Sample records for central alarm monitoring

  1. INEL central alarm monitoring and assessment system

    SciTech Connect

    Niper, E.D.

    1983-07-01

    This paper concerns the design and development of a centrally located security monitoring and assessment system for processing alarms at several remote facilities. The system provides both live and recorded CCTV assessment of alarmed areas. Computer controlled video disc recordings are made at the time the alarm is activated. Alarming areas are displayed on a color graphics monitor and an operator interacts through an overlying transparent touch panel. Computer-generated messages are also displayed to assist and inform the operator. A bidirectional, frequency-multiplexed cable system provides digital alarm information, video control commands, and several channels of video from each remote facility.

  2. INEL central alarm monitoring and assessment system

    SciTech Connect

    Niper, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    This paper concerns the design and development of a centrally located security monitoring and assessment system for processing alarms at several remote facilities. The system provides both live and recorded CCTV assessment of alarmed areas. Computer controlled video disc recordings are displayed on a color graphics monitor and an operator interacts through an overlying transparent touch panel. Computer generated messages are also displayed to assist and inform the operator. A bidirectional, frequency-multiplexed cable system provides digital alarm information, video control commands, and several channels of video from each remote facility.

  3. Remote Monitor Alarm System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stute, Robert A. (Inventor); Galloway, F. Houston (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Swindle, Robert W. (Inventor); Bierman, Tracy A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A remote monitor alarm system monitors discrete alarm and analog power supply voltage conditions at remotely located communications terminal equipment. A central monitoring unit (CMU) is connected via serial data links to each of a plurality of remote terminal units (RTUS) that monitor the alarm and power supply conditions of the remote terminal equipment. Each RTU can monitor and store condition information of both discrete alarm points and analog power supply voltage points in its associated communications terminal equipment. The stored alarm information is periodically transmitted to the CMU in response to sequential polling of the RTUS. The number of monitored alarm inputs and permissible voltage ranges for the analog inputs can be remotely configured at the CMU and downloaded into programmable memory at each RTU. The CMU includes a video display, a hard disk memory, a line printer and an audio alarm for communicating and storing the alarm information received from each RTU.

  4. Alarm- And Power-Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stute, Rob; Galloway, F. Houston; Swindle, Bob; Bierman, Tracy Alan; Medelius, Pedro

    1994-01-01

    Electronic central monitoring system, called Remote Monitor Alarm System, RMAS, used to monitor malfunction alarms and power supplies of remotely located equipment modules of transmitting and receiving equipment in fiber-optic communication network at Kennedy Space Center. Includes central monitoring unit at location convenient for technicians, plus remote terminal unit at each remote site containing equipment to be monitored.

  5. Video methods for evaluating physiologic monitor alarms and alarm responses.

    PubMed

    Bonafide, Christopher P; Zander, Miriam; Graham, Christian Sarkis; Weirich Paine, Christine M; Rock, Whitney; Rich, Andrew; Roberts, Kathryn E; Fortino, Margaret; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Lin, Richard; Keren, Ron

    2014-01-01

    False physiologic monitor alarms are extremely common in the hospital environment. High false alarm rates have the potential to lead to alarm fatigue, leading nurses to delay their responses to alarms, ignore alarms, or disable them entirely. Recent evidence from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and The Joint Commission has demonstrated a link between alarm fatigue and patient deaths. Yet, very little scientific effort has focused on the rigorous quantitative measurement of alarms and responses in the hospital setting. We developed a system using multiple temporarily mounted, minimally obtrusive video cameras in hospitalized patients' rooms to characterize physiologic monitor alarms and nurse responses as a proxy for alarm fatigue. This allowed us to efficiently categorize each alarm's cause, technical validity, actionable characteristics, and determine the nurse's response time. We describe and illustrate the methods we used to acquire the video, synchronize and process the video, manage the large digital files, integrate the video with data from the physiologic monitor alarm network, archive the video to secure servers, and perform expert review and annotation using alarm "bookmarks." We discuss the technical and logistical challenges we encountered, including the root causes of hardware failures as well as issues with consent, confidentiality, protection of the video from litigation, and Hawthorne-like effects. The description of this video method may be useful to multidisciplinary teams interested in evaluating physiologic monitor alarms and alarm responses to better characterize alarm fatigue and other patient safety issues in clinical settings. PMID:24847936

  6. Use of pagers with an alarm escalation system to reduce cardiac monitor alarm signals.

    PubMed

    Cvach, Maria M; Frank, Robert J; Doyle, Pete; Stevens, Zeina Khouri

    2014-01-01

    Alarm fatigue desensitizes nurses to alarm signals and presents potential for patient harm. This project describes an innovative method of communicating cardiac monitor alarms to pagers using an alarm escalation algorithm. This innovation was tested on 2 surgical progressive care units over a 6-month period. There was a significant decrease in mean frequency and duration of high-priority monitor alarms and improvement in nurses' perception of alarm response time, using this method of alarm communication. PMID:23963169

  7. Intra-operative monitoring--many alarms with minor impact.

    PubMed

    de Man, F R; Greuters, S; Boer, C; Veerman, D P; Loer, S A

    2013-08-01

    Alarms are key components of peri-operative monitoring devices, but a high false-alarm rate may lead to desensitisation and neglect. The objective of this study was to quantify the number of alarms and assess the value of these alarms during moderate-risk surgery. For this purpose, we analysed documentation of anaesthesia workstations during 38 surgical procedures. Alarms were classified on technical validity and clinical relevance. The median (IQR [range]) alarm density per procedure was 20.8 (14.5-34.2 [3.7-85.6]) alarms.h?¹ (1 alarm every 2.9 min) and increased during induction and emergence of anaesthesia, with up to one alarm per 0.99 min during these periods (p < 0.001). Sixty-four per cent of all alarms were clinically irrelevant, whereas 5% of all alarms required immediate intervention. The positive predictive value of an alarm during induction and emergence was 20% (95% CI 16-24%) and 11% (95% CI 8-14%), respectively. This study shows that peri-operative alarms are frequently irrelevant, with a low predictive value for an emerging event requiring clinical intervention. PMID:23745968

  8. 46 CFR 62.25-20 - Instrumentation, alarms, and centralized stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...monitor the vital systems under normal and...control devices and instrumentation to allow visual assessment of system response to control...3) Alarms and instrumentation at the main navigating...result in increased safety. [CGD...

  9. 46 CFR 62.25-20 - Instrumentation, alarms, and centralized stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...monitor the vital systems under normal and...control devices and instrumentation to allow visual assessment of system response to control...3) Alarms and instrumentation at the main navigating...result in increased safety. [CGD...

  10. 46 CFR 62.25-20 - Instrumentation, alarms, and centralized stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...monitor the vital systems under normal and...control devices and instrumentation to allow visual assessment of system response to control...3) Alarms and instrumentation at the main navigating...result in increased safety. [CGD...

  11. 46 CFR 62.25-20 - Instrumentation, alarms, and centralized stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...monitor the vital systems under normal and...control devices and instrumentation to allow visual assessment of system response to control...3) Alarms and instrumentation at the main navigating...result in increased...

  12. 46 CFR 62.25-20 - Instrumentation, alarms, and centralized stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...monitor the vital systems under normal and...control devices and instrumentation to allow visual assessment of system response to control...3) Alarms and instrumentation at the main navigating...result in increased...

  13. Optimization of WAMDAS: A Web Service-Based Wireless Alarm Monitoring and Data Acquisition System for Pharmaceutical Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edith Quispe-Holgado; Manuel Rodríguez-martínez; Edilberto García-Rodríguez

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel infrastructure which allows the Web service-based wireless alarm monitoring and data acquisition system for pharmaceutical plants (WAMDAS) to be a more portable, reliable, secure and robust wireless Web service-based middleware system. This infrastructure provides a reliable alarm management mechanism that guarantees timely alarm delivery according with a defined configuration schema for alarms. Also it provides a

  14. 21 CFR 870.2300 - Cardiac monitor (including cardiotachometer and rate alarm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...device used to measure the heart rate from an analog signal produced by an electrocardiograph, vectorcardiograph, or blood pressure monitor. This device may sound an alarm when the heart rate falls outside preset upper and lower limits....

  15. 21 CFR 870.2300 - Cardiac monitor (including cardiotachometer and rate alarm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...device used to measure the heart rate from an analog signal produced by an electrocardiograph, vectorcardiograph, or blood pressure monitor. This device may sound an alarm when the heart rate falls outside preset upper and lower limits....

  16. 21 CFR 870.2300 - Cardiac monitor (including cardiotachometer and rate alarm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...device used to measure the heart rate from an analog signal produced by an electrocardiograph, vectorcardiograph, or blood pressure monitor. This device may sound an alarm when the heart rate falls outside preset upper and lower limits....

  17. ALARM-LEVEL MONITOR FOR SO2 EMISSIONS FROM STATIONARY SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field prototype, alarm-level monitor for SO2 emissions from stationary sources was designed, fabricated and tested. The monitor was designed to be inexpensive, simple to operate and easily maintained. The monitoring system is an extractive type that employs an air aspirator to ...

  18. False alarm reduction in BSN-based cardiac monitoring using signal quality and activity type information.

    PubMed

    Tanantong, Tanatorn; Nantajeewarawat, Ekawit; Thiemjarus, Surapa

    2015-01-01

    False alarms in cardiac monitoring affect the quality of medical care, impacting on both patients and healthcare providers. In continuous cardiac monitoring using wireless Body Sensor Networks (BSNs), the quality of ECG signals can be deteriorated owing to several factors, e.g., noises, low battery power, and network transmission problems, often resulting in high false alarm rates. In addition, body movements occurring from activities of daily living (ADLs) can also create false alarms. This paper presents a two-phase framework for false arrhythmia alarm reduction in continuous cardiac monitoring, using signals from an ECG sensor and a 3D accelerometer. In the first phase, classification models constructed using machine learning algorithms are used for labeling input signals. ECG signals are labeled with heartbeat types and signal quality levels, while 3D acceleration signals are labeled with ADL types. In the second phase, a rule-based expert system is used for combining classification results in order to determine whether arrhythmia alarms should be accepted or suppressed. The proposed framework was validated on datasets acquired using BSNs and the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. For the BSN dataset, acceleration and ECG signals were collected from 10 young and 10 elderly subjects while they were performing ADLs. The framework reduced the false alarm rate from 9.58% to 1.43% in our experimental study, showing that it can potentially assist physicians in diagnosing a vast amount of data acquired from wireless sensors and enhance the performance of continuous cardiac monitoring. PMID:25671512

  19. A fouling monitor alarm to prevent forced outages

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, R.E.; Hickinbotham, A.; Fang, T.C.

    2000-07-01

    Many utilities rely on coal blending to meet emissions and boiler performance goals, but the increased variability in coal quality can adversely impact ash deposition and soot blowing requirements. Other utilities are experimenting with lower quality coals and burner zone blending of coals fired from different bunkers as part of a deregulation strategy to reduce fuel costs. However, these strategies can lead to slagging/fouling episodes, a possible outage, or a decrease in unit availability if boiler operations are not carefully monitored. This paper summarizes the development of software to monitor boiler fouling and to provide an advanced warning to the control operators when a fouling episode is imminent. With adequate warming, preemptive action can be taken (e.g., soot blowing, a change in coal blend, etc.) to potentially avoid a costly outage. The software utilizes a unique combination of combustion diagnostic techniques and convective section heat adsorption analyses to identify boiler operating conditions where ash deposition rates may be high and conductive to triggering a fouling episode. The paper outlines the history of the fouling problem and the implementation of the software on Wabamun Unit 4, a tangentially-fired unit with relatively narrow reheat tube spacing. The unit had a tendency to foul when burning a high alkaline (but low ash) coal seam. The paper discusses the software development, implementation, and data acquisitions activities. Preliminary test results are provided for Wabamun 4 and for Sundance Units 1 and 2 where the software was recently installed.

  20. ALARM-NET: Wireless Sensor Networks for Assisted-Living and Residential Monitoring

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Wood; G. Virone; T. Doan; Q. Cao; L. Selavo; Y. Wu; L. Fang; Z. He; S. Lin; J. Stankovic

    We describe ALARM-NET, a wireless sensor network for assisted-living and residential monitoring. It integrates envi- ronmental and physiological sensors in a scalable, heteroge- neous architecture. A query protocol allows real-time col- lection and processing of sensor data by user interfaces and back-end analysis programs. One such program determines circadian activity rhythms of residents, feeding activity in- formation back into the

  1. Control, monitor and alarm system for clinical application of a membrane oxygenator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Duffin; B. Martin; J. D. Cooper

    1976-01-01

    Summary  Membrane oxygenators, now commercially available, are undergoing clinical trials as long-term (days) respiratory support devices\\u000a for patients in potentially reversible respiratory failure. However, these devices must be used in an integrated system of\\u000a controls, monitors and alarms if they are to be reliable and easy to operate in the clinical environment. This paper describes\\u000a such a system.\\u000a \\u000a The tubing circuits

  2. Reducing False Alarms of Intensive Care Online-Monitoring Systems: An Evaluation of Two Signal Extraction Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Borowski, M.; Siebig, S.; Wrede, C.; Imhoff, M.

    2011-01-01

    Online-monitoring systems in intensive care are affected by a high rate of false threshold alarms. These are caused by irrelevant noise and outliers in the measured time series data. The high false alarm rates can be lowered by separating relevant signals from noise and outliers online, in such a way that signal estimations, instead of raw measurements, are compared to the alarm limits. This paper presents a clinical validation study for two recently developed online signal filters. The filters are based on robust repeated median regression in moving windows of varying width. Validation is done offline using a large annotated reference database. The performance criteria are sensitivity and the proportion of false alarms suppressed by the signal filters. PMID:21461385

  3. Nuclear incident monitor criticality alarm instrument for the Savannah River Site: Technical manual

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, J.B.

    1996-05-21

    The Savannah River Site is a Department of Energy facility. The facility stores, processes, and works with fissionable material at a number of locations. Technical standards and US Department of Energy orders, require these locations to be monitored by criticality alarm systems under certain circumstances. The Savannah River Site calls such instruments Nuclear Incident Monitors or NIMs. The Sole purpose of the Nuclear Incident Monitor is to provide an immediate evacuation signal in the case of an accidental criticality in order to minimize personnel exposure to radiation. The new unit is the third generation Nuclear Incident Monitor at the Savannah River Site. The second generation unit was developed in 1979. It was designed to eliminate vacuum-tube circuits, and was the first solid state NIM at SRS. The major design objectives of the second generation NIM were to improve reliability and reduce maintenance costs. Ten prototype units have been built and tested. This report describes the design of the new NIM and the testing that took place to verify its acceptability.

  4. Medical audible alarms: a review

    PubMed Central

    Edworthy, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This paper summarizes much of the research that is applicable to the design of auditory alarms in a medical context. It also summarizes research that demonstrates that false alarm rates are unacceptably high, meaning that the proper application of auditory alarm design principles are compromised. Target audience Designers, users, and manufacturers of medical information and monitoring systems that indicate when medical or other parameters are exceeded and that are indicated by an auditory signal or signals. Scope The emergence of alarms as a ‘hot topic’; an outline of the issues and design principles, including IEC 60601-1-8; the high incidence of false alarms and its impact on alarm design and alarm fatigue; approaches to reducing alarm fatigue; alarm philosophy explained; urgency in audible alarms; different classes of sound as alarms; heterogeneity in alarm set design; problems with IEC 60601-1-8 and ways of approaching this design problem. PMID:23100127

  5. Transformation of Ground Vibration Signal for Debris-Flow Monitoring and Detection in Alarm Systems

    PubMed Central

    Abancó, Clàudia; Hürlimann, Marcel; Fritschi, Bruno; Graf, Christoph; Moya, José

    2012-01-01

    Debris flows are fast mass movements formed by a mix of water and solid materials, which occur in steep torrents, and are a source of high risks for human settlements. Geophones are widely used to detect the ground vibration induced by passing debris flows. However, the recording of geophone signals usually requires storing a huge amount of data, which leads to problems in storage capacity and power consumption. This paper presents a method to transform and simplify the signals measured by geophones. The key input parameter is the ground velocity threshold, which removes the seismic noise that is not related to debris flows. A signal conditioner was developed to implement the transformation and the ground velocity threshold was set by electrical resistors. The signal conditioner was installed at various European monitoring sites to test the method. Results show that data amount and power consumption can be greatly reduced without losing much information on the main features of the debris flows. However, the outcome stresses the importance of choosing a ground vibration threshold, which must be accurately calibrated. The transformation is also suitable to detect other rapid mass movements and to distinguish among different processes, which points to a possible implementation in alarm systems. PMID:22666064

  6. Reaction time of a health care team to monitoring alarms in the intensive care unit: implications for the safety of seriously ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Bridi, Adriana Carla; da Silva, Roberto Carlos Lyra; de Farias, Carolina Correa Pinto; Franco, Andrezza Serpa; dos Santos, Viviane de Lima Quintas

    2014-01-01

    Objective To define the characteristics and measure the reaction time of a health care team monitoring alarms in the intensive care unit. Methods A quantitative, observational, and descriptive study developed at the coronary care unit of a cardiology public hospital in Rio de Janeiro state (RJ). Data were obtained from the information collected on the patients, the monitoring used, and the measurement of the team's reaction time to the alarms of multi-parameter monitors during a non-participatory field observation. Results Eighty-eight patients were followed (49 during the day shift and 39 during the night shift). During the 40 hours of observation (20 hours during the day shift and 20 hours during the night shift), the total number of monitoring alarms was 227, with 106 alarms during the day shift and 121 during the night shift, an average of 5.7 alarms/hour. In total, 145 alarms unanswered by the team were observed, with 68 occurring during the day shift (64.15%) and 77 during the night shift (63.64%). This study demonstrated that the reaction time was longer than 10 minutes in more than 60% of the alarms, which were considered as unanswered alarms. The median reaction time of the answered alarms was 4 minutes and 54 seconds during the day shift and 4 minutes and 55 seconds during the night shift. The respiration monitoring was activated in only nine patients (23.07%) during the night shift. Regarding the alarm quality of these variables, the arrhythmia alarm was qualified in only 10 (20.40%) of the day-shift patients and the respiration alarm in four night-shift patients (44.44%). Conclusion The programming and configuration of the physiological variables monitored and the parameters of alarms in the intensive care unit were inadequate; there was a delay and lack of response to the alarms, suggesting that relevant alarms may have been ignored by the health care team, thus compromising the patient safety. PMID:24770686

  7. Integration of Toxic Gas Monitoring Systems into Building Fire Alarm Systems at Harvard University

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Sweeney

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses the following topics: description of a large scale TGMS in a clean room; description of a small TGMS in a lab using highly toxic gas; description of a small TGMS in a lab using flammable gases; how each system interacts with the building fire alarm system (FAS); and how to implement a process to integrate the two

  8. Design and development of a personal alarm monitor for use by first responders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehntholt, Daniel J.; Louie, Alan S.; Marenchic, Ingrid G.; Forni, Ronald J.

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes the design and development of a small, portable alarm device that can be used by first responders to an emergency event to warn of the presence of low levels of a toxic nerve gas. The device consists of a rigid reusable portion and a consumable packet that is sensitive to the presence of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as the nerve gases Sarin or Soman. The sensitivity level of the alarm is set to be at initial physiological response at the meiosis level, orders of magnitude below lethal concentrations. The AChE enzyme used is specific for nerve-type toxins. A color development reaction is used to demonstrate continued activity of the enzyme over its twelve-hour operational cycle.

  9. Rack Protection Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, Stanley G.

    1998-10-21

    A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

  10. Terrestrial predator alarm vocalizations are a valid monitor of stress in captive brown capuchins (Cebus apella)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boinski, S.; Gross, T.S.; Davis, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    The vocal behavior of captive animals is increasingly exploited as an index of well-being. Here we show that the terrestrial predator alarm (TPA) vocalization, a robust and acoustically distinctive anti-predation vocal response present in many mammal and bird species, offers useful information on the relative well-being and stress levels of captive animals. In a 16-week experiment evaluating the effects of varying levels of physical environmental enrichment (control < toys < foraging box < foraging box and toys) in the cages of eight singly housed adult male brown capuchins, we quantified the 1) emission rate of TPAs, 2) proportions of normal and abnormal behavior sample intervals, and 3) fecal and plasma cortisol levels. Variation in TPA emission across the experimental conditions was significant. We found significant reductions in the mean TPA production rate by the group in the enriched (toys, foraging box, and foraging box and toys) compared to the control condition; pre-and post-experimental conditions, however, did not differ from the control condition. Mean TPA production by the group was also significantly positively correlated to mean group levels of fecal cortisol and proportion of abnormal behavior sample intervals, and significantly negatively correlated to the average proportion of normal behavior sample intervals in the group. Based on group means, plasma cortisol levels were positively, but not significantly, related to increasing TPA rate. At the level of the responses of an individual subject, however, the covariation between the vocal and non-vocal behavioral measures and the cortisol assays seldom attained significance. Nevertheless, the direction of the relationships among these parameters within individual subjects typically mirrored those correlations based on group means. At both the group mean and individual levels, our results are consistent with the.

  11. WAMDAS: A Web Service-Based Wireless Alarm Monitoring and Data Acquisition System for Pharmaceutical Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edilberto García-Rodríguez; Manuel Rodriguez-martinez

    2006-01-01

    Typical IT infrastructures used in manufacturing companies such as pharmaceutical plants are based on enterprise servers, with vast capacities for large data sets, managed with relational database systems, with powerful capabilities for query processing. In addition, workstations running diagnostics and control applications that monitor critical status conditions in manufacturing equipments are located in far locations throughout the plant. These workstations

  12. Medical Device Alarms - The Statistician

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Fried

    \\u000a The high rate of false alarms triggered by medical devices raises concerns over the reliability of current clinical alarm\\u000a systems. In close cooperation between physicians, statisticians and engineers within the Collaborative Research Centre SFB\\u000a 475, we have worked on improved alarm algorithms for online monitoring in intensive care. In current clinical practice there\\u000a are procedures based on simple fixed thresholds,

  13. 21 CFR 876.2040 - Enuresis alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 876.2040 Enuresis alarm. (a) Identification. An enuresis alarm is a...

  14. 21 CFR 876.2040 - Enuresis alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 876.2040 Enuresis alarm. (a) Identification. An enuresis alarm is a...

  15. 21 CFR 876.2040 - Enuresis alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 876.2040 Enuresis alarm. (a) Identification. An enuresis alarm is a...

  16. 21 CFR 876.2040 - Enuresis alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 876.2040 Enuresis alarm. (a) Identification. An enuresis alarm is a...

  17. 21 CFR 876.2040 - Enuresis alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 876.2040 Enuresis alarm. (a) Identification. An enuresis alarm is a...

  18. Wasabi Alarm

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi

    2011-11-23

    for those who are hard of hearing. The team tried out about 100 different smells including rotten eggs before settling on wasabi. For their work, they were awarded the Ig Nobel Prize for Chemistry. Wasabi, doc? With this alarm, you are. #ceas #hacker #japan...

  19. Semantic Alarms in Medical Device Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert Goldfain; Atanu Roy Chowdhury; Min Xu; Jim DelloStritto; Jonathan Bona; Blue Highway

    We describe preliminary work on semantic alarms, a framework for context-sensitive clinical alerts. Semantic alarms are intended for deployment in a multi-parameter vital sign monitoring system. Requirements for device and data interoperability within this system are discussed. Extended examples are provided for sepsis and congestive heart failure disease state alarms.

  20. The Best Ever Alarm System Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Kasemir, Kay [ORNL; Chen, Xihui [ORNL; Danilova, Katia [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Learning from our experience with the standard Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) alarm handler (ALH) as well as a similar intermediate approach based on script-generated operator screens, we developed the Best Ever Alarm System Toolkit (BEAST). It is based on Java and Eclipse on the Control System Studio (CSS) platform, using a relational database (RDB) to store the configuration and log actions. It employs a Java Message Service (JMS) for communication between the modular pieces of the toolkit, which include an Alarm Server to maintain the current alarm state, an arbitrary number of Alarm Client user interfaces (GUI), and tools to annunciate alarms or log alarm related actions. Web reports allow us to monitor the alarm system performance and spot deficiencies in the alarm configuration. The Alarm Client GUI not only gives the end users various ways to view alarms in tree and table, but also makes it easy to access the guidance information, the related operator displays and other CSS tools. It also allows online configuration to be simply modified from the GUI. Coupled with a good "alarm philosophy" on how to provide useful alarms, we can finally improve the configuration to achieve an effective alarm system.

  1. Clustering intrusion detection alarms to support root cause analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Klaus Julisch

    2003-01-01

    It is a well-known problem that intrusion detection systems overload their human operators by triggering thousands of alarms per day. This paper presents a new approach for handling intrusion detection alarms more efficiently. Central to this approach is the notion that each alarm occurs for a reason, which is referred to as the alarm's root causes. This paper observes that

  2. Alarm acknowledgement in a nuclear plant control room

    DOEpatents

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1994-01-01

    Alarm acknowledgment can be made not only at the alarm tile array of a given console but via other touch sensitive alarm indications in the screen displays of the monitoring system at the same or other consoles; also, touching one tile can acknowledge multiple alarm sources.

  3. Panic, Suffocation False Alarms, Separation Anxiety and Endogenous Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Preter, Maurice; Klein, Donald F.

    2008-01-01

    This review paper presents an amplification of the suffocation false alarm theory (SFA) of spontaneous panic (Klein, 1993). SFA postulates the existence of an evolved physiologic suffocation alarm system that monitors information about potential suffocation. Panic attacks maladaptively occur when the alarm is erroneously triggered. That panic is distinct from Cannon’s emergency fear response and Selye’s General Alarm Syndrome is shown by the prominence of intense air hunger during these attacks. Further, panic sufferers have chronic sighing abnormalities outside of the acute attack. Another basic physiologic distinction between fear and panic is the counter-intuitive lack of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activation in panic. Understanding panic as provoked by indicators of potential suffocation, such as fluctuations in pCO2 and brain lactate, as well as environmental circumstances fits the observed respiratory abnormalities. However, that sudden loss, bereavement and childhood separation anxiety are also antecedents of “spontaneous” panic requires an integrative explanation. Because of the opioid system’s central regulatory role in both disordered breathing and separation distress, we detail the role of opioidergic dysfunction in decreasing the suffocation alarm threshold. We present results from our laboratory where the naloxone-lactate challenge in normals produces supportive evidence for the endorphinergic defect hypothesis in the form of a distress episode of specific tidal volume hyperventilation paralleling challenge-produced and clinical panic. PMID:17765379

  4. Practical alarm filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, M.; Corsberg, D. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1994-02-01

    An expert system-based alarm filtering method is described which prioritizes and reduces the number of alarms facing an operator. This patented alarm filtering methodology was originally developed and implemented in a pressurized water reactor, and subsequently in a chemical processing facility. Both applications were in LISP and both were successful. In the chemical processing facility, for instance, alarm filtering reduced the quantity of alarm messages by 90%. 6 figs.

  5. Performance analysis of fiber fault PON monitoring using optical coding: SNR, SNIR, and false-alarm probability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammad M. Rad; Habib A. Fathallah; Leslie A. Rusch

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the theoretical performance of recently proposed optical coding (OC) technology for fiber fault monitoring of a PON through the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the signal-to-noise-plus-interference ratio (SNIR), and the falsealarm probability. First, we develop a mathematical model and expressions for the detected monitoring signals considering a square law detector and using realistic parameters. Second, we address the effect of

  6. Learn about Smoke Alarms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... smoke alarms can I buy? There are many brands of smoke alarms on the market, but they ... outreach materials you can use to help increase awareness about fires in your community. National Fire Protection ...

  7. D0 Cryogenic Auto Dialing Alarm System

    SciTech Connect

    Markely, D.; /Fermilab

    1992-08-03

    The Automatic Dialing system purchased by D0 is intended to help make the D0 cryogenic system operate unattended by cryogenic operating personnel. The auto dialer is completely programmable and is voice synthesized. The auto dialer was purchased with 32 bistable inputs, but is expandable to 64 bistable inputs with the purchase of more electronic cards at an approximate cost of $260 per card (8 bistable inputs). The auto dialer also has the capability for analog inputs, analog outputs, and bistable outputs none of which D0 uses or intends to use. The auto dialer can be called on its operating phone line to describe current alarms with the proper password. The Auto Dialer can dial lab extensions, lab pagers, and any number outside the lab. It cannot dial a long distance pager. The auto dialer monitors alarms and alarm conditions via the T1565 PLC, upon an alarm condition it initiates a phone calling sequence of preprogrammed lists with assigned priorities. When someone is reached, the auto dialer describes the individual alarm it is calling for, by a preprogrammed set of words for that individual alarm, spoken by a female voice. The called person then has a chance to acknowledge the alarm over the telephone, if the alarm is not acknowledged the auto dialer will disconnect and call the next person on the list. The auto dialer will continue to cycle through the list until it is acknowledged, reset, or the alarm condition no longer exists.

  8. AMETHYST: automatic alarm assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Mockler; N. Clarke

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the AMETHYST (AutoMatic Event auTHentication sYSTem) project is to encourage the development of a high-performance, perimeter-alarm verification system that, using computer-vision, automatically rejects false alarms. AMETHYST will pass to an operator only those alarms that are caused by an intruder.

  9. Fire alarm system improvement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1994-01-01

    This document contains the Fire Alarm System Test Procedure for Building 234-5Z, 200-West Area on the Hanford Reservation, Richland, Washington. This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the modifications to the Fire Protection systems function as required by project criteria. The ATP will test the Fire Alarm Control Panels, Flow Alarm Pressure Switch, Heat Detectors, Smoke

  10. Criticality alarm system for plutonium process operations

    SciTech Connect

    Tyree, W H; Urano, H

    1981-05-25

    A criticality alarm system using neutron detection is described. The system includes a neutron detection unit with an internal operational testing mode. The unit uses a Li/sup 6/F foil for the production of alpha particles from a thermal neturon flux, a thorium-230 alpha particle source for the continuous monitoring of the raidation detection circuits, and an internal clock which produces an alarmed condition if the detector amplifier circuit fails. This neutron detector unit is designed to replace the existing neutron detector in the criticality alarm systems at Rocky Flats. Coincidence circuits, interface system and audio signal generators used in the output of the alarm system are described. The system meets the criteria for the American National Standards and the USDOE Manual Chapter for detection, alarm, and signal output requirements.

  11. Central enhancement of evoked electromyographic monitoring of neuromuscular function.

    PubMed

    Smith, D C

    1991-05-01

    Central neural influences on neuromuscular transmission may explain the frequent failure of evoked electromyographic (EEMG) responses to return to control values during offset of neuromuscular block. This study, performed in conscious subjects, did not demonstrate any change in EEMG response of either the first dorsal interosseous muscle during onset of ulnar nerve block or the flexor hallucis brevis during onset of subarachnoid block. It is concluded that central enhancement of EEMG response via a neural mechanism does not explain the observed failure of EEMG monitoring of neuromuscular block. PMID:1851627

  12. Make an Alarm!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Center for Engineering Educational Outreach,

    After reading the story "Dear Mr. Henshaw" by Beverly Cleary, student groups create alarm systems to protect something in the classroom, just as the main character Leigh does to protect his lunchbox from thieves. Students learn about alarms and use their creativity to devise multi-step alarm systems to protect their lockers, desk, pets or classroom door. Note: This activity can also be done without reading the Cleary book.

  13. Fire alarm system improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, S.G.

    1994-10-01

    This document contains the Fire Alarm System Test Procedure for Building 234-5Z, 200-West Area on the Hanford Reservation, Richland, Washington. This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the modifications to the Fire Protection systems function as required by project criteria. The ATP will test the Fire Alarm Control Panels, Flow Alarm Pressure Switch, Heat Detectors, Smoke Detectors, Flow Switches, Manual Pull Stations, and Gong/Door by Pass Switches.

  14. Monitoring of central and room heat pumps. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. E. Bullock; R. E. Hough; S. C. Pederson

    1986-01-01

    This report presents the field data and related analysis for nine residential heat pump and five room unit installations. These results cover both heating and cooling operation for a period of one to two years, depending upon the installation date at each site. This program is a follow-on project from RP789-3, which monitored seven residential central heat pump installations. The

  15. Transportable criticality alarm system

    SciTech Connect

    Clem, W.E.

    1988-09-01

    The Transportable Criticality Alarm System was developed at the Hanford Site in 1982 to comply with the requirements of US Department of Energy Order DOE 5480.1, 12/18/80, and ANSI/ANS-8.3- 1979. The portable unit that it replaced failed to comply with the new requirements in that it did not provide the necessary warning of malfunctions, nor did it provide the Hanford Site standard criticality alarm signal. Modern technology allowed the Transportable Criticality Alarm System to comply with the criticality requirements cited and to incorporate other features that make it more usable, maintainable, and reliable. The Transportable Criticality Alarm System (TCAS) provides temporary criticality coverage in manned areas where the facility criticality alarm system is not operable. This gamma radiation-sensitive system has been in use for the past 6 yr at the Hanford Site. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Seismic monitoring of Central Asia territory in KNDC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukambayev, Aidyn; Mikhailova, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    The Central Asia territory includes the territory of five post-Soviet countries: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Every country has its own independent network of seismic observations and Data Processing Center aimed at every day seismic monitoring of one country territory. However, seismic hazard of Central Asia territory is stipulated by one geodynamic system that generates simultaneous large earthquakes on the territory of different countries. Thus, it is necessary to observe seismic situation for the whole region for emergency situations and for compilation of joint seismic bulletins of Central Asia region. A new contemporary network of seismic observations operated by the Institute of Geophysical Researches has been installed in Kazakhstan during last 15 years. Mainly, these are seismic arrays located throughout the country perimeter. The arrays were constructed under support of the CTBTO, and AFTAC. There are also IRIS and CAREMON stations. All data arrive to KNDC (Kazakhstan National Data Center) in real time mode. In addition, KNDC receives data in real time from stations Zalesovo (Russia), Alibek (Turkmenistan), Ala-Archa and Tokmak (Kyrgyzstan). Arrival times in the form of tables are received with 24-hours delay from almost 20 Kazakhstan stations belonging to SEME MES RK. This observation system allows monitoring the Central Asian seismicity by earthquakes with representative magnitude more than 3.5. In some regions, the events with magnitude 1.5 are recorded. As result, different products with different operativity are created for Central Asia territory: -bulletin of urgent alerts; -automatic seismic bulletin; -interactive seismic bulletin; -joint seismic operative bulletin by data arrived on-line and in table form. After that, in retrospective mode, the events nature is identified to discriminate mining explosions (up to 4000 per year) and natural earthquakes (up to 15000 per year). The results are available at KNDC web-site (www.kndc.kz), and are sent to Data Centers of different countries via e-mail. In addition, processing data are submitted to EMSC, ISC, and GSRAS.

  17. FundAlarm

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    FundAlarm is a "a free, non-commercial Website [which provides] objective information to help individual investors make the mutual fund 'sell' decision." Highlighted on this site is the FundAlarm database, which contains over 3,400 stock and balanced mutual funds. The database may be browsed by name of fund, or users can browse only fidelity and Vanguard funds, as well as search by up to five ticker symbols. The site also explains its benchmarking system of ranking funds, offers shop talk in its Highlights and Commentary section, and includes a discussion board. Interested users may sign up for free email notification of FundAlarm updates.

  18. Design and Implementation of Automatic Fire Alarm System based on Wireless Sensor Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lei Zhang; Gaofeng Wang

    2009-01-01

    Abstract—Fire disaster is a ,great threat to lives and property. Automatic fire alarm system provides real-time surveillance, monitoring and automatic alarm. It sends early alarm when the fire occurs and helps to reduce the fire damage. Wireless sensor network has become the most important technology in environmental monitoring and home or factory automation in recent years. In this paper, anautomatic

  19. Sounding the Alarm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordasco, Jerry M.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the use of alarms and other early-detection devices to effectively protect students in life-threatening fire situations. Ohio State University's multidiscipline approach to life safety is illustrated. (GR)

  20. Fire alarm system

    SciTech Connect

    Koehling, E.

    1995-01-01

    This test procedure is the documentation for the testing of the 4 fire alarm bells which rewired during the remodeling of the Emergency Operations Center in the Richland, Washington, Federal Office Building.

  1. Video systems for alarm assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwoll, D.A.; Matter, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Ebel, P.E. (BE, Inc., Barnwell, SC (United States))

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing closed-circuit television systems for video alarm assessment. There is a section on each of the major components in a video system: camera, lens, lighting, transmission, synchronization, switcher, monitor, and recorder. Each section includes information on component selection, procurement, installation, test, and maintenance. Considerations for system integration of the components are contained in each section. System emphasis is focused on perimeter intrusion detection and assessment systems. A glossary of video terms is included. 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. A technical approach for determining the importance of information in computerized alarm systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, D.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Lim, J.J. [Lim and Orzechowski Associates, Alamo, CA (United States)

    1994-06-10

    Computerized alarm and access control systems must be treated as special entities rather than as generic automated information systems. This distinction arises due to the real-time control and monitoring functions performed by these systems at classified facilities and the degree of centralization of a site`s safeguards system information in the associated databases. As an added requirement for these systems, DOE safeguards and security classification policy is to protect information whose dissemination has the potential for significantly increasing the probability of successful adversary action against the facility, or lowering adversary resources needed for a successful attack. Thus at issue is just how valuable would specific alarm system information be to an adversary with a higher order objective. We have developed and applied a technical approach for determining the importance of information contained in computerized alarm and access control systems. The methodology is based on vulnerability assessment rather than blanket classification rules. This method uses a system architecture diagram to guide the analysis and to develop adversary defeat methods for each node and link. These defeat methods are evaluated with respect to required adversary resources, technical difficulty, and detection capability. Then they are incorporated into site vulnerability assessments to determine the significance of alarm system information in the context of a facility attack. This methodology was successfully applied to the Argus alarm, access control, and assessment system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab. Argus is software-driven, contains interrelated databases, shares host computers, and communicates with field processors and alarms through a common network. The evaluation results provided insights into the importance of alarm system information while the methodology itself provided a framework for addressing associated information protection issues.

  3. Sensor fusion for intelligent alarm analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.L.; Fitzgerald, D.S.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of an intelligent alarm analysis system is to provide complete and manageable information to a central alarm station operator by applying alarm processing and fusion techniques to sensor information. This paper discusses the sensor fusion approach taken to perform intelligent alarm analysis for the Advanced Exterior Sensor (AES). The AES is an intrusion detection and assessment system designed for wide-area coverage, quick deployment, low false/nuisance alarm operation, and immediate visual assessment. It combines three sensor technologies (visible, infrared, and millimeter wave radar) collocated on a compact and portable remote sensor module. The remote sensor module rotates at a rate of 1 revolution per second to detect and track motion and provide assessment in a continuous 360` field-of-regard. Sensor fusion techniques are used to correlate and integrate the track data from these three sensors into a single track for operator observation. Additional inputs to the fusion process include environmental data, knowledge of sensor performance under certain weather conditions, sensor priority, and recent operator feedback. A confidence value is assigned to the track as a result of the fusion process. This helps to reduce nuisance alarms and to increase operator confidence in the system while reducing the workload of the operator.

  4. [A central monitoring system capturing the screen of an anesthesia monitor].

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hidehiro; Abe, Eiji; Abe, Mari; Anraku, Sakiko; Higuchi, Takushi; Ishida, Takashi

    2010-11-01

    e have developed a flexible, economically efficient central monitoring system. The system converts RGB analog outputs on the screen of an anesthesia monitor display into digital video signals with TwinPact 100 (Thomson Canopus, Kobe), and depicts them on the screen of Vidi-installed (http://www.mitzpettel.com/ software/vidi.php) personal computers (iMac, Apple, Tokyo), which serve as terminal monitors. These PCs are monitored and administered through Apple Remote Desktop 3 (Apple, Tokyo) on a server computer (Mac Pro, Apple, Tokyo), connected to the LAN, in the office for anesthesiologists. As Bosco's Screen Share (http://www.componentx.com/ScreenShare/) has been installed on computers in every room, we can monitor their screens via a PC in another room using Firefox (http://mozilla.jp/firefox/) and other web browsers.The system, with a screen capturing function, was designed to comply with all monitor display of all medical equipment manufacturers, with possible expansion to the operating rooms. PMID:21077323

  5. Failure Detection of Fire Alarm Sensors Based on Information Fusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jinshui Qiu; Boyun Liu

    2009-01-01

    As for the safety inspection and monitoring, it is very important to find the fault of the transducer itself. In view of the redundant transducer group are often used in the fire alarm system, this paper brings forward a fault diagnostic structure with the fire alarm sensors fault diagnosis module. This module introduces the information fusion basing on RBF neural

  6. 21 CFR 870.2640 - Portable leakage current alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2640 Portable...current between any two points of an electrical system and to sound an alarm if the current...

  7. 21 CFR 870.2640 - Portable leakage current alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2640 Portable...current between any two points of an electrical system and to sound an alarm if the current...

  8. FIRE ALARM SYSTEM OUTDATED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHANDLER, L.T.

    AN EFFICIENT FIRE ALARM SYSTEM SHOULD--(1) PROVIDE WARNING OF FIRES THAT START IN HIDDEN OR UNOCCUPIED LOCATIONS, (2) INDICATE WHERE THE FIRE IS, (3) GIVE ADVANCE WARNING TO FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION SO THAT PANIC AND CONFUSION CAN BE AVOIDED AND ORDERLY EVACUATION OCCUR, (4) AUTOMATICALLY NOTIFY CITY FIRE HEADQUARTERS OF THE FIRE, (5) OPERATE BY…

  9. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory long-range alarm system

    SciTech Connect

    DesJardin, R.; Machanik, J.

    1980-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) Long-Range Alarm System is described. The last few years have brought significant changes in the Department of Energy regulations for protection of classified documents and special nuclear material. These changes in regulations have forced a complete redesign of the LASL security alarm system. LASL covers many square miles of varying terrain and consists of separate technical areas connected by public roads and communications. A design study over a period of 2 years produced functional specifications for a distributed intelligence, expandable alarm system that will handle 30,000 alarm points from hundreds of data concentrators spread over a 250-km/sup 2/ area. Emphasis in the design was on nonstop operation, data security, data communication, and upward expandability to incorporate fire alarms and the computer-aided dispatching of security and fire vehicles. All aspects of the alarm system were to be fault tolerant from the central computer system down to but not including the individual data concentrators. Redundant communications lines travel over public domain from the alarmed area to the central alarm station.

  10. D0 Cryo System ODH and Cryo Alarm System Response

    SciTech Connect

    Urbin, J.; Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

    1990-04-05

    The D0 Cryo System is monitored by a computerized process control system and an ODH safety system. During steady state operations the cryo system will be unmanned and system experts will depend on communication systems for notification of system problems. The FIRUS system meets the minimum communication requirement and is supplemented with an autodialer which attempts to contact cryo operators by pager or phone. The RD/Safety Department requires the ODH monitor system to be connected to the labwide FIRUS system. which enables the Communications Center to receive alarms and notify the proper experts of the condition. The ODH system will have two alarm points. One for an ODH alarm and one for a system trouble alarm. The autodialer system has replaced a former cryo operations summation alarm point in the FIRUS system. This has freed space on the FIRUS system and has allowed the cryo experts more flexibility in setting up their own communication link. The FIRUS and the autodialer systems receive alarms and access lists of experts to call for notification of problems. Attempts to contact these experts will continue until the alarm or alarms is acknowledged.

  11. Control of ELT false alarms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, S.; Gershkoff, I.

    1979-01-01

    The statistics of emergency locator transmitter (ELT) alarms are presented. The primary sources of data include ELT Incident Logs, Service Difficulty Reports, and Frequency Interference Reports. The number of reported and unreported alarms is discussed, as are seasonal variations, duration of ELT transmissions, and cost of silencing. Origin, causes, and possible strategies for reducing the impact of alarms on the aviation community are considered.

  12. MINED GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL SYSTEM (MGDS) MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS CENTRALIZATION TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McGrath

    1998-03-31

    The objective of this report is to identify and document Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) requirements for centralized command and control. Additionally, to further develop the MGDS monitoring and control functions. This monitoring and control report provides the following information: (1) Determines the applicable requirements for a monitoring and control system for repository operations and construction (excluding Performance Confirmation). (2) Makes a determination as to whether or not centralized command and control is required.

  13. In-service monitoring with Centralized Failure Detection System (CFDS) in FTTH access network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammad Syuhaimi Ab-Rahman; Ng Boon Chuan; Kasmiran Jumari

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on developing a simple, attracting and user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) for centralized failure detection system (CFDS) by using MATLAB software. The developed program will be installed with optical line terminal (OLT) at central office (CO) to centrally monitoring each optical fiber line's status and detecting the failure location that occurs in the drop region of fiber

  14. Long-term Monitoring Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmed E. Hassan

    2003-01-01

    The groundwater flow and transport model of the Faultless underground nuclear test conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) was accepted by the state regulator and the environmental remediation efforts at the site have progressed to the stages of model validation and long-term monitoring design. This report discusses the long-term monitoring strategy developed for CNTA. Subsurface monitoring is an

  15. Wireless intelligent alarm technology with pyroelectric infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao

    2009-07-01

    Aiming at the defects of monitoring conducted by man in the conventional practice, we study the passive intelligent automatic alarm technology based on the pyroelectric infrared sensor and wireless communication technology. The designed passive infrared wireless alarm is composed of pyroelectric infrared sensors, infrared special chip BISS0001 and their peripheral circuits. When someone enters into the detecting and monitoring range, the alarm will detect the infrared ray of the human radiation by the contactless form and detect the signals of circuit output. Then it translates them into low frequency signals relative with human sports speed, distance and direction, produce corresponding output signals through amplifying by the back state controller, switch on the work power of the wireless transmitting circuit and make it emit the alarm signals. The system enhances the monitoring level and effects and possesses many advantages such as wide detecting range, long detecting distance and high reliability.

  16. Monitoring of cropland practices for carbon sequestration purposes in north central Montana by Landsat remote sensing

    E-print Network

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Monitoring of cropland practices for carbon sequestration purposes in north central Montana form 30 March 2009 Accepted 11 April 2009 Keywords: Carbon sequestration validation Tillage type. Cropland producers involved in terrestrial carbon sequestration programs are paid to implement practices

  17. Medical Device Alarms – The Clinician

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Imhoff

    \\u000a The alarms of medical devices are a matter of concern in critical and perioperative care. The high rate of false alarms is\\u000a not only a nuisance for patients and caregivers, but can also compromise patient safety and effectiveness of care. The development\\u000a of alarm systems has lagged behind the technological advances of medical devices over the last 20 years. From

  18. The tape recorder shutdown alarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, J. C.

    A tape recorder shutdown alarm was developed to alert Space Shuttle personnel when tape recorders registering data during flight as well as in pre-flight tests stop functioning. The audio alarm is activated when a component such as a capstan motor fails, and in failure to switchover, to provide start-up signal, and to respond to start-up signal. A provision was made for the alarm to turn on a standby recorder in less than two seconds.

  19. Estimation of central systolic blood pressure using an oscillometric blood pressure monitor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hao-Min Cheng; Kang-Ling Wang; Ying-Hwa Chen; Shing-Jong Lin; Lung-Ching Chen; Shih-Hsien Sung; Philip Yu-An Ding; Wen-Chung Yu; Jaw-Wen Chen; Chen-Huan Chen; C-H Chen

    2010-01-01

    Current noninvasive techniques for assessing central aortic pressure require the recording of an arterial pressure wave using a high-fidelity applanation tonometer. We therefore developed and validated a novel method to estimate the central aortic systolic pressure using an oscillometric blood pressure monitor alone. Invasive high-fidelity right brachial and central aortic pressure waves, and left-brachial pulse volume plethysmography from an oscillometric

  20. Fire alarm system. Revision 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1994-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the modifications to the Fire Protection systems function as required by project criteria. The ATP will test the Fire Alarm Control Panels, Flow Alarm Pressure Switch, Heat Detectors, Smoke Detectors, Flow Switches, Manual Pull Stations, and Gong\\/Door By-Pass Switches. This equipment is part of the Plutonium Finishing Plant life

  1. Reducing False Intracranial Pressure Alarms using Morphological Waveform Features

    PubMed Central

    Scalzo, Fabien; Liebeskind, David; Hu, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    False alarms produced by patient monitoring systems in intensive care units (ICU) are a major issue that causes alarm fatigue, waste of human resources, and increased patient risks. While alarms are typically triggered by manually adjusted thresholds, the trend and patterns observed prior to threshold crossing are generally not used by current systems. This study introduces and evaluates a smart alarm detection system for intracranial pressure signal (ICP) that is based on advanced pattern recognition methods. Models are trained in a supervised fashion from a comprehensive dataset of 4791 manually labelled alarm episodes extracted from 108 neurosurgical patients. The comparative analysis provided between spectral regression, kernel spectral regression, and support vector machines indicates the significant improvement of the proposed framework in detecting false ICP alarms in comparison to a threshold-based technique that is conventionally used. Another contribution of this work is to exploit an adaptive discretization to reduce the dimensionality of the input features. The resulting features lead to a decrease of 30% of false ICP alarms without compromising sensitivity. PMID:22851230

  2. Instrumental lahar monitoring at Merapi Volcano, Central Java, Indonesia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Lavigne; J.-C Thouret; B Voight; K Young; R LaHusen; J Marso; H Suwa; A Sumaryono; D. S Sayudi; M Dejean

    2000-01-01

    More than 50 volcanic debris flows or lahars were generated around Mt Merapi during the first rainy season following the nuees ardentes of 22 November 1994. The rainfalls that triggered the lahars were analyzed, using such instruments as weather radar and telemetered rain gauges. Lahar dynamics were also monitored, using new non-contact detection instrumentation installed on the slopes of the

  3. 46 CFR 76.15-30 - Alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Alarms. 76.15-30...PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-30 Alarms. (a) Spaces...July 1, 1957, alarms will be mandatory only for systems required to...

  4. 46 CFR 95.15-30 - Alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Alarms. 95.15-30...MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-30 Alarms. (a) A protected...provided to power the alarms. (c) For systems installed on or...

  5. 46 CFR 95.15-30 - Alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Alarms. 95.15-30...MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-30 Alarms. (a) Spaces...July 1, 1957, alarms will be mandatory only for systems required to...

  6. 46 CFR 193.15-30 - Alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Alarms. 193.15-30...RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-30 Alarms. (a...delayed discharge system other than paint...approved audible alarm which will...

  7. 46 CFR 76.15-30 - Alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Alarms. 76.15-30...PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-30 Alarms. (a) Spaces...July 1, 1957, alarms will be mandatory only for systems required to...

  8. 46 CFR 76.15-30 - Alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Alarms. 76.15-30...PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-30 Alarms. (a) Spaces...July 1, 1957, alarms will be mandatory only for systems required to...

  9. 46 CFR 76.15-30 - Alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Alarms. 76.15-30...PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-30 Alarms. (a) Spaces...July 1, 1957, alarms will be mandatory only for systems required to...

  10. 46 CFR 95.15-30 - Alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Alarms. 95.15-30...MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-30 Alarms. (a) A protected...provided to power the alarms. (c) For systems installed on or...

  11. 46 CFR 193.15-30 - Alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Alarms. 193.15-30...RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-30 Alarms. (a...delayed discharge system other than paint...approved audible alarm which will...

  12. 46 CFR 193.15-30 - Alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Alarms. 193.15-30...RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-30 Alarms. (a...delayed discharge system other than paint...approved audible alarm which will...

  13. 46 CFR 95.15-30 - Alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Alarms. 95.15-30...MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-30 Alarms. (a) A protected...provided to power the alarms. (c) For systems installed on or...

  14. 46 CFR 193.15-30 - Alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Alarms. 193.15-30...RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-30 Alarms. (a...delayed discharge system other than paint...approved audible alarm which will...

  15. 46 CFR 76.15-30 - Alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Alarms. 76.15-30...PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-30 Alarms. (a) Spaces...July 1, 1957, alarms will be mandatory only for systems required to...

  16. 46 CFR 193.15-30 - Alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Alarms. 193.15-30...RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-30 Alarms. (a...delayed discharge system other than paint...approved audible alarm which will...

  17. 46 CFR 95.15-30 - Alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Alarms. 95.15-30...MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-30 Alarms. (a) Spaces...July 1, 1957, alarms will be mandatory only for systems required to...

  18. A distributed approach to alarm management in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Estudillo-Valderrama, Miguel A; Talaminos-Barroso, Alejandro; Roa, Laura M; Naranjo-Hernández, David; Reina-Tosina, Javier; Aresté-Fosalba, Nuria; Milán-Martín, José A

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the feasibility study of using a distributed approach for the management of alarms from chronic kidney disease patients. In a first place, the key issues regarding alarm definition, classification, and prioritization according to available normalization efforts are analyzed for the main scenarios addressed in hemodialysis. Then, the middleware proposed for alarm management is described, which follows the publish/subscribe pattern, and supports the Object Management Group data distribution service (DDS) standard. This standard facilitates the real-time monitoring of the exchanged information, as well as the scalability and interoperability of the solution developed regarding the different stakeholders and resources involved. Finally, the results section shows, through the proof of concept studied, the viability of DDS for the activation of emergency protocols in terms of alarm prioritization and personalization, as well as some remarks about security, privacy, and real-time communication performance. PMID:25014977

  19. Mobilising around a risk : from alarm raisers to alarm carriers

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the question of alarm raisers. We have been able to show how the configuration that we have labelled "vigilance French agency for food safety. #12;risk (BSE, GMO), previously "political" dangers are re

  20. Instrumental lahar monitoring at Merapi Volcano, Central Java, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lavigne, F.; Thouret, J.-C.; Voight, B.; Young, K.; LaHusen, R.; Marso, J.; Suwa, H.; Sumaryono, A.; Sayudi, D.S.; Dejean, M.

    2000-01-01

    More than 50 volcanic debris flows or lahars were generated around Mt Merapi during the first rainy season following the nuees ardentes of 22 November 1994. The rainfalls that triggered the lahars were analyzed, using such instruments as weather radar and telemetered rain gauges. Lahar dynamics were also monitored, using new non-contact detection instrumentation installed on the slopes of the volcano. These devices include real-time seismic amplitude measurement (RSAM), seismic spectral amplitude measurement (SSAM) and acoustic flow monitoring (AFM) systems. Calibration of the various systems was accomplished by field measurements of flow velocities and discharge, contemporaneously with instrumental monitoring. The 1994–1995 lahars were relatively short events, their duration in the Boyong river commonly ranging between 30 min and 1 h 30 min. The great majority (90%) of the lahars was recognized at Kaliurang village between 13:00 and 17:30 h, due to the predominance of afternoon rainfalls. The observed mean velocity of lahar fronts ranged between 1.1 and 3.4 m/s, whereas the peak velocity of the flows varied from 11 to 15 m/s, under the Gardu Pandang viewpoint location at Kaliurang, to 8–10 m/s at a section 500 m downstream from this site. River slopes vary from 28 to 22 m/km at the two sites. Peak discharges recorded in various events ranged from 33 to 360 m3/s, with the maximum value of peak discharge 360 m3/s, on 20 May 1995. To improve the lahar warning system along Boyong river, some instrumental thresholds were proposed: large and potentially hazardous lahars may be detected by RSAM units exceeding 400, SSAM units exceeding 80 on the highest frequency band, or AFM values greater than 1500 mV on the low-gain, broad-band setting.

  1. Ultrasonic Technology in Duress Alarms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Martha A.

    2000-01-01

    Provides the pros and cons of the most commonly used technologies in personal duress alarm systems in the school environment. Discussed are radio frequency devices, infrared systems, and ultrasonic technology. (GR)

  2. Two-wave pattern shift aberration monitor for centrally obscured optical systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason P. Cain; Gregory McIntyre; Patrick Naulleau; Adam Pawloski; Bruno La Fontaine; Obert Wood II; Costas J. Spanos; Andrew R. Neureuther

    2005-01-01

    An aberration monitoring technique based on lateral shifts of two-wave interference patterns in centrally obscured optical systems is presented, and simulations are used to evaluate the performance of such a technique. The technique is being explored as a convenient means for monitoring the aberration level in the 0.3-NA Micro Exposure Tool (MET) optic over time. A binary mask was designed

  3. False-alarm characterization in hyperspectral gas-detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPietro, Robert S.; Truslow, Eric; Manolakis, Dimitris G.; Golowich, Steven E.; Lockwood, Ronald B.

    2012-09-01

    Chemical cloud detection using long-wave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral-imaging sensors has many civilian and military applications, including chemical warfare threat mitigation, environmental monitoring, and emergency response. Current capabilities are limited by variation in background clutter as opposed to the physics of photon detection, and this makes the statistical characterization of clutter and clutter-induced false alarms essential to the design of practical systems. In this exploratory work, we use hyperspectral data collected both on the ground and in the air to spectrally and spatially characterize false alarms. Focusing on two widely-used detectors, the matched filter (MF) and the adaptive cosine estimator (ACE), we compare empirical false-alarm rates to their theoretical counterparts - detector output under Gaussian, t and t-mixture distributed data - and show that these models often underestimate false-alarm rates. Next, we threshold real detection maps and show that true detections and false alarms often exhibit very different spatial behavior. To exploit this difference and understand how spatial processing affects performance, the spatial behavior of false alarms must be understood. We take a first step in this direction by showing that, although the behavior may `look' quite random, it is not well captured by the complete-spatial-randomness model. Finally, we describe how our findings impact the design of real detection systems.

  4. Users' opinions on intensive care unit alarms--a survey of German intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Siebig, S; Sieben, W; Kollmann, F; Imhoff, M; Bruennler, T; Rockmann, F; Gather, U; Wrede, C E

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring of physiologic parameters in critically ill patients is associated with an enormous number of alarms, leading to reduced clinical value with high sensitivity but low specificity. To evaluate opinions of intensive care unit (ICU) staff on current monitoring we conducted a survey of German ICUs. Furthermore, the survey aimed to assess requirements and requests for future alarm systems. The survey was conducted between May 2006 and June 2007 on a randomised sample of German ICUs. Questionnaires with 24 partly closed-ended partly open-ended questions were posted. Of 915 letters, 274 (30%) from 185 contacted ICUs were returned and evaluated. One hundred and sixty physicians, the majority (52%) working in a department of anaesthesiology, and 114 nurses returned the survey. Most responders (87%) estimated that less than 50% of current alarms result in clinical consequences (52% estimated less than 25%). We suggested trend alarms, smoothing of signals to reduce artefacts, generation of new combined alarms and integrative monitoring of different alarm systems as improvements of current ICU alarm systems, all of which were agreed to by the majority. Free text commentaries focused on the need for reducing alarms caused by artefacts and called for improvement of the monitor-user interfaces. Our survey demonstrates the dissatisfaction of clinical staff with the current alarm systems regarding alarm frequency and specificity in German ICUs, thereby confirming data raised in single institutions. ICU staff's acceptance for new alarm algorithms like signal extraction or detection of trends as a basis for smart monitoring appealed to the majority of users. PMID:19157356

  5. Correlating data from different sensors to increase the positive predictive value of alarms: an empiric assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bitan, Yuval

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Alarm fatigue from high false alarm rate is a well described phenomenon in the intensive care unit (ICU). Progress to further reduce false alarms must employ a new strategy. Highly sensitive alarms invariably have a very high false alarm rate. Clinically useful alarms have a high Positive-Predictive Value. Our goal is to demonstrate one approach to suppressing false alarms using an algorithm that correlates information across sensors and replicates the ways that human evaluators discriminate artifact from real signal. Methods: After obtaining IRB approval and waiver of informed consent, a set of definitions, (hypovolemia, left ventricular shock, tamponade, hemodynamically significant ventricular tachycardia, and hemodynamically significant supraventricular tachycardia), were installed in the monitors in a 10 bed cardiothoracic ICU and evaluated over an 85 day study period. The logic of the algorithms was intended to replicate the logic of practitioners, and correlated information across sensors in a way similar to that used by practitioners. The performance of the alarms was evaluated via a daily interview with the ICU attending and review of the tracings recorded over the previous 24 hours in the monitor. True alarms and false alarms were identified by an expert clinician, and the performance of the algorithms evaluated using the standard definitions of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. Results: Between 1 and 221 instances of defined events occurred over the duration of the study, and the positive predictive value of the definitions varied between 4.1% and 84%. Conclusions: Correlation of information across alarms can suppress artifact, increase the positive predictive value of alarms, and can employ more sophisticated definitions of alarm events than present single-sensor based systems. PMID:24358810

  6. In vivo monitoring of dopamine overflow in the central nervous system by amperometric techniques combined with

    E-print Network

    In vivo monitoring of dopamine overflow in the central nervous system by amperometric techniques independently of changes in basal release. In this context, DA release is evoked either by brief and low) contributes to the operational properties of DA terminals in converting action potentials into DA release

  7. Monitoring and Reducing Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections: A National Survey of State Hospital Associations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. Murphy; Dale M. Needham; Christine Goeschel; Eddy Fan; Sara E. Cosgrove; Peter J. Pronovost

    2010-01-01

    Central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) acquired in health care institutions are common and costly. A novel monitoring and prevention program dramatically reduced CLABSIs across one state. The extent to which other states have adopted similar efforts is unknown. State hospital associations were surveyed regarding their efforts to address these infections. All 50 responding associations endorsed the importance of improving patient

  8. Real-time Health Information Acquisition and Alarm System Based on Bluetooth and GPRS Communication Technologies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fang Yanan; Lu Xinghua; Li Huaizu

    2006-01-01

    Introducing medical monitor information integrated application system which is used to enhance the people's health guarantee. It integrated the circadian detecting technology, Bluetooth technology, GPRS technology, artificial intelligence medical diagnosis technology and alarm technology. It is an uninterrupted real-time working system which includes the subsystem of medical detecting, long distance transmission, date storage and analysis, alarm etc. It is mainly

  9. Techniques to alleviate nuisance alarms observed by PCMs following 222Rn-progeny deposition on clothing.

    PubMed

    Justus, Alan L

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents technically-based techniques to deal with nuisance personnel contamination monitor (PCM) alarms. The techniques derive from the fundamental physical characteristics of radon progeny. Some PCM alarms, although valid alarms and not actually "false," could be due to nuisance naturally-occurring radionuclides (i.e., radon progeny). Based on certain observed characteristics of the radon progeny, several prompt techniques are discussed that could either remediate or at least mitigate the problem of nuisance alarms. Examples are provided which demonstrate the effective use of the techniques. PMID:25811253

  10. Automated monitoring of satellite carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idasiak, B.

    The satellite carrier monitoring system (SCMS) currently in use in the Westar system is characterized. The primary components of the SCMS are the central monitoring system (comprising signal-control system, computer subsystem, and spectrum analyzer) and the (passive) remote monitoring system; the SCMS functions include spectrum surveillance, detection of spurious signals, multipath-amplitude modulation, and satellite-performance measurements. The SCMS validation procedures, measurements, operational modes (automatic, manual, file-preparation, and off-line), alarms, reports, and files are described in detail.

  11. Habitat use during the aquatic phase of the newts Triturus vulgaris (L.) and T. cristatus (Laurenti) in central Norway: proposition for a conservation and monitoring area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon K. Skei; Dag Dolmen; Lars Rønning; Thor H. Ringsby

    2006-01-01

    Amphibian populations are declining at an alarming pace in many parts of the world. Consequently, as part of the strategy for establishing a 360 km2 conservation and reference area for amphibians in central Norway, 341 lentic water bodies were surveyed to investigate and briefly describe their hydrography and the occurrence of the newts Triturus vulgaris (L.) and T. cristatus (Laurenti)

  12. Sewage Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Every U.S. municipality must determine how much waste water it is processing and more importantly, how much is going unprocessed into lakes and streams either because of leaks in the sewer system or because the city's sewage facilities were getting more sewer flow than they were designed to handle. ADS Environmental Services, Inc.'s development of the Quadrascan Flow Monitoring System met the need for an accurate method of data collection. The system consists of a series of monitoring sensors and microcomputers that continually measure water depth at particular sewer locations and report their findings to a central computer. This provides precise information to city managers on overall flow, flow in any section of the city, location and severity of leaks and warnings of potential overload. The core technology has been expanded upon in terms of both technical improvements, and functionality for new applications, including event alarming and control for critical collection system management problems.

  13. NASA LCLUC Program: An Integrated Forest Monitoring System for Central Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laporte, Nadine; LeMoigne, Jacqueline; Elkan, Paul; Desmet, Olivier; Paget, Dominique; Pumptre, Andrew; Gouala, Patrice; Honzack, Miro; Maisels, Fiona

    2004-01-01

    Central Africa has the second largest unfragmented block of tropical rain forest in the world; it is also one of the largest carbon and biodiversity reservoirs. With nearly one-third of the forest currently allocated for logging, the region is poised to undergo extensive land-use change. Through the mapping of the forests, our Integrated Forest Monitoring System for Central Africa (INFORMS) project aims to monitor habitat alteration, support biodiversity conservation, and promote better land-use planning and forest management. Designed as an interdisciplinary project, its goal is to integrate data acquired from satellites with field observations from forest inventories, wildlife surveys, and socio-economic studies to map and monitor forest resources. This project also emphasizes on collaboration and coordination with international, regional, national, and local partners-including non-profit, governmental, and commercial sectors. This project has been focused on developing remote sensing products for the needs of forest conservation and management, insuring that research findings are incorporated in forest management plans at the national level. The societal impact of INFORMS can be also appreciated through the development of a regional remote sensing network in central Africa. With a regional office in Kinshasa, (www.OSFAC.org), the contribution to the development of forest management plans for 1.5 million hectares of forests in northern Republic of Congo (www.tt-timber.com), and the monitoring of park encroachments in the Albertine region (Uganda and DRC) (www.albertinerift.org).

  14. Xcel Energy implements an alarm management strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, J.; Abreu, G. [Xcel Energy (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Not so long ago, Xcel Energy's Pawnee Station, a 505 MW coal-fired generating station in Brush, Colorado, USA was commonly generating 300 to 400 alarms per 8-hour shift. The article describes how the alarm system was revised and improved by tackling alarm dead-bands, and rationalising alarms for routine events. Operators are trained to understand the functions of alarm management components, their use and response, and obtain feedback. Today the power station reports about one alarm per hour. 3 photos.

  15. Escherichia Coli monitoring in the Spring Mill Lake watershed in south-central Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hasenmueller, N.R.; Comer, J.B.; Zamani, D.D.

    2003-01-01

    The escherichila (E) coli monitoring in the Spring Mill lake watershed in South-Central Indiana was presented. Water flowing from the springs in the park were analyzed to determine potential nonpoint-source contaminants entering Spring Mill Lake. E. Coli concentrations from the monitoring sites within the Spring Mill Lake watersheds varied greatly from concentrations below the detection limit, <1 most probable number (MPN) of organisms per 100 milliliters (mL) of water, to 980,000 MPN/100 mL. E. coli appears to be a potential health risk at several of the springs within the park, particularly at the Rubble site.

  16. Alarm system for a nuclear control complex

    DOEpatents

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1994-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  17. Estimation of Central Aortic Blood Pressure using a Noninvasive Automatic Blood Pressure Monitor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuan-Ta Shih; Yi-Jung Sun; Chen-Huan Chen; Hao-min Cheng; Hu Wei-Chih

    Automatic blood pressure monitors are the most important healthcare products. The abnormal blood pressure values and waveform\\u000a could indicate many cardiovascular diseases. The pressures measured using oscillometric method, which compared with invasive\\u000a blood pressure devices, are often slight overestimation in SBP and underestimation in DBP.Recent studies indicated that the\\u000a continuous pulse volume recording (PVR) could predict the central aortic blood

  18. 46 CFR 130.450 - Machinery alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.450 Machinery alarms. (a) Each alarm required by § 130.460 of this...

  19. 46 CFR 130.450 - Machinery alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.450 Machinery alarms. (a) Each alarm required by § 130.460 of this...

  20. 46 CFR 130.450 - Machinery alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.450 Machinery alarms. (a) Each alarm required by § 130.460 of this...

  1. 46 CFR 130.450 - Machinery alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.450 Machinery alarms. (a) Each alarm required by § 130.460 of this...

  2. 46 CFR 130.450 - Machinery alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.450 Machinery alarms. (a) Each alarm required by § 130.460 of this...

  3. Hornbills can distinguish between primate alarm calls.

    PubMed Central

    Rainey, Hugo J.; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Slater, Peter J. B.

    2004-01-01

    Some mammals distinguish between and respond appropriately to the alarm calls of other mammal and bird species. However, the ability of birds to distinguish between mammal alarm calls has not been investigated. Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana) produce different alarm calls to two predators: crowned eagles (Stephanoaetus coronatus) and leopards (Panthera pardus). Yellow-casqued hornbills (Ceratogymna elata) are vulnerable to predation by crowned eagles but are not preyed on by leopards and might therefore be expected to respond to the Diana monkey eagle alarm call but not to the leopard alarm call. We compared responses of hornbills to playback of eagle shrieks, leopard growls, Diana monkey eagle alarm calls and Diana monkey leopard alarm calls and found that they distinguished appropriately between the two predator vocalizations as well as between the two Diana monkey alarm calls. We discuss possible mechanisms leading to these responses. PMID:15209110

  4. 30 CFR 77.311 - Alarm devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.311 Alarm devices. Thermal dryer systems shall be equipped with both audible and visual alarm devices which are set to...

  5. Voice Alarm System in Emergency Evacuation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huiyang Li; Xianghong Sun; Kan Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Under emergency situations such as large fires, floods, hazardous-materials, etc., incident commander have to manage an evacuation\\u000a in help of alarm systems (audible or\\/and visual notification). This article reviewed selected literature relevant to ergonomics\\u000a of alarm systems (esp. voice alarm system) in emergency evacuation, and occupants’ response behavior to the voice alarm. The\\u000a literature cited is of world-wide origin, and

  6. Usefulness of central venous oxygen saturation monitoring during bidirectional Glenn shunt.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Nami; Kawahito, Shinji; Mita, Naoji; Kambe, Noriko; Kasai, Asuka; Wakamatsu, Narutomo; Katayama, Toshiko; Soga, Tomohiro; Tada, Fumihiko; Kitaichi, Takashi; Kitagawa, Tetsuya; Kitahata, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    A PediaSat™ oximetry catheter (PediaSat: Edwards Lifesciences Co., Ltd., Irvine, CA, U. S. A.), which facilitates continuous measurement of central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2), may be useful for surgery for pediatric congenital heart disease. We used PediaSat during a bidirectional Glenn shunt. The patient was a 13-month-old boy. Under a diagnosis of left single ventricle (pulmonary atresia, right ventricular hypoplasia, atrial septal defect) and residual left aortic arch/left superior vena cava, a modified right Blalock-Taussig shunt was performed. Cyanosis deteriorated, so a bidirectional Glenn shunt was scheduled. After anesthesia induction, a 4.5 Fr double-lumen (8 cm) PediaSat was inserted through the right internal jugular vein for continuous ScvO2 monitoring. Furthermore, the probe of a near-infrared, mixed blood oxygen saturation-measuring monitor was attached to the forehead for continuous monitoring of the regional brain tissue mixed blood oxygen saturation (rSO2) (INVOS™ 5100C, Covidien; Boulder, CO, U. S. A.). Blockage of the right pulmonary artery and right superior vena cava decreased the oxygen saturation, ScvO2, and rSO2, but increased the central venous pressure. Although changes in ScvO2 were parallel to those in rSO2, the former showed more marked changes. A combination of ScvO2 and rSO2 for monitoring during Glenn shunt may be safer. PMID:24190047

  7. Improved alarm tracking for better accountability

    SciTech Connect

    Nemesure, S.; Marr, G.; Shrey, T.; Kling, N.; Hammons, L.; Ingrassia, P.; D'Ottavio, T.

    2011-03-28

    An alarm system is a vital component of any accelerator, as it provides a warning that some element of the system is not functioning properly. The severity and age of the alarm may sometimes signify whether urgent or deferred attention is required. For example, older alarms may be given a lower priority if an assumption is made that someone else is already investigating it, whereas those of higher severity or alarms that are more current may indicate the need for an immediate response. The alarm history also provides valuable information regarding the functionality of the overall system, thus careful tracking of these data is likely to improve response time, remove uncertainty about the current status and assist in the ability to promptly respond to the same warning/trigger in the future. Since one goal of every alarm display is to be free of alarms, a clear and concise presentation of an alarm along with useful historic annotations can help the end user address the warning more quickly, thus expediting the elimination of such alarm conditions. By defining a discrete set of very specific alarm management states and by utilizing database resources to maintain a complete and easily accessible alarm history, we anticipate facilitated work flow due to more efficient operator response and management of alarms.

  8. FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS AND PROCEDURES FOR

    E-print Network

    Ullmer, Brygg

    FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS AND PROCEDURES FOR BUILDING EVACUATION FRED C. FREY COMPUTING SERVICES CENTER CLAIRE M. MOREAU #12;i Table of Contents Page Introduction 1 Fire Alarm Systems B Simplex and FM-200 2 of the Fire Alarm Systems 8 Automatic Activation 8 Manual Activation 9 Results of Fire Systems' Activations 10

  9. CFN Bldg 735 Safety Awareness Fire Alarms

    E-print Network

    Ohta, Shigemi

    activate the Building Fire/Evacuation Alarm System. From a safe location, call the BNL emergencyCFN Bldg 735 Safety Awareness Fire Alarms: There are 2 different fire alarms in the CFN. The first being the normal ringing in the event of a fire. The second one is a temporal 3 (distinct ring) followed

  10. Minimum fire alarm sound pressure level for elder care centres

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. T. Wong; L. K. Leung

    2005-01-01

    Some building occupants cannot hear the activated fire alarm nor can they recognize the alarm, although the fire alarm system has been installed to the acceptable standard. Measurements of fire alarm sound pressure levels (SPLs) in five elder care centres showed that the sound output of a fire alarm can be depreciated after installation. The alarm level of a new

  11. hp calculators HP 50g Setting an Alarm

    E-print Network

    Vetter, Frederick J.

    hp calculators HP 50g Setting an Alarm The TIME menu Practice setting alarms #12;hp calculators HP 50g Setting an alarm hp calculators - 2 - HP 50g Setting an alarm The TIME menu The TIME menu HP 50g Setting an alarm hp calculators - 3 - HP 50g Setting an alarm Press 6to choose ALRM

  12. False ventricular tachycardia alarm suppression in the ICU based on the discrete wavelet transform in the ECG signal.

    PubMed

    Salas-Boni, Rebeca; Bai, Yong; Harris, Patricia Rae Eileen; Drew, Barbara J; Hu, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few years, reducing the number of false positive cardiac monitor alarms (FA) in the intensive care unit (ICU) has become an issue of the utmost importance. In our work, we developed a robust methodology that, without the need for additional non-ECG waveforms, suppresses false positive ventricular tachycardia (VT) alarms without resulting in false negative alarms. Our approach is based on features extracted from the ECG signal 20 seconds prior to a triggered alarm. We applied a multi resolution wavelet transform to the ECG data 20seconds prior to the alarm trigger, extracted features from appropriately chosen scales and combined them across all available leads. These representations are presented to a L1-regularized logistic regression classifier. Results are shown in two datasets of physiological waveforms with manually assessed cardiac monitor alarms: the MIMIC II dataset, where we achieved a false alarm (FA) suppression of 21% with zero true alarm (TA) suppression; and a dataset compiled by UCSF and General Electric, where a 36% FA suppression was achieved with a zero TA suppression. The methodology described in this work could be implemented to reduce the number of false monitor alarms in other arrhythmias. PMID:25172188

  13. A centralized on-line monitoring system for damage assessment of critical components of multiple thermal power plant units

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. V. Durgaprasad; B. K. Dutta; K. K. Vaze; R. Daga; G. Bandyopadhyay; A. K. Mohindru

    2010-01-01

    A centralized version of on-line structural safety evaluation system (BOSSES) has been installed to monitor damage due to creep and fatigue in various critical plant components of multiple thermal power plants. This can be achieved from a centralized BOSSES server. This version is advancement to the earlier version of BOSSES where it was installed and maintained individually at different plant

  14. 2012 Groundwater Monitoring Report Central Nevada Test Area, Subsurface Corrective Action Unit 443

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2013-04-01

    The Central Nevada Test Area was the site of a 0.2- to 1-megaton underground nuclear test in 1968. The surface of the site has been closed, but the subsurface is still in the corrective action process. The corrective action alternative selected for the site was monitoring with institutional controls. Annual sampling and hydraulic head monitoring are conducted as part of the subsurface corrective action strategy. The site is currently in the fourth year of the 5-year proof-of-concept period that is intended to validate the compliance boundary. Analytical results from the 2012 monitoring are consistent with those of previous years. Tritium remains at levels below the laboratory minimum detectable concentration in all wells in the monitoring network. Samples collected from reentry well UC-1-P-2SR, which is not in the monitoring network but was sampled as part of supplemental activities conducted during the 2012 monitoring, indicate concentrations of tritium that are consistent with previous sampling results. This well was drilled into the chimney shortly after the detonation, and water levels continue to rise, demonstrating the very low permeability of the volcanic rocks. Water level data from new wells MV-4 and MV-5 and recompleted well HTH-1RC indicate that hydraulic heads are still recovering from installation and testing. Data from wells MV-4 and MV-5 also indicate that head levels have not yet recovered from the 2011 sampling event during which several thousand gallons of water were purged. It has been recommended that a low-flow sampling method be adopted for these wells to allow head levels to recover to steady-state conditions. Despite the lack of steady-state groundwater conditions, hydraulic head data collected from alluvial wells installed in 2009 continue to support the conceptual model that the southeast-bounding graben fault acts as a barrier to groundwater flow at the site.

  15. Study on ARM-based fire alarm networking unit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wang Huaixiu; Wang Dong; Jiang Zhijian

    2011-01-01

    An ARM-based fire alarm unit was presented in the paper. The unit hardware was composed of temperature, smog sensors, LPC2478 and GPRS transmission. The unit software was composed of \\/lC\\/OS - II embedded operation system, data acquisition, the fire identification algorithms and transmission programs. The unit was able to monitor and analyze the room's temperature and smog, and then the

  16. HOME INSECURITY: NO ALARMS, FALSE ALARMS, AND SIGINT

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, Logan M [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The market share of home security systems has substantially increased as vendors incorporate more desirable features: intrusion detection, automation, wireless, and LCD touch panel controls. Wireless connectivity allows vendors to manufacture cheaper, more featureful products that require little to no home modification to install. Consumer win, since adding devices is easier. The result: an ostensibly more secure, convenient, and connected home for a larger number of citizens. Sadly, this hypothesis is flawed; the idea of covering a home with more security sensors does not translate into a more secure home. Additionally, the number of homes using these vulnerable systems is large, and the growth rate is increasing producing a even larger problem. In this talk, I will demonstrate a generalized approach for compromising three systems: ADT, the largest home security dealer in North America; Honeywell, one of the largest manufacturers of security devices; and Vivint, a top 5 security dealer. We will suppress alarms, create false alarms, and collect artifacts that facilitate tracking the movements of individuals in their homes.

  17. SeaQuest/E906 Shift Alarm System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitts, Noah

    2014-09-01

    SeaQuest, Fermilab E906, is a fixed target experiment that measures the Drell-Yan cross-section ratio of proton-proton to proton-deuterium collisions in order to extract the sea anti-quark structure of the proton. SeaQuest will extend the measurements made by E866/NuSea with greater precision at higher Bjorken-x. The continuously running experiment is always being monitored. Those on shift must keep track of all of the detector readouts in order to make sure the experiment is running correctly. As an experiment that is still in its early stages of running, an alarm system for people on shift is being created to provide warnings, such as a plot showing a detector's performance is sufficiently different to need attention. This plan involves python scripts that track live data. When the data shows a problem within the experiment, a corresponding alarm ID is sent to the MySQL database which then sets off an alarm. These alarms, which will alert the person on shift through both an audible and visual response, are important for ensuring that issues do not go unnoticed, and to help make sure the experiment is recording good data.

  18. Alarm upgrade meets new standards.

    PubMed

    2004-11-01

    When Bedford Hospital NHS Trust decided to replace its ageing and increasingly unreliable fire detection and alarm system, it was looking to achieve more than just compliance with the latest regulations. It wanted a flexible, state-of-the-art system that would not only meet its current requirements but would also be easy to adapt and inexpensive to maintain. The pound 1 million Gent Vigilon fire system now operating across the site has given it just that. The 15-month long project to install the system was completed without a single ward or operating theatre having to be shut down. PMID:15575551

  19. Alarm sensor apparatus for closures

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, James A. (Thornton, CO); Stoddard, Lawrence M. (Arvada, CO)

    1986-01-01

    An alarm sensor apparatus for closures such as doors and windows, and particularly for closures having loose tolerances such as overhead doors, garage doors or the like, the sensor apparatus comprising a pair of cooperating bracket members, one being attached to the door facing or frame work and the other to the door member, two magnetic sensor elements carried by said bracket members, the bracket members comprising a pair of cooperating orthogonal guide slots and plates and a stop member engageable with one of the sensors for aligning the sensors with respect to each other in all three orthogonal planes when the door is closed.

  20. Alarm sensor apparatus for closures

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, J.A.; Stoddard, L.M.

    1984-01-31

    An alarm sensor apparatus for closures such as doors and windows, and particularly for closures having loose tolerances such as overhead doors, garage doors or the like, the sensor apparatus comprising a pair of cooperating bracket members, one being attached to the door facing or framework and the other to the door member, two magnetic sensor elements carried by said bracket members, the bracket members comprising a pair of cooperating orthogonal guide slots and plates and a stop member engageable with one of the sensors for aligning the sensors with respect to each other in all three orthogonal planes when the door is closed.

  1. Building intelligent alarm systems by combining mathematical models and inductive machine learning techniques Part 2—Sensitivity analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B Müller; A. Hasman; J. A. Blom

    1996-01-01

    In an earlier study an approach was described to generate intelligent alarm systems for monitoring ventilation of patients via mathematical simulation and machine learning. However, ventilator settings were not varied. In this study we investigated whether an alarm system could be created with which a satisfactory classification performance could be obtained under a wide variety of ventilator settings, by varying

  2. Alarm system management: evidence-based guidance encouraging direct measurement of informativeness to improve alarm response.

    PubMed

    Rayo, Michael F; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D

    2015-04-01

    Although there are powerful incentives for creating alarm management programmes to reduce 'alarm fatigue', they do not provide guidance on how to reduce the likelihood that clinicians will disregard critical alarms. The literature cites numerous phenomena that contribute to alarm fatigue, although many of these, including total rate of alarms, are not supported in the literature as factors that directly impact alarm response. The contributor that is most frequently associated with alarm response is informativeness, which is defined as the proportion of total alarms that successfully conveys a specific event, and the extent to which it is a hazard. Informativeness is low across all healthcare applications, consistently ranging from 1% to 20%. Because of its likelihood and strong evidential support, informativeness should be evaluated before other contributors are considered. Methods for measuring informativeness and alarm response are discussed. Design directions for potential interventions, as well as design alternatives to traditional alarms, are also discussed. With the increased attention and investment in alarm system management that alarm interventions are currently receiving, initiatives that focus on informativeness and the other evidence-based measures identified will allow us to more effectively, efficiently and reliably redirect clinician attention, ultimately improving alarm response. PMID:25734193

  3. Alarm toe switch. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Ganyard, F.P.

    1980-11-18

    An alarm toe switch inserted within a shoe for energizing an alarm circuit in a covert manner includes an insole mounting pad into which a miniature reed switch is fixedly molded. An elongated slot perpendicular to the reed switch is formed in the bottom surface of the mounting pad. A permanent cylindrical magnet positioned in the forward portion of the slot with a diameter greater than the pad thickness causes a bump above the pad. A foam rubber block is also positioned in the slot rearwardly of the magnet and holds the magnet in normal inoperative relation. A non-magnetic support plate covers the slot and holds the magnet and foam rubber in the slot. The plate minimizes bending and frictional forces to improve movement of the magnet for reliable switch activation. The bump occupies the knuckle space beneath the big toe. When the big toe is scrunched rearwardly the magnet is moved within the slot relative to the reed switch, thus magnetically activating the switch. When toe pressure is released the foam rubber block forces the magnet back into normal inoperative position to deactivate the reed switch.

  4. Testing alarm-based earthquake predictions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Douglas Zechar; Thomas H. Jordan

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Motivated by a recent resurgence in earthquake predictability research, we present a method for testing alarm-based earthquake predictions. The testing method is based on the Molchan diagram—a plot of miss rate and fraction of space-time occupied by alarm—and is applicable to a wide class of predictions, including probabilistic earthquake forecasts varying in space, time, and magnitude. A single alarm

  5. Recommendations for the LHC safety alarm system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H Laeger

    1999-01-01

    A working group was set up to define the LHC safety alarm system, also known as Alarm-of-Level-3-System (AL3S). The mandate asked for recommendations to be elaborated on four items: the overall concept of the AL3S for machine and experiments, the transmission and display of safety alarms, the AL3S during civil engineering construction, and the transition from the present LEP to

  6. 49 CFR 193.2507 - Monitoring operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...or any malfunction or flammable fluid that could cause a hazardous condition. Monitoring must be accomplished by watching or listening from an attended control center for warning alarms, such as gas, temperature, pressure, vacuum, and flow alarms,...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2507 - Monitoring operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...or any malfunction or flammable fluid that could cause a hazardous condition. Monitoring must be accomplished by watching or listening from an attended control center for warning alarms, such as gas, temperature, pressure, vacuum, and flow alarms,...

  8. Neural Mechanisms of Alarm Pheromone Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Enjin, Anders; Suh, Greg Seong-Bae

    2013-01-01

    Alarm pheromones are important semiochemicals used by many animal species to alert conspecifics or other related species of impending danger. In this review, we describe recent developments in our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying the ability of fruit flies, zebrafish and mice to mediate the detection of alarm pheromones. Specifically, alarm pheromones are detected in these species through specialized olfactory subsystems that are unique to the chemosensitive receptors, second messenger-signaling and physiology. Thus, the alarm pheromones appear to be detected by signaling mechanisms that are distinct from those seen in the canonical olfactory system. PMID:23471444

  9. Groundwater Monitoring Report Central Nevada Test Area, Corrective Action Unit 443

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2008-04-01

    This report presents the 2007 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of the CNTA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to DOE-LM on October 1, 2006. Requirements for CAU 443 are specified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 2005) entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada and includes groundwater monitoring in support of site closure. This is the first groundwater monitoring report prepared by DOE-LM for the CNTA The CNTA is located north of U.S. Highway 6, approximately 30 miles north of Warm Springs in Nye County, Nevada (Figure 1). Three emplacement boreholes, UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, were drilled at the CNTA for underground nuclear weapons testing. The initial underground nuclear test, Project Faultless, was conducted in borehole UC-1 at a depth of 3,199 feet (ft) (975 meters) below ground surface on January 19, 1968. The yield of the Project Faultless test was estimated to be 0.2 to 1 megaton (DOE 2004). The test resulted in a down-dropped fault block visible at land surface (Figure 2). No further testing was conducted at the CNTA, and the site was decommissioned as a testing facility in 1973.

  10. Source Injection Distribution Functions for Alarm Algorithm Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Sean M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Schweppe, John E.

    2008-05-15

    The development and testing of improved alarm algorithms is an ongoing priority of the Radiation Portal Monitor Project (RPMP) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Improved algorithms have the potential to reduce the impediments that radiation screening presents to the flow of commerce, without affecting the detection sensitivity to sources of interest. However, assessing alarm-algorithm performance involves careful calculation of detection probabilities and nuisance/false alarm rates for any algorithm that may be used in the field. To establish statistical confidence, such a task requires a large amount of data from drive-through (or “dynamic”) scenarios both with, and without, radioactive sources of interest present; but obtaining actual field data to meet this need is not feasible. Instead, an “injection-study” procedure is being used to approximate how the profiles of actual drive-through commercial data would change with the presence of sources of interest. This procedure adds net-counts from a pre-defined set of simulated sources to raw, gross-count drive-through data randomly selected from archived cargo data collected from deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs). (PIET-43741-TM-480)

  11. Seafloor Geodetic Monitoring of the Central Andean Subduction Zone: The Geosea Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, H.; Lange, D.; Contreras Reyes, E.; Behrmann, J. H.; McGuire, J. J.; Flueh, E. R.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor geodesy has been identified as one of the central tools in marine geosciences to monitor seafloor deformation at high resolution. To quantify strain accumulation and assess the resultant hazard potential we urgently need systems to resolve seafloor crustal deformation. The GeoSEA (Geodetic Earthquake Observatory on the Seafloor) array consists of a seafloor transponder network comprising a total of 35 units and a wave glider acting as a surface unit (GeoSURF) to ensure satellite correspondence, data transfer and monitor system health. For horizontal direct path measurements, the system utilizes acoustic ranging techniques with a ranging precision better than 15 mm and long term stability over 2 km distance. Vertical motion is obtained from pressure gauges. Integrated inclinometers monitor station settlement in two horizontal directions. Travel time between instruments and the local water sound velocity will be recorded autonomously subsea without system or human intervention for up to 3.5 years. Data from the autonomous network on the seafloor can be retrieved via the integrated high-speed acoustic telemetry link without recovering the seafloor units. In late 2015 GeoSEA will be installed on the Iquique segment of the South America - Nazca convergent plate boundary to monitor crustal deformation. The Iquique seismic gap experienced the 2014 Mw 8.1 Pisagua earthquake, which apparently occurred within a local locking minimum. It is thus crucial to better resolve resolve strain in the forearc between the mainland and the trench in order to improve our understanding of forearc deformation required for hazard assessment. Mobile autonomous seafloor arrays for continuous measurement of active seafloor deformation in hazard zones have the potential to lead to transformative discoveries of plate boundary/fault zone tectonic processes and address a novel element of marine geophysical research.

  12. AMETHYST: automatic alarm assessment becoming a reality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Horner; H. Sage; G. Leach

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the AMETHYST (AutoMatic Event auTHentication SYSTems) project is to encourage the development of a high performance perimeter detection system which combines Video Motion Detection (VMD) technology with another type of Perimeter Intrusion Detection System (PIDS). AMETHYST will automatically assess the cause of PIDS alarms and pass to an operator those alarms likely to be caused by an

  13. AMETHYST: automatic alarm assessment: operational experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Horner; Graham Leach; T. O'Dwyer

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the AMETHYST (Automatic Event Authentication Systems) project is to encourage the development of a high-performance perimeter detection system by using video assessment to enhance the Perimeter Intrusion Detection System (PIDS). AMETHYST will automatically assess the cause of all PIDS alarms and pass to an operator only those alarms that are likely to be caused by an intruder.

  14. AMETHYST: automatic alarm assessment: becoming a reality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Horner; K. Sage; G. Leach

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the AMETHYST (AutoMatic Event auTHentication SYSTems) project is to encourage the development of a high performance perimeter detection system which combines Video Motion Detection (VMD) technology with another type of Perimeter Intrusion Detection System (PIDS). AMETHYST will automatically assess the cause of all PIDS alarms and pass to an operator only those alarms which are likely to

  15. LASL upgraded alarm system functional requirements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. L. Hartway; E. N. Shaskey

    1977-01-01

    This document defines and describes the functional requirements to successfully provide Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory with a combined security and fire alarm system that will satisfy the operational needs of various users and provide compliance with applicable codes and Energy Research and Development Administration security and fire protection requirements. The four major subsystems of the upgraded Laboratory alarm system are

  16. T-Farm complex alarm upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    The alarm and controls associated with the T, TX, and TY farms are located in the 242-T control room. The design data for replacement and upgrades of the alarm panels is in this document. This task was canceled previous to the 90% design review point.

  17. Estimation of ultrafine particle concentrations at near-highway residences using data from local and central monitors.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Christina H; Brugge, Doug; Williams, Paige; Mittleman, Murray; Durant, John L; Spengler, John D

    2012-09-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP; aerodynamic diameter < 0.1 micrometers) are a ubiquitous exposure in the urban environment and are elevated near highways. Most epidemiological studies of UFP health effects use central site monitoring data, which may misclassify exposure. Our aims were to: (1) examine the relationship between distant and proximate monitoring sites and their ability to predict hourly UFP concentration measured at residences in an urban community with a major interstate highway and; (2) determine if meteorology and proximity to traffic improve explanatory power. Short-term (1 - 3 weeks) residential monitoring of UFP concentration was conducted at 18 homes. Long-term monitoring was conducted at two near-highway monitoring sites and a central site. We created models of outdoor residential UFP concentration based on concentrations at the near-highway site, at the central site, at both sites together and without fixed sites. UFP concentration at residential sites was more highly correlated with those at a near-highway site than a central site. In regression models of each site alone, a 10% increase in UFP concentration at a near-highway site was associated with a 6% (95% CI: 6%, 7%) increase at residences while a 10% increase in UFP concentration at the central site was associated with a 3% (95% CI: 2%, 3%) increase at residences. A model including both sites showed minimal change in the magnitude of the association between the near-highway site and the residences, but the estimated association with UFP concentration at the central site was substantially attenuated. These associations remained after adjustment for other significant predictors of residential UFP concentration, including distance from highway, wind speed, wind direction, highway traffic volume and precipitation. The use of a central site as an estimate of personal exposure for populations near local emissions of traffic-related air pollutants may result in exposure misclassification. PMID:23645993

  18. Estimation of ultrafine particle concentrations at near-highway residences using data from local and central monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Christina H.; Brugge, Doug; Williams, Paige L.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Durant, John L.; Spengler, John D.

    2012-09-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP; aerodynamic diameter < 0.1 ?m) are a ubiquitous exposure in the urban environment and are elevated near highways. Most epidemiological studies of UFP health effects use central site monitoring data, which may misclassify exposure. Our aims were to: (1) examine the relationship between distant and proximate monitoring sites and their ability to predict hourly UFP concentration measured at residences in an urban community with a major interstate highway and; (2) determine if meteorology and proximity to traffic improve explanatory power. Short-term (1-3 weeks) residential monitoring of UFP concentration was conducted at 18 homes. Long-term monitoring was conducted at two near-highway monitoring sites and a central site. We created models of outdoor residential UFP concentration based on concentrations at the near-highway site, at the central site, at both sites together and without fixed sites. UFP concentration at residential sites was more highly correlated with those at a near-highway site than a central site. In regression models of each site alone, a 10% increase in UFP concentration at a near-highway site was associated with a 6% (95% CI: 6%, 7%) increase at residences while a 10% increase in UFP concentration at the central site was associated with a 3% (95% CI: 2%, 3%) increase at residences. A model including both sites showed minimal change in the magnitude of the association between the near-highway site and the residences, but the estimated association with UFP concentration at the central site was substantially attenuated. These associations remained after adjustment for other significant predictors of residential UFP concentration, including distance from highway, wind speed, wind direction, highway traffic volume and precipitation. The use of a central site as an estimate of personal exposure for populations near local emissions of traffic-related air pollutants may result in exposure misclassification.

  19. Real time monitoring and analysis via the medical information bus, Part I

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Taboada; B. Arcay; J. E. Arias

    1997-01-01

    Because of the complexity of monitored data in modern intensive care units (ICUs), and the risk of information being overlooked\\u000a if medical staff have to pay attention to a multiplicity of monitoring apparatuses and alarm signals, the data for each patient\\u000a may well be best presented on a single bedside screen after digestion by expert system techniques. Such central units

  20. RESTful M2M Gateway for Remote Wireless Monitoring for District Central Heating Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bo; Wei, Zesan

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the increased interest in energy conservation and environmental protection, combined with the development of modern communication and computer technology, has resulted in the replacement of distributed heating by central heating in urban areas. This paper proposes a Representational State Transfer (REST) Machine-to-Machine (M2M) gateway for wireless remote monitoring for a district central heating network. In particular, we focus on the resource-oriented RESTful M2M gateway architecture, and present an uniform devices abstraction approach based on Open Service Gateway Initiative (OSGi) technology, and implement the resource mapping mechanism between resource address mapping mechanism between RESTful resources and the physical sensor devices, and present the buffer queue combined with polling method to implement the data scheduling and Quality of Service (QoS) guarantee, and also give the RESTful M2M gateway open service Application Programming Interface (API) set. The performance has been measured and analyzed. Finally, the conclusions and future work are presented. PMID:25436650

  1. 21 CFR 870.1100 - Blood pressure alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood pressure alarm. 870.1100 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1100 Blood pressure alarm. (a) Identification. A blood pressure alarm is a device that accepts...

  2. 47 CFR 80.318 - Use of alarm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Use of alarm signals. 80.318 Section 80.318 Telecommunication...Procedures § 80.318 Use of alarm signals. (a) The radiotelegraph or radiotelephone alarm signal, as appropriate, must only be used...

  3. 47 CFR 80.318 - Use of alarm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Use of alarm signals. 80.318 Section 80.318 Telecommunication...Procedures § 80.318 Use of alarm signals. (a) The radiotelegraph or radiotelephone alarm signal, as appropriate, must only be used...

  4. 47 CFR 80.317 - Radiotelegraph and radiotelephone alarm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Radiotelegraph and radiotelephone alarm signals. 80.317 Section 80.317 Telecommunication... Radiotelegraph and radiotelephone alarm signals. (a) The international radiotelegraph alarm signal consists of a series of twelve...

  5. 47 CFR 80.318 - Use of alarm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Use of alarm signals. 80.318 Section 80.318 Telecommunication...Procedures § 80.318 Use of alarm signals. (a) The radiotelegraph or radiotelephone alarm signal, as appropriate, must only be used...

  6. 47 CFR 80.318 - Use of alarm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Use of alarm signals. 80.318 Section 80.318 Telecommunication...Procedures § 80.318 Use of alarm signals. (a) The radiotelegraph or radiotelephone alarm signal, as appropriate, must only be used...

  7. 47 CFR 80.318 - Use of alarm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Use of alarm signals. 80.318 Section 80.318 Telecommunication...Procedures § 80.318 Use of alarm signals. (a) The radiotelegraph or radiotelephone alarm signal, as appropriate, must only be used...

  8. 21 CFR 870.1100 - Blood pressure alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood pressure alarm. 870.1100 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1100 Blood pressure alarm. (a) Identification. A blood pressure alarm is a device that accepts...

  9. 46 CFR 169.732 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 169.732 Section 169.732 Shipping...Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.732 Carbon dioxide alarm. Each carbon dioxide alarm must be conspicuously identified:...

  10. 46 CFR 169.732 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 169.732 Section 169.732 Shipping...Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.732 Carbon dioxide alarm. Each carbon dioxide alarm must be conspicuously identified:...

  11. 24 CFR 3280.208 - Smoke alarm requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Labeling. Each smoke alarm required under paragraph...Multiple Station Smoke Alarms, dated January 4...Smoke Detectors for Fire Protective Signaling Systems, dated January 4...b) Required smoke alarm locations....

  12. 24 CFR 3280.208 - Smoke alarm requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Labeling. Each smoke alarm required under paragraph...Multiple Station Smoke Alarms, dated January 4...Smoke Detectors for Fire Protective Signaling Systems, dated January 4...b) Required smoke alarm locations....

  13. 24 CFR 3280.208 - Smoke alarm requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Labeling. Each smoke alarm required under paragraph...Multiple Station Smoke Alarms, dated January 4...Smoke Detectors for Fire Protective Signaling Systems, dated January 4...b) Required smoke alarm locations....

  14. 21 CFR 870.2640 - Portable leakage current alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Portable leakage current alarm. 870.2640 Section 870.2640...Devices § 870.2640 Portable leakage current alarm. (a) Identification. A portable leakage current alarm is a device used to measure...

  15. 21 CFR 870.2640 - Portable leakage current alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Portable leakage current alarm. 870.2640 Section 870.2640...Devices § 870.2640 Portable leakage current alarm. (a) Identification. A portable leakage current alarm is a device used to measure...

  16. 21 CFR 870.2640 - Portable leakage current alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Portable leakage current alarm. 870.2640 Section 870.2640...Devices § 870.2640 Portable leakage current alarm. (a) Identification. A portable leakage current alarm is a device used to measure...

  17. Central blood pressure by EIT Page nr. 1 of 14 Non-invasive monitoring of central blood

    E-print Network

    Adler, Andy

    identified by a novel time-based processing algorithm as the respective EIT pixels representing the way towards the monitoring of cardiac and vascular parameters in hospitals and out-patients [8 by inflation of brachial cuffs are unsuitable for monitoring short-term BP regulation mechanisms, for which

  18. The ERS-1 Central Africa Mosaic: a new perspective in radar remote sensing for the global monitoring of vegetation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gianfranco De Grandi; Jean-Paul Malingreau; Marc Leysen

    1999-01-01

    The Central Africa Mosaic Project (CAMP) is an attempt to bring spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) remote sensing into an entirely new perspective for tropical forest monitoring, this goal represents a drastic change in the use of radar data, as it brings high-resolution SAR from the role of gap-filler and local hot spot analysis to the role of global mapping

  19. Ovitrap Efficacy Using Plant Infusions to Monitor Vertical Distribution of Aedes albopictus Skuse (Diptera: Culicidae) in North-Central Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The response of Aedes albopictus to ovitraps containing water, oak or oak-pine was evaluated in four suburban and four sylvatic habitats in North-Central Florida to ascertain potential egg-laying heights. A total of 48 ovitraps were suspended at 1 and 6 meters and monitored weekly for five months....

  20. 46 CFR 130.470 - Fire alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.470 Fire alarms. (a) Each fire detector and control unit must be of a...

  1. 46 CFR 130.470 - Fire alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.470 Fire alarms. (a) Each fire detector and control unit must be of a...

  2. 46 CFR 130.470 - Fire alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.470 Fire alarms. (a) Each fire detector and control unit must be of a...

  3. 46 CFR 130.470 - Fire alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.470 Fire alarms. (a) Each fire detector and control unit must be of a...

  4. 46 CFR 130.470 - Fire alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.470 Fire alarms. (a) Each fire detector and control unit must be of a...

  5. Giving radioiodine? Think about airport security alarms.

    PubMed

    Kaniuka-Jakubowska, S; Lewczuk, A; Mizan-Gross, K; Obo?o?czyk, L; Lass, P; Sworczak, K

    2012-01-01

    An increased sensitivity of airport detectors, a growing number of isotopic tests, and globalization of the society have raised a number of false positive radioactive alarms at airports and public places. This paper presents two new cases of patients who triggered airport security alarms after receiving 740MBq of (131)I for non-toxic goitre and attempts to compare surprisingly limited literature concerning this problem. A 57-year-old man triggered a security alarm at three different airports on the 17th, 28th, and 31st day after radioiodine exposure. Interestingly enough, in the meantime, on the 18th and 22nd day, no radiation was detected in him at the airport where he was twice detained as a source of radiation later on. The second case presents a 45-year-old woman who activated security alarm detectors while crossing a border on her coach trip 28 days after radioiodine administration. PMID:22226338

  6. Design Intelligent Multisensor Fire Monitoring Based on DSP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liu Baifen; Zhang Yongxian; Gan Fangcheng; Wang Donghai

    2007-01-01

    In fire alarm and monitoring system, fire detector is provided with great function. But traditional fire detector does not possess or be short of the ability to detect in early state fire. Because that signal of fire alarm and monitoring isn't alarmed in time and fire is controlled effective, to cause heavy losses by fire. In this paper, it is

  7. Hyperspectral data application for peat forest monitoring in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohki, Takashi; Yoshida, Keigo; Sekine, Hozuma; Takayama, Taichi; Takeda, Tomomi; Hirose, Kazuyo; Evri, Muhammad; Osaki, Mitsuru

    2012-11-01

    Peatland is a large CO2 reservoir which accumulates 2000Gt of CO2, which is equal to 30% of global soil carbon. However, it has been becoming a large CO2 emission source because of peat decomposition and fire due to drainage water. This is caused by social activities such as canalizing. Especially, in Indonesia, peat swamp forests cover considerable portions of Kalimantan and 37.5% of CO2 emission source is peatland (DNPI, 2010). To take measures, it is necessary to conduct appropriate assessment of CO2 emission in broad peat swamp forest. Because hyperspectral data possess higher spectral resolutions, it is expected to evaluate the detailed forest conditions. We develop a method to assess carbon emission from peat swamp forest by using hyperspectral data in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Specifically, we estimate 1) forestry biomass and 2) underground water level expected as an indicator of CO2 emission from peat. In this research, we use the image taken by HyMAP which is one of the airborne hyperspectral sensors. Since the research area differs in forest types and conditions due to the past forest fire and disturbance, forest types are classified with the sparse linear discriminant analysis. Then, we conduct a biomass estimation using Normalized Difference Spectral Index (NDSI). We also analyze the relationship between underground water level and Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), and find the possibility of underground water level estimation with hyperspectral data. We plan to establish a highly developed method to apply hyperspectral sensor to peatland monitoring system.

  8. Studying the NDVI dynamics features for vegetation monitoring method development in the south of Central Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, Irina

    Monitoring of vegetation state can be based on studying their dynamics features. Effective methods of satellite data interpretation using spectral feature distinctions should be applied for this purpose. Studying the time series of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) during growth period is one of such approaches. The analysis of NDVI temporal profile shape allows to identify vegetation objects on satellite image. The NDVI curve transformation regularities during growth period are studied in the process of study carried out. Growth rate in specific phenological phases (growth of vegetative organs; maturation and fruiting) and extreme NDVI values during total growth period are detected. Growth rate is calculated as a NDVI curve slope. The NDVI dynamics of different vegetation types (agricultural crops - wheat, oats, buckwheat; abandoned fields of different age, meadow steppe, stony steppe, feather-grass steppe, flood meadow etc.), located in the south of Central Siberia (Krasnoyarsk krai, Khakasia), has been derived and analyzed. Results of this study are as the basis for developed software, which produces the automatic identification of canopy using Terra Modis satellite measurement data.

  9. Rockfall hazard alarm strategy based on FBG smart passive net structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng; Ma, Junjie; Hu, Jun

    2015-03-01

    In order to realize working state remote monitoring for a passive net, alarm timely and correctly for the rockfall invasion, and solve the disadvantages in the existing means, such as needing power supply in situ, vulnerability to electromagnetic interference and environmental climate impact, a smart passive net structure based on the optical fiber sensing technology was designed which equipped with intercepting and sensing functions. The wire rope net as one part of the smart passive net was weaved with two kinds of optical fiber sensing elements, namely, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) perimeter severity sensors and optical fiber monitoring net with each end of the tail fiber containing an FBG probe. Based on the proposed smart structure, a combination alarm strategy for rockfall was proposed, which can distinguish transmission bug, whether the rockfall invasion or net broken occurs. Through a designed simulation test, the effectiveness of the proposed alarm strategy was certificated.

  10. Groundwater Age in Multi-Level Water Quality Monitor Wells on California Central Valley Dairies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, B. K.; Visser, A.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Singleton, M. J.; Moran, J. E.; Harter, T.

    2011-12-01

    Dairy farming in California's Central Valley is a significant source of nitrate to underlying aquifers. One approach to mitigation is to implement farm-scale management plans that reduce nutrient loading to groundwater while sustaining crop yield. While the effect of different management practices on crop yield is easily measured, their effect on groundwater quality has only infrequently been evaluated. Documenting and predicting the impact of management on water quality requires a quantitative assessment of transport (including timescale and mixing) through the vadose and saturated zones. In this study, we measured tritium, helium isotopic composition, and noble gas concentrations in groundwater drawn from monitor wells on several dairies in the Lower San Joaquin Valley and Tulare Lake Basin of California's Central Valley in order to predict the timescales on which changes in management may produce observable changes in groundwater quality. These dairies differ in age (from <10 to >100 years old), thickness of the vadose zone (from <10 to 60 m), hydrogeologic setting, and primary source of irrigation water (surface or groundwater). All of the dairies use manure wastewater for irrigation and fertilization. Three of the dairies have implemented management changes designed to reduce nutrient loading and/or water usage. Monitor wells in the southern Tulare Lake Basin dairies were installed by UC-Davis as multi-level nested wells allowing depth profiling of tritium and noble gases at these sites. Tritium/helium-3 groundwater ages, calculated using a simple piston-flow model, range from <2 to >50 years. Initial tritium (the sum of measured tritium and tritiogenic helium-3) is close to or slightly above precipitation in the calculated recharge year for young samples; and significantly above the precipitation curve for older samples. This pattern is consistent with the use of 20-30 year old groundwater recharged before 1980 for irrigation, and illustrates how irrigation with groundwater can complicate the use of tritium alone for age dating. The presence of radiogenic helium-4 in several samples with measurable tritium provides evidence of mixing between pre-modern and younger groundwater. Groundwater age-depth relationships are complicated, consistent with transient flow patterns in shallow agricultural groundwaters affected by irrigation pumping and recharge. For the multi-level installations in the southern dairies, both depth profiles and re-sampling after significant changes in groundwater elevation emphasize the need to sample groundwater within 3 meters of the water table to obtain "first-encounter" groundwater with a tritium/helium-3 age of less than 5 years, and to use age tracers to identify wells and groundwater conditions suitable for monitoring and assessment of best management practice impacts on underlying groundwater quality. This work was carried out with funding from Sustainable Conservation and the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with UC-Davis, and was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. A new device for the care of Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome patients during sleep.

    PubMed

    Cavalleri, M; Carcano, A; Morandi, F; Piazza, C; Maggioni, E; Reni, G

    2013-01-01

    Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome (CCHS) is a genetic disease that causes an autonomous nervous system dysregulation. Patients are unable to have a correct ventilation, especially during sleep, facing risk of death. Therefore, most of them are mechanically ventilated during night and their blood oxygenation is monitored, while a supervisor keeps watch over them. If low oxygen levels are detected by the pulse-oximeter, an alarm fires; the supervisor deals with the situation and, if there is neither a technical problem nor a false alarm, wakes the subject, as CCHS patients usually recover from hypoxia when roused from sleep. During a single night multiple alarms may occur, causing fractioned sleep for the subject and a lasting state of anxiety for supervisors. PMID:24110221

  12. Epidermal `alarm substance' cells of fishes maintained by non-alarm functions: possible

    E-print Network

    Blaustein, Andrew R.

    Epidermal `alarm substance' cells of fishes maintained by non-alarm functions: possible defence Department of Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802-5301, USA 5 The Nature by exposure to skin-penetrating pathogens (water moulds: Saprolegnia ferax and Saprolegnia parasitica), skin

  13. Network video capture and short message service alarm system design based on embedded Linux

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Duanchun Zhou; Guangxing Tan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the structure of video capture system based on S3C2440 processor is presented. And the embedded system, video capture, short message service (SMS) alarm, and client video monitor are introduced. Video 4 Linux is used to get the camera video data, which is transferred to the Web Server, and the data is displayed on the client browser or

  14. A new permanent multi-parameter monitoring network in Central Asian high mountains - from measurements to data bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, T.; Zech, C.; Unger-Shayesteh, K.; Rudenko, V.; Thoss, H.; Wetzel, H.-U.; Zubovich, A.

    2012-06-01

    Long-term monitoring of water resources and climate parameters at the scale of river basins requires networks of continuously operated in-situ stations. Since 2009, GFZ and CAIAG, in cooperation with the National Hydrometeorological Services (NHMS), are establishing such a regional monitoring network in Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, and Afghanistan) which is collecting observations of meteorological and hydrological parameters and delivering them to the end-users. The network design focuses mainly on the higher elevations where the recent decline of monitoring stations and networks established in Soviet times was strongest, and the resulting observational gap hinders research on climate and hydrological change as well as operational tasks in water management such as the seasonal runoff forecast. The newly developed and installed Remotely Operated Multi-Parameter Stations (ROMPS) do not only monitor standard meteorological and hydrological parameters, but also deliver GPS data for atmospheric sounding as well as tectonic studies. The observational data from the ROMPS is transmitted at least once a day to a centralized geo-database infrastructure for long-term storage and data redistribution. Users can access the data manually using a web-interface or automatically using SOS requests; in addition, data is distributed to the NHMS through standard communication and data exchange channels.

  15. A new permanent multi-parameter monitoring network in Central Asian high mountains - from measurements to data bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, T.; Zech, C.; Unger-Shayesteh, K.; Rudenko, V.; Thoss, H.; Wetzel, H.-U.; Gafurov, A.; Illigner, J.; Zubovich, A.

    2013-02-01

    Long-term monitoring of water resources and climate parameters at the scale of river basins requires networks of continuously operated in-situ stations. Since 2009, GFZ and CAIAG, in cooperation with the National Hydrometeorological Services (NHMS) of Central Asia, are establishing such a regional monitoring network in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, and lately Afghanistan to collect observations of meteorological and hydrological parameters and to deliver them to the end-users for operational tasks and scientific studies. The newly developed and installed remotely operated multi-parameter stations (ROMPS) do not only monitor standard meteorological and hydrological parameters, but also deliver Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data for atmospheric sounding as well as tectonic studies. Additionally, three stations integrate seismic sensors for earthquake monitoring. The observational data from the ROMPS is transmitted nominally in near-real time, but at least once a day to a centralized geo-database infrastructure for long-term storage and data redistribution. Users can access the data manually using a web-interface or automatically using SOS requests; in addition, data is planed to be distributed to the NHMS through standard communication and data exchange channels.

  16. Pressurized security barrier and alarm system

    SciTech Connect

    Carver, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    A security barrier for placement across a passageway is made up of interconnected pressurized tubing made up in a grid pattern with openings too small to allow passage. The tubing is connected to a pressure switch, located away from the barrier site, which activates an alarm upon occurrence of a pressure drop. A reinforcing bar is located inside and along the length of the tubing so as to cause the tubing to rupture and set off the alarm upon an intruder`s making an attempt to crimp and seal off a portion of the tubing by application of a hydraulic tool. Radial and rectangular grid patterns are disclosed.

  17. Intelligent residential security alarm and remote control system based on single chip computer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liu Zhen-ya; Wang Zhen-dong; Chen Rong; Wu Xiao-feng

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents intelligent residential burglar alarm, emergency alarm, fire alarm, toxic gas leakage remote automatic sound alarm and remote control system, which is based on 89C51 single chip computer. The system can be automatic alarm, automatic calling the police hotline number. It can be used voice alarm and show alarm occurred address. It can set up and modify user

  18. NOTE / NOTE Alarm pheromone induces a transgenerational

    E-print Network

    Mondor, Ed

    2002). Winged morphs have a longer development time, lower fertility, and a shorter life span thanNOTE / NOTE Alarm pheromone induces a transgenerational wing polyphenism in the pea aphid a transgenerational wing- induction polyphenism in response to predators and parasitoids, but the stimuli inducing

  19. An Undergraduate Experiment in Alarm System Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martini, R. A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes an experiment involving data acquisition by a computer, digital signal transmission from the computer to a digital logic circuit and signal interpretation by this circuit. The system is being used at the Illinois Institute of Technology. Discusses the fundamental concepts involved. Demonstrates the alarm experiment as it is used in…

  20. Fire Alarm Systems for Health Care Facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hugh O. Nash

    1983-01-01

    Fire alarm systems for health care facilities must be designed for early detection, accurate location annunciation, fire department notification, and control of the high voltage alternating current (HVAC) system, and elevators. The designer must keep in mind that the system is designed to initiate a planned response by the hospital staff and the fire brigade without disturbing patients unnecessarily. The

  1. FIRE ALARM SYSTEM CONTROLLED BY USING COMPUTER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Thiravasin; J. Sinthusonthichat

    This paper proposes the design and construction of fire alarm system which is controlled by 80C31 microcontroller. Computer is used to indicate situations of the system composed of 4 modes of working state, regular working mode, short circuit mode, open circuit of wiring signal mode, and fire mode. Graphic output states are displayed on personal computer, PC, by using software

  2. Automatic Fire Alarm System Based on MCU

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhang Kun; Hu Shunbin; Li Jinfang

    2010-01-01

    The paper introduced an automatic warehouse fire a1arm system based on MCU. The system was mainly made up of ATmega16, temperature sensors, smoke sensors, and EX-1 auto dialed alarm module. In the system, temperature signals were transformed to serial data, and smoke signals were transformed to voltage signals. All the data were processed by MCU. When the surveillance system checked

  3. Centralized heart rate monitoring telemetry system using ZigBee wireless sensor network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. S. A. Zulkifli; F. K. Che Harun; N. S. Azahar

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in wireless communication standards and medical monitoring system have made it possible to effectively combine mesh networking with Non-Invasive medical application which is Pulse Oximeter in order to create reliable, large-scale wireless Network. This Mesh networking will enable doctors and nurses to observe and monitor a number of patients simultaneously from one location without being with the patient's

  4. 46 CFR 161.002-12 - Manual fire alarm systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Manual fire alarm systems. 161.002-12 Section...SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Fire-Protective Systems § 161.002-12 Manual fire alarm systems. (a) General. A...

  5. 46 CFR 161.002-12 - Manual fire alarm systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Manual fire alarm systems. 161.002-12 Section...SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Fire-Protective Systems § 161.002-12 Manual fire alarm systems. (a) General. A...

  6. 29 CFR 1910.165 - Employee alarm systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Employee alarm systems. 1910.165 Section 1910.165 Labor...STANDARDS Fire Protection Other Fire Protection Systems § 1910.165 Employee alarm systems. (a) Scope and application....

  7. 29 CFR 1910.165 - Employee alarm systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Employee alarm systems. 1910.165 Section 1910.165 Labor...STANDARDS Fire Protection Other Fire Protection Systems § 1910.165 Employee alarm systems. (a) Scope and application....

  8. 29 CFR 1910.165 - Employee alarm systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Employee alarm systems. 1910.165 Section 1910.165 Labor...STANDARDS Fire Protection Other Fire Protection Systems § 1910.165 Employee alarm systems. (a) Scope and application....

  9. 29 CFR 1910.165 - Employee alarm systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Employee alarm systems. 1910.165 Section 1910.165 Labor...STANDARDS Fire Protection Other Fire Protection Systems § 1910.165 Employee alarm systems. (a) Scope and application....

  10. 46 CFR 130.460 - Placement of machinery alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.460 Placement of machinery alarms. (a) Visible and audible alarms must...

  11. 46 CFR 130.460 - Placement of machinery alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.460 Placement of machinery alarms. (a) Visible and audible alarms must...

  12. 46 CFR 130.460 - Placement of machinery alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.460 Placement of machinery alarms. (a) Visible and audible alarms must...

  13. 46 CFR 130.460 - Placement of machinery alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.460 Placement of machinery alarms. (a) Visible and audible alarms must...

  14. 46 CFR 130.460 - Placement of machinery alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.460 Placement of machinery alarms. (a) Visible and audible alarms must...

  15. 46 CFR 111.33-7 - Alarms and shutdowns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Semiconductor Rectifier Systems § 111.33-7 Alarms and shutdowns. Each power semiconductor rectifier must have a high temperature alarm or shutdown, except as...

  16. 46 CFR 97.37-7 - General alarm bells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-7 General alarm...lettering at least 1/2 inch high: “GENERAL ALARM—WHEN BELL RINGS GO TO YOUR STATION.” (b)...

  17. 46 CFR 78.47-7 - General alarm bells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-7 General alarm...lettering at least 1/2 inch high: “GENERAL ALARM—WHEN BELL RINGS GO TO YOUR STATION.” (b)...

  18. 46 CFR 78.47-7 - General alarm bells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-7 General alarm...lettering at least 1/2 inch high: “GENERAL ALARM—WHEN BELL RINGS GO TO YOUR STATION.” (b)...

  19. 46 CFR 97.37-7 - General alarm bells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-7 General alarm...lettering at least 1/2 inch high: “GENERAL ALARM—WHEN BELL RINGS GO TO YOUR STATION.” (b)...

  20. 46 CFR 78.47-7 - General alarm bells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-7 General alarm...lettering at least 1/2 inch high: “GENERAL ALARM—WHEN BELL RINGS GO TO YOUR STATION.” (b)...

  1. 46 CFR 97.37-7 - General alarm bells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-7 General alarm...lettering at least 1/2 inch high: “GENERAL ALARM—WHEN BELL RINGS GO TO YOUR STATION.” (b)...

  2. Criticality accident alarm system at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, R.C.; Brown, T.D.; Wooldridge, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the staus of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) criticality alarm system. A new radiation detection alarm system was installed in 1990. The anunciation system, calibration and maintenance, and detector placement is described.

  3. 46 CFR 76.05-5 - Manual alarm system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Manual alarm system. 76.05-5 Section 76...CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fire Detecting and Extinguishing...Required § 76.05-5 Manual alarm system. (a) An approved...

  4. 8. INTERIOR, FIRE ALARM CONTROL ROOM (NORTH OF MAIN GARAGE), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR, FIRE ALARM CONTROL ROOM (NORTH OF MAIN GARAGE), FROM ENTRYWAY, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING ADDITIONAL 'GAMEWELL' FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Firehouse, East of Fourth Street, between A & B Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  5. 46 CFR 76.05-5 - Manual alarm system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Manual alarm system. 76.05-5 Section 76...CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fire Detecting and Extinguishing...Required § 76.05-5 Manual alarm system. (a) An approved...

  6. 46 CFR 76.05-5 - Manual alarm system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Manual alarm system. 76.05-5 Section 76...CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fire Detecting and Extinguishing...Required § 76.05-5 Manual alarm system. (a) An approved...

  7. 46 CFR 76.05-5 - Manual alarm system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Manual alarm system. 76.05-5 Section 76...CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fire Detecting and Extinguishing...Required § 76.05-5 Manual alarm system. (a) An approved...

  8. 46 CFR 76.05-5 - Manual alarm system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Manual alarm system. 76.05-5 Section 76...CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fire Detecting and Extinguishing...Required § 76.05-5 Manual alarm system. (a) An approved...

  9. 46 CFR 78.47-7 - General alarm bells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-7 General alarm...lettering at least 1/2 inch high: “GENERAL ALARM—WHEN BELL RINGS GO TO YOUR STATION.” (b)...

  10. 46 CFR 97.37-7 - General alarm bells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-7 General alarm...lettering at least 1/2 inch high: “GENERAL ALARM—WHEN BELL RINGS GO TO YOUR STATION.” (b)...

  11. 46 CFR 78.47-7 - General alarm bells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-7 General alarm...lettering at least 1/2 inch high: “GENERAL ALARM—WHEN BELL RINGS GO TO YOUR STATION.” (b)...

  12. 46 CFR 97.37-7 - General alarm bells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-7 General alarm...lettering at least 1/2 inch high: “GENERAL ALARM—WHEN BELL RINGS GO TO YOUR STATION.” (b)...

  13. Alarm OnCall Form (Instructions) Office of Physical Security

    E-print Network

    Moore, Paul A.

    Alarm OnCall Form (Instructions) Office of Physical Security 101 Campus Operations Bowling; Alarm OnCall Form Office of Physical Security 101 Campus Operations Bowling Green State University/Director: ________________________________________________ Chair/Director email: ________________________________________________________ Fax

  14. Smart container UWB sensor system for situational awareness of intrusion alarms

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Carlos E.; Haugen, Peter C.; Zumstein, James M.; Leach, Jr., Richard R.; Vigars, Mark L.

    2013-06-11

    An in-container monitoring sensor system is based on an UWB radar intrusion detector positioned in a container and having a range gate set to the farthest wall of the container from the detector. Multipath reflections within the container make every point on or in the container appear to be at the range gate, allowing intrusion detection anywhere in the container. The system also includes other sensors to provide false alarm discrimination, and may include other sensors to monitor other parameters, e.g. radiation. The sensor system also includes a control subsystem for controlling system operation. Communications and information extraction capability may also be included. A method of detecting intrusion into a container uses UWB radar, and may also include false alarm discrimination. A secure container has an UWB based monitoring system

  15. Design of intelligent fire alarm system based on GSM network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chun-yuan Lian

    2011-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of complex cabling, misdeclaration and missing alarm of traditional fire alarm system, an intelligent fire alarm system based on GSM network is designed. MSP430F149 is adopted as main control chip, and the remote alarming and data exchanging are achieved by using GSM module TC35I. By adopting smoke detector and temperature detector and using a

  16. Evaluation of a Long-Term Amphibian Monitoring Protocol in Central America

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Kristine

    2008-01-01

    PROTOCOL detection of population declines. Although theA. N. 1954. Decline in toad populations in central Oklahoma.declines, or methods to mitigate them, underscores the need for protocols which yield reliable population

  17. Improved correlation analysis and visualization of industrial alarm data.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Shah, S L; Xiao, D; Chen, T

    2012-07-01

    The problem of multivariate alarm analysis and rationalization is complex and important in the area of smart alarm management due to the interrelationships between variables. The technique of capturing and visualizing the correlation information, especially from historical alarm data directly, is beneficial for further analysis. In this paper, the Gaussian kernel method is applied to generate pseudo continuous time series from the original binary alarm data. This can reduce the influence of missed, false, and chattering alarms. By taking into account time lags between alarm variables, a correlation color map of the transformed or pseudo data is used to show clusters of correlated variables with the alarm tags reordered to better group the correlated alarms. Thereafter correlation and redundancy information can be easily found and used to improve the alarm settings; and statistical methods such as singular value decomposition techniques can be applied within each cluster to help design multivariate alarm strategies. Industrial case studies are given to illustrate the practicality and efficacy of the proposed method. This improved method is shown to be better than the alarm similarity color map when applied in the analysis of industrial alarm data. PMID:22503464

  18. False Fire Alarms: A Deviant Pattern of Seeking Help.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camblin, Louise; Weinland, Laura

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the phenomenon of false fire alarms, the deliberate, intentional false reporting of fires, by mentally troubled persons as a primitive kind of help-seeking behavior. Several common themes found by reviewing false alarm cases are presented. Suggests that identifying the intrapsychic dynamics of false alarm reporters could be useful in…

  19. Alarm fatigue: a roadmap for mitigating the cacophony of beeps.

    PubMed

    Purbaugh, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon known as alarm fatigue is the direct result of excessive alarms in hospitals. This article highlights the effects of alarm fatigue and reviews current clinical recommendations and guidelines to raise nurse awareness and provide tools to combat the problem. PMID:24310707

  20. Empirical Bayes Methods Applied to Estimating Fire Alarm Probabilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grace M. Carter; John E. Rolph

    1974-01-01

    An empirical Bayes approach is used to derive a Stein-type estimator of a multivariate normal mean when the components have unequal variances. This estimator is applied to estimating the probability that a fire alarm reported from a particular street box signals a structural fire rather than a false alarm or other emergency. The approach is to group alarm boxes into

  1. Incorporation of false alarms in simulations of electronic receivers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. P. Sobczynski; C. J. Pearson

    1973-01-01

    A simple method for simulating false alarms in simulations of electronic receivers is developed. False alarms are an important part of electronic receivers and previously their generation was computationally complex because of their random nature and very small probability of occurrence. The approach derives the probability density function of the time between false alarms and shows how, for typical values

  2. Towards a centralized Grid Speedometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhunov, I.; Andreeva, J.; Fajardo, E.; Gutsche, O.; Luyckx, S.; Saiz, P.

    2014-06-01

    Given the distributed nature of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid and the way CPU resources are pledged and shared around the globe, Virtual Organizations (VOs) face the challenge of monitoring the use of these resources. For CMS and the operation of centralized workflows, the monitoring of how many production jobs are running and pending in the Glidein WMS production pools is very important. The Dashboard Site Status Board (SSB) provides a very flexible framework to collect, aggregate and visualize data. The CMS production monitoring team uses the SSB to define the metrics that have to be monitored and the alarms that have to be raised. During the integration of CMS production monitoring into the SSB, several enhancements to the core functionality of the SSB were required; They were implemented in a generic way, so that other VOs using the SSB can exploit them. Alongside these enhancements, there were a number of changes to the core of the SSB framework. This paper presents the details of the implementation and the advantages for current and future usage of the new features in SSB.

  3. Soft real-time alarm messages for ATLAS TDAQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darlea, G.; Al Shabibi, A.; Martin, B.; Lehmann Miotto, G.

    2010-05-01

    The ATLAS TDAQ network consists of three separate Ethernet-based networks (Data, Control and Management) with over 2000 end-nodes. The TDAQ system has to be aware of the meaningful network failures and events in order for it to take effective recovery actions. The first stage of the process is implemented with Spectrum, a commercial network management tool. Spectrum detects and registers all network events, then it publishes the information via a CORBA programming interface. A gateway program (called NSG—Network Service Gateway) connects to Spectrum through CORBA and exposes to its clients a Java RMI interface. This interface implements a callback mechanism that allows the clients to subscribe for monitoring "interesting" parts of the network. The last stage of the TDAQ network monitoring tool is implemented in a module named DNC (DAQ to Network Connection), which filters the events that are to be reported to the TDAQ system: it subscribes to the gateway only for the machines that are currently active in the system and it forwards only the alarms that are considered important for the current TDAQ data taking session. The network information is then synthesized and presented in a human-readable format. These messages can be further processed either by the shifter who is in charge, the network expert or the Online Expert System. This article aims to describe the different mechanisms of the chain that transports the network events to the front-end user, as well as the constraints and rules that govern the filtering and the final format of the alarm messages.

  4. Journal of Chemical Ecology, Vol. 25, No. 12, 1999 CONDITIONED ALARM BEHAVIOR IN FATHEAD

    E-print Network

    Wisenden, Brian D.

    (Pimephales promelas) RESULTING FROM ASSOCIATION OF CHEMICAL ALARM PHEROMONE WITH A NONBIOLOGICAL VISUAL--Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) adopt antipredator (alarm) behavior when they detect alarm pheromone, Pimephales promelas, alarm pheromone, Schreckstoff, learned recognition of predation risk, red light. #12

  5. Alarm annunciation in a graphical environment

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.G.

    1994-08-01

    Well-designed graphical user interfaces, such as Microsoft Windows{trademark} or UNIX{trademark} -- based X-Windows, provide a capability for enhanced display of security alarm information. Conversely, a poorly designed interface can quickly overwhelm an operator. This paper describes types of graphical information that can be displayed and offers guidance on how to best display that information. Limits are proposed for the complexity of the user interface, and guidelines are suggested for the display of maps and sensors.

  6. Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test for the Hanford Central Plateau: Interim Post-Desiccation Monitoring Results

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Strickland, Christopher E.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Johnson, Christian D.; Clayton, Ray E.; Chronister, Glen B.

    2013-09-01

    A field test of desiccation is being conducted as an element of the deep vadose zone treatability test program. Desiccation technology relies on removal of water from a portion of the subsurface such that the resultant low moisture conditions inhibit downward movement of water and dissolved contaminants. Previously, a field test report (Truex et al. 2012a) was prepared describing the active desiccation portion of the test and initial post-desiccation monitoring data. Additional monitoring data have been collected at the field test site during the post-desiccation period and is reported herein along with interpretation with respect to desiccation performance. This is an interim report including about 2 years of post-desiccation monitoring data.

  7. Real Time Monitoring: Achieving Energy Efficiency 

    E-print Network

    Rouse, S.

    2009-01-01

    monitoring (RTM) is a tool that operators can use to detect and diagnose energy consumption in real time to identify problems and take immediate action! RTM allows the monitoring of energy consumption in 5 minute increments. Alarms notify...

  8. Oxidative Stress in the Central Nervous System: Monitoring the Metabolic Response using the Pentose Phosphate Pathway

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oded Ben-Yoseph; Peter A. Boxer; Brian D. Ross

    1994-01-01

    We propose that monitoring the activity of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) may provide an opportunity to obtain unique information regarding the metabolic response to oxidative stress since glutathione peroxidase activity is coupled, via glutathione reductase, to the PPP enzyme glucoses-phosphate dehydrogenase. PPP activity was quantitated from data obtained from gas chromatography\\/mass spectrometry analysis of released lactate following metabolic degradation

  9. Passive monitoring of atmospheric heavy metals in a historical city of central India by Lepraria lobificans Nyl.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Rajesh; Upreti, D K; Dwivedi, S K

    2010-07-01

    Using an organism living in situ for monitoring is referred as passive monitoring. Lepraria lobificans Nyl., a leprose lichen growing naturally on monuments and buildings in the city Mandav in central India is used for passive monitoring of atmospheric metals. Seven metals (Cd, Cr, Ni, Al, Fe, Cu, and Zn) were analyzed. Samples collected from road site exhibit the maximum concentration of Fe, Cd, Cr, Ni, and Zn. Iron exhibit maximum accumulation both in lichen thallus and the substratum with mean values of 2,195.63 microg g(-1) dry weight. As compared with other growth form of lichens, L. lobificans exhibits the higher accumulation of Fe than foliose and fruticose lichens. On the basis of these results, it can be hypothesized that L. lobificans is an excellent accumulator of different metals. The statistical analysis applied to the element concentration between the metals as well as between the sites by analysis of variance found the difference to be significant at 1% and 5%, respectively. Student-Newman-Keuls test also shows significant difference for iron between the different metals. PMID:19496009

  10. Application of water quality indices and analysis of the surface water quality monitoring network in semiarid North-Central Chile.

    PubMed

    Espejo, Lesly; Kretschmer, Nicole; Oyarzún, Jorge; Meza, Francisco; Núñez, Jorge; Maturana, Hugo; Soto, Guido; Oyarzo, Paula; Garrido, Marcela; Suckel, Felipe; Amezaga, Jaime; Oyarzún, Ricardo

    2012-09-01

    Surface water quality has increasing importance worldwide and is particularly relevant in the semiarid North-Central Chile, where agriculture and mining activities are imposing heavy pressure on limited water resources. The current study presents the application of a water quality index in four watersheds of the 29°-33°S realm for the period 1999-2008, based on the Canadian Council of Ministers for the Environment approach and the Chilean regulation for irrigation water quality. In addition, two modifications to the index are tested and a comprehensive characterization of the existing monitoring network is performed through cluster analysis. The basins studied show fairly good water quality in the overall, specially the Limarí basin. On the other hand, the lower index values were obtained for the headwaters of Elqui, associated with the El Indio mining district. The first modification of the indicator (i.e., to consider parameters differentially according to their effect on human health or the environment) did not produce major differences with respect to the original index, given the generally good water quality. The second modification (i.e., to consider as threshold values the more restrictive figures derived from a set of regulations) yielded important differences in the indicator values. Finally, an adequate characterization of the monitoring network was obtained. The results presented spatial coherence and the information can be used as a basis for the optimization of the monitoring network if required. PMID:21938385

  11. Do smoke alarms still function a year after installation? A follow-up of the get-alarmed campaign.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Corleen J; Jones, Alma R; Davis, Mary Kidd; Caplan, Lee S

    2004-04-01

    The Get-Alarmed Campaign Follow-up Study was the second phase of an initiative to assure that homes of families at high risk of fire-related injury and death had functioning smoke alarms. Smoke alarms and/or batteries were installed in over 94 percent of 454 participating households in Schley and Henry Counties, Georgia, in 2000. Before the study began, 60.6 percent of these homes had smoke alarms, but only 36.6 percent had functioning smoke alarms. The follow-up study was designed to determine the experiences of participants with smoke alarms and whether participating households had functioning smoke alarms a year after baseline. Participants were phoned or visited and asked about their experiences with smoke alarms since the baseline study. During the interview, they were asked to test a smoke alarm, the results of which could frequently be heard. Respondents included 237 from Schley County and 113 from Henry County, for an overall 77.1 percent response rate. While 80.3 percent of respondents had a smoke alarm that was heard by the interviewer when it was tested, 6.6 percent reported that their smoke alarm had been disabled or had a dead battery. Over 75 percent of respondents had smoke alarm sound offs in the prior year, predominately due to cooking smoke, but only about 5 percent reported removing the battery or otherwise disabling it to prevent sound offs. However, the measures taken may render a household unprotected at a critical time. Efforts to increase protection with smoke alarms should be augmented with programs to insure adequate and timely testing and maintenance of existing smoke alarms. PMID:15065735

  12. Distributed Guarding and Alarming System Based on Telephone Automatical Dialing and Remote Communication Technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu Chen

    2009-01-01

    Circumstance data of building such as fire accident smoke, robberpsilas body information, temperature and humidity signal, etc is acquired by different kinds of sensor unit. Single chip microprocessor (SCM) AT89C51 processes data signal collection and realize telephone automatically dialing-alarming when there is unusual condition, as well as it controls wireless transceiver chip nRF905 to complete data transmission between monitor controller

  13. The low-technology monitoring of atmospheric metal pollution in central Scotland.

    PubMed

    Yule, F A; Lloyd, O L

    1984-01-01

    In epidemiological studies covering relationships of disease patterns and patterns of atmospheric pollution, conventional filtering equipment is normally used for monitoring the pollution. For various reasons, however, this type of approach often results in levels of pollution being obtained for only a few sites within an extensive fieldwork area. Hence, alternative monitoring techniques, which allow a high density of sampling sites in an area, have been of interest to an increasing number of investigators. The monitors used, known as low-technology monitors, fall into two main categories; indigenous; and transplants. In our own surveys of atmospheric metal pollutants in industrial communities in Scotland, the indigenous sample materials have included: Hypnum cupressiforme, Lecanora conizaeoides, Agropyron repens and surface soils. In our transplant surveys a variety of different low-technology samplers have been deployed, the most frequently used being: spherical and flat moss bags, Hypogymnia physodes, 'Tak' (synthetic fabric), and total deposition collectors. The data obtained from the various surveys have been plotted on a variety of types of computer map to minimize any systematic bias resulting from the use of a single technique. The pollution patterns found in one particular town were partly unexpected, in view of the dominant wind direction in the locality concerned. Hence it was decided to carry out a wind tunnel experiment to investigate the situation further. The wind tunnel experiment produced results which were consistent with the patterns of pollution derived from the metal surveys, and revealed that the meteorological dispersal of the pollution was unexpectedly influenced by local topography. Because pulmonary pathology was the main focus of the complementary epidemiological study, an investigation of the size, shape and roughness of the metal particles was considered relevant. This investigation involved the examination of samplers and their particles by means of the electron microscope. To complete the study of the methodology of low-technology samplers in this town, their uptake is also being compared to that of filtering equipment (high-technology samplers). The information gained from the present survey at this early stage has indicated that several of the low-technology monitors could have considerable value in the provision of continuous, but low-cost, surveillance of the air quality of wide areas of industrial communities. PMID:6532984

  14. Indoor and Outdoor Social Alarms: Understanding Users' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The elderly population is increasing and there is a need to provide care and safety at a high level with limited resources. New social alarm solutions may contribute to safety and independence for many elderly. However, it is important to understand the needs within the user group. This work studied social alarms in a broad sense and from several user perspectives. In the first study, social alarm use and its aspects were investigated. To understand where there may be problems and weaknesses, users, caregivers, managers of municipalities, and personnel at alarm centers were interviewed. The interviews helped identify a number of problems. For municipalities, the processes of procuring new alarms and managing their organization were found to be complex. The effect of this was that the same social alarm systems had been ordered over and over again without taking into account new user needs or new technical solutions. For alarm users, one large problem was that the alarms had very limited reach and were designed for indoor use only. This has resulted in users hesitating to leave their homes, which in turn has negative effects due to lack of physical activity and fewer social contacts. One important result from the first study was the need for a social alarm solution that worked outdoors. In a second study, needs regarding outdoor social alarms were investigated. The results from this study showed that wearable outdoor alarms must be easy to use, provide communication, and be well designed. Finally, these alarms must work both indoors and outdoors, and the user should not have to worry about where he/she is or who is acting on an alarm. PMID:25099060

  15. Weather Alarm Clock 2.1

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-01-01

    This handy application is fairly self-explanatory: It displays both the weather and tells the time. Now, it does so in a visually pleasing manner, and for that alone it should be praised. It comes with a few customized skins, and users can create alarms which can be accompanied by pop-up messages. Finally, for those who are quite particular about the exact time, the clock feature can be synchronized with various omnipotent atomic clock servers. This version is compatible with computers running Windows 2000, XP, and 2003.

  16. Monitoring of transient central nervous system postirradiation effects by /sup 133/Xe inhalation regional cerebral blood flow measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hylton, P.D.; Reichman, O.H.; Palutsis, R.

    1987-12-01

    The early transient postirradiation effects in the central nervous system are well known; however, no specific means of objective follow-up have been devised. The xenon (/sup 133/Xe) inhalation technique for measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) is easily reproducible. Serial rCBF measurements corresponding to the clinical presentation and course of the early postirradiation syndrome have not been previously reported. It is our belief that the global decline in rCBF identified in these patients represents a generalized metabolic derangement induced by whole brain irradiation rather than primary vascular changes. A distinction between tumor recurrence and the early transient postirradiation effects can be made utilizing this technique. It also provides a reproducible monitor of the clinical and metabolic impact of radiotherapy for brain tumors. A series of seven such patients is presented with appropriate case histories and graphic representations of the serial rCBF measurements.

  17. Use of central venous saturation monitoring in a patient with pediatric cardiac beriberi.

    PubMed

    Majima, Nozomi; Umegaki, Osamu; Soen, Masako

    2013-09-16

    The patient was a 1-year-and-4-mo-old boy. He had drunk about 1 L of an isotonic drink for infants daily since about 10 mo after birth. He was examined by a local doctor due to anorexia and vomiting, found to have cardiomegaly, and transported to our hospital with suspected myocarditis. After admission, the patient showed polypnea, a decreased level of consciousness, and marked metabolic acidosis and lapsed into circulatory insufficiency, requiring catecholamine administration, endotracheal intubation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Initially, low-output heart failure due to acute myocarditis was suspected, but the central venous oxygen saturation was high, at 82%. Considering high-output heart failure to be more likely, we evaluated its cause and noted, by urinary organic acid analysis, increases in lactate, pyruvate, 3-OH-butyrate, acetoacetate, metabolic products of branched-chain amino acids, 2-ketoglutarate, 2-OH-glutarate, 2-keto-adipate, and 2-OH-adipate. Since the vitamin B1 level was reduced to 12 ng/mL (normally 20-50 ng/mL), a diagnosis of cardiac beriberi due to vitamin B1 deficiency was made. When unexplained heart failure is observed in children, cardiac beriberi must be excluded as a differential diagnosis of myocarditis and cardiomyopathy. The measurement of the central venous oxygen saturation may be useful for the diagnosis. PMID:24303502

  18. The 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule megathrust earthquake of Central Chile, monitored by GPS.

    PubMed

    Vigny, C; Socquet, A; Peyrat, S; Ruegg, J-C; Métois, M; Madariaga, R; Morvan, S; Lancieri, M; Lacassin, R; Campos, J; Carrizo, D; Bejar-Pizarro, M; Barrientos, S; Armijo, R; Aranda, C; Valderas-Bermejo, M-C; Ortega, I; Bondoux, F; Baize, S; Lyon-Caen, H; Pavez, A; Vilotte, J P; Bevis, M; Brooks, B; Smalley, R; Parra, H; Baez, J-C; Blanco, M; Cimbaro, S; Kendrick, E

    2011-06-17

    Large earthquakes produce crustal deformation that can be quantified by geodetic measurements, allowing for the determination of the slip distribution on the fault. We used data from Global Positioning System (GPS) networks in Central Chile to infer the static deformation and the kinematics of the 2010 moment magnitude (M(w)) 8.8 Maule megathrust earthquake. From elastic modeling, we found a total rupture length of ~500 kilometers where slip (up to 15 meters) concentrated on two main asperities situated on both sides of the epicenter. We found that rupture reached shallow depths, probably extending up to the trench. Resolvable afterslip occurred in regions of low coseismic slip. The low-frequency hypocenter is relocated 40 kilometers southwest of initial estimates. Rupture propagated bilaterally at about 3.1 kilometers per second, with possible but not fully resolved velocity variations. PMID:21527673

  19. [Monitoring human African trypanosomiasis in Central Africa in 2001 and cartography: results and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Lucas, P; Fanchey, G; Mouton, C; Jannin, J

    2001-01-01

    Cases of human African trypanosomiasis are distributed in changing geographical "outbreak areas" that can be visualized over time and space. Because of these variations in distribution, cartography and spatial analysis provide powerful tools for planning surveillance and control strategies. In 1996, the WHO in collaboration with the 15 most endemic countries in Central Africa undertook a program to develop a standardized inter-regional map of trypanosomiasis. This article provides a brief overview of the value of geomatic tools in public health followed by a description of the WHO program and its preliminary results. Also presented in this article is the Trypinfo site being development on the internet to increase the surveillance response-time and improve the feedback system. PMID:11803827

  20. Calibrating a FDR sensor for soil moisture monitoring in a wetland in Central Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Beate; Becker, Mathias; Diekkrüger, Bernd

    The recent transformation of wetlands into farmland in East Africa is accelerating due to growing food-demand, land shortages, and an increasing unpredictability of climatic conditions for crop production in uplands. However, the conversion of pristine wetlands into sites of production may alter hydrological attributes with negative effects on production potential. Particularly the amount and the dynamics of plant available soil moisture in the rooting zone of crops determine to a large extent the agricultural production potential of wetlands. Various methods exist to assess soil moisture dynamics with Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) being among the most prominent. However, the suitability of FDR sensors for assessing plant available soil moisture has to date not been confirmed for wetland soils in the region. We monitored the seasonal and spatial dynamics of water availability for crop growth in an inland valley wetland of the Kenyan highlands using a FDR sensor which was site-specifically calibrated. Access tubes were installed within different wetland use types and hydrological situations along valley transects and soil properties affecting soil moisture (organic C, texture, and bulk density) were investigated. There was little variation in soil attributes between physical positions in the valley, and also between topsoil and subsoil attributes with the exception of organic C contents. With a root mean squared error of 0.073 m3/m3, the developed calibration function of the FDR sensor allows for reasonably accurate soil moisture prediction for both within-site comparisons and the monitoring of temporal soil moisture variations. Applying the calibration equation to a time series of profile probe readings over a period of one year illustrated not only the temporal variation of soil moisture, but also effects of land use.

  1. Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test for the Hanford Central Plateau: Interim Post-Desiccation Monitoring Results, Fiscal Year 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Johnson, Christian D.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Chronister, Glen B.

    2014-09-01

    Over decades of operation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have released nearly 2 trillion L (450 billion gal.) of liquid into the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Much of this discharge of liquid waste into the vadose zone occurred in the Central Plateau, a 200 km2 (75 mi2) area that includes approximately 800 waste sites. Some of the inorganic and radionuclide contaminants in the deep vadose zone at the Hanford Site are at depths below the limit of direct exposure pathways, but may need to be remediated to protect groundwater. The Tri-Party Agencies (DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology) established Milestone M 015 50, which directed DOE to submit a treatability test plan for remediation of technetium-99 (Tc-99) and uranium in the deep vadose zone. These contaminants are mobile in the subsurface environment and have been detected at high concentrations deep in the vadose zone, and at some locations have reached groundwater. Testing technologies for remediating Tc-99 and uranium will also provide information relevant for remediating other contaminants in the vadose zone. A field test of desiccation is being conducted as an element of the DOE test plan published in March 2008 to meet Milestone M 015 50. The active desiccation portion of the test has been completed. Monitoring data have been collected at the field test site during the post-desiccation period and are reported herein. This is an interim data summary report that includes about 3 years of post-desiccation monitoring data. The DOE field test plan proscribes a total of 5 years of post-desiccation monitoring.

  2. Structural Damage Alarm Utilizing Modified Back-Propagation Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiaoma

    Damage alarm is an important step among structure damage identification. Its objective is to evaluate the structure health. The existing damage alarm methods are mostly based on Back-Propagation Neural Networks without thinking over testing noise. Therefore, in order to avoid the disadvantages of conventional Back-Propagation Neural Networks, a modified Back-Propagation Neural Networks was proposed for structure damage alarm system in this paper. The experiment results of steel truss girder bridge show that the improved method is better than BPNN for structural damage alarm.

  3. Functional Alarms for Systems of Interoperable Medical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Venkatasubramanian, Krishna K.; Vasserman, Eugene Y.; Sokolsky, Oleg; Lee, Insup

    2014-01-01

    Alarms are essential for medical systems in order to ensure patient safety during deteriorating clinical situations and inevitable device malfunction. As medical devices are connected together to become interoperable, alarms become crucial part in making them high-assurance, in nature. Traditional alarm systems for interoperable medical devices have been patientcentric. In this paper, we introduce the need for an alarm system that focuses on the correct functionality of the interoperability architecture itself, along with several considerations and design challenges in enabling them. PMID:25404867

  4. Early warning, warning or alarm systems for natural hazards? A generic classification.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sättele, Martina; Bründl, Michael; Straub, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Early warning, warning and alarm systems have gained popularity in recent years as cost-efficient measures for dangerous natural hazard processes such as floods, storms, rock and snow avalanches, debris flows, rock and ice falls, landslides, flash floods, glacier lake outburst floods, forest fires and even earthquakes. These systems can generate information before an event causes loss of property and life. In this way, they mainly mitigate the overall risk by reducing the presence probability of endangered objects. These systems are typically prototypes tailored to specific project needs. Despite their importance there is no recognised system classification. This contribution classifies warning and alarm systems into three classes: i) threshold systems, ii) expert systems and iii) model-based expert systems. The result is a generic classification, which takes the characteristics of the natural hazard process itself and the related monitoring possibilities into account. The choice of the monitoring parameters directly determines the system's lead time. The classification of 52 active systems moreover revealed typical system characteristics for each system class. i) Threshold systems monitor dynamic process parameters of ongoing events (e.g. water level of a debris flow) and incorporate minor lead times. They have a local geographical coverage and a predefined threshold determines if an alarm is automatically activated to warn endangered objects, authorities and system operators. ii) Expert systems monitor direct changes in the variable disposition (e.g crack opening before a rock avalanche) or trigger events (e.g. heavy rain) at a local scale before the main event starts and thus offer extended lead times. The final alarm decision incorporates human, model and organisational related factors. iii) Model-based expert systems monitor indirect changes in the variable disposition (e.g. snow temperature, height or solar radiation that influence the occurrence probability of snow avalanches) or trigger events (e.g. heavy snow fall) to predict spontaneous hazard events in advance. They encompass regional or national measuring networks and satisfy additional demands such as the standardisation of the measuring stations. The developed classification and the characteristics, which were revealed for each class, yield a valuable input to quantifying the reliability of warning and alarm systems. Importantly, this will facilitate to compare them with well-established standard mitigation measures such as dams, nets and galleries within an integrated risk management approach.

  5. Monitoring

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

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  6. Monitoring of the Central Region of the Globular Cluster M15 = NGC 7078: New Variable Stars

    E-print Network

    Alexander P. Zheleznyak; Valery V. Kravtsov

    2003-10-14

    We obtained a series of more than two hundred R-band CCD images for the crowded central (115"x77") region of the metal-poor globular cluster M15 with an angular resolution of 0.5"-0.9" in most images. Optimal image subtraction was used to identify variable stars. Brightness variations were found in 83 stars, 55 of which were identified with known cluster variables and the remaining 28 are candidates for new variables. Two of them are most likely SX Phe variables. The variability type of two more stars is incertain. The remaining stars were tentatively classified as RR Lyrae variables. A preliminary analysis of published data and our results shows that the characteristics of RR Lyrae variables in the densest part (rstars shifts toward shorter periods; i.e., there is an increase in the fraction of stars pulsating with periods stars with 0.35d-0.40d. The ratio of the number of these short-period RR Lyrae variables to the number of fundamental-tone (RR0) pulsating variables changes appreciably. We found and corrected the error of transforming the coordinates of variables V128-155 in M15 to the coordinate system used in the catalog of variable stars in globular clusters.

  7. Acid rain monitoring in East-Central Florida from 1977 to present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, B. C.; Kheoh, T.; Hinkle, C. R.; Dreschel, T. W.

    1990-01-01

    Rainfall has been collected on the University of Central Florida campus and at the Kennedy Space Center over a 12 year period. The chemical composition has been determined and summarized by monthly, annual periods, and for the entire 12 year period at both locations. The weighted average pH at each site is 4.58; however, annual weighted average pH has been equal to or above the 12 year average during six of the past eight years. Nitrate concentrations have increased slightly during recent years while excess sulfate concentrations have remained below the 12 year weighted average during six of the past seven years. Stepwise regression suggests that sulfate, nitrate, ammonium ion and calcium play major roles in the description of rainwater acidity. Annual acid deposition and annual rainfall have varied from 20 to 50 meg/(m(exp 2) year) and 100 to 180 cm/year, respectively. Sea salt comprises at least 25 percent of the total ionic composition.

  8. Criticality Accident Alarm System Modeling with SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL] [ORNL; Petrie Jr, Lester M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Criticality accident alarm systems (CAAS) can be difficult to analyze since they consist of both criticality calculations and deep-penetration radiation transport calculations. Radiation transport codes are typically optimized for one of those two aspects but not both. A three-dimensional CAAS modeling capability within SCALE 6 has been created by linking the KENO-VI criticality code to the MAVRIC shielding sequence. KENO-VI has been optimized for criticality calculations and used for over 20 years. MAVRIC is a new sequence in SCALE 6 designed for radiation transport in deep-penetration problems. MAVRIC contains features such as automated variance reduction and mesh tally capabilities, which are quite useful in CAAS modeling.

  9. Research and application of highway tunnel fire alarm system based on fiber Bragg grating sensor technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ciming Zhou; Liuyong Chen; Desheng Jiang; Jun He; Shaoyun Zhang

    2007-01-01

    A new fire alarm system based on FBG sensor has been investigated to determine its potential in fire alarm applications for highway tunnel. The system has been experimentally tested and some of its application are reported. The results show that the new fire alarm system is capable of fixed temperature alarm and rate-of-rise alarm promptly; the fire place can easily

  10. Visual display and alarm system for wind tunnel static and dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanly, Richard D.; Fogarty, James T.

    1987-01-01

    A wind tunnel balance monitor and alarm system developed at NASA Ames Research Center will produce several beneficial results. The costs of wind tunnel delays because of inadvertent balance damage and the costs of balance repair or replacement can be greatly reduced or eliminated with better real-time information on the balance static and dynamic loading. The wind tunnel itself will have enhanced utility with the elimination of overly cautious limits on test conditions. The microprocessor-based system features automatic scaling and 16 multicolored LED bargraphs to indicate both static and dynamic components of the signals from eight individual channels. Five individually programmable alarm levels are available with relay closures for internal or external visual and audible warning devices and other functions such as automatic activation of external recording devices, model positioning mechanisms, or tunnel shutdown.

  11. Visual display and alarm system for wind tunnel static and dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanly, Richard D.; Fogarty, James T.

    1987-01-01

    A wind tunnel balance monitor and alarm system developed at NASA Ames Research Center will produce several beneficial results. The costs of wind tunnel delays because of inadvertent balance damage and the costs of balance repair or replacement can be greatly reduced or eliminated with better real-time information on the balance static and dynamic loading. The wind tunnel itself will have enhanced utility with the elimination of overly cautious limits on test conditions. The microprocessor-based system features automatic scaling and 16 multicolored LED bargraphs to indicate both static and dynamic components of the signals from eight individual channels. Five individually programmable alarm levels are available with relay closures for internal or external visual and audible warning devices and other functions such as automatic activation of external recording devices, model positioning mechanism, or tunnel shutdown.

  12. 33 CFR 401.17 - Pitch indicators and alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pitch indicators and alarms. 401.17 Section 401...Condition of Vessels § 401.17 Pitch indicators and alarms. Every vessel of 1600...be equipped with— (a) A pitch indicator in the wheelhouse and the engine...

  13. 33 CFR 157.440 - Autopilot alarm or indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Autopilot alarm or indicator. 157.440 Section 157.440 Navigation and Navigable...Carrying Petroleum Oils § 157.440 Autopilot alarm or indicator. (a) A tankship owner or operator shall ensure...

  14. Successful use of the nocturnal urine alarm for diurnal enuresis.

    PubMed Central

    Friman, P C; Vollmer, D

    1995-01-01

    We report the effects of using a urine alarm, typically employed for nocturnal enuresis, to treat chronic diurnal enuresis in a 15-year-old female resident at Boys' Town. The results of an ABAB reversal design indicate that the alarm eliminated wetting in both treatment phases and that continence was maintained at 3- and 6-month follow-up. PMID:7706154

  15. Reliability and the adaptive utility of discrimination among alarm callers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel T. Blumstein; Laure Verneyre; Janice C. Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Unlike individually distinctive contact calls, or calls that aid in the recognition of young by their parents, the function or functions of individually distinctive alarm calls is less obvious. We conducted three experiments to study the importance of caller reliability in explaining individual-discriminative abilities in the alarm calls of yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris). In our first two experiments, we found

  16. Points & Deviations A pattern language for fire alarm systems

    E-print Network

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    Page 1 Points & Deviations ­ A pattern language for fire alarm systems Peter Molin and Lennart the architecture embedded in the framework. The result of this effort was a small pattern language which. Keywords : object­oriented framework, design pattern, pattern language, fire alarm system. 1 Introduction

  17. Collection and evaluation of false alarm signatures in background data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sanjeev Agarwal; Shivakar Vulli; Neil J. Malloy; Elizabeth M. Lord; Josh R. Fairley; Bruce M. Sabol; Wesley Johnson; Richard Ess; Anh H. Trang

    2009-01-01

    A significant amount of background airborne data was collected as part of May 2005 tests for airborne minefield detection at an arid site. The locations of false alarms which occurred consistently during different runs, were identified and geo-referenced by MultiSensor Science LLC. Ground truth information, which included pictures, type qualifiers and some hyperspectral data for these identified false alarm locations,

  18. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory long-range alarm system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. DesJardin; J. Machanik

    1980-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) Long-Range Alarm System is described. The last few years have brought significant changes in the Department of Energy regulations for protection of classified documents and special nuclear material. These changes in regulations have forced a complete redesign of the LASL security alarm system. LASL covers many square miles of varying terrain and consists of

  19. Research on the fire alarming system of fiber grating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yaobin Qi

    2007-01-01

    The application of fiber grating sensing technology in fire alarming based on temperature detection has the advantages of high accuracy, high reliability and strong immunity from electronic and magnetic fields. It is especially advantageous to use this system in the petroleum and chemistry industry because it can provide an extraordinary safe means for the fire alarm. But due to the

  20. Fire alarm system based-on video processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Tjokorda Agung Budi; Iping Supriana Suwardi

    2011-01-01

    Fire is one of the disasters that often occur in everyday life and causing losses both in terms of material and non-material. There has been much research done to build a field alarm system. One way to build a fire alarm system is base on fire detection on video data; this is done with digital image processing techniques and machine-

  1. University of Houston Fire Alarm Installation / Revision Permit

    E-print Network

    Azevedo, Ricardo

    to be done: Will Fire Alarm System be shut down? Yes No If yes, what is the name of the Fire Watch? FireUniversity of Houston Fire Alarm Installation / Revision Permit All FMO Permits Must Be Submitted end? Weekend Work: Yes No If yes, what days? Have Certified Plans been submitted to UH Fire Marshal

  2. Evaluating Injury Prevention Programs: The Oklahoma City Smoke Alarm Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallonee, Sue

    2000-01-01

    Illustrates how evaluating the Oklahoma City Smoke Alarm Project increased its success in reducing residential fire-related injuries and deaths. The program distributed and tested smoke alarms in residential dwellings and offered educational materials on fire prevention and safety. Evaluation provided sound data on program processes and outcomes,…

  3. 1. Photographic copy of fire alarm plan for Control and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photographic copy of fire alarm plan for Control and Recording Center Building 4221/E-22, showing layout of rooms. California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Plant Engineering 'Edwards Test Station, Fire Alarm Plan, Bldg. E-22,' drawing no. EFA/11-1, December 15, 1961. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Control & Recording Center, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. Advanced fire detection using multi-signature alarm algorithms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel T. Gottuk; Michelle J. Peatross; Richard J. Roby; Craig L. Beyler

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the feasibility of reducing false alarms while increasing sensitivity through the use of combined conventional smoke detectors with carbon monoxide (CO) sensors. This was accomplished through an experimental program using both real (fire) and nuisance alarm sources. A broad selection of sources was used ranging from smoldering wood and flaming fabric to

  5. Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-11-23

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  6. Smart alarms from medical devices in the OR and ICU.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Michael; Kuhls, Silvia; Gather, Ursula; Fried, Roland

    2009-03-01

    Alarms in medical devices are a matter of concern in critical and perioperative care. The high rate of false alarms is not only a nuisance for patients and caregivers, but can also compromise patient safety and effectiveness of care. The development of alarm systems has lagged behind the technological advances of medical devices over the last 20 years. From a clinical perspective, major improvements in alarm algorithms are urgently needed. This review gives an overview of the current clinical situation and the underlying problems, and discusses different methods from statistics and computational science and their potential for clinical application. Some examples of the application of new alarm algorithms to clinical data are presented. PMID:19449615

  7. Integrating monitoring networks to obtain estimates of ground-level ozone concentrations --a proof of concept in Tuscany (central Italy).

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Marco; Andrei, Sara; Caldini, Gabriella; Grechi, Daniele; Mazzali, Cristina; Galanti, Emilio; Pellegrini, Marco

    2008-06-25

    Prior to 2000 a network of conventional ozone (O3) analysers existed in the Province of Firenze (Tuscany, central Italy). Between 2000 and 2004 the network was extended to incorporate a newly designed bioindicator network of tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum Bel W3). The objective was to set-up an integrated monitoring system to obtain estimates of ground-level O3 concentrations over the whole study area (3513 km2) in order to fill data gaps and cover reporting requirements. The existing conventional monitors were purposefully located mainly in urban areas. A total of 45 biomonitoring sites were selected using a systematic design to cover the target area. Two to five additional biomonitoring sites were co-located with conventional O3 analysers for calibration purposes, and five more sites for independent validation of modelled O3 concentrations. Visible Leaf Injury Index (LII) on the tobacco plants was significantly correlated (P: 0.018/0.0014) with a series of O3 exposure variables (mean of weekly 1-hour maxima, M1; mean of 7-hour means, M7; 24-hour mean, M24; and weekly AOT40). LII was found to be a significant predictor of weekly means of the O3 exposure variables with a standard error of estimates between 13.6 and 24.3 microg m(-3) (absolute values). LII was mapped with an ad-hoc spatial model over the study area at a 22 km grid resolution, and mapped values were used to predict O3 concentrations by means of a first order linear model. Results showed that high estimates of O3 (up to 188 microg m(-3) as mean of weekly maxima, M1) occurred more frequently in hilly and mountainous areas, with a spatial pattern changing on an annual basis. Predicted O3 concentrations were not significantly different from the measured concentrations (P: 0.34), although marked differences were observed for individual sites and years. The study provided evidence that integration of monitoring networks using different methods can be a viable option to obtain estimates of O3 concentrations over large areas. PMID:18377957

  8. 46 CFR 154.1330 - Liquid level alarm system: Independent tank type C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Liquid level alarm system: Independent tank...DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED...and Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1330 Liquid level alarm system: Independent tank...liquid level alarm system under §...

  9. 46 CFR 154.1325 - Liquid level alarm system: All cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Liquid level alarm system: All cargo tanks...DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED...and Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1325 Liquid level alarm system: All cargo tanks...liquid level alarm system that:...

  10. 46 CFR 154.1330 - Liquid level alarm system: Independent tank type C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Liquid level alarm system: Independent tank...DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED...and Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1330 Liquid level alarm system: Independent tank...liquid level alarm system under §...

  11. 46 CFR 154.1330 - Liquid level alarm system: Independent tank type C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Liquid level alarm system: Independent tank...DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED...and Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1330 Liquid level alarm system: Independent tank...liquid level alarm system under §...

  12. 46 CFR 154.1325 - Liquid level alarm system: All cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Liquid level alarm system: All cargo tanks...DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED...and Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1325 Liquid level alarm system: All cargo tanks...liquid level alarm system that:...

  13. 46 CFR 154.1325 - Liquid level alarm system: All cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Liquid level alarm system: All cargo tanks...DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED...and Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1325 Liquid level alarm system: All cargo tanks...liquid level alarm system that:...

  14. 46 CFR 154.1330 - Liquid level alarm system: Independent tank type C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Liquid level alarm system: Independent tank...DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED...and Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1330 Liquid level alarm system: Independent tank...liquid level alarm system under §...

  15. 46 CFR 154.1325 - Liquid level alarm system: All cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Liquid level alarm system: All cargo tanks...DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED...and Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1325 Liquid level alarm system: All cargo tanks...liquid level alarm system that:...

  16. 46 CFR 154.1330 - Liquid level alarm system: Independent tank type C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Liquid level alarm system: Independent tank...DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED...and Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1330 Liquid level alarm system: Independent tank...liquid level alarm system under §...

  17. 46 CFR 154.1325 - Liquid level alarm system: All cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Liquid level alarm system: All cargo tanks...DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED...and Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1325 Liquid level alarm system: All cargo tanks...liquid level alarm system that:...

  18. 46 CFR 108.627 - Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. 108.627...Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.627 Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. Each carbon dioxide alarm must be identified by...

  19. 47 CFR 80.221 - Special requirements for automatically generating the radiotelephone alarm signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...generating the radiotelephone alarm signal. 80.221 Section 80.221 ...generating the radiotelephone alarm signal. (a) Each device for automatically generating the radiotelephone alarm signal must be capable of being...

  20. 47 CFR 80.221 - Special requirements for automatically generating the radiotelephone alarm signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...generating the radiotelephone alarm signal. 80.221 Section 80.221 ...generating the radiotelephone alarm signal. (a) Each device for automatically generating the radiotelephone alarm signal must be capable of being...

  1. 33 CFR 149.414 - What are the requirements for a fire detection and alarm system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...the requirements for a fire detection and alarm system? 149.414 Section...the requirements for a fire detection and alarm system? (a) All accommodation...must have an automatic fire detection and alarm system that: (1)...

  2. 33 CFR 149.414 - What are the requirements for a fire detection and alarm system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...the requirements for a fire detection and alarm system? 149.414 Section...the requirements for a fire detection and alarm system? (a) All accommodation...must have an automatic fire detection and alarm system that: (1)...

  3. 33 CFR 149.414 - What are the requirements for a fire detection and alarm system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...the requirements for a fire detection and alarm system? 149.414 Section...the requirements for a fire detection and alarm system? (a) All accommodation...must have an automatic fire detection and alarm system that: (1)...

  4. 33 CFR 149.414 - What are the requirements for a fire detection and alarm system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...the requirements for a fire detection and alarm system? 149.414 Section...the requirements for a fire detection and alarm system? (a) All accommodation...must have an automatic fire detection and alarm system that: (1)...

  5. 33 CFR 149.414 - What are the requirements for a fire detection and alarm system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...the requirements for a fire detection and alarm system? 149.414 Section...the requirements for a fire detection and alarm system? (a) All accommodation...must have an automatic fire detection and alarm system that: (1)...

  6. 46 CFR 108.627 - Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. 108.627 ...Markings and Instructions § 108.627 Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. Each carbon dioxide alarm must be identified by...

  7. 46 CFR 76.35-10 - Location and spacing of manual alarm boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Location and spacing of manual alarm boxes. 76.35-10 Section...CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Manual Alarm System, Details § 76.35-10 Location and spacing of manual alarm boxes. (a) There...

  8. 46 CFR 169.732 - Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...dioxide and clean agent alarms. 169.732 ...Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment...and clean agent alarms. (a) Each...dioxide or clean agent fire extinguishing alarm must be conspicuously...by carbon dioxide systems, or any...

  9. 46 CFR 76.35-10 - Location and spacing of manual alarm boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Location and spacing of manual alarm boxes. 76.35-10 Section...CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Manual Alarm System, Details § 76.35-10 Location and spacing of manual alarm boxes. (a) There...

  10. 46 CFR 193.05-1 - Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised patrol systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised patrol systems. 193.05-1... § 193.05-1 Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised patrol systems. (a) Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised...

  11. 46 CFR 76.35-10 - Location and spacing of manual alarm boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Location and spacing of manual alarm boxes. 76.35-10 Section...CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Manual Alarm System, Details § 76.35-10 Location and spacing of manual alarm boxes. (a) There...

  12. 46 CFR 193.05-1 - Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised patrol systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised patrol systems. 193.05-1... § 193.05-1 Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised patrol systems. (a) Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised...

  13. 46 CFR 193.05-1 - Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised patrol systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised patrol systems. 193.05-1... § 193.05-1 Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised patrol systems. (a) Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised...

  14. 46 CFR 193.05-1 - Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised patrol systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised patrol systems. 193.05-1... § 193.05-1 Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised patrol systems. (a) Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised...

  15. 46 CFR 76.35-10 - Location and spacing of manual alarm boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Location and spacing of manual alarm boxes. 76.35-10 Section...CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Manual Alarm System, Details § 76.35-10 Location and spacing of manual alarm boxes. (a) There...

  16. 46 CFR 169.732 - Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...dioxide and clean agent alarms. 169.732 ...Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment...and clean agent alarms. (a) Each...dioxide or clean agent fire extinguishing alarm must be conspicuously...by carbon dioxide systems, or any...

  17. The application of multi-sensor weighted measurement fusion filter in fire alarm system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiujinag Lv; Yunfeng Shi; Lina Han; Shangfeng Huang

    2010-01-01

    This paper put forward the theory of weighted measurement fusion filter is used in fire alarm, fuse the alarm of multiple sensors filter signal, get an accurate early warning signals in fire alarm, and improve police efficiency.

  18. 46 CFR 76.35-10 - Location and spacing of manual alarm boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Location and spacing of manual alarm boxes. 76.35-10 Section...CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Manual Alarm System, Details § 76.35-10 Location and spacing of manual alarm boxes. (a) There...

  19. 46 CFR 169.732 - Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...dioxide and clean agent alarms. 169.732 ...Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment...and clean agent alarms. (a) Each...dioxide or clean agent fire extinguishing alarm must be conspicuously...by carbon dioxide systems, or any...

  20. 46 CFR 193.05-1 - Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised patrol systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised patrol systems. 193.05-1... § 193.05-1 Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised patrol systems. (a) Fire detecting, manual alarm, and supervised...

  1. Prairie dog alarm calls encode labels about predator colors.

    PubMed

    Slobodchikoff, C N; Paseka, Andrea; Verdolin, Jennifer L

    2009-05-01

    Some animals have the cognitive capacity to differentiate between different species of predators and generate different alarm calls in response. However, the presence of any addition information that might be encoded into alarm calls has been largely unexplored. In the present study, three similar-sized human females walked through a Gunnison's prairie dog (Cynomys gunnisoni) colony wearing each of three different-colored shirts: blue, green, and yellow. We recorded the alarm calls and used discriminant function analysis to assess whether the calls for the different-colored shirts were significantly different. The results showed that the alarm calls for the blue and the yellow shirts were significantly different, but the green shirt calls were not significantly different from the calls for the yellow shirt. The colors that were detected, with corresponding encoding into alarm calls, reflect the visual perceptual abilities of the prairie dogs. This study suggests that prairie dogs are able to incorporate labels about the individual characteristics of predators into their alarm calls, and that the complexity of information contained in animal alarm calls may be greater than has been previously believed. PMID:19116730

  2. Collection and evaluation of false alarm signatures in background data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sanjeev; Vulli, Shivakar; Malloy, Neil J.; Lord, Elizabeth M.; Fairley, Josh R.; Sabol, Bruce M.; Johnson, Wesley; Ess, Richard; Trang, Anh H.

    2009-05-01

    A significant amount of background airborne data was collected as part of May 2005 tests for airborne minefield detection at an arid site. The locations of false alarms which occurred consistently during different runs, were identified and geo-referenced by MultiSensor Science LLC. Ground truth information, which included pictures, type qualifiers and some hyperspectral data for these identified false alarm locations, was surveyed by ERDC-WES. This collection of background data, and subsequent survey of the false alarm locations, is unique in that it is likely the first such airborne data collection with ground truthed and documented false alarm locations. A library of signatures for different sources of these false alarms was extracted in the form of image chips and organized into a self-contained database by Missouri S&T. The library contains target chips from airborne mid wave infrared (MWIR) and multispectral imaging (MSI) sensors, representing data for different days, different times of day and different altitudes. Target chips for different surface mines were also added to the database. This database of the target signatures is expected to facilitate evaluation of spectral and shape characteristics of the false alarms, to achieve better false alarm mitigation and improve mine and minefield detection for airborne applications. The aim of this paper is to review and summarize the data collection procedure used, present the currently available database of target chips and make some recommendations regarding future data collections.

  3. Computational Human Performance Modeling For Alarm System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques Hugo

    2012-07-01

    The introduction of new technologies like adaptive automation systems and advanced alarms processing and presentation techniques in nuclear power plants is already having an impact on the safety and effectiveness of plant operations and also the role of the control room operator. This impact is expected to escalate dramatically as more and more nuclear power utilities embark on upgrade projects in order to extend the lifetime of their plants. One of the most visible impacts in control rooms will be the need to replace aging alarm systems. Because most of these alarm systems use obsolete technologies, the methods, techniques and tools that were used to design the previous generation of alarm system designs are no longer effective and need to be updated. The same applies to the need to analyze and redefine operators’ alarm handling tasks. In the past, methods for analyzing human tasks and workload have relied on crude, paper-based methods that often lacked traceability. New approaches are needed to allow analysts to model and represent the new concepts of alarm operation and human-system interaction. State-of-the-art task simulation tools are now available that offer a cost-effective and efficient method for examining the effect of operator performance in different conditions and operational scenarios. A discrete event simulation system was used by human factors researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop a generic alarm handling model to examine the effect of operator performance with simulated modern alarm system. It allowed analysts to evaluate alarm generation patterns as well as critical task times and human workload predicted by the system.

  4. Integrated nuclear radiation detector and monitor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. L. Biehl; S. I. Lieberman

    1982-01-01

    A battery powered device which can continuously monitor and detect nuclear radiation utilizing fully integrated circuitry and which is provided with an alarm which alerts persons when the radiation level exceeds a predetermined threshold.

  5. Evaluation of voltage-sensitive fluorescence dyes for monitoring neuronal activity in the embryonic central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Mullah, Saad Habib-E-Rasul; Komuro, Ryo; Yan, Ping; Hayashi, Shihori; Inaji, Motoki; Momose-Sato, Yoko; Loew, Leslie M.; Sato, Katsushige

    2014-01-01

    Using an optical imaging technique with voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs), we have been investigating the functional organization and architecture of the central nervous system (CNS) during embryogenesis. In the embryonic nervous system, a merocyanine-rhodanine dye, NK2761, has proved to be the most useful absorption dye for detecting neuronal activity because of its high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), low toxicity, and small dye bleaching. In the present study, we evaluated the suitability of voltage-sensitive fluorescence dyes for optical recording in the embryonic CNS. We screened eight styryl (hemicyanine) dyes in isolated brainstem-spinal cord preparations from 7-day old chick embryos. Measurements of voltage-related optical signals were made using a multiple-site optical recording system. The signal size, S/N, photobleaching, effects of perfusion, and recovery of neural responses after staining were compared. We also evaluated optical responses with various magnifications. Although the S/N was lower than with the absorption dye, clear optical responses were detected with several fluorescence dyes, including di-2-ANEPEQ, di-4-ANEPPS, di-3-ANEPPDHQ, di-4-AN(F)EPPTEA, di-2-AN(F)EPPTEA, and di-2-ANEPPTEA. Di-2-ANEPEQ showed the largest S/N, whereas its photobleaching was faster and the recovery of neural responses after staining was slower. Di-4-ANEPPS and di-3-ANEPPDHQ also exhibited a large S/N, but required a relatively long time for recovery of neural activity. Di-4-AN(F)EPPTEA, di-2-AN(F)EPPTEA, and di-2-ANEPPTEA showed smaller S/Ns than di-2-ANEPEQ, di-4-ANEPPS, and di-3-ANEPPDHQ, but the recovery of neural responses after staining was faster. This study demonstrates the potential utility of these styryl dyes in optical monitoring of voltage changes in the embryonic CNS. PMID:23975337

  6. 46 CFR 28.250 - High water alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    Requirements for Documented Vessels That Operate Beyond the Boundary Lines or With More Than 16 Individuals On Board, or for Fish Tender Vessels Engaged in the Aleutian Trade § 28.250 High water alarms. On a vessel 36 feet...

  7. 46 CFR 28.250 - High water alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    Requirements for Documented Vessels That Operate Beyond the Boundary Lines or With More Than 16 Individuals On Board, or for Fish Tender Vessels Engaged in the Aleutian Trade § 28.250 High water alarms. On a vessel 36 feet...

  8. 46 CFR 111.33-7 - Alarms and shutdowns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...111.33-7 Section 111.33-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Semiconductor Rectifier Systems § 111.33-7 Alarms...

  9. Measurement of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant criticality accident alarm

    SciTech Connect

    Tayloe, R.W. Jr. (Battelle Columbus (USA)); McGinnis, B. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (USA))

    1990-08-31

    Measurements of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant's nuclear criticality accident radiation alarm signal response time, sound wave frequency, and sound volume levels were made to demonstrate compliance with ANSI/ANS-8.3-1986. A steady-state alarm signal is produced within one-half second of obtaining a two-out-of-three detector trip. The fundamental alarm sound wave frequency is 440 hertz. The sound volume levels are greater than 10 decibels above background and ranged from 100 to 125 A-weighted decibels. The requirements of the standard were met; however the recommended maximum sound volume level of 115 dBA was exceeded. Emergency procedures require immediate evacuation upon initiation of a facility's radiation alarm. Comparison with standards for allowable time of exposure at different noise levels indicate that the elevated noise level at this location does not represent an occupational injury hazard. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  10. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF OLD, PUNCHTYPE MASTER FIRE ALARM SYSTEM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF OLD, PUNCH-TYPE MASTER FIRE ALARM SYSTEM, LOCATED ON S WALL OF ENGINE STORAGE ROOM; LOOKING S. (Ceronie and Ryan) - Watervliet Arsenal, Building No. 22, Westervelt Avenue & Buffington Street, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  11. False alarm mitigation techniques for hyperspectral target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieper, M. L.; Manolakis, D.; Truslow, E.; Cooley, T.; Brueggeman, M.

    2013-05-01

    A challenging problem of major importance in hyperspectral imaging applications is the detection of subpixel objects of military and civilian interest. High false alarm thresholds are required to detect subpixel objects due to the large amount of surrounding background clutter. These high false alarm rates are unacceptable for military purposes, requiring the need for false alarm mitigation (FAM) techniques to weed out the objects of interest. The objective of this paper is to provide a comparison of the implementation of these FAM techniques and their inherent benefits in the whitened detection space. The widely utilized matched filter (MF) and adaptive cosine estimator (ACE) are both based on a linear mixing model (LMM) between a background and object class. The matched filter approximates the object abundance, and the ACE measures the model error. Each of these measurements provides inadequate object separation alone, but by using both the object abundance and model error, the objects can be separated from the false alarms.

  12. 46 CFR 108.445 - Alarm and means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.445 Alarm and means of escape. (a) Each CO2 system that has a supply of...

  13. 46 CFR 108.445 - Alarm and means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.445 Alarm and means of escape. (a) Each CO2 system that has a supply of...

  14. 46 CFR 108.445 - Alarm and means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.445 Alarm and means of escape. (a) Each CO2 system that has a supply of...

  15. 18. DETAIL VIEW OF FIRE ALARM SYSTEM BOARD THAT LISTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL VIEW OF FIRE ALARM SYSTEM BOARD THAT LISTS AREAS IN SHOPS COMPLEX. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Shops, South side of Pratt Street between Carey & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  16. 46 CFR 108.445 - Alarm and means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.445 Alarm and means of escape. (a) Each CO2 system that has a supply of...

  17. 46 CFR 108.445 - Alarm and means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.445 Alarm and means of escape. (a) Each CO2 system that has a supply of...

  18. Research on the fire alarming system of fiber grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yaobin

    2007-09-01

    The application of fiber grating sensing technology in fire alarming based on temperature detection has the advantages of high accuracy, high reliability and strong immunity from electronic and magnetic fields. It is especially advantageous to use this system in the petroleum and chemistry industry because it can provide an extraordinary safe means for the fire alarm. But due to the traditional optical Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) technology is limited by the optic source bandwidth, the number of its multiplexing points is few. In this paper WDM technology will be developed mixing with Identified Bragg, which is called Identified and Wavelength Multiplexing, to build the Fiber Grating (FBG) fire alarm system integrated with computers. Some technologies applied in fire alarming system of fiber grating such as the transmission of test signals which pass through modulate and demodulate, the disposal of software system, the output of control signal and the strong ability of anti-disturbance have been studied and discussed.

  19. 124. FIRE ALARM SYSTEM PANEL AT WEST SIDE OF SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    124. FIRE ALARM SYSTEM PANEL AT WEST SIDE OF SOUTH WALL, TRANSFORMER ROOM (112), LSB (BLDG. 770) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  20. 47 CFR 80.317 - Radiotelegraph and radiotelephone alarm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...listening watch on the distress frequency. (b) The international radiotelephone alarm signal consists of two substantially sinusoidal audio frequency tones transmitted alternately. One tone must have a frequency of 2200 Hertz and the other a frequency of...

  1. Nuthatches eavesdrop on variations in heterospecific chickadee mobbing alarm calls.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Christopher N; Greene, Erick

    2007-03-27

    Many animals recognize the alarm calls produced by other species, but the amount of information they glean from these eavesdropped signals is unknown. We previously showed that black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) have a sophisticated alarm call system in which they encode complex information about the size and risk of potential predators in variations of a single type of mobbing alarm call. Here we show experimentally that red-breasted nuthatches (Sitta canadensis) respond appropriately to subtle variations of these heterospecific "chick-a-dee" alarm calls, thereby evidencing that they have gained important information about potential predators in their environment. This study demonstrates a previously unsuspected level of discrimination in intertaxon eavesdropping. PMID:17372225

  2. Nuthatches eavesdrop on variations in heterospecific chickadee mobbing alarm calls

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Christopher N.; Greene, Erick

    2007-01-01

    Many animals recognize the alarm calls produced by other species, but the amount of information they glean from these eavesdropped signals is unknown. We previously showed that black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) have a sophisticated alarm call system in which they encode complex information about the size and risk of potential predators in variations of a single type of mobbing alarm call. Here we show experimentally that red-breasted nuthatches (Sitta canadensis) respond appropriately to subtle variations of these heterospecific “chick-a-dee” alarm calls, thereby evidencing that they have gained important information about potential predators in their environment. This study demonstrates a previously unsuspected level of discrimination in intertaxon eavesdropping. PMID:17372225

  3. The event notification and alarm system for the Open Science Grid operations center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, S.; Teige and, S.; Quick, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Open Science Grid Operations (OSG) Team operates a distributed set of services and tools that enable the utilization of the OSG by several HEP projects. Without these services users of the OSG would not be able to run jobs, locate resources, obtain information about the status of systems or generally use the OSG. For this reason these services must be highly available. This paper describes the automated monitoring and notification systems used to diagnose and report problems. Described here are the means used by OSG Operations to monitor systems such as physical facilities, network operations, server health, service availability and software error events. Once detected, an error condition generates a message sent to, for example, Email, SMS, Twitter, an Instant Message Server, etc. The mechanism being developed to integrate these monitoring systems into a prioritized and configurable alarming system is emphasized.

  4. Onsite Portable Alarm System - Its Merit and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saita, J.; Sato, T.; Nakamura, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Recently an existence of the earthquake early warning system (EEWS) becomes popular. In general, the EEWS will be installed in a fixed observation site and it may consist of several separated components such as a sensing portion, A/D converter, an information processing potion and so on. The processed information for warning may be transmitted to network via fixed communication line, and therefore this kind of alarm system is called as Network Alarm System. On the other hand, after the severe earthquake damage, it is very important to save the disaster victims immediately. These rescue staffs are also under the risk of aftershocks and need a local alarm not depending on the network, so this kind of alarm can be called as Onsite Alarm. But the common early warning system is too complex to set onsite temporary, and even if possible to install, the alarm is too late to receive at the epicentral area. However, the new generation earthquake early warning system FREQL can issue the P wave alarm by minimum 0.2 seconds after P wave detection. And FREQL is characterized as the unique all-in-one seismometer with power unit. At the time of the 2004 Niigata-Ken-Chuetsu earthquake, a land slide attacked a car just passing. A hyper rescue team of Tokyo Fire Department pulled the survivor, one baby, from the land slide area. During their activity the rescue team was exposed to the risk of secondary hazards caused by the aftershocks. It was clear that it is necessary to use a portable warning system to issue the onsite P wave alarm. Because FREQL was originally developed as portable equipment, Tokyo Fire Department asked us to modify it to the portable equipment with the loud sound and the light signal. In this moment, this portable FREQL has equipped in nation wide. When the hyper rescue team of Tokyo Fire Department was sent to Pakistan as a task force for rescue work of the 2005 Pakistan earthquake, the portable FREQL was used as important onsite portable warning system and P wave alarms was actually issued by three times during the rescue work. Although this is one example for the actual application of portable onsite alarm, it is possible to apply the other field as the construction field. In this presentation, Portable Onsite Alarm is discussed from views of its necessity and application.

  5. Burglar and Fire Alarms.: Costs and Benefits to the Locality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon Hakim; George F. Rengert; Yochanan Shachmurove

    1995-01-01

    The alarm industry has been estimated at 8-11 billion dollars in 1993. There are approximately 17 million alarms installed nationwide. The annual growth of installations has been 8 percent over the last five years. At the same time, the number of false activations per system is 1.1 to 1.4 per year, with 20 to 30 percent of police manpower devoted

  6. Hydrologic monitoring of selected streams in coal fields of central and southern Utah - Summary of data collected, August 1978-September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.; Plantz, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    The US Geological Survey conducted a coal-hydrology monitoring program in coal-field areas of central and southern Utah during August 1978-September 1984 to determine possible hydrologic impacts of future mining and to provide a better understanding of the hydrologic systems of the coal resource areas monitored. Data were collected at 19 gaging stations - 18 stations in the Price, San Rafael, and Dirty Devil River basins, and 1 in the Kanab Creek Basin. Types of data collected at each station included quantity and quality of stream-flow; suspended sediment concentrations; and descriptions of stream bottom sediments, benthic invertebrate, and phytoplankton samples. Also, base flow measurements were made annually upstream from 12 of the gaging stations. Stream bottom sediment sampled at nearly all the monitoring sites contained small to moderate quantities of coal, which may be attributed chiefly to pre-monitoring mining. Streamflow sampled at several sites contained large concentrations of sulfate and dissolved solids. Also, concentrations of various trace elements at 10 stations, and phenols at 18 stations, exceeded the criteria of the EPA for drinking water. The data collected during the complete water years (1979-84) of monitoring do provide a better understanding of the hydrologic systems of the coal field areas monitored. The data also provide a definite base by which to evaluate hydrologic impacts of continued or increased coal mining in those areas. 14 refs., 32 figs., 21 tabs.

  7. Sun-glint false alarm mitigation in a maritime scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Alessandro; Riccobono, Aldo; Landini, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    Airborne hyperspectral imaging can be exploited to detect anomalous objects in the maritime scenario. Due to the objects high contrast with respect to the sea surface, detection can be easily accomplished by means of local anomaly detectors, such as the well-known Reed-Xiaoli (RX) algorithm. During the development of a real-time system for the detection of anomalous pixels, it has been noticed that the performance of detection is deeply affected by the presence of sun-glint. The reflection on the sea surface of the solar radiation produces a high density of alarms, that makes challenging the task of detecting the objects of interest. In this paper, it is introduced a strategy aimed at discriminating the sun-glint false alarms from the effective alarms related to targets of potential interest. False alarms due to glint are mitigated performing a local spatio-spectral analysis on each alarm furnished by the anomaly detector. The technique has been tested on hyperspectral images collected during a measurement campaign carried out near Pisa, Italy. The Selex ES SIMGA hyperspectral sensor was mounted on board of an airplane to collect high spectral resolution images in both the VNIR and SWIR spectral channels. Several experiments were carried out, setting up scenarios with small man-made objects deployed on the sea surface, so as to simulate search and rescue operations. The results have highlighted the effectiveness of the proposed solution in terms of mitigation of false alarms due to sun-glints on the maritime scenario.

  8. Do Aphid Colonies Amplify their Emission of Alarm Pheromone?

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Eduardo; Kunert, Grit; Bartram, Stefan; Boland, Wilhelm; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    When aphids are attacked by natural enemies, they emit alarm pheromone to alert conspecifics. For most aphids tested, (E)-?-farnesene (EBF) is the main, or only, constituent of the alarm pheromone. In response to alarm pheromone, alerted aphids drop off the plant, walk away, or attempt to elude predators. However, under natural conditions, EBF concentration might be low due to the low amounts emitted, to rapid air movement, or to oxidative degradation. To ensure that conspecifics are warned, aphids might conceivably amplify the alarm signal by emitting EBF in response to EBF emitted by other aphids. To examine whether such amplification occurs, we synthesized deuterated EBF (DEBF), which allowed us to differentiate between applied and aphid-derived chemical. Colonies of Acyrthosiphon pisum were treated with DEBF, and headspace volatiles were collected and analyzed for evidence of aphid-derived EBF. No aphid-derived EBF was detected, suggesting that amplification of the alarm signal does not occur. We discuss the disadvantages of alarm signal reinforcement. PMID:18704588

  9. Reciprocal recognition of sifaka ( Propithecus verreauxi verreauxi ) and redfronted lemur ( Eulemur fulvus rufus ) alarm calls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claudia Fichtel

    2004-01-01

    Redfronted lemurs ( Eulemur fulvus rufus) and Verreaux's sifakas ( Propithecus verreauxi verreauxi) occur sympatrically in western Madagascar. Both species exhibit a so-called mixed alarm call system with functionally referential alarm calls for raptors and general alarm calls for carnivores and raptors. General alarm calls also occur in other contexts associated with high arousal, such as inter-group encounters. Field playback

  10. A mutual understanding? Interspecific responses by birds to each other's aerial alarm calls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert D. Magrath; Benjamin J. Pitcher; Janet L. Gardner

    2007-01-01

    Individuals are likely to benefit from responding to the alarm signals of other species with similar predators, and mutual interspecific responses to aerial (hawk) alarms are thought to be common in birds, in part because similarity in alarm call structure among species might facilitate detection or interpretation. However, there has been no test of whether interspecific responses to aerial alarm

  11. How Safe Is Our Campus? Does every student's room have a smoke alarm?

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Diane

    by contractors working in buildings. The number of malicious fire alarms is very minimal. The fine system has that are causing false alarms. #12;Is the fire department IMMEDIATLEY notified whenever ANY fire alarm system is activated? Yes, the alarm systems are tied into the Emergency Communications Center and the University Fire

  12. CRT graphic display system of automatic fire alarm system based on GIS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huide Liu; Lili Gao; Suwei Li; Junfu Li

    2010-01-01

    According to the fire alarm system and the problems that the CRT, puts forward the automatic fire alarm system based on GIS graphic display CRT and discusses its implementation process. Firstly introduces the CRT graphic display system, expounds the necessity and feasibility of CRT graphic display system of automatic fire alarm system based on GIS design. Automatic fire alarm system

  13. Intelligent method of reducing BIT's false alarm based on SVM_FCA_HMM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sun Ping; Zhang Wenjin

    2011-01-01

    BIT's false alarm is one of the most important reasons of restricting testability's development. In order to decrease BIT's false alarm and develop BITE's performance, this paper discusses present situation of BIT's false alarm at first, then introduces several advanced models of reducing false alarm which are neural network, support vector machine, fuzzy clustering analysis and hidden Markov model. After

  14. An alarm correlation algorithm for network management based on root cause analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dae Sun Kim; Hiroyuki Shinbo; Hidetoshi Yokota

    2011-01-01

    The alarm correlation is an essential function of network management systems to provide detection, isolation and correlation of unusual operational behaviour of telecommunication network. However, existing alarm correlation approaches still rely on the manual processing, and depend on the knowledge of the network operators. Since, the telecommunication network produces a number of alarms which are so called the alarm floods,

  15. Epidermal 'alarm substance' cells of fishes maintained by non-alarm functions: possible defence against pathogens, parasites and UVB radiation.

    PubMed

    Chivers, Douglas P; Wisenden, Brian D; Hindman, Carrie J; Michalak, Tracy A; Kusch, Robin C; Kaminskyj, Susan G W; Jack, Kristin L; Ferrari, Maud C O; Pollock, Robyn J; Halbgewachs, Colin F; Pollock, Michael S; Alemadi, Shireen; James, Clayton T; Savaloja, Rachel K; Goater, Cameron P; Corwin, Amber; Mirza, Reehan S; Kiesecker, Joseph M; Brown, Grant E; Adrian, James C; Krone, Patrick H; Blaustein, Andrew R; Mathis, Alicia

    2007-10-22

    Many fishes possess specialized epidermal cells that are ruptured by the teeth of predators, thus reliably indicating the presence of an actively foraging predator. Understanding the evolution of these cells has intrigued evolutionary ecologists because the release of these alarm chemicals is not voluntary. Here, we show that predation pressure does not influence alarm cell production in fishes. Alarm cell production is stimulated by exposure to skin-penetrating pathogens (water moulds: Saprolegnia ferax and Saprolegnia parasitica), skin-penetrating parasites (larval trematodes: Teleorchis sp. and Uvulifer sp.) and correlated with exposure to UV radiation. Suppression of the immune system with environmentally relevant levels of Cd inhibits alarm cell production of fishes challenged with Saprolegnia. These data are the first evidence that alarm substance cells have an immune function against ubiquitous environmental challenges to epidermal integrity. Our results indicate that these specialized cells arose and are maintained by natural selection owing to selfish benefits unrelated to predator-prey interactions. Cell contents released when these cells are damaged in predator attacks have secondarily acquired an ecological role as alarm cues because selection favours receivers to detect and respond adaptively to public information about predation. PMID:17686729

  16. Epidermal ‘alarm substance’ cells of fishes maintained by non-alarm functions: possible defence against pathogens, parasites and UVB radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chivers, Douglas P; Wisenden, Brian D; Hindman, Carrie J; Michalak, Tracy A; Kusch, Robin C; Kaminskyj, Susan G.W; Jack, Kristin L; Ferrari, Maud C.O; Pollock, Robyn J; Halbgewachs, Colin F; Pollock, Michael S; Alemadi, Shireen; James, Clayton T; Savaloja, Rachel K; Goater, Cameron P; Corwin, Amber; Mirza, Reehan S; Kiesecker, Joseph M; Brown, Grant E; Adrian, James C; Krone, Patrick H; Blaustein, Andrew R; Mathis, Alicia

    2007-01-01

    Many fishes possess specialized epidermal cells that are ruptured by the teeth of predators, thus reliably indicating the presence of an actively foraging predator. Understanding the evolution of these cells has intrigued evolutionary ecologists because the release of these alarm chemicals is not voluntary. Here, we show that predation pressure does not influence alarm cell production in fishes. Alarm cell production is stimulated by exposure to skin-penetrating pathogens (water moulds: Saprolegnia ferax and Saprolegnia parasitica), skin-penetrating parasites (larval trematodes: Teleorchis sp. and Uvulifer sp.) and correlated with exposure to UV radiation. Suppression of the immune system with environmentally relevant levels of Cd inhibits alarm cell production of fishes challenged with Saprolegnia. These data are the first evidence that alarm substance cells have an immune function against ubiquitous environmental challenges to epidermal integrity. Our results indicate that these specialized cells arose and are maintained by natural selection owing to selfish benefits unrelated to predator–prey interactions. Cell contents released when these cells are damaged in predator attacks have secondarily acquired an ecological role as alarm cues because selection favours receivers to detect and respond adaptively to public information about predation. PMID:17686729

  17. FAULT DIAGNOSIS WITH MULTI-STATE ALARMS IN A NUCLEAR POWER CONTROL SIMULATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Austin Ragsdale; Roger Lew; Brian P. Dyre; Ronald L. Boring

    2012-10-01

    This research addresses how alarm systems can increase operator performance within nuclear power plant operations. The experiment examined the effect of two types of alarm systems (two-state and three-state alarms) on alarm compliance and diagnosis for two types of faults differing in complexity. We hypothesized three-state alarms would improve performance in alarm recognition and fault diagnoses over that of two-state alarms. We used sensitivity and criterion based on Signal Detection Theory to measure performance. We further hypothesized that operator trust would be highest when using three-state alarms. The findings from this research showed participants performed better and had more trust in three-state alarms compared to two-state alarms. Furthermore, these findings have significant theoretical implications and practical applications as they apply to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear power plant operations.

  18. Fault Diagnosis with Multi-State Alarms in a Nuclear Power Control Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart A. Ragsdale; Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring

    2014-09-01

    This research addresses how alarm systems can increase operator performance within nuclear power plant operations. The experiment examined the effects of two types of alarm systems (two-state and three-state alarms) on alarm compliance and diagnosis for two types of faults differing in complexity. We hypothesized the use of three-state alarms would improve performance in alarm recognition and fault diagnoses over that of two-state alarms. Sensitivity and criterion based on the Signal Detection Theory were used to measure performance. We further hypothesized that operator trust would be highest when using three-state alarms. The findings from this research showed participants performed better and had more trust in three-state alarms compared to two-state alarms. Furthermore, these findings have significant theoretical implications and practical applications as they apply to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear power plant operations.

  19. Attributions of Cancer ‘Alarm’ Symptoms in a Community Sample

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Katriina L.; Scott, Suzanne E.; Winstanley, Kelly; Macleod, Una; Wardle, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Background Attribution of early cancer symptoms to a non-serious cause may lead to longer diagnostic intervals. We investigated attributions of potential cancer ‘alarm’ and non-alarm symptoms experienced in everyday life in a community sample of adults, without mention of a cancer context. Methods A questionnaire was mailed to 4858 adults (?50 years old, no cancer diagnosis) through primary care, asking about symptom experiences in the past 3 months. The word cancer was not mentioned. Target 'alarm' symptoms, publicised by Cancer Research UK, were embedded in a longer symptom list. For each symptom experienced, respondents were asked for their attribution (‘what do you think caused it'), concern about seriousness (‘not at all’ to ‘extremely’), and help-seeking (‘did you contact a doctor about it’: Yes/No). Results The response rate was 35% (n?=?1724). Over half the respondents (915/1724; 53%) had experienced an ‘alarm’ symptom, and 20 (2%) cited cancer as a possible cause. Cancer attributions were highest for ‘unexplained lump’; 7% (6/87). Cancer attributions were lowest for ‘unexplained weight loss’ (0/47). A higher proportion (375/1638; 23%) were concerned their symptom might be ‘serious’, ranging from 12% (13/112) for change in a mole to 41% (100/247) for unexplained pain. Just over half had contacted their doctor about their symptom (59%), although this varied by symptom. Alarm symptoms were appraised as more serious than non-alarm symptoms, and were more likely to trigger help-seeking. Conclusions Consistent with retrospective reports from cancer patients, ‘alarm’ symptoms experienced in daily life were rarely attributed to cancer. These results have implications for understanding how people appraise and act on symptoms that could be early warning signs of cancer. PMID:25461959

  20. Ground-water modeling and the installation of deep multiple-well monitoring sites in the Central and West Coast Basins, Los Angeles County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, E. G.; Johnson, T. A.; Land, M.; Everett, R. R.; Ponti, D. J.; Edwards, B. D.; Crawford, S. M.; Kulshan, T.

    2002-12-01

    An ongoing regional study of the geohydrology and geochemistry of the Central and West Coast Basins in Los Angeles County, California has iteratively combined the drilling of deep multiple-well monitoring sites with groundwater modeling. The monitoring sites are generally between 1,000 and 1,500 ft in depth and consist of 4-6 piezometers installed within a single borehole that provide depth-dependent geohydrologic data. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRDSC) drilled four monitoring sites at the beginning of the cooperative study. The data from these sites, along with data compiled from existing wells, formed the basis for developing a preliminary multi-aquifer ground-water simulation model. Initial model simulations were then used to help prioritize new drilling locations where additional geohydrologic data were needed to more accurately simulate the complex system. Additional drilling, updating the regional simulation model, and new modeling-including development of particle tracking, simulation-optimization, and solute transport models-have proceeded iteratively. As of September, 2002, 34 multiple-well monitoring sites (162 piezometers) have been constructed. The new modeling, which focuses on seawater intrusion, has identified the need for more detailed data on sequence stratigraphy, geometries of confining beds and high permeability zones, and pore-water chemistry. In response to this need, continuous coring has been conducted cooperatively by the USGS, WRDSC, and Los Angeles County Department of Public Works at six of the monitoring sites completed thus far.

  1. Design and Implementation of a Mobile Phone Integrated Alarming-System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liao YunYan; Yang YinGen

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a mobile phone integrated alarming-system, which has two models: mobile, fixed alarm-ways. The alarming information contains local sound, video and GPS information. The system provides two ways of reading the alarming information: web ways and mobile alarming media player ways for instant checking or repeated watching and analysis .The real-time transmission of sound and video information is

  2. Centralization and Experimentation in the Implementation of a National Monitoring and Evaluation SystemThe Experience of Malawi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Useem; Graham Chipande

    1991-01-01

    The general principles and technical procedures of monitoring and evaluation are well documented, but far less attention has been directed at the equally important process of field implementation in development settings. To identify general principles of implementation that may prove useful in building any monitoring and evaluation system, the authors focus on Malawi's experience over more than 2 decades in

  3. Home monitor for SIDS with telecommunications capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, William; Kejariwal, Murari; Leach, Harley

    1990-06-01

    The use of home monitors for the detection and prevention of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) in infants has experienced limited success and substantial controversy. The usefulness of home apnea monitors has been plagued with false positive alarms and lack of alarm during apneic episodes. The cause of the alarm is generally not known which increases the anxiety of the parent while lowering confidenca in the monitor. An 87 5 1H microcontroller based respiration and heart rates monitor has been developed to combine the benefits of inexpensive home monitoring with professional data analysis and alarm parameter adjustment. The microcontroller retains heart and respiration rate data (including mean and standard deviation) preceding to and during an apparent Jfe-threatening event (ALTE). The data are stored in a circular buffer as to keep the latest data. The buffer size can be adjisted by the physician depending upon the ALTEs required for further analysis. The home monitor is equipped with telecommunications capability. The stored data and alarm parameters can be transferred at the request of the physidan or parent through an IntErnal telephone modem to a personal computer at the physician''s office or hospital. The monitor retains the cost-effectiveness of home monitoring while providing data collection and analysis by a trained speciaJist.

  4. 105. DAMAGE CONTROL CENTRAL STARBOARD LOOKING TO PORT SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    105. DAMAGE CONTROL CENTRAL - STARBOARD LOOKING TO PORT SHOWING PLOTTING BOARD, FLOODING & FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS AND DRAGE GAUGE. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  5. Intended long-term permafrost monitoring in Austria: Observations from eight years (2006-2014) of ground temperature monitoring in the Tauern Range, Central Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas; Lintschnig, Michèle

    2015-04-01

    At present permafrost monitoring in Austria is carried out by several institutions at some 20 sites in the Austrian Alps. However, so far this monitoring is not coordinated and institutionalised in terms of monitoring strategy, organization, data management and funding. Within the currently running permAT project such an institutionalization is in progress. Permafrost in the Austrian mountains is rather warm and hence sensitive to present climate change. Consequently permafrost conditions and changes are of increasing importance also for the public. Therefore, it is evident that a coordinated and institutionalised long-term monitoring of ground temperature in Austria is essential for permafrost understanding and people's safety. In this contribution we present up to eight years of field data from nine different study sites in Austria. All sites are located in the highest mountain range in Austria, the Tauern Range (maximum elevation 3798 m asl) covering some 9000 km² of the national territory. The nine different study sites are located between latitude 46°55' to 47°22' and longitude 12°44' to 14°41'. Altogether 57 ground temperature monitoring sites have been installed in 2006 and 2007 at the nine study sites using one- (at 23 sites) and three-channel (at 34 sites) miniature temperature dataloggers produced by GeoPrecision, Germany. Therefore, more than 120 ground temperature data series are available from between the ground surface to maximum depths of 2.75 m. The 57 monitoring sites range from 1922 to 3002 m asl in elevation and consider flat terrain as well as step rock walls. All slope aspects are adequately considered. Relevant research questions we intend to address in this contribution include (a) general ground thermal conditions in 2006-2014, (b) the influence of different substrates and aspects on ground temperatures, (c) potential permafrost occurrence, (d) changes or stable conditions during the observation period, (e) regional pattern, and (f) possible influence on weathering and geomorphological processes.

  6. Nuclear-power-plant perimeter-intrusion alarm systems

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, D.J.

    1982-04-01

    Timely intercept of an intruder requires the examination of perimeter barriers and sensors in terms of reliable detection, immediate assessment and prompt response provisions. Perimeter security equipment and operations must at the same time meet the requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 73.55 with some attention to the performance and testing figures of Nuclear Regulatory Guide 5.44, Revision 2, May 1980. A baseline system is defined which recommends a general approach to implementing perimeter security elements: barriers, lighting, intrusion detection, alarm assessment. The baseline approach emphasizes cost/effectiveness achieved by detector layering and logic processing of alarm signals to produce reliable alarms and low nuisance alarm rates. A cost benefit of layering along with video assessment is reduction in operating expense. The concept of layering is also shown to minimize testing costs where detectability performance as suggested by Regulatory Guide 5.44 is to be performed. Synthesis of the perimeter intrusion alarm system and limited testing of CCTV and Video Motion Detectors (VMD), were performed at E-Systems, Greenville Division, Greenville, Texas during 1981.

  7. Stable isotopes as indicators of sources and processes influencing nitrate distributions in dairy monitoring wells and domestic supply wells in the Central Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. B.; Harter, T.; Kendall, C.; Silva, S. R.; Esser, B. K.; Singleton, M. J.; Holstege, D.; Lockhart, K.; Applegate, O.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrate concentrations above the 10 mg/L NO3-N maximum contaminant level (MCL) have been found in many wells throughout the Central Valley, California. This area contains many possible anthropogenic nitrate sources including current and historic agriculture, private septic systems, municipal waste water, and confined animal feeding operations (primarily dairies). In order to better understand the potential contributions of dairy manure derived nitrate to both shallow and deep groundwater, we used a combined chemical, stable isotope, and age-dating approach for water samples collected from a network of shallow groundwater monitoring wells located on seven different dairies, and from a survey of approximately 200 deeper domestic supply wells (used for drinking water and dairy operations). Groundwater from shallow monitoring wells and deep supply wells was collected in two geographic regions. In the northern region, the lower San Joaquin Valley, the water table is shallow (2- 5 m below surface) and therefore considered highly vulnerable to contamination, while in the southern region, the Tulare Lake Basin, the water table is much deeper (20 - 30 m). Mean ?15N of nitrate in dairy monitoring wells in both the north and south regions was significantly higher than the mean ?15N measured in the deeper supply wells, and also showed greater variability. Mean ?15N and ?18O values measured in the deep supply wells were not significantly different between the north and south regions. Mean nitrate concentrations, ?15N, and ?18O were significantly higher in the northern (lower San Joaquin Valley) monitoring wells in comparison to the southern (Tulare Lake Basin) monitoring wells. Nitrate isotope measurements indicated that many of the northern monitoring wells had consistently high contributions of manure-derived nitrate to the shallow groundwater during the 16 month study. Monitoring wells located in relatively new dairies in the south region showed little evidence of manure-derived nitrate, while those located in much older dairies in the south region showed a very wide range of nitrate isotope values, indicating significant nitrate contributions from multiple sources including manure and industrial fertilizer and biological processing effects. Combined nitrate concentration and isotopic data from all the monitoring wells showed very little evidence of significant saturated-zone denitrification. Monitoring well networks within individual dairies showed wide ranges of nitrate concentrations, nitrate isotopic compositions, and geochemical compositions, confirming the heterogeneity of the nitrate loading across dairy facilities and indicating that measurements from any single monitoring well may not be representative of general groundwater quality downgradient of an individual dairy.

  8. The function of nonlinear phenomena in meerkat alarm calls

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Simon W.; Manser, Marta B.

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear vocal phenomena are a ubiquitous feature of human and non-human animal vocalizations. Although we understand how these complex acoustic intrusions are generated, it is not clear whether they function adaptively for the animals producing them. One explanation is that nonlinearities make calls more unpredictable, increasing behavioural responses and ultimately reducing the chances of habituation to these call types. Meerkats (Suricata suricatta) exhibit nonlinear subharmonics in their predator alarm calls. We specifically tested the ‘unpredictability hypothesis’ by playing back naturally occurring nonlinear and linear medium-urgency alarm call bouts. Results indicate that subjects responded more strongly and foraged less after hearing nonlinear alarm calls. We argue that these findings support the unpredictability hypothesis and suggest this is the first study in animals or humans to show that nonlinear vocal phenomena function adaptively. PMID:20659926

  9. Accessory and rock forming minerals monitoring the evolution of zoned mafic ultramafic complexes in the Central Ural Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, J.; Brügmann, G. E.; Pushkarev, E. V.

    2007-04-01

    This study describes major and trace element compositions of accessory and rock forming minerals from three Uralian-Alaskan-type complexes in the Ural Mountains (Kytlym, Svetley Bor, Nizhnii Tagil) for the purpose of constraining the origin, evolution and composition of their parental melts. The mafic-ultramafic complexes in the Urals are aligned along a narrow, 900 km long belt. They consist of a central dunite body grading outward into clinopyroxenite and gabbro lithologies. Several of these dunite bodies have chromitites with platinum group element mineralization. High Fo contents in olivine (Fo 92-93) and high Cr/(Cr + Al) in spinel (0.67-0.84) suggest a MgO-rich (> 15 wt.%) and Al 2O 3-poor ultramafic parental magma. During its early stages the magma crystallized dominantly olivine, spinel and clinopyroxene forming cumulates of dunite, wehrlite and clinopyroxenite. This stage is monitored by a common decrease in the MgO content in olivine (Fo 93-86) and the Cr/(Cr + Al) value of coexisting accessory chromite (0.81-0.70). Subsequently, at subsolidus conditions, the chromite equilibrated with the surrounding silicates producing Fe-rich spinel while Al-rich spinel exsolved chromian picotite and chromian titanomagnetite. This generated the wide compositional ranges typical for spinel from Uralian-Alaskan-type complexes world wide. Laser ablation analyses (LA-ICPMS) reveal that clinopyroxene from dunites and clinopyroxenite from all three complexes have similar REE patterns with an enrichment of LREE (0.5-5.2 prim. mantle) and other highly incompatible elements (U, Th, Ba, Rb) relative to the HREE (0.25-2.0 prim. mantle). This large concentration range implies the extensive crystallization of olivine and clinopyroxene together with spinel from a continuously replenished, tapped and crystallizing magma chamber. Final crystallization of the melt in the pore spaces of the cooling cumulate pile explains the large variation in REE concentrations on the scale of a thin section, the REE-rich rims on zoned clinopyroxene phenocrysts (e.g. La Rim/La Core ˜ 2), and the formation of interstitial clinopyroxene with similar REE enrichment. Trace element patterns of the parental melt inferred from clinopyroxene analyses show negative anomalies for Ti, Zr, Hf, and a positive anomaly for Sr. These imply a subduction related geotectonic setting for the Uralian zoned mafic-ultramafic complexes. Ankaramites share many petrological and geochemical features with these complexes and could represent the parental melts of this class of mafic-ultramafic intrusions. Diopside from chromitites and cross cutting diopside veins in dunite has similar trace element patterns with LREE/HREE ratios (e.g. La/Lu = 5-60) much higher than those in diopside from all other lithologies. We suggest that the chromitites formed at high temperatures (800-900 °C) during the waning stages of solidification as a result of the interaction of an incompatible element-rich melt or fluid with the dunite cumulates.

  10. Peripheral arterial blood pressure monitoring adequately tracks central arterial blood pressure in critically ill patients: an observational study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mariano Alejandro Mignini; Enrique Piacentini; Arnaldo Dubin

    2006-01-01

    Introduction  Invasive arterial blood pressure monitoring is a common practice in intensive care units (ICUs). Accuracy of invasive blood\\u000a pressure monitoring is crucial in evaluating the cardiocirculatory system and adjusting drug therapy for hemodynamic support.\\u000a However, the best site for catheter insertion is controversial. Lack of definitive information in critically ill patients\\u000a makes it difficult to establish guidelines for daily practice

  11. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2009-10-01

    This report presents results of data collected during the annual post-closure site inspection conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area, surface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 in June 2009. The annual post-closure site inspection included inspections of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 sites in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the CAU 417 Closure Report (NNSA/NV 2001). The annual inspection conducted at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) indicated that the site and soil cover were in good condition. Three new fractures were identified in the soil cover and were filled with bentonite chips during the inspection. The vegetation on the soil cover was adequate but showed signs of the area's ongoing drought. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations

  12. Alarm timing, trust and driver expectation for forward collision warning systems.

    PubMed

    Abe, Genya; Richardson, John

    2006-09-01

    In order to improve road safety, automobile manufacturers are now developing Forward Collision Warning Systems (FCWS). However, there has been insufficient consideration of how drivers may respond to FCWS. This driving simulator study focused on alarm timing and its impact on driver response to alarm. The experimental investigation considered driver perception of alarm timings and its influence on trust at three driving speeds (40, 60 and 70 mile/h) and two time headways (1.7 and 2.2 s). The results showed that alarm effectiveness varied in response to driving conditions. Alarm promptness had a greater influence on ratings of trust than improvements in braking performance enabled by the alarm system. Moreover, alarms which were presented after braking actions had been initiated were viewed as late alarms. It is concluded that drivers typically expect alarms to be presented before they initiate braking actions and when this does not happen driver trust in the system is substantially decreased. PMID:16364231

  13. Evaluation of fire-safety programs that use 10-year smoke alarms.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Mark; Wilson, Jonathan; Akoto, Judith; Dixon, Sherry; Jacobs, David E; Ballesteros, Michael F

    2010-10-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began funding a Smoke Alarm Installation and Fire Safety Education (SAIFE) program in 1998. This program involves the installation of lithium-powered "10-year" smoke alarms in homes at high risk for fires and injuries. This study aimed to (1) determine among original SAIFE homes if the lithium-powered alarms were still present and functional 8-10 years after installation and (2) understand factors related to smoke alarm presence and functionality. Data on a total of 384 homes and 601 smoke alarms in five states were collected and analyzed. Only one-third of alarms were still functional; 37% of installed alarms were missing; and 30% of alarms were present, but not functioning. Alarms were less likely to be functioning if they were installed in the kitchen and if homes had a different resident at follow-up. Of the 351 alarms that were present and had a battery at the time of the evaluation, only 21% contained lithium-powered batteries. Of these, 78% were still functioning. Programs that install lithium-powered alarms should use units that have sealed-in batteries and "hush" buttons. Additionally, education should be given on smoke alarm maintenance that includes a message that batteries in these alarms should not be replaced. Lithium-powered smoke alarms should last up to 10 years if maintained properly. PMID:20177753

  14. University of North Carolina at Charlotte Design and Construction Manual Section 2, Division 28 Voice Evacuation Fire Alarm System Appendix

    E-print Network

    Xie,Jiang (Linda)

    in fire alarm and detection systems. This provider shall employ factory trained and NICET Level III ­ Voice Evacuation Fire Alarm System Appendix SECTION 2 DIVISION 28 VOICE EVACUATION FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS 28 ­ Voice Evacuation Fire Alarm System Appendix DIVISION 28-VOICE EVACUATION FIRE ALARM SYSTEM

  15. Neutrophil-derived azurocidin alarms the immune system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oliver Soehnlein; Lennart Lindbom

    2008-01-01

    Azurocidin (heparin-binding protein\\/ cationic antimicrobial protein of 37 kD) is a pro- tein that is mobilized rapidly from emigrating poly- morphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). Initially, this in- active serine protease was recognized for its antimicrobial effects. However, it soon became ap- parent that azurocidin may act to alarm the im- mune system in different ways and thus serve as an important

  16. The Cost of False Alarms in Hellman and Rainbow Tradeoffs

    E-print Network

    and the rainbow table method in a manner that takes false alarms into account. We also analyze the effects pre- computation process. Keywords time memory tradeoff, Hellman, rainbow table, checkpoint- tion by 50% at the most. On the other hand, the paper presenting the rainbow table method [16], which

  17. 46 CFR 162.050-35 - Bilge alarm: Approval tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2) of this section are repeated seven additional times. During the last hour, the alarm must be inclined at an angle of 22.5° with the plane of its normal operating position. [USCG-2004-18939, 74 FR 3391, Jan. 16,...

  18. 46 CFR 162.050-35 - Bilge alarm: Approval tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2) of this section are repeated seven additional times. During the last hour, the alarm must be inclined at an angle of 22.5° with the plane of its normal operating position. [USCG-2004-18939, 74 FR 3391, Jan. 16,...

  19. 46 CFR 162.050-35 - Bilge alarm: Approval tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2) of this section are repeated seven additional times. During the last hour, the alarm must be inclined at an angle of 22.5° with the plane of its normal operating position. [USCG-2004-18939, 74 FR 3391, Jan. 16,...

  20. 46 CFR 162.050-35 - Bilge alarm: Approval tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2) of this section are repeated seven additional times. During the last hour, the alarm must be inclined at an angle of 22.5° with the plane of its normal operating position. [USCG-2004-18939, 74 FR 3391, Jan. 16,...

  1. 46 CFR 162.050-35 - Bilge alarm: Approval tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2) of this section are repeated seven additional times. During the last hour, the alarm must be inclined at an angle of 22.5° with the plane of its normal operating position. [USCG-2004-18939, 74 FR 3391, Jan. 16,...

  2. Cost-Effective School Alarm Systems. Security Topics Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufer, Steve

    This document outlines considerations in the selection of a cost-effective school-alarm system. Steps in the planning process include: conducting a district needs assessment; gathering input from all staff levels; consulting technical expertise; and selecting a security system that can be integrated with other site needs. It further describes the…

  3. Detection system ensures positive alarm activation in digital message loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokros, P.; Burstein, A.; Hewitt, E. D.

    1966-01-01

    Lost Word Detection System /LOWDS/ provides special identification for each error detection message transmitted from receiver to transmitter. The message is identified as an original message or an n-times retransmitted message so the receiver can detect where a retransmission request was not fulfilled and activate an alarm.

  4. 30 CFR 56.14132 - Horns and backup alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...equipment shall have— (i) An automatic reverse-activated signal alarm; (ii...sounds at least once for each three feet of reverse movement; (iii) A discriminating...surrounding noise level. (3) An automatic reverse-activated strobe light may be used...

  5. 30 CFR 56.14132 - Horns and backup alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...equipment shall have— (i) An automatic reverse-activated signal alarm; (ii...sounds at least once for each three feet of reverse movement; (iii) A discriminating...surrounding noise level. (3) An automatic reverse-activated strobe light may be used...

  6. Is alarm calling risky? Marmots avoid calling from risky places.

    PubMed

    Collier, Travis C; Blumstein, Daniel T; Girod, Lewis; Taylor, Charles E

    2010-12-01

    Alarm calling is common in many species. A prevalent assumption is that calling puts the vocalizing individual at increased risk of predation. If calling is indeed costly, we need special explanations for its evolution and maintenance. In some, but not all species, callers vocalize away from safety and thus may be exposed to an increased risk of predation. However, for species that emit bouts with one or a few calls, it is often difficult to identify the caller and find the precise location where a call was produced. We analyzed the spatial dynamics of yellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris) alarm calling using an acoustic localization system to determine the location from which calls were emitted. Marmots almost always called from positions close to the safety of their burrows, and, if they produced more than one alarm call, tended to end their calling bouts closer to safety than they started them. These results suggest that for this species, potential increased predation risk from alarm calling is greatly mitigated and indeed calling may have limited predation costs. PMID:21116460

  7. A simple alarm device for the Bennet PR2 ventilator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephan Stoyanov; Søren Jørgensen

    1978-01-01

    A simple alarm device for use with the Bennet PR-2 ventilator is described. It is based on the operation of a photo-electric cell, is simple in construction, and can be used on other types of ventilators if the pressure gauge is compatible.

  8. Points & Deviations - A pattern language for fire alarm systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Molin; Lennart Ohlsson

    1996-01-01

    After an object-orient ed framework for micro-processor based fire alarm systems had been implemented and the first instantiated system had reached product status an effort was undertaken to clearly document the architecture embedded in the framework. The result of this effort was a small pattern language which is presented in this paper. Important patterns in this language are the Point

  9. Original article Effects of honey-bee alarm pheromone compounds

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Effects of honey-bee alarm pheromone compounds on the behaviour of Varroa) Summary — In a simultaneous choice test, bees killed by freezing were more attractive to Varroa than bees stung to death by other bees. The smell of the sting apparatus proved to be repellent for Varroa

  10. A ship fire alarm system based on fuzzy neural network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wang Xihuai; Xiao Jianmei; Bao Minzhong

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of a ship fire alarm system is to detect a fire at an earlier stage in the ship and then to give a highly reliable judgement result. The paper presents a multi-sensor fire detection algorithm using two fire parameters (temperature and smoke density). The processing of the sensor signals are carried out by a fuzzy inference system based

  11. Intelligent Fire Alarm System Based on Fuzzy Neural Network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu Qiongfang; Zheng Dezhong; Fu Yongli; Dong Aihua

    2009-01-01

    Fire is a kind of disaster threatening the social wealth and humanity's safety. The fire detection is the special type signal's detection, system must have the ability of automatic adjust the operational parameters to adapt to the environment change. Traditional fire detection systems' intellectualized degree are low, the error alarm and the leakage take place frequently. In order to reduce

  12. A Cellular Phone Based Home \\/ Office Controller & Alarm System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Haldun; Nihat DALDAL

    2006-01-01

    Remote management of several home and office appliances is a subject of growing interest and in recent years we have seen many systems providing such controls. In this study, we have developed a cellular phone based home\\/office remote controller equipped with power controllers, an alarm system, a voice memory and a back-up battery unit. In traditional PSTN based remote controllers,

  13. Frequency-domain fluorescence based fiber optic fire alarm system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Sun; Z. Y. Zhang; K. T. V. Grattan

    2001-01-01

    Erbium and thulium doped fibers have been investigated in this work, for the first time, to determine their potential in fire or high temperature alarm applications based on the use of fluorescence decay in the frequency domain. Two configurations of the sensing system have been tested and compared, with particular reference to their minimum spatial resolution and location discrimination characteristics.

  14. A Fire-Alarming Method Based on Video Processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ping-He Huang; Jing-Yong Su; Zhe-Ming Lu; Jeng-Shyang Pan

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a fire-alarming method based on video processing. We propose a system that uses color and motion information extracted from video sequences to detect fire. Flame can be recognized according to its color which is a primary element of fire images. Thus choosing a suitable color model is the key to detect flames from fire images. An effective

  15. ONE-WAY FIRE WARNING ALARM SYSTEM FOR UNDERGROUND MINES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KENNETH E. HJELMSTAD; MARK A. ACKERSON

    Abstract - An ideal,fire,warning,alarm,system,for underground mines would be low cost, convenient, fast, re1 iable, and able to warn all underground workers. Present warning systems, such as phones, messengers, and stench, fail one or more of these criteria. The U.S. Bureau,of Mines may,have,devised,the,i deal

  16. Smart Wireless Video Sensor Network for Fire Alarm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qiulin Li; Qun Hao; Kai Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Smart Wireless Video Sensor Network (SWVSN) provides a new approach for fire detection and alarm. Compare with traditional approach, the system based on SWVSN proposed in this paper has features of smart event-oriented data processing, convenient arrangement, flexible network organizing. The system consists of three layers including camera node layer, base station layer and control layer. Due to using lower

  17. Design and Implementation of Mobile Robot Remote Fire Alarm System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hongke Xu; Hao Chen; Chao Cai; Xunzhao Guo; Jianwu Fang; Zhu Sun

    2011-01-01

    The current fire fighting robot accomplishes mostly assignments independently, which cannot meet the demand that managers in remote terminal mastery the real-time information of fire scene. Aiming at this problem, this paper designs and implements the mobile robot remote fire alarm system, which is composed of two parts: mobile robot and remote terminal. Modules of the two parts which consist

  18. Ionization analyzing air pollution, smoke, and fire alarm device

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beyersdorf

    1976-01-01

    An ionization analyzing alarm system of extreme accuracy independent of atmospheric turbulences caused by fire and of minute dimensions, ease and safety of manufacture, assembly and repairs and devoid of forced air devices is provided having an air baffle zone, a first ionization chamber with advantageously located electrodes, radioactive source and circuitry and optionally a second ionization chamber with radioactive

  19. LonWorks-based intelligent train's fire alarming control network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu Zujun; Shi Hongmei; Ai Li; Guo Baoqing

    2002-01-01

    LonWorks Field Bus is introduced. Then one way of using this technology to design intelligent train's fire alarming and controlling network is presented. This way successfully realizes the serial port communication between the neuron chip and PC or ?p. Thus another approach of applying LonWorks to traditional measurement and control system is founded.

  20. A fire alarm vision system based on IR image processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Won-Ho Kim; Seung-Kyeom Kim; Jong-Ho Lee; Chang-Ho Hyun

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a fire alarm vision system based on flame detection algorithm of infrared image. The presented flame detection algorithm measures the luminance variation of candidate flame blocks of the IR image and it determines existence of the fire according to the amount of variation of luminance. By using the test images, the simulation of flame detection algorithm was

  1. A methodology of alarm filtering using dynamic fault tree

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zineb Simeu-Abazi; Arnaud Lefebvre; Jean-Pierre Derain

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a new approach for filtering the faults, thanks to the defined dynamic fault tree (DFT). The proposed methodology includes the dependencies between fault events in the models. Two problems must thus be solved: they relate to the filtering of false alarms, and the reduction of the size of the ambiguity of fault isolation related to the occurrence

  2. TSS; A comprehensive, video-based alarm assessment system

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, J.D. (Presearch Inc., Systems and Software Engineering Div., Fairfax, VA (US))

    1991-01-01

    The combination of growing threats and increasing security awareness is driving the design of large and larger perimeter protection systems at nuclear facilities worldwide. This paper reports on the Tactical Security System (TSS) which is a modular, solid-state video system that adds Pre-Alarm Image Recall (PAIR) assessment capabilities to existing fixed-site surveillance systems. PAIR allows guard forces to view video images taken prior to perimeter sensor alarms. The system can be configured to show from 8 to 64 such images for each alarm and can display multiple cameras and multiple zones simultaneous. The TSS hardware architecture can be configured to include capabilities for digital image storage, image transmission, image printing, video loss detection, video motion detection and security force training. The incorporation of all of these video-based functions into one system give guard focuses and integrated workstation for video detection, assessment, documentation and communication. It reduces the number of responses to nuisance alarms and increases confidence in guard force decisions.

  3. Automatic diagnosis of multiple alarms for reactor-control rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Gimmy, K.L.; Nomm, E.

    1981-01-01

    A system has been developed at the Savannah River Plant to help reactor operators respond to multiple alarms in a developing incident situation. The need for such systems has become evident in recent years, particularly after the three Mile Island incident.

  4. Is alarm calling risky? Marmots avoid calling from risky places

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Travis C.; Blumstein, Daniel T.; Girod, Lewis; Taylor, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    Alarm calling is common in many species. A prevalent assumption is that calling puts the vocalizing individual at increased risk of predation. If calling is indeed costly, we need special explanations for its evolution and maintenance. In some, but not all species, callers vocalize away from safety and thus may be exposed to an increased risk of predation. However, for species that emit bouts with one or a few calls, it is often difficult to identify the caller and find the precise location where a call was produced. We analyzed the spatial dynamics of yellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris) alarm calling using an acoustic localization system to determine the location from which calls were emitted. Marmots almost always called from positions close to the safety of their burrows, and, if they produced more than one alarm call, tended to end their calling bouts closer to safety than they started them. These results suggest that for this species, potential increased predation risk from alarm calling is greatly mitigated and indeed calling may have limited predation costs. PMID:21116460

  5. Integrated alarm annunciation and entry control systems -- Survey results

    SciTech Connect

    Clever, J.J.; Arakaki, L.H.; Monaco, F.M.; Juarros, L.E.; Quintana, G.R.

    1993-10-01

    This report provides the results and analyses of a detailed survey undertaken in Summer 1993 to address integrated intrusion detection alarm annunciation and entry control system issues. This survey was undertaken as a first attempt toward beginning to answer questions about integrated systems and commercial capabilities to meet or partially meet US Department of Energy (DOE) site needs.

  6. A 13-WEEK COMPARISON OF PASSIVE AND CONTINUOUS OZONE MONITORS AT FORESTED SITES IN NORTH-CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ogawa passive 03 samplers were used in a 13-233k study (June 1-September 1, 1999) involving 11 forested and mountaintop sites in north-central Pennsylvania. Four of the sites were collocated with TECO model 49 O3 analyzers. A significant correlation (p...

  7. A THIRTEEN-WEEK COMPARISON OF PASSIVE AND CONTINUOUS OZONE MONITORS AT FORESTED SITES IN NORTH-CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ogawa passive 03 samplers were used in a 13-233k study (June 1-September 1, 1999) involving 11 forested and mountaintop sites in north-central Pennsylvania. Four of the sites were collocated with TECO model 49 O3 analyzers. A significant correlation (p...

  8. Benthic foraminifera for heavy metal pollution monitoring: A case study from the central Adriatic Sea coast of Italy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Frontalini; R. Coccioni

    2008-01-01

    Benthic foraminifera are increasingly used as environmental bio-indicators of pollution in coastal and marginal marine settings. Their community structure provides information on the general characteristics of the environment and some species are sensitive to specific environmental parameters. Among various criteria, the occurrence of test abnormalities may represent a useful bioindicator for monitoring environmental impacts in coastal regions. A study of

  9. Violence Exposure and Drug Use in Central American Youth: Family Cohesion and Parental Monitoring as Protective Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliewer, Wendy; Murrelle, Lenn; Prom, Elizabeth; Ramirez, Melva; Obando, Patricia; Sandi, Luis; Karenkeris, Maria del Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Associations between witnessing serious violence and drug use, and the protective influences of family cohesion and parental monitoring, were investigated among 9,840 adolescents (50.5% female, M age=15.29 years, SD=1.76) living in Panama and Costa Rica. After accounting for demographics and parental and sibling substance use, witnessing serious…

  10. Technical Assessment of DOE Savannah River Site-Sponsored Radionuclide Monitoring Efforts in the Central Savannah River Area

    E-print Network

    Georgia, University of

    Technical Assessment of DOE Savannah River Site-Sponsored Radionuclide Monitoring Efforts...................................................................................................... 3 Summary Conclusions to DOE Regarding CAB Recommendation 317........................... 4 to a request by the Department of Energy Savannah River Site (DOE-SR) for a technical evaluation of the current

  11. Study of Vadose Zone Monitoring at the Hanford Site Task 2 Potential Applications at the Central Plateau Remediation Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2003-01-01

    This report is the second of two studies on potential applications for vadose zone monitoring (VZM) at the Hanford Site. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) agreed to perform the studies in a letter from M. S. Schlender, DOE, to M. L. Goldstein, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and M. A. Wilson, Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), subject ''Vadose Zone

  12. Development of a distance-to-roadway proximity metric to compare near-road pollutant levels to a central site monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzyk, Timothy M.; George, Barbara Jane; Vette, Alan F.; Williams, Ronald W.; Croghan, Carry W.; Stevens, Carvin D.

    The primary objective of the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) was to compare air pollutant concentrations measured at various neighborhoods, or exposure monitoring areas (EMAs), throughout a major metropolitan area to levels measured at a central site or community monitor. One of the EMAs was located near a busy freeway (annual average daily traffic (AADT) of ˜130,000) so that impacts of mobile sources could be examined. Air pollution concentrations from the roadway-proximate sites were compared to the central site monitor. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) selected (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m,p- and o-xylene, 1,3 butadiene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and 4-ethyltoluene) are typically associated with mobile sources. Gradients were also evident that demonstrated the amplification of pollutant levels near the roadway compared to the community monitor. A novel distance-to-roadway proximity metric was developed to plot the measurements and model these gradients. Effective distance represents the actual distance an air parcel travels from the middle of a roadway to a site and varies as a function of wind direction, whereas perpendicular distance is a fixed distance oriented normal to the roadway. Perpendicular distance is often used as a proxy for exposures to traffic emissions in epidemiological studies. Elevated concentrations of all the compounds were found for both a summer and winter season. Effective distance was found to be a statistically significant ( p < 0.05) univariate predictor for concentrations of toluene, ethylbenzene, m,p-xylene and o-xylene for summer 2005. For each of these pollutants, effective distance yielded lower p-values than the corresponding perpendicular distance models, and model fit improved. Results demonstrate that this near-road EMA had elevated levels of traffic-related VOCs compared to the community monitor, and that effective distance was a more accurate predictor of the degree to which they were elevated as a function of distance. Effective distance produced a range of distance-to-roadway values for a single site based on wind direction, thus increasing the number and range of values that could be used to plot and predict relative differences in pollutant concentrations between two sites.

  13. TEMPERATURE-MONITORING AND SAFETY-CONTROL DEVICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two channel (sensitive) temperature monitor is described, and a parts list and wiring diagram are given. This equipment can be used as a safety shut-off or alarm system, or both. The sensitivity is 0.3C....

  14. 46 CFR 97.37-9 - Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. 97.37-9...Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-9 Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. Each carbon dioxide or clean agent fire extinguishing...

  15. 46 CFR 97.37-9 - Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. 97.37-9...Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-9 Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. Each carbon dioxide or clean agent fire extinguishing...

  16. 46 CFR 78.47-9 - Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. 78.47-9...Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-9 Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. Each carbon dioxide or clean agent fire extinguishing...

  17. 46 CFR 78.47-9 - Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. 78.47-9...Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-9 Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. Each carbon dioxide or clean agent fire extinguishing...

  18. 46 CFR 196.37-9 - Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. 196...Equipment, etc. § 196.37-9 Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. Each extinguishing system using carbon dioxide or clean agent complying...

  19. 46 CFR 113.27-1 - Engineers' assistance-needed alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engineers...Engineers' assistance-needed alarm. Each self-propelled ocean, Great Lakes, or coastwise vessel must have a...

  20. 46 CFR 113.27-1 - Engineers' assistance-needed alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...113.27-1 Section 113.27-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engineers' Assistance-Needed Alarm § 113.27-1...

  1. 46 CFR 113.25-25 - General emergency alarm systems for manned ocean and coastwise barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false General emergency alarm systems for manned ocean and coastwise barges. 113.25-25 Section...25-25 General emergency alarm systems for manned ocean and coastwise barges. A manned ocean or coastwise barge of more than 100...

  2. 46 CFR 113.25-25 - General emergency alarm systems for manned ocean and coastwise barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false General emergency alarm systems for manned ocean and coastwise barges. 113.25-25 Section...25-25 General emergency alarm systems for manned ocean and coastwise barges. A manned ocean or coastwise barge of more than 100...

  3. 46 CFR 113.25-25 - General emergency alarm systems for manned ocean and coastwise barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...false General emergency alarm systems for manned ocean and coastwise barges. 113.25-25 Section...25-25 General emergency alarm systems for manned ocean and coastwise barges. A manned ocean or coastwise barge of more than 100...

  4. 46 CFR 131.815 - Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. 131.815 ...and Emergency Equipment § 131.815 Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. Each carbon dioxide or clean agent fire extinguishing...

  5. 46 CFR 131.815 - Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. 131.815 ...and Emergency Equipment § 131.815 Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. Each carbon dioxide or clean agent fire extinguishing...

  6. 46 CFR 196.37-9 - Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. 196...Equipment, etc. § 196.37-9 Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. Each extinguishing system using carbon dioxide or clean agent complying...

  7. 46 CFR 78.47-9 - Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. 78.47-9...Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-9 Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. Each carbon dioxide or clean agent fire extinguishing...

  8. 46 CFR 113.25-8 - Distribution of general emergency alarm system feeders and branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...for each vertical fire zone that has general emergency alarm signal. (e) Each system must have one...not divided into fire zones by main vertical fire bulkheads, the general emergency alarm system must be...

  9. 46 CFR 113.25-8 - Distribution of general emergency alarm system feeders and branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...for each vertical fire zone that has general emergency alarm signal. (e) Each system must have one...not divided into fire zones by main vertical fire bulkheads, the general emergency alarm system must be...

  10. 46 CFR 113.25-8 - Distribution of general emergency alarm system feeders and branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...for each vertical fire zone that has general emergency alarm signal. (e) Each system must have one...not divided into fire zones by main vertical fire bulkheads, the general emergency alarm system must be...

  11. 46 CFR 95.16-45 - Pre-discharge alarms and time delay devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Pre-discharge alarms and time delay devices...MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Gas Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.16-45 Pre-discharge alarms and time delay devices. (a) Each system protecting a...

  12. 46 CFR 95.16-45 - Pre-discharge alarms and time delay devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Pre-discharge alarms and time delay devices...MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Gas Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.16-45 Pre-discharge alarms and time delay devices. (a) Each system protecting a...

  13. 46 CFR 113.25-8 - Distribution of general emergency alarm system feeders and branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...for each vertical fire zone that has general emergency alarm signal. (e) Each system must have one...not divided into fire zones by main vertical fire bulkheads, the general emergency alarm system must be...

  14. 46 CFR 95.16-45 - Pre-discharge alarms and time delay devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Pre-discharge alarms and time delay devices...MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT...Gas Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.16-45 Pre-discharge alarms and time delay devices. (a) Each system protecting a...

  15. 46 CFR 113.25-8 - Distribution of general emergency alarm system feeders and branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...for each vertical fire zone that has general emergency alarm signal. (e) Each system must have one...not divided into fire zones by main vertical fire bulkheads, the general emergency alarm system must be...

  16. 76 FR 76327 - Installation of Radiation Alarms for Rooms Housing Neutron Sources

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ...NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...NRC-2011-0251] Installation of Radiation Alarms for Rooms Housing...Neutron Sources AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission...require installation of radiation alarms for rooms housing...December 2011. For the Nuclear Regulatory...

  17. Smoke Alarm Presence and Performance in U.S. Home Fires

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marty Ahrens

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of U.S. homes have at least one smoke alarm. For smoke alarms to be effective, they must have a functional\\u000a power source, be close enough to the smoke to activate, they must be heard, and occupants must take appropriate action. In\\u000a homes with smoke alarms and fires considered large enough, the alarms operated 83% of the time.

  18. Multisensor fusion system using wavelet-based detection algorithm applied to physiological monitoring under high-G environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Han Chool Ryoo

    2000-01-01

    A significant problem in physiological state monitoring systems with single data channels is high rates of false alarm. In order to reduce false alarm probability, several data channels can be integrated to enhance system performance. In this work, we have investigated a sensor fusion methodology applicable to physiological state monitoring, which combines local decisions made from dispersed detectors. Difficulties in

  19. Groundwater-Level Monitoring Program: Example from the Barton Springs Segment of the Edwards Aquifer, Central Texas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian B. Hunt; Brian A. Smith; Stefani Campbell; Shu Liang

    Groundwater-levels are the most critical information collected about an aquifer indicating its hydrologic character and stresses. Water-level data are increasingly used by agencies to calibrate groundwater models and to design, implement, and monitor the effectiveness of groundwater management and conservation efforts. However, water-level data are often limited in frequency and geographic distribution for meaningful analyses. This paper presents an example

  20. Online root-cause analysis of alarms in discrete Bayesian networks with known structures

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jiandong

    Online root-cause analysis of alarms in discrete Bayesian networks with known structures Jiandong to analyze the root cause of alarms arisen in industrial process variables. The relation among alarm one child node exits so that its abnormal state is caused by one or multiple parent nodes. The root

  1. Automated troubleshooting of mobile networks based on alarm and performance data using bayesian networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Tikunov; T. Nishimura

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present an automated troubleshooting method for mobile networks based on alarm and performance data using two Bayesian Networks. The method provides online, reactive diagnosis of malfunction alarms using the Bayesian Network with alarm correlation and diagnosis of cells' bad performance using another Bayesian network. The proposed method and models were used in a trial with history

  2. 46 CFR 35.40-5 - General alarm bells-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false General alarm bells-TB/ALL. 35.40-5 Section 35.40-5 Shipping...OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL. § 35.40-5 General alarm bells—TB/ALL. General alarm bells must be marked...

  3. 46 CFR 35.40-5 - General alarm bells-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false General alarm bells-TB/ALL. 35.40-5 Section 35.40-5 Shipping...OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-5 General alarm bells—TB/ALL. General alarm bells must be marked...

  4. 46 CFR 35.40-5 - General alarm bells-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false General alarm bells-TB/ALL. 35.40-5 Section 35.40-5 Shipping...OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-5 General alarm bells—TB/ALL. General alarm bells must be marked...

  5. 46 CFR 35.40-1 - General alarm contact maker-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... false General alarm contact maker-TB/ALL. 35.40-1 Section 35.40-1 Shipping...OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-1 General alarm contact maker—TB/ALL. Each general alarm contact maker...

  6. 46 CFR 35.40-5 - General alarm bells-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false General alarm bells-TB/ALL. 35.40-5 Section 35.40-5 Shipping...OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-5 General alarm bells—TB/ALL. General alarm bells must be marked...

  7. 46 CFR 35.40-5 - General alarm bells-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false General alarm bells-TB/ALL. 35.40-5 Section 35.40-5 Shipping...OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL. § 35.40-5 General alarm bells—TB/ALL. General alarm bells must be marked...

  8. Multisensor fire detection algorithm for ship fire alarm system using neural fuzzy network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wang Xihuai; Xiao Jianmei; Bao Minzhong

    2000-01-01

    Multi-sensor fire detection algorithm (MSFDA) are one of the current important developments in ship fire detection technology. Old ship fire alarm systems often use single sensor and are based on simple logic judgement. To make a less erroneous alarm, a new MSFDA is developed based on the fuzzy inference system and neural network. The multi-grade alarm of ship fire is

  9. 46 CFR 27.201 - What are the requirements for general alarms on towing vessels?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...requirements for general alarms on towing vessels... TOWING VESSELS Fire-Protection Measures...requirements for general alarms on towing vessels...public-address (PA) system or other means of...instead of a general alarm, if the system— (1) Is...

  10. 46 CFR 27.201 - What are the requirements for general alarms on towing vessels?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...requirements for general alarms on towing vessels... TOWING VESSELS Fire-Protection Measures...requirements for general alarms on towing vessels...public-address (PA) system or other means of...instead of a general alarm, if the system— (1) Is...

  11. Family guard against theft and alarm system based on GSM Modem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhou Yu; Zhisong Hou; Gaoli Zhao; Xiangang Zuo

    2011-01-01

    The System is made up of MCU and GSM Modem. It will display the alarm content in Chinese directly at your mobile screen, and it recurs to the most reliable GSM mobile network. The system adopted initiative infrared sensor to detect, and it turned the traditional alarm net and alarm windows to immateriality. Besides, the system equipped the smog sensor

  12. Design of large space fire alarm controller based on intelligent video surveillance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shuangye Chen; Chen Luo; Yawei Chen; Weijing Zhang; Jie Hou; Jiaru Qian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the ARM embedded fire alarm controller is designed and applied to the fire intelligent video surveillance system of large space. Based on the Modbus communication protocol, the fire alarm controller receive the information from video surveillance platform, sending out alarm signal of voice and light when fire happened, and then the fire sprinkler system are controlled to

  13. Project 93L-EWL-097, fire alarm system improvements, 300 Area

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.V.

    1995-01-01

    This document contains the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) which will demonstrate that the modifications to the Fire Protection systems in the 338 Building function as intended. The ATP will test the fire alarm control panel, flow alarm pressure switch, post indicator valve tamper switch, heat detectors, flow switches, and fire alarm signaling devices.

  14. 46 CFR 131.815 - Alarm for fixed gaseous fire-extinguishing system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alarm for fixed gaseous fire-extinguishing system. 131.815 Section 131...Emergency Equipment § 131.815 Alarm for fixed gaseous fire-extinguishing system. Each alarm for a fixed gaseous...

  15. 46 CFR 131.815 - Alarm for fixed gaseous fire-extinguishing system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alarm for fixed gaseous fire-extinguishing system. 131.815 Section 131...Emergency Equipment § 131.815 Alarm for fixed gaseous fire-extinguishing system. Each alarm for a fixed gaseous...

  16. Effects of a fire alarm strobe light on fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations in mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerald Silverman; Denice Godfrey

    2009-01-01

    The type and location of fire alarms are important considerations in animal facility design. The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals recommends minimizing animal exposure to such alarms. Nevertheless, it is often necessary to maintain fire alarms within animal housing or procedural areas. The authors exposed male mice to the flashing strobe light component of a standard

  17. 46 CFR 27.201 - What are the requirements for general alarms on towing vessels?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...requirements for general alarms on towing vessels... TOWING VESSELS Fire-Protection Measures...requirements for general alarms on towing vessels...public-address (PA) system or other means of...instead of a general alarm, if the system— (1) Is...

  18. Design of the Intelligent Test Equipment of Airplane Fire Alarm System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xu Hengcheng; Zeng Xianlin; Liu Xiangqun

    2010-01-01

    The airplane fire alarm system is a piece of the most important equipment influencing the flight security. Due to the factors of design and working condition, the reliability of the system is poor, especially the high rate of false alarm. So the test equipment of airplane fire alarm system, an intelligent synthesis test system allowing multiple parameters and digital data

  19. Fire alarm bell audibility in a housing block in Hong Kong

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Mak; Christopher Y H Chao

    1998-01-01

    A case study on fire alarm bell audibility in a government housing block in Hong Kong is presented. A sound survey included sound pressure level measurement, and a questionnairehas been administered. The results highlight a typical problem in the audibility of fire alarm bell in residential buildings in Hong Kong. Improvement to the fire alarm bell system is suggested. A

  20. Social cost benefit analysis of commercial and residential burglar and fire alarms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon Hakim; Yochanan Shachmurove

    1996-01-01

    This paper evaluates the net benefits yielded by residential and commercial burglar and fire alarm systems. The policy issue addressed is whether or not alarms should be encouraged by local police departments as a crime prevention measure. It is shown that the total benefits of burglar alarm ownership outweigh the total costs for the combined and separate commercial and residential

  1. 46 CFR 27.201 - What are the requirements for general alarms on towing vessels?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...requirements for general alarms on towing vessels... TOWING VESSELS Fire-Protection Measures...requirements for general alarms on towing vessels...public-address (PA) system or other means of...instead of a general alarm, if the system— (1) Is...

  2. 46 CFR 27.201 - What are the requirements for general alarms on towing vessels?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...requirements for general alarms on towing vessels... TOWING VESSELS Fire-Protection Measures...requirements for general alarms on towing vessels...public-address (PA) system or other means of...instead of a general alarm, if the system— (1) Is...

  3. A design of a fire alarm system based on dual-signal detection and transmission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chai Chunlai

    2009-01-01

    Disadvantages such as high false alarm rate and the duration of long checking cycle time appear in current fire alarm equipments\\/systems. In view of these disadvantages, this paper presents data communications using non-conventional and conventional data communications to achieve a combination of information transmitting fire alarm system working principle, the main system controller analysis, the area controller analysis, the detection

  4. Autonomous mining for alarm correlation patterns based on time-shift similarity clustering in manufacturing system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yan Chen; Jay Lee

    2011-01-01

    Current alarm systems employed in manufacturing applications are ambiguous in terms of indicating the root causes of process disturbances, which causes many difficulties for decision making. As manufacturing systems increase in complexity and scale, the continued reliance on human operators for alarm information management is impossible. A computer- aided information management system would increase analytical capability for alarm analysis. To

  5. A Next Generation Alarm Processing Algorithm Incorporating Recommendations and Decisions on Wide Area Control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elias Kyriakides; Jonathan W. Stahlhut; Gerald T. Heydt

    2007-01-01

    The number of alarms for a typical power system event may be overwhelming to power system operators and may delay the operator from taking appropriate corrective action. Worldwide, a number of alarm processing techniques are used to reduce the number of alarms that the operator 'sees', so as to better comprehend the situation at hand and make accurate decisions faster.

  6. Chair Alarm for patient fall prevention based on Gesture Recognition and Interactivity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heather Knight; Jae-Kyu Lee; Hongshen Ma

    2008-01-01

    The Gesture Recognition Interactive Technology (GRiT) Chair Alarm aims to prevent patient falls from chairs and wheelchairs by recognizing the gesture of a patient attempting to stand. Patient falls are one of the greatest causes of injury in hospitals. Current chair and bed exit alarm systems are inadequate because of insufficient notification, high false-alarm rate, and long trigger delays. The

  7. A cost effective FBG-based security fence with fire alarm function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H. J.; Li, S. S.; Lu, X. L.; Wu, Y.; Rao, Y. J.

    2012-02-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) is sensitive to the temperature as well when it is measuring the strain change, which is always avoided in most measurement applications. However, in this paper strain/temperature dual sensitivity is utilized to construct a special security fence with a second function of fire threat prediction. In an FBG-based fiber fence configuration, only by characteristics analysis and identification method, it can intelligently distinguish the different effects of personal threats and fires from their different trends of the wavelength drifts. Thus without any additional temperature sensing fittings or other fire alarm systems integrated, a normal perimeter security system can possess a second function of fire prediction, which can not only monitor the intrusion induced by personal actions but also predict fire threats in advance. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the method.

  8. Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose in Diabetes: From Evidence to Clinical Reality in Central and Eastern Europe—Recommendations from the International Central-Eastern European Expert Group

    PubMed Central

    Barkai, László; Bolgarska, Svetlana; Bronisz, Agata; Broz, Jan; Cypryk, Katarzyna; Honka, Marek; Janez, Andrej; Krnic, Mladen; Lalic, Nebojsa; Martinka, Emil; Rahelic, Dario; Roman, Gabriela; Tankova, Tsvetalina; Várkonyi, Tamás; Wolnik, Bogumi?; Zherdova, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is universally considered to be an integral part of type 1 diabetes management and crucial for optimizing the safety and efficacy of complex insulin regimens. This extends to type 2 diabetes patients on intensive insulin therapy, and there is also a growing body of evidence suggesting that structured SMBG is beneficial for all type 2 diabetes patients, regardless of therapy. However, access to SMBG can be limited in many countries in Central and Eastern Europe. A consensus group of diabetes experts from 10 countries in this region (with overlapping historical, political, and social environments)—Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Ukraine—was formed to discuss the role of SMBG across the spectrum of patients with diabetes. The group considered SMBG to be an essential tool that should be accessible to all patients with diabetes, including those with non–insulin-treated type 2 diabetes. The current article summarizes the evidence put forward by the consensus group and provides their recommendations for the appropriate use of SMBG as part of individualized patient management. The ultimate goal of these evidence-based recommendations is to help patients and providers in Central and Eastern Europe to make optimal use of SMBG in order to maximize the efficacy and safety of glucose-lowering therapies, to prevent complications, and to empower the patient to play a more active role in the management of their diabetes. PMID:24716890

  9. Soil cover patterns influence on the land environmental functions, agroecological quality, land-use and monitoring efficiency in the Central Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, Ivan; Yashin, Ivan; Lukin, Sergey; Valentini, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    First decades of XXI century actualized for soil researches the principal methodical problem of most modern geosciences: what spatial and temporal scale would be optimal for land quality evaluation and land-use practice optimizing? It is becoming obvious that this question cannot have one solution and have to be solved with especial attention on the features of concrete region and landscape, land-use history and practical issues, land current state and environmental functions, soil cover patterns and variability, governmental requirements and local society needs, best available technologies and their potential profitability. Central Russia is one of the most dynamical economic regions with naturally high and man-made complicated landscape and soil cover variability, long-term land-use history and self-contradictory issues, high potential of profitable farming and increased risks of land degradation. Global climate and technological changes essentially complicate the originally high and sharply increased in XX century farming land heterogeneity in the Central Russia that actualizes system analysis of its zonal, intra-zonal and azonal soil cover patterns according to their influence on land environmental functions, agroecological quality, and land-use and monitoring efficiency variability. Developed by the Laboratory of agroecological monitoring, ecosystem modeling & prediction (LAMP / RTSAU with support of RF Governmental projects #11.G34.31.0079 and #14.120.14.4266) regional systems of greenhouse gases environmental monitoring RusFluxNet (6 fixed & 1 mobile eddy covariance stations with zonal functional sets of key plots with chamber investigations in 5 Russian regions) and of agroecological monitoring (in representative key plots with different farming practice in 9 RF regions) allow to do this analysis in frame of enough representative regional multi-factorial matrix of soil cover patterns, bioclimatic conditions, landscape features, and land-use history and current practice versions. Well-elaborated monitoring collaboration with the principal natural reserves in south-taiga and forest-steppe zones provides process-based interaction with long-term data on zonal climatic, landscape and soil features necessary to test the process, functional and evaluation models in the specific conditions of each bioclimatic zone. The dominated erosion and dehumification trends have been essentially activated for last 3-4 decades due to hu¬mus negative balance around 0.6-0.7 t ha-1year-1 and connected disaggregation with annual rate between 1 and 25 g/kg for aggregates 10-0.25 mm. "Standard" monitoring objects and regionally generalized data showed characteristic for Chernozems 2-2.5 % humus drop during this period and active processes of CO2 emission and humus eluvial-illuvial profile redistribution too. Forest-steppe Chernozems are usually characterized by higher stability than steppe ones. The ratio between erosive and biological losses in humus stock can be ten¬tatively estimated as fifty-fifty with essential variability within slope landscape. Both these processes have essential impacts on different sets of soil environmental and agroecological functions (including atmospheric air, surface and ground water quality, biodiversity and profitability) that we need to understand and predict. A drop of humus content below threshold values (for different soils between 1.5 and 6%) considerably reduces not only soil environmental regulation functions but also effectiveness of used fertilizers, crop yield quality and possibility of sustainable agricultural land-use. The carried out long-term researches of representative natural, rural and urban landscapes in Tver, Yaroslavl, Vladimir, Moscow, Kaluga, Kursk, Belgorod, Tambov, Voronezh and Saratov regions give us validation and ranging of the limiting factors of the elementary soil cover patterns current features and transformation processes, environmental functions and agroecological quality, monitoring results functional interpretation, spatial and temporal interpolation a

  10. The double slit experiment and the time reversed fire alarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halabi, Tarek

    2011-03-01

    When both slits of the double slit experiment are open, closing one paradoxically increases the detection rate at some points on the detection screen. Feynman famously warned that temptation to "understand" such a puzzling feature only draws us into blind alleys. Nevertheless, we gain insight into this feature by drawing an analogy between the double slit experiment and a time reversed fire alarm. Much as closing the slit increases probability of a future detection, ruling out fire drill scenarios, having heard the fire alarm, increases probability of a past fire (using Bayesian inference). Classically, Bayesian inference is associated with computing probabilities of past events. We therefore identify this feature of the double slit experiment with a time reversed thermodynamic arrow. We believe that much of the enigma of quantum mechanics is simply due to some variation of time's arrow.

  11. Gene expression monitoring for gene discovery in models of peripheral and central nervous system differentiation, regeneration, and trauma.

    PubMed

    Farlow, D N; Vansant, G; Cameron, A A; Chang, J; Khoh-Reiter, S; Pham, N L; Wu, W; Sagara, Y; Nicholls, J G; Carlo, D J; Ill, C R

    2000-10-20

    Gene expression monitoring using gene expression microarrays represents an extremely powerful technology for gene discovery in a variety of systems. We describe the results of seven experiments using Incyte GEM technology to compile a proprietary portfolio of data concerning differential gene expression in six different models of neuronal differentiation and regeneration, and recovery from injury or disease. Our first two experiments cataloged genes significantly up- or down-regulated during two phases of the retinoic acid-induced differentiation of the embryonal carcinoma line Ntera-2. To identify genes involved in neuronal regeneration we performed three GEM experiments, which included changes in gene expression in rat dorsal root ganglia during the healing of experimentally injured sciatic nerve, in regenerating neonatal opossum spinal cord, and during lipopolysaccharide stimulation of primary cultures of rat Schwann cells. Finally we have monitored genes involved in the recovery phase of the inflammatory disease of the rat spinal cord, experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, as well as those responsible for protection from oxidative stress in a glutamate-resistant rat hippocampal cell line. Analysis of the results of the approximately 70,000 data points collected is presented. PMID:11074584

  12. Dialects in the alarm calls of prairie dogs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. N. Slobodchikoff; R. Coast

    1980-01-01

    1.The alarm calls of the Gunnison's prairie dog, Cynomys gunnisoni zuniensis, have differentiated into local dialects.2.Call characteristics show that, within a given dialect, the number of syllables, the length of the syllables, and the interval length between syllables are weakly correlated with one another. The number of syllables, however, is strongly correlated with the total length of the call.3.Both the

  13. Fluorescence based optical fibre fire alarm system [for aeroengine application

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Sun; K. T. V. Grattan; W. M. Sun

    2002-01-01

    A fluorescence-based optical fibre fire alarm system, which offers the advantages of light weight and relatively low cost, has been discussed to address the specifications required for aeroengine fire detection. A temperature excursion as low as 50-100°C has been detected and current spatial resolution achieved is ?20 cm. Lengths of 1.2 m of Er & Tm doped fibres have been

  14. ZoneAlarm Free Firewall 9.2

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    This latest version of ZoneAlarm Free Firewall 9.2 will help keep users' computers free from phishing devices and other such pesky intruders. The application takes about 5 minutes to setup, and it can now also stop program spoofing, which is when a malicious program pretends to be a good one. The program also has an extensive interactive help feature, which can be useful for new users. This version is compatible with computers running Windows XP, Vista, and 7.

  15. Research and application of highway tunnel fire alarm system based on fiber Bragg grating sensor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ciming; Chen, Liuyong; Jiang, Desheng; He, Jun; Zhang, Shaoyun

    2007-01-01

    A new fire alarm system based on FBG sensor has been investigated to determine its potential in fire alarm applications for highway tunnel. The system has been experimentally tested and some of its application are reported. The results show that the new fire alarm system is capable of fixed temperature alarm and rate-of-rise alarm promptly; the fire place can easily determined according to the location of maximum temperature; the temperature distribution and the rule of temperature development in the tunnel can be obtained at the same time.

  16. New technologies for item monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, J.A. [EG & G Energy Measurements, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Waddoups, I.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This report responds to the Department of Energy`s request that Sandia National Laboratories compare existing technologies against several advanced technologies as they apply to DOE needs to monitor the movement of material, weapons, or personnel for safety and security programs. The authors describe several material control systems, discuss their technologies, suggest possible applications, discuss assets and limitations, and project costs for each system. The following systems are described: WATCH system (Wireless Alarm Transmission of Container Handling); Tag system (an electrostatic proximity sensor); PANTRAK system (Personnel And Material Tracking); VRIS (Vault Remote Inventory System); VSIS (Vault Safety and Inventory System); AIMS (Authenticated Item Monitoring System); EIVS (Experimental Inventory Verification System); Metrox system (canister monitoring system); TCATS (Target Cueing And Tracking System); LGVSS (Light Grid Vault Surveillance System); CSS (Container Safeguards System); SAMMS (Security Alarm and Material Monitoring System); FOIDS (Fiber Optic Intelligence & Detection System); GRADS (Graded Radiation Detection System); and PINPAL (Physical Inventory Pallet).

  17. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2009-01-01

    This report presents data collected during the annual post-closure site inspection conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area Surface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 in May of 2008. The annual post-closure site inspection included inspections of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 sites in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the CAU 417 Closure Report (NNSA/NV 2001). The annual inspection conducted at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) indicated that the site and soil cover were in good condition. Three new cracks or fractures were observed in the soil cover during the annual inspection and were immediately filled with bentonite chips. The vegetation on the soil cover was adequate, but showed signs of the area's ongoing drought. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations. The annual subsidence survey was conducted at UC-1 CMP and UC-4 Mud Pit C in August 2008. The results of the subsidence surveys indicate that the covers are performing as expected, and no unusual subsidence was observed.

  18. Masters Thesis- Criticality Alarm System Design Guide with Accompanying Alarm System Development for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory in Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, Bryce A.

    2009-12-20

    A detailed instructional manual was created to guide criticality safety engineers through the process of designing a criticality alarm system (CAS) for Department of Energy (DOE) hazard class 1 and 2 facilities. Regulatory and technical requirements were both addressed. A list of design tasks and technical subtasks are thoroughly analyzed to provide concise direction for how to complete the analysis. An example of the application of the design methodology, the Criticality Alarm System developed for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory (RPL) of Richland, Washington is also included. The analysis for RPL utilizes the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 for establishing detector coverage in the facility. Significant improvements to the existing CAS were made that increase the reliability, transparency, and coverage of the system.

  19. Bladder Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Diagnostic Ultrasound Corporation's Bladder Scan Monitor continuously records and monitors bladder fullness and alerts the wearer or caretaker when voiding is required. The sensor is held against the lower abdomen by a belt and connected to the monitor by a cable. The sensor obtains bladder volume data from sound waves reflecting off the bladder wall. The device was developed by Langley Research Center, the Ames Research Center and the NASA Technology Applications Team. It utilizes Langley's advanced ultrasound technology. It is licensed to the ARC for medical applications, and sublicensed to Diagnostics Ultrasound. Central monitoring systems are planned for the future.

  20. COMPARISON OF VENTED AND ABSOLUTE PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS FOR WATER-LEVEL MONITORING IN HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD JP

    2011-09-08

    Automated water-level data collected using vented pressure transducers deployed in Hanford Site Central Plateau wells commonly display more variability than manual tape measurements in response to barometric pressure fluctuations. To explain this difference, it was hypothesized that vented pressure transducers installed in some wells are subject to barometric pressure effects that reduce water-level measurement accuracy. Vented pressure transducers use a vent tube, which is open to the atmosphere at land surface, to supply air pressure to the transducer housing for barometric compensation so the transducer measurements will represent only the water pressure. When using vented transducers, the assumption is made that the air pressure between land surface and the well bore is in equilibrium. By comparison, absolute pressure transducers directly measure the air pressure within the wellbore. Barometric compensation is achieved by subtracting the well bore air pressure measurement from the total pressure measured by a second transducer submerged in the water. Thus, no assumption of air pressure equilibrium is needed. In this study, water-level measurements were collected from the same Central Plateau wells using both vented and absolute pressure transducers to evaluate the different methods of barometric compensation. Manual tape measurements were also collected to evaluate the transducers. Measurements collected during this study demonstrated that the vented pressure transducers over-responded to barometric pressure fluctuations due to a pressure disequilibrium between the air within the wellbores and the atmosphere at land surface. The disequilibrium is thought to be caused by the relatively long time required for barometric pressure changes to equilibrate between land surface and the deep vadose zone and may be exacerbated by the restriction of air flow between the well bore and the atmosphere due to the presence of sample pump landing plates and well caps. The disequilibrium is likely limited to wells screened across the water table (i.e., open to the deep vadose zone) where the depth to water is large or a low-permeability layer occurs in the vadose zone. Such wells are a pathway for air movement between the deep vadose zone and land surface and this sustains the pressure disequilibrium between the well bore and the atmosphere for longer time periods. Barometric over-response was not observed with the absolute pressure transducers because barometric compensation was achieved by directly measuring the air pressure within the well. Users of vented pressure transducers should be aware of the over-response issue in certain Hanford Site wells and ascertain if it will affect the use of the data. Pressure disequilibrium between the well and the atmosphere can be identified by substantial air movement through the wellbore. In wells exhibiting pressure disequilibrium, it is recommended that absolute pressure transducers be used rather than vented transducers for applications that require precise automated determinations of well water-level changes in response to barometric pressure fluctuations.

  1. Flights of fear: a mechanical wing whistle sounds the alarm in a flocking bird

    PubMed Central

    Hingee, Mae; Magrath, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Animals often form groups to increase collective vigilance and allow early detection of predators, but this benefit of sociality relies on rapid transfer of information. Among birds, alarm calls are not present in all species, while other proposed mechanisms of information transfer are inefficient. We tested whether wing sounds can encode reliable information on danger. Individuals taking off in alarm fly more quickly or ascend more steeply, so may produce different sounds in alarmed than in routine flight, which then act as reliable cues of alarm, or honest ‘index’ signals in which a signal's meaning is associated with its method of production. We show that crested pigeons, Ocyphaps lophotes, which have modified flight feathers, produce distinct wing ‘whistles’ in alarmed flight, and that individuals take off in alarm only after playback of alarmed whistles. Furthermore, amplitude-manipulated playbacks showed that response depends on whistle structure, such as tempo, not simply amplitude. We believe this is the first demonstration that flight noise can send information about alarm, and suggest that take-off noise could provide a cue of alarm in many flocking species, with feather modification evolving specifically to signal alarm in some. Similar reliable cues or index signals could occur in other animals. PMID:19726481

  2. Progress report on sediment analyses at selected faunal monitoring sites in north-central and northeastern Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, T.M.; Means, G.H.; Brewster-Wingard, G. L.

    1997-01-01

    Florida Bay is a shallow, subtropical lagoon at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula. The 2200 square kilometer, triangular-shaped area is the site of modern carbonate sediment formation and deposition. The intricate ecosystem of the bay has undergone significant changes as the result of natural influences and human intervention. The purpose of this study is to investigate carbonate sediment characteristics and distribution in conjunction with faunal and floral to determine the substrate preferences of associated fauna and flora. The modern data provide the proxy data for down-core analyses of sediments, fauna and flora in order to document ecosystem changes in the bay. Selected sediment samples collected during 1996 from 18 sites in the northeastern and central bay were analyzed for insoluble residues, organic content, total carbonate, and percent of silt and clay sized particles. Insoluble residues range from 0.8% of the sediment in a shell lag to 11.5% with an average of 5.1%. Organic content ranged from a minimum of 1.43% of the sediment to 18.05% with an average of 7.6%. The total carbonate content ranged from 72.56% to 97.81%, averaging 87.98%. The percent silt and clay sized particles ranged from 13.75% to 63.62% for the samples analyzed. The insoluble residue content shows a general trend of decreasing insoluble residues from the northeastern bay toward the southwest. Organic content is variable throughout the bay and does not show a regional trend. Several sites show a trend of higher organic content in the samples collected in February as compared to those collected in July. Lithologic examination indicated that, in addition to the carbonate mud (less than 63mm), sample components included whole and fragmented mollusks, foraminifers, bryozoans, ostracods, and organic matter. The insoluble residues consisted of quartz sand and silt, clays and siliceous fossils. A component of the insoluble residues may be dust derived from Africa and transported to southern Florida by the prevailing winds. This report is preliminary and has not been reviewed for conformity with U.S. Geological Survey editorial standards or with the North American Stratigraphic Code. Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

  3. Frequency-domain fluorescence based fiber optic fire alarm system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2001-04-01

    Erbium and thulium doped fibers have been investigated in this work, for the first time, to determine their potential in fire or high temperature alarm applications based on the use of fluorescence decay in the frequency domain. Two configurations of the sensing system have been tested and compared, with particular reference to their minimum spatial resolution and location discrimination characteristics. The initial results show that temperature excursions of 125 °C within 10 cm along a length of a 1.2 m sensing loop can be determined within a period of some tens of seconds, which is adequate for the sensor purpose, and work is continuing to increase the system's sensitivity.

  4. Organic Carbon Dynamics beyond the Perspective of Monitoring: Impact of Historical Landscape Utilization on the Past Lake-Water Carbon Trajectory in Central Boreal Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Jacob, C.; Tolu, J.; Bigler, C.; Bindler, R.

    2014-12-01

    To date, the key drivers behind the recent observed increase in organic carbon (OC) concentrations in surface waters are still controversial. The lack of long-term monitoring data - over centuries and millennia - leaves us with an ambiguous understanding of the past trajectory of OC concentrations in surface waters, and inhibits a better mechanistic understanding of past and a reliable prediction of future changes in OC levels.By using a paleolimnological approach, we reconstructed past lake-water total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations in lakes across the boreal landscape of central Sweden. Reconstructions are based on a transfer function between visible near-infrared spectra of surface sediments and the corresponding TOC concentration in the water column. Potential drivers behind changes in TOC were determined by a multi-proxy analysis of one of the studied lake sediment records including organic and inorganic geochemistry as well as biological proxies (pollen, diatoms).Our results show a significant decrease in lake-water TOC beginning already ~550 years ago. This decline continued until the mid-20th century when TOC concentrations started to increase again. These dynamics in TOC coincide with changes in proxies indicating catchment disturbance by human activities. The chronology of these changes corresponds to the expansion and decline of a landscape-wide system of summer forest grazing and farming in central Sweden from the 15th century to the turn of the 20th century. Frequent grazing and exploitation of forests and mires reduce aboveground vegetation and physically disturb soils. This further affects the carbon cycling by enhancing carbon turnover, reducing the thickness of organic soils and consequently altering the transport of OC from the catchment to lakes.Our findings suggest that recent changes in lake-water TOC in Sweden are strongly associated with historical patterns in land use and not only on-going changes in climate or sulfur deposition.

  5. Gunshot acoustic signature specific features and false alarms reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzier, Alain; Millet, Joel

    2005-05-01

    This paper provides a detailed analysis of the most specific parameters of gunshot signatures through models as well as through real data. The models for the different contributions to gunshot typical signature (shock and muzzle blast) are presented and used to discuss the variation of measured signatures over the different environmental conditions and shot configurations. The analysis is followed by a description of the performance requirements for gunshot detection systems, from sniper detection that was the main concern 10 years ago, to the new and more challenging conditions faced in today operations. The work presented examines the process of how systems are deployed and used as well as how the operational environment has changed. The main sources of false alarms and new threats such as RPGs and mortars that acoustic gunshot detection systems have to face today are also defined and discussed. Finally, different strategies for reducing false alarms are proposed based on the acoustic signatures. Different strategies are presented through various examples of specific missions ranging from vehicle protection to area protection. These strategies not only include recommendation on how to handle acoustic information for the best efficiency of the acoustic detector but also recommends some add-on sensors to enhance system overall performance.

  6. Reliability and the adaptive utility of discrimination among alarm callers.

    PubMed

    Blumstein, Daniel T; Verneyre, Laure; Daniel, Janice C

    2004-09-01

    Unlike individually distinctive contact calls, or calls that aid in the recognition of young by their parents, the function or functions of individually distinctive alarm calls is less obvious. We conducted three experiments to study the importance of caller reliability in explaining individual-discriminative abilities in the alarm calls of yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris). In our first two experiments, we found that calls from less reliable individuals and calls from individuals calling from a greater simulated distance were more evocative than calls from reliable individuals or nearby callers. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that marmots assess the reliability of callers to help them decide how much time to allocate to independent vigilance. The third experiment demonstrated that the number of callers influenced responsiveness, probably because situations where more than a single caller calls, are those when there is certain to be a predator present. Taken together, the results from all three experiments demonstrate the importance of reliability in explaining individual discrimination abilities in yellow-bellied marmots. Marmots' assessment of reliability acts by influencing the time allocated to individual assessment and thus the time not allocated to other activities. PMID:15315902

  7. The double slit experiment and the time reversed fire alarm

    E-print Network

    Tarek Halabi

    2010-04-10

    When both slits of the double slit experiment are open, closing one paradoxically increases the detection rate at some points on the detection screen. Feynman famously warned that temptation to "understand" such a puzzling feature only draws us into blind alleys. Nevertheless, we gain insight into this feature by drawing an analogy between the double slit experiment and a time reversed fire alarm. Much as closing the slit increases probability of a future detection, ruling out fire drill scenarios, having heard the fire alarm, increases probability of a past fire (using Bayesian inference). Classically, Bayesian inference is associated with computing probabilities of past events. We therefore identify this feature of the double slit experiment with a time reversed thermodynamic arrow. We believe that much of the enigma of quantum mechanics is simply due to some variation of time's arrow. In further support of this, we employ a plausible formulation of the thermodynamic arrow to derive an uncertainty in classical mechanics that is reminiscent of quantum uncertainty.

  8. Recent Results on "Approximations to Optimal Alarm Systems for Anomaly Detection"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Rodney Alexander

    2009-01-01

    An optimal alarm system and its approximations may use Kalman filtering for univariate linear dynamic systems driven by Gaussian noise to provide a layer of predictive capability. Predicted Kalman filter future process values and a fixed critical threshold can be used to construct a candidate level-crossing event over a predetermined prediction window. An optimal alarm system can be designed to elicit the fewest false alarms for a fixed detection probability in this particular scenario.

  9. Evaluation of Fire-Safety Programs that use 10Year Smoke Alarms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Jackson; Jonathan Wilson; Judith Akoto; Sherry Dixon; David E. Jacobs; Michael F. Ballesteros

    2010-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began funding a Smoke Alarm Installation and Fire Safety Education (SAIFE)\\u000a program in 1998. This program involves the installation of lithium-powered “10-year” smoke alarms in homes at high risk for\\u000a fires and injuries. This study aimed to (1) determine among original SAIFE homes if the lithium-powered alarms were still\\u000a present and functional 8–10 years

  10. Construction of Wireless Fire Alarm System Based on ZigBee Technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MA Shu-guang

    2011-01-01

    This paper points out the defect of wired automatic fire alarm system in used, and the necessity and possibility of constructing wireless fire alarm system. ZigBee technology based on IEEE802.15.4 and its characteristics are introduced. We also give out a method of constructing wireless fire alarm system based on ZigBee, including the design of construction, hardware and software.

  11. Assimilation of GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage into a Land Surface Model: Evaluation 1 and Potential Value for Drought Monitoring in Western and Central Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Bailing; Rodell, Matthew; Zaitchik, Benjamin F.; Reichle, Rolf H.; Koster, Randal D.; van Dam, Tonie M.

    2012-01-01

    A land surface model s ability to simulate states (e.g., soil moisture) and fluxes (e.g., runoff) is limited by uncertainties in meteorological forcing and parameter inputs as well as inadequacies in model physics. In this study, anomalies of terrestrial water storage (TWS) observed by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission were assimilated into the NASA Catchment land surface model in western and central Europe for a 7-year period, using a previously developed ensemble Kalman smoother. GRACE data assimilation led to improved runoff correlations with gauge data in 17 out of 18 hydrological basins, even in basins smaller than the effective resolution of GRACE. Improvements in root zone soil moisture were less conclusive, partly due to the shortness of the in situ data record. In addition to improving temporal correlations, GRACE data assimilation also reduced increasing trends in simulated monthly TWS and runoff associated with increasing rates of precipitation. GRACE assimilated root zone soil moisture and TWS fields exhibited significant changes in their dryness rankings relative to those without data assimilation, suggesting that GRACE data assimilation could have a substantial impact on drought monitoring. Signals of drought in GRACE TWS correlated well with MODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data in most areas. Although they detected the same droughts during warm seasons, drought signatures in GRACE derived TWS exhibited greater persistence than those in NDVI throughout all seasons, in part due to limitations associated with the seasonality of vegetation.

  12. The research of highway traffic accident management and pre-alarm system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianping; Zhang, Tiejun; Wan, Jiaonan; Zhang, Juwen; Wang, Rui

    For the rigorous traffic safety issues resulting from rapid transportation development, as well as the more and more attention paid to the traffic accidents dynamic analysis and pre-alarm methods, combined with the practical needs of the highway safety management, this paper summarizes the experience of traffic safety pre-alarm research both in domestic and abroad, designs the frame of highway traffic accident management and pre-alarm system from the function and software engineering requirement, and refines kernel modules such as accident prone section judgement, traffic safety pre-alarm analysis and perfecting safety measures analysis, in order to guide the exploitation and application of the system.

  13. Influence of Body Size on the Responses of Fathead Minnows, Pimephales promelas, to Damselfly Alarm Cues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reehan S. Mirza; Douglas P. Chivers

    2003-01-01

    Abstract A wide,diversity of aquatic organisms,release chemical,alarm,cues upon encountering,or being attacked by a predator. These alarm cues can be used by nearby,individuals to assess local predation,risk. Receivers warned,by chemical alarm cues gain a survival benefit when,encountering,predators. Animals that are in the same prey guild (i.e. that co-occur and share the same predators) may,learn to recognize,each,others,chemical,alarm,cues. This ability may,confer,an adaptive,advantage,if the

  14. Alarm substance from adult zebrafish alters early embryonic development in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Mourabit, S.; Rundle, S. D.; Spicer, J. I.; Sloman, K. A.

    2010-01-01

    Alarm substances elicit behavioural responses in a wide range of animals but effects on early embryonic development are virtually unknown. Here we investigated whether skin injury-induced alarm substances caused physiological responses in embryos produced by two Danio species (Danio rerio and Danio albolineatus). Both species showed more rapid physiological development in the presence of alarm substance, although there were subtle differences between them: D. rerio had advanced muscle contraction and heart function, whereas D. albolineatus had advanced heart function only. Hence, alarm cues from injured or dying fish may be of benefit to their offspring, inducing physiological responses and potentially increasing their inclusive fitness. PMID:20071391

  15. System and method for statistically monitoring and analyzing sensed conditions

    DOEpatents

    Pebay, Philippe P. (Livermore, CA); Brandt, James M. (Dublin, CA); Gentile, Ann C. (Dublin, CA); Marzouk, Youssef M. (Oakland, CA); Hale, Darrian J. (San Jose, CA); Thompson, David C. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-01-04

    A system and method of monitoring and analyzing a plurality of attributes for an alarm condition is disclosed. The attributes are processed and/or unprocessed values of sensed conditions of a collection of a statistically significant number of statistically similar components subjected to varying environmental conditions. The attribute values are used to compute the normal behaviors of some of the attributes and also used to infer parameters of a set of models. Relative probabilities of some attribute values are then computed and used along with the set of models to determine whether an alarm condition is met. The alarm conditions are used to prevent or reduce the impact of impending failure.

  16. System and method for statistically monitoring and analyzing sensed conditions

    DOEpatents

    Pebay, Philippe P. (Livermore, CA); Brandt, James M. (Dublin, CA), Gentile; Ann C. (Dublin, CA), Marzouk; Youssef M. (Oakland, CA), Hale; Darrian J. (San Jose, CA), Thompson; David C. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-07-13

    A system and method of monitoring and analyzing a plurality of attributes for an alarm condition is disclosed. The attributes are processed and/or unprocessed values of sensed conditions of a collection of a statistically significant number of statistically similar components subjected to varying environmental conditions. The attribute values are used to compute the normal behaviors of some of the attributes and also used to infer parameters of a set of models. Relative probabilities of some attribute values are then computed and used along with the set of models to determine whether an alarm condition is met. The alarm conditions are used to prevent or reduce the impact of impending failure.

  17. System and method for statistically monitoring and analyzing sensed conditions

    DOEpatents

    Pebay, Philippe P. (Livermore, CA); Brandt, James M. (Dublin, CA); Gentile, Ann C. (Dublin, CA); Marzouk, Youssef M. (Oakland, CA); Hale, Darrian J. (San Jose, CA); Thompson, David C. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-01-25

    A system and method of monitoring and analyzing a plurality of attributes for an alarm condition is disclosed. The attributes are processed and/or unprocessed values of sensed conditions of a collection of a statistically significant number of statistically similar components subjected to varying environmental conditions. The attribute values are used to compute the normal behaviors of some of the attributes and also used to infer parameters of a set of models. Relative probabilities of some attribute values are then computed and used along with the set of models to determine whether an alarm condition is met. The alarm conditions are used to prevent or reduce the impact of impending failure.

  18. Cross-correlation analysis of 2012-2014 seismic events in Central-Northern Italy: insights from the geochemical monitoring network of Tuscany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierotti, Lisa; Facca, Gianluca; Gherardi, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    Since late 2002, a geochemical monitoring network is operating in Tuscany, Central Italy, to collect data and possibly identify geochemical anomalies that characteristically occur before regionally significant (i.e. with magnitude > 3) seismic events. The network currently consists of 6 stations located in areas already investigated in detail for their geological setting, hydrogeological and geochemical background and boundary conditions. All these stations are equipped for remote, continuous monitoring of selected physicochemical parameters (temperature, pH, redox potential, electrical conductivity), and dissolved concentrations of CO2 and CH4. Additional information are obtained through in situ discrete monitoring. Field surveys are periodically performed to guarantee maintenance and performance control of the sensors of the automatic stations, and to collect water samples for the determination of the chemical and stable isotope composition of all the springs investigated for seismic precursors. Geochemical continuous signals are numerically processed to remove outliers, monitoring errors and aseismic effects from seasonal and climatic fluctuations. The elaboration of smoothed, long-term time series (more than 200000 data available today for each station) allows for a relatively accurate definition of geochemical background values. Geochemical values out of the two-sigma relative standard deviation domain are inspected as possible indicators of physicochemical changes related to regional seismic activity. Starting on November 2011, four stations of the Tuscany network located in two separate mountainous areas of Northern Apennines separating Tuscany from Emilia-Romagna region (Equi Terme and Gallicano), and Tuscany from Emilia-Romagna and Umbria regions (Vicchio and Caprese Michelangelo), started to register anomalous values in pH and CO2 partial pressure (PCO2). Cross-correlation analysis indicates an apparent relationship between the most important seismic events (magnitude >3 up to 5.4) experienced in the Tuscany, Emilia-Romagna and Umbria regions during the period 2012-2014, and these geochemical anomalies. Changes in pH (decreasing) and PCO2 (increasing) are generally observed from a few months to a few weeks before the main shock. This trend has been recognized for the Parma quake of 27 January 2012 (M = 5.4), for the Pieve Fosciana quake of 13 January 2013 (M = 4.8), for the Garfagnana-Lunigiana seismic sequence started June 21, 2013 (Mmax = 5.2), for the Montefeltro seismic sequence started July 11, 2013 (Mmax = 3.9), for the Gubbio seismic sequences of July and December 2013 (Mmax = 3.9), for the Città di Castello seismic sequences of April 2013 and December 2013 (Mmax = 3.9), for the Casentino seismic sequence started October 17, 2014 (Mmax = 3.5), and for the Chianti seismic sequence started December 19, 2014 (Mmax = 4.1). These features suggest that the selected mineral springs can be considered as appropriate sites for the search of geochemical earthquake precursors. Further investigations focused on in-depth analysis of signals are currently in progress.

  19. When one is not enough: prevalence and characteristics of homes not adequately protected by smoke alarms

    PubMed Central

    Peek-Asa, C; Allareddy, V; Yang, J; Taylor, C; Lundell, J; Zwerling, C

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has specific recommendations about the number, location, and type of smoke alarms that are needed to provide maximum protection for a household. No previous studies have examined whether or not homes are completely protected according to these guidelines. The authors describe the prevalence and home characteristics associated with compliance to recommendations for smoke alarm installation by the NFPA. Design, setting, and subjects: Data are from the baseline on-site survey of a randomized trial to measure smoke alarm effectiveness. The trial was housed in a longitudinal cohort study in a rural Iowa county. Of 1005 homes invited, 691 (68.8%) participated. Main outcome measures: Information about smoke alarm type, placement, and function, as well as home and occupant characteristics, was collected through an on-site household survey. Results: Although 86.0% of homes had at least one smoke alarm, only 22.3% of homes (approximately one in five) were adequately protected according to NFPA guidelines. Fourteen percent of homes had no functioning smoke alarms. More than half of the homes with smoke alarms did not have enough of them or had installed them incorrectly, and 42.4% of homes with alarms had at least one alarm that did not operate. Homes with at least one high school graduate were nearly four times more likely to be fully protected. Homes that had multiple levels, a basement, or were cluttered or poorly cleaned were significantly less likely to be fully protected. Conclusion: These findings indicate that consumers may not be knowledgeable about the number of alarms they need or how to properly install them. Occupants are also not adequately maintaining the alarms that are installed. PMID:16326772

  20. Tritium Room Air Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader; B. J. Denny

    2008-09-01

    Monitoring the breathing air in tritium facility rooms for airborne tritium is a radiological safety requirement and a best practice for personnel safety. Besides audible alarms for room evacuation, these monitors often send signals for process shutdown, ventilation isolation, and cleanup system actuation to mitigate releases and prevent tritium spread to the environment. Therefore, these monitors are important not only to personnel safety but also to public safety and environmental protection. This paper presents an operating experience review of tritium monitor performance on demand during small (1 mCi to 1 Ci) operational releases, and intentional airborne inroom tritium release tests. The tritium tests provide monitor operation data to allow calculation of a statistical estimate for the reliability of monitors annunciating in actual tritium gas airborne release situations. The data show a failure to operate rate of 3.5E-06/monitor-hr with an upper bound of 4.7E-06, a failure to alarm on demand rate of 1.4E-02/demand with an upper bound of 4.4E-02, and a spurious alarm rate of 0.1 to 0.2/monitor-yr.