankin scale score at post-operative 3 months were 0 in 11, and 3 in 2 patients. Conclusion Transarterial Onyx embolization can be a first line therapeutic option in patients with dAVFs. However, transvenous approach should be tried first in cavernous sinus dAVF because of the risk of intracranial migration of liquid embolic materials. Furthermore, combined surgical endovascular approach can be considered as a useful option in inaccessible route. PMID:26885282

  18. An Exploration of Hispanic Mothers' Culturally Sustaining Experiences at an Informal Science Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiland, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Science education reform focuses on learner-centered instruction within contexts that support learners' sociocultural experiences. The purpose of this study was to explore Hispanic mothers' experiences as accompanying adults at an informal science center within the context of culturally sustaining experiences, which include the fluidity…

  19. Ghana's experience in the establishment of a national data center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekua, Amponsah Paulina; Yaw, Serfor-Armah

    2012-08-01

    The government of Ghana in a bilateral agreement with the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) has established a National Data Center in Ghana with the aim of monitoring the testing of nuclear explosions. Seismic, hydroacoustic, radionuclide and infrasound methods are used for the monitoring. The data center was commissioned on 3 February, 2010 at the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. At present Ghana does not have any operational, centralised data (seismic, hydroacoustic, radionuclide and infrasound) acquisition system with the capability of accessing data from other international stations. Hence, the need of setting up the National Data Center which would enable us constantly monitor, manage and coordinate both natural and man-made seismic activities in the country and around the globe, upload data to the International Data Center (IDC) as well as receive and use International Monitoring System (IMS) data and IDC products for treaty verification and compliance. Apart from these, the center also accesses and analyzes seismic waveforms relevant to its needs from the International Data Center; makes data available to its stakeholder institutions for earthquake disaster mitigation; reports on all aspects of disasters related to earthquake to the relevant government agencies that deal with disasters; makes recommendations to the government of Ghana on earthquake safety measures; provides information to assist government institutions to develop appropriate land and building policies. The center in collaboration with stakeholder agencies periodically organises public lectures on earthquake disaster risk mitigation.

  20. Hemoglobin H Disease in Turkey: Experience from Eight Centers

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Selma; Oktay, Gönül; Acıpayam, Can; İlhan, Gül; Gali, Edip; Celkan, Tiraje; Bay, Ali; Malbora, Barış; Akar, Nejat; Oymak, Yeşim; Toptaş, Tayfur

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to research the problem of hemoglobin H (HbH) disease, to reveal the distribution patterns among different health centers, and to emphasize the importance of this disease for Turkey. A total of 273 patients were included from 8 hemoglobinopathy centers. The Antakya Hemoglobinopathy Center reported 232 patients and the remaining 7 centers reported 41 patients. PubMed was also searched for published articles related to Turkish patients with HbH disease, and we found 16 articles involving a total of 198 HbH patients. Most of the patients were reported from Antakya; thus, special attention should be paid to this region. This is a preliminary study to investigate the extent of the problem of HbH disease and it emphasizes the need for hematology associations or the Ministry of Health to record all cases of HbH disease in Turkey. PMID:26376738

  1. National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Center Stack Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeyer, C; Chrzanowski, J; Dudek, L; Fan, H; Hatcher, R; Heitzenroeder, P; Menard, J; Ono, M; Ramakrishnan, S; Titus, P; Woolley, R; Zhan, H

    2009-09-24

    The purpose of the NSTX Center Stack Upgrade project is to expand the NSTX operational space and thereby the physics basis for next-step ST facilities. The plasma aspect ratio (ratio of plasma major to minor radius) of the upgrade is increased to 1.5 from the original value of 1.26, which increases the cross sectional area of the center stack by a factor of ~ 3 and makes possible higher levels of performance and pulse duration.

  2. Lifelong Learning Center: An Experiment in Counseling Succeeds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, Arthur

    1979-01-01

    Describes the evolution and program of Philadelphia's Lifelong Learning Center, which stresses helping individuals to overcome problems of unemployment due to job obsolescence, mid-life career change, women returning to the job market, and career education and planning. Both workshops and individual interviews are used in working with clients.…

  3. Making Experience Count: Career Centers Staffed by Retired Volunteer Paraprofessionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutro, Kenneth R.

    This paper describes the planning and implementation of a veterans' hospital career center program that offers a comprehensive career counseling, vocational assessment, vocational rehabilitation planning, job placement, and follow-up program to inpatients and outpatients, under the direction of a counseling psychologist. Recruitment of volunteer…

  4. User-Centered Design in Practice: The Brown University Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordac, Sarah; Rainwater, Jean

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a case study in user-centered design that explores the needs and preferences of undergraduate users. An analysis of LibQual+ and other user surveys, interviews with public service staff, and a formal American with Disabilities Act accessibility review served as the basis for planning a redesign of the Brown University…

  5. A center's experience: pulmonary function in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Schilero, Gregory J; Radulovic, Miroslav; Wecht, Jill M; Spungen, Ann M; Bauman, William A; Lesser, Marvin

    2014-06-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with significant psychological and physical challenges. A multidisciplinary approach to management is essential to ensure recovery during the acute phase, and comprehensive rehabilitative strategies are necessary to foster independence and quality of life throughout the chronic phase of injury. Complications that beset these individuals are often a unique consequence of SCI, and knowledge of the effects of SCI upon organ systems is essential for appropriate management. According to the National SCI Statistical Center (NSCISC), as of 2010 there were an estimated 265,000 persons living with SCI in the United States, with approximately 12,000 incidence cases annually. Although life expectancy for newly injured individuals with SCI is markedly reduced, persons with chronic SCI are expected to live about as long as individuals without SCI; however, longevity varies inversely with level of injury. Since 2005, 56 % of persons with SCI are tetraplegic, and due to paralysis of respiratory muscles, these individuals may be especially prone to pulmonary complications, which remain a major cause of mortality among persons with chronic SCI. We at the VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of SCI at the James J. Peters VA Medical Center have devoted more than 25 years to the study of secondary medical conditions that complicate SCI. Herein, we review pulmonary research at the Center, both our past and future endeavors, which form an integral part of our multidisciplinary approach toward achieving a greater understanding of and improving care for veterans with SCI. PMID:24723067

  6. Observing system simulation experiments at NASA. Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R.; Kalnay, E.; Baker, W. E.; Susskind, J.; Reuter, D.; Halem, M.

    1985-01-01

    A series of realistic simulation studies is being conducted as a cooperative effort between the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), the National Meteorological Center (NMC), and the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA), to provide a quantitative assessment of the potential impact of future observing systems on large scale numerical weather prediction. A special objective is to avoid the unrealistic character of earlier simulation studies. Following a brief review of previous simulation studies and real data impact tests, the methodology for the current simulation system will be described. Results from an assessment of the realism of the simulation system and of the potential impact of advanced observing systems on numerical weather prediction and preliminary results utilizing this system will be presented at the conference.

  7. Docker experience at INFN-Pisa Grid Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoni, E.; Arezzini, S.; Boccali, T.; Ciampa, A.; Coscetti, S.; Bonacorsi, D.

    2015-12-01

    Clouds and virtualization offer typical answers to the needs of large-scale computing centers to satisfy diverse sets of user communities in terms of architecture, OS, etc. On the other hand, solutions like Docker seems to emerge as a way to rely on Linux kernel capabilities to package only the applications and the development environment needed by the users, thus solving several resource management issues related to cloud-like solutions. In this paper, we present an exploratory (though well advanced) test done at a major Italian Tier2, at INFN-Pisa, where a considerable fraction of the resources and services has been moved to Docker. The results obtained are definitely encouraging, and Pisa is transitioning all of its Worker Nodes and services to Docker containers. Work is currently being expanded into the preparation of suitable images for a completely virtualized Tier2, with no dependency on local configurations.

  8. Common injuries in athletes' knee: experience of a specialized center

    PubMed Central

    Nicolini, Alexandre Pedro; de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Matsuda, Marcelo Mitsuro; Sayum, Jorge; Cohen, Moisés

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present cross-sectional study aims to identify the most common knee injuries in athletes cared at a Specialized Outpatient Clinics. METHOD: Analysis of patients cared at the Knee Outpatient Clinics of a Sports Trauma Center, divided by gender, age and diagnosed injury. RESULTS: Initially 440 patients were divided into 33 types of sports; after excluding the less statistically significant practices, nine sports remained. The most frequently performed sports were football with almost 50% of total patients presenting anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and road runs with great frequency of meniscal injury. There was no correlation of the disorder with the type of sports performed but a correlation was found with patient's age/gender. CONCLUSION: The complete ACL rupture was the most common injury found in football, basketball and volleyball players, followed by meniscal injury in street runners. Level of Evidence IV, Study Transversal. PMID:25061417

  9. Blunt pancreatic trauma: experience at a rural referral center.

    PubMed

    Timberlake, G A

    1997-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare mechanism of injury, treatment methods, and outcome of blunt pancreas trauma patients transferred from another hospital to those of patients brought directly from the scene. A retrospective review was conducted of 6078 patients treated at a Level I trauma center from 1/1/90 to 12/31/94. Blunt pancreas injury was found in 39 (0.64%) patients (mean age, 33.2 years). Mechanism of injury included 34 (87%) motor vehicle crashes, 3 (8%) motorcycle crashes, and 2 (5%) other injuries. There were 11 transfer patients (28%), and 28 (72%) admitted directly from the scene. Eighty-two per cent of the motor vehicle crash patients were unrestrained, and 35 per cent had ethanol intoxication. Exploratory laparotomy was performed on 32 (82%); eight (25%) required repair or resection; 22 (69%) had trivial injuries, at most requiring drainage; and two (6.3%) exsanguinated. No patients required Whipple resection or pancreatiocojejunostomy. At operation, an average of 2.5 associated intra-abdominal injuries were found. Overall survival was 35 of 39 (90%). Among the patients brought directly to the trauma center, 93 per cent survived, whereas survival among transferred patients was 82 per cent (chi2 = 0.19; P = 0.66). Blunt pancreatic injuries vary in severity, but radical resection is rarely required. Lack of safety restraint and ethanol use are major risk factors. Despite the high likelihood of associated injuries, survivability is high. No difference in outcome was seen between directly admitted and transferred patients. PMID:9036900

  10. Interventional Electrophysiology in Children: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Mosaed, Pasha; Dalili, Mohammad; Emkanjoo, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    Objective Ablation techniques of cardiac arrhythmia in children have significantly progressed in the past decade; however, the number of pediatric ablations is still significantly lower than that in adults. Accordingly, there is less information regarding the success rate and complications in this age group. Methods All pediatric ablations conducted between March 2005 and February 2011 at Rajaie Heart Center were studied. Abolishing the arrhythmia source by the end of procedure was considered as success. Recurrences before hospital discharge and those thereafter were named early recurrence and late recurrence, respectively. Findings A total of 125 catheter ablations were performed for 112 patients. Of them 118 (94.4%) procedures were successful. The success rate was significantly higher in the patients with atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT). Of 105 patients who continued follow-up program, 7 (6.7%) cases experienced recurrence; the recurrence rate was inversely dependent on the patients’ body size (P-value <0.05). There was no mortality. Five cases were complicated during or early after the procedure, all the complications were cured completely. Conclusion Therapeutic electrophysiology in children is an effective and relatively low-risk method. The recurrence and complication rates are similar to those reported in adults. Considering our results and the previous reports, pediatric patients with serious arrhythmia should not be deprived from ablation and should not be exposed to long-term toxic drugs. PMID:23399953

  11. Portal hypertensive biliopathy: A single center experience and literature review.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Vanessa; Puerta, Andrés; Santos, Luisa Fernanda; Pérez, Juan Manuel; Varón, Adriana; Botero, Rafael Claudino

    2013-03-27

    Portal hypertensive biliopathy (PHB) is characterized by anatomical and functional abnormalities of the intrahepatic, extrahepatic and pancreatic ducts, in patients with portal hypertension associated to extrahepatic portal vein obstruction and less frequently to cirrhosis. These morphological changes, consisting in dilatation and stenosis of the biliary tree, are due to extensive venous collaterals occurring in an attempt to decompress the portal venous blockage. It is usually asymptomatic until it progresses to more advanced stages with cholestasis, jaundice, biliary sludge, gallstones, cholangitis and finally biliary cirrhosis. Imaging modalities of the biliary tree such as Doppler ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are essential to establish the diagnosis and the need of therapeutical interventions. Once the diagnosis is established, treatment with ursodesoxycholic acid seems to be beneficial. Decompression of the biliary tree to dilate, remove stones or implant biliary prosthesis by endoscopic or surgical procedures (hepato-yeyunostomy) usually resolves the cholestatic picture and prevents septic complications. The ideal treatment is the decompression of the portal system, with transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt or a surgical porto-systemic shunt. Unfortunately, few patients will be candidates for these procedures due to the extension of the thrombotic process. The purpose of this paper is to report the first 3 cases of PHB seen in a Colombian center and to review the literature. PMID:23556047

  12. Head and Neck Sarcomas: A Comprehensive Cancer Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Tejani, Mohamedtaki A.; Galloway, Thomas J.; Lango, Miriam; Ridge, John A.; von Mehren, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Head/neck sarcomas are rare, accounting for about 1% of head/neck malignancies and 5% of sarcomas. Outcomes have historically been worse in this group, due to anatomic constraints leading to difficulty in completely excising tumors, with high rates of local recurrence. We retrospectively analyzed cases of head/neck soft tissue sarcomas (STS) and osteogenic sarcomas managed in a multi-disciplinary setting at Fox Chase Cancer Center from 1999–2009 to describe clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment, outcomes, and prognostic factors for disease control and survival. Thirty patients with STS and seven patients with osteogenic sarcoma were identified. Most STS were high grade (23) and almost all were localized at presentation (28). Common histologies were synovial cell (6), rhabdomyosarcoma (5), angiosarcoma (4), liposarcoma (4) and leiomyosarcoma (3). The type of primary therapy and disease outcomes were analyzed. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). The HR and 95% CI for Cox model and median DFS/OS analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves were calculated. PMID:24202325

  13. Electronic Text Centers: Creating Research Collections on a Limited Budget, the Nebraska Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesecke, Joan R.; McNeil, Beth; Minks, Gina L. B.

    2000-01-01

    Defines electronic text centers as tools for digital collection development in the humanities and describes experiences at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in developing an electronic text center. Considers staffing, standards for encoding and describing electronic texts, hardware and software selection, and partnerships with the University of…

  14. Do Children's Advocacy Centers Improve Families' Experiences of Child Sexual Abuse Investigations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lisa M.; Cross, Theodore P.; Walsh, Wendy A.; Simone, Monique

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The Children's Advocacy Center (CAC) model of child abuse investigation is designed to be more child and family-friendly than traditional methods, but there have been no rigorous studies of their effect on children's and caregivers' experience. Data collected as part of the Multi-Site Evaluation of Children's Advocacy Centers were used…

  15. A Qualitative Examination of Connections between Learner-Centered Teaching and Past Significant Learning Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brackenbury, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Learner-centered teaching is a collection of instructional practices that shift the emphasis of courses from the instructors' goals and methods of delivery to the knowledge and skills that the students develop. This study examined potential commonalities between features of learner-centered teaching and the past significant learning experiences of…

  16. A cesium TELEC experiment at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The thermoelectronic laser energy converter (TELEC), was studied as a method of converting a 10.6 mm CO2 laser beam into electric power. The calculated characteristics of a TELEC seem to be well matched to the requirements of a spacecraft laser energy conversion system. The TELEC is a high power density plasma device which absorbs an intense laser beam by inverse bremsstrahlung with the plasma electrons. In the TELEC process, electromagnetic radiation is absorbed directly in the plasma electrons producing a high electron temperature. The energetic electrons diffuse out of the plasma striking two electrodes which are in contact with the plasma at the boundaries. These two electrodes have different areas: the larger one is designated as the collector, the smaller one is designated as the emitter. The smaller electrode functions as an electron emitter to provide continuity of the current. Waste heat is rejected from the collector electrode. An experiment was carried out with a high power laser using a cesium vapor TELEC cell with 30 cm active length. Laser supported plasma was produced in the TELEC device during a number of laser runs over a period of several days. Electric power from the TELEC was observed with currents in the range of several amperes and output potentials of less than 1 volt. The magnitudes of these electric outputs were smaller than anticipated but consistent with the power levels of the laser during this experiment.

  17. Endoscopic necrosectomy under fluoroscopic guidance – a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Smoczyński, Marian; Jabłońska, Anna; Adrych, Krystian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Our report presents a technique of necrotic tissue removal during transmural drainage of walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN) that is an alternative to the one that has already been described in the literature. Aim To assess the effectiveness and safety of endoscopic necrosectomy performed during transmural drainage of symptomatic WOPN. Material and methods Within the years 2012–2013, 64 patients underwent endoscopic treatment of symptomatic WOPN in our center. Eight patients underwent endoscopic necrosectomy during transmural drainage. Fragments of necrotic tissues were removed from the collection's cavity under fluoroscopic guidance using a Dormia basket. The results and complications of treatment were compared retrospectively. Results Sixty-four patients with WOPN underwent transmural drainage under endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) guidance. Eight patients (12.5%, 5 women and 3 men, mean age 57.25 years) were qualified for endoscopic necrosectomy. Transmural transgastric access was made in 7 patients and transduodenal access in 1 patient. Additional percutaneous drainage was used in 2 patients. Active drainage was continued for 24 days (11–44 days). The mean number of endoscopic procedures was 4.75 (3–9). The average number of necrosectomy procedures during drainage was 1.75 (1–4). Complications of endotherapy occurred in 2/8 (25%) patients, and they were not directly connected with necrosectomy. Therapeutic success after the end of active drainage was achieved in all patients. During a 6-month follow-up no recurrence of the collection was observed. Conclusions Endoscopic necrosectomy under fluoroscopic guidance is an effective and safe method of minimally invasive treatment in a selected group of patients with symptomatic WOPN. PMID:26240624

  18. Uncommon renal tumors in children: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Kartik Chandra; Mukhopadhyay, Madhumita; Barman, Shibsankar; Halder, Pankaj; Mukhopadhyay, Biswanath; Kumar, Rajarshi

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Scrutiny over the clinical behaviors, management, and the final outcome of some rare renal neoplasm in order to find out some hidden facts about these tumors which are playing an important role in the disease course and its management. Materials and Methods: Retrospective evaluation of uncommon (non-Wilms’) renal neoplasm in the pediatric population in a tertiary care center. Fifteen cases of uncommon renal tumors were treated in our institution over the last 5 years (January 2008 to December 2012). The cases were tabulated in the form of age, sex, mode of presentation, preoperative investigations, intraoperative grading, pathological type, postoperative management and the final outcome. The patients were followed up for 2 years (clinically every 3 months and ultrasonography abdomen in every 6 months for first 2 years) in order to see any evidence of recurrence and complications related to postoperative chemotherapy. Results: Out of 15 cases, four cases were clear cell sarcoma (CCS) (26.6%), three cases were rhabdoid tumor (20%), three cases were congenital mesoblastic nephroma (20%), two cases were multilocular cystic nephroma (13.3%), two cases were renal teratoma (13.3%), and one case of teratoid Wilms’ tumor (6.6%). There were two deaths (one CCS and one rhabdoid tumor) due to chemotherapy-related toxicity but no recurrence. Three patients were lost during postoperative follow-up; ten patients are doing well and getting a regular visit in the follow-up clinic. Conclusion: The clinical presentations of these uncommon renal tumors are similar to that of Wilms’ tumor. Thus, preoperative diagnosis is difficult even with modern imaging techniques. Some of these tumors (CCS, rhabdoid tumor) are rapidly progressing and have a poor outcome. Hence, early intervention in the form of complete surgical resection of the tumor (whenever possible) and postoperative chemo/radiotherapy are imperative for fruitful outcome. PMID:27046976

  19. Management of locoregional stage esophageal cancer: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Javle, M M; Nwogu, C E; Donohue, K A; Iyer, R V; Brady, W E; Khemka, S V; Smith, J L; Demmy, T L; Yang, G Y; Nava, H R

    2006-01-01

    Therapeutic options for locoregional esophageal cancer (EC) include primary surgery, neoadjuvant or definitive chemoradiation and systemic chemotherapy. The role of surgery in these multimodal strategies has recently been debated and definitive chemoradiation is being offered as an alternative to surgery at many centers. We examined our results with multimodal therapy and surgery in this patient population. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 172 patients with locoregional (AJCC stages I-III) EC treated at RPCI between February 14, 1990 and September 20, 2002. Median age was 65 years (range, 36-95); there were 136 male patients. There were 100 regional (stages IIB-III), 69 local (stages I-IIA) and three in situ cases. Initial therapy was either combined modality (n = 122) or single modality (surgery) (n = 50). There was 0%, 30-day, postoperative mortality. Median survival for all patients was 25.3 months and was better for local stage with surgery alone (75 months) than with neoadjuvant (35.7 months) or definitive chemoradiation (19.1 months, P < 0.001). Survival for patients with regional disease treated with surgery alone, neoadjuvant or definitive chemoradiation was 21.5, 24.4 and 11.8 months, respectively (P = not significant). The associations of prognostic factors with overall survival were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis and 2-sided Wald's chi-square test. On multivariate analysis, carefully selected patients treated with surgery alone had better outcomes compared with those treated with definitive chemoradiation (P < 0.001). Patients with locoregional esophageal cancer who are eligible for surgical resection either alone or as a part of multimodal therapy may have better outcomes than those treated with non-surgical approaches. PMID:16643174

  20. Carotid Artery Stenting: Single-Center Experience Over 11 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Nolz, Richard Schernthaner, Ruediger Egbert; Cejna, Manfred; Schernthaner, Melanie Lammer, Johannes Schoder, Maria

    2010-04-15

    This article reports the results of carotid artery stenting during an 11-year period. Data from 168 carotid artery stenting procedures (symptomatic, n = 55; asymptomatic, n = 101; symptoms not accessible, n = 12) were retrospectively collected. Primary technical success rate, neurological events in-hospital, access-site complications, and contrast-induced nephropathy (n = 118) were evaluated. To evaluate the influence of experience in carotid artery stenting on intraprocedural neurologic complications, patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included the first 80 treated patients, and group 2 the remainder of the patients (n = 88). In-stent restenoses at last-follow-up examinations (n = 89) were assessed. The overall primary technical success rate was 95.8%. The in-hospital stroke-death rate was 3.0% (n = 5; symptomatic, 5.4%; asymptomatic, 2.0%; p = 0.346). Neurologic complications were markedly higher in group 1 (4.2%; three major strokes; symptomatic, 2.8%, asymptomatic, 1.4%) compared to group 2 (2.4%; one major and one minor stroke-symptomatic, 1.2%, asymptomatic 1.2%), but this was not statistically significant. Further complications were access-site complications in 12 (7.1%), with surgical revision required in 1 (0.6%) and mild contrast-induced nephropathy in 1 (0.85%). Twenty-one (23.6%) patients had >50% in-stent restenosis during a mean follow-up of 28.2 months. In conclusion, advanced experience in carotid artery stenting leads to an acceptable periprocedural stroke-death rate. In-stent restenosis could be a critical factor during the follow-up course.

  1. Progressive Transformation of Germinal Centers: Single-Center Experience of 33 Turkish Patients.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Melda Cömert; Özsan, Nazan; Hekimgil, Mine; Saydam, Güray; Töbü, Mahmut

    2016-08-01

    Progressive transformation of germinal centers (PTGCs) is a benign disease of the lymph nodes that is rarely associated with Hodgkin disease. We reviewed the clinical and pathologic features of PTGCs and the relationship of PTGCs with lymphoid neoplasia in an adult population. The data from 33 patients who were diagnosed with PTCGs were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 33 PTGC patients, 48.5% were men and 51.5% were women, with a mean age of 43.8 years at diagnosis. Most of the enlarged and excised lymph nodes were cervical and axillary. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma was detected concurrent with PTGC in 2 patients. Also, PTGCs was detected 3 years after the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma, and T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma in 3 patients. No relapse was found in the patients with lymphoma, and no progression to lymphoma was detected during the follow-up of the other patients. PTGCs is not considered a premalignant entity; however, the development of lymphoma has been reported rarely. If PTGCs occurs in the follow-up process of patients with lymphoma, the follow-up intervals should be shortened. PMID:27133958

  2. How the hydroelectric design center`s experience ensures new SCADA systems are successful

    SciTech Connect

    Gantenbein, C.

    1995-12-31

    An installed SCADA system doesn`t require age for obsolescence. Effective obsolescence can be a SCADA system, of any age, which no longer receives the manufacturer`s product support or it could be a new SCADA system which was never supplied with complete documentation for the delivered hardware or software. It could also be the system which was the state-of-the-market SCADA when designed and when the procurement documents were prepared but, by the time of final system acceptance, the hardware is two generations old in technology. The Hydroelectric Design Center (HDC) is aware of the many times these situations have occurred when SCADA systems have been purchased, not only by the Government, but by the hydroelectric industry in general. These situations can rapidly grow into significant and expensive problems as the Government`s needs change and expand. How can an applications software routine be modified when no source code was provided? How can a new device be added to the SCADA system`s communications ports when the communications protocol is unknown or is a vendor`s {open_quotes}proprietary{close_quotes} software. HDC is aggressively working on solutions to minimize the obsolescence of newly installed SCADA systems while still remaining within the boundaries of the Government`s procurement guidelines.

  3. Interventional Treatment of Pulmonary Valve Stenosis: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Idrizi, Shpend; Milev, Ivan; Zafirovska, Planinka; Tosheski, Goce; Zimbakov, Zan; Ampova-Sokolov, Vilma; Angjuseva, Tanja; Mitrev, Zan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Percutaneous pulmonary valvuloplasty is well established treatment of choice in pulmonary valve stenosis. AIM: The aim of our study was to present our experience with the interventional technique, its immediate and mid-term effectiveness as well as its complication rate. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 43 patients, where 33 (74%) of them were children between the age of 1 month and 15 years. RESULTS: The procedure was successful in 38 patients or 90%. Mean peak to peak transvalvular gradient was reduced from 91.2 mmHg (55-150 mmHg) to 39.1 mmHg (20-80 mmHg). Follow- up of patients was between 2 and 13 years and included echocardiographic evaluation of pulmonary valve gradient, right heart dimensions and function as well as assessment of pulmonary regurgitation. We experienced one major complication pericardial effusion in a 5 months old child that required pericardiocenthesis. Six patients (13.9%) required a second intervention. During the follow up period there was significant improvement of right heart function and echocardiography parameters. Mild pulmonary regurgitation was noted in 24 (55%) patients, and four (9%) patients developed moderate regurgitation, without affecting the function of the right ventricle. CONCLUSIONS: Percutaneous pulmonary valvuloplasty is an effective procedure in treatment of pulmonary stenosis with good short and mid-term results. PMID:27275259

  4. Five years’ experience with capsule endoscopy in a single center

    PubMed Central

    Kav, Taylan; Bayraktar, Yusuf

    2009-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) is a novel technology that facilitates highly effective and noninvasive imaging of the small bowel. Although its efficacy in the evaluation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) has been proven in several trials, data on uses of CE in different small bowel diseases are rapidly accumulating in the literature, and it has been found to be superior to alternative diagnostic tools in a range of such diseases. Based on literature evidence, CE is recommended as a first-line investigation for OGIB after negative bi-directional endoscopy. CE has gained an important role in the diagnosis and follow-up of Crohn’s disease and celiac disease and in the surveillance of small bowel tumors and polyps in selected patients. Capsule retention is the major complication, with a frequency of 1%-2%. The purpose of this review was to discuss the procedure, indications, contraindications and adverse effects associated with CE. We also review and share our five-year experience with CE in various small bowel diseases. The recently developed balloon-assisted enteroscopies have both diagnostic and therapeutic capability. At the present time, CE and balloon-assisted enteroscopies are complementary techniques in the diagnosis and management of small bowel diseases. PMID:19399924

  5. A ventral visual stream reading center independent of visual experience.

    PubMed

    Reich, Lior; Szwed, Marcin; Cohen, Laurent; Amedi, Amir

    2011-03-01

    The visual word form area (VWFA) is a ventral stream visual area that develops expertise for visual reading. It is activated across writing systems and scripts and encodes letter strings irrespective of case, font, or location in the visual field with striking anatomical reproducibility across individuals. In the blind, comparable reading expertise can be achieved using Braille. This study investigated which area plays the role of the VWFA in the blind. One would expect this area to be at either parietal or bilateral occipital cortex, reflecting the tactile nature of the task and crossmodal plasticity, respectively. However, according to the metamodal theory, which suggests that brain areas are responsive to a specific representation or computation regardless of their input sensory modality, we predicted recruitment of the left-hemispheric VWFA, identically to the sighted. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that activation during Braille reading in blind individuals peaks in the VWFA, with striking anatomical consistency within and between blind and sighted. Furthermore, the VWFA is reading selective when contrasted to high-level language and low-level sensory controls. Thus, we propose that the VWFA is a metamodal reading area that develops specialization for reading regardless of visual experience. PMID:21333539

  6. MRI-guided stereotactic amygdalohippocampectomy: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Vojtěch, Zdeněk; Malíková, Hana; Krámská, Lenka; Liščák, Roman; Vladyka, Vilibald

    2015-01-01

    Background This paper presents our experience of stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy performed for intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods The article describes the cases of 61 patients who were treated during the period from 2004 to 2010. Mean postoperative follow-up was 5.3 years. Neuropsychological results were obtained for a subset of 31 patients. Results At their last postsurgical visit, 43 (70.5%) patients were Engel class I, six (9.8%) class II, nine (14.8%) class III, and three (4.9%) class IV. The surgery was complicated by four intracranial hematomas. One of them caused acute hydrocephalus and was treated by shunting and resolved without sequelae, while another caused transitory aphasia. The remaining hematomas were asymptomatic. There were two cases of meningitis which required antibiotic treatment. One patient committed suicide due to postoperative depression. After the procedure, we performed open epilepsy surgery and rethermolesions in three and two patients, respectively (8.2%). Patients showed increases in their mean full scale, verbal, and performance intelligence quotient (IQ) scores of 4, 3, and 4 IQ points, respectively (P<0.05). Five (17.2%), four (13.8%), and four (13.3%) patients improved their full scale, verbal, and performance IQ scores, respectively. No significant changes were found in memory performance, with a mean increase of 1, 3, and 0 memory quotient points in global, verbal, and visual memory, respectively (P<0.05). Global memory improved in three (10.3%) patients, verbal memory in one (3.4%), and one patient (3.3%) showed deterioration in visual memory. Conclusion Stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy offers a safe, effective, and less aggressive treatment modality in cases of well-defined mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure outcome is comparable with the results of conventional epilepsy surgery and cognitive results could be even better. PMID:25709460

  7. Pediatric idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Ahmad S.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM) is a severe illness with high mortality in the pediatric population. AIMS: To highlight our experience about clinical course and outcome of IDCM. Settings and Design: Patients’ files were reviewed retrospectively for diagnosed cases of IDCM in the pediatric cardiology unit of King Abdul Aziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, from Jan 2003 to Jun 2011. Materials and Methods: Data about full history, clinical examination and investigations were recorded and grouped according to outcome as alive and well (group 1), alive and symptomatic (group 2) and worsened or dead (group 3). Statistical Analysis: Data was subjected to descriptive analysis. Chi-square and Student's paired t-test techniques were used where appropriate. Spearman rank correlation and survival analysis was done. Results: Eighty three patients were included with presenting age median (range), i.e.,14 (2 months–12 years) with females predominance 53 (63.9%). On presentation; cardiomegaly was noted in 72 (86.7%) with increased lung vascularity in 45 (54%). Sixty-one (74%) patients had ST segment and T-wave changes on electrocardiogram, while the same number had left ventricular hypertrophy, and 15 (18%) had arrhythmias. Echocardiography records on presentation and at last follow-up showed significant difference in several areas. Group 1 had 40 (48.2%), Group 2 had 23 (27.7%) while 20 (24.1%) were in Group 3 including nine cases who died. Survival rate over three years was 78%. Older the age, worse was the outcome (Spearman's rho = 0.3, P = 0.04). Conclusion: Majority of subjects were presented during first year of life; the three year survival rate was 78%. Favorable outcome was correlated with younger age at presentation. PMID:23633851

  8. Surgical Approach to Splenic Hydatid Cyst: Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Eris, Cengiz; Akbulut, Sami; Yildiz, Mehmet Kamil; Abuoglu, Hasan; Odabasi, Mehmet; Ozkan, Erkan; Atalay, Suleyman; Gunay, Emre

    2013-01-01

    The benefits and risks of surgery for splenic hydatid cyst (SHC) remain controversial. We aimed to share our experience about a surgical approach for SHC. Sixteen consecutive patients with SHC disease who underwent open splenectomy at our hospital between January 2006 and July 2012 were retrospectively evaluated. Data on the patients' demographic features, clinical findings, radiological and serological diagnostic methods, and surgical and medicinal treatment options were collected and used to generate descriptive profiles of diagnosis, treatment course, and outcome. The patient population was composed of 6 females and 10 males, with an age range of 18 to 79 years (mean age: 47.0 ± 18.0). Radiological examinations detected hydatid cysts in spleen alone (n = 7) or both spleen and liver (n = 9). Preoperative serological testing identified 13 of the patients as IHA positive. All except 1 patient received a 10- to 21-day preoperative course of albendazole therapy and all patients received vaccination 1 week prior to surgery. Seven patients underwent splenectomy. The remaining patients underwent splenectomy with partial cystectomy and omentopexy (n = 6), partial cystectomy and unroofing (n = 1), pericystectomy (n = 1), or pericystectomy with partial nephrectomy (n = 1). All except one patient received a 10- to 45-day postoperative course of albendazole. No patients developed serious complications or signs of recurrence during the follow-up. The clinical profile of SHC disease at our hospital includes diagnosis by radiological methods, splenectomy treatment by simple or concomitant procedures according to the patient's symptoms, cyst size, number and localization, and compression of adjacent organs, and adjunct vaccination to decrease risk of postoperative septic complications. This profile is associated with low risk of complications and high therapeutic efficacy. PMID:24229022

  9. Ecology-centered experiences among children and adolescents: A qualitative and quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Judy

    The present research involved two studies that considered ecology-centered experiences (i.e., experiences with living things) as a factor in children's environmental attitudes and behaviors and adolescents' ecological understanding. The first study (Study 1) examined how a community garden provides children in an urban setting the opportunity to learn about ecology through ecology-centered experiences. To do this, I carried out a yearlong ethnographic study at an urban community garden located in a large city in the Southeastern United States. Through participant observations and informal interviews of community garden staff and participants, I found children had opportunities to learn about ecology through ecology-centered experiences (e.g., interaction with animals) along with other experiences (e.g., playing games, reading books). In light of previous research that shows urban children have diminished ecological thought---a pattern of thought that privileges the relationship between living things---because of their lack of ecology-centered experiences (Coley, 2012), the present study may have implications for urban children to learn about ecology. As an extension of Study 1, I carried out a second study (Study 2) to investigate how ecology-centered experiences contribute to adolescents' environmental attitudes and behaviors in light of other contextual factors, namely environmental responsibility support, ecological thought, age and gender. Study 2 addressed three research questions. First, does ecological thought---a pattern of thought that privileges the relationship between living things---predict environmental attitudes and behaviors (EAB)? Results showed ecological thought did not predict EAB, an important finding considering the latent assumptions of previous research about the relationship between these two factors (e.g., Brugger, Kaiser, & Roczen, 2011). Second, do two types of contextual support, ecology-centered experiences (i.e., experiences with

  10. Ecology-Centered Experiences among Children and Adolescents: A Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orton, Judy

    2013-01-01

    The present research involved two studies that considered "ecology-centered experiences" (i.e., experiences with living things) as a factor in children's environmental attitudes and behaviors and adolescents' ecological understanding. The first study (Study 1) examined how a community garden provides children in an urban setting the…

  11. Parents' Experiences with Childhood Deafness: Implications for Family-Centered Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Carla Wood; Traub, Randi J.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the need for family-centered follow-up, this study examined parents' experiences with deafness after early identification. Qualitative inquiry methods were used to explore and describe the perceptions and experiences of nine parents of children identified with severe to profound deafness. Parents participated in face-to-face…

  12. Supporting flight data analysis for Space Shuttle Orbiter Experiments at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. J.; Budnick, M. P.; Yang, L.; Chiasson, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter Experiments program in responsible for collecting flight data to extend the research and technology base for future aerospace vehicle design. The Infrared Imagery of Shuttle (IRIS), Catalytic Surface Effects, and Tile Gap Heating experiments sponsored by Ames Research Center are part of this program. The paper describes the software required to process the flight data which support these experiments. In addition, data analysis techniques, developed in support of the IRIS experiment, are discussed. Using the flight data base, the techniques have provided information useful in analyzing and correcting problems with the experiment, and in interpreting the IRIS image obtained during the entry of the third Shuttle mission.

  13. Supporting flight data analysis for Space Shuttle Orbiter experiments at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. J.; Budnick, M. P.; Yang, L.; Chiasson, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    The space shuttle orbiter experiments program is responsible for collecting flight data to extend the research and technology base for future aerospace vehicle design. The infrared imagery of shuttle (IRIS), catalytic surface effects, and tile gap heating experiments sponsored by Ames Research Center are part of this program. The software required to process the flight data which support these experiments is described. In addition, data analysis techniques, developed in support of the IRIS experiment, are discussed. Using the flight data base, the techniques provide information useful in analyzing and correcting problems with the experiment, and in interpreting the IRIS image obtained during the entry of the third shuttle mission.

  14. Core-centering of compound drops in capillary oscillations: Observations on USML-1 experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G.; Anikumar, A. V.; Lee, C. P.; Lin, K. C.

    1994-01-01

    AA Using the existing inviscid theories, an attempt is made to explain the centering of the oscillating liquid shell. Experiments on liquid shells and liquid-core compound drops were conducted using acoustic levitation, in a low-gravity environment during a Space Shuttle flight. It was observed that their inner and outer interfaces became concentric when excited into capillary oscillations. Using the existing inviscid theories, and attempt is made to explain the centering of the oscillating liquid shell. It is concluded that viscosity needs to be considered in order to provide a realistic description of the centering process.

  15. [The social experience of psychosis in the context of a Psychosocial Care Center].

    PubMed

    Dias, Marcelo Kimati

    2011-04-01

    This study discusses the relations existing between the institutional aspects of a Psychosocial Care Center (Caps) and the experience of psychotic patients. Using the referential base of the social experience of psychosis, which is broader in scope than a description of the experience of symptoms, while considering cultural aspects of the experience, three case studies were conducted at two different times. All of the patients studied were interviewed in 1995 and again in 2003. In addition to interviews with the subjects themselves, open interviews were conducted with their families and their professional carers, thereby taking the social relationship networks of the patients into consideration. Three central aspects were emphasized: (1) study of the history of the illness; (2) study of the representations of the disease; and (3) description of the everyday life and social relationships of the patients. Aspects with respect to the treatment of psychotic patients included in Psychosocial Care Centers were conducted using an anthropological approach. PMID:21584457

  16. Establishment and furnishing of the Photovoltaic Center for the Southwest Residential Experiment Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwibel, H. S.; Schaefer, J. F.

    1982-04-01

    A building to serve as the operations, data gathering, and administrative complex and visitor center for the Southwest Residential Experiment Station (SW RES) was designed, constructed, and furnished as a cost-shared portion of a multiyear effort by the New Mexico Solar Energy Institute to establish and operate the SW RES for the Department of Energy National Photovoltaic Center Program. The 3000-square-foot building, called the Photovoltaic Center, houses a Visitor Center, shop area, offices, rest rooms, and a large data collection room. The passive solar design includes Earth berms, glazing along the southwest wall of the building and thermal mass in 55-gallon drums filled with water to store heat from solar radiation entering the building. The building is located on the New Mexico State University campus in Las Cruces.

  17. High School Students' Experiences of Bullying and Victimization and the Association with School Health Center Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine; Deardorff, Julianna; Lahiff, Maureen; Soleimanpour, Samira; Sakashita, Kimi; Brindis, Claire D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bullying and victimization are ongoing concerns in schools. School health centers (SHCs) are well situated to support affected students because they provide crisis intervention, mental health care, and broader interventions to improve school climate. This study examined the association between urban adolescents' experiences of…

  18. CENTER DIRECTOR RICHARD SMITH AND OTHER PERSONNEL OBSERVE SPACELAB 1 MODULE AND EXPERIMENT PALLET HO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    CENTER DIRECTOR RICHARD SMITH AND OTHER PERSONNEL OBSERVE SPACELAB 1 MODULE AND EXPERIMENT PALLET HO KSC-383C-2860.02 P-16225,ARCHIVE-03951 Spacelab 1 module and its attached pallet are hoisted out of the payload canister, over the work stands and into the cargo bay of the Columbia.

  19. The Cispus Experience: A Curriculum Guide for the Cispus Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Washington School Principals, Olympia.

    This curriculum guide presents lesson plans for outdoor and environmental education at the Cispus Learning Center, a camp in Randle, Washington. Objectives for the Cispus experience cover student learning of content, socialization as a team member, development of aesthetic awareness of nature and art, and increased physical wellness. Lesson plans…

  20. Individual Differences and the Conundrums of User-Centered Design: Two Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Bryce

    2000-01-01

    Discusses individual differences between users of information systems that can influence search performance, and describes two experiments that addressed user-centered design of information systems. Highlights include interaction between cognitive abilities and design features; compensation and capitalization perspectives; recall and precision;…

  1. Leaders' Experiences with High School-College Writing Center Collaborations: A Qualitative Multiple-Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to explore academic leaders' experiences with the organizational elements of their own high school-college writing center collaborations. Conjoining theories framed this study: collaborative leadership theory, Kenneth Bruffee's notion of social constructionism and collaborative learning…

  2. An Unsuccessful Experience with Computerized Medical Records in an Academic Medical Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dambro, Mark R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Experience with the Computer Stored Ambulatory Record (COSTAR), a computerized medical records system, installed at a large primary care clinic at a university medical center is reported. Use of the system was terminated because clinic revenues could not cover operating costs. (Author/MLW)

  3. Mass storage system experiences and future needs at the National Center for Atmospheric Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olear, Bernard T.

    1991-01-01

    A summary and viewgraphs of a discussion presented at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) Mass Storage Workshop is included. Some of the experiences of the Scientific Computing Division at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) dealing the the 'data problem' are discussed. A brief history and a development of some basic mass storage system (MSS) principles are given. An attempt is made to show how these principles apply to the integration of various components into NCAR's MSS. Future MSS needs for future computing environments is discussed.

  4. An Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience in a Student-Staffed Medication Therapy Management Call Center

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Anna M.; Roane, Teresa E.; Mistry, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To describe the implementation of an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in medication therapy management (MTM) designed to contribute to student pharmacists’ confidence and abilities in providing MTM. Design. Sixty-four student pharmacists provided MTM services during an APPE in a communication and care center. Assessment. Students conducted 1,495 comprehensive medication reviews (CMRs) identifying 6,056 medication-related problems. Ninety-eight percent of the students who completed a survey instrument (52 of 53) following the APPE expressed that they had the necessary knowledge and skills to provide MTM services. Most respondents felt that pharmacist participation in providing Medicare MTM could move the profession of pharmacy forward and that pharmacists will have some role in deciding the specific provisions of the Medicare MTM program (92% and 91%, respectively). Conclusion. Students completing the MTM APPE received patient-centered experiences that supplemented their confidence, knowledge, and skill in providing MTM services in the future. PMID:22919086

  5. Preliminary Pioneer 10 encounter results from the Ames Research Center plasma analyzer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, J. H.; Collard, H. R.; Mihalov, J. D.; Intriligator, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    Preliminary results from the Ames Research Center plasma analyzer experiment for the Pioneer 10 Jupiter encounter indicate that Jupiter has a detached bow shock and magnetopause similar to the case at Earth but much larger in spatial extent. In contrast to Earth, Jupiter's outer magnetosphere appears to be highly inflated by thermal plasma and therefore highly responsive in size to changes in solar wind dynamic pressure.

  6. Nursing at ground zero: experiences during and after September 11 World Trade Center attack.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Suzanne Steffan; Jezewski, Mary Ann; Nelson-Tuttle, Christine; Shipkey, Nancy; Wilk, Nancy; Crandall, Blythe

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to discover shared perceptions, feelings, and common experiences of nurses after the September 11th World Trade Center terrorist attack through interpretive analysis of narrative stories of seventeen nurses. Six themes and one constitutive pattern describe the experiences: (a) Loss of a symbol and regaining new meaning, (b) Disaster without patients, (c) Coordinating with and without organizations, (d) Rediscovering the pride in nursing, (e) Traumatic Stress, and (f) Preparing for the future. The constitutive pattern is that nursing enables a humanitarian disaster response. PMID:12146085

  7. [The experience lived by clients' family members of a child psychosocial care center].

    PubMed

    Machineski, Gicelle Galvan; Schneider, Jacó Fernando; Camatta, Marcio Wagner

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the lived experiences of family members of children attending a Child Psychosocial Care Center. This study is a qualitative research with a phenomenological approach, developed at a Child Psychosocial Care Center (CAPSi as per its acronym in Portuguese) located in the municipality of Cascavel, State of Paraná. Participants were eleven family members of clients attending the above mentioned service and who, more actively, took part in the clients' care. Semi-structured interviews were performed and the gathered data were then analyzed by means of social phenomenology methodology The experience lived by the family members of children attending the Child Psychosocial Care Center included experiences in dealing with clients' behavior; seeking referrals to other services; waiting for treatment; hoping to see an improvement in the clinical profile of the patient and experiencing the service support provided to the family. Thus, this present study may contribute to a reflection on mental health nursing practice in caring for clients and their families. PMID:23781733

  8. A qualitative study of the experience of CenteringPregnancy group prenatal care for physicians

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study sought to understand the central meaning of the experience of group prenatal care for physicians who were involved in providing CenteringPregnancy through a maternity clinic in Calgary, Canada. Method The study followed the phenomenological qualitative tradition. Three physicians involved in group prenatal care participated in a one-on-one interview between November and December 2009. Two physicians participated in verification sessions. Interviews followed an open ended general guide and were audio recorded and transcribed. The purpose of the analysis was to identify meaning themes and the core meaning experienced by the physicians. Results Six themes emerged: (1) having a greater exchange of information, (2) getting to knowing, (3) seeing women get to know and support each other, (4) sharing ownership of care, (5) having more time, and (6) experiencing enjoyment and satisfaction in providing care. These themes contributed to the core meaning for physicians of “providing richer care.” Conclusions Physicians perceived providing better care and a better professional experience through CenteringPregnancy compared to their experience of individual prenatal care. Thus, CenteringPregnancy could improve work place satisfaction, increase retention of providers in maternity care, and improve health care for women. PMID:23445867

  9. NASA Glenn Research Center's Materials International Space Station Experiments (MISSE 1-7)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce a.; Dever, Joyce A.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Miller, Sharon K.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Panko, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (Glenn) has 39 individual materials flight experiments (>540 samples) flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) to address long duration environmental durability of spacecraft materials in low Earth orbit (LEO). MISSE is a series of materials flight experiments consisting of trays, called Passive Experiment Carriers (PECs) that are exposed to the space environment on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). MISSE 1-5 have been successfully flown and retrieved and were exposed to the space environment from one to four years. MISSE 6A & 6B were deployed during the STS-123 shuttle mission in March 2008, and MISSE 7A & 7B are being prepared for launch in 2009. The Glenn MISSE experiments address atomic oxygen (AO) effects such as erosion and undercutting of polymers, AO scattering, stress effects on AO erosion, and in-situ AO fluence monitoring. Experiments also address solar radiation effects such as radiation induced polymer shrinkage, stress effects on radiation degradation of polymers, and radiation degradation of indium tin oxide (ITO) coatings and spacesuit fabrics. Additional experiments address combined AO and solar radiation effects on thermal control films, paints and cermet coatings. Experiments with Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) seals and UltraFlex solar array materials are also being flown. Several experiments were designed to provide ground-facility to in-space calibration data thus enabling more accurate in-space performance predictions based on ground-laboratory testing. This paper provides an overview of Glenn s MISSE 1-7 flight experiments along with a summary of results from Glenn s MISSE 1 & 2 experiments.

  10. Financial Planning for Military Child Care Centers: A Guidebook Based on the Experiences of the Fort Lewis Child Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Good record keeping--along with a constant and detailed knowledge of expenses, income, profit, and loss--is the first step toward profitable management of a child care center. Good record keeping is especially important in a center that provides "drop-in" or occasional care because income may fluctuate greatly as a result of the variable number of…

  11. Establishment of a Comprehensive Epilepsy Center in Pakistan: Initial Experiences, Results, and Reflections

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, M. Zubair; Sobani, Zain A.; Quadri, S. A.; Ahmed, S. Nizam; Sheerani, Mughis; Siddiqui, Fowzia; Boling, Warren W.; Enam, Syed Ather

    2012-01-01

    Background. Developing countries, home to 80% of epilepsy patients, do not have comprehensive epilepsy surgery programs. Considering these needs we set up first epilepsy surgery center in Pakistan. Methods. Seventeen teleconferences focused on setting up an epilepsy center at the Aga Khan University (AKU), Karachi, Pakistan were arranged with experts from the University of Alberta Hospital, Alberta, Canada and the University of West Virginia, USA over a two-year period. Subsequently, the experts visited the proposed center to provide hands on training. During this period several interactive teaching sessions, a nationwide workshop, and various public awareness events were organized. Results. Sixteen patients underwent surgery, functional hemispherectomy (HS) was done in six, anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) in six, and neuronavigation-guided selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) using keyhole technique in four patients. Minimal morbidity was observed in ATL and, SAH groups. All patients in SAH group (100%) had Grade 1 control, while only 5 patients (83%) in ATL group, and 4 patients (66%) in HS group had Grade 1 control according to Engel's classification, in average followups of 12 months, 24 months and 48 months for SAH, ATL, and HS, respectively. Conclusion. As we share our experience we hope to set a practical example for economically constrained countries that successful epilepsy surgery centers can be managed with limited resources. PMID:22957232

  12. The L-SCAN Experiment: Mapping the Axial Magma Chamber Beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, C. M.; Dunn, R.; Brooks, K.; Conder, J. A.; Martinez, F.; Conley, M. M.

    2009-12-01

    The L-SCAN (Lau Spreading Center Active-source Investigation) seismic experiment was designed to examine the relationship between melt supply and magmatic, tectonic, and hydrothermal processes along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (a RIDGE2000 focus site). This 3-D active-source ocean-bottom-seismometer experiment covers a 100-km-long section of the spreading center, which exhibits significant along-strike variability in seafloor morphology, tectonics, crustal magma storage, and hydrothermal venting. Presumably these changes arise from variations in mantle melt supply. During the seismic experiment, we deployed 84 4-component ocean bottom seismometers (OBS), obtained from the OBSIP national instrument pool, over a 40 x 100 sq. km area centered on the ridge at 20°30'S. Sixty-five seismic lines (50-150 km in length) were shot using the R/V M. G. Langseth's 36-element airgun source, generating ~1 million seismic travel time observations. The experiment extends across three ridge segments, separated by two overlapping spreading centers. The southern segment exhibits an ‘inflated’ cross-sectional area and is underlain by an axial-magma-chamber seismic reflector (as detected by a previous MCS seismic study). We present a preliminary analysis of the L-SCAN refraction data collected along this ridge segment. Travel times of P-wave seismic energy were measured and compared for ray paths as a function of distance from the ridge axis, thereby allowing us to map, to first order, the location of the crustal low-velocity zone that extends beneath the AMC reflector. Only P-wave energy that has traveled within ~2-3 km of the ridge axis clearly exhibits the travel time delays indicative of a crustal low-velocity "mush” zone. We have not yet examined the deeper, Moho- and mantle-turning P-wave arrivals. It has been previously observed that high-temperature venting along this ridge segment is restricted to a narrow region at the ridge axis. We suggest a model in which a

  13. Forging successful academic-community partnerships with community health centers: the California statewide Area Health Education Center (AHEC) experience.

    PubMed

    Fowkes, Virginia; Blossom, H John; Mitchell, Brenda; Herrera-Mata, Lydia

    2014-01-01

    Increased access to insurance under the Affordable Care Act will increase demands for clinical services in community health centers (CHCs). CHCs also have an increasingly important educational role to train clinicians who will remain to practice in community clinics. CHCs and Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) are logical partners to prepare the health workforce for the future. Both are sponsored by the Health Resources and Services Administration, and they share a mission to improve quality of care in medically underserved communities. AHECs emphasize the educational side of the mission, and CHCs the service side. Building stronger partnerships between them can facilitate a balance between education and service needs.From 2004 to 2011, the California Statewide AHEC program and its 12 community AHECs (centers) reorganized to align training with CHC workforce priorities. Eight centers merged into CHC consortia; others established close partnerships with CHCs in their respective regions. The authors discuss issues considered and approaches taken to make these changes. Collaborative innovative processes with program leadership, staff, and center directors revised the program mission, developed common training objectives with an evaluation plan, and defined organizational, functional, and impact characteristics for successful AHECs in California. During this planning, centers gained confidence as educational arms for the safety net and began collaborations with statewide programs as well as among themselves. The AHEC reorganization and the processes used to develop, strengthen, and identify standards for centers forged the development of new partnerships and established academic-community trust in planning and implementing programs with CHCs. PMID:24280858

  14. A public health training center experience: professional continuing education at schools of public health.

    PubMed

    Potter, Margaret A; Fertman, Carl I; Eggleston, Molly M; Holtzhauer, Frank; Pearsol, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    The Public Health Training Center (PHTC) national program was first established at accredited schools of public health in 2000. The PHTC program used the US Health Resources and Services Administration's grants to build workforce development programs, attracting schools as training providers and the workforce as training clients. This article is a reflection on the experience of two schools, whose partnership supported one of the PHTCs, for the purpose of opening a conversation about the future of continuing education throughout schools and degree programs of public health. This partnership, the Pennsylvania & Ohio Public Health Training Center (POPHTC), concentrated its funding on more intensive training of public healthcare workers through a relatively narrow inventory of courses that were delivered typically in-person rather than by distance-learning technologies. This approach responded to the assessed needs and preferences of the POPHTC's workforce population. POPHTC's experience may not be typical among the PHTCs nationally, but the collective experience of all PHTCs is instructive to schools of public health as they work to meet an increasing demand for continuing education from the public health workforce. PMID:18552638

  15. An experience of liver transplantation in Latin America: a medical center in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Londoño, Mauricio; Marín, Juan; Muñoz, Octavio; Mena, Álvaro; Guzmán, Carlos; Hoyos, Sergio; Restrepo, Juan; Arbeláez, María; Correa, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for acute and chronic liver failure, for selected cases of tumors, and for conditions resulting from errors in metabolism. This paper reports the experience of a medical center in Latin America. Methods: Were conducted 305 orthotopic liver transplantations on 284 patients between 2004 and 2010. Of these patients, 241 were adults undergoing their first transplantation. Results: The average age of patients was 52 years old, and 62% of the individuals were male. The most common indication was alcoholic cirrhosis. The rate of patient survival after 1 and 5 years was 82 and 72% respectively. The rate of liver graft survival after 1 and 5 years was 78 and 68% respectively. The main cause of death was sepsis. Complications in the hepatic artery were documented for 5% of the patients. Additionally, 14.5% of the patients had complications in the biliary tract. Infections were found in 41% of the individuals. Acute rejection was observed in 30% of the subjects, and chronic rejection in 3%. Conclusion: In conclusion, liver transplantation at our medical center in Colombia offers good mid-term results, with a complication rate similar to that reported by other centers around the world. PMID:26019379

  16. Uncovering paradoxes from physicians' experiences of patient-centered ward-round.

    PubMed

    Bååthe, Fredrik; Ahlborg, Gunnar; Edgren, Lars; Lagström, Annica; Nilsson, Kerstin

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to uncover paradoxes emerging from physicians' experiences of a patient-centered and team-based ward round, in an internal medicine department. Design/methodology/approach Abductive reasoning relates empirical material to complex responsive processes theory in a dialectical process to further understandings. Findings This paper found the response from physicians, to a patient-centered and team-based ward round, related to whether the new demands challenged or confirmed individual physician's professional identity. Two empirically divergent perspectives on enacting the role of physician during ward round emerged: We-perspective and I-perspective, based on where the physician's professional identity was centered. Physicians with more of a We-perspective experienced challenges with the new round, while physicians with more of an I-perspective experienced alignment with their professional identity and embraced the new round. When identity is challenged, anxiety is aroused, and if anxiety is not catered to, then resistance is likely to follow and changes are likely to be hampered. Practical implications For change processes affecting physicians' professional identity, it is important for managers and change leaders to acknowledge paradox and find a balance between new knowledge that needs to be learnt and who the physician is becoming in this new procedure. Originality/value This paper provides increased understanding about how physicians' professional identity is interacting with a patient-centered ward round. It adds to the knowledge about developing health care in line with recent societal requests and with sustainable physician engagement. PMID:27198705

  17. My personal experiences at the BEST Medical Center: A day in the clinic-the morning.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip R; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Ida Lystic is a gastroenterologist who trained at the OTHER (Owen T. Henry and Eugene Rutherford) Medical Center, after having completed her MD degree at the prestigious Harvey Medical School (recently renamed the Harvey Provider School). She accepted a faculty position at the BEST (Byron Edwards and Samuel Thompson) Medical Center. Dr. Lystic shares her experiences on a typical morning in gastroenterology clinic. Although her clinic start date was delayed by 2 months after becoming sick following a mandatory flu shot and having to complete more than 70 hours of compliance training modules, she is now familiar with the BEST system. Clinic scheduling priorities include ensuring that the staff can eat lunch together and depart at 5:00 pm. It is a continual challenge to find time to complete the electronic medical record after BEST changed from the SIMPLE (Succinct Input Making Patients Lives Electronic) system to LEGEND (referred to as Lengthy and Excessively Graded Evaluation and Nomenclature for Diagnosis by her colleagues). To maintain clinic punctuality, a compliance spreadsheet is e-mailed monthly to the Wait Time Committee. Their most recent corrective action plan for tardy physicians included placing egg timers on the doors and having nurses interrupt visits that exceed the allotted time. Administrative decisions have resulted in downsizing personnel. Patients are required to schedule their own tests and procedures and follow-up appointments-causing low patient satisfaction scores; however, the money saved lead to a large year-end bonus for the vice president of BEST Efficiency, who holds "providers" accountable for the poor patient experience. Although Dr. Ida Lystic and the gastroenterology clinic at "the BEST Medical Center" are creations of the authors' imagination, the majority of the anecdotes are based on actual events. PMID:27265082

  18. The challenges of transdisciplinary research in health disparities: the early experiences of the centers for population health and health disparities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2003, NIH funded 8 Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHD). The mission of these centers is to understand and reduce health disparities using a transdisciplinary approach with community partners as co-investigators. The present study aims to identify early challenges experi...

  19. [Experience of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in critical care of respiratory failure in newborn with congenital diaphragmatic hernia in perinatal center].

    PubMed

    Burov, A A; Nikiforov, D V; Podurovskaia, Iu L; Dorofeeva, E I; Abramian, M A; Makhalin, M V; Shatalov, K V; Nikiforov, V S; Degtiarev, D N

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with an experience of veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use in preterm infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia during postoperative period in the perinatal center. PMID:24749262

  20. Group Violence and Migration Experience among Latin American Youths in Justice Enforcement Centers (Madrid, Spain).

    PubMed

    Martínez García, José Manuel; Martín López, María Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Group violence among Latin American immigrant youth has led to ongoing debates in political, legal, and media circles, yet none of those many perspectives has arrived at a solid, empirically supported definition for the phenomenon. This study aims to explore the relationship between the immigrant experience and violent group behavior in youths from Latin America serving prison sentences in Justice Enforcement Centers in the Community of Madrid. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 juveniles, and content analysis was applied to the resulting transcripts, employing Grounded Theory to create an axial codification of intra- and inter-categorical contents, and Delphi panels for quality control. The research team delved into 62 topics, addressing participants' perceptions of the immigrant experience and its effects on five socialization settings (neighborhood, school, family, peer group, and significant other), and each one's relationship to violent behavior. The results led us to believe the young people's immigration experiences had been systematically examined. Their personal and social development was influenced by negative socioeconomic conditions, ineffective parental supervision, maladjustment and conflict at school, and experiences of marginalization and xenophobia. All those conditions favored affiliation with violent groups that provided them instrumental (economic and material), expressive, or affective support. PMID:26514376

  1. The Deep Impact Network Experiment Operations Center Monitor and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Shin-Ywan (Cindy); Torgerson, J. Leigh; Schoolcraft, Joshua; Brenman, Yan

    2009-01-01

    The Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) software at JPL is an implementation of Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) which has been proposed as an interplanetary protocol to support space communication. The JPL Deep Impact Network (DINET) is a technology development experiment intended to increase the technical readiness of the JPL implemented ION suite. The DINET Experiment Operations Center (EOC) developed by JPL's Protocol Technology Lab (PTL) was critical in accomplishing the experiment. EOC, containing all end nodes of simulated spaces and one administrative node, exercised publish and subscribe functions for payload data among all end nodes to verify the effectiveness of data exchange over ION protocol stacks. A Monitor and Control System was created and installed on the administrative node as a multi-tiered internet-based Web application to support the Deep Impact Network Experiment by allowing monitoring and analysis of the data delivery and statistics from ION. This Monitor and Control System includes the capability of receiving protocol status messages, classifying and storing status messages into a database from the ION simulation network, and providing web interfaces for viewing the live results in addition to interactive database queries.

  2. Atmospheric monitoring of a perfluorocarbon tracer at the 2009 ZERT Center experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekney, Natalie; Wells, Arthur; Rodney Diehl, J.; McNeil, Matthew; Lesko, Natalie; Armstrong, James; Ference, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Field experiments at Montana State University are conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Zero Emissions Research and Technology Center (ZERT) to test and verify monitoring techniques for carbon capture and storage (CCS). A controlled release of CO 2 with an added perfluorocarbon tracer was conducted in July 2009 in a multi-laboratory study of atmospheric transport and detection technologies. Tracer plume dispersion was measured with various meteorological conditions using a tethered balloon system with Multi-Tube Remote Samplers (MTRS) at elevations of 10 m, 20 m, and 40 m above ground level (AGL), as well as a ground-based portable tower with monitors containing sorbent material to collect the tracer at 1 m, 2 m, 3 m, and 4 m AGL. Researchers designed a horizontal grid of sampling locations centered at the tracer plume source, with the tower positioned at 10 m and 30 m in both upwind and downwind directions, and the MTRS spaced at 50 m and 90 m downwind and 90 m upwind. Tracer was consistently detected at elevated concentrations at downwind sampling locations. With very few exceptions, higher tracer concentrations correlated with lower elevations. Researchers observed no statistical difference between sampling at 50 m and 90 m downwind at the same elevation. The US EPA AERMOD model applied using site-specific information predicted transport and dispersion of the tracer. Model results are compared to experimental data from the 2009 ZERT experiment. Successful characterization of the tracer plume simulated by the ZERT experiment is considered a step toward demonstrating the feasibility of remote sampling with unmanned aerial systems (UAS's) at future sequestration sites.

  3. The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1993 run cycle. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Farrer, R.; Longshore, A.

    1995-06-01

    This year the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) ran an informal user program because the US Department of Energy planned to close LANSCE in FY1994. As a result, an advisory committee recommended that LANSCE scientists and their collaborators complete work in progress. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and a associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can Iter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. This year, a total of 127 proposals were submitted. The proposed experiments involved 229 scientists, 57 of whom visited LANSCE to participate in measurements. In addition, 3 (nuclear physics) participating research teams, comprising 44 scientists, carried out experiments at LANSCE. Instrument beam time was again oversubscribed, with 552 total days requested an 473 available for allocation.

  4. Assessing exploitation experiences of girls and boys seen at a Child Advocacy Center.

    PubMed

    Edinburgh, Laurel; Pape-Blabolil, Julie; Harpin, Scott B; Saewyc, Elizabeth

    2015-08-01

    The primary aim of this study was to describe the abuse experiences of sexually exploited runaway adolescents seen at a Child Advocacy Center (N=62). We also sought to identify risk behaviors, attributes of resiliency, laboratory results for sexually transmitted infection (STI) screens, and genital injuries from colposcopic exams. We used retrospective mixed-methods with in-depth forensic interviews, together with self-report survey responses, physical exams and chart data. Forensic interviews were analyzed using interpretive description analytical methods along domains of experience and meaning of sexual exploitation events. Univariate descriptive statistics characterized trauma responses and health risks. The first sexual exploitation events for many victims occurred as part of seemingly random encounters with procurers. Older adolescent or adult women recruited some youth working for a pimp. However, half the youth did not report a trafficker involved in setting up their exchange of sex for money, substances, or other types of consideration. 78% scored positive on the UCLA PTSD tool; 57% reported DSM IV criteria for problem substance use; 71% reported cutting behaviors, 75% suicidal ideation, and 50% had attempted suicide. Contrary to common depictions, youth may be solicited relatively quickly as runaways, yet exploitation is not always linked to having a pimp. Avoidant coping does not appear effective, as most patients exhibited significant symptoms of trauma. Awareness of variations in youth's sexual exploitation experiences may help researchers and clinicians understand potential differences in sequelae, design effective treatment plans, and develop community prevention programs. PMID:25982287

  5. Training for life science experiments in space at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, Annette T.; Maese, A. Christopher

    1993-01-01

    As this country prepares for exploration to other planets, the need to understand the affects of long duration exposure to microgravity is evident. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center's Space Life Sciences Payloads Office is responsible for a number of non-human life sciences payloads on NASA's Space Shuttle's Spacelab. Included in this responsibility is the training of those individuals who will be conducting the experiments during flight, the astronauts. Preparing a crew to conduct such experiments requires training protocols that build on simple tasks. Once a defined degree of performance proficiency is met for each task, these tasks are combined to increase the complexity of the activities. As tasks are combined into in-flight operations, they are subjected to time constraints and the crew enhances their skills through repetition. The science objectives must be completely understood by the crew and are critical to the overall training program. Completion of the in-flight activities is proof of success. Because the crew is exposed to the background of early research and plans for post-flight analyses, they have a vested interest in the flight activities. The salient features of this training approach is that it allows for flexibility in implementation, consideration of individual differences, and a greater ability to retain experiment information. This training approach offers another effective alternative training tool to existing methodologies.

  6. Assessing exploitation experiences of girls and boys seen at a Child Advocacy Center

    PubMed Central

    Edinburgh, Laurel; Pape-Blabolil, Julie; Harpin, Scott B.; Saewyc, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to describe the abuse experiences of sexually exploited runaway adolescents seen at a Child Advocacy Center (N = 62). We also sought to identify risk behaviors, attributes of resiliency, laboratory results for sexually transmitted infection (STI) screens, and genital injuries from colposcopic exams. We used retrospective mixed-methods with in-depth forensic interviews, together with self-report survey responses, physical exams and chart data. Forensic interviews were analyzed using interpretive description analytical methods along domains of experience and meaning of sexual exploitation events. Univariate descriptive statistics characterized trauma responses and health risks. The first sexual exploitation events for many victims occurred as part of seemingly random encounters with procurers. Older adolescent or adult women recruited some youth working for a pimp. However, half the youth did not report a trafficker involved in setting up their exchange of sex for money, substances, or other types of consideration. 78% scored positive on the UCLA PTSD tool; 57% reported DSM IV criteria for problem substance use; 71% reported cutting behaviors, 75% suicidal ideation, and 50% had attempted suicide. Contrary to common depictions, youth may be solicited relatively quickly as runaways, yet exploitation is not always linked to having a pimp. Avoidant coping does not appear effective, as most patients exhibited significant symptoms of trauma. Awareness of variations in youth’s sexual exploitation experiences may help researchers and clinicians understand potential differences in sequelae, design effective treatment plans, and develop community prevention programs. PMID:25982287

  7. The Real Astronomy Experience: Making the IVO Effective for International Planetaria and Science Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennypacker, Carl

    The Real Astronomy Experience, or RAE, is a new exhibit just beginning development in the late fall of 2002, hopefully to be funded by the US National Science Foundation. RAE will allow public visitors in science centers, museums, and planetaria to operate and acquire images from a either a remote telescope in the southern hemisphere or from IVO data bases. RAE can operate from Europe and North America during daylight at the exhibit site. This project will be implemented also by international Global Hands-On Universe ("GHOU") collaborators. Greater international success will be facilitated by other GHOU nations joining the collaboration to build a viable network of small, inexpensive telescopes, and federating their data bases for the IVO.

  8. Assessing patient experiences in the pediatric patient-centered medical home: a comparison of two instruments.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Chakravorty, Shourjo; Madden, Vanessa; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline; Gubernick, Ruth; Kairys, Steven; Pelaez-Velez, Cristina; Sanders, Lee M; Thompson, Lindsay

    2014-11-01

    The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a model of care that has been promoted as a way to transform a broken primary care system in the US. However, in order to convince more practices to make the transformation and to properly reimburse practices who are PCMHs, valid and reliable data are needed. Data that capture patient experiences in a PCMH is valuable, but which instrument should be used remains unclear. Our study aims to compare the validity and reliability of two national PCMH instruments. Telephone surveys were conducted with children who receive care from 20 pediatric practices across Florida (n = 990). All of the children are eligible for Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program. Analyses were conducted to compare the Consumer Assessment of Health Plan Survey-Patient-Centered Medical Home (CAHPS-PCMH) and the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) medical home domain. Respondents were mainly White non-Hispanic, female, under 35 years old, and from a two-parent household. The NS-CSHCN outperformed the CAHPS-PCMH in regard to scale reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficients all ≥0.81 vs. 0.56-0.85, respectively). In regard to item-domain convergence and discriminant validity the CAHPS-PCMH fared better than the NS-CSHCN (range of convergence 0.66-0.93 vs. 0.32-1.00). The CAHPS-PCMH did not correspond to the scale structure in construct validity testing. Neither instrument performed well in the known-groups validity tests. No clear best instrument was determined. Further revision and calibration may be needed to accurately assess patient experiences in the PCMH. PMID:24585412

  9. Technology Transfer from University-Based Research Centers: The University of New Mexico Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Everett M.; Hall, Brad; Hashimoto, Michio; Steffensen, Morten; Speakman, Kristen L.; Timko, Molly K.

    1999-01-01

    A study of 55 research centers at the University of New Mexico investigated the nature of the typical center, why funding has risen during the 1990s, reasons for founding the centers, the director's role, how university-based research centers transfer technology to private companies and other organizations, and what determines program…

  10. Glenn's Telescience Support Center Provided Around-the-Clock Operations Support for Space Experiments on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malarik, Diane C.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center s Telescience Support Center (TSC) allows researchers on Earth to operate experiments onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and the space shuttles. NASA s continuing investment in the required software, systems, and networks provides distributed ISS ground operations that enable payload developers and scientists to monitor and control their experiments from the Glenn TSC. The quality of scientific and engineering data is enhanced while the long-term operational costs of experiments are reduced because principal investigators and engineering teams can operate their payloads from their home institutions.

  11. Crack-Detection Experiments on Simulated Turbine Engine Disks in NASA Glenn Research Center's Rotordynamics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.; Abdul-Aziz, Ali

    2010-01-01

    The development of new health-monitoring techniques requires the use of theoretical and experimental tools to allow new concepts to be demonstrated and validated prior to use on more complicated and expensive engine hardware. In order to meet this need, significant upgrades were made to NASA Glenn Research Center s Rotordynamics Laboratory and a series of tests were conducted on simulated turbine engine disks as a means of demonstrating potential crack-detection techniques. The Rotordynamics Laboratory consists of a high-precision spin rig that can rotate subscale engine disks at speeds up to 12,000 rpm. The crack-detection experiment involved introducing a notch on a subscale engine disk and measuring its vibration response using externally mounted blade-tip-clearance sensors as the disk was operated at speeds up to 12 000 rpm. Testing was accomplished on both a clean baseline disk and a disk with an artificial crack: a 50.8-mm- (2-in.-) long introduced notch. The disk s vibration responses were compared and evaluated against theoretical models to investigate how successful the technique was in detecting cracks. This paper presents the capabilities of the Rotordynamics Laboratory, the baseline theory and experimental setup for the crack-detection experiments, and the associated results from the latest test campaign.

  12. Preliminary single center clinical experience of the use of a new implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J M; Roberts, P R; Allen, S; Kallok, M J

    1998-12-01

    We report a single center's preliminary clinical experience of the Sentinel (Angeion, Minneapolis, MN) implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), which employs novel technologies that offer the potential for significant reduction in ICD size. Thirty-three patients have received Sentinel ICDs with a mean follow-up of 450 (range 150-1023) days. Device shock therapy has been used to defibrillate/cardiovert 43 spontaneous episodes of malignant ventricular arrhythmia and 510 episodes of hemodynamically well tolerated ventricular arrhythmia have been pace-terminated (pace-termination failed in 6 episodes with subsequent delivery of appropriate shock therapy). There has been no arrhythmic death in this patient population. There have been 9 inappropriate shocks in 6 patients (in 2 patients for atrial fibrillation which had satisfied the algorithm detection criteria for high zone ventricular arrhythmia, in 3 for sinus tachycardia [rate greater than 180 beats per min] and in 1 due to device capacitor malfunction). Device replacement has been required for component malfunction in 3 patients. There have been no other major complications. Follow-up time to date is short and longterm device efficacy and performance remain unproven. However, our early clinical experience suggests that the innovations used to manufacture the Sentinel ICD have facilitated reduction in ICD size without compromising therapeutic efficacy. PMID:10027122

  13. Laparoscopy Versus Robotic Surgery for Colorectal Cancer: A Single-Center Initial Experience.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Francesco; Piagnerelli, Riccardo; Scheiterle, Maximilian; Di Mare, Giulio; Gnoni, Pasquale; Marrelli, Daniele; Roviello, Franco

    2016-08-01

    Background Minimally invasive approach has gained interest in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study is to analyze the differences between laparoscopy and robotics for colorectal cancer in terms of oncologic and clinical outcomes in an initial experience of a single center. Materials and Methods Clinico-pathological data of 100 patients surgically treated for colorectal cancer from March 2008 to April 2014 with laparoscopy and robotics were analyzed. The procedures were right colonic, left colonic, and rectal resections. A comparison between the laparoscopic and robotic resections was made and an analysis of the first and the last procedures in the 2 groups was performed. Results Forty-two patients underwent robotic resection and 58 underwent laparoscopic resection. The postoperative mortality was 1%. The number of harvested lymph nodes was higher in robotics. The conversion rate was 7.1% for robotics and 3.4% for laparoscopy. The operative time was lower in laparoscopy for all the procedures. No differences were found between the first and the last procedures in the 2 groups. Conclusions This initial experience has shown that robotic surgery for the treatment of colorectal adenocarcinoma is a feasible and safe procedure in terms of oncologic and clinical outcomes, although an appropriate learning curve is necessary. Further investigation is needed to demonstrate real advantages of robotics over laparoscopy. PMID:26721500

  14. Early Clinical Experiences for Second-Year Student Pharmacists at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Amerine, Lindsey B.; Chen, Sheh-Li; Luter, David N.; Arnall, Justin; Smith, Shayna; Roth, Mary T.; Rodgers, Philip T.; Williams, Dennis M.; Pinelli, Nicole R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine student outcomes associated with the Student Medication and Reconciliation Team (SMART) program, which was designed to provide second-year student pharmacists at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Eshelman School of Pharmacy direct patient care experience at UNC Medical Center. Design. Twenty-two second-year student pharmacists were randomly selected from volunteers, given program training, and scheduled for three 5-hour evening shifts in 2013-2014. Pre/post surveys and reflection statements were collected from 19 students. Data were analyzed with a mixed methods approach. Assessment. Survey results revealed an increase in student self-efficacy (p<0.05) and positive perceptions of SMART. Qualitative findings suggest the program provided opportunities for students to develop strategies for practice, promoted an appreciation for the various roles pharmacists play in health care, and fostered an appreciation for the complexity of real-world practice. Conclusion. Early clinical experiences can enhance student learning and development while fostering an appreciation for pharmacy practice. PMID:26839428

  15. Assessment of the Patient-Centered and Family-Centered Care Experience of Total Joint Replacement Patients Using a Shadowing Technique.

    PubMed

    Marcus-Aiyeku, Ulanda; DeBari, Margaret; Salmond, Susan

    2015-01-01

    In 2030, when baby boomers reach 65 years of age and represent 18% of the population, it is anticipated that 67 million adults will have a diagnosis of arthritis increasing the demand for total hip and knee arthroplasty. With the growing emphasis on patient- and family-centered care, the aim of this project was to assess the patient experience of patients and families throughout the entire spectrum of the total joint replacement service line care at a university regional trauma hospital. A shadowing methodology as defined by the Institute for Health Improvement was utilized. Eight patient/family groups undergoing total joint replacements were shadowed. The mapped care experience included time, caregiver, activity, shadower observations, and impressions. Findings revealed inconsistencies in the delivery of patient- and family-centered care. Communication and interactions were predominantly provider-centric, with a focus on care routines versus the patient and family, and anticipation that care would be medically directed. PMID:26375835

  16. OPEN PELVIC FRACTURES: THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE MEDICAL CENTER AT KNOXVILLE EXPERIENCE OVER TEN YEARS

    PubMed Central

    Black, Emily Anne; Lawson, Christy M; Smith, Scott; Daley, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Open fractures of the pelvis remain a devastating injury with a high mortality and morbidity. Such injuries require an aggressive treatment plan and the coordination of trauma and orthopaedic surgeons to achieve the best outcomes. We report our experience at the University of Tennessee Medical Center at Knoxville with open pelvic fractures over the last ten years. Methods After IRB and institutional approval, we reviewed patients admitted with a diagnosis of open fracture of the pelvis from 1999 to 2009. Demographic and admission data were recorded in the trauma registry (TRACS) of the Level I Trauma Center, serving the 1.2 million people living in the regions of east Tennessee, western North Carolina and southeastern Kentucky. Data on fractures were obtained from review of the medical records and radiographs within the chart Results There were 3053 pelvic fractures from January 1999 to December 2009. There were 231 deaths in this group (6%) and ages ranged from 18 to 89 years old and Injury Severity Scores ranged from 4 to 75, with a mean of 18.3. Seventy five percent of patients were able to be discharged home. Fifty-two fractures were open. There were 43 men and the mean age was 39 years old. Average ISS was 23 and ranged from 5 to 50. There were 10 deaths (19%) and eight patients underwent an-gioembolization for control of bleeding (3 deaths). Motorcycle crashes were the most frequent cause of an open fracture, with lateral compression injuries representing 71%. A defined algorithm for fracture management has been in place and employed to assure adequate resuscitation and fracture care and is presented. Discussion Open pelvic fractures are usually the result of a high energy transfer, and convey a high morbidity and mortality. A defined resuscitation and fixation strategy improves outcome from historical reports. Injuries from penetrating mechanisms are associated with less morbidity and lower mortality. PMID:22096441

  17. Evaluating Quality in Clinical Cancer Research: The M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cox, James D.; Giralt, Sergio A.; Veazie, Mary L.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Bruner, Janet M.; Chan, Ka Wah; Hittelman, Walter N.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Iyer, Revathy B.; Karp, Daniel D.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Lippman, Scott M.; Raad, Issam I.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Zwelling, Leonard A.; Markman, Maurie

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the unquestionable importance of clinically oriented research designed to test the safety and efficacy of new therapies in patients with malignant disease, there is limited information regarding strategies to evaluate the quality of such efforts at academic institutions. Methods To address this issue, a committee of senior faculty at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center established specific criteria by which investigators from all departments engaged in clinical research could be formally evaluated. Scoring criteria were established and revised based on the results of a pilot study. Beginning in January 2004, the committee evaluated all faculty involved in clinical research within 35 departments. Scores for individual faculty members were assigned on a scale of 1 (outstanding) to 5; a score of 3 was set as the standard for the institution. Each department also received a score. The results of the evaluation were shared with departmental chairs and the Chief Academic Officer. Results 392 faculty were evaluated. The median score was 3. Full professors more frequently received a score of 1, but all faculty ranks received scores of 4 and 5. As a group, tenure/tenure track faculty achieved superior scores compared to nontenure track faculty. Conclusions Based on our experience, we believe it is possible to conduct a rigorous consensus-based evaluation of the quality of clinical cancer research being conducted at an academic medical center. It is reasonable to suggest such evaluations can be used as a management tool and may lead to higher-quality clinical research. PMID:19571599

  18. Nuclear Energy Experiments to the Center for Global Security and Cooperation.

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, Douglas M.

    2015-06-01

    This is to serve as verification that the Center 6200 experimental pieces supplied to the Technology Training and Demonstration Area within the Center of Global Security and Cooperation are indeed unclassified unlimited released for viewing.

  19. Introducing sexual orientation and gender identity into the electronic health record: one academic health center's experience.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Edward J; Sitkin, Nicole; Ton, Hendry; Eidson-Ton, W Suzanne; Weckstein, Julie; Latimore, Darin

    2015-02-01

    Many U.S. populations experience significant health disparities. Increasing health care providers' awareness of and education about sexual orientation (SO) and gender identity (GI) diversity could help reduce health disparities among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients. The authors share the University of California, Davis, Health System's (UCDHS's) experience as it became the first U.S. academic health center to formally introduce patient SO/GI demographic data into its electronic health record (EHR) as a step toward reducing LGBT health disparities. Adding these data to the EHR initially met with resistance. The authors, members of the UCDHS Task Force for Inclusion of SO/GI in the EHR, viewed this resistance as an invitation to educate leaders, providers, and staff about LGBT health disparities and to expose providers to techniques for discussing SO/GI with patients. They describe the strategies they employed to effect institutional culture change, including involvement of senior leadership, key informant interviews, educational outreach via grand rounds and resident workshops, and creation of a patient safety net through inviting providers to self-identify as welcoming LGBT patients. The ongoing cultural change process has inspired spin-off projects contributing to an improved climate for LGBT individuals at UCDHS, including an employee organization supporting SO/GI diversity, support for and among LGBT medical learners through events and listservs, development and implementation of an LGBT health curriculum, and creation of peer navigator programs for LGBT patients with cancer. The authors reflect on lessons learned and on institutional pride in and commitment to providing quality care for LGBT patients. PMID:25162618

  20. Community Health Center Use After Oregon’s Randomized Medicaid Experiment

    PubMed Central

    DeVoe, Jennifer E.; Marino, Miguel; Gold, Rachel; Hoopes, Megan J.; Cowburn, Stuart; O’Malley, Jean P.; Heintzman, John; Gallia, Charles; McConnell, K. John; Nelson, Christine A.; Huguet, Nathalie; Bailey, Steffani R.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE There is debate about whether community health centers (CHCs) will experience increased demand from patients gaining coverage through Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansions. To better understand the effect of new Medicaid coverage on CHC use over time, we studied Oregon’s 2008 randomized Medicaid expansion (the “Oregon Experiment”). METHODS We probabilistically matched demographic data from adults (aged 19–64 years) participating in the Oregon Experiment to electronic health record data from 108 Oregon CHCs within the OCHIN community health information network (originally the Oregon Community Health Information Network) (N = 34,849). We performed intent-to-treat analyses using zero-inflated Poisson regression models to compare 36-month (2008–2011) usage rates among those selected to apply for Medicaid vs not selected, and instrumental variable analyses to estimate the effect of gaining Medicaid coverage on use. Use outcomes included primary care visits, behavioral/mental health visits, laboratory tests, referrals, immunizations, and imaging. RESULTS The intent-to-treat analyses revealed statistically significant differences in rates of behavioral/mental health visits, referrals, and imaging between patients randomly selected to apply for Medicaid vs those not selected. In instrumental variable analyses, gaining Medicaid coverage significantly increased the rate of primary care visits, laboratory tests, referrals, and imaging; rate ratios ranged from 1.27 (95% CI, 1.05–1.55) for laboratory tests to 1.58 (95% CI, 1.10–2.28) for referrals. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that use of many different types of CHC services will increase as patients gain Medicaid through Affordable Care Act expansions. To maximize access to critical health services, it will be important to ensure that the health care system can support increasing demands by providing more resources to CHCs and other primary care settings. PMID:26195674

  1. An excellent navigation system and experience in craniomaxillofacial navigation surgery: a double-center study

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jiewen; Wu, Jinyang; Wang, Xudong; Yang, Xudong; Wu, Yunong; Xu, Bing; Shi, Jun; Yu, Hongbo; Cai, Min; Zhang, Wenbin; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Hao; Shen, Guofang; Zhang, Shilei

    2016-01-01

    Numerous problems regarding craniomaxillofacial navigation surgery are not well understood. In this study, we performed a double-center clinical study to quantitatively evaluate the characteristics of our navigation system and experience in craniomaxillofacial navigation surgery. Fifty-six patients with craniomaxillofacial disease were included and randomly divided into experimental (using our AccuNavi-A system) and control (using Strker system) groups to compare the surgical effects. The results revealed that the average pre-operative planning time was 32.32 mins vs 29.74 mins between the experimental and control group, respectively (p > 0.05). The average operative time was 295.61 mins vs 233.56 mins (p > 0.05). The point registration orientation accuracy was 0.83 mm vs 0.92 mm. The maximal average preoperative navigation orientation accuracy was 1.03 mm vs 1.17 mm. The maximal average persistent navigation orientation accuracy was 1.15 mm vs 0.09 mm. The maximal average navigation orientation accuracy after registration recovery was 1.15 mm vs 1.39 mm between the experimental and control group. All patients healed, and their function and profile improved. These findings demonstrate that although surgeons should consider the patients’ time and monetary costs, our qualified navigation surgery system and experience could offer an accurate guide during a variety of craniomaxillofacial surgeries. PMID:27305855

  2. Stent treatment for basilar artery dissection: A single-center experience of 21 patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Li, Tianxiao; Xue, Jiangyu; Wang, Ziliang; Bai, Weixing; Zhu, Liangfu; Feng, Guang; Xu, Gangqin; Yang, Bowen

    2016-06-01

    Basilar artery dissection is a rare disease with high morbidity and mortality. No well-established management strategy exists for this lesion. Endovascular reconstructive therapy using stents (with or without coiling) may be the optimum strategy.We describe our center's experience for this treatment strategy in 21 patients with basilar artery dissection from January 2009 to July 2014 (17 men, four women; age range, 18-70 years; median age, 56 years). We divided patients into two groups: Group 1 patients received stent-assisted coiling treatment, and Group 2 patients received stent-only treatment. Pre-treatment, peri-operation and follow-up evaluation were investigated for complications, clinical outcome and angiographic results. The median follow-up time was 20 months (range, 3-67 months).All patients were treated endovascularly by stent-assisted coiling (14 patients) or stent only (seven patients). Immediate angiography showed: in Group 1, five of 14 lesions were completely occluded, five were partially occluded, four revealed retention of contrast media; in Group 2, all patients (seven of seven) had contrast retention. At the follow-up visit (median seven months, 3-29 months), the aneurysms were angiographically improved in five of 13 patients in Group 1 compared with immediately post-operation, while six of sevenimproved in Group 2. Five patients (all in Group 1) had ischemic or hemorrhage peri-operation complications. Long-term good clinical outcomes (modified Rankin Scale score (mRS) ≤ 2) were achieved in all patients except three death cases (two in Group1, one in Group 2).In our experience, endovascular reconstructive therapy using stents (with or without coiling) for basilar artery dissection is effective and safe. Stent-only treatment seems have a better safety profile during the peri-operation period. PMID:26842610

  3. Three-Year Experience of an Academic Medical Center Ombuds Office.

    PubMed

    Raymond, John R; Layde, Peter M

    2016-03-01

    An ombuds is an individual who informally helps people or groups (visitors) resolve disputes and/or interpersonal conflicts as an alternative to formal dispute resolution mechanisms within an organization. Ombuds are nearly ubiquitous in many governmental, business, and educational settings but only recently have gained visibility at medical schools. Medical schools in the United States are increasingly establishing ombuds offices as part of comprehensive conflict management systems to address concerns of faculty, staff, students, and others. As of 2015, more than 35 medical schools in the United States have active ombuds Web pages. Despite the growing number of medical schools with ombuds offices, the literature on medical school ombuds offices is scant. In this article, the authors review the first three years of experience of the ombuds office at the Medical College of Wisconsin, a freestanding medical and graduate school with a large physician practice. The article is written from the perspective of the inaugural ombuds and the president who initiated the office. The authors discuss the rationale for, costs of, potential advantages of, and initial reactions of faculty, staff, and administration to having an ombuds office in an academic medical center. Important questions relevant to medical schools that are considering an ombuds office are discussed. The authors conclude that an ombuds office can be a useful complement to traditional approaches for conflict management, regulatory compliance, and identification of systemic issues. PMID:26675192

  4. Retroperitoneal Laparoscopic Nephroureterectomy for Tuberculous Nonfunctioning Kidneys: a single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiquan; Wang, Mingshuai; Niu, Yinong; Zhang, Junhui; Song, Liming; Xing, Nianzeng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To present our surgical techniques and experiences of retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephroureterectomy for the treatment of tuberculous nonfunctioning kidneys. Materials and Methods From March 2005 to March 2013, a total of 51 patients with tuberculous nonfunctioning kidney underwent retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephroureterectomy at our medical center. The techniques included early control of renal vessels and dissection of the diseased kidney along the underlying layer outside the Gerato’s fascia. The distal ureter was dissected through a Gibson incision and the entire specimen was removed en bloc from the incision. Patient demographics, perioperative characteristics and laboratory parameters as well as postoperative outcome were retrospectively reviewed. Results Retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephroureterectomy was successfully performed in 50 patients, whereas one case required conversion to open surgery due to non-progression of dissection. The mean operating time was 123.0 minutes (107-160 minutes) and the mean estimated blood loss was 134 mL (80-650 mL).The mean postoperative hospital stay was 3.6 days (3-5days) and the mean return to normal activity was 11.6 days (10-14days). Most intra-operative and post-operative complications were minor complications and can be managed conservatively. After 68 months (12-96 months) follow-up, the outcome was satisfactory, and ureteral stump syndrome did not occur. Conclusions Retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephroureterectomy as a minimally invasive treatment option is feasible for treatment of tuberculous nonfunctioning kidneys. PMID:26005971

  5. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: a single Spanish center's experience over the last 40 yr.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Linares, Cristina; Ojeda, Emilio; Forés, Rafael; Pastrana, Miguel; Cabero, Martín; Morillo, Daniel; Bautista, Guiomar; Baños, Isolina; Monteserín, Carmen; Bravo, Pilar; Jaro, Esther; Cedena, Teresa; Steegmann, Juan Luis; Villegas, Ana; Cabrera, José Rafael

    2014-10-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare clonal disease. To date, many reviews and series have been described. We report the experience of our center by presenting a review of 56 PNH patient cases with an average age at diagnosis of 38 yr and follow-ups beginning at approximately 40 yr; the median survival rate was 11 yr. The average clonal size upon diagnosis was 48%, presenting a variable evolution. Thrombotic episodes and cancer were five each, and the main causes of death among our patients were equal at 8.9%. Radiological study by magnetic resonance imaging is presented as a fundamental technique for estimating the deposit of iron levels in the liver and kidney, as well as in some decisive cases at the start of eculizumab therapy. Sixteen patients have been treated with eculizumab so far in our series, and being a safe drug, it provides improvement in the patients' quality of life, and the disappearance of clinical symptoms, and avoids the emergence of new thrombosis. PMID:24758317

  6. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source experience at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, T; Cee, R; Haberer, T; Naas, B; Peters, A; Scheloske, S; Spädtke, P; Tinschert, K

    2008-02-01

    Radiotherapy with heavy ions is an upcoming cancer treatment method with to date unparalleled precision. It associates higher control rates particularly for radiation resistant tumor species with reduced adverse effects compared to conventional photon therapy. The accelerator beam lines and structures of the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) have been designed under the leadership of GSI, Darmstadt with contributions of the IAP Frankfurt. Currently, the accelerator is under commissioning, while the injector linac has been completed. When the patient treatment begins in 2008, HIT will be the first medical heavy ion accelerator in Europe. This presentation will provide an overview about the project, with special attention given to the 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources in operation with carbon, hydrogen, helium, and oxygen, and the experience of one year of continuous operation. It also displays examples for beam emittances, measured in the low energy beam transport. In addition to the outlook of further developments at the ECR ion sources for a continuously stable operation, this paper focuses on some of the technical processings of the past year. PMID:18315121

  7. Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Single-Center Experience in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hiroki; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Unagami, Kohei; Hirai, Toshihito; Toki, Daisuke; Omoto, Kazuya; Okumi, Masayoshi; Imai, Yoichi; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-04-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a serious complication of solid organ transplantation; however, few large studies have been performed in Asian institutions. We review our single-center experience with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder patients in Japan. We retrospectively evaluated patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation between January 1985 and December 2013. The patients were divided into early-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (<1 year) and late-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (≥1 year) groups. Thirteen patients had the disorder, an incidence rate of 0.75% (13/1730). Early-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (N = 3) had not occurred for the last two decades. In the late-onset group (N = 10), the median time of onset was 108.7 months. The Kaplan-Meier 10-year overall survival rates were 76.9% and 95.4% in patients with and without the disorder, respectively (P = 0.0001). Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder significantly affected transplant recipients' mortality. Late-onset occurred even > 10 years after transplantation; therefore, long-term monitoring of patients is needed. PMID:26948427

  8. Partial Cystectomy after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Contemporary Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Ryan P.; Donahue, Timothy F.; Russo, Paul; Bochner, Bernard H.; Donat, Sherri M.; Dalbagni, Guido; Herr, Harry W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To report our contemporary experience with partial cystectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and Methods. Retrospective review of patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and partial cystectomy for urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from 1995 to 2013. Log-rank test and Cox regression models were used to analyze variables possibly associated with recurrence-free, advanced recurrence-free (free from recurrence beyond salvage with intravesical therapy or radical cystectomy), and overall survival. Results. All 36 patients had a solitary tumor <5 cm in size. Twenty-one patients (58%) achieved cT0 following neoadjuvant chemotherapy with 7 (33%) having residual disease at PC. At last follow-up, 19 (53%) patients had recurrence, 15 (42%) had advanced recurrence, 10 (28%) died of disease, and 22 (61%) maintained an intact bladder. Median follow-up of those who were with no evidence of disease was 17 months. On univariable analysis, after neoadjuvant chemotherapy positive nodes on imaging and positive surgical margin at partial cystectomy were both associated with worse recurrence-free, advanced recurrence-free, and overall survival. Five-year recurrence-free, advanced recurrence-free, and overall survival were 28%, 51%, and 63%, respectively. Conclusion. Partial cystectomy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy provides acceptable oncologic outcomes in highly selected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

  9. Three-Year Experience of an Academic Medical Center Ombuds Office

    PubMed Central

    Layde, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    An ombuds is an individual who informally helps people or groups (visitors) resolve disputes and/or interpersonal conflicts as an alternative to formal dispute resolution mechanisms within an organization. Ombuds are nearly ubiquitous in many governmental, business, and educational settings but only recently have gained visibility at medical schools. Medical schools in the United States are increasingly establishing ombuds offices as part of comprehensive conflict management systems to address concerns of faculty, staff, students, and others. As of 2015, more than 35 medical schools in the United States have active ombuds Web pages. Despite the growing number of medical schools with ombuds offices, the literature on medical school ombuds offices is scant. In this article, the authors review the first three years of experience of the ombuds office at the Medical College of Wisconsin, a freestanding medical and graduate school with a large physician practice. The article is written from the perspective of the inaugural ombuds and the president who initiated the office. The authors discuss the rationale for, costs of, potential advantages of, and initial reactions of faculty, staff, and administration to having an ombuds office in an academic medical center. Important questions relevant to medical schools that are considering an ombuds office are discussed. The authors conclude that an ombuds office can be a useful complement to traditional approaches for conflict management, regulatory compliance, and identification of systemic issues. PMID:26675192

  10. Presentation and Management of Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Karakuş, Abdullah; Ekmen, Mehmet Önder; Ayyildiz, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare acquired disorder characterized by intravascular hemolysis. Real-world experience of PNH management is largely unreported. A retrospective analysis was undertaken based on medical records from six patients with PNH [two with aplastic anemia (AA)] treated at our center, Dicle University, Turkey. Diagnosis was based on granulocyte PNH clones, ranging from 93% to 66%. All patients had symptoms consistent with PNH. One patient was managed adequately with supportive measures only. Five were treated with the complement inhibitor eculizumab. Follow-up data (<1 year) were available in four cases (the fifth had received only three infusions by final follow-up). Hemoglobin level in these four patients increased from 4.1-7.2 g/dL to 8.3-13.0 g/dL. Lactate dehydrogenase, a marker for hemolysis, decreased profoundly in the two non-AA patients, with more minor improvements in the two AA patients. Weakness and fatigue improved in all eculizumab-treated patients. Four of the five treated patients became transfusion independent, including the patient given only three infusions. In the remaining case, a patient with AA, transfusion requirement decreased, and abdominal pain and dysphagia resolved. No adverse events occurred. PNH can be successfully managed in routine practice. PMID:27103981

  11. Routine use of Hemospray for gastrointestinal bleeding: prospective two-center experience in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Sulz, Michael C; Frei, Remus; Meyenberger, Christa; Bauerfeind, Peter; Semadeni, Gian-Marco; Gubler, Christoph

    2014-07-01

    Hemospray (Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) is a hemostatic agent recently introduced for the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). To date, there is little experience with this fairly new hemostatic tool. The aim of this case series was to reflect the use and effectiveness of Hemospray as a treatment option in GIB in everyday clinical practice at two tertiary referral centers. Consecutive patients (n = 16) with active GIB of various origins were treated with Hemospray. The rate of successful initial hemostasis was 93.75 % (15 /16; salvage therapy 92.85 % [13/14]; monotherapy 100 % [2 /2]). The rebleeding rate within 7 days was 12.5 % (2/16). One patient, in whom interventional radiology also failed, had to undergo surgery as salvage therapy. The effectiveness of Hemospray in the management of GIB in various clinical situations is promising. Future multicenter randomized prospective trials for clearly defined bleeding situations are needed for greater generalizability of case series findings. PMID:24770964

  12. Pharmacomechanical Thrombolysis for the Treatment of Thrombosed Native Arteriovenous Fistula: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Boonsrirat, Ussanee; Hongsakul, Keerati

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Native arteriovenous fistula is one of the important routes for hemodialysis patients because of increased long-term survival and preservation of quality of life. We reported on a single-center experience with using pharmacomechanical thrombolysis for the treatment of thrombosed native arteriovenous fistula. Material/Methods This was a retrospective study of 12 hemodialysis patients (8 males and 4 females) with 14 thrombosed distal forearm Brescia-Cimino radiocephalic fistulas who were referred for pharmacomechanical thrombolytic treatment in the intervention unit of the Radiology Department, from 1 January 2010 to 30 December 2011. Demographic data, technical success rates, clinical success rates and complications were evaluated. The patency was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results The technical and clinical success was found in 12 thrombosed fistulas. Only 3 procedures had minor complications including small amounts of adjacent soft tissue hematoma. There were no procedure-related major complications. The primary patency rates at 6 and 12 months were 67% and 50%. The secondary patency rates at 6 and 12 months were 75% and 67%. Conclusions Pharmacomechanical thrombolysis is a minimally invasive, effective, durable, and safe procedure for the treatment of thrombosed native arteriovenous fistula. This procedure can be considered as an alternative treatment for thrombosed dialysis fistulas. PMID:25343002

  13. Reasons, procedures, and outcomes in ventriculoatrial shunts: A single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Celal; Demırtas, Sinan; Calıskan, Ahmet; Kamasak, Kaan; Karahan, Oguz; Guclu, Orkut; Yazıcı, Suleyman; Mavıtas, Binali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ventricular shunts are used to drain cerebrospinal fluid into extra-cranial spaces. Ventriculoatrial (VA) shunts are provided to transfer cerebrospinal fluid from the cerebral ventricle into the right atrium of the heart. A single center experience of indications, procedure, and clinical outcomes in VA shunt was presented in current study. Methods: VA shunts were applied in 10 patients who had repeated previous shunt dysfunction or infection. The reasons, clinical findings, replacement methods, and postoperative clinical follow-ups and outcomes were recorded retrospectively. Results: There were seven female (70%) and three (30%) male patients; their ages ranged from 5 to 13 years (mean ± SD; 8.5 ± 2.6 years). Shunt re-placement reasons were as follows: Shunt occlusion in five patients, intraperitoneal infection in four patients and a distal catheter was kinked and knotted in one patient. Postoperative early complications were seen in one patient as early catheter thrombosis and catheter revision were applied. Late complications were seen in two patients as follows: Catheter infection and infective endocarditis occurred in one patient and pulmonary thrombus occurred in one other patient. There was not any catheter-related mortality observed at the one year follow-up period. Conclusion: VA shunts may be an option for cerebrospinal fluid drainage at necessary conditions. However, sterilization and general training on asepsy and antisepsy are the most important determinants affecting the clinical outcome due to the cardio systemic relationship. PMID:23493480

  14. Skin Necrosis and Purpura Fulminans in Children With and Without Thrombophilia--A Tertiary Center's Experience.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Strauss, Tzipora; Rubinstein, Marina; Ben Harush, Miriam; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Kapelushmik, Joseph; Paret, Gideon; Kenet, Gili

    2015-01-01

    Purpura fulminans (PF) is a very rare clinicopathologic skin disorder comprising dermal microvascular thrombosis associated with perivascular hemorrhage of multiple origins. It may occur as the presenting symptom of severe congenital deficiency of protein C (PC) or protein S (PS) during the newborn period, or later in life following oral anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists, or of sepsis that may be associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation. Treatment consists of anticoagulants and PC concentrates during acute episodes. We report our experience in the diagnosis and management of pediatric PF. The medical records of the 6 children aged 2-16 years (median: 5 years) who presented with PF to our tertiary care center between 1996 and 2013 were studied. The thrombophilia workup revealed either the presence of congenital homozygous PC deficiency, prothrombotic polymorphisms (factor V Leiden and FIIG20210A heterozygosity), acquired PC/PS deficiency, or no discernible thrombophilia. The skin necrosis resolved following conservative fresh-frozen plasma/anticoagulant therapy in 2 cases, whereas 3 children required interventional plastic surgery. The sixth case, a 10-year-old child with severe PC deficiency, heterozygous factor V Leiden, and FIIG20210A, received recombinant activated PC. PF in childhood is rare and has multiple etiologies. Understanding of the variable pathogenesis and risk factors will facilitate diagnosis and appropriate clinical management. PMID:26436558

  15. Introducing an enhanced recovery after surgery program in colorectal surgery: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Bona, Stefano; Molteni, Mattia; Rosati, Riccardo; Elmore, Ugo; Bagnoli, Pietro; Monzani, Roberta; Caravaca, Monica; Montorsi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the implementation of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program at a large University Hospital from “pilot study” to “standard of care”. METHODS: The study was designed as a prospective single centre cohort study. A prospective evaluation of compliance to a protocol based on full application of all ERAS principles, through the progressive steps of its implementation, was performed. Results achieved in the initial pilot study conducted by a dedicated team (n = 47) were compared to those achieved in the shared protocol phase (n = 143) three years later. Outcomes were length of postoperative hospital stay, readmission rate, compliance to the protocol and morbidity. Primary endpoint was the description of the results and the identification of critical issues of large scale implementation of an ERAS program in colorectal surgery emerged in the experience of a single center. Secondary endpoint was the identification of interventions that have been proven to be effective for facilitating the transition from traditional care pathways to a multimodal management protocol according to ERAS principles in colorectal surgery at a single center. RESULTS: During the initial pilot study (March 2009 to December 2010; 47 patients) conducted by a dedicated multidisciplinary team, compliance to the items of ERAS protocol was 93%, with a median length of hospital stay (LOS) of 3 d. Early anastomotic fistulas were observed in 2 cases (4.2%), which required reoperation (Clavien-Dindo grade IIIb). None of the patients had been discharged before the onset of the complication, which could therefore receive prompt treatment. There were also four (8.5%) minor complications (Clavien-Dindo grade II). Thirty days readmission rate was 4%. Perioperative mortality was nil. After implementation of the protocol throughout the Hospital in unselected patients (May 2012 to December 2012; 147 patients) compliance was 74%, with a median LOS of 6 d. Early anastomotic fistulas

  16. Parent Perspectives on How a Child-Centered Preschool Experience Shapes Children's Navigation of Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Recchia, Susan; Bentley, Dana Frantz

    2013-01-01

    The authors used qualitative case study methodology to explore parents' perceptions of their children's readiness for kindergarten. The authors interviewed parents, focusing on their children's experiences during their transition from a child-centered, play-based preschool setting guided by an emergent curriculum into a range of…

  17. Radiation-Induced Sarcoma: A 15-Year Experience in a Single Large Tertiary Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Su; Chang, Ji Hyun; Choi, Noorie; Kim, Han-Soo; Han, Ilkyu; Moon, Kyung Chul; Kim, Il Han; Kim, Hak Jae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to report on the incidence and the experience in management of radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS) at a large single center in Korea for 15 years. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the sarcoma registry of a large institution from January 2000 to April 2014. Results Out of the 3,674 patients listed in the registry, 33 patients (0.9%) diagnosed with RIS were identified. The median latency of RIS was 12.1 years. The number of cases of RIS increased from four cases in the years 2000-2003 to 14 cases in the years 2012-2014. The most common histology was osteosarcoma (36.4%). The median follow-up period was 23.1 months, the median overall survival (OS) of all patients was 2.9 years, and their 5-year survival rate was 44.7%. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed association of the age at diagnosis (p=0.01) and the treatment aim (p=0.001) with the OS. The median OS and the 5-year survival rate of patients treated with curative surgery (n=19) were 9.6 years and 65%, respectively, and of the conservatively treated patients, 0.7 years and 0% (n=14). Re-irradiation was delivered to nine patients, and radiation toxicity was observed in five patients. Conclusion In this study, RIS accounted for 0.9% of the cases of sarcoma, with increasing incidence. Despite the association of curative resection with increased survival, it could be applied to only 58% of the patients. Considering the limited treatment options for RIS, conduct of a genetic study to identify the underlying mechanism of RIS is needed. PMID:27004955

  18. Liver Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Single Center Resume Overlooking Four Decades of Experience.

    PubMed

    Emmanouilidis, Nikos; Peters, Rickmer; Ringe, Bastian P; Güner, Zeynep; Ramackers, Wolf; Bektas, Hüseyin; Lehner, Frank; Manns, Michael; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Schrem, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Background. This is a single center oncological resume overlooking four decades of experience with liver transplantation (LT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods. All 319 LT for HCC that were performed between 1975 and 2011 were included. Predictors for HCC recurrence (HCCR) and survival were identified by Cox regression, Kaplan-Meier analysis, Log Rank, and χ (2)-tests where appropriate. Results. HCCR was the single strongest hazard for survival (exp⁡(B) = 10.156). Hazards for HCCR were tumor staging beyond the histologic MILAN (exp⁡(B) = 3.645), bilateral tumor spreading (exp⁡(B) = 14.505), tumor grading beyond G2 (exp⁡(B) = 8.668), and vascular infiltration of small or large vessels (exp⁡(B) = 11.612, exp⁡(B) = 18.324, resp.). Grading beyond G2 (exp⁡(B) = 10.498) as well as small and large vascular infiltrations (exp⁡(B) = 13.337, exp⁡(B) = 16.737, resp.) was associated with higher hazard ratios for long-term survival as compared to liver transplantation beyond histological MILAN (exp⁡(B) = 4.533). Tumor dedifferentiation significantly correlated with vascular infiltration (χ (2) p = 0.006) and intrahepatic tumor spreading (χ (2) p = 0.016). Conclusion. LT enables survival from HCC. HCC dedifferentiation is associated with vascular infiltration and intrahepatic tumor spreading and is a strong hazard for HCCR and survival. Pretransplant tumor staging should include grading by biopsy, because grading is a reliable and easily accessible predictor of HCCR and survival. Detection of dedifferentiation should speed up the allocation process. PMID:27057348

  19. Liver Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Single Center Resume Overlooking Four Decades of Experience

    PubMed Central

    Emmanouilidis, Nikos; Peters, Rickmer; Ringe, Bastian P.; Güner, Zeynep; Ramackers, Wolf; Bektas, Hüseyin; Lehner, Frank; Manns, Michael; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Schrem, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Background. This is a single center oncological resume overlooking four decades of experience with liver transplantation (LT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods. All 319 LT for HCC that were performed between 1975 and 2011 were included. Predictors for HCC recurrence (HCCR) and survival were identified by Cox regression, Kaplan-Meier analysis, Log Rank, and χ2-tests where appropriate. Results. HCCR was the single strongest hazard for survival (exp⁡(B) = 10.156). Hazards for HCCR were tumor staging beyond the histologic MILAN (exp⁡(B) = 3.645), bilateral tumor spreading (exp⁡(B) = 14.505), tumor grading beyond G2 (exp⁡(B) = 8.668), and vascular infiltration of small or large vessels (exp⁡(B) = 11.612, exp⁡(B) = 18.324, resp.). Grading beyond G2 (exp⁡(B) = 10.498) as well as small and large vascular infiltrations (exp⁡(B) = 13.337, exp⁡(B) = 16.737, resp.) was associated with higher hazard ratios for long-term survival as compared to liver transplantation beyond histological MILAN (exp⁡(B) = 4.533). Tumor dedifferentiation significantly correlated with vascular infiltration (χ2p = 0.006) and intrahepatic tumor spreading (χ2p = 0.016). Conclusion. LT enables survival from HCC. HCC dedifferentiation is associated with vascular infiltration and intrahepatic tumor spreading and is a strong hazard for HCCR and survival. Pretransplant tumor staging should include grading by biopsy, because grading is a reliable and easily accessible predictor of HCCR and survival. Detection of dedifferentiation should speed up the allocation process. PMID:27057348

  20. Older People’s Experiences of Patient-Centered Treatment for Chronic Pain: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Carrie F.; Karp, Jordan F.; Kleinman, Arthur; Reynolds, Charles F.; Weiner, Debra K.; Cleary, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Older adults with chronic pain who seek treatment often are in a health care environment that emphasizes patient-directed care, a change from the patriarchal model of care to which many older adults are accustomed. Objective To explore the experiences of older adults seeking treatment for chronic pain, with respect to patient-directed care and the patient–provider relationship. Design In-depth interviews with 15 Caucasian older adults with chronic pain who had been evaluated at a university-based pain clinic. All interviews were audiotaped and the transcripts were analyzed using a grounded theory based approach. Results Older adults with chronic pain vary in their willingness to be involved in their treatment decisions. Many frequently participate in decisions about their pain treatment by asking for or refusing specific treatments, demanding quality care, or operating outside of the patient–provider relationship to manage pain on their own. However, others prefer to let their provider make the decisions. In either case, having a mutually respectful patient–provider relationship is important to this population. Specifically, participants described the importance of “being heard” and “being understood” by providers. Conclusions As some providers switch from a patriarchal model of care toward a model of care that emphasizes patient activation and patient-centeredness, the development and cultivation of valued patient–provider relationships may change. While it is important to encourage patient involvement in treatment decisions, high-quality, patient-centered care for older adults with chronic pain should include efforts to strengthen the patient–provider relationship by attending to differences in patients’ willingness to engage in patient-directed care and emphasizing shared decision-making. PMID:19207235

  1. Laparoscopic splenectomy: a single center experience. Unusual cases and expanded inclusion criteria for laparoscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Marte, Gianpaolo; Scuderi, Vincenzo; Rocca, Aldo; Surfaro, Giuseppe; Migliaccio, Carla; Ceriello, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    Laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) is nowadays considered as the gold standard for most hematological diseases where splenectomy is necessary, but many questions still remain. The aim of this study was to analyze our 5-years experiences consisting of 48 consecutive LS cases in order to assess the optimal approach and the feasibility of the procedure also in malignant diseases and unusual cases such as a primary spleen lymphoma, a big splenic artery aneurism, or a spleen infarct due to a huge pancreatic pseudo-cyst. Forty-eight consecutive patients underwent LS from January 2006 to January 2011 with at least 1-year follow-up. Clinical data and immediate outcome were retrospectively recorded; age, diagnosis, operation time, perioperative transfusion requirement, conversion rate, accessory incision, hospital stay, and complications were analyzed. We had 14 cases of malignant splenic disease, the most frequent malignant diagnosis was non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (12/14, 85.7 %). Splenomegaly (interpole diameter (ID) >20 cm) was observed in 12 cases (25 %) and massive splenomegaly (ID >25 cm) in 3 cases (6.25 %). Conversion to laparotomy occurred in two patients (4.16 %), both associated to uncontrollable bleeding in patients with splenomegaly. Mean operative time was 138 ± 22 min. Mean hospital stay was 4.5 days. Postoperative morbidity rate was 8.8 % for the benign group and 35.7 % in the malignant group. Mortality occurred in 1/48 patients (2.08 %), as a result of overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI). LS can be performed safely for malignant splenic disease and splenomegaly without any statistically significant increase of morbidity and mortality rate. Conversion rate is increased for massive splenomegaly. LS should be considered as the preferential approach even in patients with malignant disease, splenomegaly, or unusual cases. Massive splenomegaly should be considered as relative contraindication to LS even at experienced centers. PMID:23355349

  2. Robotic-assisted partial nephrectomy without using ureteral stent: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, Burak; Coşkuner, Enis Rauf; Yalçın, Veli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To share our results of robotic assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN) we performed without using ureteral stent in a single center from Turkey. Material and methods Medical records of consecutive 45 patients (34 men and 11 women) who underwent RAPN for kidney lesions between March 2011 and December 2014 were retrieved, and evaluated. All the procedures were performed by a transperitoneal approach without using ureteral stent prior to surgery. Renal artery clamping was used in all cases and intraoperative ultrasonography was used in 2 cases. Results Patients undergoing RAPN had a mean tumor size of 4.42 cm (2–8) and a mean renal nephrometry score of 5.82 (4–11). The mean estimated blood loss was 250 mL (150–450 ml) and the mean operative time was 195 minutes (150–300). There was no statistical difference between the preoperative and postoperative serum creatinine levels at the first follow-up visit (0.9 vs. 0.95, p=0.087). Surgical margin positivity was not detected in any patient, and the mean surgical margin distance was calculated as 0.4 mm (0.2–10). In only 1 patient disease recurrence was detected at the 21st month of the the follow-up period, and no distant metastases was reported in our patients at a mean follow-up of 10 months (3–36 mos). Our complication rate was 11.1% and according to the Clavien system complications were as; grade 2 (3 patients), grade 3a (1 patient) and grade 3b (1 patient). Conclusion With appropriately selected patients and adequate surgical experience, RAPN performed without using ureteral stent is a safe and feasible method for localized renal tumors. PMID:27011873

  3. Radio-chemotherapy in anal cancer: Institutional experience at a large radiation oncology center in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Moisés; Ovalle, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Aim In this article the aim is to provide a concise narrative review and inform the institutional experience at a referral center in Chile with the use of radio-chemotherapy in anal cancer. Background Cancer of the anus and anal canal is mainly a loco-regional disease. For years the standard of care has been concomitant radio-chemotherapy, which permits organ preservation and better local control than alternative surgical procedures. Materials and methods A retrospective analysis of 44 patients treated between 2002 and 2010 was performed. Local recurrence, distant recurrence and overall survival were analyzed with the Kaplan–Meier method. Relevant groups where compared with the log-rank test and univariate analysis were done with the Cox proportional hazards model. Results Median follow-up of the cohort was 56 months, with a minimum follow-up of at least 24 months. There was a significant difference between clinical stages in disease free survival (log-rank trend p < 0.001), and a significant difference in overall survival (OS) when comparing clinical stages that were grouped in stage I–IIIa and IIIB (log-rank p = 0.001). On univariate analysis, age older than 60, having received full treatment and dose above 45 Gy were all significantly related to OS (p < 0.05). An overall survival of 45% and disease free survival of 45% at 5 years were found in our series. Conclusions Our findings show that results at the Instituto de Radiomedicina in Chile are comparable to published literature. Dismal results in stage IIIb cases indicate much work remains in therapies to achieve loco-regional control in locally advanced cases. PMID:25061522

  4. Bowel preparation in “real-life” small bowel capsule endoscopy: a two-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Amir; Dashkovsky, Marianna; Gralnek, Ian; Peled, Ravit; Chowers, Yehuda; Khamaysi, Iyad; Har-Noy, Ofir; Levi, Idan; Nadler, Moshe; Eliakim, Rami; Kopylov, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Background Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is an established diagnostic tool for the investigation of small bowel (SB) pathology. Bowel preparation prior to VCE may improve visualization, transit time, and diagnostic yield. We aimed to evaluate the “real-life” experience comparing two different preparation protocols in patients undergoing SB VCE. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from SB VCE procedures, performed in two tertiary care medical centers in Israel. VCE procedures performed at “Sheba Medical Center” used a 2-L polyethylene glycol (PEG) bowel preparation (n=360) while VCEs performed at “Rambam Health Care campus” used a clear liquid diet plus 12-h fast protocol (n=500). A dichotomous preparation scale (adequate, inadequate) was used to classify cleansing quality. Data collection included patient and procedural details. The proportion of VCE procedures with adequate bowel preparation and the overall positive SB findings in the two different bowel preparation protocols were evaluated. Results SB completion rates were higher in the PEG protocol (96% vs. 83%, P<0.001) and SB passage time was significantly faster in the PEG protocol (mean 217±73 vs. 238±77 min, P<0.001). Bowel preparation quality was similar between groups (8% vs. 7% inadequate preparation, P=0.591). Overall positive SB findings were similar between the two groups (57% clear liquid fasting only vs. 51% PEG protocol, P=0.119). Conclusion In this large cohort, a 2-L PEG protocol had similar preparation quality and diagnostic yield compared with clear liquid fasting. PMID:27064840

  5. A Single-center Experience in Splenic Diffuse Red Pulp Lymphoma Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Julhakyan, Hunan L; Al-Radi, L S; Moiseeva, T N; Danishyan, K I; Kovrigina, A M; Glebova, S M; Lugovskaya, S A; Dvirnik, V N; Khvastunova, A N; Yakutik, I A; Savchenko, V G

    2016-08-01

    The World Health Organization 2008 classification highlighted a new nosology-splenic diffuse red pulp lymphoma (SDRPL) with clinical and laboratory features similar to both splenic marginal zone lymphoma and hairy cell leukemia (HCL) and variant form of HCL. Experience of hematologists on the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of SDRPL is extremely limited. The aim of our report was to characterize the clinical and immunomorphologic features of SDRPL on our own observations. During 2013-2014, in National Research Center for Hematology, 87 spleen specimens removed from various B-cell lymphomas were analyzed. In four (4.6%) cases, the diagnosis SDRPL was made based on morphologic, immunohistochemical, immunophenotypic, molecular examination of spleen biopsies, blood and bone marrow samples. In all cases of SDRPL were observed significant splenomegaly, lymphocytosis from 56% to 94% (in two cases with leukocytosis 55.000 and 75.000 109/l). The circulating "villous" lymphocytes phenotype was CD20+ (bright), CD11c+/±, CD103 (weakly)+/±, LAIR-1+, CD25-, CD5-, CD10-, and CD23-. Mutation BRAFV600E was not detected. Bone marrow with minor lymphoid CD20+, CD25-, Annexin1-, Cyclin D1- cell infiltration. The average weight of the spleen was 3900 g (1450-9500 g), and morphologically, there was revealed lymphoid infiltration of red pulp with phenotype CD20+, DBA.44+, CD25-, Annexin1-, Cyclin D1-, CD103-, CD123-, CD27-, focal SD11c± and TRAP±. Now patients are observed in remission: two patients after splenectomy, two after splenectomy and cladribine+rituximab chemotherapy. SRDPL-a rare lymphoma that is suspected in the cases with significant splenomegaly and lymphocytosis with villous lymphocytes forms that have only a part of the classic markers HCL, with minor bone marrow infiltration. The standard diagnosis and treatment is splenectomy. Differential diagnosis of SMZL and HCL has clear criteria, but criteria of differentiation with variant HCL are still unknown. PMID

  6. Patients’ Experiences in Different Models of Community Health Centers in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Harry H. X.; Wong, Samuel Y. S.; Wong, Martin C. S.; Wei, Xiao Lin; Wang, Jia Ji; Li, Donald K. T.; Tang, Jin Ling; Gao, Gemma Y.; Griffiths, Sian M.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Current health care reforms in China have an overall goal of strengthening primary care through the establishment and expansion of primary care networks based on community health centers (CHCs). Implementation in urban areas has led to the emergence of different models of ownership and management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the primary care experiences of patients in the Pearl River Delta as measured by the Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCAT) and the relationships with ownership and management in the 3 different models we describe. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted on-site at CHCs in 3 cities within the Pearl River Delta, China, using a multistage cluster sampling method. A validated Mandarin Chinese version of the PCAT–Adult Edition (short version) was adopted to collect information from adult patients regarding their experiences with primary care sources. PCAT scores for individual primary care attributes and total primary care assessment scores were assessed with respect to sociodemographic characteristics, health characteristics, and health care service utilization across 3 primary care models. RESULTS One thousand four hundred forty (1,440) primary care patients responded to the survey, for an overall response rate of 86.1%. Respondents gave government-owned and -managed CHCs the highest overall PCAT scores when compared with CHCs either managed by hospitals (95.18 vs 90.81; P = .005) or owned by private and social entities (95.18 vs 90.69; P =.007) as a result of better first-contact care (better first-contact utilization) and coordination of care (better service coordination and information system). Factors that were positively and significantly associated with higher overall assessment scores included the presence of a chronic condition (P <.001), having medical insurance (P = .006), and a self-reported good health status (P <.001). CONCLUSIONS This study suggests that government-owned and -managed CHCs may be able

  7. The Brave New World of GEC Evaluation: The Experience of the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filinson, Rachel; Clark, Phillip G.; Evans, Joann; Padula, Cynthia; Willey, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the Health Resources Services Administration introduced new mandates that raised the standards on program evaluation for Geriatric Education Centers. Described in this article are the primary and secondary evaluation efforts undertaken for one program within the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center (RIGEC), the findings from these…

  8. Students Writing Their Own Tests--An Experiment in Student-Centered Assessment in Two Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Lionel M., Jr.

    A study investigated the usefulness of adopting innovative, student-centered instructional techniques in two traditional but very different cultures, Turkey and Puerto Rico. In each country, the study occurred in a program to train teachers of English as a Second Language (ESL). Using a student-centered approach, trainees learned how to prepare…

  9. Review of Restricted Experiment Requests, Division of Select Agents and Toxins, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2006-2013.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacinta; Gangadharan, Denise; Weyant, Robbin

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Division of Select Agents and Toxins (DSAT) regulates laboratories that possess, use, or transfer select agents and toxins in the United States. DSAT also mitigates biosafety risks through the review of "restricted experiments," which under the select agent regulations are experiments that pose heightened biosafety risks. From January 2006 through December 2013, DSAT received 618 requests from 109 entities to perform potentially restricted experiments. Of these requests, 85% were determined not to meet the regulatory definition of a restricted experiment, while 15% of the requests met the definition of a restricted experiment. Of the 91 restricted experiments proposed, DSAT approved 31 (34%) requests because the biosafety conditions proposed were commensurate with the experiments' biosafety risk. All 31 approved restricted experiments were for work with select toxins. DSAT did not approve 60 restricted experiment requests due to potentially serious biosafety risks to public health and safety. All 60 denied restricted experiments proposed inserting drug resistance traits into select agents that could compromise the control of disease. The select agents and toxins associated most frequently with requests that met the regulatory definition of a restricted experiment are Shiga toxin (n = 16), Burkholderia mallei (n = 15), Botulinum neurotoxin (n = 14), and Brucella abortus (n = 14). In general, all restricted experiment decisions are determined on a case-by-case basis. This article describes the trends and characteristics of the data associated with restricted experiment requests among select agents that have an impact on public health and safety (HHS only agents) or both public health and safety and animal health or products (overlap agents). The information presented here, coupled with the information published in the restricted experiment guidance document ( www.selectagents.gov ), is intended to promote awareness

  10. Staff's experiences of a person-centered health education group intervention for people with a persistent mental illness.

    PubMed

    Jormfeldt, Henrika; Brunt, David Arthur; Rask, Mikael; Bengtsson, Agneta; Svedberg, Petra

    2013-07-01

    Patient education in mental health care is a conventional intervention to increase patients' knowledge about their illness and treatment. A provider-centered focus in patient education may put patients in a passive role, which can counteract their processes of recovery. There is an increasing emphasis on recovery-oriented practice, an approach that is aligned with the service user perspective, but little is known about health care staff's perspectives on person-centered mental health care. A qualitative approach was used to describe staff's experiences of being group leaders in a person-centered health education intervention in municipal services for persons with a persistent mental illness. The analysis of staff experiences revealed three core categories: (1) implications of the division of responsibility among local authorities, (2) awareness of facilitating factors of growth, and (3) the meaning of dialogue. These formed the theme Preconditions for Person-Centered Care. Further research is required to explore larger economic, political, and social structures as backdrops to person-centered mental health care, from the perspective of service users, families, health professionals, and the community at large. PMID:23875550

  11. Culturally Focused Community-Centered Service Learning: An International Cultural Immersion Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson-Clarke, Saundra M.; Clarke, Darren

    2010-01-01

    An immersion training model is described that incorporates culturally focused community-centered service in South Africa as an experiential learning approach. Recommendations for developing international cultural immersion training with a goal of developing cultural competencies are suggested.

  12. Alternative funding for academic medicine: experience at a Canadian Health Sciences Center.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Paul; Shortt, S E D; Walker, D M C

    2004-03-01

    In 1994 the School of Medicine of Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, its clinical teachers, and the three principal teaching hospitals initiated a new approach to funding, the Alternative Funding Plan, a pragmatic response to the inability of fee-for-service billing by clinical faculty to subsidize the academic mission of the health sciences center. The center was funded to provide a package of service and academic deliverables (outputs), rather than on the basis of payment for physician clinical activity (inputs). The new plan required a new governance structure representing stakeholders and raised a number of important issues: how to reconcile the preservation of physician professional autonomy with corporate responsibilities; how to gather requisite information so as to equitably allocate resources; and how to report to the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care in order to demonstrate accountability. In subsequent iterations of the agreement it was necessary to address issues of flexibility resulting from locked-in funding levels and to devise meaningful performance measures for departments and the center as a whole. The authors conclude that the Alternative Funding Plan represents a successful innovation in funding for an academic health sciences center in that it has created financial stability, as well as modest positive effects for education and research. The Ontario government hopes to replicate the model at the province's other four health sciences centers, and it may have applicability in any jurisdiction in which the costs of medical education outstrip the capacity of faculty clinical earnings. PMID:14985191

  13. Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) on River and Coastal Restoration—a Center Approach to Creating a Unique Research Experience for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbotten, D. M.; Campbell, K. M.; Hill, K. M.; Podolak, C.; Bevington, A.; Holm, G. O.; Wilcock, P.; Twilley, R.

    2009-12-01

    At the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics (NCED), the NSF-sponsored REU on River and Coastal Restoration provides students an intensive research experience in a center environment that incorporates many aspects of the typical graduate student experience at an NSF-funded Science and Technology Center. These include a team-oriented approach in which students work closely with one another while completing their individual research projects, team-mentoring that brings together NCED faculty, staff, and graduate students to meet students’ advising needs, and an approach to research that incorporates field research, laboratory experiments, and an introduction to computational and quantitative methodologies. In addition, students' individual research projects constitute a contribution to larger ongoing field campaigns, allowing them, often for the first time, to understand the role of their own research in a larger context. Students join one of two teams: Team Marmot participates in an ongoing campaign to document the geomorphic response of the Sandy River to the 2007 removal of the Marmot Dam; Team Delta participates in research on coastal restoration of the Mississippi River Delta. After an orientation period at our headquarters, the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory in Minnesota, each team spends the majority of their summer in the field. The teams are then reunited for poster sessions at the end of the summer at which they share the outcomes of their research with one another and the larger NCED and University of Minnesota communities.

  14. Measuring User Experience of the Student-Centered e-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santoso, Harry B.; Schrepp, Martin; Isal, R. Yugo Kartono; Utomo, Andika Yudha; Priyogi, Bilih

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to develop an adapted version of User Experience Questionnaire (UEQ) and evaluate a learning management system. Although there is a growing interest on User Experience, there are still limited resources (i.e. measurement tools or questionnaires) available to measure user experience of any products, especially…

  15. Backward deletion to minimize prediction errors in models from factorial experiments with zero to six center points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holms, A. G.

    1980-01-01

    Population model coefficients were chosen to simulate a saturated 2 to the 4th fixed-effects experiment having an unfavorable distribution of relative values. Using random number studies, deletion strategies were compared that were based on the F-distribution, on an order statistics distribution of Cochran's, and on a combination of the two. The strategies were compared under the criterion of minimizing the maximum prediction error, wherever it occurred, among the two-level factorial points. The strategies were evaluated for each of the conditions of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 center points. Three classes of strategies were identified as being appropriate, depending on the extent of the experimenter's prior knowledge. In almost every case the best strategy was found to be unique according to the number of center points. Among the three classes of strategies, a security regret class of strategy was demonstrated as being widely useful in that over a range of coefficients of variation from 4 to 65%, the maximum predictive error was never increased by more than 12% over what it would have been if the best strategy had been used for the particular coefficient of variation. The relative efficiency of the experiment, when using the security regret strategy, was examined as a function of the number of center points, and was found to be best when the design used one center point.

  16. Single-center experience in pediatric renal transplantation using thymoglobulin induction and steroid minimization.

    PubMed

    Warejko, Jillian K; Hmiel, S Paul

    2014-12-01

    Our center has offered thymoglobulin induction with steroid minimization to our pediatric renal transplant patients for the last 10 yr. Steroid minimization or avoidance has shown favorable results in survival, kidney function, and growth in previous studies of pediatric patients. We report our experience with this protocol over the past 10 yr with respect to patient/graft survival, acute rejection episodes, renal function, linear growth, bone density, cardiovascular risk factors, and opportunistic infections. A retrospective chart review was performed for pediatric renal transplant patients on the steroid-minimized protocol between January 2002 and December 2011 on an intention to treat basis. Patient demographics, height, weight, serum creatinine, iGFR, biopsies, and survival data were collected. Height and weight z-scores were calculated with EpiInfo 7, using the CDC 2000 growth charts. Survival was calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. eGFR was calculated using the original and modified Schwartz equations. Forty-four pediatric patients were identified, aged 13 months to 19 yr. Five-yr survival was 95.5% for males and 94.4% for females. Only five patients had biopsy-proven ACR, two of which were at more than 12 months post-transplantation. Height delta z-scores from transplant to one, three, and five yr were 0.34, 0.38, and 0.79, respectively. Weight delta z-scores from transplant to one, three, and five yr were 0.87, 0.79, and 0.84, respectively. Mean original Schwartz eGFR was 84.3 ± 15.8 mL/min/1.73 m(2) , modified Schwartz eGFR was 59.3 ± 11.5 mL/min/1.73 m(2) , and iGFR was 64.2 ± 8.5 mL/min/1.73 m(2) at three yr. Of 18 subjects who had a bone density exam, none had a z-score less than -2 on DEXA exam at one-yr post-transplantation. Fifty-one percent of patients were on antihypertensives at the time of transplant compared with 43% at one-yr post-transplantation. Three yr post-transplantation, the average LDL was <100 mg/dL, and

  17. Building a Collaborative Educational Research Center: The Portland Public Schools & Portland State University Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nave, Gary R.

    The Center for Urban Research in Education (CURE), jointly conceived by the Portland (Oregon) Public Schools and Portland State University, was established in 1987 by the Oregon State Legislature to explore solutions to the educational problems of at-risk student populations, especially those in urban settings. This paper shares the results of…

  18. Veterans Affairs and Academic Medical Center Affiliations: The North Texas Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohl, Paul Cecil; Hendrickse, William; Orsak, Catherine; Vermette, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors review the more than 30-year history of the academic affiliation between the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and the Mental Health Service at the Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System. Methods: The authors interviewed individuals involved at various stages…

  19. The Hamovitch Research Center: An Experiment in Collective Responsibility for Advancing Science in the Human Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Marilyn; Brekke, John S.; Soydan, Haluk

    2008-01-01

    Research centers in schools of social work are growing in number and scope. In this article the authors argue that this increase is in line with the growing recognition that research and science are critical components of the mission of the social work profession. The authors examine the purposes and various models for establishing research…

  20. The Structure and Functioning of a Low-Budget Center for Applied Linguistics: The Brazilian Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomes de Matos, Francisco

    1980-01-01

    Describes the structure and functioning of the "Centro de Linguistica Aplicada do Instituto de Idiomas Yazigi" of Sao Paulo and comments on its role in promoting applied linguistics studies in Latin America. Also outlines the Center's historical background and its educational services, particularly those related to the teaching of English. (MES)

  1. The Outsourcing Experience of the Technical Library at NASA Glenn Research Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Mary S.

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a case study of the NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center library to examine strictures related to outsourcing, how they have helped and/or harmed the relationship between the civil servants employed by the library and the contracted employees, and the management of the…

  2. Student-Centered Literacy Instruction: An Examination of an Elementary Teacher's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiezorek, Carolyn Marie

    2012-01-01

    In this qualitative study, I examined and interpreted the literacy instruction of a fourth grade instructor who identified herself as a student-centered teacher. I sought to understand and interpret the beliefs and attitudes of my participant, Julie. Through seven unstructured interviews and five observations, I collected, and simultaneously…

  3. Family Centered Health Care--A Viable Reality? The Denver Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowen, David L:; Sbarbaro, John A.

    In early 1966, the Denver Department of Health and Hospitals embarked on a city-wide, decentralized health program in an effort to provide family centered "team" health care to medically indigent patients. The program encompasses 28 different clinics and facilities. Factors hindering or influencing the final pattern of health care delivery…

  4. Understanding and Engagement in Places of Science Experience: Science Museums, Science Centers, Zoos, and Aquariums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwan, Stephan; Grajal, Alejandro; Lewalter, Doris

    2014-01-01

    Science museums, science centers, zoos, and aquariums (MCZAs) constitute major settings of science learning with unique characteristics of informal science education. Emphasis will be given to the analysis of four specific characteristics of MCZAs that seem relevant for educational research and practice, namely, conditions of mixed motives and…

  5. The Experience of Distance Learning at the Scarman Center: The Realities and the Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Roger Hopkins; Gill, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Describes the distance learning initiative at the Scarman Center for the Study of Public Order (UK), focusing on two Masters courses. Discusses the course design, course materials, study guides, and complementary reading materials. Describes elements of the student support system: the student handbook, "fax-a-tutor" system, regional seminars, and…

  6. Intergenerational Learning at a Nature Center: Families Using Prior Experiences and Participation Frameworks to Understand Raptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Heather Toomey; McClain, Lucy Richardson

    2014-01-01

    Using a sociocultural framework to approach intergenerational learning, this inquiry examines learning processes used by families during visits to one nature center. Data were collected from videotaped observations of families participating in an environmental education program and a follow-up task to draw the habitat of raptors. Based on a…

  7. Use of APTIMA Combo 2: The Experience of a Child Advocacy Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leder, M. Ranee; Leber, Amy L.; Marcon, Mario J.; Scribano, Philip V.

    2013-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends nucleic acid amplification testing for chlamydia and gonorrhea in sexually abused girls. No studies describe performance of APTIMA Combo 2 Assay with second target confirmation on the same testing platform. This nucleic acid amplification testing is evaluated within a large child advocacy…

  8. Volume of Cataract Surgery and Surgeon Gender: The Florida Ambulatory Surgery Center Experience 2005 Through 2012.

    PubMed

    French, Dustin D; Margo, Curtis E; Campbell, Robert R; Greenberg, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Cataract is the most common surgically reversible cause of vision loss and the most common major surgical procedure performed in the United States. To understand how gender composition might affect differences in health services, we examined the surgeon gender-specific rates of routine cataract surgery performed in ambulatory surgical centers in Florida. Routine cataract surgeries were identified through the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) ambulatory surgery center dataset. The background of individual surgeons was determined by linking license numbers in the dataset to physician profiles publicly available from AHCA. From 2005 through 2012, women ophthalmologists in Florida performed roughly half the annual rate of cataract surgery as their male counterparts. This difference is not explained by greater time in clinical practice for men. Further investigation into the causes of this gender-volume disparity is warranted to determine what roles choice and barriers may play. PMID:27249881

  9. Bone marrow transplantation in Basel: single center experience from 1973 to 1989.

    PubMed

    Speck, B; Nissen, C; Tichelli, A; Roth, J; Dazzi, H; Stebler, C H; Wernli, M; Signer, E; Gratwohl, A

    1989-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation with a small to medium-sized single hospital team is feasible. It leads to results similar to those observed at large centers and with the same major risk factors: age, stage of the disease at the time of transplant, degree of histocompatibility, graft-versus-host disease prevention method, and selection. A single small to medium-sized center cannot conduct prospective randomized studies but it can pioneer new concepts. Bone marrow transplantation today offers a good choice for patients suffering from otherwise lethal bone marrow diseases. These include severe aplastic anemia, acute leukemias, chronic myeloid and chronic lymphoid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and congenital disorders. Changes in outcome are due to innovative steps, such as the introduction of CsA for GvHD prevention. In addition they are certainly influenced by unrecognized changes in the patient selection process. PMID:2487556

  10. Resistance calculation of the face-centered cubic lattice: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owaidat, M. Q.

    2013-12-01

    The effective resistance between two arbitrary lattice points in an infinite, face-centered cubic lattice network of identical resistors is calculated using the lattice Green's function method. Theoretical results have been verified experimentally by constructing actual finite networks of resistors. This problem could be useful in undergraduate courses (e.g., advanced mathematical methods course) and would provide a good example for introducing the concept of Green's function.

  11. My personal experiences at the BEST Medical Center: A day in the clinic-the afternoon.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip R; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Ida Lystic is a gastroenterologist who recently began her new faculty position at the BEST (Byron Edwards and Samuel Thompson) Medical Center. After completing her MD degree at the prestigious Harvey Medical School (recently renamed the Harvey Provider School), she did her internal medicine residency and fellowship training at the OTHER (Owen T. Henry and Eugene Rutherford) Medical Center. Her morning in gastroenterology clinic was highlighted by: (1) being reprimanded by the clinic nurse manager for a patient who not only arrived early, before clinic had opened, but also neglected to schedule the anesthesiologist for his colonoscopy; (2) the continued challenges of LEGEND (also known as Lengthy and Excessively Graded Evaluation and Nomenclature for Diagnosis by her colleagues), the new electronic medical record system after the BEST discarded the SIMPLE (Succinct Input Making Patient's Lives Electronic) system; (3) a nurse's interruption of an office visit-once the egg timer on the examination room door ran out-because she had exceeded the allocated time for the appointment; and (4) her chairman's unanticipated arrival in the clinic to visit with the clinic nurse manager. In addition to seeing her patients, Dr. Lystic's afternoon is occupied by attending a LOST (Laboratory OverSight and Testing) Committee meeting and a visit from a wayfinding and signage specialist to depersonalize the doorpost plaques of the examination rooms. Her day ends with a demeaning email from her chairman regarding the poor results of the most recent patient satisfaction survey and being personally held accountable to develop solutions to improve not only her performance but also that of the clinic. Although Dr. Ida Lystic and the gastroenterology clinic at "the BEST Medical Center" are creations of the authors' imagination, the majority of the anecdotes mentioned in this essay are based on individual patients and their physicians, clinics in medical centers and their administration

  12. Creating an academy of clinical excellence at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center: a 3-year experience.

    PubMed

    Wright, Scott M; Kravet, Steven; Christmas, Colleen; Burkhart, Kathleen; Durso, Samuel C

    2010-12-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) are committed to the tripartite missions of research, education, and patient care. Promotion decisions at many AHCs focus predominantly on research accomplishments, and some members of the community remain concerned about how to reward clinicians who excel in, and spend a majority of their time, caring for patients. Many clinically excellent physicians contribute substantively to all aspects of the mission by collaborating with researchers (either through intellectual discourse or enrolling participants in trials), by serving as role models for trainees with respect to ideal caring and practice, and by attracting patients to the institution. Not giving fair and appreciative recognition to these clinically excellent faculty places AHCs at risk of losing them. The Center for Innovative Medicine at Johns Hopkins set out to address this concern by defining, measuring, and rewarding clinical excellence. Prior to this initiative, little attention was directed toward the "bright spots" of excellence in patient care at Johns Hopkins Bayview. Using a scholarly approach, the authors launched a new academy; this manuscript describes the history, creation, and ongoing activities of the Miller-Coulson Academy of Clinical Excellence at Johns Hopkins University Bayview Medical Center. While membership in the academy is honorific, the members of this working academy are committed to influencing institutional culture as they collaborate on advocacy, scholarship, and educational initiatives. PMID:20978424

  13. Cost analysis of awake versus asleep deep brain stimulation: a single academic health center experience.

    PubMed

    Jacob, R Lorie; Geddes, Jonah; McCartney, Shirley; Burchiel, Kim J

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to compare the cost of deep brain stimulation (DBS) performed awake versus asleep at a single US academic health center and to compare costs across the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) Clinical Database. METHODS Inpatient and outpatient demographic and hospital financial data for patients receiving a neurostimulator lead implant (from the first quarter of 2009 to the second quarter of 2014) were collected and analyzed. Inpatient charges included those associated with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) procedure code 0293 (implantation or replacement of intracranial neurostimulator lead). Outpatient charges included all preoperative charges ≤ 30 days prior to implant and all postoperative charges ≤ 30 days after implant. The cost of care based on reported charges and a cost-to-charge ratio was estimated. The UHC database was queried (January 2011 to March 2014) with the same ICD-9 code. Procedure cost data across like hospitals (27 UHC hospitals) conducting similar DBS procedures were compared. RESULTS Two hundred eleven DBS procedures (53 awake and 158 asleep) were performed at a single US academic health center during the study period. The average patient age ( ± SD) was 65 ± 9 years old and 39% of patients were female. The most common primary diagnosis was Parkinson's disease (61.1%) followed by essential and other forms of tremor (36%). Overall average DBS procedure cost was $39,152 ± $5340. Asleep DBS cost $38,850 ± $4830, which was not significantly different than the awake DBS cost of $40,052 ± $6604. The standard deviation for asleep DBS was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05). In 2013, the median cost for a neurostimulator implant lead was $34,052 at UHC-affiliated hospitals that performed at least 5 procedures a year. At Oregon Health & Science University, the median cost was $17,150 and the observed single academic health center cost for a neurostimulator lead implant was

  14. Outcome of patients with glioblastoma in Saudi Arabia: Single center experience

    PubMed Central

    ALTWAIRGI, ABDULLAH K.; ALGAREEB, WALEED; YAHYA, GAAEM; MAKLAD, AHMED M.; ALY, MOAMEN MOM; AL SHAKWEER, WAFA; BALBAID, ALI; ALSAEED, EYAD; ALHUSSAIN, HUSSAIN; ORZ, YASSIR; LARY, AHMED; ELYAMANY, ASHRAF

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common primary brain tumor in adults, is associated with one of the worst 5 year survival rates among all human cancer types. To date, no published data are available for the outcome of this disease in Saudi Arabia. The present study performed a single-center, retrospective cohort study to evaluate the outcome of patients with GBM in Saudi Arabia. The Comprehensive Cancer Center at King Fahad Medical city (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia) was used in the present study. All adult patients (≥18 years) diagnosed with histologically proven GBM between January 2008 and December 2013 were included in the present study. A total of 90 patients were treated during the specified period. Of this, 73 (81%) patients underwent resection and 17 (19%) had biopsy only. The majority of patients (n=88; 98%) received radiotherapy (XRT): 67 (76%) with standard and 21 (24%) with hypo-fractionated dosage. Of the total patients, 65 (72%) received combined modality therapy [standard XRT concurrently with Temozolmide (TMZ)]. The 6 month progression-free survival rate was 43% for all patients and 55% for the combined modality subgroup. The median overall survival (OS) for all patients was 13.7 months. However, the median OS for patients treated with combined modality was 19.7 months. In this single-center retrospective study, the outcomes of patients with GBM were similar to those in previously reported studies. An improved outcome was associated with an improved performance status, absence of residual disease and use of adjuvant TMZ. PMID:27123275

  15. [Mycobacterial species repartition: experience of the Antituberculosis Center in Pointe Noire (Republic of Congo)].

    PubMed

    Ontsira Ngoyi, E N; Obengui; Taty Taty, R; Koumba, E L; Ngala, P; Ossibi Ibara, R B

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to describe mycobacteria species isolated in the antituberculosis center of Pointe-Noire city in Congo Brazzaville. It was a descriptive transversal study, conducted between September 2008 and April 2009 (7 months). A simple random sample was established from patients who came to the antituberculosis center of Pointe-Noire City (reference center on diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis). To those patients consulting with symptoms leading to suspect pulmonary tuberculosis, a sputum sampling in three sessions was conducted. Staining techniques to Ziehl-Neelsen and auramine were performed in Pointe-Noire. Culture, molecular hybridization and antibiotic susceptibility testing to first-line antituberculosis drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, pyrazinamide or streptomycine) using diffusion method on agar were performed in Cerba Pasteur laboratory in France. In 77 patients, 24 sputum (31.20%) were positive to the microscopic examination and 45 (58.44%) to the culture and identification by molecular hybridization. Mycobacteria species complex isolated were M. tuberculosis with 31 cases (68.9%) and M. africanum with 3 cases (6.67%). Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NMT) were isolated in association or not with M. tuberculosis in 9 cases (20%) and the most common species were M. intracellulare. In M. tuberculosis species, 7 strains (41.20%) were tested sensitive to the first-line antituberculosis drugs, 8 cases (47%) monoresistance and 2 cases multidrug resistance at both isoniazide and rifampicine (12%) (MDR). This study showed the importance of Mycobacteria species complex and non-mycobacteria species in pulmonary tuberculosis. The data on resistance can help medical physicians in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. Another study with a large population is required to confirm these data. PMID:25260392

  16. Inventory management for cardiac catheterization labs: the Princeton-Baptist Medical Center experience.

    PubMed

    Long, T A

    1993-08-01

    Several issues must be considered for implementation in order to decrease inventories and make them more manageable. Physician consensus on products, strict vendor control by the department manager, setting and maintaining low par levels, inventorying stock daily, negotiating just-in-time deliveries, conservation-minded staff, and working in concert with central supply and materiel management personnel are steps that when employed correctly can lead to more manageable inventories in cardiac catheterization departments. If these steps are implemented, they will enhance the liquidity of the department and ultimately that of the medical center. PMID:10127553

  17. "Bath salts" and "plant food" products: the experience of one regional US poison center.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Christine M; Dulaney, Anna R; Beuhler, Michael C; Kacinko, Sherri

    2013-03-01

    Abuse of psychogenic substances sold as "bath salts" and "plant food" has escalated in recent years in the United States (USA). Previous reports suggest regional differences in the primary active β-keto phenylalkylamines found in these products and the corresponding signs and symptoms reported after exposure. Currently, there are only limited studies describing the clinical effects associated with reported "bath salts" exposure in the USA. This study describes the clinical effects associated with "bath salt" and "plant food" exposures as reported to the poison center serving the state of North Carolina (Carolinas Poison Center). We performed a retrospective review of the Carolinas Poison Center database for all cases of reported human exposure to "bath salt" and "plant food" products from 2010 to 2011 with specific attention to clinical effects and routes of exposure. Additionally, we reviewed therapies used, trended the volume of exposure cases reported over the study period, and evaluated the distribution of calls within state counties using descriptive statistics. Carolinas Poison Center received 485 total calls and 409 reported exposure calls regarding "bath salt" or "plant food" products between January of 2010 and December of 2011. The peak of reported exposures occurred in May of 2011. Clinical effects commonly reported in the exposure cases generated from these calls included tachycardia (53.3 %, n = 218), agitated/irritable (50.4 %, n = 206), hallucination/delusions (26.7 %, n = 109), and hypertension (25.2 %, n = 103). In addition to intravenous fluids, common therapies included benzodiazepines (46.0 %, n = 188), sedation (13.4 %, n = 55), alkalinization (3.90 %, n = 16), antihistamine (4.16 %, n = 17), and intubation (3.67 %, n = 15). Haloperidol was the antipsychotic agent used most often to treat agitation (n = 40). Serious complications associated with reported exposure to "bath salt" and "plant food" products

  18. Holmium:YAG laser coronary angioplasty: quantitative angiography and clinical results in a large experience of a single medical center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On; Luxenberg, Michael; Schumacher, Audrey

    1994-07-01

    Clinical experience with the mid IR holmium:YAG laser in a single medical center (St. Paul Ramsey Medical Center, University of Minnesota Medical School, St. Paul, MN) includes 112 patients who underwent holmium laser coronary angioplasty. Utilizing a unique lasing technique; `pulse and retreat,' we applied this laser to thrombotic and nonthrombotic lesions in patients presenting with unstable angina, stable angina, and acute myocardial infarction. A very high clinical success and very low complication rates were achieved. Holmium:YAG laser is effective and safe therapy for patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease. Unlike excimer lasers, the clinical success, efficacy and safety of holmium laser angioplasty is not compromised when thrombus is present.

  19. Urinary tract infections following renal transplantation: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Barbouch, Samia; Cherif, Mejda; Ounissi, Mondher; Karoui, Cyrine; Mzoughi, Sonia; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Abderrahim, Ezeddine; Bozouita, Abdellatif; Abdalla, Taiebben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-11-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most frequent infectious complication among renal transplant recipients and a frequent cause of bacteremia, sepsis and acute graft failure. To evaluate the incidence, risk factors, type of pathogens and long-term effect of UTIs on graft and patient survivals in our center, we performed a retrospective cohort study reviewing the medical records of patients who received a renal transplant at our center from June 1986 to December 2009, excluding patients who lost their grafts in the first month due to arterial or veins thrombosis and acute antibody-mediated rejection. We studied 393 kidney-transplanted recipients; at least one UTI occurred in 221 (53.69%) patients during the follow-up period. The most frequent pathogens isolated in urine culture were Escherichia coli (n = 39, 18.4%) and Klebsiella pneumonia (n = 31, 14.6%). When patients with UTIs were compared with those without UTIs, female gender and use of mycophenolate mofetil or azathioprine seemed to be risk factors for UTIs on univariate analysis. However, female gender was the only independent risk factor on multivariate analysis RR = 1.964 (1.202-3.207), P = 0.007. This study confirmed that UTIs remain a major problem in renal transplant recipients, and female gender was the only independent risk factor. PMID:23168875

  20. COOP 3D ARPA Experiment 109 National Center for Atmospheric Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Coupled atmospheric and hydrodynamic forecast models were executed on the supercomputing resources of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado and the Ohio Supercomputing Center (OSC)in Columbus, Ohio. respectively. The interoperation of the forecast models on these geographically diverse, high performance Cray platforms required the transfer of large three dimensional data sets at very high information rates. High capacity, terrestrial fiber optic transmission system technologies were integrated with those of an experimental high speed communications satellite in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) to test the integration of the two systems. Operation over a spacecraft in GEO orbit required modification of the standard configuration of legacy data communications protocols to facilitate their ability to perform efficiently in the changing environment characteristic of a hybrid network. The success of this performance tuning enabled the use of such an architecture to facilitate high data rate, fiber optic quality data communications between high performance systems not accessible to standard terrestrial fiber transmission systems. Thus obviating the performance degradation often found in contemporary earth/satellite hybrids.

  1. Liver Transplantation for Metabolic Liver Disease: Experience at a Living Donor Dominant Liver Transplantation Center

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Suk; Oh, Seak Hee; Kim, Hyun Jin; Cho, Jin Min; Yoo, Han-Wook; Namgoong, Jung-Man; Kim, Dae Yeon; Kim, Ki-Hun; Hwang, Shin; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Metabolic liver disease (MLD) often progresses to life-threatening conditions. This study intends to describe the outcomes of liver transplantation (LTx) for MLD at a living donor-dominant transplantation center where potentially heterozygous carrier grafts are employed. Methods We retrospectively evaluated the medical records of 54 patients with MLD who underwent LTx between November 1995 and February 2012 at Asan Medical Center in Seoul, Korea. The cumulative graft and patient survival rates were analyzed according to patient age, and living or deceased donor LTx. Recurrence of the original disease was also investigated. Results The post-transplant cumulative patient survival rates at one, five, and 10 years were 90.7%, 87.5% and 87.5%, and the graft survival rates were 88.8%, 85.5%, and 85.5%, respectively. There were no differences in the patient survival rates according to the recipient age, human leukocyte antigen matching, and living or deceased donor LTx. There were also no differences in the patient survival rates between the MLD and the non-MLD groups for children. Recurrence of the original metabolic disease was not observed in any patient during the follow-up period. Conclusion Our results suggest that the living donor-dominant transplantation program is well-tolerated in MLD without recurrence of the original MLD using all types of transplantation. PMID:25866733

  2. Lionfish string experiences of an inland poison center: a retrospective study of 23 cases.

    PubMed

    Trestrail, J H; al-Mahasneh, Q M

    1989-04-01

    From January 1979 through March 1988, our regional poison center, located many hundreds of miles from the nearest coastal salt water, documented 23 cases of envenomation by "Lionfish" (members of genus Pterois). All cases involved specimens which were maintained in the homes of amateur aquarists. A study of patient epidemiology showed the following: patient's sex 91.3% male, 8.7% female; patients ages ranged from 17 to 50 years with an average age for males of 29.8 years and 35 years for females; the site of the envenomation accident was always in the home; the only part of the body envenomated was the hand or finger; and all of the patients were symptomatic. Symptoms noted included sharp pain, swelling, redness, bleeding, nausea, numbness, joint pain, anxiety, headache, disorientation, and dizziness. One patient had a complication of cellulitis. Treatment provided included immersion of the effected area in hot water at 40 C for 60 to 90 min, analgesics, tetanus toxoid, and antibiotics. There were no deaths noted and treatment proved effective in all cases. This paper also discusses the natural history, clinical effects, and current treatment for envenomations from these beautiful but dangerous venomous fish, which can cause poisoning exposures that are likely to be encountered by poison centers anywhere in the world. PMID:2929130

  3. Subcutaneous Trastuzumab for HER2-positive Breast Cancer – Evidence and Practical Experience in 7 German Centers

    PubMed Central

    Jackisch, C.; Müller, V.; Dall, P.; Neumeister, R.; Park-Simon, T.-W.; Ruf-Dördelmann, A.; Seiler, S.; Tesch, H.; Ataseven, B.

    2015-01-01

    A subcutaneous formulation of trastuzumab to treat patients with HER2-positive breast cancer is available since August 2013. The subcutaneous formulation is administered as a fixed dose of 600 mg over a period of up to 5 minutes. The HannaH trial compared subcutaneous with intravenous administration and found comparable pharmacokinetics, efficacy and tolerability for both administration forms of trastuzumab in the neoadjuvant setting. The randomized crossover study PrefHer reported a clear preference from the patientʼs point of view for subcutaneous over intravenous administration of trastuzumab. The accompanying time-and-motion study reported a reduction concerning the total time spent for the institution as well as for the patient receiving trastuzumab s. c.. The experience of 7 German centers largely corresponded with the results of these studies. Patients expressed a clear preference for subcutaneous trastuzumab administration, with the time saved by the subcutaneous administration route cited as the greatest benefit. Although the existing reimbursement terms mean that centers will receive a lower remuneration, the centersʼ overall evaluation of the subcutaneous administration route for trastuzumab was overwhelmingly positive. The greatest benefit cited by the centers was the flexibility in scheduling patient appointments. This increased flexibility improved conditions in some centers which were experiencing pressures due to a shortage of staff, particularly at peak times. The general consensus, however, was that the remuneration systems for oncological treatments urgently need to be amended to ensure that the real costs of treatment are covered, even if the administration route has changed. PMID:26166837

  4. Hemoptysis workup before embolization: single-center experience with a 15-year period follow-up.

    PubMed

    de Gregorio, Miguel A; Medrano, Joaquin; Laborda, Alicia; Higuera, Teresa

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this work was to present our experience in arterial embolization in the endovascular treatment of massive hemoptysis and remark on the importance of the workup before embolization. We present some clinical aspects to keep in mind before carrying out a bronchial embolization in a patient with severe hemoptysis. The main causes of hemoptysis are presented, as well as diagnosis means and the most important therapeutic procedures aimed to stabilize the patient who will undergo a bronchial arterial embolization. Likewise, we present our own experience with 401 patients with over a 15-year period of follow-up. PMID:18572140

  5. Compulsory drug detention center experiences among a community-based sample of injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite Thailand's official reclassification of drug users as "patients" deserving care and not "criminals," the Thai government has continued to rely heavily on punitive responses to drug use such as "boot camp"-style compulsory "treatment" centers. There is very little research on experiences with compulsory treatment centers among people who use drugs. The work reported here is a first step toward filling that gap. Methods We examined experiences of compulsory drug treatment among 252 Thai people who inject drugs (IDU) participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project in Bangkok. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors independently associated with a history of compulsory treatment experience. Results In total, 80 (31.7%) participants reported a history of compulsory treatment. In multivariate analyses, compulsory drug detention experience was positively associated with current spending on drugs per day (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.86; 95%CI: 1.07 - 3.22) and reporting drug planting by police (AOR = 1.81; 95%CI: 1.04 - 3.15). Among those with compulsory treatment experience, 77 (96.3%) reported injecting in the past week, and no difference in intensity of drug use was observed between those with and without a history of compulsory detention. Conclusion These findings raise concerns about the current approach to compulsory drug detention in Thailand. Exposure to compulsory drug detention was associated with police abuse and high rates of relapse into drug use, although additional research is needed to determine the precise impact of exposure to this form of detention on future drug use. More broadly, compulsory "treatment" based on a penal approach is not consistent with scientific evidence on addressing drug addiction and should be phased out in favor of evidence-based interventions. PMID:22014093

  6. Managing Disaster Recovery Centers on Campus: The Experience of Southeastern Louisiana University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Heather; Shafer, Duane

    2007-01-01

    When Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in August 2005, Southeastern Louisiana University was spared the brunt of the storm and was fortunate that most structures on campus remained intact. However, the storm still affected the campus for weeks. This article reflects on the experiences of university leaders and facility managers as they provided…

  7. Hitting the TARGET? A Case Study of the Experiences of Teachers in Steel Mill Learning Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Amy D.; Jeris, Laurel; Smith, Robert

    Part of a larger study on the experience of teaching in the steel mill learning environment was an inquiry focused on professional development. Teachers and coordinators were all members of the Teachers Action Research Group for Educational Technology (TARGET), a group of adult educators interested in improving learning and teaching in career…

  8. An Academic Medical Center's Experience with Mandatory Managed Care for Medicaid Recipients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Alan L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on experiences and concerns of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania as a participating primary care site in a Medicaid managed care program (HealthPASS). Discussed are the modification of existing activities to meet increased care demands and administrative demands, and characteristics of HealthPASS that have impeded…

  9. The Pawnee Experience: From Center Village to Oklahoma (Junior High Unit).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solberg, Chris; Goldenstein, Erwin, Ed.

    A sample packet on the Pawnee experience, developed for use by junior high teachers, includes a reading list and materials for teachers and students. Sections on Pawnee origins, history, religion and world view, tribal structure and kinship, and economic system before and after relocation from Nebraska to Oklahoma include objectives, lists of…

  10. Online Digital Archives Technology That Supports Rich, Student-Centered Learning Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Today's students watch the newest movie trailers on the Web, share music files, play video games with other players over the Internet, and swap digital pictures of the latest teen idols. Donald Tapscott points out in his book Growing Up Digital that as this rich multimedia experience becomes more a part of students' lives outside of school, they…

  11. Group Project Work and Student-centered Active Learning: Two Different Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingstone, David; Lynch, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    Compared experiences with group-based student projects in a Geographical Information Systems degree taught by one faculty member and in geography degree modules taught by another. Concludes that care must be taken in the design and execution of these projects to avoid problems that might reinforce myths about negative effects of team-based…

  12. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center LANSCE experiment reports 1989 run cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, D.K.; DiStravolo, M.A.

    1990-10-01

    This report contains a listing and description of experiments carried on at the LANSCE neutron scattering facility in the following areas: High Density Powder Diffraction; Neutron Powder Diffractometer, (NPD); Single Crystal Diffractometer, (SCD); Low-Q Diffractometer, (LQD); Surface Profile Analysis Reflectometer, (SPEAR); Filter Difference Spectrometer, (FDS); and Constant-Q Spectrometer.

  13. Delayed-Interval Delivery in Dichorionic Twin Pregnancies: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cozzolino, Mauro; Seravalli, Viola; Masini, Giulia; Pasquini, Lucia; Di Tommaso, Mariarosaria

    2015-01-01

    Background Preterm delivery is the most common complication of multiple gestations and is associated with high perinatal mortality. When preterm labor occurs, delivery of the first fetus is inevitable. However, successfully delaying the delivery of the second fetus can be lifesaving. Case Report We report 2 cases of delayed-interval delivery of dichorionic diamniotic twin pregnancies admitted to our emergency department at 17+5 and 22+1 weeks of gestation. After abortion of the first fetus, the second twin was left in utero, and uterine contractions ceased. The patients received antibiotics, and tocolytic therapy was administered when needed after 24 weeks. This management prolonged pregnancy for 64 and 16 days, respectively. Conclusion Although no accepted protocol for the treatment of this condition currently exists, an excellent outcome for the second fetus is possible if these pregnancies are managed in a tertiary perinatal center. PMID:26412996

  14. Acute Ataxia in Childhood: 11-Year Experience at a Major Pediatric Neurology Referral Center.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Kavita; Maricich, Stephen M; Alper, Gulay

    2016-08-01

    We categorized the causes of acute ataxia in the pediatric population-referred to the Division of Neurology-at a large, urban pediatric medical center. Of the 120 cases identified over the past 11 years, post-infectious cerebellar ataxia was the most commonly diagnosed (59%), followed by drug intoxication, opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia syndrome, episodic ataxia, acute cerebellitis, cerebellar stroke, ADEM, meningitis, cerebral vein thrombosis, Leigh's disease, Miller-Fisher syndrome, and concussion. Among the patients with post-infectious cerebellar ataxia, 85% were 1-6 years old and all had a history of antecedent viral illness. CSF pleocytosis was present in 40% of patients; all had normal brain MRIs. The majority (91%) recovered within 30 days. We conclude that post-infectious cerebellar ataxia remains the most common cause of acute ataxia in childhood and that it carries a good prognosis. We also differentiate acute post-infectious cerebellar ataxia from other causes with similar presentations. PMID:27071467

  15. NASA Glenn Research Center Experience Using DOE Midwest Region Super ESPC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zala, Laszlo F.

    2000-01-01

    The energy crisis of 1973 prompted the Federal Government and private industry to look into alternative methods to save energy. At the same time the constant reduction of operations and maintenance funds during the last 5 years forced Glenn Research Center (GRC) to look for alternative funding sources to meet the mandate to reduce energy consumption. The Super Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) was chosen as a viable source of facility improvement funding that can create larger project scope and help replace aging, inefficient equipment. This paper describes Glenn's participation in the Department of Energy (DOE) Super ESPC program. This program provided Glenn cost savings in the performance of energy audits, preparation of documents, evaluation of proposals, and selection of energy service company (ESCO).

  16. Household bleaches based on sodium hypochlorite: review of acute toxicology and poison control center experience.

    PubMed

    Racioppi, F; Daskaleros, P A; Besbelli, N; Borges, A; Deraemaeker, C; Magalini, S I; Martinez Arrieta, R; Pulce, C; Ruggerone, M L; Vlachos, P

    1994-09-01

    Bleaches based on solutions of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) are widely used in the household to disinfect and clean hard surfaces and to bleach the laundry. A review of both published and unpublished toxicological data is presented. In addition, the results of a survey of human accidents with hypochlorite bleaches by the Poison Control Centers of France, Italy, Belgium, Greece, Turkey, Spain and Portugal for the period 1989-1992 are presented. The data show that acute accidental exposure to household bleach in use or in foreseeable misuse situations results, in the great majority of the cases, in minor, transient adverse effects on health, with no permanent sequelae. Ingestion is the most frequent route of exposure, followed by inhalation of gases evolved by mixing sodium hypochlorite bleach with acid or alkaline products. All evidence presented confirms the normal safety profile of hypochlorite-based bleaches to be similar to that of other 'generally recognized as safe' household products. PMID:7927083

  17. Experience Transitioning Models and Data at the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center has a long history of transitioning research data and models into operations and with the validation activities required. The first stage in this process involves demonstrating that the capability has sufficient value to customers to justify the cost needed to transition it and to run it continuously and reliably in operations. Once the overall value is demonstrated, a substantial effort is then required to develop the operational software from the research codes. The next stage is to implement and test the software and product generation on the operational computers. Finally, effort must be devoted to establishing long-term measures of performance, maintaining the software, and working with forecasters, customers, and researchers to improve over time the operational capabilities. This multi-stage process of identifying, transitioning, and improving operational space weather capabilities will be discussed using recent examples. Plans for future activities will also be described.

  18. Outcome science in practice: an overview and initial experience at the Vanderbilt Spine Center.

    PubMed

    McGirt, Matthew J; Speroff, Theodore; Godil, Saniya Siraj; Cheng, Joseph S; Selden, Nathan R; Asher, Anthony L

    2013-01-01

    In terms of policy, research, quality improvement, and practice-based learning, there are essential principles--namely, quality, effectiveness, and value of care--needed to navigate changes in the current and future US health care environment. Patient-centered outcome measurement lies at the core of all 3 principles. Multiple measures of disease-specific disability, generic health-related quality of life, and preference-based health state have been introduced to quantify disease impact and define effectiveness of care. This paper reviews the basic principles of patient outcome measurement and commonly used outcome instruments. The authors provide examples of how utilization of outcome measurement tools in everyday neurosurgical practice can facilitate practice-based learning, quality improvement, and real-world comparative effectiveness research, as well as promote the value of neurosurgical care. PMID:23278268

  19. Establishing effective working relations with a potential user community - NASA Lewis Research Center experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, P.

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has held a series of six major and unique technology utilization conferences which were major milestones in planned structured efforts to establish effective working relationships with specific technology user communities. These efforts were unique in that the activities undertaken prior to the conference were extensive, and effectively laid the groundwork for productive technology transfer following, and as a direct result of, the conferences. The effort leading to the conference was in each case tailored to the characteristics of the potential user community, however, the common factors comprise a basic framework applicable to similar endeavors. The process is essentially a planned sequence of steps that constitute a technical market survey and a marketing program for the development of beneficial applications of aerospace technology beyond the aerospace field.

  20. The Schema.org Datasets Schema: Experiences at the National Snow and Ice Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerr, R.; Billingsley, B. W.; Harper, D.; Kovarik, J.

    2014-12-01

    Data discovery, is still a major challenge for many users. Relevant data may be located anywhere. There are currently no existing universal data registries. Often users start with a simple query through their web browser. But how do you get your data to actually show up near the top of the results? One relatively new way to accomplish this is to use schema.org dataset markup in your data pages. Theoretically this provides web crawlers the additional information needed so that a query for data will preferentially return those pages that were marked up accordingly. The National Snow and Ice Data Center recently implemented an initial set of markup in the data set pages returned by its catalog. The Datasets data model, our process, challenges encountered and results will be described.

  1. Blood blister-like aneurysms: single center experience and systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ana Marcos; Narata, Ana Paula; Yilmaz, Hasan; Bijlenga, Philippe; Radovanovic, Ivan; Schaller, Karl; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Pereira, Vitor Mendes

    2014-01-01

    Blood blister-like aneurysms (BBAs) are a controversial entity. They arise from non-branching sites on the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) and are suspected to originate from a dissection. Our aim is to describe the BBA cases seen in our center and to present a systematic review of the literature on BBAs. We analyzed the eleven cases of BBA admitted to our center from 2003 to 2012. We assessed the medical history, treatment modality (endovascular and/or surgery), complications and clinical outcome. The cohort included 8 women and 4 men with a mean age of 53.16 years. Treatment of the BBA consisted of stenting and coiling in 5 patients, stenting only in 4 patients, coiling and clipping in 1 patient, clipping only in 1 patient, and conservative treatment in 1 patient. A good outcome was found in 10 patients, as defined by a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) less than or equal to two at three months. A systematic review of the literature was performed, and 314 reported patients were found: 221 patients were treated with a primarily surgical approach, and 87 patients were treated with a primarily endovascular approach. A rescue or second treatment was required in 46 patients (21%). The overall estimated treatment morbidity rate was 17%, and the mortality rate was 15%. BBAs exhibit more aggressive behavior compared to saccular aneurysms, and more intra-operative complications occur with BBAs, independent of the treatment type offered. They are also significantly more likely to relapse and rebleed after treatment. Endovascular treatment offers a lower morbidity-mortality compared with surgical approaches. Multilayer flow-diverting stents appear to be a promising strategy. PMID:24231267

  2. Authorship in a Multi-Center Clinical Trial: the HF-ACTION Experience

    PubMed Central

    Whellan, DJ; Kraus, WE; Kitzman, DW; Rooney, B; Keteyian, SJ; Piña, IL; Ellis, SJ; Ghali, JK; Lee, K; Cooper, L; O'Connor, CM

    2015-01-01

    Background Few guidelines exist regarding authorship on manuscripts resulting from large multicenter trials. The HF-ACTION investigators devised a system to address assignment of authorship on trial publications and tested the outcomes in the course of conducting the large, multi-center, NHLBI-funded trial (n=2,331; 82 clinical sites; 3 countries). The HF-ACTION Authorship and Publication (HAP) Scoring System was designed to enhance rate of dissemination, recognize investigator contributions to the successful conduct of the trial, and harness individual expertise in manuscript generation. Methods The HAP score was generated by assigning points based on investigators’ participation in trial enrollment, follow-up, and adherence, as well as participation in committees and other trial activity. Overall publication rates, publication rates by author, publication rates by site, and correlation between site publication and HAP score using a Poisson regression model were examined. Results Fifty peer-reviewed, original manuscripts were published within 6.5 years following conclusion of study enrollment. In total, 137 different authors were named in at least 1 publication. Forty-five of the 82 sites (55%) had an author named to at least one manuscript. A Poisson regression model examining incident rate ratios revealed that a higher HAP score resulted in a higher incidence of a manuscript, with a 100-point increase in site score corresponding to an approximately 32% increase in the incidence of a published manuscript. Conclusions Given the success in publishing a large number of papers and widely distributing authorship, regular use of a transparent, objective authorship assignment system for publishing results from multi-center trials may be recommended to optimize fairness and dissemination of trial results. PMID:25819851

  3. Incidence of Atypical Femur Fractures in Cancer Patients: The MD Anderson Cancer Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Beatrice J; Sun, Ming; West, Dennis P; Guindani, Michele; Lin, Yan Heather; Lu, Huifang; Hu, Mimi; Barcenas, Carlos; Bird, Justin; Feng, Chun; Saraykar, Smita; Tripathy, Debasish; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Gagel, Robert; Murphy, William A

    2016-08-01

    Atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) are rare adverse events attributed to bisphosphonate (BP) use. Few cases of AFF in cancer have been described; the aim of this study is to identify the incidence and risk factors for AFF in a large cancer center. This retrospective study was conducted at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. The incidence rate of AFF among BP users was calculated from January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2013. The control group (n = 51) included 2 or 3 patients on BPs matched for age (≤1 year) and gender. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between clinical characteristics and AFF. Twenty-three AFF cases were identified radiographically among 10,587 BP users, the total BP exposure was 53,789 months (4482 years), and the incidence of AFF in BP users was 0.05 cases per 100,000 person-years. Meanwhile, among 300,553 patients who did not receive BPs there were 2 cases of AFF as compared with the 23 cases noted above. The odds ratio (OR) of having AFF in BP users was 355.58 times higher (95% CI, 84.1 to 1501.4, p < 0.0001) than the risk in non-BP users. The OR of having AFF in alendronate users was 5.54 times greater (OR 5.54 [95% CI, 1.60 to 19.112, p = 0.007]) than the odds of having AFF among other BP users. Patients who were on zoledronic acid (ZOL) had smaller odds of developing AFF compared with other BP users in this matched case control sample. AFFs are rare, serious adverse events that occur in patients with cancer who receive BP therapy. Patients with cancer who receive BPs for prior osteoporosis therapy or for metastatic cancer are at higher risk of AFF. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26896384

  4. Diversity of Disorders Causing Neonatal Cholestasis – The Experience of a Tertiary Pediatric Center in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Hoerning, André; Raub, Simon; Dechêne, Alexander; Brosch, Michelle N.; Kathemann, Simone; Hoyer, Peter F.; Gerner, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Rapidly establishing the cause of neonatal cholestasis is an urgent matter. The aim of this study was to report on the prevalence and mortality of the diverse disorders causing neonatal cholestasis in an academic center in Germany. Methods: Clinical chemistry and cause of disease were retrospectively analyzed in 82 infants (male n = 42, 51%) that had presented with neonatal cholestasis to a tertiary medical center from January 2009 to April 2013. Results: Altogether, 19 disorders causing neonatal cholestasis were identified. Biliary atresia was the most common diagnosis (41%), followed by idiopathic cases (13%), progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC, 10%), cholestasis in preterm infants (10%), α1AT deficiency, Alagille syndrome, portocaval shunts, mitochondriopathy, biliary sludge (all 2%), and others. Infants with biliary atresia were diagnosed with a mean age of 62 days, they underwent Kasai portoenterostomy ~66 days after birth. The majority of these children (~70%) received surgery within 10 weeks of age and 27% before 60 days. The 2-year survival with their native liver after Kasai procedure was 12%. The time span between Kasai surgery and liver transplantation was 176 ± 73 days. Six children (7%), of whom three patients had a syndromic and one a non-syndromic biliary atresia, died prior to liver transplantation. The pre- and post-transplant mortality rate for children with biliary atresia was ~12 and ~17%, respectively. Conclusion: Neonatal cholestasis is a severe threat associated with a high risk of complications in infancy and it therefore requires urgent investigation in order to initiate life saving therapy. Although in the last 20 years new causes such as the PFICs have been identified and newer diagnostic tools have been introduced into the clinical routine biliary atresia still represents the major cause. PMID:25003101

  5. The 10-year Trend of Periprocedural Complication Following Carotid Artery Stenting; Single Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Jeong-Ho; Kang, Jihoon; Yeo, Min-Ju; Kim, Beom Joon; Jang, Min Uk; Bae, Hee-Joon; Kwon, O-Ki; Hwang, Gyo Jun; Oh, Chang Wan; Jung, Cheolkyu; Lee, Ji Sung; Han, Moon-Ku

    2015-04-15

    PurposeCarotid endarterectomy and stenting are used to treat carotid stenosis, with the volume of carotid artery procedures increasing over the past decade. We investigated the 10-year trend of periprocedural complications with an increasing procedure volume of carotid stenting at a single tertiary hospital.MethodsWe collected 416 consecutive cases (384 patients) of carotid artery stenting performed for either symptomatic (231 cases, 55.5 %) or asymptomatic (185 cases, 44.5 %) internal carotid artery stenosis at a single center. Periprocedural complication was defined as any stroke, myocardial infarction, or death. Procedure-related outcome included any dissection, hemodynamic event, or periprocedural complication.ResultsThe mean age was 68.8 years (82.8 % males; range of 20–89 years); 23.9 % were older than 75 years. Before the procedure, 99.3 and 56.0 % of patients received antiplatelet and lipid-lowering medication, respectively. The overall periprocedural complication rate was 3.6 % (1.6 and 5.2 % in the asymptomatic and symptomatic group, respectively). The composite outcome of any stroke or death was 3.4 %. Periprocedural complication and procedure-related outcome showed a decremental trend with increasing procedure volume, and this trend remained after adjusting for confounders.ConclusionsOur study suggests that carotid stenting at an experienced center might reduce the periprocedural complications. Our periprocedural complication rate of carotid artery stenting may be comparable to, or somewhat lower than, that reported in other clinical trials.

  6. Male victims of sexual assault; 10 years' experience from a Danish Assault Center.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Mie-Louise; Hilden, Malene

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to provide descriptive data regarding male victims of sexual assault seen at the Centre for Victims of Sexual Assault in Copenhagen, Denmark. All 55 male victims attending the center in the time period of March 2001 until December 2010 underwent a standardized data collection. Data included information on the victim and the sexual assault. Male victims accounted for less than 2% of the total number of visits to the center in this time period. Fifty three percent were between 15 and 24 years. In all cases the perpetrator was male, and 25% were assaulted by more than one perpetrator. Of the 62% of male victims who gave information on sexual orientation, 36% reported themselves as heterosexuals. A total of 45.5% had an alcohol intake of more than 5 units in the hours before the assault. Forty two percent reported the assault to the police. The male victims differed from female victims in several ways; they were more often assaulted by a stranger; more likely to be assaulted by more than one perpetrator; more likely being victim of drug rape; less likely to have experienced previous sexual abuse and less willing to report their assault to the police. Being victim of a sexual assault by another man is considered a taboo subject and it is likely that the dark figure of men exposed to sexual assault is much higher than it is for women. Strengthening our knowledge regarding male victims of sexual assault is necessary to improve both primary and secondary preventive measures in order to make male victims feel safe in coming forward. Male victims should have equal access to both medical and psychological help as female victims. PMID:27391940

  7. Single center TAVR experience with a focus on the prevention and management of catastrophic complications

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Samir R; Svensson, Lars G; Roselli, Eric; Schoenhagen, Paul; Popovic, Zoran; Alfirevic, Andrej; Barzilai, Benico; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Stewart, William; Mehta, Anand; lal Poddar, Kanhaiya; Parashar, Akhil; Modi, Dhruv; Ozkan, Alper; Khot, Umesh; Lytle, Bruce W; Murat Tuzcu, E

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an important treatment option for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) who are inoperable or at high risk for complications with surgical aortic valve replacement. We report here our single-center data on consecutive patients undergoing transfemoral (TF) TAVR since the inception of our program, with a special focus on minimizing and managing complications. Methods The patient population consists of all consecutive patients who underwent an attempted TF-TAVR at our institution, beginning with the first proctored case in May 2006, through December 2012. Clinical, procedural, and echocardiographic data were collected by chart review and echo database query. All events are reported according to Valve Academic Research Consortium-2. Results During the study period, 255 patients with AS had attempted TF-TAVR. The procedure was successful in 244 (95.7%) patients. Serious complications including aortic annular rupture (n = 2), coronary occlusion (n = 2), iliac artery rupture (n = 1), and ventricular embolization (n = 1) were successfully managed. Death and stroke rate at 30 days was 0.4% and 1.6%, respectively. One-year follow-up was complete in 171 (76%) patients. One-year mortality was 17.5% with a 3.5% stroke rate. Descending aortic rupture, while advancing the valve, was the only fatal procedural event. There were 24.4% patients with ≥2+ aortic regurgitation. Conclusions TAVR can be accomplished with excellent safety in a tertiary center with a well-developed infrastructure for the management of serious complications. The data presented here provide support for TAVR as an important treatment option, and results from randomized trials of patients with lower surgical risk are eagerly awaited. PMID:24407775

  8. Major Complications of Pneumatic Dilation and Heller Myotomy for Achalasia: Single Center Experience and Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Kristle L; Pandolfino, John E; Howden, Colin W; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Pneumatic dilation (PD) and laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) can be definitive therapies for achalasia; recent data suggest comparable efficacy. However, risk must also be considered. We reviewed the major complication rate of PD and LHM in a high volume center and reviewed the corresponding literature. Methods We reviewed 12 years of our institution’s achalasia treatment experience. During this interval a consistent technique of PD was used utilizing Rigiflex dilators. Medical records were reviewed for post-procedure complications. We administered a telephone survey and examined medical records to assess efficacy of treatment. We also performed a systematic review of the literature for comparable clinical data and examined 80 reports encompassing 12,494 LHM and PD procedures. Results At our center, 463 achalasia patients underwent 567 PD or LHM procedures. 78% of the PDs used a 30 mm Rigiflex dilator. 157/184 (85%) patients underwent 1 or 2 PD without any subsequent treatment. There were seven clinically significant perforations; one from PD and 6 from LHM. There were no resultant deaths from these perforations; two deaths occurred within 30 days of LHM from unrelated causes. Complications and deaths post-PD were significantly fewer than those post-LHM (p=.02). Conclusions Esophageal perforation from PD at our high-volume center was less common than often reported and lower than that associated with LHM. We conclude that, in the hands of experienced operators using conservative technique, PD has fewer major complications and deaths than LHM. PMID:23032978

  9. The end-of-life experiences of 9/11 civilians: death and dying in the World Trade Center.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, M Sara

    2013-01-01

    This bioethics analysis of trapped civilians in the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001, is based on a review of materials in the public domain. Death and dying experiences are divided into three major groups: sudden death, of which there was virtually no suffering or foreknowledge; deaths in which there was a maximum of 102 minutes of suffering; and death by falling or jumping, in which an autonomous decision may have been exercised as a palliative approach. A content analysis of publicly available records of this event reveals many types of end-of-life decisions were being made within the 102-minute time frame from aircraft impact to collapse. Many WTC occupants experienced intensified suffering directly consequent to unprepared emergency dispatchers and inaccurate instructions. Truthtelling and appropriate end-of-life dialogues could have reduced loss of life, suffering, and led to qualitatively improved dying experiences. PMID:24416875

  10. Cardiovascular Impact of Eating Disorders in Adults: A Single Center Experience and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Muhammad Rizwan; Greway, Andrea; DeAngelis, Michael; Tysko, Erin O'Malley; Lehmann, Shawn; Wohlstetter, Melinda; Patel, Riti

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders have multiple medical sequelae, including potentially life-threatening cardiovascular complications. This article describes our cardiology practice experience of treating adults with eating disorders in the outpatient setting and documents baseline cardiac findings in this complex patient population. We describe our findings in patients across the spectrum of eating disorders; past studies have generally focused on anorexia only. This article also includes a review of the current literature on cardiovascular complications associated with disordered eating. PMID:27326349

  11. Mass storage system experiences and future needs at the National Center for Atmospheric Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olear, Bernard T.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation is designed to relate some of the experiences of the Scientific Computing Division at NCAR dealing with the 'data problem'. A brief history and a development of some basic Mass Storage System (MSS) principles are given. An attempt is made to show how these principles apply to the integration of various components into NCAR's MSS. There is discussion of future MSS needs for future computing environments.

  12. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE experiment reports: 1990 Run Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    DiStravolo, M.A.

    1991-10-01

    This year was the third in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each six-month LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred thirty-four proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic nature to the Laboratory. Our definition of beam availability is when the proton current from the PSR exceeds 50% of the planned value. The PSR ran at 65{mu}A current (average) at 20 Hz for most of 1990. All of the scheduled experiments were performed and experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods.

  13. Wide-Angle Refraction Tomographic Inversion of Mid Cayman Spreading Center and its Oceanic Core Complex, CaySEIS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, J.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Hayman, N. W.; Grevemeyer, I.; Peirce, C.; Dannowski, A.; Papenberg, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The CaySEIS experiment, conducted in April 2015, is a multi-national collaborative seismic study of the Mid Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC), an ultra-slow spreading center [15 mm/yr fr] in the Caribbean Sea. Ultra-slow spreading centers are thought to have very thin crust and a paucity of magmatism due to cooler mantle conditions. However, the suggestion that gabbro-cored oceanic core complexes (OCCs), volcanic deposits, and multiple layers of hydrothermal vents are widespread in the MCSC and other ultra-slow spreading centers has led to questions about the relationship between seafloor spreading rates and magmatism. To investigate this further, we conducted the CaySEIS experiment, with five wide-angle seismic refraction lines parallel and perpendicular to the neovolcanic zone. This analysis is based on two east-west oriented 100-km-long seismic refraction lines, which were each occupied by 18 ocean bottom seismometers. Line 2 lies across the central MCSC and an OCC called Mt. Dent. Line 3 crosses the northern end of the MCSC near the Oriente Transform Zone. With the wide-angle OBS data we can image the seismic velocity structure of Mt. Dent and distinguish between two models of OCCs - either Mt. Dent is composed of mostly gabbro with peridotite lenses identified by a low velocity gradient, or it is composed of mostly peridotite with gabbroic bodies identified by a constant velocity gradient. The crustal structure of both lines gives more insight into the asymmetry of the MCSC and the style of seafloor spreading to the east vs. the west. The 2-D velocity models reveal Mt. Dent has thick crust of 8 km with a low velocity gradient, supporting the magmatic gabbroic origin of OCCs. The surrounding crust to the west of the MCSC is highly variable, with areas of very thin crust. The crust to the east of the MCSC has an approximately constant thickness of 4 km. The development of OCCs may contribute to the crustal heterogeneity of ultra-slow spreading centers.

  14. Evolution in the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis: experience from a single tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Yurci, Alper; Stevens, Tyler; Shah, Shetal N; Law, Ryan E; Walsh, Matthew R; Yerian, Lisa; Liu, Xiuli

    2013-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a recently characterized disease with specific clinical, radiographic, and histological features. These diagnostic features have been codified in the recently revised HISORt criteria. The aim of this study was to determine how the recognition and management of AIP has evolved at our center since the publication of the HISORt criteria in 2006. Methods: We conducted a historical cohort study consisting of patients with AIP based on the revised HISORt criteria seen at our tertiary care center since 1990. Cases were identified from pathology, laboratory, and pancreas clinic databases. The medical records were reviewed to ascertain demographic and clinical characteristics, radiologic and laboratory results, and patient outcomes. When available, prior images and pathology slides were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical outcomes of the patients were assessed following surgical or medical treatment, and compared based on the calendar year of presentation (before or after 2006). Results: Forty-seven cases were identified based on the revised HISORt criteria. Of these, 22 were evaluated before and 25 after January 1, 2006. In the early cohort, the diagnosis was frequently missed, including 15 patients that underwent surgical resections. None from the early cohort had a serum IgG4 drawn or mention of possible AIP in the imaging reports. When histology was obtained, the surgical pathologist did not perform IgG4 or Movat stain to allow a histological diagnosis of AIP. Several patients developed diabetes (n=3), calcific pancreatitis with exocrine insufficiency (n=3), proximal biliary strictures (n=7), and pancreatic cancer (n=1) during follow-up. In contrast, patients in the late cohort were less likely to undergo a surgical resection that the early cohort (36% vs. 68%, p=0.042). They were more likely to have a serum IgG4 drawn (80% vs. 0%) and to undergo a corticosteroid trial (44% vs. 0%, p=0.0003). 10/11 patients (92%) who

  15. Circumcision with Glubran® 2 in children: experience of Italian Center

    PubMed Central

    Cerchia, Elisa; Molinaro, Francesco; Bulotta, Anna Lavinia; Ferrara, Francesco; Bindi, Edoardo; Messina, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Circumcision is one of the most common surgical procedures in the world. Despite it is known its wide prevalence for religious and medical reasons in children, it remains a controversial practice in paediatric age. To date, there is no described the gold standard technique to circumcise paediatric patients. We started to use glue for circumcision about 2 years ago. We designed this prospective study with the aim to compare two surgical techniques, which were used in our hospital to perform circumcision in children. The implication for practice was the understanding if there were differences between these approaches related to patient’s and parents benefits to manage this condition and benefits for surgeon and hospital in term of saving money and time. Methods This is a randomized, single-blind one-center study. It was conducted at the Department of Paediatric Surgery of Siena. Data were collected between March 2011 and December 2012. Study’s population involved all patients who required circumcision. Two randomizes groups: group one which involved patients who underwent circumcision using sutures and group two, which involved patients who underwent circumcision using surgical glue (Glubran® 2). Two exclusion criteria were used: the redo-circumcision and the allergy or hyper-sensibility to cyanoacrylate (main component of glue). Results We report 99 patients who underwent circumcision with Glubran® 2 in comparison with a group of children circumcised with sutures (vycril rapide). We measured three outcomes (operating time, postoperative pain and assessment of cosmetic), which, even if not all statistically significant, allowed us to draw any conclusions about the use of glue in circumcision. Conclusions Traditional circumcision is performed using a standard sleeve technique with sutures for the approximation of the skin edges. However, since some years a tissue adhesive as N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) (Glubran® 2) is used in many centers to

  16. Perinatal Diagnostic Approach to Fetal Skeletal Dysplasias: Six Years Experience of a Tertiary Center.

    PubMed

    Toru, Havva Serap; Nur, Banu Guzel; Sanhal, Cem Yasar; Mihci, Ercan; Mendilcioğlu, İnanç; Yilmaz, Elanur; Yilmaz, Gulden Tasova; Ozbudak, Irem Hicran; Karaali, Kamil; Alper, Ozgul M; Karaveli, Fatma Şeyda

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal dysplasias (SDs) constitute a group of heterogeneous disorders affecting growth morphology of the chondro-osseous tissues. Prenatal diagnosis of SD is a considerable clinical challenge due to phenotypic variability. We performed a retrospective analysis of the fetal autopsies series conducted between January 2006 and December 2012 at our center. SD was detected in 54 (10%) out of 542 fetal autopsy cases which included; 11.1% thanatophoric dysplasia (n = 6), 7.4% achondroplasia (n = 4), 3.7% osteogenesis imperfect (n = 2), 1.9% Jarcho-Levin Syndrome (n = 1), 1.9% arthrogryposis (n = 1), 1.9% Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen syndrome (n = 1), 72.1% of dysostosis cases (n = 39). All SD cases were diagnosed by ultrasonography. In 20 of the cases, amniocentesis was performed, 4 cases underwent molecular genetic analyses. Antenatal identification of dysplasia is important in the management of pregnancy and in genetic counseling. Our data analysis showed that SD is usually detected clinically after the 20th gestational week. Genetic analyses for SD may provide early diagnosis and management. PMID:26376227

  17. Factitious Disorder-Experience at a Neuropsychiatric Center in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Dahale, Ajit Bhalchandra; Hatti, Shivananda; Thippeswamy, Harish; Chaturvedi, Santosh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Factitious disorder is amongst the more intriguing but less-studied psychological disorders. Studies from different parts of the world have reported of varying prevalence rates. Here, we try to study the prevalence of factitious disorder in a specific sample of patients attending a neuropsychiatric center in India. Materials and Methods: We did a retrospective review of our institute's database for cases with a diagnosis of factitious disorder in the 10-year duration from 2001 to 2010. We reviewed the available clinical and socio-demographic data. Results: Of the 81,176 patients seen in the 10-year duration, only 8 patients had been assigned the diagnosis of factitious disorder, leading to a prevalence rate of 0.985 per 10,000 patients in this sample. Most of the patients were lost to follow-up; hence. Conclusion: Factitious disorder remains highly underdiagnosed in developing countries like India. Mental health professionals need to be more aware and inquisitive about this particular disorder, so that they do not miss the diagnosis. PMID:24701013

  18. [An original experience through the creation of a new functional rehabilitation center for Vietnamese lepers].

    PubMed

    Vu, D L; Chabaud, B; Nguyen, K K; Nguyen, V T; Hoang, T Q

    1994-01-01

    Since 1990, the creation of a Rehabilitation Center for Vietnamese leprosy patients under the aegis of "Oeuvres Hospitalières Françaises de l'Ordre de Malte" is the result of emphasized collaboration between governmental and non-governmental organizations, and between medical and paramedical specialists. This humanitarian action is not "a present home delivery". The end of this action is to set progressively a realist enterprise that depends on preliminary epidemiologic investigations on the spot to analyse means and necessities. Frequency of disabilities (49.6%) and predominance of grades 1 and 2 (83.5%) require aids. The realisation of technology transfer at all medical care levels is necessary. But at the same time, it is essential to build surroundings adapted infrastructure, to equip with effective material giving comfort and security for patients, and even to supply with pharmaceutic drugs in order to continue rehabilitation's activities. In short range, patient's selection and regular control give first objective results. PMID:8209627

  19. [De novo malignant tumors following liver transplantation. A single-center experience in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Antinucci, Florencia; Anders, Margarita; Orozco, Federico; Mella, José; Cobos, Manuel; McCormack, Lucas; Mastai, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence and clinical features of de novo tumors in patients undergoing liver transplantation in our center as well as to assess survival. We retrospectively analyzed 168 liver transplantations (159 patients) performed from May 2006 to May 2014. The incidence of de novo tumors was 7.5% (n = 12). The mean age at diagnosis was 63 ± 7 years. The most frequent neoplasms were non melanoma skin tumors and adenocarcinomas. Fifty percent of the tumors developed in the second and third year after transplantation. Type of immunosuppression did not influence tumoral type, although most patients receive tacrolimus in combination with mycofenolate and/or corticoids. The mean duration of follow-up after diagnosis of the tumor was 25 ± 29 months (range 0-76) and the mortality was 41%. The actuarial probability of survival at 1 and 5 years was 83 and 55%, respectively. De novo tumors are frequent after liver transplantation and their clinical course differs from that in the general population. Because their clinical course is more aggressive, regular follow up of these patients is essential for early diagnosis. PMID:25637895

  20. Evaluation of cardiac masses by CMR-strengths and pitfalls: a tertiary center experience.

    PubMed

    Tumma, Roja; Dong, Wei; Wang, Jing; Litt, Harold; Han, Yuchi

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is often considered the reference method to assess cardiac tumors. However, little data exists concerning the effectiveness of CMR for the accurate diagnosis of cardiac masses. We sought to understand the diagnostic value of CMR for evaluation of suspected cardiac mass. A total of 249 consecutive CMR cases performed at a single center from January 2005 to June 2013 for evaluation of masses found on echocardiography or computed tomography (CT) were included. All the clinical data and imaging features of these patients were retrospectively reviewed and medical records were verified for follow up care. More than half of the patients referred for evaluation of masses found at echocardiography or CT were found to have no evidence of mass by CMR. CMR correctly differentiated between thrombus and myxoma in 88.4 % cases. Malignant masses were accurately diagnosed on CMR. However, CMR missed or misdiagnosed a few cases of benign masses. Diagnosing cardiac masses remains an important use for imaging, despite technical difficulties with current imaging modalities. CMR can play a key role in confirming presence or absence of a mass. Additionally, in the presence of a mass, CMR can provide accurate differentiation of pseudomasses, benign and malignant masses. However, the limitations of CMR must be recognized. PMID:26838354

  1. Outcome of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair: Experience of a tertiary center in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hinai, Ahmed S.; Al-Abri, Mohamed S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To study the outcome of repair of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) in a tertiary center. Materials and Methods: Review of electronic medical records within a period of 29 months of consecutive patients who underwent surgical repair for RRD in Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH). Results: We included 33 consecutive patients (36 eyes). Males constituted 70% of them. The average age was 47 years. Seven eyes out of the 36 had macula-on RRD at presentation. The primary success rate with a single procedure was 86%. However, redetachment occurred in five eyes (14%). Visual acuity was either same as preoperative or better in 81% of the eyes. Giant retinal tear was found in three eyes (8%). The average follow-up period for all patients was 10.25 months (range: 3-25 months). Conclusion: Rhegmatogenous RD is not uncommon disorder. It occurs more frequently in males. However, it has a good prognosis if an intervention was performed in early stages. PMID:24379553

  2. Prognostic factors and treatment results of pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma: A single center experience.

    PubMed

    Büyükkapu-Bay, Sema; Çorapçıoğlu, Funda; Aksu, Görkem; Anık, Yonca; Demir, Hakan; Erçin, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the demographic, clinic data, prognostic factors and treatment/follow-up results of children who were diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma and followed in our center of Pediatric Oncology, Kocaeli University Medical Faculty, Kocaeli, Turkey, for 10 years. This retrospective study evaluated 41 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma who were younger than 18 years-old. All patients were treated with risked adapted ABVD (Adriamycin, Bleomycin, Vincristine, Dacarbazine) chemotherapy and also received involved field radiotherapy. Thirty-two patients (78%) were males and 9 (22%) were females, with a mean age of 10.7±4.0 years. The histopathological diagnosis was mixed cellular type in 51.2% of the patients. B symptoms (unexplained fever, unexplained weight loss, drenching night sweats) were present in 53.7% of the patients and 36.6% of the patients were at advanced stage at the time of the diagnosis. The 3-year overall and event-free survival rates were 88% and 5-year overall and event-free survival rates were 88%, 78%. Age, stage, treatment risk groups, presence of B symptoms and hematological parameters had no significant effect on overall and event-free survival in univariate analysis while bulky disease was the only significant factor on overall survival. Our treatment policy was succesful regarding the similar survival rates in the treatment risk groups, however novel treatment strategies adopting the early response with the reduction of adverse effects are planned in the near future. PMID:27186698

  3. Thoracic outlet syndrome: a 50-year experience at Baylor University Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Kourlis, Harry

    2007-01-01

    During the past 5 decades, the recognition and management of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) have evolved. This article elucidates these changes and improvements in the diagnosis and management of TOS at Baylor University Medical Center. The most remarkable change over the past 50 years is the use of nerve conduction velocity to diagnose and monitor patients with nerve compression. Recognition that procedures such as breast implantation and median sternotomy may produce TOS has been revealing. Prompt thrombolysis followed by surgical venous decompression for Paget-Schroetter syndrome has markedly improved results compared with the conservative anticoagulation approach; thrombolysis and prompt first rib resection is the optimal treatment for most patients with Paget-Schroetter syndrome. Complete first rib extirpation at the initial procedure markedly reduces the incidence of recurrent neurologic symptoms or the need for a second procedure. Chest pain or pseudoangina can be caused by TOS. Dorsal sympathectomy is helpful for patients with sympathetic maintained pain syndrome or causalgia and patients with recurrent TOS symptoms who need a second procedure. PMID:17431445

  4. Insulin degludec and insulin degludec/insulin aspart in Ramadan: A single center experience.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to document the utility and safety of insulin degludec (IDeg) and insulin degludec aspart (IDegAsp) in persons with type 2 diabetes, observing the Ramadan fast. An observational study was conducted at a single center, in the real world setting, on six persons who either switched to IDeg or IDegAsp a month before Ramadan or changed time of administration of IDegAsp at the onset of Ramadan, to keep the fast in a safe manner. Subjects were kept under regular monitoring and surveillance before, during, and after Ramadan, and counseled in an opposite manner. Four persons, who shifted from premixed insulin to IDegAsp, experienced a 12-18% dose reduction after 14 days. At the onset of Ramadan, the Suhur dose was reduced by 30%, and this remained unchanged during the fasting month. The Iftar dose had to be increased by 4 units. One person who shifted from neutral protamine hagedorn to IDeg demonstrated a 25% dose reduction at 20 days, without any further change in insulin requirement during Ramadan. One person who changed time of injection of IDegAsp from morning to night reported no change in dosage. No episode of major hypoglycemia was reported. IDeg and IDegAsp are effective, safe, and well-tolerated means of achieving glycemic control in persons with type 2 diabetes who wish to fast. PMID:27366727

  5. Outcome analysis of management of liver trauma: A 10-year experience at a trauma center

    PubMed Central

    She, Wong Hoi; Cheung, Tan To; Dai, Wing Chiu; Tsang, Simon H Y; Chan, Albert C Y; Tong, Daniel K H; Leung, Gilberto K K; Lo, Chung Mau

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review the outcomes of liver trauma in patients with hepatic injuries only and in patients with associated injuries outside the liver. METHODS: Data of liver trauma patients presented to our center from January 2003 to October 2013 were reviewed. The patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of patients who had hepatic injuries only. Group 2 consisted of patients who also had associated injuries outside the liver. RESULTS: Seven (30.4%) patients in group 1 and 10 (28.6%) patients in group 2 received non-operative management; the rest underwent operation. Blunt trauma occurred in 82.8% (48/58) of the patients and penetrative trauma in 17.2% (10/58). A higher injury severity score (ISS) was observed in group 2 (median 45 vs 25, P < 0.0001). More patients in group 1 were hemodynamically stable (65.2% vs 37.1%, P = 0.036). Other parameters were comparable between groups. Group 1 had better 30-d survival (91.3% vs 71.4%, P = 0.045). On multivariate analysis using the logistic regression model, ISS was found to be associated with mortality (P = 0.004, hazard ratio = 1.035, 95%CI: 1.011-1.060). CONCLUSION: Liver trauma patients with multiple injuries are relatively unstable on presentation. Despite a higher ISS in group 2, non-operative management was possible for selected patients. Associated injuries outside the liver usually account for morbidity and mortality. PMID:27239257

  6. Sociodemographic Parameters of Esophageal Cancer in Northwest India: A Regional Cancer Center Experience of 10 Years

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Akhil; Kumar, Vanita; Singhal, Mukesh Kumar; Nirban, Raj Kumar; Beniwal, Surender Kumar; Kumar, Harvindra Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite various advances in the treatment of Esophageal Cancer (EC), being one of the least responsive tumors to cancer therapy, the overall prognosis remains poor. Therefore, it is significant to understand various sociodemographic factors associated with EC to find out various schemes for primary prevention of the disease. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of medical records of the EC patients registered in the regional cancer center of northwest India from January 2003 to December 2012. The site of the disease and the histology were also recorded in addition to the various sociodemographic parameters. Results: Out of 55,742 patients registered in our hospital; 3,667 were diagnosed to have EC. Male:female ratio was 1.15:1. The mean age was 54.6 ± 11.74 years; 66.15% of the patients were illiterate and 48.6% belonged to the low socioeconomic status. Smoking and alcohol consumption were identified as risk factors in 48 and 25.6% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The etiology in majority of the patients is linked to tobacco and alcohol, thus, modification of life style with limiting the use of addictions may be an effective strategy in the prevention of this dreaded and mostly incurable disease. PMID:26435600

  7. Frequency of kidney diseases and clinical indications of pediatric renal biopsy: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, S.; Nasir, K.; Drohlia, M. F.; Salman, B.; Ahmad, A.

    2016-01-01

    Kidney biopsy occupies a fundamental position in the management of kidney diseases. There are very few renal pathology studies available in the literature from developing world. This study scrutinized the frequency and clinicopathological relationship of kidney biopsies done at the kidney center from 1997 to 2013 amongst pediatric patients. Kidney allograft biopsy were excluded. The specimen was examined under light microscopy and immunofluorescence while electron microscopy was not done. The study includes 423 patients, mean age was 10.48 ± 4.58 years, males 245 (57.9%) were more than females 178 (42.1%). Nephrotic syndrome 314 (74.2%) was the most common clinical presentation followed by acute nephritic syndrome 35 (8.3%) and acute renal failure 24 (5.7%). Primary glomerulonephritis (PGN) was the most common group of diseases, seen in 360 (85.1%) followed by secondary glomerulonephritis (SGN) in 27 (6.4%) and tubulointerstitial nephritis in 21 (5.0%). Among PGN, minimal change disease (MCD) was the most dominant disease, with 128 (30.3%) cases followed by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis FSGS in 109 (25.8%) and membranous glomerulonephropathy in 27 (6.4%). Lupus nephritis (LN) was the leading cause of glomerular disease in SGN followed by hemolytic uremic syndrome. In conclusion, MCD is the most common histological finding, especially in younger children and FSGS is second to it. SGN is rare, and the most common disease in this category is LN while tubulointerstitial and vascular diseases are infrequent. PMID:27194835

  8. Insulin degludec and insulin degludec/insulin aspart in Ramadan: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to document the utility and safety of insulin degludec (IDeg) and insulin degludec aspart (IDegAsp) in persons with type 2 diabetes, observing the Ramadan fast. An observational study was conducted at a single center, in the real world setting, on six persons who either switched to IDeg or IDegAsp a month before Ramadan or changed time of administration of IDegAsp at the onset of Ramadan, to keep the fast in a safe manner. Subjects were kept under regular monitoring and surveillance before, during, and after Ramadan, and counseled in an opposite manner. Four persons, who shifted from premixed insulin to IDegAsp, experienced a 12–18% dose reduction after 14 days. At the onset of Ramadan, the Suhur dose was reduced by 30%, and this remained unchanged during the fasting month. The Iftar dose had to be increased by 4 units. One person who shifted from neutral protamine hagedorn to IDeg demonstrated a 25% dose reduction at 20 days, without any further change in insulin requirement during Ramadan. One person who changed time of injection of IDegAsp from morning to night reported no change in dosage. No episode of major hypoglycemia was reported. IDeg and IDegAsp are effective, safe, and well-tolerated means of achieving glycemic control in persons with type 2 diabetes who wish to fast. PMID:27366727

  9. Comparison of Capsule Endoscopy Findings to Subsequent Double Balloon Enteroscopy: A Dual Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Amandeep S; Walker, Andrew J; Benson, Mark E; Soni, Anurag; Guda, Nalini M; Misha, Mehak; Gopal, Deepak V

    2015-01-01

    Background. There has been a growing use of both capsule endoscopy (CE) and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) to diagnose and treat patients with obscure gastrointestinal blood loss and suspected small bowel pathology. Aim. To compare and correlate sequential CE and DBE findings in a large series of patients at two tertiary level hospitals in Wisconsin. Methods. An IRB approved retrospective study of patients who underwent sequential CE and DBE, at two separate tertiary care academic centers from May 2007 to December 2011, was performed. Results. 116 patients were included in the study. The mean age ± SD was 66.6 ± 13.2 years. There were 56% males and 43.9% females. Measure of agreement between prior capsule and DBE findings was performed using kappa statistics, which gave kappa value of 0.396 with P < 0.001. Also contingency coefficient was calculated and was found to be 0.732 (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Our study showed good overall agreement between DBE and CE. Findings of angioectasia had maximum agreement of 69%. PMID:26420979

  10. Is one head and neck immobilization system as good as another? One center's experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, Leah Bapp; May, Sharon; Bailey, Michael; Smith, Leigh

    2003-03-31

    The William Buckland Radiotherapy Center has used 2 different immobilization systems for patients requiring radiotherapy to the head-and-neck region. A polycarbonate mask was manufactured for radical treatments and a thermoplastic mask for palliative treatments. This study evaluated field placement accuracy, staff opinion, and production costs of both systems. The manual matching program of Varian PortalVision Electronic Portal Imaging (EPI) System was used to assess field placement accuracy on a daily basis. Radiation therapists (RTs) were surveyed before and after the study to determine their opinions of each system. Production time and required materials were recorded to assess cost. Nineteen patients from each system had daily EPI results compiled with no statistically significant difference observed in field placement accuracy. The thermoplastic system was found to be more cost efficient due to a combination of the reduced production time and reuseability of the masks. User acceptability of the thermoplastic system has increased so that it is now the preferred system. In conclusion, the thermoplastic system is a viable alternative to the polycarbonate system in terms of treatment accuracy and cost. It is recommended that the thermoplastic system be used for all radical and palliative treatments. In addition, RTs prefer the thermoplastic system.

  11. Frequency of kidney diseases and clinical indications of pediatric renal biopsy: A single center experience.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, S; Nasir, K; Drohlia, M F; Salman, B; Ahmad, A

    2016-01-01

    Kidney biopsy occupies a fundamental position in the management of kidney diseases. There are very few renal pathology studies available in the literature from developing world. This study scrutinized the frequency and clinicopathological relationship of kidney biopsies done at the kidney center from 1997 to 2013 amongst pediatric patients. Kidney allograft biopsy were excluded. The specimen was examined under light microscopy and immunofluorescence while electron microscopy was not done. The study includes 423 patients, mean age was 10.48 ± 4.58 years, males 245 (57.9%) were more than females 178 (42.1%). Nephrotic syndrome 314 (74.2%) was the most common clinical presentation followed by acute nephritic syndrome 35 (8.3%) and acute renal failure 24 (5.7%). Primary glomerulonephritis (PGN) was the most common group of diseases, seen in 360 (85.1%) followed by secondary glomerulonephritis (SGN) in 27 (6.4%) and tubulointerstitial nephritis in 21 (5.0%). Among PGN, minimal change disease (MCD) was the most dominant disease, with 128 (30.3%) cases followed by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis FSGS in 109 (25.8%) and membranous glomerulonephropathy in 27 (6.4%). Lupus nephritis (LN) was the leading cause of glomerular disease in SGN followed by hemolytic uremic syndrome. In conclusion, MCD is the most common histological finding, especially in younger children and FSGS is second to it. SGN is rare, and the most common disease in this category is LN while tubulointerstitial and vascular diseases are infrequent. PMID:27194835

  12. Controversies Surrounding Renal Denervation: Lessons Learned From Real-World Experience in Two United Kingdom Centers.

    PubMed

    Burchell, Amy E; Chan, Kenneth; Ratcliffe, Laura E K; Hart, Emma C; Saxena, Manish; Collier, David J; Jain, Ajay K; Mathur, Anthony; Knight, Charles J; Caulfield, Mark J; Paton, Julian F R; Nightingale, Angus K; Lobo, Melvin D; Baumbach, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Renal denervation (RDN) is a therapy that targets treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH). The Renal Denervation in Patients With Uncontrolled Hypertension (Symplicity) HTN-1 and Symplicity HTN-2 trials reported response rates of >80%; however, sham-controlled Symplicity HTN-3 failed to reach its primary blood pressure (BP) outcome. The authors address the current controversies surrounding RDN, illustrated with real-world data from two centers in the United Kingdom. In this cohort, 52% of patients responded to RDN, with a 13±32 mm Hg reduction in office systolic BP (SBP) at 6 months (n=29, P=.03). Baseline office SBP and number of ablations correlated with office SBP reduction (R=-0.47, P=.01; R=-0.56, P=.002). RDN appears to be an effective treatment for some patients with TRH; however, individual responses are highly variable. Selecting patients for RDN is challenging, with only 10% (33 of 321) of the screened patients eligible for the study. Medication alterations and nonadherence confound outcomes. Adequate ablation is critical and should impact future catheter design/training. Markers of procedural success and improved patient selection parameters remain key research aims. PMID:26857092

  13. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A single center experience with Berlin, Frankfurt, and Munster-95 protocol

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Venkatraman; Gupta, Sumant; Ganesan, Prasanth; Rajendranath, Rejiv; Ganesan, Trivadi S.; Rajalekshmy, Kamalalayan Raghavan; Sagar, Tenali Gnana

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of data on the outcome following the treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) from developing countries. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and thirty-eight consecutive patients with ALL <30 years of age diagnosed between January 2005 and December 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were treated modified Berlin, Frankfurt, and Munster 95 protocol. Event-free survival (EFS) was calculated using Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and variables were compared using log-rank test. Results: The EFS was 63.4% at a median follow-up was 32.7 months. On univariate analysis National Cancer Institute (NCI) risk stratification, sex, white blood cell count, day 8 blast clearance, and income were significantly associated with EFS. However, on multivariate analysis only female sex (P = 0.01) and day 8 blast clearance (P = 0.006) were significantly associated with EFS. Seventy-four of 238 (31%) patients had recurrent leukemia. The common sites of relapse were bone marrow in 55/74 (75%) patients and central nervous system in 11/74 (20%) patients. Conclusion: Compared to western data, there was an increased proportion of NCI high-risk patients and T-cell immunophenotype in our study. There has been an improvement in outcome of patients with ALL at our center over the last 2 decades. Female sex and clearance of blast in peripheral blood by day 8 of induction was associated with better EFS. PMID:26811597

  14. Family Centered Approach in Primary Health Care: Experience from an Urban Area of Mangalore, India

    PubMed Central

    Majra, J. P.; Akshaya, K. M.; Qadiri, Ghulam Jeelani

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. “Health for All” still eludes public health experts despite many approaches to prevent disease and promote health among urban poor. Several key illness factors lie beyond the conventional healthcare boundaries. Objective. To examine the effectiveness of family centered approach (FCA) in addressing health and related issues in an urban area of Mangalore, India. Method. A longitudinal study was conducted in Bengre, an outreach centre of Mangalore from June 2011 to November 2013. Family folders were created with pertinent details. Demand generation and health education activities were conducted through two female community health link workers. An FCA package was implemented by medical and nursing interns, under supervision, to address the priority issues. Effect was assessed by comparing their practices and service utilization before and after the study. Results. About 809 families participated in this study. Social, cultural, and religious factors were responsible for viciousness of malaria and maternal and child health issues. FCA improved their perceptions and practices towards health and related issues. Significant (P < 0.05) and sustained hike in service utilization was evident. Conclusion. FCA exposes key illness factors beyond the conventional care, eases need based healthcare implementation, and provides feasible and enduring solutions. Community involvement makes it more practicable. PMID:25695098

  15. Comparison of Capsule Endoscopy Findings to Subsequent Double Balloon Enteroscopy: A Dual Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Amandeep S.; Walker, Andrew J.; Benson, Mark E.; Soni, Anurag; Guda, Nalini M.; Misha, Mehak; Gopal, Deepak V.

    2015-01-01

    Background. There has been a growing use of both capsule endoscopy (CE) and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) to diagnose and treat patients with obscure gastrointestinal blood loss and suspected small bowel pathology. Aim. To compare and correlate sequential CE and DBE findings in a large series of patients at two tertiary level hospitals in Wisconsin. Methods. An IRB approved retrospective study of patients who underwent sequential CE and DBE, at two separate tertiary care academic centers from May 2007 to December 2011, was performed. Results. 116 patients were included in the study. The mean age ± SD was 66.6 ± 13.2 years. There were 56% males and 43.9% females. Measure of agreement between prior capsule and DBE findings was performed using kappa statistics, which gave kappa value of 0.396 with P < 0.001. Also contingency coefficient was calculated and was found to be 0.732 (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Our study showed good overall agreement between DBE and CE. Findings of angioectasia had maximum agreement of 69%. PMID:26420979

  16. Extended interval dosing of natalizumab: a two-center, 7-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Pawate, Siddharama

    2014-01-01

    Background: The enthusiasm for natalizumab, a highly efficacious agent in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), has been tempered by the risks of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy associated with its use, and strategies to minimize those risks are of great interest. Extended interval dosing (EID) has been proposed as a way to maintain the efficacy of natalizumab while reducing exposure to it. We reviewed a cohort of patients who received natalizumab at 6–8-week intervals instead of the typical infusions every 4 weeks with the goal to assess if patients on EID had an increase in clinical relapses. Methods: This is a retrospective review of all patients with MS treated with natalizumab at two MS centers where patients were offered the opportunity to switch to an EID every 6 or 8 weeks. Results: A total of 361 patients received natalizumab for 22 ± 13 months (minimum duration 6 months). Of these, 96 patients received EID natalizumab at some point for 20 ± 11 months (minimum duration 6 months). Over the study period, there was no significant difference between the relapse rate in the monthly dosing (13%) and the EID (13%) groups of patients. Conclusion: Natalizumab is effective in controlling MS as very few clinical relapses were observed in our dataset. We found that EID did not compromise the treatment effect as measured by relapse rate and no significant breakthrough disease activity was observed. EID is an optional regimen for maintenance natalizumab therapy, but prospective studies are warranted to determine its efficacy. PMID:25342976

  17. Importance and feasibility of creating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy centers in developing countries: the experience in India.

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J

    2015-07-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is a relatively common genetic heart disease responsible for mortality and morbidity at all ages. Using contemporary treatment advances, such as implantable defibrillators, surgical myectomy, heart transplant, and modern defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, it is now possible to reduce HC-related mortality considerably to 0.5% per year, less than expected in the general US adult population. However, in much of the developing world, HC has not yet become a priority given the many other cardiac conditions, such as coronary artery disease and systemic hypertension, so prevalent in the most populous countries such as China and India. Management of HC is best achieved in dedicated centers within institutions, such as previously demonstrated in the United States, Canada, some European countries, and Australia. This model has recently been introduced for the first time in India at the Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research in Kochi, Kerala, in which a robust program focused on HC has emerged. This novel initiative, created despite the many obstacles in the Indian health care system, is an important step forward and is reported here detail. PMID:25983127

  18. Driving under the influence--a level-I trauma center's experience.

    PubMed

    Fantus, R J; Zautcke, J L; Hickey, P A; Fantus, P P; Nagorka, F W

    1991-11-01

    Alcohol-impaired driving is a major issue confronting today's society. New legislation is emerging to help curtail this ongoing problem. To evaluate the legislative effects in terms of outcome pertaining to injured drivers, we analyzed the records of 116 consecutive motor vehicle drivers who were admitted to our trauma center over a 16-month period. Medical reports, police reports, and drivers' abstracts were reviewed. Of the 116 drives, 61 (53%) had blood alcohol concentrations that exceeded the legal limit (blood alcohol level greater than or equal to 100 mg/dL) on arrival at the emergency department. Only four of these patients were ticketed for driving under the influence and received the mandatory suspension of their driver's license. None was convicted of this offense, which carries criminal charges and a revocation of the driver's license. Mechanisms for efficient collection of blood specimens and mandatory occurrence reporting are two recommendations that merit investigation to obviate further escape of injured, intoxicated drivers from the legal net. In addition, alcohol rehabilitation and education cannot be overlooked and should warrant strong societal support. PMID:1942173

  19. Sports hernia: the experience of Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas.

    PubMed

    Preskitt, John T

    2011-04-01

    Groin injuries in high-performance athletes are common, occurring in 5% to 28% of athletes. Athletic pubalgia syndrome, or so-called sports hernia, is one such injury that can be debilitating and sport ending in some athletes. It is a clinical diagnosis of chronic, painful musculotendinous injury to the medial inguinal floor occurring with athletic activity. Over the past 12 years, we have operated on >100 patients with this injury at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas. These patients have included professional athletes, collegiate athletes, competitive recreational athletes, and the occasional "weekend warrior." The repair used is an open technique using a lightweight polypropylene mesh. Patient selection is important, as is collaboration with other experienced and engaged sports health care professionals, including team trainers, physical therapists, team physicians, and sports medicine and orthopedic surgeons. Of the athletes who underwent surgery, 98% have returned to competition. After a minimum of 6 weeks for recovery and rehabilitation, they have usually returned to competition within 3 months. PMID:21566750

  20. Sports hernia: the experience of Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Groin injuries in high-performance athletes are common, occurring in 5% to 28% of athletes. Athletic pubalgia syndrome, or so-called sports hernia, is one such injury that can be debilitating and sport ending in some athletes. It is a clinical diagnosis of chronic, painful musculotendinous injury to the medial inguinal floor occurring with athletic activity. Over the past 12 years, we have operated on >100 patients with this injury at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas. These patients have included professional athletes, collegiate athletes, competitive recreational athletes, and the occasional “weekend warrior.” The repair used is an open technique using a lightweight polypropylene mesh. Patient selection is important, as is collaboration with other experienced and engaged sports health care professionals, including team trainers, physical therapists, team physicians, and sports medicine and orthopedic surgeons. Of the athletes who underwent surgery, 98% have returned to competition. After a minimum of 6 weeks for recovery and rehabilitation, they have usually returned to competition within 3 months. PMID:21566750

  1. Kratom abuse in Ramathibodi Poison Center, Thailand: a five-year experience.

    PubMed

    Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Tongpo, Achara; Sriapha, Charuwan; Wongvisawakorn, Sunun; Rittilert, Panee; Kaojarern, Sming; Wananukul, Winai

    2013-01-01

    Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa Korth), a native tree in Southeast Asia, is misused as an abuse drug and becomes legally widespread to several countries. Currently, it is available through the online market or by some shops. The clinical manifestations of Kratom's effects are not well-defined and the clinical studies are limited. This study was designed to identify the characteristics of Kratom poisoning and withdrawal cases from Kratom exposure cases in Ramathibodi Poison Center (RPC), Thailand, during a five-year period. We used a retrospective review of Kratom exposure cases from the RPC toxic surveillance system. A total of 52 Kratom exposure cases were identified. The trend of case consultations has been increasing. There were Kratom poisoning cases (76.9%) and withdrawal cases (23.1%). Common presenting symptoms in the poisoning group were palpitation (22.5%), followed by seizure (17.5%). For the withdrawal group, the common presenting symptoms were myalgia (33.3%), insomnia (16.67%), fatigue (16.67%), and chest discomfort (16.67%). There was a baby with withdrawal symptoms who was delivered from a chronic Kratom-abusing mother, suggesting possible exposure via the transplacental route. There were no deaths in either group. Kratom abuse can cause either poisoning or withdrawal. Most cases in both groups had good prognostic outcome. PMID:24592666

  2. Upper Limb Ischemia: Clinical Experiences of Acute and Chronic Upper Limb Ischemia in a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Miju; Chung, Sung Woon; Lee, Chung Won; Choi, Jinseok; Song, Seunghwan; Kim, Sang-pil

    2015-01-01

    Background Upper limb ischemia is less common than lower limb ischemia, and relatively few cases have been reported. This paper reviews the epidemiology, etiology, and clinical characteristics of upper limb ischemia and analyzes the factors affecting functional sequelae after treatment. Methods The records of 35 patients with acute and chronic upper limb ischemia who underwent treatment from January 2007 to December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Results The median age was 55.03 years, and the number of male patients was 24 (68.6%). The most common etiology was embolism of cardiac origin, followed by thrombosis with secondary trauma, and the brachial artery was the most common location for a lesion causing obstruction. Computed tomography angiography was the first-line diagnostic tool in our center. Twenty-eight operations were performed, and conservative therapy was implemented in seven cases. Five deaths (14.3%) occurred during follow-up. Twenty patients (57.1%) complained of functional sequelae after treatment. Functional sequelae were found to be more likely in patients with a longer duration of symptoms (odds ratio, 1.251; p=0.046) and higher lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (odds ratio, 1.001; p=0.031). Conclusion An increased duration of symptoms and higher initial serum LDH levels were associated with the more frequent occurrence of functional sequelae. The prognosis of upper limb ischemia is associated with prompt and proper treatment and can also be predicted by initial serum LDH levels. PMID:26290835

  3. Various anatomic locations of surgically proven endometriosis: A single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Ju; Park, Ye Mi; Kim, Yong Beom; Suh, Chang Suk

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report the various anatomic locations of surgically and pathologically proven endometriosis. Methods Pathologic reports (n=1,376) of women who underwent surgeries at a single center between April 2005 and March 2013 were retrieved from the electronic medical record system of the hospital. Pathologic reports were included after performing a search by using the key-words "endometrial cyst," "endometriotic cyst," "endometriosis," or "endometrioma." Only reports dealing with female patients were selected, and the pathologic reports of 1,350 women (1,374 surgery cases) were included in the analysis. Results The predominant location of endometriosis was the ovaries (96.4%), followed by the soft tissue (2.8%), gastrointestinal tract (0.3%) and urinary tract (0.2%). Laparoscopic surgery was the major surgical technique used for the pelvic endometriosis (89.2%). Adrenal gland endometriosis was found in a 55-year-old woman. Conclusion We established the various anatomic locations of surgically and pathologically proven endometriosis in Korean women. PMID:25629019

  4. Genotypic and phenotypic features of citrin deficiency: five-year experience in a Chinese pediatric center.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuan-Zong; Deng, Mei; Chen, Feng-Ping; Wen, Fang; Guo, Li; Cao, Shui-Liang; Gong, Jian; Xu, Hao; Jiang, Guang-Yu; Zhong, Le; Kobayashi, Keiko; Saheki, Takeyori; Wang, Zi-Neng

    2011-07-01

    Citrin is a liver-type aspartate/glutamate carrier (AGC) encoded by the gene SLC25A13. Two phenotypes for human citrin deficiency have been described, namely the adult-onset citrullinemia type II (CTLN2) and the neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency (NICCD). However, citrin deficiency currently remains a perplexing and poorly recognized disorder. In particular, description of post-NICCD clinical presentations before CTLN2 onset is rather limited. Analysis of SLC25A13 mutations, identification of dysmorphic erythrocytes, hepatobiliary scintigraphic imaging and investigation of post-NICCD clinical presentations were performed in a citrin-deficient cohort comprised of 51 cases of children diagnosed with citrin deficiency in a Chinese pediatric center. Twelve SLC25A13 mutations were detected in this cohort, including the novel V411M and G283X mutations. Among the 51 citrin-deficient subjects, 7 cases had echinocytosis, which was associated with more severe biochemical abnormalities. Delayed hepatic discharge and bile duct/bowel visualization were common scintigraphic findings. Moreover, 9 of the 34 post-NICCD cases demonstrated concurrent failure to thrive and dyslipidemia, constituting a clinical phenotype different from NICCD and CTLN2. The novel mutations, echinocytosis, hepatobiliary scintigraphic features and the novel clinical phenotype in this study expanded the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of citrin deficiency, and challenge the traditionally-assumed 'apparently healthy' period after the NICCD state for this disease entity. PMID:21424115

  5. Early enteral nutrition vs parenteral nutrition following pancreaticoduodenectomy: Experience from a single center

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jian-Wen; Liu, Chang; Du, Zhao-Qing; Liu, Xue-Min; Lv, Yi; Zhang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze and compare postoperative morbidity between patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and early enteral nutrition supplemented with parenteral nutrition (EEN + PN). METHODS: Three hundred and forty patients receiving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) from 2009 to 2013 at our center were enrolled retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups depending on postoperative nutrition support scheme: an EEN + PN group (n = 87) and a TPN group (n = 253). Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, preoperative biochemical parameters, pathological diagnosis, intraoperative information, and postoperative complications of the two groups were analyzed. RESULTS: The two groups did not differ in demographic characteristics, preoperative comorbidities, preoperative biochemical parameters or pathological findings (P > 0.05 for all). However, patients with EEN + PN following PD had a higher incidence of delayed gastric emptying (16.1% vs 6.7%, P = 0.016), pulmonary infection (10.3% vs 3.6%, P = 0.024), and probably intraperitoneal infection (18.4% vs 10.3%, P = 0.059), which might account for their longer nasogastric tube retention time (9 d vs 5 d, P = 0.006), postoperative hospital stay (25 d vs 20 d, P = 0.055) and higher hospitalization expenses (USD10397 vs USD8663.9, P = 0.008), compared to those with TPN. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that TPN might be safe and sufficient for patient recovery after PD. Postoperative EEN should only be performed scrupulously and selectively. PMID:27076767

  6. Attending an activity center: positive experiences of a group of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia

    PubMed Central

    Söderhamn, Ulrika; Aasgaard, Live; Landmark, Bjørg

    2014-01-01

    Background In Norway, there is a focus on home-dwelling people with dementia receiving the opportunity to participate in organized meaningful activities. The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia who attend an activity center and participate in adapted physical and social activities delivered by nurses and volunteers. Methods The study adopted a qualitative approach, with individual interviews conducted among eight people diagnosed with early-stage dementia. The interview texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis. Results Four categories, ie, “appreciated activities”, “praised nurses and volunteers”, “being more active”, and “being included in a fellowship”, as well as the overall theme “participation in appreciated activities and a sense of feeling included in a fellowship may have a positive influence on health and well-being” emerged in the analysis. The informants appreciated the adapted physical and social activities and expressed their enjoyment and gratitude. They found the physical activities useful, and they felt themselves to be included in a fellowship through cheerful nurses and volunteers. The nurses were able to create a good atmosphere and spread joy in the center together with the volunteers. The informants felt themselves valued as the persons they were. These findings indicated that such activities may have had a positive influence on the informants’ health and well-being. Conclusion In order to succeed with this kind of activity center, it is decisive that the nurses are able to tailor meaningful activities and create an environment where the persons with dementia can feel that they are respected and valued. The municipality health care service should implement such activity centers with specialist nurses in dementia care together with volunteers. PMID:25419121

  7. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1992 run cycle. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    DiStravolo, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    This year was the fifth in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory, examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred sixty-seven proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic interest to the Laboratory; six experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods. Oversubscription for instrument beam time by a factor of three was evident with 839 total days requested and only 371 available for allocation.

  8. The Versatility of Autologous Fat Transplantation in Correction of Facial Deformities: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Hammer-Hansen, Niels; Akram, Javed; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg

    2015-01-01

    Deformities in the craniofacial region are of great social and functional importance. Several surgical techniques have been used to treat such pathologies often with high morbidity and lacking the ability to address smaller contour defects. The minimally invasive technique of fat transplantation has evolved rapidly within the last few decades. The objective of this paper is to present the versatility and applicability of fat transplantation in a wide range of contour deformities in the craniofacial region. We share our experiences in treating 13 patients with autoimmune disorders, congenital malformations, and acquired defects. Future perspectives of fat transplantation in the field of craniofacial reconstruction are discussed. PMID:25821598

  9. Escalating therapy of cutaneous side effects of EGFR inhibitors: experience of German reference centers.

    PubMed

    Homey, Bernhard; Gerber, Peter Arne; Wollenberg, Andreas; Dirschka, Thomas; Hassel, Jessica C; Bölke, Edwin; Hauschild, Axel; Gutzmer, Ralf

    2012-08-01

    Recommendations for the management of cutaneous adverse effects of inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are urgently needed. In this context an expert panel of German dermatologists recently proposed a 3-step management concept based on personal experience and a current literature consensus. While steps 1 and 2 addressed general and preventive measures, as well as the therapy that can be performed by the primary treating physician, here we address the management of challenging cases (step 3) that do not respond well to basic measures and should be referred to an experienced dermatologist. PMID:22672156

  10. Robot-Assisted Cardiac Surgery Using the Da Vinci Surgical System: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eung Re; Lim, Cheong; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Jun Sung; Park, Kay Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background We report our initial experiences of robot-assisted cardiac surgery using the da Vinci Surgical System. Methods Between February 2010 and March 2014, 50 consecutive patients underwent minimally invasive robot-assisted cardiac surgery. Results Robot-assisted cardiac surgery was employed in two cases of minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass, 17 cases of mitral valve repair, 10 cases of cardiac myxoma removal, 20 cases of atrial septal defect repair, and one isolated CryoMaze procedure. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time and average aorta cross-clamping time were 194.8±48.6 minutes and 126.1±22.6 minutes in mitral valve repair operations and 132.0±32.0 minutes and 76.1±23.1 minutes in myxoma removal operations, respectively. During atrial septal defect closure operations, the average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 128.3±43.1 minutes. The median length of stay was between five and seven days. The only complication was that one patient needed reoperation to address bleeding. There were no hospital mortalities. Conclusion Robot-assisted cardiac surgery is safe and effective for mitral valve repair, atrial septal defect closure, and cardiac myxoma removal surgery. Reducing operative time depends heavily on the experience of the entire robotic surgical team. PMID:25883892