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Sample records for central artery stiffness

  1. Arterial Stiffness, Central Pulsatile Hemodynamic Load, and Orthostatic Hypotension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Si; Wan, Shixi; Zhou, Yufei; Pan, Pei; Wen, Bo; Zhang, Xin; Liao, Hang; Shi, Di; Shi, Rufeng; Chen, Xiaoping; Jangala, Tulasiram

    2016-07-01

    The association between central pulsatile hemodynamic load, arterial stiffness, and orthostatic hypotension (OH) is unclear. The authors recruited 1099 participants from the community. Questionnaire, physical examination, and laboratory tests were performed. To assess the correlation between central pulsatile hemodynamic load, arterial stiffness, and OH, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed, and the discriminatory power was assessed by the area under the receiver operating curve. The prevalence of OH in this population was 5.6%. After adjusting for potential confounders, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (BaPWV) was significantly and positively correlated with OH in both the hypertension and nonhypertension groups (all P<.05), while central systolic blood pressure (CSBP) was only significantly associated with OH in the hypertension subgroup. In addition, BaPWV seemed to have a better discriminatory power than CSBP in both subgroups. BaPWV appears to be a better indicator of OH than CSBP in routine clinical practice. PMID:26543017

  2. Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Avolio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Stiffness of large arteries has been long recognized as a significant determinant of pulse pressure. However, it is only in recent decades, with the accumulation of longitudinal data from large and varied epidemiological studies of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease, that it has emerged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. This has generated substantial interest in investigations related to intrinsic causative and associated factors responsible for the alteration of mechanical properties of the arterial wall, with the aim to uncover specific pathways that could be interrogated to prevent or reverse arterial stiffening. Much has been written on the haemodynamic relevance of arterial stiffness in terms of the quantification of pulsatile relationships of blood pressure and flow in conduit arteries. Indeed, much of this early work regarded blood vessels as passive elastic conduits, with the endothelial layer considered as an inactive lining of the lumen and as an interface to flowing blood. However, recent advances in molecular biology and increased technological sophistication for the detection of low concentrations of biochemical compounds have elucidated the highly important regulatory role of the endothelial cell affecting vascular function. These techniques have enabled research into the interaction of the underlying passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall with the active cellular and molecular processes that regulate the local environment of the load-bearing components. This review addresses these emerging concepts. PMID:26587425

  3. The acute effect of maximal exercise on central and peripheral arterial stiffness indices and hemodynamics in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Melo, Xavier; Fernhall, Bo; Santos, Diana A; Pinto, Rita; Pimenta, Nuno M; Sardinha, Luís B; Santa-Clara, Helena

    2016-03-01

    This study compared the effects of a bout of maximal running exercise on arterial stiffness in children and adults. Right carotid blood pressure and artery stiffness indices measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), compliance and distensibility coefficients, stiffness index α and β (echo-tracking), contralateral carotid blood pressure, and upper and lower limb and central/aortic PWV (applanation tonometry) were taken at rest and 10 min after a bout of maximal treadmill running in 34 children (7.38 ± 0.38 years) and 45 young adults (25.22 ± 0.91 years) having similar aerobic potential. Two-by-two repeated measures analysis of variance and analysis of covariance were used to detect differences with exercise between groups. Carotid pulse pressure (PP; η(2) = 0.394) increased more in adults after exercise (p < 0.05). Compliance (η(2) = 0.385) decreased in particular in adults and in those with high changes in distending pressure, similarly to stiffness index α and β. Carotid PWV increased more in adults and was related to local changes in PP but not mean arterial pressure (MAP). Stiffness in the lower limbs decreased (η(2) = 0.115) but apparently only in those with small MAP changes (η(2) = 0.111). No significant exercise or group interaction effects were found when variables were adjusted to height. An acute bout of maximal exercise can alter arterial stiffness and hemodynamics in the carotid artery and within the active muscle beds. Arterial stiffness and hemodynamic response to metabolic demands during exercise in children simply reflect their smaller body size and may not indicate a particular physiological difference compared with adults. PMID:26842667

  4. Decreased elastic energy storage, not increased material stiffness, characterizes central artery dysfunction in fibulin-5 deficiency independent of sex.

    PubMed

    Ferruzzi, J; Bersi, M R; Uman, S; Yanagisawa, H; Humphrey, J D

    2015-03-01

    Central artery stiffness has emerged over the past 15 years as a clinically significant indicator of cardiovascular function and initiator of disease. Loss of elastic fiber integrity is one of the primary contributors to increased arterial stiffening in aging, hypertension, and related conditions. Elastic fibers consist of an elastin core and multiple glycoproteins; hence defects in any of these constituents can adversely affect arterial wall mechanics. In this paper, we focus on mechanical consequences of the loss of fibulin-5, an elastin-associated glycoprotein involved in elastogenesis. Specifically, we compared the biaxial mechanical properties of five central arteries-the ascending thoracic aorta, descending thoracic aorta, suprarenal abdominal aorta, infrarenal abdominal aorta, and common carotid artery-from male and female wild-type and fibulin-5 deficient mice. Results revealed that, independent of sex, all five regions in the fibulin-5 deficient mice manifested a marked increase in structural stiffness but also a marked decrease in elastic energy storage and typically an increase in energy dissipation, with all differences being most dramatic in the ascending and abdominal aortas. Given that the primary function of large arteries is to store elastic energy during systole and to use this energy during diastole to work on the blood, fibulin-5 deficiency results in a widespread diminishment of central artery function that can have significant effects on hemodynamics and cardiac function. PMID:25532020

  5. Multimarker Analysis for New Biomarkers in Relation to Central Arterial Stiffness and Hemodynamics in a Chinese Community-Dwelling Population.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shihui; Luo, Leiming; Ye, Ping; Xiao, Wenkai

    2015-11-01

    Central arterial stiffness and hemodynamics independently reflect the risk of cardiovascular events. This Chinese community-based analysis was performed to evaluate the relationships of new biomarkers with central arterial stiffness and hemodynamics by a multimarker method. This analysis consisted of 1540 participants who were fully tested for the new biomarkers including N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide, lipid accumulation product, triglyceride-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG-HDL-c) ratio, uric acid, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and homocysteine. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), central pulse pressure (cPP), and central augmentation index (cAIx) were measured. The median (range) age of entire cohort was 62 years (21-96 years), and 40.5% were males. The median (interquartile range) of cfPWV, cPP, and cAIx was 11.0 m/s (9.6-13.0 m/s), 42 mm Hg (35-52 mm Hg), and 28% (21%-33%), respectively. In multivariate analysis, participants with higher cfPWV had significantly higher age, peripheral pulse pressure, TG, TG-HDL-c ratio, and homocysteine levels compared with others (P < .05 for all). Multimarker analysis in a Chinese community-dwelling population reinforced the potential clinical value of plasma TG-HDL-c ratio and homocysteine levels as the biomarkers of increased arterial stiffness. PMID:25883364

  6. Effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on central arterial stiffness and arterial wave reflections in young and older healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, Kevin D; Feehan, Robert P; Blaha, Cheryl; McLaughlin, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Increased central arterial stiffness and enhanced arterial wave reflections may contribute to increased risk of cardiovascular disease development with advancing age. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3) ingestion may reduce cardiovascular risk via favorable effects exerted on arterial structure and function. We determined the effects of n-3 supplementation (4 g/day for 12 weeks) on important measures of central arterial stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity; PWV) and arterial wave reflection (central augmentation index) in young (n = 12; 25 ± 1-year-old, mean ± SE) and older (n = 12; 66 ± 2) healthy adults. We hypothesized that n-3 supplementation would decrease carotid-femoral PWV and central augmentation index in older adults. Our results indicate that carotid-femoral PWV and central augmentation index were greater in older (988 ± 65 cm/sec and 33 ± 2%) than in young adults (656 ± 16 cm/sec and 3 ± 4%: both P < 0.05 compared to older) before the intervention (Pre). N-3 supplementation decreased carotid-femoral PWV in older (Δ-9 ± 2% Precompared to Post; P < 0.05), but not young adults (Δ2 ± 3%). Central augmentation index was unchanged by n-3 supplementation in young (3 ± 4 vs. 0 ± 4% for Pre and Post, respectively) and older adults (33 ± 2 vs. 35 ± 3%). Arterial blood pressure at rest, although increased with age, was not altered by n-3 supplementation in young or older adults. Collectively, these data indicate that 12 weeks of daily n-3 supplementation decreases an important measure of central arterial stiffness (carotid-femoral PWV) in older, but not young healthy adults. The mechanism underlying decreased central arterial stiffness with n-3 supplementation is unknown, but appears to be independent of effects on arterial blood pressure or arterial wave reflections. PMID:26109192

  7. Associations and clinical relevance of aortic-brachial artery stiffness mismatch, aortic reservoir function, and central pressure augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Martin G.; Hughes, Alun D.; Davies, Justin E.; Sharman, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Central augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx) predict cardiovascular events and mortality, but underlying physiological mechanisms remain disputed. While traditionally believed to relate to wave reflections arising from proximal arterial impedance (and stiffness) mismatching, recent evidence suggests aortic reservoir function may be a more dominant contributor to AP and AIx. Our aim was therefore to determine relationships among aortic-brachial stiffness mismatching, AP, AIx, aortic reservoir function, and end-organ disease. Aortic (aPWV) and brachial (bPWV) pulse wave velocity were measured in 359 individuals (aged 61 ± 9, 49% male). Central AP, AIx, and aortic reservoir indexes were derived from radial tonometry. Participants were stratified by positive (bPWV > aPWV), negligible (bPWV ≈ aPWV), or negative stiffness mismatch (bPWV < aPWV). Left-ventricular mass index (LVMI) was measured by two-dimensional-echocardiography. Central AP and AIx were higher with negative stiffness mismatch vs. negligible or positive stiffness mismatch (11 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 vs. 8 ± 6 mmHg, P < 0.001 and 24 ± 10 vs. 24 ± 11 vs. 21 ± 13%, P = 0.042). Stiffness mismatch (bPWV -aPWV) was negatively associated with AP (r = −0.18, P = 0.001) but not AIx (r = −0.06, P = 0.27). Aortic reservoir pressure strongly correlated to AP (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and AIx (r = 0.62, P < 0.001) independent of age, sex, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and height (standardized β = 0.61 and 0.12, P ≤ 0.001). Aortic reservoir pressure independently predicted abnormal LVMI (β = 0.13, P = 0.024). Positive aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch does not result in higher AP or AIx. Aortic reservoir function, rather than discrete wave reflection from proximal arterial stiffness mismatching, provides a better model description of AP and AIx and also has clinical relevance as evidenced by an independent association of aortic reservoir pressure with LVMI. PMID:26276816

  8. Associations and clinical relevance of aortic-brachial artery stiffness mismatch, aortic reservoir function, and central pressure augmentation.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Martin G; Hughes, Alun D; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E

    2015-10-01

    Central augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx) predict cardiovascular events and mortality, but underlying physiological mechanisms remain disputed. While traditionally believed to relate to wave reflections arising from proximal arterial impedance (and stiffness) mismatching, recent evidence suggests aortic reservoir function may be a more dominant contributor to AP and AIx. Our aim was therefore to determine relationships among aortic-brachial stiffness mismatching, AP, AIx, aortic reservoir function, and end-organ disease. Aortic (aPWV) and brachial (bPWV) pulse wave velocity were measured in 359 individuals (aged 61 ± 9, 49% male). Central AP, AIx, and aortic reservoir indexes were derived from radial tonometry. Participants were stratified by positive (bPWV > aPWV), negligible (bPWV ≈ aPWV), or negative stiffness mismatch (bPWV < aPWV). Left-ventricular mass index (LVMI) was measured by two-dimensional-echocardiography. Central AP and AIx were higher with negative stiffness mismatch vs. negligible or positive stiffness mismatch (11 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 vs. 8 ± 6 mmHg, P < 0.001 and 24 ± 10 vs. 24 ± 11 vs. 21 ± 13%, P = 0.042). Stiffness mismatch (bPWV-aPWV) was negatively associated with AP (r = -0.18, P = 0.001) but not AIx (r = -0.06, P = 0.27). Aortic reservoir pressure strongly correlated to AP (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and AIx (r = 0.62, P < 0.001) independent of age, sex, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and height (standardized β = 0.61 and 0.12, P ≤ 0.001). Aortic reservoir pressure independently predicted abnormal LVMI (β = 0.13, P = 0.024). Positive aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch does not result in higher AP or AIx. Aortic reservoir function, rather than discrete wave reflection from proximal arterial stiffness mismatching, provides a better model description of AP and AIx and also has clinical relevance as evidenced by an independent association of aortic reservoir pressure with LVMI. PMID:26276816

  9. Effects of antihypertensive drugs on arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Dudenbostel, Tanja; Glasser, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the possible pathophysiological mechanisms and the role of arterial stiffness as a biomarker, a blood pressure-independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The effects of different antihypertensive drug classes on noninvasively assessed markers of arterial stiffness are also discussed. Current evidence will be reviewed regarding the effect of drugs on arterial stiffness, including the peripheral and central effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor antagonists, dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers, beta blockers (including vasodilating beta blockers), diuretics, and mineralocorticoid antagonists. PMID:22573107

  10. Markers of arterial stiffness in peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Husmann, Marc; Jacomella, Vincenzo; Thalhammer, Christoph; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice R

    2015-09-01

    Increased arterial stiffness results from reduced elasticity of the arterial wall and is an independent predictor for cardiovascular risk. The gold standard for assessment of arterial stiffness is the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. Other parameters such as central aortic pulse pressure and aortic augmentation index are indirect, surrogate markers of arterial stiffness, but provide additional information on the characteristics of wave reflection. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterised by its association with systolic hypertension, increased arterial stiffness, disturbed wave reflexion and prognosis depending on ankle-brachial pressure index. This review summarises the physiology of pulse wave propagation and reflection and its changes due to aging and atherosclerosis. We discuss different non-invasive assessment techniques and highlight the importance of the understanding of arterial pulse wave analysis for each vascular specialist and primary care physician alike in the context of PAD. PMID:26317253

  11. Preeclampsia Is Associated with Increased Central Aortic Pressure, Elastic Arteries Stiffness and Wave Reflections, and Resting and Recruitable Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Juan; Farro, Ignacio; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. An altered endothelial function (EF) could be associated with preeclampsia (PE). However, more specific and complementary analyses are required to confirm this topic. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and hyperemic-related changes in carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWVcr) offer complementary information about "recruitability" of EF. Objectives. To evaluate, in healthy and hypertensive pregnant women (with and without PE), central arterial parameters in conjunction with "basal and recruitable" EF. Methods. Nonhypertensive (HP) and hypertensive pregnant women (gestational hypertension, GH; preeclampsia, PE) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), wave reflection parameters (AIx@75), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and PWVcr, and brachial and common carotid stiffness and intima-media thickness were measured. Brachial FMD and L-FMC and hyperemic-related change in PWVcr were measured. Results. Aortic BP and AIx@75 were elevated in PE. PE showed stiffer elastic but not muscular arteries. After cuff deflation, PWVcr decreased in HP, while GH showed a blunted PWVcr response and PE showed a tendency to increase. Maximal FMD and L-FMC were observed in HP followed by GH; PE did not reach significant arterial constriction. Conclusion. Aortic BP and wave reflections as well as elastic arteries stiffness are increased in PE. PE showed both "resting and recruitable" endothelial dysfunctions. PMID:26351578

  12. Preeclampsia Is Associated with Increased Central Aortic Pressure, Elastic Arteries Stiffness and Wave Reflections, and Resting and Recruitable Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Torrado, Juan; Farro, Ignacio; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. An altered endothelial function (EF) could be associated with preeclampsia (PE). However, more specific and complementary analyses are required to confirm this topic. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and hyperemic-related changes in carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWVcr) offer complementary information about “recruitability” of EF. Objectives. To evaluate, in healthy and hypertensive pregnant women (with and without PE), central arterial parameters in conjunction with “basal and recruitable” EF. Methods. Nonhypertensive (HP) and hypertensive pregnant women (gestational hypertension, GH; preeclampsia, PE) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), wave reflection parameters (AIx@75), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and PWVcr, and brachial and common carotid stiffness and intima-media thickness were measured. Brachial FMD and L-FMC and hyperemic-related change in PWVcr were measured. Results. Aortic BP and AIx@75 were elevated in PE. PE showed stiffer elastic but not muscular arteries. After cuff deflation, PWVcr decreased in HP, while GH showed a blunted PWVcr response and PE showed a tendency to increase. Maximal FMD and L-FMC were observed in HP followed by GH; PE did not reach significant arterial constriction. Conclusion. Aortic BP and wave reflections as well as elastic arteries stiffness are increased in PE. PE showed both “resting and recruitable” endothelial dysfunctions. PMID:26351578

  13. Body Weight and Not Exercise Capacity Determines Central Systolic Blood Pressure, a Surrogate for Arterial Stiffness, in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jan; Meyer, Joanna; Elmenhorst, Julia; Oberhoffer, Renate

    2016-08-01

    Cardiopulmonary fitness benefits cardiovascular health. Various studies have shown a strong negative correlation between exercise capacity and arterial stiffness in adults. However, evidence for this connection in children and adolescents is scarce. About 320 healthy children and adolescents (252 male, 14.0±2.1 years) were evaluated with regard to their demographic, anthropometric and hemodynamic parameters, and their peak oxygen uptake. Peripheral and central systolic blood pressures were measured with patients in a supine position using an oscillometric device. Peak oxygen uptake was assessed by cardiopulmonary exercise testing. In multivariate regression, only peripheral systolic blood pressure (β=0.653, P<.001) and body weight (β=0.284, P<.001) emerged as independent determinants for central systolic blood pressure. Body weight therefore determines central systolic blood pressure in children and adolescents rather than measures of cardiorespiratory fitness. The prevention of overweight in childhood is necessary to reduce stiffening of the arteries and delay the onset of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26689169

  14. Central arterial stiffness is increased among subjects with severe and very severe COPD: report from a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Qvist, Linnea; Nilsson, Ulf; Johansson, Viktor; Larsson, Kjell; Rönmark, Eva; Langrish, Jeremy; Blomberg, Anders; Lindberg, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is, as productive cough, related to poorer prognosis in COPD. Central arterial stiffness is a marker of early atherosclerosis, but the association between COPD, productive cough, and arterial stiffness as a possible indicator of CVD is unclear. Objectives To compare both arterial stiffness among subjects with and without COPD and the impact of productive cough in a population-based cohort. Methods A population-based cohort, including 993 COPD and 993 non-COPD subjects, has been invited to annual examination since 2005. In 2010, 947 subjects, of which 416 had COPD (according to the GOLD spirometric criteria), participated in examinations including structured interview, spirometry, and measurements of central arterial stiffness as pulse wave velocity (PWV). Results PWV was higher in GOLD 3–4 compared to non-COPD (10.52 vs. 9.13 m/s, p=0.042). CVD and age ≥60 were both associated with significantly higher PWV in COPD as well as in non-COPD. In COPD, those with productive cough had higher PWV than those without, significantly so in GOLD 1 (9.59 vs. 8.92 m/s, p=0.024). In a multivariate model, GOLD 3–4 but not productive cough was associated with higher PWV, when adjusted for sex, age group, smoking habits, blood pressure, CVD, and pulse rate. Conclusions GOLD 3–4, age ≥60, and CVD were associated with increased arterial stiffness, and also increased in COPD subjects with productive cough compared to those without. Of importance, GOLD 3–4 but not productive cough remained associated with increased central arterial stiffness when adjusted for confounders. PMID:26557263

  15. Arterial Stiffness and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Anne-Sophie; Briet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health concern due to the high prevalence of associated cardiovascular (CV) disease. CV mortality is 10-30 times higher in end-stage renal disease patients than in the age-adjusted general population. The last 20 years have been marked by a huge effort in the characterization of the vascular remodeling process associated with CKD and its consequences on the renal, CV and general prognosis. By comparison with patients with normal renal function, with or without hypertension, an increase in large artery stiffness has been described in end-stage renal disease as well as in CKD stages 2-5. Most clinical studies are consistent with the observation that damage to large arteries may contribute to the high incidence of CV disease. By contrast, the impact of large artery stiffening and remodeling on CKD progression is still a matter of debate. Concomitant exposure to other CV risk factors, including diabetes, seems to play a major role in the association between aortic stiffness and estimated GFR. The conflicting results obtained from longitudinal studies designed to evaluate the impact of baseline aortic stiffness on GFR progression are detailed in the present review. Only pulse pressure, central and peripheral, is almost constantly associated with incident CKD and GFR decline. Kidney transplantation improves patients’ CV prognosis, but its impact on arterial stiffness is still controversial. Donor age, living kidney donation and mean blood pressure appear to be the main determinants of improvement in aortic stiffness after kidney transplantation. PMID:27195244

  16. The Effect of High Dose Cholecalciferol on Arterial Stiffness and Peripheral and Central Blood Pressure in Healthy Humans: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bressendorff, Iain; Brandi, Lisbet; Schou, Morten; Nygaard, Birgitte; Frandsen, Niels Erik; Rasmussen, Knud; Ødum, Lars; Østergaard, Ove Vyff; Hansen, Ditte

    2016-01-01

    Background Low levels of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D are associated with increased arterial stiffness and hypertension. Supplementation with vitamin D precursors has been proposed as a treatment option for these conditions. We examined the effect of oral cholecalciferol on arterial stiffness and blood pressure in healthy normotensive adults. Methods 40 healthy adults were randomised in this double-blinded study to either oral cholecalciferol 3000 IU/day or matching placebo and were followed for 16 weeks to examine any effects on pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AIx), peripheral and central blood pressure and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. Results 22 subjects in the cholecalciferol arm and 18 subjects in the placebo arm completed the 16 weeks of follow-up. There was no difference in changes in PWV, AIx corrected for heart rate or central or peripheral blood pressure between the two groups. There was no correlation between serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D and any of these parameters. Conclusions Oral cholecalciferol 3000 IU/day does not affect arterial stiffness or blood pressure after 16 weeks of treatment in healthy normotensive adults. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00952562 PMID:27509187

  17. Effect of A Reduction in glomerular filtration rate after NEphrectomy on arterial STiffness and central hemodynamics: Rationale and design of the EARNEST study☆

    PubMed Central

    Moody, William E.; Tomlinson, Laurie A.; Ferro, Charles J.; Steeds, Richard P.; Mark, Patrick B.; Zehnder, Daniel; Tomson, Charles R.; Cockcroft, John R.; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Townend, Jonathan N.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence of an association between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease. To date, however, proof that a reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a causative factor in cardiovascular disease is lacking. Kidney donors comprise a highly screened population without risk factors such as diabetes and inflammation, which invariably confound the association between CKD and cardiovascular disease. There is strong evidence that increased arterial stiffness and left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis, rather than atherosclerotic disease, mediate the adverse cardiovascular effects of CKD. The expanding practice of live kidney donation provides a unique opportunity to study the cardiovascular effects of an isolated reduction in GFR in a prospective fashion. At the same time, the proposed study will address ongoing safety concerns that persist because most longitudinal outcome studies have been undertaken at single centers and compared donor cohorts with an inappropriately selected control group. Hypotheses The reduction in GFR accompanying uninephrectomy causes (1) a pressure-independent increase in aortic stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity) and (2) an increase in peripheral and central blood pressure. Methods This is a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal, parallel group study of 440 living kidney donors and 440 healthy controls. All controls will be eligible for living kidney donation using current UK transplant criteria. Investigations will be performed at baseline and repeated at 12 months in the first instance. These include measurement of arterial stiffness using applanation tonometry to determine pulse wave velocity and pulse wave analysis, office blood pressure, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and a series of biomarkers for cardiovascular and bone mineral disease. Conclusions These data will prove valuable by characterizing the direction of causality between cardiovascular and renal disease. This

  18. [Impact of aortic stiffness on central hemodynamics and cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Bulas, J; Potočárová, M; Filková, M; Simková, A; Murín, J

    2013-06-01

    Arterial stiffness increases as a result of degenerative processes accelerated by aging and many risk factors, namely arterial hypertension. Basic clinical examination reveals increased pulse pressure as its hemodynamic manifestation. The most serious consequence of increased vascular stiffness, which cannot be revealed by clinical examination, is a change of central hemodynamics leading to increased load of left ventricle, left ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction and to overall increase of cardiovascular risk. This review aimed to point at some patophysiological mechanisms taking part in the development of vascular stiffness, vascular remodeling and hemodynamic consequences of these changes. This work also gives an overview of noninvasive examination methods and their characteristics enabling to evaluate the local, regional and systemic arterial stiffness and central pulse wave analysis and their meaning for central hemodynamics and heart workload. PMID:23808736

  19. Arterial stiffness, pulse pressure, and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Safar, Michel E; Plante, Gérard E; Mimran, Albert

    2015-05-01

    Classical studies indicate that the contribution of kidneys to hypertension is almost exclusively related to the association between mean arterial pressure (MAP) and vascular resistance. Recent reports including estimates of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have shown that pulse pressure (PP) and pulse wave velocity, 2 major indices of arterial stiffness, now emerge as significant predictors of cardiovascular risk and age-associated decline in GFR. Such findings are mainly observed in patients with hypertension and renal failure and in atherosclerotic subjects undergoing coronary angiography. In such patients, amplification of PP between ascending and terminal aorta at the renal site is constantly increased over 10mm Hg (P < 0.001), whereas MAP level remains continuously unmodified. This PP amplification is significantly associated with presence of proteinuria. Furthermore, increases in plasma creatinine and aortic stiffness are independently and positively correlated (P < 0.001) both in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. All these relationships associating PP, arterial stiffness, and renal function are mainly observed in patients 60 years of age or older. Furthermore, in renal transplant patients and their donors, subjects have been recruited for evaluations of arterial stiffness and posttransplant decline in GFR. Determinants of GFR decline were evaluated 1 and 9 years after transplantation. The first year GFR decline was related to smoking and acute rejection, whereas the later was significantly and exclusively associated with donor age and aortic stiffness. Thus, in hypertensive humans, the observed association between PP and GFR suggests that the 2 parameters are substantially mediated by arterial stiffness, not exclusively by vascular resistance. PMID:25480804

  20. Overall and abdominal obesity indicators had different association with central arterial stiffness and hemodynamics independent of age, sex, blood pressure, glucose, and lipids in Chinese community-dwelling adults

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shihui; Luo, Leiming; Ye, Ping; Liu, Yuan; Zhu, Bing; Zheng, Jin; Bai, Yongyi; Bai, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Objective Limited large sample studies have specially compared overall and abdominal obesity in relation to central arterial stiffness and hemodynamics in community-dwelling adults, especially in the People’s Republic of China. This study aimed to compare the relationship between an overall obesity indicator (body mass index [BMI]), an abdominal obesity index (waist circumference [WC]), and central arterial stiffness and hemodynamics, independent of age, sex, blood pressure, glucose, and lipids, in Chinese community-dwelling adults. Methods For 2,624 adults in this study, anthropometric indices, such as BMI and WC, were measured. Central arterial stiffness was assessed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV). Central hemodynamics was represented by central pulse pressure (cPP). Results Both overall and abdominally obese adults were older, with significantly higher cfPWV, cPP, peripheral pulse pressure (pPP), fasting blood glucose (FBG), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), and significantly lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C). After adjusting for age and sex, both the overall and abdominally obese individuals had independently higher pPP, FBG, and LDL-C levels, and lower HDL-C level. The overall obese individuals had independently higher cPP, but not cfPWV, after adjusting for age and sex, while the abdominally obese individuals had independently higher cfPWV, but not cPP. After adjusting for age, sex, pPP, FBG, LDL-C, and HDL-C, WC, but not BMI, was independently correlated with cfPWV, and BMI, but not WC, was independently associated with cPP. Age, sex, pPP, FBG, and HDL-C levels have independent association with cfPWV. Age, sex, pPP, but not FBG and HDL-C levels, have independent association with cPP. Conclusion The abdominal obesity index (WC), rather than the overall obesity indicator (BMI), was related to central arterial stiffness, independent of age, sex, blood pressure, glucose and lipids, while the overall obesity

  1. Hypertension and arterial stiffness in heart transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    de Souza-Neto, João David; de Oliveira, Ítalo Martins; Lima-Rocha, Hermano Alexandre; Oliveira-Lima, José Wellington; Bacal, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Post-transplantation hypertension is prevalent and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and subsequent graft dysfunction. The present study aimed to identify the factors associated with arterial stiffness as measured by the ambulatory arterial stiffness index. METHODS: The current study used a prospective, observational, analytical design to evaluate a group of adult heart transplantation patients. Arterial stiffness was obtained by monitoring ambulatory blood pressure and using the ambulatory arterial stiffness index as the surrogate outcome. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to control confounding. RESULTS: In a group of 85 adult heart transplantation patients, hypertension was independently associated with arterial stiffness (OR 4.98, CI 95% 1.06-23.4) as well as systolic and diastolic blood pressure averages and nighttime descent. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of ambulatory arterial stiffness index is a new, non-invasive method that is easy to perform, may contribute to better defining arterial stiffness prognosis and is associated with hypertension.

  2. Arterial stiffness in mild primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Mishaela R; Maurer, Mathew S; McMahon, Donald J; Bilezikian, John P; Silverberg, Shonni J

    2005-06-01

    When primary hyperparathyroidism was a more symptomatic disease, it was often associated with increased cardiovascular risk. As the clinical manifestations of the disease have changed to a milder, more asymptomatic disorder, investigation is shifting to more subtle cardiovascular abnormalities. We measured arterial stiffness in 39 patients with mild primary hyperparathyroidism [serum calcium, 2.66 +/- 0.2 mmol/liter (10.7 +/- 0.6 mg/dl); PTH, 21.7 +/- 9.5 pmol/liter (89 +/- 39 pg/ml)] and in 134 controls. Arterial stiffness was measured mathematically at the radial artery with a noninvasive device as the "augmentation index" (AIx). The AIx measures the difference between the second and first systolic peaks in the pressure waveform and correlates with increased cardiovascular risk. When physiological variables affecting augmentation index and potentially confounding cardiovascular risk factors (age, gender, heart rate, height, blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, smoking, and hyperlipidemia) were adjusted for, primary hyperparathyroidism was an independent predictor of increased augmentation index (B = 3.37; P < 0.03). A matched-pair analysis showed that 15% of the variance in AIx was uniquely accounted for by the presence of primary hyperparathyroidism. The presence of primary hyperparathyroidism was a stronger predictor of elevated AIx than age, gender, smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, or diabetes mellitus. AIx was also directly correlated with evidence of more active parathyroid disease, including higher PTH levels (r = +0.42; P < 0.05) and lower bone mineral density at the distal one-third radius (r = -0.33; P < 0.05). The diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism was therefore an independent predictor of increased AIx, an early measure of arterial stiffness, and the increase was associated with evidence of more active parathyroid disease. PMID:15769995

  3. The Conundrum of Arterial Stiffness, Elevated blood pressure, and Aging

    PubMed Central

    AlGhatrif, Majd; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    Isolated systolic hypertension is a major health burden that is expanding with the aging of our population. There is evidence that central arterial stiffness contributes to the rise in systolic blood pressure (SBP); at the same time central arterial stiffening is accelerated in patients with increased (SBP). This bidirectional relationship created a controversy in the field on whether arterial stiffness leads to hypertension or vice versa. Given the profound interdependency of arterial stiffness and blood pressure, this question seems intrinsically challenging, or probably naïve. The aorta’s function of dampening the pulsatile flow generated by the heart is optimal a range of distending pressure that secures the required distal flow, keeps the aorta in an optimal mechanical conformation, and minimizes cardiac work. This homeostasis is disturbed by age-associated, minute alterations in aortic hemodynamic and mechanical properties that induce short- and long-term alterations in each other. Hence, it is impossible to detect an “initial insult” at an epidemiological level. Earlier manifestations of these alterations are observed in young adulthood with a sharp decline in aortic strain and distensibility accompanied by an increase in diastolic blood pressure. Subsequently aortic mechanical reserve is exhausted, and aortic remodeling with wall stiffening and dilatation ensue. These two phenomena affect pulse pressure in opposite directions and different magnitudes. With early remodeling there is an increase in pulse pressure, due to the dominance of arterial wall stiffness, which in turn accelerates aortic wall stiffness and dilation. With advanced remodeling, which appears to be greater in men, the effect of diameter becomes more pronounced and partially offsets the effect of wall stiffness leading to plateauing in pulse pressure in men, and slower increase in PP than that of wall stiffness in women. The complex nature of hemodynamic changes with aging makes the

  4. Arterial Stiffness, Distensibility, and Strain in Asthmatic Children

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, Esra Akyüz; Serin, Halil İbrahim; Khosroshahi, Hashem E.; Kılıç, Mahmut; Ekim, Meral; Beysel, Perihan; Geçit, U. Aliye; Domur, Esra

    2016-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that since asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease, it could lead to the early development of atherosclerosis in childhood-onset asthma. The aim of this study was to investigate arterial stiffness, distensibility, and strain of different peripheral arteries, the parameters of which can be used to detect atherosclerosis in asthmatic children. Material/Methods We studied 22 pediatric patients with asthma and 18 healthy children. Fasting blood glucose and cholesterol levels were evaluated to exclude children with diabetes and hyperlipidemia, which are risk factors for atherosclerosis. Renal, carotid, and brachial arteries diameters were measured. Using the measured data, stiffness, distensibility, and strain of the arteries of all children were calculated. Results Pulse pressure, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, cholesterols, and glucose levels of the obese individuals were similar to the controls. In carotid arteries there were no statistical differences regarding stiffness, distensibility, and strain. According to multiple ANCOVA analysis, distensibility and strain of right and left brachial arteries and right renal artery were higher, whereas right renal artery stiffness was lower in asthmatic children than in controls. Approximately one-fifth of the change in the left and right brachial arteries and right renal artery distensibility and strain and a small portion of the change in the right renal artery stiffness were associated with asthma. In contrast, left renal artery distensibility, strain, and stiffness were not associated with asthma. Conclusions Peripheral arteries had higher distensibility and strain, and lower stiffness in asthmatic children than in controls. PMID:26803723

  5. Heart Rate Dependency of Large Artery Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Tan, Isabella; Spronck, Bart; Kiat, Hosen; Barin, Edward; Reesink, Koen D; Delhaas, Tammo; Avolio, Alberto P; Butlin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) quantifies large artery stiffness, it is used in hemodynamic research and is considered a useful cardiovascular clinical marker. cfPWV is blood pressure (BP) dependent. Intrinsic heart rate (HR) dependency of cfPWV is unknown because increasing HR is commonly accompanied by increasing BP. This study aims to quantify cfPWV dependency on acute, sympathovagal-independent changes in HR, independent of BP. Individuals (n=52, age 40-93 years, 11 female) with in situ cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators were paced at 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 bpm. BP and cfPWV were measured at each HR. Both cfPWV (mean [95% CI], 0.31 [0.26-0.37] m/s per 10 bpm; P<0.001) and central aortic diastolic pressure (3.78 [3.40-4.17] mm Hg/10 bpm; P<0.001) increased with HR. The HR effect on cfPWV was isolated by correcting the BP effects by 3 different methods: (1) statistically, by a linear mixed model; (2) mathematically, using an exponential relationship between BP and cross-sectional lumen area; and (3) using measured BP dependency of cfPWV derived from changes in BP induced by orthostatic changes (seated and supine) in a subset of subjects (n=17). The BP-independent effects of HR on cfPWV were quantified as 0.20 [0.11-0.28] m/s per 10 bpm (P<0.001, method 1), 0.16 [0.11-0.22] m/s per 10 bpm (P<0.001, method 2), and 0.16 [0.11-0.21] m/s per 10 bpm (P<0.001, method 3). With a mean HR dependency in the range of 0.16 to 0.20 m/s per 10 bpm, cfPWV may be considered to have minimal physiologically relevant changes for small changes in HR, but larger differences in HR must be considered as contributing to significant differences in cfPWV. PMID:27245180

  6. “Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness Syndrome”—Revisiting the Structural Basis of Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Sehgel, Nancy L.; Vatner, Stephen F.; Meininger, Gerald A.

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the pervasiveness of increased arterial stiffness in patients with cardiovascular disease has become increasingly apparent. Though, this phenomenon has been well documented in humans and animal models of disease for well over a century, there has been surprisingly limited development in a deeper mechanistic understanding of arterial stiffness. Much of the historical literature has focused on changes in extracellular matrix proteins—collagen and elastin. However, extracellular matrix changes alone appear insufficient to consistently account for observed changes in vascular stiffness, which we observed in our studies of aortic stiffness in aging monkeys. This led us to examine novel mechanisms operating at the level of the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)—that include increased cell stiffness and adhesion to extracellular matrix—which that may be interrelated with other mechanisms contributing to arterial stiffness. We introduce these observations as a new concept—the Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness Syndrome (SMCSS)—within the field of arterial stiffness and posit that stiffening of vascular cells impairs vascular function and may contribute stiffening to the vasculature with aging and cardiovascular disease. Importantly, this review article revisits the structural basis of arterial stiffness in light of these novel findings. Such classification of SMCSS and its contextualization into our current understanding of vascular mechanics may be useful in the development of strategic therapeutics to directly target arterial stiffness. PMID:26635621

  7. Evaluation of Arterial Stiffness by Echocardiography: Methodological Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae Yeong

    2016-01-01

    As humans age, degenerative changes in the arterial structure gradually progress and result in the stiffening of the arteries, which is called arteriosclerosis. Arterial stiffness is now an established risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This stiffening has adverse effects for both the general population as well as for patients with CVD. Measurements of pulse wave velocity and pulse wave analysis are the two most commonly used methods in the evaluation of arterial stiffness, but these methods just allow indirect measures of arterial stiffness. Echocardiography is the most widely used imaging modality in the evaluation of cardiac structure and function and with recent technical advances, it has become possible to evaluate the structure, function and blood flow hemodynamics of the arteries using echocardiography. In the present review, we will discuss the current status of echocardiography in the evaluation of arterial stiffness, especially focusing on the methodological aspects. PMID:27231673

  8. Arterial stiffness is higher in older adults with increased perceived fatigue and fatigability during walking.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Joaquin U; Wiberg, Matthew; Defferari, Elizabeth; Proctor, David N

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether central and/or peripheral arterial stiffness contributes to increased perceived fatigue during walking in mobility-intact older adults. Arterial stiffness of the common carotid artery and superficial femoral artery (SFA) was measured using Doppler-ultrasound in 45 community-dwelling women and men (60-78yrs). The change in perceived fatigue was measured after a fast-pace 400meter walk test. Adults that rated feeling more tired after walking (n=10) had higher SFA stiffness (p<0.01), but not carotid artery stiffness, than adults that reported feeling more energetic after walking (n=22). The change in perceived fatigue rating was normalized to energy expenditure during walking to determine perceived fatigability. Adults were divided into lower and higher perceived fatigability groups (n=22 per group). Carotid artery stiffness was not different between perceived fatigability groups after adjusting for age, sex, body fat, systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, daily physical activity levels, and resting diameter. However, SFA stiffness was significantly elevated in the higher as compared to lower perceived fatigability group (β-index: 20.7±1.3 vs. 15.3±1.4U; p=0.02) after adjusting for the abovementioned variables. Moreover, stepwise regression identified SFA β-index to be an independent predictor of perceived fatigability (r(2)=0.38, p<0.01). These results suggest that peripheral arterial stiffness is independently associated with perceived fatigue and fatigability in older adults. PMID:25482474

  9. Impact of blood pressure perturbations on arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jisok; Pearman, Miriam E; Park, Wonil; Alkatan, Mohammed; Machin, Daniel R; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2015-12-15

    Although the associations between chronic levels of arterial stiffness and blood pressure (BP) have been fairly well studied, it is not clear whether and how much arterial stiffness is influenced by acute perturbations in BP. The primary aim of this study was to determine magnitudes of BP dependence of various measures of arterial stiffness during acute BP perturbation maneuvers. Fifty apparently healthy subjects, including 25 young (20-40 yr) and 25 older adults (60-80 yr), were studied. A variety of BP perturbations, including head-up tilt, head-down tilt, mental stress, isometric handgrip exercise, and cold pressor test, were used to encompass BP changes induced by physical, mental, and/or mechanical stimuli. When each index of arterial stiffness was plotted with mean BP, all arterial stiffness indices, including cardio-ankle vascular index or CAVI (r = 0.50), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity or cfPWV (r = 0.51), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity or baPWV (r = 0.61), arterial compliance (r = -0.42), elastic modulus (r = 0.52), arterial distensibility (r = -0.32), β-stiffness index (r = 0.19), and Young's modulus (r = 0.35) were related to mean BP (all P < 0.01). Changes in CAVI, cfPWV, baPWV, and elastic modulus were significantly associated with changes in mean BP in the pooled conditions, while changes in arterial compliance, arterial distensibility, β-stiffness index, and Young's modulus were not. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that BP changes in response to various forms of pressor stimuli were associated with the corresponding changes in arterial stiffness indices and that the strengths of associations with BP varied widely depending on what arterial stiffness indices were examined. PMID:26468262

  10. Arterial Stiffness and Renal Replacement Therapy: A Controversial Topic

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Edmundo Cabrera; Zócalo, Yanina; Galli, Cintia; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The increase of arterial stiffness has been to have a significant impact on predicting mortality in end-stage renal disease patients. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a noninvasive, reliable parameter of regional arterial stiffness that integrates the vascular geometry and arterial wall intrinsic elasticity and is capable of predicting cardiovascular mortality in this patient population. Nevertheless, reports on PWV in dialyzed patients are contradictory and sometimes inconsistent: some reports claim the arterial wall stiffness increases (i.e., PWV increase), others claim that it is reduced, and some even state that it augments in the aorta while it simultaneously decreases in the brachial artery pathway. The purpose of this study was to analyze the literature in which longitudinal or transversal studies were performed in hemodialysis and/or peritoneal dialysis patients, in order to characterize arterial stiffness and the responsiveness to renal replacement therapy. PMID:26064684

  11. Effects of Moderate-to-Severe Impairment of the Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate and of Proteinuria on the Central Hemodynamics and Arterial Stiffness in Middle-Aged Healthy Japanese Men

    PubMed Central

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Odaira, Mari; Matsumoto, Chisa; Yamada, Jiko; Yoshida, Masanobu; Shiina, Kazuki; Yamashina, Akira

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of moderate-to-severe impairment of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR: 15 to 59 mL/min per 1.73 m2) and of proteinuria on the central hemodynamics and the pulse wave velocity (PWV) in 2244 middle-aged healthy Japanese men who were not receiving any medications for cardiovascular diseases or cardiovascular risk factors. The adjusted value of the radial augmentation index was higher in the subjects with proteinuria than in those without proteinuria. On the other hand, this value was similar between the subjects with and without moderate-to-severe impairment of the eGFR. Not only proteinuria but also moderate-to-severe impairment of the eGFR was associated with increase in the adjusted value of the brachial-ankle PWV. Thus, proteinuria was found to be an independent risk factor for abnormal central hemodynamics and increased stiffness of the large- to middle-sized arteries, while moderate-to-severe impairment of the eGFR was associated with an increase of the arterial stiffness, but not with abnormality of the central hemodynamics. PMID:21423551

  12. METABOLIC SYNDROME INCREASES CAROTID ARTERY STIFFNESS: THE NORTHERN MANHATTAN STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Della-Morte, David; Gardener, Hannah; Denaro, Federica; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Paik, Myunghee C.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Rundek, Tatjana

    2010-01-01

    Background Arterial Stiffness, an intermediate pre-clinical marker of atherosclerosis, has been associated with an increased risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The metabolic syndrome and its components are established CVD risk factors and may also increase arterial stiffness, but data on this potential relationship is limited. The goal of this study was to determine the association between the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) and carotid artery stiffness (STIFF) in an elderly multi-ethnic cohort. Methods STIFF was assessed by carotid ultrasound as part of the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS), a prospective population-based cohort of stroke-free individuals. STIFF was calculated as [ln(systolicBP/diastolicBP)/Strain], where Strain was [(Systolic Diameter Diastolic Diameter)/Diastolic Diameter]. MetSyn was defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program: Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) criteria. LogSTIFF was analyzed as the dependent variable in linear regression models, adjusting for demographics, education, current smoking, presence of carotid plaque and intima-media thickness. Results STIFF was analyzed in 1133 NOMAS subjects (mean age 65±9 years; 61% women; 58% Hispanic, 22% Black, 20% White). The prevalence of MetSyn was 49%. The mean LogSTIFF was 2.01±0.61 among those with and 1.90±0.59 among those without MetSyn (p=0.003). MetSyn was significantly associated with increased logSTIFF in the final adjusted model (parameter estimate β=0.100, p=0.01). Among individual MetSyn components, waist circumference and elevated blood pressure were most significantly associated with a mean increase in logSTIFF (p<0.01). Conclusion MetSyn is significantly associated with increased carotid artery stiffness in a multiethnic population. Increased carotid artery stiffness may, in part, explain a high risk of stroke among individuals with the metabolic syndrome. PMID:20536608

  13. Arterial stiffness estimation based photoplethysmographic pulse wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huotari, Matti; Maatta, Kari; Kostamovaara, Juha

    2010-11-01

    Arterial stiffness is one of the indices of vascular healthiness. It is based on pulse wave analysis. In the case we decompose the pulse waveform for the estimation and determination of arterial elasticity. Firstly, optically measured with photoplethysmograph and then investigating means by four lognormal pulse waveforms for which we can find very good fit between the original and summed decomposed pulse wave. Several studies have demonstrated that these kinds of measures predict cardiovascular events. While dynamic factors, e.g., arterial stiffness, depend on fixed structural features of the vascular wall. Arterial stiffness is estimated based on pulse wave decomposition analysis in the radial and tibial arteries. Elucidation of the precise relationship between endothelial function and vascular stiffness awaits still further study.

  14. Associations between arterial stiffness and platelet activation in normotensive overweight and obese young adults.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jennifer N; Evans, Rhobert W; Mori Brooks, Maria; Fried, Linda; Holmes, Chris; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Obese individuals have elevated platelet activation and arterial stiffness, but the strength and temporality of the relationship between these factors remain unclear. We aimed to determine the effect of increased arterial stiffness on circulating platelet activity in overweight/obese young adults. This analysis included 92 participants (mean age 40 years, 60 women) in the Slow Adverse Vascular Effects of excess weight (SAVE) trial, a clinical trial examining the effects of a lifestyle intervention with or without sodium restriction on vascular health in normotensive overweight/obese young adults. Carotid-femoral (cf), brachial-ankle (ba) and femoral-ankle (fa) pulse wave velocity (PWV) served as measures of arterial stiffness and were measured at baseline and 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up. Platelet activity was measured as plasma β-thromboglobulin (β-TG) at 24 months. Higher plasma β-TG was correlated with greater exposure to elevated cfPWV (p = 0.02) and baPWV (p = 0.04) during the preceding two years. After adjustment for serum leptin, greater exposure to elevated baPWV remained significant (p = 0.03) and exposure to elevated cfPWV marginally significant (p = 0.054) in predicting greater plasma β-TG. Greater arterial stiffness, particularly central arterial stiffness, predicts greater platelet activation in overweight/obese individuals. This relationship might partly explain the association between increased arterial stiffness and incident atherothrombotic events. PMID:23654212

  15. A Retrospective Analysis on Gender Differences in the Arterial Stiffness Response to Microgravity Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuday, Eric C.; Platts, Steven H.; Nyhan, Daniel; Shoukas, Artin A.; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2008-06-01

    Several studies indicate that the incidence of orthostatic intolerance (OI) among female astronauts is significantly higher than compared to their male counterparts. Our lab has previously demonstrated that astronauts who are orthostatically tolerant after spaceflight develop an increase in central arterial stiffness during spaceflight. We hypothesize that the arterial stiffness of female astronauts does not increase, or increases insufficiently, during spaceflight. This may explain, in part, the gender difference in the incidence of OI. We explored this hypothesis by using previously collected hemodynamic data from astronauts as well as from subjects subjected to -6° head-down tilt bedrest. Female astronauts had a non-significant decrease in arterial stiffness following spaceflight (0.08 ± 0.066 mmHg/ml N=11, P=0.2405) in contrast, male astronauts demonstrated a significant increase in arterial stiffness (0.10 ± 0.04 mmHg/ml N=46, P=0.0145). Female bedrest subjects had an insignificant increase in arterial stiffness during bedrest, (0.17±0.059 mmHg/ml, p=0.0973, N=3); however, it was not as great as the increase in arterial stiffness developed by the male subjects (0.33±0.056 mmHg/ml, p=0.01, N=4). Thus, it is apparent that there is a gender difference in the arterial stiffness response to microgravity exposure. This gender-based differential arterial stiffness response may explain, in part, the disparity of microgravity-induced OI incidence between the genders.

  16. Association between sleep condition and arterial stiffness in Chinese adult with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xia; Zhou, Jiansong; Yuan, Hong; Chen, Zhiheng

    2016-07-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) usually has worse cardiovascular risk factors. Given the potential association between deterioration of sleep and arterial stiffness, we aim to investigate the association between deterioration of sleep and arterial stiffness in a middle-aged Chinese population with NAFLD. In this cross-sectional study, 15,372 Chinese aged 40-60 years who participated in periodic health checkups in central south China, were included. Self-reported sleep duration and sleep quality, anthropometric, biochemical, and liver ultrasound scan were analyzed and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) was used as the indicator of arterial stiffness. Poor sleep quality was found to be associated with increased arterial stiffness, with odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) of 2.28 (95 % CI, 1.53-3.38) compared with good sleep quality. Using sleep duration ≥ 8 h as the reference, there was no significant association between sleep duration of ≤ 6 or 6-8 h and arterial stiffness after multivariable-adjusted. In additional analyses, further investigation of the association of different combinations of sleep duration and quality in relation to arterial stiffness indicated participants with poor sleep quality and sleep duration ≤ 6 h were more likely to have arterial stiffness than those with good quality sleep who sleep for ≥ 8 h (OR 2.59, 95 % CI 1.58-4.24). The present study indicates that short sleep duration, poor sleep quality in individuals with NAFLD correlate with increased arterial stiffness. PMID:27034174

  17. Therapeutic modification of arterial stiffness: An update and comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Liu, Pang-Yen; Wu, Tsung-Jui; Hung, Yuan; Yang, Shih-Ping; Lin, Gen-Min

    2015-11-26

    Arterial stiffness has been recognized as a marker of cardiovascular disease and associated with long-term worse clinical outcomes in several populations. Age, hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, known as traditional vascular risk factors, as well as diabetes, obesity, and systemic inflammation lead to both atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. Targeting multiple modifiable risk factors has become the main therapeutic strategy to improve arterial stiffness in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Additionally to life style modifications, long-term ω-3 fatty acids (fish oil) supplementation in diet may improve arterial stiffness in the population with hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Pharmacological treatment such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists, metformin, and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors were useful in individuals with hypertension and diabetes. In obese population with obstructive sleep apnea, weight reduction, aerobic exercise, and continuous positive airway pressure treatment may also improve arterial stiffness. In the populations with chronic inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, a use of antibodies against tumor necrosis factor-alpha could work effectively. Other therapeutic options such as renal sympathetic nerve denervation for patients with resistant hypertension are investigated in many ongoing clinical trials. Therefore our comprehensive review provides knowledge in detail regarding many aspects of pathogenesis, measurement, and management of arterial stiffness in several populations, which would be helpful for physicians to make clinical decision. PMID:26635922

  18. Therapeutic modification of arterial stiffness: An update and comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Liu, Pang-Yen; Wu, Tsung-Jui; Hung, Yuan; Yang, Shih-Ping; Lin, Gen-Min

    2015-01-01

    Arterial stiffness has been recognized as a marker of cardiovascular disease and associated with long-term worse clinical outcomes in several populations. Age, hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, known as traditional vascular risk factors, as well as diabetes, obesity, and systemic inflammation lead to both atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. Targeting multiple modifiable risk factors has become the main therapeutic strategy to improve arterial stiffness in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Additionally to life style modifications, long-term ω-3 fatty acids (fish oil) supplementation in diet may improve arterial stiffness in the population with hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Pharmacological treatment such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists, metformin, and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors were useful in individuals with hypertension and diabetes. In obese population with obstructive sleep apnea, weight reduction, aerobic exercise, and continuous positive airway pressure treatment may also improve arterial stiffness. In the populations with chronic inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, a use of antibodies against tumor necrosis factor-alpha could work effectively. Other therapeutic options such as renal sympathetic nerve denervation for patients with resistant hypertension are investigated in many ongoing clinical trials. Therefore our comprehensive review provides knowledge in detail regarding many aspects of pathogenesis, measurement, and management of arterial stiffness in several populations, which would be helpful for physicians to make clinical decision. PMID:26635922

  19. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index in children after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dégi, Arianna; Kerti, Andrea; Cseprekál, Orsolya; Kis, Éva; Sallay, Péter; Szabó, Attila J; Reusz, George S

    2013-11-01

    Given the increase in CV morbidity after RTx and the scarcity of CV events in pediatrics, surrogate markers should be assessed to characterize CV damage in this population. AASI is a marker of arterial stiffness in adults, predicting cardio- and cerebrovascular morbidity. Our aim was to assess the determinants of AASI in RTx children (n = 54, 15.5 ± 3.5 yr) and to examine its relationship to central PWV. AASI was calculated from 24 h ABPM. PWV was determined by applanation tonometry, body composition by multifrequency bioimpedance measurement. The dipping state, volume overload, and time on dialysis were the main predictors of AASI (p < 0.05). Children with established HT (n = 34) had increased AASI, extracellular body water, and BNP (p < 0.05). In contrast to AASI, PWV did not differ between HT and normotensive RTx patient groups. There was no correlation between AASI and PWV. PWV was increased in children who spent more than one yr on dialysis prior to RTx. In conclusion, increased AASI in HT RTx children better characterizes the actual volume- and pressure-dependent arterial rigidity rather than long-term morphological changes in large arteries as reflected by PWV. PMID:23855604

  20. Cross-Sectional Relations of Arterial Stiffness, Pressure Pulsatility, Wave Reflection and Arterial Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Connie W.; Pencina, Karol M.; Massaro, Joseph M.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Levy, Daniel; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Hoffmann, Udo; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Mitchell, Gary F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Arterial hemodynamics and vascular calcification are associated with increased risk for CVD, but their inter-relations remain unclear. We sought to examine the associations of arterial stiffness, pressure pulsatility, and wave reflection with arterial calcification in individuals free of prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD). Approach and Results Framingham Heart Study Third Generation and Offspring Cohort participants free of CVD underwent applanation tonometry to measure arterial stiffness, pressure pulsatility, and wave reflection, including carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CFPWV), central pulse pressure (CPP), forward wave amplitude, and augmentation index (AI). Participants in each cohort (n=1905, 45±6 years and n=1015, 65±9 years, respectively) underwent multi-detector computed tomography to assess presence and quantity of thoracic (TAC) and abdominal (AAC) aortic calcification and coronary artery calcification (CAC). In multivariable-adjusted models, both higher CFPWV and CPP were associated with greater TAC and AAC, whereas higher AI was associated with AAC. Among the tonometry measures, CFPWV was the strongest correlate of all calcification measures in multivariable-adjusted models (odds ratio [OR] per SD for TAC 2.69 (95%CI 2.17-3.35), AAC 1.47 (95%CI 1.26-1.73), and CAC 1.48 (95%CI 1.28-1.72), all p<0.001, respectively). We observed stronger relations of CFPWV, CPP, and forward wave amplitude with nearly all continuous calcification measures in the younger Third Generation Cohort as compared with the Offspring Cohort. Conclusions In community-dwelling individuals without prevalent CVD, abnormal central arterial hemodynamics were positively associated with vascular calcification, and were observed at younger ages than previously recognized. The mechanisms of these associations may be bidirectional and deserve further study. PMID:25169933

  1. Diabetes and Risk of Arterial Stiffness: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Huang, Ya; Xie, Lan; Peng, Kui; Ding, Lin; Lin, Lin; Wang, Po; Hao, Mingli; Chen, Yuhong; Sun, Yimin; Qi, Lu; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang; Bi, Yufang

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to explore the causal association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and increased arterial stiffness. We performed a Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis in 11,385 participants from a well-defined community study in Shanghai during 2011-2013. We genotyped 34 T2D-associated common variants identified in East Asians and created a genetic risk score (GRS). We assessed arterial stiffness noninvasively with the measurement of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). We used the instrumental variable (IV) estimator to qualify the causal relationship between T2D and increased arterial stiffness. We found each 1-SD increase in T2D_GRS was associated with 6% higher risk in increased arterial stiffness (95% CI 1.01, 1.12), after adjustment of other metabolic confounders. Using T2D_GRS as the IV, we demonstrated a causal relationship between T2D and arterial stiffening (odds ratio 1.24, 95% CI 1.06, 1.47; P = 0.008). When categorizing the genetic loci according to their effect on insulin secretion or resistance, we found genetically determined decrease in insulin secretion was associated with increase in baPWV (βIV = 122.3 cm/s, 95% CI 41.9, 204.6; P = 0.0005). In conclusion, our results provide evidence supporting a causal association between T2D and increased arterial stiffness in a Chinese population. PMID:26953161

  2. Severity of Osteoarthritis Is Associated with Increased Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Kals, Jaak; Zilmer, Mihkel; Paapstel, Kaido; Märtson, Aare

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality. Evidence is lacking about whether arterial stiffness is involved in OA. The objective of our study was to find out associations between OA, arterial stiffness, and adipokines. Design. Seventy end-stage knee and hip OA patients (age 62 ± 7 years) and 70 asymptomatic controls (age 60 ± 7 years) were investigated using the applanation tonometry to determine their parameters of arterial stiffness. Serum adiponectin, leptin, and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) levels were determined using the ELISA method. Correlation between variables was determined using Spearman's rho. Multiple regression analysis with a stepwise selection procedure was employed. Results. Radiographic OA grade was positively associated with increased carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) (r = 0.272, p = 0.023). We found that OA grade was also associated with leptin and MMP-3 levels (rho = −0.246, p = 0.040 and rho = 0.235, p = 0.050, resp.). In addition, serum adiponectin level was positively associated with augmentation index and inversely with large artery elasticity index (rho = 0.293, p = 0.006 and rho = −0.249, p = 0.003, resp.). Conclusions. Our results suggest that OA severity is independently associated with increased arterial stiffness and is correlated with expression of adipokines. Thus, increased arterial stiffness and adipokines might play an important role in elevated cardiovascular risk in end-stage OA. PMID:27493667

  3. Right Ventricular Myocardial Stiffness in Experimental Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rain, Silvia; Andersen, Stine; Najafi, Aref; Gammelgaard Schultz, Jacob; da Silva Gonçalves Bós, Denielli; Handoko, M. Louis; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Andersen, Asger; van der Velden, Jolanda; Ottenheijm, Coen A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background— The purpose of this study was to determine the relative contribution of fibrosis-mediated and myofibril-mediated stiffness in rats with mild and severe right ventricular (RV) dysfunction. Methods and Results— By performing pulmonary artery banding of different diameters for 7 weeks, mild RV dysfunction (Ø=0.6 mm) and severe RV dysfunction (Ø=0.5 mm) were induced in rats. The relative contribution of fibrosis- and myofibril-mediated RV stiffness was determined in RV trabecular strips. Total myocardial stiffness was increased in trabeculae from both mild and severe RV dysfunction in comparison to controls. In severe RV dysfunction, increased RV myocardial stiffness was explained by both increased fibrosis-mediated stiffness and increased myofibril-mediated stiffness, whereas in mild RV dysfunction, only myofibril-mediated stiffness was increased in comparison to control. Histological analyses revealed that RV fibrosis gradually increased with severity of RV dysfunction, whereas the ratio of collagen I/III expression was only elevated in severe RV dysfunction. Stiffness measurements in single membrane-permeabilized RV cardiomyocytes demonstrated a gradual increase in RV myofibril stiffness, which was partially restored by protein kinase A in both mild and severe RV dysfunction. Increased expression of compliant titin isoforms was observed only in mild RV dysfunction, whereas titin phosphorylation was reduced in both mild and severe RV dysfunction. Conclusions— RV myocardial stiffness is increased in rats with mild and severe RV dysfunction. In mild RV dysfunction, stiffness is mainly determined by increased myofibril stiffness. In severe RV dysfunction, both myofibril- and fibrosis-mediated stiffness contribute to increased RV myocardial stiffness. PMID:27370069

  4. Arterial stiffness of lifelong Japanese female pearl divers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hirofumi; Tomoto, Tsubasa; Kosaki, Keisei; Sugawara, Jun

    2016-05-15

    Japanese female pearl divers called Ama specialize in free diving in the cold sea for collecting foods and pearls in oysters. Exercising in the water combined with marked bradycardia and pressor responses provides a circulatory challenge to properly buffer or cushion elevated cardiac pulsations. Because Ama perform repeated free dives throughout their lives, it is possible that they may have adapted similar arterial structure and function to those seen in diving mammals. We compared arterial stiffness of lifelong Japanese pearl divers with age-matched physically inactive adults living in the same fishing villages. A total of 115 Japanese female pearl divers were studied. Additionally, 50 physically inactive adults as well as 33 physically active adults (participating in community fitness programs) living in the same coastal villages were also studied. There were no differences in age (∼65 yr), body mass index, and brachial blood pressure between the groups. Measures of arterial stiffness, cardio-ankle vascular index and β-stiffness index were lower (P < 0.05) in pearl divers and physically active adults than in their physically inactive peers. Augmentation pressure and augmentation index adjusted for the heart rate of 75 beats/min were lower (P < 0.05) in pearl divers than in other groups. These results indicate that lifelong Japanese pearl divers demonstrate reduced arterial stiffness and arterial wave reflection compared with age-matched physically inactive peers living in the same fishing villages. PMID:26984889

  5. Children and Adolescent Obesity Associates with Pressure-Dependent and Age-Related Increase in Carotid and Femoral Arteries' Stiffness and Not in Brachial Artery, Indicative of Nonintrinsic Arterial Wall Alteration

    PubMed Central

    García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Castro, Juan Manuel; Arana, Maite; Giachetto, Gustavo; Chiesa, Pedro; Zócalo, Yanina

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze if childhood obesity associates with changes in elastic, transitional, and/or muscular arteries' stiffness. Methods. 221 subjects (4–15 years, 92 females) were assigned to normal weight (NW, n = 137) or obesity (OB, n = 84) groups, considering their body mass index z-score. Age groups were defined: 4–8; 8–12; 12–15 years old. Carotid, femoral, and brachial artery local stiffness was determined through systodiastolic pressure-diameter and stress-strain relationships. To this end, arterial diameter and peripheral and aortic blood pressure (BP) levels and waveforms were recorded. Carotid-femoral, femoropedal, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities were determined to evaluate aortic, lower-limb, and upper-limb regional arterial stiffness, respectively. Correlation analysis between stiffness parameters and BP was done. Results. Compared to NW, OB subjects showed higher peripheral and central BP and carotid and femoral stiffness, reaching statistical significance in subjects aged 12 and older. Arterial stiffness differences disappeared when levels were normalized for BP. There were no differences in intrinsic arterial wall stiffness (elastic modulus), BP stiffness relationships, and regional stiffness parameters. Conclusion. OB associates with BP-dependent and age-related increase in carotid and femoral (but not brachial) stiffness. Stiffness changes would not be explained by intrinsic arterial wall alterations but could be associated with the higher BP levels observed in obese children. PMID:27066273

  6. Children and Adolescent Obesity Associates with Pressure-Dependent and Age-Related Increase in Carotid and Femoral Arteries' Stiffness and Not in Brachial Artery, Indicative of Nonintrinsic Arterial Wall Alteration.

    PubMed

    García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Castro, Juan Manuel; Arana, Maite; Giachetto, Gustavo; Chiesa, Pedro; Zócalo, Yanina; Bia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze if childhood obesity associates with changes in elastic, transitional, and/or muscular arteries' stiffness. Methods. 221 subjects (4-15 years, 92 females) were assigned to normal weight (NW, n = 137) or obesity (OB, n = 84) groups, considering their body mass index z-score. Age groups were defined: 4-8; 8-12; 12-15 years old. Carotid, femoral, and brachial artery local stiffness was determined through systodiastolic pressure-diameter and stress-strain relationships. To this end, arterial diameter and peripheral and aortic blood pressure (BP) levels and waveforms were recorded. Carotid-femoral, femoropedal, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities were determined to evaluate aortic, lower-limb, and upper-limb regional arterial stiffness, respectively. Correlation analysis between stiffness parameters and BP was done. Results. Compared to NW, OB subjects showed higher peripheral and central BP and carotid and femoral stiffness, reaching statistical significance in subjects aged 12 and older. Arterial stiffness differences disappeared when levels were normalized for BP. There were no differences in intrinsic arterial wall stiffness (elastic modulus), BP stiffness relationships, and regional stiffness parameters. Conclusion. OB associates with BP-dependent and age-related increase in carotid and femoral (but not brachial) stiffness. Stiffness changes would not be explained by intrinsic arterial wall alterations but could be associated with the higher BP levels observed in obese children. PMID:27066273

  7. Sex-specific association of anthropometric measures of body composition with arterial stiffness in a healthy population

    PubMed Central

    Budimir, Danijela; Jeroncic, Ana; Gunjaca, Grgo; Rudan, Igor; Polasek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Anthropometric measures of body composition and arterial stiffness are commonly used as indicators of cardiovascular risk. Little is known, however, about the association of the anthropometric measures with arterial stiffness, especially in a healthy, generally non-obese population. Material/Methods In a sample of 352 healthy subjects (200 premenopausal women), 3 arterial stiffness indices were analyzed (pulse wave velocity, augmentation index and central systolic blood pressure) in relation to 5 anthropometric measures of body composition (body mass index – BMI, body fat percentage by skinfold measurements –%BF, waist circumference – WC, waist-hip ratio – WHpR, and waist-height ratio – WHtR). Data were analyzed using correlation and regression analyses, with adjustment for the following confounders: age, blood pressures, height, heart rate, blood lipids and smoking. Results Most correlations between anthropometric measures and arterial stiffness indices were significant and positive in both sex groups (r=0.14–0.40, P<0.05). After adjustment for confounding effects, BMI, WC and WHtR remained significant (but inverse) predictors of arterial stiffness (β from −0.06 to −0.16; P<0.05) in the females, while in the males BMI was the only measure inversely predicting arterial stiffness (β from −0.09 to −0.13; P<0.05). Conclusions Measures of body composition are weak and inverse predictors of arterial stiffness and their influence is sex-dependent. BMI, WC and WHtR were key predictors of arterial stiffness in the females, while BMI was the principal predictor in the males. The associations of anthropometric measures with arterial stiffness are strongly and differently confounded by various factors that have to be taken into account when explaining results of similar studies. PMID:22293879

  8. Aerobic exercise training reduces arterial stiffness in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Donley, David A.; Fournier, Sara B.; Reger, Brian L.; DeVallance, Evan; Bonner, Daniel E.; Olfert, I. Mark; Frisbee, Jefferson C.

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a threefold increase risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality partly due to increased arterial stiffening. We compared the effects of aerobic exercise training on arterial stiffening/mechanics in MetS subjects without overt CVD or type 2 diabetes. MetS and healthy control (Con) subjects underwent 8 wk of exercise training (ExT; 11 MetS and 11 Con) or remained inactive (11 MetS and 10 Con). The following measures were performed pre- and postintervention: radial pulse wave analysis (applanation tonometry) was used to measure augmentation pressure and index, central pressures, and an estimate of myocardial efficiency; arterial stiffness was assessed from carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (cfPWV, applanation tonometry); carotid thickness was assessed from B-mode ultrasound; and peak aerobic capacity (gas exchange) was performed in the seated position. Plasma matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and CVD risk (Framingham risk score) were also assessed. cfPWV was reduced (P < 0.05) in MetS-ExT subjects (7.9 ± 0.6 to 7.2 ± 0.4 m/s) and Con-ExT (6.6 ± 1.8 to 5.6 ± 1.6 m/s). Exercise training reduced (P < 0.05) central systolic pressure (116 ± 5 to 110 ± 4 mmHg), augmentation pressure (9 ± 1 to 7 ± 1 mmHg), augmentation index (19 ± 3 to 15 ± 4%), and improved myocardial efficiency (155 ± 8 to 168 ± 9), but only in the MetS group. Aerobic capacity increased (P < 0.05) in MetS-ExT (16.6 ± 1.0 to 19.9 ± 1.0) and Con-ExT subjects (23.8 ± 1.6 to 26.3 ± 1.6). MMP-1 and -7 were correlated with cfPWV, and both MMP-1 and -7 were reduced post-ExT in MetS subjects. These findings suggest that some of the pathophysiological changes associated with MetS can be improved after aerobic exercise training, thereby lowering their cardiovascular risk. PMID:24744384

  9. Genetic impact dominates over environmental effects in development of carotid artery stiffness: a twin study.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Tamás; Osztovits, János; Pintér, Alexandra; Littvay, Levente; Cseh, Domonkos; Tárnoki, Adám D; Tárnoki, Dávid L; Jermendy, Adám L; Steinbach, Rita; Métneki, Júlia; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Kollai, Márk; Jermendy, György

    2014-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and all-cause mortality. Quantifying the genetic influence on the stiff arterial phenotype allows us to better predict the development of arterial stiffness. In this study, we aimed to determine the heritability of carotid artery stiffness in healthy twins. We studied 98 twin pairs of both sexes. We determined carotid artery stiffness locally using echo tracking and applanation tonometry. We estimated the heritability of stiffness parameters using structural equation modeling. The carotid distensibility coefficient showed the highest heritability (64%, 95% confidence interval 45-77%). The incremental elastic modulus, compliance and stiffness index β also showed substantial heritability (62%, 61% and 58%, respectively). The remaining 36-42% phenotypic variance was attributed to unshared environmental effects. Genetic influence appears to dominate over environmental factors in the development of carotid artery stiffness. Environmental factors may have an important role in favorably influencing the genetic predisposition for accelerated arterial stiffening. PMID:24089266

  10. Aspects of Hyperglycemia Contribution to Arterial Stiffness and Cardiovascular Complications in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gordin, Daniel; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2016-09-01

    Controlling the blood glucose level is of outmost importance for the prevention of the micro- and macrovascular diabetic complications observed in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Although the pathogenesis behind the complex cascade of complications is far from solved, one possible mechanism could be a negative effect of glucose on the arteries resulting in a stiffening of the arteries and ultimately in vascular complications. Intriguingly, patients with T1D have been shown to suffer from premature arterial aging compared to nondiabetic subjects-an association that is even more evident in the presence of diabetic complications such as diabetic nephropathy. Arterial stiffness has in several patient populations been shown to independently predict cardiovascular disease. However, interventional studies aimed at attenuating arterial stiffness to reduce cardiovascular disease in T1D are yet to come. Moreover, most of the data on pharmacological treatments of arterial stiffening are directed toward pathophysiological pathways other than hyperglycemia. Interestingly, the sodium-glucose transport-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor empagliflozin was recently shown to reduce both blood pressure and arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes. Whether, these effects can also be replicated in patients with T1D is an intriguing question. Tight metabolic and antihypertensive control are still of central importance for the prevention and the treatment of diabetic complications. However, the need for a noninvasive intermediate marker to identify at risk patients for aggressive treatment is evident. One such tool might be arterial stiffness linking diabetes to increased cardiovascular risk. Future research efforts exploring large-scale databases will play a key role in the identification of other clinically useful markers. PMID:26956240

  11. Effects of Allopurinol on Arterial Stiffness: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gang; Qiu, Zhandong; Li, Dayong; Fang, Yu; Zhang, Suming

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several studies have tested the effects of allopurinol on arterial stiffness, but the results have been inconclusive. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis to investigate the impacts of allopurinol treatment on arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx). MATERIAL AND METHODS Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of allopurinol on arterial stiffness were identified through searching PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library for Central Register of Clinical Trials, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure up to December 2015. The primary endpoints were the change of PWV and AIx after allopurinol treatment. The weighted mean difference (WMD) or standardized mean difference (SMD) and the 95% confidence interval (CI) of each study were pooled for meta-analysis. RESULTS A total of 11 RCTs met the inclusion criteria and were included in the final meta-analysis. Eight RCTs with 1,111 patients were pooled for PWV; eight RCTs with 397 patients were pooled for PWV. Allopurinol administration did not significantly change PWV (WMD=-0.19 m/s, 95% CI: -0.49 to 0.12, Z=1.21, p=0.23), but significantly reduced AIx (SMD=-0.34, 95% CI: -0.54 to -0.14, Z=3.35, p=0.0008). CONCLUSIONS Although our meta-analysis showed some favorable effects of allopurinol treatment on improving AIx, its impact on arterial stiffness must be tested in more large-scale RCTs. PMID:27110924

  12. Pseudo-hypertension and arterial stiffness: a review.

    PubMed

    Foran, Timothy G; Sheahan, Noirin F; Cunningham, Conal; Feely, John

    2004-04-01

    Hypertension is a condition of persistently elevated blood pressure, associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Non-invasive BP measurement using Korotkoff sounds is the most common method of screening for the condition. The possibility of inaccurate readings leading to a false diagnosis of hypertension (pseudo-hypertension) is of concern. Stiffened arteries in the elderly have been proposed as being the primary cause of pseudo-hypertension. Non-invasive detection of pseudo-hypertension remains problematic. This paper reviews clinical literature on pseudo hypertension and approaches to measuring the compressive stiffness of arteries, as well as biomechanical literature regarding models of arterial stiffness and the origin of Korotkoff sounds. Models of the latter show the importance of the relationship between transmural pressure and cross-sectional area (P1/Csa curve) of the brachial artery as it closes under the influence of the pressure cuff. The review concludes that future research on pseudo-hypertension should include development of new instrumentation to measure the P1/Csa curve of the brachial artery in vivo using non-invasive techniques suitable for application to an elderly population. PMID:15132306

  13. Symmetric ambulatory arterial stiffness index in the young.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh B; Singer, Pamela; Kaskel, Fredrick; Mahgerefteh, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    The ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) and the symmetric ambulatory arterial stiffness index (s-AASI) have been shown to correlate to arterial stiffness in adults. This study assesses these indices with anthropometric and blood pressure (BP) measures in children. A total of 102 children at a pediatric hypertension clinic who had ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) done from 2009 to 2013 were included (75% males, 7-22yo, 47% hypertensive, 24% prehypertensive, and 34% white-coat hypertensives). AASI is 1 minus the regression slope of diastolic BP values on systolic BP values from a 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. s-AASI is the symmetric regression of AASI. Obese patients had a significantly higher AASI. s-AASI correlated with systolic BP variability. In multivariable regression, BP variability independently correlated with AASI and s-AASI. s-AASI is related to systolic dipping.AASI and s-AASI are highly dependent on BP variability in children. Further studies are necessary to assess their utility. PMID:27118486

  14. Arterial Stiffness, Oxidative Stress, and Smoke Exposure in Wildland Firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, Denise M.; Siegel, Paul D.; Hughes, Michael D.; Chang, Chiung-Yu; Law, Brandon F.; Campbell, Corey R.; Richards, Jennifer C.; Kales, Stefanos F.; Chertok, Marcia; Kobzik, Lester; Nguyen, Phuongson; O’Donnell, Carl R.; Kiefer, Max; Wagner, Gregory R.; Christiani, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between exposure, oxidative stress, symptoms, and cardiorespiratory function in wildland firefighters. Methods We studied two Interagency Hotshot Crews with questionnaires, pulse wave analysis for arterial stiffness, spirometry, urinary 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (8-isoprostane) and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and the smoke exposure marker (urinary levoglucosan). Arterial stiffness was assessed by examining levels of the aortic augmentation index, expressed as a percentage. An oxidative stress score comprising the average of z-scores created for 8-OHdG and 8-isoprostane was calculated. Results Mean augmentation index % was higher for participants with higher oxidative stress scores after adjusting for smoking status. Specifically for every one unit increase in oxidative stress score the augmentation index % increased 10.5% (95% CI: 2.5, 18.5%). Higher mean lower respiratory symptom score was associated with lower percent predicted forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity. Conclusions Biomarkers of oxidative stress may serve as indicators of arterial stiffness in wildland firefighters. PMID:24909863

  15. Exposure to wood smoke increases arterial stiffness and decreases heart rate variability in humans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Emissions from biomass combustion are a major source of indoor and outdoor air pollution, and are estimated to cause millions of premature deaths worldwide annually. Whilst adverse respiratory health effects of biomass exposure are well established, less is known about its effects on the cardiovascular system. In this study we assessed the effect of exposure to wood smoke on heart rate, blood pressure, central arterial stiffness and heart rate variability in otherwise healthy persons. Methods Fourteen healthy non-smoking subjects participated in a randomized, double-blind crossover study. Subjects were exposed to dilute wood smoke (mean particle concentration of 314±38 μg/m3) or filtered air for three hours during intermittent exercise. Heart rate, blood pressure, central arterial stiffness and heart rate variability were measured at baseline and for one hour post-exposure. Results Central arterial stiffness, measured as augmentation index, augmentation pressure and pulse wave velocity, was higher after wood smoke exposure as compared to filtered air (p < 0.01 for all), and heart rate was increased (p < 0.01) although there was no effect on blood pressure. Heart rate variability (SDNN, RMSSD and pNN50; p = 0.003, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001 respectively) was decreased one hour following exposure to wood smoke compared to filtered air. Conclusions Acute exposure to wood smoke as a model of exposure to biomass combustion is associated with an immediate increase in central arterial stiffness and a simultaneous reduction in heart rate variability. As biomass is used for cooking and heating by a large fraction of the global population and is currently advocated as a sustainable alternative energy source, further studies are required to establish its likely impact on cardiovascular disease. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01488500 PMID:23742058

  16. Increased arterial stiffness in South Dakota American Indian children.

    PubMed

    Litz, Andrew M; Van Guilder, Gary P

    2016-02-01

    Arterial stiffness has been observed in white American obese children, yet there are no data in American Indian youth, who are affected disproportionately by the cardiovascular consequences of childhood obesity and its accompanying risk factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of childhood overweight-obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors with arterial stiffness in South Dakota white American and American Indian children. Thirty-six (28 white American and 8 American Indian) children (age, 13 ± 1 years; grades 6-8) from a rural South Dakota elementary and middle school were studied: 18 had a healthy weight (body mass index (BMI), 19.5 ± 1.9 kg/m(2)) and 18 were overweight-obese (BMI, 26.8 ± 3.5 kg/m(2)). Arterial stiffness was assessed using applanation tonometry via pulse wave analysis to determine carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (crPWV) and aortic augmentation index (AIx). There were no differences (P = 0.94) in crPWV between healthy weight (7.1 ± 1.4 m/s) and overweight-obese (7.3 ± 1.0 m/s) children, even after controlling for risk factors. However, crPWV was markedly elevated (P = 0.002) in overweight-obese American Indian children (7.7 ± 1.1 m/s) compared with white American children (6.8 ± 0.5 m/s), and these differences remained after controlling for blood pressure and more severe obesity in the American Indians. An obesity-matched subgroup analysis indicated that crPWV (7.7 ± 1.1 vs 6.8 ± 0.4 m/s) remained significantly greater in the American Indians (P = 0.03). There were no between-group differences in aortic AIx. These findings indicate an adverse influence of American Indian ethnicity on arterial stiffening in children with elevated adiposity. Arterial stiffness in American Indian children may accelerate early adulthood vascular disease. PMID:26761621

  17. Proinflammation of Aging Central Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyi; Monticone, Robert E.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial aging is a cornerstone of organismal aging. The central arterial wall structurally and functionally remodels under chronic proinflammatory stress over a lifetime. The low grade proinflammation that accompanies advancing age causes arterial wall thickening and stiffening. These structural and functional alterations are consequences of adverse molecular and cellular events, e.g., an increase in local angiotensin II signaling that induces an inflammatory phenotypic shift of endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Thus, interventions to restrict proinflammatory signaling are a rational approach to delay or prevent age-associated adverse arterial remodeling. PMID:25171100

  18. Effect of passive heat stress on arterial stiffness in smokers versus non-smokers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyen, N. E.; Ganio, M. S.; Burchfield, J. M.; Tucker, M. A.; Gonzalez, M. A.; Dougherty, E. K.; Robinson, F. B.; Ridings, C. B.; Veilleux, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    In non-smokers, passive heat stress increases shear stress and vasodilation, decreasing arterial stiffness. Smokers, who reportedly have arterial dysfunction, may have similar improvements in arterial stiffness with passive heat stress. Therefore, we examined the effects of an acute bout of whole-body passive heat stress on arterial stiffness in smokers vs. non-smokers. Thirteen smokers (8.8 ± 5.5 [median = 6] cigarettes per day for >4 years) and 13 non-smokers matched for age, mass, height, and exercise habits (27 ± 8 years; 78.8 ± 15.4 kg; 177.6 ± 6.7 cm) were passively heated to 1.5 °C core temperature ( T C) increase. At baseline and each 0.5 °C T C increase, peripheral (pPWV) and central pulse wave velocity (cPWV) were measured via Doppler ultrasound. No differences existed between smokers and non-smokers for any variables (all p > 0.05), except cPWV slightly increased from baseline (526.7 ± 81.7 cm · s-1) to 1.5 °C Δ T C (579.7 ± 69.8 cm · s-1; p < 0.005), suggesting heat stress acutely increased central arterial stiffness. pPWV did not change with heating (grand mean: baseline = 691.9 ± 92.9 cm · s-1; 1.5 °C Δ T C = 691.9 ± 79.5 cm · s-1; p > 0.05). Changes in cPWV and pPWV during heating correlated ( p < 0.05) with baseline PWV in smokers (cPWV: r = -0.59; pPWV: r = -0.62) and non-smokers (cPWV: r = -0.45; pPWV: r = -0.77). Independent of smoking status, baseline stiffness appears to mediate the magnitude of heating-induced changes in arterial stiffness.

  19. Effect of passive heat stress on arterial stiffness in smokers versus non-smokers.

    PubMed

    Moyen, N E; Ganio, M S; Burchfield, J M; Tucker, M A; Gonzalez, M A; Dougherty, E K; Robinson, F B; Ridings, C B; Veilleux, J C

    2016-04-01

    In non-smokers, passive heat stress increases shear stress and vasodilation, decreasing arterial stiffness. Smokers, who reportedly have arterial dysfunction, may have similar improvements in arterial stiffness with passive heat stress. Therefore, we examined the effects of an acute bout of whole-body passive heat stress on arterial stiffness in smokers vs. non-smokers. Thirteen smokers (8.8 ± 5.5 [median = 6] cigarettes per day for > 4 years) and 13 non-smokers matched for age, mass, height, and exercise habits (27 ± 8 years; 78.8 ± 15.4 kg; 177.6 ± 6.7 cm) were passively heated to 1.5 °C core temperature (T C) increase. At baseline and each 0.5 °C T C increase, peripheral (pPWV) and central pulse wave velocity (cPWV) were measured via Doppler ultrasound. No differences existed between smokers and non-smokers for any variables (all p >  .05), except cPWV slightly increased from baseline (526.7 ± 81.7 cm · s(-1)) to 1.5 °C ΔT C (579.7 ± 69.8 cm · s(-1); p < 0.005), suggesting heat stress acutely increased central arterial stiffness. pPWV did not change with heating (grand mean: baseline = 691.9 ± 92.9 cm · s(-1); 1.5 °C ΔT C = 691.9 ± 79.5 cm · s(-1); p > 0.05). Changes in cPWV and pPWV during heating correlated (p < 0.05) with baseline PWV in smokers (cPWV: r = -0.59; pPWV: r = -0.62) and non-smokers (cPWV: r = -0.45; pPWV: r = -0.77). Independent of smoking status, baseline stiffness appears to mediate the magnitude of heating-induced changes in arterial stiffness. PMID:26266482

  20. The relation of arterial stiffness to endothelial function in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Wright, C I; Brouwer-de Cock, K A J; Kroner, C I; Hoeks, A P G; Draijer, R

    2007-05-01

    Local wall stiffness affects endothelial responsiveness but how global measures affect responsiveness is unanswered. We assessed this by comparing reactive hyperaemic responses of brachial diameter (RHRBD) with central (heart-to-brachial artery pulse wave velocity (PWV); large (C1)) and peripheral (C2) arterial stiffness. Twelve healthy subjects were investigated. RHRBD was induced via an upper- or forearm occluding cuff. Arterial diameter changes were measured using echo ultrasound. Arterial stiffness and RHRBD were compared using a Pearson correlation coefficient (r) and Bland-Altman analysis of Z-scores (indicated as 95% confidence intervals (CI) and expressed in units of standard deviation (SD) from the mean). Weak relations were found between upper-arm RHRBD responses and C2 (r = 0.56, P = 0.06; 95% CI +/- 1.84 SDs) and C1 (r = 0.55, P = 0.06; 95% CI +/- 1.86 SDs). An inverse relation was found between upper-arm RHRBD responses and PWV (r = -0.55, P = 0.06), but Bland-Altman plots revealed no agreement between these parameters (P > 0.05; 95% CI +/- 3.46 SDs). Forearm RHRBD were not related to PWV, C1 or C2 (P > 0.05; 95% CI > 2 SDs). The weak relation between upper-arm endothelial responses and C2 and C1 seems to suggest that C2, and also C1, is not a good and reliable method for assessments of endothelial health. Furthermore, if anything, upper-arm mediated RHRBD responses are more affected by arterial stiffness than forearm responses. PMID:17470989

  1. Transposition of great arteries is associated with increased carotid artery stiffness.

    PubMed

    Mersich, Beatrix; Studinger, Peter; Lenard, Zsuzsanna; Kadar, Krisztina; Kollai, Mark

    2006-06-01

    Transposition of great arteries is the consequence of abnormal aorticopulmonary septation. Animal embryonic data indicate that septation and elastogenesis are related events, but human and clinical data are not available. We tested the hypothesis that large artery elastic function was impaired in patients with transposition of great arteries. We studied 34 patients aged 9 to 19 years, 12+/-3 years after atrial switch operation; 14 patients aged 7 to 9 years, 8+/-1 years after arterial switch operation; and 108 healthy control subjects matched for age. Carotid artery diastolic diameter and pulsatile distension were determined by echo wall-tracking; carotid blood pressure was measured by tonometry. Systolic pressure was higher and diastolic pressure was lower in patients than in controls. Patients with atrial and arterial switch repair were compared with their respective controls by 2-factor ANOVA. For patients with atrial switch repair versus control, stiffness index beta was 4.9+/-1.5 versus 3.1+/-1.0 (P<0.001); for patients witch arterial switch versus control, stiffness index beta was 3.8+/-1.1 versus 2.1+/-0.6 (P<0.001). Similar differences were observed for carotid compliance, distensibility, and incremental elastic modulus as well. The interaction term was not significant for any of the elastic variables, indicating that carotid stiffening was a characteristic of the condition and not the consequence of different hemodynamics. Carotid artery is markedly stiffer in patients, suggesting that impaired elastogenesis may constitute part of the congenital abnormality. Since carotid artery stiffness has been established as an independent cardiovascular risk factor, this condition may have consequences in the clinical management of these patients. PMID:16618837

  2. Arterial stiffness in adolescents and young adults with and without type 1 diabetes: the SEARCH CVD study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amy S.; Wadwa, R. Paul; Dabelea, Dana; Hamman, Richard F.; D’Agostino, Ralph; Marcovina, Santica; Daniels, Stephen R.; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Fino, Nora F.; Urbina, Elaine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is a useful parameter to predict future cardiovascular disease. Objective We sought to compare arterial stiffness in adolescents and young adults with and without type 1 diabetes (T1D) and explore the risk factors associated with the differences observed. Subjects and methods Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AI75), and brachial distensibility (BrachD) were measured in 402 adolescents and young adults with T1D (age 18.8 ± 3.3 yr, T1D duration 9.8 ± 3.8 yr) and 206 non-diabetic controls that were frequency-matched by age, sex, and race/ethnicity in a cross-sectional study. General linear models were used to explore variables associated with an increase in arterial stiffness after adjustment for demographic and metabolic covariates. Results T1D status was associated with a higher PWV (5.9 ± 0.05 vs. 5.7 ± 0.1 m/s), AI75 (1.3 ± 0.6 vs. −1.9 ± 0.7%), and lower BrachD (6.2 ± 0.1 vs. 6.5 ± 0.1%Δ/mmHg), all p < 0.05. In multivariate models, age, sex, race, adiposity, blood pressure, lipids, and the presence of microalbuminuria were found to be independent correlates of increased arterial stiffness. After adjustment for these risk factors, T1D status was still significantly associated with arterial stiffness (p < 0.05). Conclusions Peripheral and central subclinical vascular changes are present in adolescents and young adults with T1D compared to controls. Increased cardiovascular risk factors alone do not explain the observed differences in arterial stiffness among cases and controls. Identifying other risk factors associated with increased arterial stiffness in youth with T1D is critical to prevent future vascular complications. PMID:25912292

  3. An update on the role of adipokines in arterial stiffness and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sabbatini, Andréa R; Fontana, Vanessa; Laurent, Stephane; Moreno, Heitor

    2015-03-01

    Adipokines are hormones produced by adipocytes and have been involved in multiple pathologic pathways, including inflammatory and cardiovascular complications in essential hypertension. Arterial stiffness is a frequent vascular complication that represents increased cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients. Adipokines, such as adiponectin, leptin and resistin, might be implicated in hypertension, as well as in vascular alterations associated with this condition. Arterial stiffness has proven to be a predictor of cardiovascular events. Obesity and target-organ damage such as arterial stiffness are features associated with hypertension. This review aims to update the association between adipokines and arterial stiffness in essential and resistant hypertension (RHTN). PMID:25502905

  4. Linking systemic arterial stiffness among adolescents to adverse childhood experiences.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Stephen A; Chirico, Daniele; O'Leary, Deborah D; Cairney, John; Wade, Terrance J

    2016-06-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been linked with cardiovascular disease and early mortality among adults. Most research examines this relationship retrospectively. Examining the association between ACEs and children's cardiovascular health is required to understand the time course of this association. We examined the relationship between ACEs exposure and ECG-to-toe pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of systemic arterial stiffness that is strongly related to cardiovascular mortality among adults. PWV (distance/transit time; m/s) was calculated using transit times from the ECG R-wave to the pulse wave contour at the toe. Transit times were collected over 15 heartbeats and the distance from the sternal notch to the left middle toe was used. A total of 221 children (119 females) aged 10-14 years participated in data collection of PWV, hemodynamic and anthropometric variables. Parents of these children completed a modified inventory of ACEs taken from the Childhood Trust Events Survey. Multivariable regression assessed the relationship between ACEs group (<4 ACEs versus ≥4 ACEs) and PWV. Analyses yielded an ACEs group by sex interaction, with males who experienced four or more ACEs having higher PWV (p<0.01). This association was independent of hemodynamic, anthropometric and sociodemographic variables (R(2)=0.346; p<0.01). Four or more ACEs is associated with greater arterial stiffness in male children aged 10-14 years. Addressing stress and trauma exposure in childhood is an important target for public health interventions to reduce early cardiovascular risk. PMID:27107504

  5. Blood pressure and arterial stiffness in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hvidt, Kristian Nebelin

    2015-03-01

    Obesity, elevated blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. A strong relationship exists between obesity and elevated BP in both children and adults. Obesity and elevated BP in childhood track into adult life increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Ambulatory BP is the most precise measure to evaluate the BP burden, whereas carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is regarded as the gold standard for evaluating arterial (i.e. aortic) stiffness. These measures might contribute to a better understanding of obesity's adverse impact on the cardiovascular system, and ultimately a better prevention and treatment of childhood obesity. The overall aim of the present PhD thesis is to investigate arterial stiffness and 24-hour BP in obese children and adolescents, and evaluate whether these measures are influenced by weight reduction. The present PhD thesis is based on four scientific papers.  In a cross-sectional design, 104 severe obese children and adolescents with an age of 10-18 years were recruited when newly referred to the Children's Obesity Clinic, Holbæk University Hospital, and compared to 50 normal weighted age and gender matched control individuals. Ambulatory BP was measured, and cfPWV was investigated in two ways in respect to the distance measure of aorta; the previously recommended length - the so called subtracted distance, and the currently recommended length - the direct distance. In a longitudinal design, the obese patients were re-investigated after one-year of lifestyle intervention at the Children's Obesity Clinic in purpose of reducing the degree of obesity. In the cross-sectional design, the obese group had higher measures of obesity, while matched for age, gender and height, when compared to the control group. In the longitudinal design, 74% of the 72 followed up obese patients experienced a significant weight reduction. CfPWV was dependent on the method used to measure the

  6. Effects of Allopurinol on Arterial Stiffness: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gang; Qiu, Zhandong; Li, Dayong; Fang, Yu; Zhang, Suming

    2016-01-01

    Background Several studies have tested the effects of allopurinol on arterial stiffness, but the results have been inconclusive. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis to investigate the impacts of allopurinol treatment on arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx). Material/Methods Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of allopurinol on arterial stiffness were identified through searching PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library for Central Register of Clinical Trials, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure up to December 2015. The primary endpoints were the change of PWV and AIx after allopurinol treatment. The weighted mean difference (WMD) or standardized mean difference (SMD) and the 95% confidence interval (CI) of each study were pooled for meta-analysis. Results A total of 11 RCTs met the inclusion criteria and were included in the final meta-analysis. Eight RCTs with 1,111 patients were pooled for PWV; eight RCTs with 397 patients were pooled for PWV. Allopurinol administration did not significantly change PWV (WMD=−0.19 m/s, 95% CI: −0.49 to 0.12, Z=1.21, p=0.23), but significantly reduced AIx (SMD=−0.34, 95% CI: −0.54 to −0.14, Z=3.35, p=0.0008). Conclusions Although our meta-analysis showed some favorable effects of allopurinol treatment on improving AIx, its impact on arterial stiffness must be tested in more large-scale RCTs. PMID:27110924

  7. Acute effects of submaximal endurance training on arterial stiffness in healthy middle- and long-distance runners.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jan; Wilms, Michael; Oberhoffer, Renate

    2015-05-01

    Measures of arterial stiffness are indicators for cardiovascular health and predictors of cardiovascular events. Arterial stiffness is responsive to acute physiologic stressors such as exercise. However, the acute effects of intensive exercise and recovery on arterial stiffness are controversial. Thirty-seven healthy middle- and long-distance runners (33 men, mean age 26.5±6.6 years) underwent evaluation of their cardiovascular stiffness at rest, after a 15-minute warm-up, immediately after vigorous running 3 km at the pace of their 10-km personal best, and finally 30 minutes after terminating their workout. Peripheral and central systolic blood pressure, as well as augmentation index and pulse wave velocity (PWV), increased during exercise in comparison to baseline (P<.001, general linear model). Thirty minutes after terminating the workout, a drop in peripheral blood pressure (P<.001), central blood pressure (P<.001), and PWV (P=.001) below baseline was observed. Therefore, the authors found that exercise of either moderate or vigorous intensity causes a temporary increase in arterial stiffness in middle- and long-distance runners. PMID:25782686

  8. Arterial stiffness & Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:27586642

  9. Increased arterial stiffness predicts cognitive impairment in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Tasmoc, Alexandra; Donciu, Mihaela-Dora; Veisa, Gabriel; Nistor, Ionut; Covic, Adrian

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Cognitive impairment is a major, but underdiagnosed, risk factor for negative outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The main goal of this study was to evaluate, for the first time, the relationship between arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment in a cohort of hemodialysis patients. Methods We prospectively analyzed the cognitive function and pulse wave velocity (PWV) of 72 hemodialysis patients, mean age 56.54 ± 13.96 y, from two Romanian dialysis centers. We administered to all patients the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Trail Making Test Part-A (TMTA) and Part-B (TMTB), and Mini-Cog Test. Radial arterial waveforms during 40 cardiac cycles were recorded in each patient. Findings Mean MMSE score was 25.13 ± 3.47, mean MiniCog score was 3.51 ± 1.18, mean TMTA (sec) was 103.77 ± 53.13 and mean TMTB (sec) was 214.93 ± 112.25. In linear unadjusted regression, PWV values were associated with worse MMSE scores (β = -0.36, P = 0.001, 95% CI: -0.68 to -0.17), and MiniCog scores (β = -0.26, P = 0.02, 95% CI: -0.19 to -0.01). Also, PWV value was significant associated with TMTA test, but not with TMTB. After further adjustments, PWV remained a strong predictor for cognitive impairment measured by MMSE, TMTA, MiniCog, but not for TMTB. Discussion Cognitive impairment was associated with higher PWV values in our cohort. Further evidence is needed in order to support arterial stiffness as a long-term predictor for cognitive decline in ESRD patients. PMID:26861856

  10. The role of pulmonary arterial stiffness in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Weir-McCall, Jonathan R.; Struthers, Allan D.; Lipworth, Brian J.; Houston, J. Graeme

    2015-01-01

    COPD is the second most common cause of pulmonary hypertension, and is a common complication of severe COPD with significant implications for both quality of life and mortality. However, the use of a rigid diagnostic threshold of a mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) of ≥25mHg when considering the impact of the pulmonary vasculature on symptoms and disease is misleading. Even minimal exertion causes oxygen desaturation and elevations in mPAP, with right ventricular hypertrophy and dilatation present in patients with mild to moderate COPD with pressures below the threshold for diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. This has significant implications, with right ventricular dysfunction associated with poorer exercise capability and increased mortality independent of pulmonary function tests. The compliance of the pulmonary artery (PA) is a key component in decoupling the right ventricle from the pulmonary bed, allowing the right ventricle to work at maximum efficiency and protecting the microcirculation from large pressure gradients. PA stiffness increases with the severity of COPD, and correlates well with the presence of exercise induced pulmonary hypertension. A curvilinear relationship exists between PA distensibility and mPAP and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) with marked loss of distensibility before a rapid rise in mPAP and PVR occurs with resultant right ventricular failure. This combination of features suggests PA stiffness as a promising biomarker for early detection of pulmonary vascular disease, and to play a role in right ventricular failure in COPD. Early detection would open this up as a potential therapeutic target before end stage arterial remodelling occurs. PMID:26095859

  11. Arterial stiffness &Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:27586642

  12. Intima-media thickness and arterial stiffness of carotid artery in Korean patients with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Moo-Yong; Chang, Hyun Kyu; Kim, Seong-Kyu

    2007-06-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a systemic vasculitis involving diverse sizes of arteries and veins. We performed this study to evaluate the vascular changes by assessment of the arterial stiffness and intima-media thickness (IMT) of carotid artery in Korean patients with BD. Forty-one patients with BD and age-, and sex-matched 53 healthy subjects were recruited in this study. Carotid arterial stiffness and IMT were assessed by using high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography. Arterial stiffness parameters such as carotid arterial distensibility coefficient, stiffness index, and incremental elastic modulus (E(inc)) were significantly increased in BD patients compared with those in healthy subjects, but not in IMT. Positive relationship was noted between age and IMT, whereas age of onset was significantly associated with arterial stiffness in BD. This finding suggests impaired endothelial function before visible structural changes of arterial wall in BD. Age and age of onset may be an independent risk factor for carotid IMT and arterial stiffness, respectively. Further studies in more large populations are required to confirm our results. PMID:17596642

  13. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Arterial Stiffness: Tsunami Effect in the Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Saji, Naoki; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral small vessel diseases, including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, pose a risk for cerebrovascular disease, cognitive impairment, and the geriatric syndrome via effects on arterial stiffness. However, the vascular, physiological, and metabolic roles of arterial stiffness in cerebral small vessel diseases remain unclear. Summary Arterial stiffness can be assessed using various indicators such as the ankle-brachial index, pulse wave velocity, cardio-ankle vascular index, and augmentation index. Arterial stiffness is independently associated with all components of cerebral small vessel disease including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, although there are some methodological differences between the various surrogate markers. Evidence of arterial stiffness indicates microvessel arteriosclerosis presenting with vascular endothelial dysfunction. Further, vascular narrowing due to atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness due to lipohyalinosis can accelerate the pulse waves. This hemodynamic stress, pulsatile pressure, or blood pressure variability can cause a ‘tsunami effect’ towards the cerebral parenchyma and lead to cerebral small vessel disease. Previous studies have shown that silent lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are strongly associated with arterial stiffness. However, the association between microbleeds and arterial stiffness remains controversial, as there are two vessel mechanisms related to microbleeds: cerebral amyloid angiopathy and hypertensive small vessel disease. Key Messages Cerebral small vessel disease with associated arterial stiffness is a risk factor for silent cerebral lesions, stroke, and cognitive impairment. Improvement of the living environment, management of risk factors, and innovation and development of novel drugs that improve arterial stiffness may suppress the progression of cerebral small vessel disease, and may reduce

  14. Assessment of arterial stiffness from pedal artery Korotkoff sound recordings: feasibility and potential utility.

    PubMed

    Ihsan, Muhammad; Nunez, Arismendy; Liu, Yang; Ahmed, Faraz; Patel, Harsh; Sharma, Navneet; Diaz, Marco; Stewart, Mark; Naggar, Isaac; Salciccioli, Louis; Lazar, Jason M

    2016-01-01

    Brachial artery (BA) Korotkoff sound (KS) timing reflects arterial stiffness. We recorded pedal artery (PA) KS in 68 healthy subjects using an electronic stethoscope and electrocardiography. Intervals between QRS complex of the electrocardiogram and KS waveform peaks (termed the QKD interval) were measured for 60 seconds, averaged, and QKD velocity (v) calculated. Carotid-BA and carotid-PA pulse wave velocities (PWVs) were measured by applanation tonometry. Analyzable KS recordings were obtained from BA and PA in 100% and 92% subjects. PA QKDv decreased less than BA QKDv with progressive cuff inflation. At diastolic blood pressure + 20 mm Hg (maximal yield), BA QKDv was independently associated with weight and pulse pressure, whereas PA QKDv was related to weight and age. PA QKDv correlated with its corresponding PWV stronger than BA QKDv. In conclusion, PA KS is optimally recorded at diastolic blood pressure + 20 mm Hg; PA QKDv is correlated with age and better correlates with PWV than does BA QKDv. This technique may provide a simple arterial stiffness measure. PMID:26672909

  15. Arterial pressure measurement: Is the envelope curve of the oscillometric method influenced by arterial stiffness?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelido, G.; Angiletta, S.; Pujalte, A.; Quiroga, P.; Cornes, P.; Craiem, D.

    2007-11-01

    Measurement of peripheral arterial pressure using the oscillometric method is commonly used by professionals as well as by patients in their homes. This non invasive automatic method is fast, efficient and the required equipment is affordable with a low cost. The measurement method consists of obtaining parameters from a calibrated decreasing curve that is modulated by heart beats witch appear when arterial pressure reaches the cuff pressure. Diastolic, mean and systolic pressures are obtained calculating particular instants from the heart beats envelope curve. In this article we analyze the envelope of this amplified curve to find out if its morphology is related to arterial stiffness in patients. We found, in 33 volunteers, that the envelope waveform width correlates to systolic pressure (r=0.4, p<0.05), to pulse pressure (r=0.6, p<0.05) and to pulse pressure normalized to systolic pressure (r=0.6, p<0.05). We believe that the morphology of the heart beats envelope curve obtained with the oscillometric method for peripheral pressure measurement depends on arterial stiffness and can be used to enhance pressure measurements.

  16. Surrogates of Large Artery versus Small Artery Stiffness and Ankle-Brachial Index

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Päivi; Syvänen, Kari; Aarnio, Pertti

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral artery tonometry (PAT) is a novel method for assessing arterial stiffness of small digital arteries. Pulse pressure can be regarded as a surrogate of large artery stiffness. When ankle-brachial index (ABI) is calculated using the higher of the two ankle systolic pressures as denominator (ABI-higher), leg perfusion can be reliably estimated. However, using the lower of the ankle pressures to calculate ABI (ABI-lower) identifies more patients with isolated peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in ankle arteries. We aimed to compare the ability of PAT, pulse pressure, and different calculations of ABI to detect atherosclerotic disease in lower extremities. We examined PAT, pulse pressure, and ABI in 66 cardiovascular risk subjects in whom borderline PAD (ABI 0.91 to 1.00) was diagnosed 4 years earlier. Using ABI-lower to diagnose PAD yielded 2-fold higher prevalence of PAD than using ABI-higher. Endothelial dysfunction was diagnosed in 15/66 subjects (23%). In a bivariate correlation analysis, pulse pressure was negatively correlated with ABI-higher (r = −0.347, p = 0.004) and with ABI-lower (r = −0.424, p < 0.001). PAT hyperemic response was not significantly correlated with either ABI-higher (r = −0.148, p = 0.24) or with ABI-lower (r = −0.208, p = 0.095). Measurement of ABI using the lower of the two ankle pressures is an efficient method to identify patients with clinical or subclinical atherosclerosis and worth performing on subjects with pulse pressure above 65 mm Hg. The usefulness of PAT measurement in detecting PAD is vague. PMID:22942632

  17. Stiffness Indices and Fractal Dimension relationship in Arterial Pressure and Diameter Time Series in-Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cymberknop, L.; Legnani, W.; Pessana, F.; Bia, D.; Zócalo, Y.; Armentano, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The advent of vascular diseases, such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, is associated to significant alterations in the physical properties of arterial vessels. Evaluation of arterial biomechanical behaviour is related to the assessment of three representative indices: arterial compliance, arterial distensibility and arterial stiffness index. Elasticity is the most important mechanical property of the arterial wall, whose natures is strictly non-linear. Intervention of elastin and collagen fibres, passive constituent elements of the arterial wall, is related to the applied wall stress level. Concerning this, appropriate tools are required to analyse the temporal dynamics of the signals involved, in order to characterize the whole phenomenon. Fractal geometry can be mentioned as one of those techniques. The aim of this study consisted on arterial pressure and diameter signals processing, by means of nonlinear techniques based on fractal geometry. Time series morphology was related to different arterial stiffness states, generated by means of blood flow variations, during experiences performed in vitro.

  18. Arterial stiffness and sedentary lifestyle: Role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lessiani, Gianfranco; Santilli, Francesca; Boccatonda, Andrea; Iodice, Pierpaolo; Liani, Rossella; Tripaldi, Romina; Saggini, Raoul; Davì, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Sedentary lifestyle is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease, and leads to a quantifiable impairment in vascular function and arterial wall stiffening. We tested the hypothesis of oxidative stress as a determinant of arterial stiffness (AS) in physically inactive subjects, and challenged the reversibility of these processes after the completion of an eight-week, high-intensity exercise training (ET). AS was assessed before and after ET, measuring carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) with a Vicorder device. At baseline and after ET, participants performed urine collection and underwent fasting blood sampling. Urinary 8-iso-PGF2α, an in vivo marker of lipid peroxidation, total, HDL and LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations were measured. ET was associated with significantly reduced urinary 8-iso-PGF2α(p<0.0001) levels. PWV was significantly reduced after ET completion (p<0.0001), and was directly related to urinary 8-iso-PGF2α(Rho=0.383, p=0.021). After ET, cardiovascular fitness improved [peak oxygen consumption (p<0.0001), peak heart rate (p<0.0001)]. However, no improvement in lipid profile was observed, apart from a significant reduction of triglycerides (p=0.022). PWV and triglycerides were significantly related (Rho=0.466, p=0.005) throughout the study period. PWV levels were also related to urinary 8-iso-PGF2α in our previously sedentary subjects. We conclude that regular physical exercise may be a natural antioxidant strategy, lowering oxidant stress and thereby the AS degree. PMID:26044182

  19. Pulmonary Arterial Stiffness: Toward a New Paradigm in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Pathophysiology and Assessment.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Michal; Myers, Cynthia; Brown, R Dale; Frid, Maria G; Tan, Wei; Hunter, Kendall; Stenmark, Kurt R

    2016-01-01

    Stiffening of the pulmonary arterial bed with the subsequent increased load on the right ventricle is a paramount feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). The pathophysiology of vascular stiffening is a complex and self-reinforcing function of extracellular matrix remodeling, driven by recruitment of circulating inflammatory cells and their interactions with resident vascular cells, and mechanotransduction of altered hemodynamic forces throughout the ventricular-vascular axis. New approaches to understanding the cell and molecular determinants of the pathophysiology combine novel biopolymer substrates, controlled flow conditions, and defined cell types to recapitulate the biomechanical environment in vitro. Simultaneously, advances are occurring to assess novel parameters of stiffness in vivo. In this comprehensive state-of-art review, we describe clinical hemodynamic markers, together with the newest translational echocardiographic and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging methods, to assess vascular stiffness and ventricular-vascular coupling. Finally, fluid-tissue interactions appear to offer a novel route of investigating the mechanotransduction processes and disease progression. PMID:26733189

  20. Assessment of Arterial Stiffness, Volume, and Nutritional Status in Stable Renal Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Czyzewski, Lukasz; Wyzgal, Janusz; Czyzewska, Emilia; Kurowski, Andrzej; Sierdzinski, Janusz; Truszewski, Zenon; Szarpak, Lukasz

    2016-02-01

    Reduction of cardiovascular death might have a significant effect on the long-term survival rates of renal transplant recipients (RTRs). The aim of the study was to assess the relation between arterial stiffness and graft function, adipose tissue content, and hydration status in patients after kidney transplantation (KTx).The study included 83 RTR patients (mean age: 55 ± 13 years) who had been admitted to a nephrology-transplantation outpatient clinic 0.5 to 24 years after KTx. Clinical and laboratory data were analyzed and eGFR was calculated with the CKD-EPI formula. Arterial stiffness was assessed in all RTRs with pulse wave propagation velocity (PWV) with the use of a complior device. In addition, fluid and nutritional status was assessed with a Tanita BC 418 body composition analyzer. The control group consisted of 31 hospital workers who received no medication and had no history of cardiovascular disease.Multivariable linear regression analysis, with PWV as a dependent variable, retained the following independent predictors in the final regression model: red blood cell distribution width (RDW) (B = 0.323; P = 0.004), age (B = 0.297; P = 0.005), tacrolimus therapy (B = -0.286; P = 0.004), and central DBP (B = 0.185; P = 0.041). Multivariable linear regression analysis with eGFR as a dependent variable retained the following independent predictors in the final regression model; creatinine concentration (B = -0.632; P = 0.000), hemoglobin (B = 0.280; P = 0.000), CRP (B = -0.172; P = 0.011), tacrolimus therapy (B = 0.142; P = 0.039), and triglycerides (B = -0.142; P = 0.035).Our data indicates that: kidney transplant recipients can present modifiable CVD risk factors linked to increased arterial stiffness, DBP, waist circumference, SCr, time on dialysis, CyA therapy, and visceral fat mass; RDW is a parameter associated with arterial stiffness; and parameters such as CyA therapy, time on

  1. Assessment of Arterial Stiffness, Volume, and Nutritional Status in Stable Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Czyzewski, Lukasz; Wyzgal, Janusz; Czyzewska, Emilia; Kurowski, Andrzej; Sierdzinski, Janusz; Truszewski, Zenon; Szarpak, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reduction of cardiovascular death might have a significant effect on the long-term survival rates of renal transplant recipients (RTRs). The aim of the study was to assess the relation between arterial stiffness and graft function, adipose tissue content, and hydration status in patients after kidney transplantation (KTx). The study included 83 RTR patients (mean age: 55 ± 13 years) who had been admitted to a nephrology-transplantation outpatient clinic 0.5 to 24 years after KTx. Clinical and laboratory data were analyzed and eGFR was calculated with the CKD-EPI formula. Arterial stiffness was assessed in all RTRs with pulse wave propagation velocity (PWV) with the use of a complior device. In addition, fluid and nutritional status was assessed with a Tanita BC 418 body composition analyzer. The control group consisted of 31 hospital workers who received no medication and had no history of cardiovascular disease. Multivariable linear regression analysis, with PWV as a dependent variable, retained the following independent predictors in the final regression model: red blood cell distribution width (RDW) (B = 0.323; P = 0.004), age (B = 0.297; P = 0.005), tacrolimus therapy (B = −0.286; P = 0.004), and central DBP (B = 0.185; P = 0.041). Multivariable linear regression analysis with eGFR as a dependent variable retained the following independent predictors in the final regression model; creatinine concentration (B = −0.632; P = 0.000), hemoglobin (B = 0.280; P = 0.000), CRP (B = −0.172; P = 0.011), tacrolimus therapy (B = 0.142; P = 0.039), and triglycerides (B = −0.142; P = 0.035). Our data indicates that: kidney transplant recipients can present modifiable CVD risk factors linked to increased arterial stiffness, DBP, waist circumference, SCr, time on dialysis, CyA therapy, and visceral fat mass; RDW is a parameter associated with arterial stiffness; and parameters such as

  2. Assessment of pulmonary arterial stiffness in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Ozkececi, Gulay; Ulasli, Sevinc Sarinc; Akci, Onder; Dural, İbrahim Ethem; Avsar, Alaettin; Unlu, Mehmet; Onrat, Ersel

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is one of the major complications of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Pulmonary arterial stiffness (PAS) can be used in determination of PH. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the PAS and cardiac function of patients with OSAS and analyses the relationship between OSAS severity and PAS. Sixty newly diagnosed patients with OSAS (mean age 49.6 ± 11.7 years) and 30 healthy controls (mean age 46.4 ± 14 years) were enrolled. Right ventricle (RV) and left ventricle (LV) echocardiographic parameters and PAS values of study groups were compared. There were no significant differences in terms of LV ejection fraction, LV Tei-index and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion. PAS, mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and RV Tei-index were significantly higher but tricuspid annulus early diastolic myocardial velocity was lower in patients with OSAS than control subjects (respectively p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001). Moreover, we found a higher PAS in OSAS patients without PH compared to controls (p < 0.001). When we investigated the relationship between polysomnographic variables and echocardiographic parameters, we found positive correlations between apnea hypopnea index and total oxygen desaturation with PAS and mean PAP (r = 0.384, p < 0.001; r = 0.404, p < 0.001; r = 0.36, p < 0.001; r = 0.349, p = 0.001 respectively). PAS and mean PAP were increased in patients with OSAS. Pulmonary vascular bed may be affected due to the fluctuation of PAP during day and night time. Therefore, assessment of PAS can be more useful than PAP in OSAS patients. PMID:26783146

  3. Lifestyle modification decreases arterial stiffness in overweight and obese men: dietary modification vs. exercise training.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Seiji; Zempo-Miyaki, Asako; Sasai, Hiroyuki; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; So, Rina; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2015-02-01

    Obesity and increased arterial stiffness are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Arterial stiffness is increased in obese individuals than in age-matched nonobese individuals. We demonstrated that dietary modification and exercise training are effective in reducing arterial stiffness in obese persons. However, the differences in the effect on arterial stiffness between dietary modification and exercise training are unknown. The purpose of the current study was to compare the effect of dietary modification and aerobic exercise training on arterial stiffness and endothelial function in overweight and obese persons. Forty-five overweight and obese men (48 ± 1 year) completed either a dietary modification (well-balanced nutrient, 1680 kcal/day) or an exercise-training program (walking, 40-60 min/day, 3 days/week) for 12 weeks. Before and after the intervention, all participants underwent anthropometric measurements. Arterial stiffness was measured based on carotid arterial compliance, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), and endothelial function was determined by circulating level of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide metabolite (nitrites/nitrate as metabolite: NOx). Body mass and waist circumference significantly decreased after both intervention programs. Weight loss was greater after dietary modification than after exercise training (-10.1 ± 0.6 kg vs. -3.6 ± 0.5 kg, p < .01). Although arterial stiffness and the plasma levels of ET-1 and NOx were improved after dietary modification or exercise training, there were no differences in those improvements between the 2 types of interventions. Exercise training improves arterial function in obese men without as much weight loss as after dietary modification. PMID:25029200

  4. Arterial stiffness response to exercise in persons with and without Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Min; Yan, Huimin; Ranadive, Sushant M; Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Fahs, Christopher A; Atiq, Muhammed; Atique, Nazia; Fernhall, Bo

    2013-10-01

    This study compared arterial stiffness and wave reflection at rest and following maximal exercise between individuals with and without Down syndrome (DS), and the influence of body mass index (BMI), peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) on changes in arterial stiffness. Twelve people with DS (26.6 ± 2.6 yr) and 15 healthy controls (26.2 ± 0.6 yr) completed this study. Intima-media thickness (IMT) and stiffness of common carotid artery was examined. Hemodynamic and arterial variables were measured before and 3-min after exercise. Persons with DS had higher BMI and lower VO 2 peak than controls. IMT did not differ between groups. At rest, carotid β stiffness was significantly higher in persons with DS (P<0.05) but there was no difference in between groups for any of the other arterial stiffness measures. After exercise, persons with DS exhibited attenuated arterial stiffness responses in AIx-75, carotid β stiffness and Ep in contrast with controls (significant group-by-time interactions). When controlling for BMI and VO 2 peak, the interactions disappeared. In both groups combined, BMI was correlated significantly with carotid Ep and β at rest. VO 2 peak correlated significantly with AIx-75 and its pre-post change (r=-0.45, P=0.029; r=0.47, P=0.033, respectively). The arterial stiffness responses to maximal exercise in persons with DS were blunted, potentially reflecting diminished vascular reserve. Obesity and particularly VO 2 peak influenced these findings. These results suggest impaired vascular function in people with DS. PMID:23883823

  5. Adverse effect of diabetes and hyperglycaemia on arterial stiffness in Europeans, South Asians, and African Caribbeans in the SABRE study.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chloe M; Tillin, Therese; March, Katherine; Jones, Siana; Whincup, Peter H; Mayet, Jamil; Chaturvedi, Nish; Hughes, Alun D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Ethnic minority groups in the UK experience marked differences in cardiovascular disease risk. We investigated differences in arterial central hemodynamics, stiffness and load in a tri-ethnic population-based cohort. Methods 1312 participants (70±6y) underwent echocardiography and measurement of brachial and central blood pressure to assess central arterial hemodynamics including central pulse pressure (cPP), arterial stiffness (cPP/stroke volume (SV)), systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and load (Ea). Results Brachial and central systolic blood pressures were similar in all ethnic groups. Compared to Europeans, cPP, cPP/SV and Ea were higher in South Asians. In contrast, cPP/SV was lower in African Caribbeans despite higher mean arterial pressure, higher SVR and higher diabetes prevalence. cPP/SV and Ea remained significantly higher in South Asians and significantly lower in African Caribbeans after multivariate adjustment. Diabetes and higher HbA1c were more strongly associated with higher cPP/SV in South Asians than in Europeans (p interaction=0.045 and 0.005 respectively); higher HbA1c was also more strongly associated with increased Ea in South Asians than Europeans (p interaction=0.01). There was no evidence of an interaction between glycemia and cPP/SV in African Caribbeans. Conclusion Compared to Europeans, South Asians have unfavourable arterial function. Diabetes and hyperglycemia have a more deleterious effect on cPP/SV and Ea in South Asians. In contrast African Caribbeans have more favourable arterial function than Europeans and South Asians. These differences may contribute to the differential ethnic rates of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26628109

  6. ARTSENSTouch--A portable device for evaluation of carotid artery stiffness.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jayaraj; Thrivikraman, Arya Sree; Radhakrishnan, Ravikumar; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2015-08-01

    Arterial stiffness is recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and has potential in vascular screening. We have developed 'ARTSENS(®)', an image free system for evaluation of vascular stiffness. Here, we present ARTSENSTouch, a portable device for evaluation of carotid artery stiffness in field settings. A technical validation of the device in comparison with reference ultrasound imaging system is presented. The validation study emulated constraints faced in evaluation of stiffness in field, such as measurement in sitting posture, use of brachial blood pressure for computations, limited time available for testing and lack of electrical power supply for instrument. The usability of the device and its accuracy, with respect to the reference ultrasound imaging system, was verified by conducting in-vivo measurements on 30 subjects. Stiffness measurements made using ARTSENS in sitting posture showed strong correlation with those obtained from the imaging system in supine posture. The repeatability of ARTSENS measurements was also found to be satisfactory. PMID:26737110

  7. Exercise Training Reduces Peripheral Arterial Stiffness and Myocardial Oxygen Demand in Young Prehypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Large artery stiffness is a major risk factor for the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Persistent prehypertension accelerates the progression of arterial stiffness. METHODS Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive (systolic blood pressure (SBP) = 120–139mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) = 80–89mm Hg) men and women and 15 normotensive time-matched control subjects (NMTCs; n = 15) aged 18–35 years of age met screening requirements and participated in the study. Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to a resistance exercise training (PHRT; n = 15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n = 13) or time-control group (PHTC; n = 15). Treatment groups performed exercise training 3 days per week for 8 weeks. Pulse wave analysis, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and central and peripheral blood pressures were evaluated before and after exercise intervention or time-matched control. RESULTS PHRT and PHET reduced resting SBP by 9.6±3.6mm Hg and 11.9±3.4mm Hg, respectively, and DBP by 8.0±5.1mm Hg and 7.2±3.4mm Hg, respectively (P < 0.05). PHRT and PHET decreased augmentation index (AIx) by 7.5% ± 2.8% and 8.1% ± 3.2% (P < 0.05), AIx@75 by 8.0% ± 3.2% and 9.2% ± 3.8% (P < 0.05), and left ventricular wasted pressure energy, an index of extra left ventricular myocardial oxygen requirement due to early systolic wave reflection, by 573±161 dynes s/cm2 and 612±167 dynes s/cm2 (P < 0.05), respectively. PHRT and PHET reduced carotid–radial PWV by 1.02±0.32 m/sec and 0.92±0.36 m/sec (P < 0.05) and femoral–distal PWV by 1.04±0.31 m/sec and 1.34±0.33 m/sec (P < 0.05), respectively. No significant changes were observed in the time-control groups. CONCLUSIONS This study suggests that both resistance and endurance exercise alone effectively reduce peripheral arterial stiffness, central blood pressures, augmentation index, and myocardial oxygen demand in young prehypertensive subjects. PMID:23736111

  8. Greater impairments in cerebral artery compared with skeletal muscle feed artery endothelial function in a mouse model of increased large artery stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ashley E; Henson, Grant D; Reihl, Kelly D; Morgan, R Garrett; Dobson, Parker S; Nielson, Elizabeth I; Ling, Jing; Mecham, Robert P; Li, Dean Y; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Donato, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Advancing age as well as diseases such as diabetes are characterized by both increased large artery stiffness and impaired peripheral artery function. It has been hypothesized that greater large artery stiffness causes peripheral artery dysfunction; however, a cause-and-effect relationship has not previously been established. We used elastin heterozygote mice (Eln+/–) as a model of increased large artery stiffness without co-morbidities unrelated to the large artery properties. Aortic stiffness, measured by pulse wave velocity, was ∼35% greater in Eln+/– mice than in wild-type (Eln+/+) mice (P = 0.04). Endothelium-dependent dilatation (EDD), assessed by the maximal dilatation to acetylcholine, was ∼40% lower in Eln+/– than Eln+/+ mice in the middle cerebral artery (MCA, P < 0.001), but was similar between groups in the gastrocnemius feed arteries (GFA, P = 0.79). In the MCA, EDD did not differ between groups after incubation with the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (P > 0.05), indicating that lower NO bioavailability contributed to the impaired EDD in Eln+/– mice. Superoxide production and content of the oxidative stress marker nitrotyrosine was higher in MCAs from Eln+/− compared with Eln+/+ mice (P < 0.05). In the MCA, after incubation with the superoxide scavenger TEMPOL, maximal EDD improved by ∼65% in Eln+/– (P = 0.002), but was unchanged in Eln+/+ mice (P = 0.17). These results indicate that greater large artery stiffness has a more profound effect on endothelial function in cerebral arteries compared with skeletal muscle feed arteries. Greater large artery stiffness can cause cerebral artery endothelial dysfunction by reducing NO bioavailability and increasing oxidative stress. PMID:25627876

  9. Assessments of Arterial Stiffness and Endothelial Function Using Pulse Wave Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, Lee; Young, Joanna M.; Fryer, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Conventionally, the assessments of endothelial function and arterial stiffness require different sets of equipment, making the inclusion of both tests impractical for clinical and epidemiological studies. Pulse wave analysis (PWA) provides useful information regarding the mechanical properties of the arterial tree and can also be used to assess endothelial function. PWA is a simple, valid, reliable, and inexpensive technique, offering great clinical and epidemiological potential. The current paper will outline how to measure arterial stiffness and endothelial function using this technique and include discussion of validity and reliability. PMID:22666595

  10. Large Elastic Artery Stiffness with Aging: Novel Translational Mechanisms and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Fleenor, Bradley S.

    2013-01-01

    Large elastic artery stiffness is an independent predictor of age-related cardiovascular events that is attributable to structural remodeling throughout the artery. The intima, media and adventitial layers of the artery uniquely remodel with advancing age and all contribute to arterial stiffening. The specific expression of the extracellular matrix proteins collagen and elastin, and post-translational modifications of these proteins by advanced glycation end-products are key mechanisms in arterial stiffening with age and will be reviewed in the context of region-specific expression. In addition, interventions for attenuating age-related arterial stiffness and novel imaging advances for translating basic findings to older clinical populations will be discussed. PMID:23696949

  11. Associations of cardiorespiratory fitness, physical activity, and adiposity with arterial stiffness in children.

    PubMed

    Veijalainen, A; Tompuri, T; Haapala, E A; Viitasalo, A; Lintu, N; Väistö, J; Laitinen, T; Lindi, V; Lakka, T A

    2016-08-01

    Associations of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), physical activity (PA), sedentary behavior, and body fat percentage (BF%) with arterial stiffness and dilation capacity were investigated in 160 prepubertal children (83 girls) 6-8 years of age. We assessed CRF (watts/lean mass) by maximal cycle ergometer exercise test, total PA, structured exercise, unstructured PA, commuting to and from school, recess PA and total and screen-based sedentary behavior by questionnaire, BF% using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and arterial stiffness and dilation capacity using pulse contour analysis. Data were adjusted for sex and age. Poorer CRF (standardized regression coefficient β = -0.297, P < 0.001), lower unstructured PA (β = -0.162, P = 0.042), and higher BF% (β = 0.176, P = 0.044) were related to higher arterial stiffness. When CRF, unstructured PA, and BF% were in the same model, only CRF was associated with arterial stiffness (β = -0.246, P = 0.006). Poorer CRF was also related to lower arterial dilation capacity (β = 0.316, P < 0.001). Children with low CRF (< median) and high BF% (≥ median; P = 0.002), low CRF and low unstructured PA (< median; P = 0.006) or children with low unstructured PA and high BF% (P = 0.005) had higher arterial stiffness than children in the opposite halves of these variables. Poor CRF was independently associated with increased arterial stiffness and impaired arterial dilation capacity among children. PMID:26220100

  12. Arterial stiffness during acute and recovery phases of children with rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, N N I N; Jaafar, H; Rasool, A H; Wong, A R

    2016-02-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is associated with systemic inflammation and arterial stiffness during the acute stage. It has not been reported if arterial stiffness remains after recovery. The aim of this study was to determine the arterial stiffness during acute stage and 6 months after recovery from ARF. Arterial stiffness was assessed by carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) in 23 ARF patients during the acute stage of ARF and 6 months later. Simultaneously, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and other anthropometric measurements were taken during both stages. There was a significant reduction in PWV; 6.5 (6.0, 7.45) m/s to 5.9 (5.38, 6.48) m/s, p=0.003 6 months after the acute stage of ARF. Similarly, ESR was also significantly reduced from 92.0 (37.5, 110.50) mm/hr to 7.0 (5.0, 16.0) mm/hr, p=0.001. In conclusion, arterial stiffness improved 6 months after the acute stage with routine aspirin treatment; this correlates well with the reduction in systemic inflammation. PMID:27130739

  13. Determinants of arterial stiffness in an apparently healthy population over 60 years.

    PubMed

    Alecu, C; Gueguen, R; Aubry, C; Salvi, P; Perret-Guillaume, C; Ducrocq, X; Vespignani, H; Benetos, A

    2006-10-01

    Arterial stiffness assessed by the pulse wave velocity (PWV), a non-invasive and reproducible method, predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The main determinants of arterial stiffness are well established in younger and middle-aged populations, but much less in the elderly. The aim of this study was to describe the determinants of arterial stiffness in elderly apparently healthy subjects. The study included 221 voluntary subjects born before 1944 (mean age 67.4+/-5.0 years), who had a standard health check-up at the 'Centre de Médecine Préventive' of Nancy. Arterial stiffness was evaluated by measuring the carotid-femoral PWV with the PulsePen automatic device. Clinical and biological parameters were evaluated at the same day. Measurements were valid and analysed in 207 subjects (94 women). Mean PWV was 9.39+/-2.64 m/s. Men showed higher PWV values than women (9.99+/-2.56 vs 8.66+/-2.56, P<0.001). In univariate analysis, PWV was correlated with age (r=0.26, P<0.001) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) (r=0.40, P<0.001), and these relationships were similar in men and women. Subjects with hypertension (P<0.001), diabetes mellitus (P<0.001) and obesity (P<0.01) had higher values of PWV. In multiple regression analysis, PWV correlated positively and independently with age, male gender, MAP and diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, in an apparently healthy elderly population, the main determinants of arterial stiffness are the age, MAP, diabetes and gender. Our study also shows that the gender-related differences in arterial stiffness observed in middle-aged subjects are maintained in the elderly. PMID:16855622

  14. Relationship between occupational exposure to lead and local arterial stiffness and left ventricular diastolic function in individuals with arterial hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Poreba, Rafal; Gac, Pawel; Poreba, Malgorzata; Antonowicz-Juchniewicz, Jolanta; Andrzejak, Ryszard

    2011-08-01

    Relationship between occupational exposure to lead and frequency of complications in persons with arterial hypertension has been poorly investigated. This study aimed at evaluation of the relationship between occupational exposure to lead and manifestation of an increased local arterial stiffness and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. The studies included 105 men (mean age: 44.47 {+-} 9.12 years) with arterial hypertension, treated with hypotensive drugs: group I - men occupationally exposed to lead (n = 53), and group II - men not exposed to lead (n = 52). In echocardiographic examination, the left ventricular diastolic dysfunction was diagnosed significantly more frequently in group I than in group II. In eTracking examination mean values of stiffness parameter ({beta}), augmentation index (AI) and one-point pulse wave velocity (PWV-{beta}) were significantly higher and mean values of arterial compliance (AC) were significantly lower in group I than in group II. The logistic regression showed that in the group of persons with arterial hypertension occupationally exposed to lead a more advanced age, higher blood lead concentration and higher mean values of augmentation index represent independent risk factors of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. The multifactorial regression showed that amongst persons with arterial hypertension occupationally exposed to lead higher blood zinc protoporphyrin concentration, a more advanced age and higher value of body mass index (BMI) represent independent risk factors of an increased local arterial stiffness. In summary, we should note that in the group of persons with arterial hypertension occupationally exposed to lead the study has demonstrated a significantly more frequent manifestation of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and an increase in local arterial stiffness. - Highlights: > Amongst persons with AH exposed to Pb higher ZnPP represent independent risk factor of increased local arterial stiffness

  15. Hyperemia-Related Changes in Arterial Stiffness: Comparison between Pulse Wave Velocity and Stiffness Index in the Vascular Reactivity Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Torrado, Juan; Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Ignacio; Farro, Federico; Armentano, Ricardo L.

    2012-01-01

    Carotid-to-radial pulse wave velocity (PWVcr) has been proposed to evaluate endothelial function. However, the measurement of PWVcr is not without limitations. A new simple approach could have wide application. Stiffness index (SI) is obtained by analysis of the peripheral pulse wave and gives reproducible information about stiffness of large arteries. This study assessed the effects of hyperemia on SI and compared it with PWVcr in 14 healthy subjects. Both were measured at rest and during 8 minutes after ischemia. SI temporal course was determined. At 1 minute, SI and PWVcr decreased (5.58 ± 0.24 to 5.34 ± 0.23 m/s, P < 0.05; 7.8 ± 1.0 to 7.2 ± 0.9 m/s; P < 0.05, resp.). SI was positively related to PWVcr in baseline (r = 0.62 , P < 0.05), at 1 minute (r = 0.79, P < 0.05), and during the whole experimental session (r = 0.52, P < 0.05). Conclusion. Hyperemia significantly decreases SI in healthy subjects. SI was related to PWVcr and could be used to facilitate the evaluation of hyperemia-related changes in arterial stiffness. PMID:22919496

  16. Hyperemia-Related Changes in Arterial Stiffness: Comparison between Pulse Wave Velocity and Stiffness Index in the Vascular Reactivity Assessment.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Juan; Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Ignacio; Farro, Federico; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2012-01-01

    Carotid-to-radial pulse wave velocity (PWV(cr)) has been proposed to evaluate endothelial function. However, the measurement of PWV(cr) is not without limitations. A new simple approach could have wide application. Stiffness index (SI) is obtained by analysis of the peripheral pulse wave and gives reproducible information about stiffness of large arteries. This study assessed the effects of hyperemia on SI and compared it with PWV(cr) in 14 healthy subjects. Both were measured at rest and during 8 minutes after ischemia. SI temporal course was determined. At 1 minute, SI and PWV(cr) decreased (5.58 ± 0.24 to 5.34 ± 0.23 m/s, P < 0.05; 7.8 ± 1.0 to 7.2 ± 0.9 m/s; P < 0.05, resp.). SI was positively related to PWV(cr) in baseline (r = 0.62 , P < 0.05), at 1 minute (r = 0.79, P < 0.05), and during the whole experimental session (r = 0.52, P < 0.05). Conclusion. Hyperemia significantly decreases SI in healthy subjects. SI was related to PWV(cr) and could be used to facilitate the evaluation of hyperemia-related changes in arterial stiffness. PMID:22919496

  17. Review of ‘the potential role of arterial stiffness in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease’

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Timothy M; Craft, Suzanne; Lopez, Oscar L

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Arterial stiffness is emerging as an important risk marker for poor brain aging and dementia through its associations with cerebral small vessel disease, stroke, β-amyloid deposition, brain atrophy and cognitive impairment. Arterial stiffness directly relates the detrimental effects of hypertension on peripheral organs with dire consequences for the extensive microvasculature structure of the kidneys and brain. In this review, we discuss the evidence linking arterial stiffness, hypertension and brain structural abnormalities in older adults. In particular, we discuss the potential mechanisms linking arterial stiffness to brain β-amyloid deposition and dementia and potential therapeutic strategies to prevent hypertension’s adverse effects on the brain. PMID:25894876

  18. The Impact of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning on Arterial Stiffness and Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Angina Pectoris

    PubMed Central

    Zagidullin, Naufal; Scherbakova, Elena; Safina, Yuliana; Zulkarneev, Rustem; Zagidullin, Shamil

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is the set of ischemia episodes that protects against subsequent periods of prolonged ischemia through the cascade of adaptive responses; however, the mechanisms of RIPC are not entirely clear. Here, we aimed to study the impact of RIPC in patients with stable angina pectoris and compare it with healthy individuals with respect to arterial stiffness and heart rate variability. In the randomized, sham-controlled, crossover blind design study, a group of 30 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients (63.9 ± 1.6 years) with stable angina pectoris NYHA II-III and a control group of 20 healthy individuals (58.2 ± 2.49) were both randomly allocated for remote RIPC or sham RIPC. Arterial stiffness, pulse wave velocity (Spygmacor, Australia), and heart rate variability (HRV) were recorded before and after the procedure followed by the crossover examination. In the group of healthy individuals, RIPC showed virtually no impact on the cardiovascular parameters, while, in the CHD group, the systolic and central systolic blood pressure, central pulse pressure, and augmentation decreased, and total power of HRV improved. We conclude that ischemic preconditioning reduces not only systolic blood pressure, but also reduces central systolic blood pressure and improves arterial compliance and heart rate modulation reserve, which may be associated with the antianginal effect of preconditioning. PMID:27348009

  19. The Impact of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning on Arterial Stiffness and Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Angina Pectoris.

    PubMed

    Zagidullin, Naufal; Scherbakova, Elena; Safina, Yuliana; Zulkarneev, Rustem; Zagidullin, Shamil

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is the set of ischemia episodes that protects against subsequent periods of prolonged ischemia through the cascade of adaptive responses; however, the mechanisms of RIPC are not entirely clear. Here, we aimed to study the impact of RIPC in patients with stable angina pectoris and compare it with healthy individuals with respect to arterial stiffness and heart rate variability. In the randomized, sham-controlled, crossover blind design study, a group of 30 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients (63.9 ± 1.6 years) with stable angina pectoris NYHA II-III and a control group of 20 healthy individuals (58.2 ± 2.49) were both randomly allocated for remote RIPC or sham RIPC. Arterial stiffness, pulse wave velocity (Spygmacor, Australia), and heart rate variability (HRV) were recorded before and after the procedure followed by the crossover examination. In the group of healthy individuals, RIPC showed virtually no impact on the cardiovascular parameters, while, in the CHD group, the systolic and central systolic blood pressure, central pulse pressure, and augmentation decreased, and total power of HRV improved. We conclude that ischemic preconditioning reduces not only systolic blood pressure, but also reduces central systolic blood pressure and improves arterial compliance and heart rate modulation reserve, which may be associated with the antianginal effect of preconditioning. PMID:27348009

  20. The cross-sectional association of sitting time with carotid artery stiffness in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Quan L; Blizzard, Christopher L; Sharman, James E; Magnussen, Costan G; Dwyer, Terence; Venn, Alison J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Physical activity is negatively associated with arterial stiffness. However, the relationship between sedentary behaviour and arterial stiffness is poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association of sedentary behaviour with arterial stiffness among young adults. Design Cross-sectional. Setting 34 study clinics across Australia during 2004–2006. Participants 2328 participants (49.4% male) aged 26–36 years who were followed up from a nationally representative sample of Australian schoolchildren in 1985. Measurements Arterial stiffness was measured by carotid ultrasound. Sitting time per weekday and weekend day, and physical activity were self-reported by questionnaire. Cardiorespiratory fitness was estimated as physical work capacity at a heart rate of 170 bpm. Anthropometry, blood pressure, resting heart rate and blood biochemistry were measured. Potential confounders, including strength training, education, smoking, diet, alcohol consumption and parity, were self-reported. Rank correlation was used for analysis. Results Sitting time per weekend day, but not per weekday, was correlated with arterial stiffness (males r=0.11 p<0.01, females r=0.08, p<0.05) and cardiorespiratory fitness (males r = −0.14, females r = −0.08, p<0.05), and also with fatness and resting heart rate. One additional hour of sitting per weekend day was associated with 5.6% (males p=0.046) and 8.6% (females p=0.05) higher risk of having metabolic syndrome. These associations were independent of physical activity and other potential confounders. The association of sitting time per weekend day with arterial stiffness was not mediated by resting heart rate, fatness or metabolic syndrome. Conclusions Our study demonstrates a positive association of sitting time with arterial stiffness. The greater role of sitting time per weekend day in prediction of arterial stiffness and cardiometabolic risk than that of sitting time per weekday may be due

  1. Serum Sclerostin as an Independent Marker of Peripheral Arterial Stiffness in Renal Transplantation Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Bang-Gee; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Lee, Chung-Jen; Chen, Yen-Cheng; Ho, Guan-Jin; Lee, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is thought to be implicated in the development of arterial stiffness and vascular calcification. As a Wnt signaling pathway inhibitor, it is interesting to investigate whether sclerostin or dickkopf-1 (DKK1) level is correlated with arterial stiffness in renal transplant (RT) recipients. Fasting blood samples were obtained for biochemical data, sclerostin, DKK1, and osteoprotegerin (OPG) determinations. In this study, we applied automatic pulse wave analyzer (VaSera VS-1000) to measure brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and either sides of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity value, which greater than 14.0 m/s was determined as high arterial stiffness. Among 68 RT recipients, 30 patients (44.1%) were in the high arterial stiffness group. Compared with patients in the low arterial stiffness group, patients in the high arterial stiffness group had higher prevalence of hypertension (P = 0.002), diabetes (P < 0.001), metabolic syndrome (P = 0.025), longer posttransplant duration (P = 0.005), higher systolic blood pressure (P < 0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.018), and higher fasting glucose (P = 0.004), total cholesterol (P = 0.042), blood urea nitrogen (P = 0.020), phosphorus (P = 0.042), and sclerostin levels (P = 0.001). According to our multivariable forward stepwise linear regression analysis, age (β = 0.272, P = 0.014), phosphorus (β = 0.308, P = 0.007), and logarithmically-transformed OPG (log-OPG; β = 0.222, P = 0.046) were positively associated with sclerostin levels, and multivariate logistic regression analysis, sclerostin (odds ratio 1.052, 95% confidence interval 1.007–1.099, P = 0.024), and posttransplant duration (odds ratio 1.024, 95% confidence interval 1.004–1.045, P = 0.019) were the independent predictors of peripheral arterial stiffness in RT recipients. In this study, serum sclerostin level, but not DKK1, was

  2. Impact of diabetes mellitus on arterial stiffness in a representative sample of an urban Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Independent of other cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, increased arterial stiffness has been established as a predictor of morbidity and mortality. The main aim of this study was to investigate the impact of diabetes on arterial stiffness in a representative sample of an urban Brazilian population plus Amerindians. Methods A total of 1,415 individuals from the general population were randomly selected plus 588 Amerindians from a native community in Brazil. In addition, a sub-sample of 380 individuals from the general population had 5-year follow-up data. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with a non-invasive automatic device (Complior, Colson; Garges les Gonesses, France) and increased arterial stiffness was defined as PWV ≥ 12 m/s. Results In the overall group, diabetic individuals had higher frequencies of increased arterial stiffness and hypertension. They also had higher values of PWV, body mass index, total cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressures compared to non-diabetic individuals (p < 0.01). In an analysis stratified by hypertension, PWV values and increased arterial stiffness frequency were higher in diabetic individuals in both groups (hypertensive and non-hypertensive) (p < 0.05). Furthermore, higher risk for increased arterial stiffness was observed in the diabetic individuals from the overall group (OR = 2.27; CI = 1.47-3.52, p < 0.001) and from the hypertensive group (OR = 2.70; CI = 1.58-4.75, p < 0.001), adjusted for covariates. Regarding the ethnic stratification, diabetic individuals from Amerindian, White, and Mulatto (mixed-race) groups had higher PWV values and a greater frequency of increased arterial stiffness compared to non-diabetic individuals. Both diabetic and non-diabetic individuals had higher PWV values after 5 years. There was no significant difference in the 5-year PWV progression in diabetic compared to non-diabetic individuals. Conclusions These

  3. Age, arterial stiffness, and components of blood pressure in Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meili; Xu, Xiping; Wang, Xiaobin; Huo, Yong; Xu, Xin; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Xing, Houxun; Fan, Fangfang; Cui, Wei; Yang, Xinchun

    2014-12-01

    Blood pressure (BP) changes with age. We conducted a cross-sectional study in rural Chinese adults to investigate: (1) what is the relationship between age, arterial stiffness, and BP in Chinese men and women; and (2) to what degree can the age-BP relationship be explained by arterial stiffness, controlling for other covariables. These analyses included a total of 1688 subjects (males/females: 623/1065), aged 40 to 88 years. Among them, 353 (20.9%) had hypertension (defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥ 140 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥ 90 mm Hg). Arterial stiffness was measured by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). baPWV appeared to be more strongly correlated with BP (including SBP, DBP, mean arterial pressure [MAP], pulse pressure [PP]) than age (P < 0.001 for comparisons between Spearman correlation coefficients). Furthermore, baPWV was associated with BP (including SBP, DBP, MAP, and PP) and risk of hypertension in a dose-response fashion, independent of age; in contrast, the age-BP associations were either attenuated or became negative after adjusting for baPWV. Arterial stiffness appears to be an independent contributor to hypertension, even after adjusting for age and other covariables. In contrast, age-BP associations became attenuated or negative after adjusting for baPWV. The utility of baPWV as a diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic indicator for hypertension warrants further investigation. PMID:25546666

  4. Assessment of Arterial Stiffness Using the Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Toru; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of outcomes for patients with cardiovascular disease. Although measurement of pulse wave velocity is a widely accepted, noninvasive approach for the assessment of arterial stiffness, its accuracy is affected by changes in blood pressure. Summary The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is an index of the overall stiffness of the artery from the origin of the aorta to the ankle and is theoretically independent of blood pressure at the time of measurement. CAVI increases linearly with age and is elevated even in mild arteriosclerotic disease. It can identify differences in the degree of arteriosclerosis among patients with severe arteriosclerotic disease and better reflects the severity of disease of the coronary artery than does brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity. Patients with higher CAVI values show a poor prognosis compared with those with lower CAVI values. Furthermore, CAVI can be lowered by controlling diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Key Messages The primary aims of assessing arterial stiffness using CAVI are to assist in the early detection of arteriosclerosis, allowing timely treatment and lifestyle modification, and to quantitatively evaluate the progression of disease and the effectiveness of treatment. Whether CAVI-guided therapy can improve prognosis in high-risk patients needs to be further examined to confirm the clinical usefulness of this measure. PMID:27493899

  5. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D status, arterial stiffness and the renin-angiotensin system in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Abdi-Ali, Ahmed; Nicholl, David D M; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; MacRae, Jennifer M; Sola, Darlene Y; Ahmed, Sofia B

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased arterial stiffness. We sought to clarify the influence of vitamin D in modulating angiotensin II-dependent arterial stiffness. Thirty-six healthy subjects (33 ± 2 years, 67% female, mean 25-hydroxyvitamin D 69 ± 4 nmol/L) were studied in high salt balance. Arterial stiffness, expressed as brachial pulse wave velocity (bPWV) and aortic augmentation index (AIx), was measured by tonometry at baseline and in response to angiotensin II infusion (3 ng/kg/min × 30 min then 6 ng/kg/min × 30 min). The primary outcome was change in bPWV after an angiotensin II challenge. Results were analyzed according to plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D status: deficient (<50 nmol/L) and sufficient (≥ 50 nmol/L). There were no differences in baseline arterial stiffness between vitamin D deficient (25-hydroxyvitamin D 40 ± 2 nmol/L) and sufficient (25-hydroxyvitamin D 80 ± 4 nmol/L) groups. Compared with sufficient vitamin D status, vitamin D deficiency was associated with a decreased arterial response to angiotensin II challenge (Δbrachial pulse wave velocity: 0.48 ± 0.44 m/s versus 1.95 ± 0.22 m/s, p=0.004; Δaortic augmentation index: 9.4 ± 3.4% versus 14.2 ± 2.7%, p=0.3), which persisted for brachial pulse wave velocity response after adjustment for covariates (p=0.03). Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased arterial stiffness in healthy humans, possibly through an angiotensin II-dependent mechanism. PMID:24164282

  6. Does short-term whole-body vibration training affect arterial stiffness in chronic stroke? A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Yule, Christie E.; Stoner, Lee; Hodges, Lynette D.; Cochrane, Darryl J.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Previous studies have shown that stroke is associated with increased arterial stiffness that can be diminished by a program of physical activity. A novel exercise intervention, whole-body vibration (WBV), is reported to significantly improve arterial stiffness in healthy men and older sedentary adults. However, little is known about its efficacy in reducing arterial stiffness in chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Six participants with chronic stroke were randomly assigned to 4 weeks of WBV training or control followed by cross-over after a 2-week washout period. WBV intervention consisted of 3 sessions of 5 min intermittent WBV per week for 4 weeks. Arterial stiffness (carotid arterial stiffness, pulse wave velocity [PWV], pulse and wave analysis [PWA]) were measured before/after each intervention. [Results] No significant improvements were reported with respect to carotid arterial stiffness, PWV, and PWA between WBV and control. However, carotid arterial stiffness showed a decrease over time following WBV compared to control, but this was not significant. [Conclusion] Three days/week for 4 weeks of WBV seems too short to elicit appropriate changes in arterial stiffness in chronic stroke. However, no adverse effects were reported, indicating that WBV is a safe and acceptable exercise modality for people with chronic stroke. PMID:27134400

  7. Does short-term whole-body vibration training affect arterial stiffness in chronic stroke? A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Yule, Christie E; Stoner, Lee; Hodges, Lynette D; Cochrane, Darryl J

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] Previous studies have shown that stroke is associated with increased arterial stiffness that can be diminished by a program of physical activity. A novel exercise intervention, whole-body vibration (WBV), is reported to significantly improve arterial stiffness in healthy men and older sedentary adults. However, little is known about its efficacy in reducing arterial stiffness in chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Six participants with chronic stroke were randomly assigned to 4 weeks of WBV training or control followed by cross-over after a 2-week washout period. WBV intervention consisted of 3 sessions of 5 min intermittent WBV per week for 4 weeks. Arterial stiffness (carotid arterial stiffness, pulse wave velocity [PWV], pulse and wave analysis [PWA]) were measured before/after each intervention. [Results] No significant improvements were reported with respect to carotid arterial stiffness, PWV, and PWA between WBV and control. However, carotid arterial stiffness showed a decrease over time following WBV compared to control, but this was not significant. [Conclusion] Three days/week for 4 weeks of WBV seems too short to elicit appropriate changes in arterial stiffness in chronic stroke. However, no adverse effects were reported, indicating that WBV is a safe and acceptable exercise modality for people with chronic stroke. PMID:27134400

  8. Physical activity is associated with lower arterial stiffness in older adults: results of the SAPALDIA 3 Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Endes, Simon; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Caviezel, Seraina; Dratva, Julia; Autenrieth, Christine Sonja; Wanner, Miriam; Martin, Brian; Stolz, Daiana; Pons, Marco; Turk, Alexander; Bettschart, Robert; Schindler, Christian; Künzli, Nino; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno

    2016-03-01

    Associations of physical activity (PA) intensity with arterial stiffness in older adults at the population level are insufficiently studied. We examined cross-sectional associations of self-reported PA intensities with arterial stiffness in elderly Caucasians of the Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults. Mixed central and peripheral arterial stiffness was measured oscillometrically by the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). The self-reported International Physical Activity Questionnaire long version was administered to classify each subject's PA level. We used univariable and multivariable mixed linear and logistic regression models for analyses in 1908 persons aged 50 years and older. After adjustment for several confounders moderate, vigorous and total PA were inversely associated with CAVI (p = 0.02-0.03). BaPWV showed negative and marginally significant associations with vigorous and moderate PA (each p = 0.06), but not with total PA (p = 0.28). Increased arterial stiffness (CAVI ≥ 9, upper tertile) was inversely and significantly associated with vigorous PA [odds ratio (OR) 0.65, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.48-0.88], and marginally significantly with total PA (OR 0.76, 95 % CI 0.57-1.02) and moderate PA (OR 0.75, 95 % CI 0.56-1.01). The odds ratio for baPWV ≥ 14.4 was 0.67 (95 % CI 0.48-0.93) across the vigorous PA levels, and was non-significant across the total (OR 0.91, 95 % CI 0.66-1.23) and moderate PA levels (OR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.69-1.28). In this general Caucasian population of older adults higher levels especially of vigorous PA were associated with lower arterial stiffness. These data support the importance of PA for improving cardiovascular health in elderly people. PMID:26220521

  9. White matter hyperintensities and geriatric syndrome: An important role of arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Saji, Naoki; Ogama, Noriko; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are defined as cerebral white matter changes presumed to be of vascular origin, bilateral and mostly symmetrical. They can appear as hyperintense on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences, and as isointense or hypointense on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. WMH have been focused on because of their clinical importance as a risk factor for cerebrovascular diseases and cognitive impairment. WMH are associated with geriatric syndrome, which is defined by clinical symptoms characteristic of older adults, including cognitive and functional impairment and falls. Cerebral small vessel diseases, such as WMH, might play an important role as risk factors for cerebrovascular diseases, cognitive impairment and geriatric syndrome through the mechanism of arterial stiffness. However, the vascular, physiological and metabolic roles of arterial stiffness remain unclear. Basically, arterial stiffness indicates microvessel arteriosclerosis presenting with vascular endothelial dysfunction. These changes might arise from hemodynamic stress as a result of a "tsunami effect" on cerebral parenchyma. In the present article, we review the clinical characteristics of WMH, focusing particularly on two associations: (i) those between cerebral small vessel diseases including WMH and arterial stiffness; and (ii) those between WMH and geriatric syndrome. PMID:26671153

  10. An Imageless Ultrasound Device to Measure Local and Regional Arterial Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Sahani, Ashish Kumar; Shah, Malay Ilesh; Radhakrishnan, Ravikumar; Joseph, Jayaraj; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2016-02-01

    Arterial stiffness (AS) has been shown to be an important marker for risk assessment of cardiovascular events. Local arterial stiffness (LAS) is conventionally measured by evaluating arterial distensibility at particular arterial sites through ultrasound imaging systems. Regional arterial stiffness (RAS) is generally obtained by evaluating carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) through tonometric devices. RAS has a better prognostic value than LAS and cfPWV is considered as the gold standard of AS. Over the past few years our group has been developing ARTerial Stiffness Evaluation for Non-Invasive Screening (ARTSENS), an inexpensive and portable device to measure the LAS. It uses a single element ultrasound transducer to obtain A-Mode frames from the desired artery and is fully automated to enable a non-expert to perform measurements. In this work, we report an extension of ARTSENS to enable measurement of cfPWV that now makes it the only fully automatic device that can measure both LAS and RAS. In this paper, we provide a general review of the ARTSENS and compare it with other state-of-the-art AS measurement systems. cfPWV measurement using ARTSENS was cross-validated against SphygmoCor by successive measurements with both devices on 41 human subjects and excellent agreement between both devices was demonstrated (Coefficient of determination and, limits of agreement m/s). The inter-device correlation between ARTSENS and SphygmoCor was found to be better than other similar studies reported in the literature. PMID:25775498

  11. A cohort evaluation on arterial stiffness and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are associated with systemic endothelial dysfunction leading to impaired physiological vasodilation. Recent evidence has shown central aortic pressures obtained through pulse wave analysis, at less than 14 weeks of gestation, to be predictive of pre-eclampsia. In light of this, we aimed to evaluate the role of central aortic stiffness in the prediction and discrimination of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. Methods A cohort study of women with viable, singleton pregnancies at less than 14 weeks of amenorrhoea, and without multiple pregnancies, autoimmune or renal disease, diagnosed with aneuploidy or fetal anomaly will be recruited from a single maternity hospital and followed up till delivery and puerperium. A targeted sample size of 1000 eligible pregnant women will be enrolled into the study from antenatal clinics. Main exposure under study is central aortic pulse pressure using radial pulse wave recording, and the outcomes under follow-up are gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia. Other measures include lifestyle factors such as smoking, physical exercise, psychometric evaluations, vasoactive factors, uterine artery pulsatility index, height and weight measurements. These measures will be repeated over 4 antenatal visits at 11-14, 18-22, 28-32 and above 34 weeks of gestation. Double data entry will be performed on Microsoft Access, and analysis of data will include the use of random effect models and receiver operating characteristic curves on Stata 11.2. Discussion The proposed study design will enable a longitudinal evaluation of the central aortic pressure changes as a marker for vascular compliance during pregnancy. As measures are repeated over time, the timing and severity of changes are detectable, and findings may yield important information on how aberrant vascular responses occur and its role in the early detection and prediction of hypertensive disorders. PMID:23268774

  12. Relations of Arterial Stiffness and Brachial Flow-Mediated Dilation With New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation: The Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Amir Y; Wang, Na; Yin, Xiaoyan; Larson, Martin G; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Hamburg, Naomi M; Magnani, Jared W; Ellinor, Patrick T; Lubitz, Steven A; Mitchell, Gary F; Benjamin, Emelia J; McManus, David D

    2016-09-01

    The relations of measures of arterial stiffness, pulsatile hemodynamic load, and endothelial dysfunction to atrial fibrillation (AF) remain poorly understood. To better understand the pathophysiology of AF, we examined associations between noninvasive measures of vascular function and new-onset AF. The study sample included participants aged ≥45 years from the Framingham Heart Study offspring and third-generation cohorts. Using Cox proportional hazards regression models, we examined relations between incident AF and tonometry measures of arterial stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity), wave reflection (augmentation index), pressure pulsatility (central pulse pressure), endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation), resting brachial arterial diameter, and hyperemic flow. AF developed in 407/5797 participants in the tonometry sample and 270/3921 participants in the endothelial function sample during follow-up (median 7.1 years, maximum 10 years). Higher augmentation index (hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.32; P=0.02), baseline brachial artery diameter (hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.43; P=0.04), and lower flow-mediated dilation (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.99; P=0.04) were associated with increased risk of incident AF. Central pulse pressure, when adjusted for age, sex, and hypertension (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.28; P=0.02) was associated with incident AF. Higher pulsatile load assessed by central pulse pressure and greater apparent wave reflection measured by augmentation index were associated with increased risk of incident AF. Vascular endothelial dysfunction may precede development of AF. These measures may be additional risk factors or markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease associated with increased risk of incident AF. PMID:27456517

  13. Assessments of endothelial function and arterial stiffness are reproducible in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Miguelez, Paula; Seigler, Nichole; Bass, Leon; Dillard, Thomas A; Harris, Ryan A

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated cardiovascular disease risk is observed in patients with COPD. Non-invasive assessments of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness have recently emerged to provide mechanistic insight into cardiovascular disease risk in COPD; however, the reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness has yet to be investigated in this patient population. Objectives This study sought to examine the within-day and between-day reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with COPD. Methods Baseline diameter, peak diameter, flow-mediated dilation, augmentation index, augmentation index at 75 beats per minute, and pulse wave velocity were assessed three times in 17 patients with COPD (six males, eleven females, age range 47–75 years old; forced expiratory volume in 1 second =51.5% predicted). Session A and B were separated by 3 hours (within-day), whereas session C was conducted at least 7 days following session B (between-day). Reproducibility was assessed by: 1) paired t-tests, 2) coefficients of variation, 3) coefficients of variation prime, 4) intra-class correlation coefficient, 5) Pearson’s correlations (r), and 6) Bland–Altman plots. Five acceptable assessments were required to confirm reproducibility. Results Six out of six within-day criteria were met for endothelial function and arterial stiffness outcomes. Six out of six between-day criteria were met for baseline and peak diameter, augmentation index and pulse wave velocity, whereas five out of six criteria were met for flow-mediated dilation. Conclusion The present study provides evidence for within-day and between-day reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with COPD. PMID:26396509

  14. Associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness in adolescents: The European Youth Hearts Study.

    PubMed

    Ried-Larsen, M; Grøntved, A; Østergaard, L; Cooper, A R; Froberg, K; Andersen, L B; Møller, N C

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness, independent of objectively measured moderate-and-vigorous physical activity. This cross-sectional study included 375 adolescents (age 15.7 ± 0.4 years) from the Danish site of the European Youth Heart Study. Total frequency of bicycle usage was assessed by self-report, and carotid arterial stiffness was assessed using B-mode ultrasound. After adjusting for pubertal status, body height, and objectively measured physical activity and other personal lifestyle and demographic factors, boys using their bicycle every day of the week displayed a higher carotid arterial compliance {standard beta 0.47 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07-0.87]} and distension [standard beta 0.38 (95% CI -0.04 to 0.81)]. Boys using their bicycle every day of the week furthermore displayed a lower Young's elastic modulus [standard beta -0.48 (95% CI -0.91 to -0.06)]. Similar trends were observed when investigating the association between commuter bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness. These associations were not observed in girls. Our observations suggest that increasing bicycling in adolescence may be beneficial to carotid arterial health among boys. PMID:25156494

  15. Effects of sodium and potassium supplementation on blood pressure and arterial stiffness: a fully controlled dietary intervention study.

    PubMed

    Gijsbers, L; Dower, J I; Mensink, M; Siebelink, E; Bakker, S J L; Geleijnse, J M

    2015-10-01

    We performed a randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover study to examine the effects of sodium and potassium supplementation on blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness in untreated (pre)hypertensive individuals. During the study, subjects were on a fully controlled diet that was relatively low in sodium and potassium. After a 1-week run-in period, subjects received capsules with supplemental sodium (3 g d(-1), equals 7.6 g d(-1) of salt), supplemental potassium (3 g d(-1)) or placebo, for 4 weeks each, in random order. Fasting office BP, 24-h ambulatory BP and measures of arterial stiffness were assessed at baseline and every 4 weeks. Of 37 randomized subjects, 36 completed the study. They had a mean pre-treatment BP of 145/81 mm Hg and 69% had systolic BP ⩾140 mm Hg. Sodium excretion was increased by 98 mmol per 24 h and potassium excretion by 63 mmol per 24 h during active interventions, compared with placebo. During sodium supplementation, office BP was significantly increased by 7.5/3.3 mm Hg, 24-h BP by 7.5/2.7 mm Hg and central BP by 8.5/3.6 mm Hg. During potassium supplementation, 24-h BP was significantly reduced by 3.9/1.6 mm Hg and central pulse pressure by 2.9 mm Hg. Pulse wave velocity and augmentation index were not significantly affected by sodium or potassium supplementation. In conclusion, increasing the intake of sodium caused a substantial increase in BP in subjects with untreated elevated BP. Increased potassium intake, on top of a relatively low-sodium diet, had a beneficial effect on BP. Arterial stiffness did not materially change during 4-week interventions with sodium or potassium. PMID:25673113

  16. In vivo and in vitro measurements of pulmonary arterial stiffness: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lian; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2012-01-01

    During the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH), proximal pulmonary arteries (PAs) undergo remodeling such that they become thicker and the elastic modulus increases. Both of these changes increase the vascular stiffness. The increase in pulmonary vascular stiffness contributes to increased right ventricular (RV) afterload, which causes RV hypertrophy and eventually failure. Studies have found that proximal PA stiffness or its inverse, compliance, is strongly related to morbidity and mortality in patients with PH. Therefore, accurate in vivo measurement of PA stiffness is useful for prognoses in patients with PH. It is also important to understand the structural changes in PAs that occur with PH that are responsible for stiffening. Here, we briefly review the most common parameters used to quantify stiffness and in vivo and in vitro methods for measuring PA stiffness in human and animal models. For in vivo approaches, we review invasive and noninvasive approaches that are based on measurements of pressure and inner or outer diameter or cross-sectional area. For in vitro techniques, we review several different testing methods that mimic one, two or several aspects of physiological loading (e.g., uniaxial and biaxial testing, dynamic inflation-force testing). Many in vivo and in vitro measurement methods exist in the literature, and it is important to carefully choose an appropriate method to measure PA stiffness accurately. Therefore, advantages and disadvantages of each approach are discussed. PMID:23372936

  17. Manipulation of arterial stiffness, wave reflections, and retrograde shear rate in the femoral artery using lower limb external compression

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Lefferts, Wesley K; Kasprowicz, Ari G; Tarzia, Brendan J; Thijssen, Dick H; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of the arterial wall to retrograde shear acutely leads to endothelial dysfunction and chronically contributes to a proatherogenic vascular phenotype. Arterial stiffness and increased pressure from wave reflections are known arbiters of blood flow in the systemic circulation and each related to atherosclerosis. Using distal external compression of the calf to increase upstream retrograde shear in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), we examined the hypothesis that changes in retrograde shear are correlated with changes in SFA stiffness and pressure from wave reflections. For this purpose, a pneumatic cuff was applied to the calf and inflated to 0, 35, and 70 mmHg (5 min compression, randomized order, separated by 5 min) in 16 healthy young men (23 ± 1 years of age). Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis was used to measure SFA retrograde shear rate, reflected pressure wave intensity (negative area [NA]), elastic modulus (Ep), and a single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV) during acute cuff inflation. Cuff inflation resulted in stepwise increases in retrograde shear rate (P < 0.05 for main effect). There were also significant cuff pressure-dependent increases in NA, Ep, and PWV across conditions (P < 0.05 for main effects). Change in NA, but not Ep or PWV, was associated with change in retrograde shear rate across conditions (P < 0.05). In conclusion, external compression of the calf increases retrograde shear, arterial stiffness, and pressure from wave reflection in the upstream SFA in a dose-dependent manner. Wave reflection intensity, but not arterial stiffness, is correlated with changes in peripheral retrograde shear with this hemodynamic manipulation. PMID:24303111

  18. Effect of eplerenone on the severity of obstructive sleep apnea and arterial stiffness in patients with resistant arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Krasińska, Beata; Miazga, Angelika; Cofta, Szczepan; Szczepaniak-Chicheł, Ludwina; Trafas, Tomasz; Krasiński, Zbigniew; Pawlaczyk-Gabriel, Katarzyna; Tykarski, Andrzej

    2016-05-27

    INTRODUCTION    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is considered to be one of the major causes of resistant arterial hypertension (RAH). Apnea episodes cause hypoxia, which triggers the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. This leads to water retention and swelling in the neck region, exacerbating OSA symptoms. It is assumed that the use of eplerenone may reduce the swelling and thus alleviate the severity of OSA. OBJECTIVES    We aimed to prospectively assess the impact of eplerenone on the severity of OSA and arterial stiffness in patients with RAH. PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study included 31 patients with RAH and OSA. The exclusion criteria were as follows: secondary hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke 6 months prior to the study, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney failure, alcohol or drug addiction, and active cancer. In all patients, the following tests were performed: blood pressure (BP) measurement (traditionally and using ambulatory BP measuring [ABPM]), applanation tonometry, polysomnography, and the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) calculation. The tests were done before and after 3 months of eplerenone therapy. Patients received 50 mg of oral eplerenone daily, along with other hypertensive drugs. RESULTS    The mean age of participants was 57.76 ±6.16 years. After 3 months of eplerenone therapy, we observed a significant reduction in the AHI, neck circumference, BP, aortic pulse wave, and arterial wall stiffness. There were significant correlations between the AHI and mean BP measured by ABPM and between the AHI and arterial stiffness parameters. CONCLUSIONS    Our results provide evidence for the clinical significance of eplerenone, not only as an antihypertensive medication but also as a drug that may reduce the severity of OSA and arterial stiffness in patients with RAH and OSA. PMID:27230560

  19. Uteroplacental insufficiency programs regional vascular dysfunction and alters arterial stiffness in female offspring.

    PubMed

    Mazzuca, Marc Q; Wlodek, Mary E; Dragomir, Nicoleta M; Parkington, Helena C; Tare, Marianne

    2010-06-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction caused by uteroplacental insufficiency increases the risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Vascular mechanisms in female offspring are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of uteroplacental insufficiency on blood pressure, vascular reactivity and arterial stiffness in four vascular beds in female offspring born growth restricted. Uteroplacental insufficiency was induced on day 18 of gestation in Wistar Kyoto rats by bilateral uterine vessel ligation (Restricted) or sham surgery (Controls). Wire and pressure myography were used to test endothelial and smooth muscle function, and passive mechanical wall properties, respectively, in uterine, mesenteric, renal and femoral arteries of 18-month-old female offspring. Collagen and elastin fibres were quantified using circular crossed-polarized light microscopy and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. Restricted female offspring were born 10-15% smaller. Restricted females were normotensive, had plasma triglycerides 2-fold elevated and had uterine endothelial dysfunction, attributed to a 23% reduction in the maximal relaxation produced by endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor. Uterine artery stiffness was increased, with an augmented proportion of thick and decreased proportion of thin collagen fibres. Vascular reactivity and mechanical wall properties were preserved in mesenteric, renal and femoral arteries in growth restricted females. Female offspring born growth restricted have selective uterine artery endothelial dysfunction and increased wall stiffness. The preserved vascular function in other arteries may explain the lack of hypertension in these females. The uterine artery specific dysfunction has potential implications for impaired pregnancy adaptations and a compromised intrauterine environment of the next generation. PMID:20403978

  20. Arterial Stiffness Estimation by Shear Wave Elastography: Validation in Phantoms with Mechanical Testing.

    PubMed

    Maksuti, Elira; Widman, Erik; Larsson, David; Urban, Matthew W; Larsson, Matilda; Bjällmark, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent risk factor found to correlate with a wide range of cardiovascular diseases. It has been suggested that shear wave elastography (SWE) can be used to quantitatively measure local arterial shear modulus, but an accuracy assessment of the technique for arterial applications has not yet been performed. In this study, the influence of confined geometry on shear modulus estimation, by both group and phase velocity analysis, was assessed, and the accuracy of SWE in comparison with mechanical testing was measured in nine pressurized arterial phantoms. The results indicated that group velocity with an infinite medium assumption estimated shear modulus values incorrectly in comparison with mechanical testing in arterial phantoms (6.7 ± 0.0 kPa from group velocity and 30.5 ± 0.4 kPa from mechanical testing). To the contrary, SWE measurements based on phase velocity analysis (30.6 ± 3.2 kPa) were in good agreement with mechanical testing, with a relative error between the two techniques of 8.8 ± 6.0% in the shear modulus range evaluated (40-100 kPa). SWE by phase velocity analysis was validated to accurately measure stiffness in arterial phantoms. PMID:26454623

  1. Association of arterial stiffness with coronary flow reserve in revascularized coronary artery disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Tritakis, Vlassis; Tzortzis, Stavros; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Dima, Kleanthi; Pavlidis, Georgios; Trivilou, Paraskevi; Paraskevaidis, Ioannis; Katsimaglis, Giorgos; Parissis, John; Lekakis, John

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association of arterial wave reflection with coronary flow reserve (CFR) in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients after successful revascularization. METHODS: We assessed 70 patients with angiographically documented CAD who had undergone recent successful revascularization. We measured (1) reactive hyperemia index (RHI) using fingertip peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT Endo-PAT); (2) carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity (PWVc-Complior); (3) augmentation index (AIx), the diastolic area (DAI%) and diastolic reflection area (DRA) of the central aortic pulse wave (Arteriograph); (4) CFR using Doppler echocardiography; and (5) blood levels of lipoprotein-phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2). RESULTS: After adjustment for age, sex, blood pressure parameter, lipidemic, diabetic and smoking status, we found that coronary flow reserve was independently related to AIx (b = -0.38, r = 0.009), DAI (b = 0.36, P = 0.014), DRA (b = 0.39, P = 0.005) and RT (b = -0.29, P = 0.026). Additionally, patients with CFR < 2.5 had higher PWVc (11.6 ± 2.3 vs 10.2 ± 1.4 m/s, P = 0.019), SBPc (139.1 ± 17.8 vs 125.2 ± 19.1 mmHg, P = 0.026), AIx (38.2% ± 14.8% vs 29.4% ± 15.1%, P = 0.011) and lower RHI (1.26 ± 0.28 vs 1.50 ± 0.46, P = 0.012), DAI (44.3% ± 7.9% vs 53.9% ± 6.7%, P = 0.008), DRA (42.2 ± 9.6 vs 51.6 ± 11.4, P = 0.012) and LpPLA2 (268.1 ± 91.9 vs 199.5 ± 78.4 ng/mL, P = 0.002) compared with those with CFR ≥ 2.5. Elevated LpPLA2 was related with reduced CFR (r = -0.33, P = 0.001), RHI (r = -0.37, P < 0.001) and DRA (r = -0.35, P = 0.001) as well as increased PWVc (r = 0.34, P = 0.012) and AIx (r = 0.34, P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Abnormal arterial wave reflections are related with impaired coronary flow reserve despite successful revascularization in CAD patients. There is a common inflammatory link between impaired aortic wall properties, endothelial dysfunction and coronary flow impairment in CAD. PMID:26981218

  2. Cytomegalovirus Seropositivity Is Associated with Increased Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Nicola C.; Pankhurst, Tanya; Harper, Lorraine; Steeds, Richard P.; Lauder, Sarah; Townend, Jonathan N.; Moss, Paul; Ferro, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic kidney disease have an increased cardiovascular risk that is not fully explained by traditional risk factors but appears to be related to increased arterial stiffness. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is associated with increased cardiovascular risk although the mechanisms for this are unknown. We examined whether CMV seropositivity was associated with increased arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease. Methodology and Principal Findings In 215 non-diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease, CMV seropositivity was determined using an anti-CMV IgG ELISA. Pulse wave velocity was measured and aortic distensibility assessed in the ascending, proximal descending and distal descending thoracic aorta. Patients seropositive for CMV had a higher pulse wave velocity and lower aortic distensibility at all 3 levels. These differences (except for ascending aortic distensibility) persisted in a subcohort matched for age, gender and renal function, and when the whole cohort was divided into quartiles of age. In multivariable analyses, CMV seropositivity was an independent determinant of pulse wave velocity and proximal and distal descending aortic distensibility. Conclusions In patients with chronic kidney disease, CMV seropositivity is associated with increased arterial stiffness and decreased distensibility of the proximal descending and distal aorta. These findings suggest that further research is required to examine CMV as a possible cause of arterial disease and increased cardiovascular risk in patients with CKD and may be relevant more widely for CMV seropositive patients with normal renal function. PMID:23451030

  3. A Novel Echocardiographic Method for Assessing Arterial Stiffness in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Aytac; Cakmak, Huseyin Altug; Gunbatar, Hulya; Asker, Muntecep; Babat, Naci; Tosu, Aydin Rodi; Yaman, Mehmet; Gumrukcuoglu, Hasan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with increased arterial stiffness and cardiovascular complications. The objective of this study was to assess whether the color M-mode-derived propagation velocity of the descending thoracic aorta (aortic velocity propagation, AVP) was an echocardiographic marker for arterial stiffness in OSAS. Subjects and Methods The study population included 116 patients with OSAS and 90 age and gender-matched control subjects. The patients with OSAS were categorized according to their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) as follows: mild to moderate degree (AHI 5-30) and severe degree (AHI≥30). Aortofemoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), and AVP were measured to assess arterial stiffness. Results AVP and FMD were significantly decreased in patients with OSAS compared to controls (p<0.001). PWV and CIMT were increased in the OSAS group compared to controls (p<0.001). Moreover, AVP and FMD were significantly decreased in the severe OSAS group compared to the mild to moderate OSAS group (p<0.001). PWV and CIMT were significantly increased in the severe group compared to the mild to moderate group (p<0.001). AVP was significantly positively correlated with FMD (r=0.564, p<0.001). However, it was found to be significantly inversely related to PWV (r=-0.580, p<0.001) and CIMT (r=-0.251, p<0.001). Conclusion The measurement of AVP is a novel and practical echocardiographic method, which may be used to identify arterial stiffness in OSAS. PMID:26617653

  4. Serum Uric Acid Level and Diverse Impacts on Regional Arterial Stiffness and Wave Reflection

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Suyan; Guo, Hongyang; Ye, Ping; Luo, Leiming; Wu, Hongmei; Xiao, Wenkai

    2012-01-01

    Background: Both increased arterial stiffness and hyperuricaemia are associated with elevated cardiovascular risks. Little is known about the relations of serum uric acid (UA) level to regional arterial stiffness and wave reflection. The aim of the study was to investigate the gender-specific association of serum UA and indices of arterial function in a community-based investigation in China. Methods: Cross-sectional data from 2374 adults (mean age 58.24 years) who underwent routine laboratory tests, regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis measurements were analyzed in a gender-specific manner. None of the participants had atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, chronic renal failure, systemic inflammatory disease, gout, or were under treatment which would affect serum UA level. Results: Men had higher serum UA level than women. Subjects with hyperuricaemia had significantly higher carotid-ankle PWV in both genders (P< 0.05), and the carotid-femoral PWV (PWVc-f) was higher in women (P< 0.001) while the augmentation index was marginally lower in men (P = 0.049). Multiple regression analysis showed that serum UA was an independent determinant only for PWVc-f in women (β = 0.104, P = 0.027) when adjusted for atherogenic confounders. No other independent relationship was found between UA level and other surrogates of arterial stiffness. Conclusions: Serum UA levels are associated with alterations in systemic arterial stiffness that differ in men and women. Women might be more susceptible to large vascular damage associated with hyperuricaemia. PMID:23113222

  5. Serum Phospholipid Docosahexaenoic Acid Is Inversely Associated with Arterial Stiffness in Metabolically Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Hyang; Kwon, Nayeon; Yoon, So Ra

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that lower proportion of serum phospholipid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is inversely associated with increased cardiovascular risk and vascular function in metabolically healthy men. To elucidate it, we first compared serum phospholipid free fatty acid (FA) compositions and cardiovascular risk parameters between healthy men (n = 499) and male patients with coronary artery disease (CAD, n = 111) (30-69 years) without metabolic syndrome, and then further-analyzed the association of serum phospholipid DHA composition with arterial stiffness expressed by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) in metabolically healthy men. Basic parameters, lipid profiles, fasting glycemic status, adiponectin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and LDL particle size, and serum phospholipid FA compositions were significantly different between the two subject groups. Serum phospholipid DHA was highly correlated with most of long-chain FAs. Metabolically healthy men were subdivided into tertile groups according to serum phospholipid DHA proportion: lower (< 2.061%), middle (2.061%-3.235%) and higher (> 3.235%). Fasting glucose, insulin resistance, hs-CRP and ba-PWVs were significantly higher and adiponectin and LDL particle size were significantly lower in the lower-DHA group than the higher-DHA group after adjusted for confounding factors. In metabolically healthy men, multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed that serum phospholipid DHA mainly contributed to arterial stiffness (β′-coefficients = -0.127, p = 0.006) together with age, systolic blood pressure, triglyceride (r = 0.548, p = 0.023). Lower proportion of serum phospholipid DHA was associated with increased cardiovascular risk and arterial stiffness in metabolically healthy men. It suggests that maintaining higher proportion of serum phospholipid DHA may be beneficial for reducing cardiovascular risk including arterial stiffness in metabolically healthy men. PMID:27482523

  6. Association of Parental Hypertension With Arterial Stiffness in Nonhypertensive Offspring: The Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Charlotte; Quiroz, Rene; Enserro, Danielle; Larson, Martin G; Hamburg, Naomi M; Vita, Joseph A; Levy, Daniel; Benjamin, Emelia J; Mitchell, Gary F; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2016-09-01

    High arterial stiffness seems to be causally involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that offspring of parents with hypertension may display higher arterial stiffness before clinically manifest hypertension, given that hypertension is a heritable condition. We compared arterial tonometry measures in a sample of 1564 nonhypertensive Framingham Heart Study third-generation cohort participants (mean age: 38 years; 55% women) whose parents were enrolled in the Framingham Offspring Study. A total of 468, 715, and 381 participants had 0 (referent), 1, and 2 parents with hypertension. Parental hypertension was associated with greater offspring mean arterial pressure (multivariable-adjusted estimate=2.9 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-3.9, and 4.2 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 2.9-5.5, for 1 and 2 parents with hypertension, respectively; P<0.001 for both) and with greater forward pressure wave amplitude (1.6 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-2.7, and 1.9 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-3.2, for 1 and 2 parents with hypertension, respectively; P=0.003 for both). Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and augmentation index displayed similar dose-dependent relations with parental hypertension in sex-, age-, and height-adjusted models, but associations were attenuated on further adjustment. Offspring with at least 1 parent in the upper quartile of augmentation index and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity had significantly higher values themselves (P≤0.02). In conclusion, in this community-based sample of young, nonhypertensive adults, we observed greater arterial stiffness in offspring of parents with hypertension. These observations are consistent with higher vascular stiffness at an early stage in the pathogenesis of hypertension. PMID:27456526

  7. Glycated Albumin is Independently Associated With Arterial Stiffness in Non-Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon Young; Park, Seung Kyo; Yun, Gi Young; Choi, Ah Ran; Lee, Jung Eun; Ha, Sung Kyu; Park, Hyeong Cheon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glycated albumin (GA) exhibits atherogenic effects and increased serum GA levels are associated with the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients. GA production also increases with aging, oxidative stress, and renal dysfunction. We performed this study to further ascertain the association between GA and arterial stiffness in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We enrolled 129 nondiabetic CKD patients. Arterial stiffness was measured by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) using a volume plethysmographic instrument along with simultaneous measurements of GA. Insulin resistance was determined with the homeostatic model assessment. The estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated using serum creatinine and cystatin C according to the CKD-EPI Creatinine-Cystatin C equation adjusted for age, sex, and race (eGFRcr-cys). Nondiabetic CKD patients with arterial stiffness (baPWV ≥1400 cm/s) showed higher GA levels than those without arterial stiffness (14.2 [8.7–20.2]% vs 13.0 [8.8–18.9]%, P = 0.004). In the subgroup analysis, the patients who had both a higher GA level and a lower eGFRcr-cys, showed the highest baPWV compared with patients with a higher GA or a lower GFR alone. By Spearman's correlation analysis, GA correlated significantly with baPWV (r = +0.291, P = 0.001) and fasting serum glucose level (r = +0.191, P = 0.030), whereas The homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance did not show any significant correlation with baPWV. Systolic blood pressure (r = +0.401 P < 0.001), age (r = +0.574, P < 0.001), high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol level (r = −0.317, P < 0.001), and eGFRcr-cys (r = −0.285, P = 0.002) had a significant correlation with baPWV. According to multivariable logistic regression analysis, higher GA and systolic blood pressure were the independent risk factors affecting arterial stiffness. Our results suggest

  8. Application of a four-channel vibrometer system for detection of arterial stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Adriaan; Waz, Adam; Dudzik, Grzegorz; Dirckx, Joris; Abramski, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CD) are the most important cause of death in the world and their prevalence is only rising. A significant aspect in the etiology of CD is the stiffening of the large arteries (arteriosclerosis) and plaque formation (atherosclerosis) in the common carotid artery (CCA) in the neck. As shown by increasing evidence, both conditions can be detected by assessing pulse wave velocity (PWV) in the CCA, and several approaches allow local detection of PWV, including ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In previous studies, laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) was introduced as an approach to assess arterial stiffness. In the present work, a new, compact four-channel LDV system is used for PWV detection in four phantom arteries mimicking real life CCA conditions. The high sensitivity of the LDV system allowed PWV to be assessed, and even local changes in phantom architecture could be detected. This method has potential for cardiovascular screening, as it allows arteriosclerosis assessment and plaque detection.

  9. Cardiovascular outcome associations among cardiovascular magnetic resonance measures of arterial stiffness: the Dallas heart study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has been validated for the noninvasive assessment of total arterial compliance and aortic stiffness, but their associations with cardiovascular outcomes is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations of CMR measures of total arterial compliance and two CMR measures of aortic stiffness with respect to future cardiovascular events. Methods The study consisted of 2122 Dallas Heart Study participants without cardiovascular disease who underwent CMR at 1.5 Tesla. Aortic stiffness was measured by CMR-derived ascending aortic distensibility and aortic arch pulse wave velocity. Total arterial compliance was calculated by dividing left ventricular stroke volume by pulse pressure. Participants were monitored for cardiovascular death, non-fatal cardiac events, and non-fatal extra-cardiac vascular events over 7.8 ± 1.5 years. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess for associations between CMR measures and cardiovascular events. Results Age, systolic blood pressure, and resting heart rate were independently associated with changes in ascending aortic distensibility, arch pulse wave velocity, and total arterial compliance (all p < .0001). A total of 153 participants (6.9%) experienced a cardiovascular event. After adjusting for traditional risk factors, total arterial compliance was modestly associated with increased risk for composite events (HR 1.07 per 1SD, p = 0.03) while the association between ascending aortic distensibility and composite events trended towards significance (HR 1.18 per 1SD, p = 0.08). Total arterial compliance and aortic distensibility were independently associated with nonfatal cardiac events (HR 1.11 per 1SD, p = 0.001 and HR 1.45 per 1SD, p = 0.0005, respectively), but not with cardiovascular death or nonfatal extra-cardiac vascular events. Arch pulse wave velocity was independently associated with nonfatal extra-cardiac vascular events (HR

  10. Taurine supplementation attenuates delayed increase in exercise-induced arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Ra, Song-Gyu; Choi, Youngju; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Ohmori, Hajime; Maeda, Seiji

    2016-06-01

    There is a delayed increase in arterial stiffness after eccentric exercise that is possibly mediated by the concurrent delayed increase in circulating oxidative stress. Taurine has anti-oxidant action, and taurine supplementation may be able to attenuate the increase in oxidative stress after exercise. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether taurine supplementation attenuates the delayed increase in arterial stiffness after eccentric exercise. In the present double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled trial, we divided 29 young, healthy men into 2 groups. Subjects received either 2.0 g of placebo (n = 14) or taurine (n = 15) 3 times per day for 14 days prior to the exercise, on the day of exercise, and the following 3 days. The exercise consisted of 2 sets of 20 maximal-effort eccentric repetitions with the nondominant arm only. On the morning of exercise and for 4 days thereafter, we measured serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) as indices of oxidative stress and arterial stiffness, respectively. On the third and fourth days after exercise, both MDA and cfPWV significantly increased in the placebo group. However, these elevations were significantly attenuated in the taurine group. The increase in MDA was associated with an increase in cfPWV from before exercise to 4 days after exercise (r = 0.597, p < 0.05) in the placebo group, but not in the taurine group. Our results suggest that delayed increase in arterial stiffness after eccentric exercise was probably affected by the exercise-induced oxidative stress and was attenuated by the taurine supplementation. PMID:27163699

  11. Serum ferritin levels are associated with arterial stiffness in healthy Korean adults.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ji Yoon; Kim, Min Kyung; Kang, Shinae; Nam, Ji Sun; Ahn, Chul Woo; Kim, Kyung Rae; Park, Jong Suk

    2016-08-01

    Although an association between serum ferritin and atherosclerosis has been suggested, limited epidemiologic data are available regarding the association between ferritin and arterial stiffness in healthy adults. A total of 2932 healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. Anthropometric and biochemical profiles including ferritin were measured. The arterial stiffness was measured using brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Serum ferritin levels were classified into quartiles and baPWV values gradually increased with each ferritin quartile. Multiple regression analysis showed that ferritin levels were independently correlated with baPWV. After adjusting for multiple risk factors, as compared with the lowest quartile, the odds ratios for high baPWV (>75(th) percentile) were 1.15 (0.84-1.56), 1.37 (0.97-1.73), and 1.46 (1.29-2.17) among men (p for trend < 0.05) and 1.24 (0.87-1.79), 1.53 (1.09-2.16), and 1.80 (1.25-2.82) among women (p for trend < 0.05), for the second, third, and fourth quartiles of ferritin, respectively. In conclusion, serum ferritin levels are independently associated with arterial stiffness in healthy Korean adults. PMID:26926288

  12. Adiponectin Genotype, Blood Pressures, and Arterial Stiffness: The Cardiometabolic Risk in Chinese (CRC) Study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jun; Qiu, Qinqin; Gong, Ying; Liu, Xuekui; Dou, Lianjun; Zou, Caiyan; Wang, Yu; Qi, Lu

    2015-05-01

    The authors examined whether the adiponectin gene (ADIPOQ) variant was associated with blood pressure and arterial stiffness in Chinese adults. A genome-wide association study of the adiponectin variant rs864265 in the ADIPOQ gene was genotyped in a total of 2364 participants. After adjustment for sex, age, body mass index (BMI), fasting glucose, and lipids, participants carrying the T allele of rs864265 showed a greater increase in carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) and systolic blood pressure (SBP). Further adjustment for blood pressure did not appreciably change the association with cfPWV. The authors found significant interactions between rs864265 and BMI, waist circumference, body fat percentage, and SBP in relation to cfPWV (P for interaction = .035, .001, .003, .013, respectively). The T allele of rs864265 was associated with high blood pressure and arterial stiffness. BMI, body fat percentage, waist circumference, and SBP might modify the effects of genetic polymorphism on arterial stiffness. PMID:25894102

  13. Relation of Habitual Chocolate Consumption to Arterial Stiffness in a Community-Based Sample: Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Crichton, Georgina E.; Elias, Merrill F.; Alkerwi, Ala'a; Stranges, Saverio; Abhayaratna, Walter P.

    2016-01-01

    Background The consumption of chocolate and cocoa has established cardiovascular benefits. Less is known about the effects of chocolate on arterial stiffness, a marker of subclinical cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chocolate intakes are independently associated with pulse wave velocity (PWV), after adjustment for cardiovascular, lifestyle and dietary factors. Methods Prospective analyses were undertaken on 508 community-dwelling participants (mean age 61 years, 60% women) from the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study (MSLS). Habitual chocolate intakes, measured using a food frequency questionnaire, were related to PWV, measured approximately 5 years later. Results Chocolate intake was significantly associated with PWV in a non-linear fashion with the highest levels of PWV in those who never or rarely ate chocolate and lowest levels in those who consumed chocolate once a week. This pattern of results remained and was not attenuated after multivariate adjustment for diabetes, cardiovascular risk factors and dietary variables (p = 0.002). Conclusions Weekly chocolate intake may be of benefit to arterial stiffness. Further studies are needed to explore the underlying mechanisms that may mediate the observed effects of habitual chocolate consumption on arterial stiffness. PMID:27493901

  14. Digital Photoplethysmography for Assessment of Arterial Stiffness: Repeatability and Comparison with Applanation Tonometry

    PubMed Central

    Östling, Gerd; Nilsson, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Arterial stiffness is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and can be assessed by applanation tonometry by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIX) by pressure pulse wave analysis (PWA). As an inexpensive and operator independent alternative, photoelectric plethysmography (PPG) has been introduced with analysis of the digital volume pulse wave (DPA) and its second derivatives of wave reflections. Objective The objective was to investigate the repeatability of arterial stiffness parameters measured by digital pulse wave analysis (DPA) and the associations to applanation tonometry parameters. Methods and Results 112 pregnant and non-pregnant individuals of different ages and genders were examined with SphygmoCor arterial wall tonometry and Meridian DPA finger photoplethysmography. Coefficients of repeatability, Bland-Altman plots, intraclass correlation coefficients and correlations to heart rate (HR) and body height were calculated for DPA variables, and the DPA variables were compared to tonometry variables left ventricular ejection time (LVET), PWV and AIX. No DPA variable showed any systematic measurement error or excellent repeatability, but dicrotic index (DI), dicrotic dilatation index (DDI), cardiac ejection elasticity index (EEI), aging index (AI) and second derivatives of the crude pulse wave curve, b/a and e/a, showed good repeatability. Overall, the correlations to AIX were better than to PWV, with correlations coefficients >0.70 for EEI, AI and b/a. Considering the level of repeatability and the correlations to tonometry, the overall best DPA parameters were EEI, AI and b/a. The two pansystolic time parameters, ejection time compensated (ETc) by DPA and LVET by tonometry, showed a significant but weak correlation. Conclusion For estimation of the LV function, ETc, EEI and b/a are suitable, for large artery stiffness EEI, and for small arteries DI and DDI. The only global parameter, AI, showed a high

  15. Evaluating arterial stiffness in type 2 diabetes patients using ultrasonic radiofrequency.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao-Jun; Liu, Yang; Du, Lian-Fang; Luo, Xiang-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Differences in arterial stiffness between the two sides of the carotid arteries were investigated using ultrasonic radiofrequency in 88 patients with type 2 diabetes and 70 controls. The compliance coefficient (CC), pulse wave velocity (PWV), intima-media thickness (CIMT) and diameter (CCAD) of the common carotid arteries (CCAs) were measured. The ratio of the left to right CCAs was calculated to provide four indexes: CC ratio, PWV ratio, CIMT ratio and CCAD ratio. In the diabetes group, the PWV on the left side was significantly higher than that on the right side, while the CC on the left side was significantly lower than that on the right side. The bilateral CIMT was thicker and CCAD was wider, the left PWV traveled faster, and the right CC was higher in the diabetes group than in the control group. The PWV ratio between the two groups was significantly different and correlated positively with duration of diabetes and systolic blood pressure (SBP). The differences between the two sides of CCAs in patients with diabetes suggested that disease duration and SBP were important risk factors for arterial stiffness. Identifying the difference could potentially lead to the much earlier diagnosis of arteriosclerosis. PMID:27376818

  16. Association of Insulin Resistance, Arterial Stiffness and Telomere Length in Adults Free of Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Strazhesko, Irina; Tkacheva, Olga; Boytsov, Sergey; Akasheva, Dariga; Dudinskaya, Ekaterina; Vygodin, Vladimir; Skvortsov, Dmitry; Nilsson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation and oxidative stress might be considered the key mechanisms of aging. Insulin resistance (IR) is a phenomenon related to inflammatory and oxidative stress. We tested the hypothesis that IR may be associated with cellular senescence, as measured by leukocyte telomere length (LTL), and arterial stiffness (core feature of arterial aging), as measured by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (c-f PWV). Methods The study group included 303 subjects, mean age 51.8 ±13.3 years, free of known cardiovascular diseases and regular drug consumption. For each patient, blood pressure was measured, blood samples were available for biochemical parameters, and LTL was analyzed by real time q PCR. C-f PWV was measured with the help of SphygmoCor. SAS 9.1 was used for statistical analysis. Results Through multiple linear regression analysis, c-f PWV is independently and positively associated with age (p = 0.0001) and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; p = 0.0001) and independently negatively associated with LTL (p = 0.0378). HOMA-IR seems to have a stronger influence than SBP on arterial stiffness. In all subjects, age, HOMA-IR, LTL, and SBP predicted 32% of the variance in c-f PWV. LTL was inversely associated with HOMA-IR (p = 0.0001) and age (p = 0.0001). In all subjects, HOMA-IR, age, sex, and SBP predicted 16% of the variance in LTL. Conclusions These data suggest that IR is associated with cell senescence and arterial aging and could, therefore, become the main target in preventing accelerated arterial aging, besides blood pressure control. Research in telomere biology may reveal new ways of estimating cardiovascular aging and risk. PMID:26308091

  17. Main pulmonary arterial wall shear stress correlates with invasive hemodynamics and stiffness in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Michal; Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Schroeder, Joyce D; Dunning, Jamie; Shandas, Robin; Buckner, J Kern; Browning, James; Hertzberg, Jean; Hunter, Kendall S; Fenster, Brett E

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with proximal pulmonary arterial remodeling characterized by increased vessel diameter, wall thickening, and stiffness. In vivo assessment of wall shear stress (WSS) may provide insights into the relationships between pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular remodeling. We investigated the relationship between main pulmonary artery (MPA) WSS and pulmonary hemodynamics as well as markers of stiffness. As part of a prospective study, 17 PH patients and 5 controls underwent same-day four-dimensional flow cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (4-D CMR) and right heart catheterization. Streamwise velocity profiles were generated in the cross-sectional MPA in 45° increments from velocity vector fields determined by 4-D CMR. WSS was calculated as the product of hematocrit-dependent viscosity and shear rate generated from the spatial gradient of the velocity profiles. In-plane average MPA WSS was significantly decreased in the PH cohort compared with that in controls (0.18 ± 0.07 vs. 0.32 ± 0.08 N/m(2); P = 0.01). In-plane MPA WSS showed strong inverse correlations with multiple hemodynamic indices, including pulmonary resistance (ρ = -0.74, P < 0.001), mean pulmonary pressure (ρ = -0.64, P = 0.006), and elastance (ρ = -0.70, P < 0.001). In addition, MPA WSS had significant associations with markers of stiffness, including capacitance (ρ = 0.67, P < 0.001), distensibility (ρ = 0.52, P = 0.013), and elastic modulus (ρ = -0.54, P = 0.01). In conclusion, MPA WSS is decreased in PH and is significantly associated with invasive hemodynamic indices and markers of stiffness. 4-D CMR-based assessment of WSS may represent a novel methodology to study blood-vessel wall interactions in PH. PMID:27076906

  18. Main pulmonary arterial wall shear stress correlates with invasive hemodynamics and stiffness in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O.; Schroeder, Joyce D.; Dunning, Jamie; Shandas, Robin; Buckner, J. Kern; Browning, James; Hertzberg, Jean; Hunter, Kendall S.; Fenster, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with proximal pulmonary arterial remodeling characterized by increased vessel diameter, wall thickening, and stiffness. In vivo assessment of wall shear stress (WSS) may provide insights into the relationships between pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular remodeling. We investigated the relationship between main pulmonary artery (MPA) WSS and pulmonary hemodynamics as well as markers of stiffness. As part of a prospective study, 17 PH patients and 5 controls underwent same-day four-dimensional flow cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (4-D CMR) and right heart catheterization. Streamwise velocity profiles were generated in the cross-sectional MPA in 45° increments from velocity vector fields determined by 4-D CMR. WSS was calculated as the product of hematocrit-dependent viscosity and shear rate generated from the spatial gradient of the velocity profiles. In-plane average MPA WSS was significantly decreased in the PH cohort compared with that in controls (0.18 ± 0.07 vs. 0.32 ± 0.08 N/m2; P = 0.01). In-plane MPA WSS showed strong inverse correlations with multiple hemodynamic indices, including pulmonary resistance (ρ = −0.74, P < 0.001), mean pulmonary pressure (ρ = −0.64, P = 0.006), and elastance (ρ = −0.70, P < 0.001). In addition, MPA WSS had significant associations with markers of stiffness, including capacitance (ρ = 0.67, P < 0.001), distensibility (ρ = 0.52, P = 0.013), and elastic modulus (ρ = −0.54, P = 0.01). In conclusion, MPA WSS is decreased in PH and is significantly associated with invasive hemodynamic indices and markers of stiffness. 4-D CMR–based assessment of WSS may represent a novel methodology to study blood-vessel wall interactions in PH. PMID:27076906

  19. Causal estimation of neural and overall baroreflex sensitivity in relation to carotid artery stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lipponen, Jukka A; Tarvainen, Mika P; Laitinen, Tomi; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Vanninen, Joonas; Koponen, Timo; Laitinen, Tiina M

    2013-12-01

    Continuous electrocardiogram, blood pressure and carotid artery ultrasound video were analyzed from 15 diabetics and 28 healthy controls. By using these measurements artery elasticity, overall baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) assessed between RR and systolic blood pressure variation, and neural BRS assessed between RR and artery diameter variation were estimated. In addition, BRS was estimated using traditional and causal methods which enable separation of feedforward and feedback variation. The aim of this study was to analyze overall and neural BRS in relation to artery stiffness and to validate the causal BRS estimation method in assessing these two types of BRS within the study population. The most significant difference between the healthy and diabetic groups (p < 0.0007) was found for the overall BRS estimated using the causal method. The difference between the groups was also significant for neural BRS (p < 0.0018). However neural BRS was normal in some old diabetics, which indicates normal functioning of autonomic nervous system (ANS), even though the elasticity in arteries of these subjects was reduced. The noncausal method overestimated neural BRS in low BRS values when compared to causal BRS. In conclusion, neural BRS estimated using the causal method is proposed as the best marker of ANS functioning. PMID:24168896

  20. Bone Strength and Arterial Stiffness Impact on Cardiovascular Mortality in a General Population.

    PubMed

    Avramovski, Petar; Avramovska, Maja; Sikole, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis and increased arterial stiffness independently have been found to be associated with higher cardiovascular events rates in the general population (GP). We examined 558 patients from GP by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurements at baseline, with 36-month follow-up period. DXA assessed bone mineral density of femoral neck (BMD FN) and lumbar spine (BMD LS). Carotid-femoral PWV was assessed by pulsed-Doppler. The aim of our study is to find correlation between bone strength and arterial stiffness and their impact on cardiovascular mortality in GP. The mean ± SD of BMD FN, BMD LS, and PWV was 0.852 ± 0.1432 g/cm(2), 0.934 ± 0.1546 g/cm(2), and 9.209 ± 1.9815 m/s. In multiple regression analysis we found BMD FN (βst = -6.0094, p < 0.0001), hypertension (βst = 1.7340, p < 0.0091), and diabetes (βst = 0.4595, p < 0.0046). With Cox-regression analysis, after 17 cardiovascular events, the significant covariates retained by the backward model were BMD FN (b = -2.4129, p = 0.015) and PWV (b = 0.2606, p = 0.0318). The cut-off values were PWV = 9.4 m/s, BMD FN = 0.783 g/cm(2), and BMD LS = 0.992 g/cm(2). The results for BMD FN and PWV hazard ratio risk were 1.116 and 1.297, respectively. BMD FN as a measure of bone strength and PWV as a measure of arterial stiffness are strong independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality in GP. PMID:27047700

  1. Bone Strength and Arterial Stiffness Impact on Cardiovascular Mortality in a General Population

    PubMed Central

    Avramovska, Maja; Sikole, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis and increased arterial stiffness independently have been found to be associated with higher cardiovascular events rates in the general population (GP). We examined 558 patients from GP by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurements at baseline, with 36-month follow-up period. DXA assessed bone mineral density of femoral neck (BMD FN) and lumbar spine (BMD LS). Carotid-femoral PWV was assessed by pulsed-Doppler. The aim of our study is to find correlation between bone strength and arterial stiffness and their impact on cardiovascular mortality in GP. The mean ± SD of BMD FN, BMD LS, and PWV was 0.852 ± 0.1432 g/cm2, 0.934 ± 0.1546 g/cm2, and 9.209 ± 1.9815 m/s. In multiple regression analysis we found BMD FN (βst = −6.0094, p < 0.0001), hypertension (βst = 1.7340, p < 0.0091), and diabetes (βst = 0.4595, p < 0.0046). With Cox-regression analysis, after 17 cardiovascular events, the significant covariates retained by the backward model were BMD FN (b = −2.4129, p = 0.015) and PWV (b = 0.2606, p = 0.0318). The cut-off values were PWV = 9.4 m/s, BMD FN = 0.783 g/cm2, and BMD LS = 0.992 g/cm2. The results for BMD FN and PWV hazard ratio risk were 1.116 and 1.297, respectively. BMD FN as a measure of bone strength and PWV as a measure of arterial stiffness are strong independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality in GP. PMID:27047700

  2. Tetrahydrocurcumin Protects against Cadmium-Induced Hypertension, Raised Arterial Stiffness and Vascular Remodeling in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sangartit, Weerapon; Kukongviriyapan, Upa; Donpunha, Wanida; Pakdeechote, Poungrat; Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol; Surawattanawan, Praphassorn; Greenwald, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cadmium (Cd) is a nonessential heavy metal, causing oxidative damage to various tissues and associated with hypertension. Tetrahydrocurcumin (THU), a major metabolite of curcumin, has been demonstrated to be an antioxidant, anti-diabetic, anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory agent. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of THU against Cd-induced hypertension, raised arterial stiffness and vascular remodeling in mice. Methods Male ICR mice received CdCl2 (100 mg/l) via drinking water for 8 weeks. THU was administered intragastrically at dose of 50 or 100 mg/kg/day concurrently with Cd treatment. Results Administration of CdCl2 significantly increased arterial blood pressure, blunted vascular responses to vasoactive agents, increased aortic stiffness, and induced hypertrophic aortic wall remodeling by increasing number of smooth muscle cells and collagen deposition, decreasing elastin, and increasing matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 levels in the aortic medial wall. Supplementation with THU significantly decreased blood pressure, improved vascular responsiveness, and reversed the structural and mechanical alterations of the aortas, including collagen and elastin deposition. The reduction on the adverse response of Cd treatment was associated with upregulated eNOS and downregulated iNOS protein expressions, increased nitrate/nitrite level, alleviated oxidative stress and enhanced antioxidant glutathione. Moreover, THU also reduced the accumulation of Cd in the blood and tissues. Conclusions Our results suggest that THU ameliorates cadmium-induced hypertension, vascular dysfunction, and arterial stiffness in mice through enhancing NO bioavailability, attenuating oxidative stress, improving vascular remodeling and decreasing Cd accumulation in other tissues. THU has a beneficial effect in moderating the vascular alterations associated with Cd exposure. PMID:25502771

  3. Echo-tracking technology assessment of carotid artery stiffness in patients with coronary slow flow.

    PubMed

    Yang, Song; Wang, De-Zhao; Zhang, Hong-Xia; He, Wen; Chen, Bu-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Coronary slow flow (CSF) in coronary angiography (CAG) is a well-recognized clinical entity. Previous studies have suggested that microvascular abnormalities and endothelial dysfunction are responsible for CSF. Accordingly, we hypothesized that the CSF phenomenon is a form of atherosclerosis including both small vessels and epicardial coronary arteries. The echo-tracking (ET) technique is a non-invasive detection method for early prediction of arterial atherosclerosis. Therefore, we investigated carotid elasticity with the ET technique in patients with CSF. Fifty patients with CSF and 50 patients with normal coronary artery blood flow, as determined by CAG, with a similar distribution of risk factors were recruited. The stiffness parameter (β), pressure-strain elastic modulus (Ep), arterial compliance (AC), augmentation index (AIx) and local pulse-wave velocity (PWV) were determined at the level of the bilateral common carotid artery (CCA) with using the ET technique. Levels of serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-HSCRP) were determined for the two groups. β, Ep and PWV were significantly higher in the CSF group than in the control group (β: 11.4 ± 3.76 vs. 9.22 ± 3.28, p < 0.01; Ep: 153.44 ± 47.85 vs. 126.40 ± 43.32, p < 0.01; PWV: 7.26 ± 1.10 vs. 6.55 ± 1.02, p < 0.01), but AC was lower in the CSF group than in the control group (0.62 ± 0.20 vs. 0.74 ± 0.24, p < 0.01). The elasticity parameters of the bilateral common carotid artery did not significantly differ. The level of hs-HSCRP was correlated positively with β (r = 0.306, p = 0.015), Ep (r = 0.358, p = 0.005) and PWV (r = 0.306, p = 0.015), but negatively with AC (r = -0.236, p = 0.049). In conclusion, the ET technique is a simple practical method for evaluating carotid artery elasticity, and there is a significant correlation between carotid artery stiffness and level of hs-HSCRP in patients with CSF. PMID:25438843

  4. Effect of Lysyl Oxidase Inhibition on Angiotensin II-Induced Arterial Hypertension, Remodeling, and Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Eberson, Lance S.; Sanchez, Pablo A.; Majeed, Beenish A.; Tawinwung, Supannikar; Secomb, Timothy W.; Larson, Douglas F.

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that angiotensin II (Ang II) induces altered vascular stiffness through responses including both structural and material remodeling. Concurrent with remodeling is the induction of the enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) through which ECM proteins are cross-linked. The study objective was to determine the effect of LOX mediated cross-linking on vascular mechanical properties. Three-month old mice were chronically treated with Ang II with or without the LOX blocker, β -aminopropionitrile (BAPN), for 14 days. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) from Doppler measurements of the aortic flow wave was used to quantify in vivo vascular stiffness in terms of an effective Young’s modulus. The increase in effective Young’s modulus with Ang II administration was abolished with the addition of BAPN, suggesting that the material properties are a major controlling element in vascular stiffness. BAPN inhibited the Ang II induced collagen cross-link formation by 2-fold and PWV by 44% (P<0.05). Consistent with this observation, morphometric analysis showed that BAPN did not affect the Ang II mediated increase in medial thickness but significantly reduced the adventitial thickness. Since the hypertensive state contributes to the measured in vivo PWV stiffness, we removed the Ang II infusion pumps on Day 14 and achieved normal arterial blood pressures. With pump removal we observed a decrease of the PWV in the Ang II group to 25% above that of the control values (P=0.002), with a complete return to control values in the Ang II plus BAPN group. In conclusion, we have shown that the increase in vascular stiffness with 14 day Ang II administration results from a combination of hypertension-induced wall strain, adventitial wall thickening and Ang II mediated LOX ECM cross-linking, which is a major material source of vascular stiffening, and that the increased PWV was significantly inhibited with co-administration of BAPN. PMID:25875748

  5. Sex Differences in Flexibility-Arterial Stiffness Relationship and Its Application for Diagnosis of Arterial Stiffening: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Nishiwaki, Masato; Kurobe, Kazumichi; Kiuchi, Atsushi; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Matsumoto, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Arterial stiffness might be related to trunk flexibility in middle-aged and older participants, but it is also affected by age, sex, and blood pressure. This cross-sectional observational study investigated whether trunk flexibility is related to arterial stiffness after considering the major confounding factors of age, sex, and blood pressure. We further investigated whether a simple diagnostic test of flexibility could be helpful to screen for increased arterial stiffening. Methods According to age and sex, we assigned 1150 adults (male, n = 536; female, n = 614; age, 18–89 y) to groups with either high- or poor-flexibility based on the sit-and-reach test. Arterial stiffness was assessed by cardio-ankle vascular index. Results In all categories of men and in older women, arterial stiffness was higher in poor-flexibility than in high-flexibility (P<0.05). This difference remained significant after normalizing arterial stiffness for confounding factors such as blood pressure, but it was not found among young and middle-aged women. Stepwise multiple-regression analysis also supported the notion of the sex differences in flexibility-arterial stiffness relationship. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that cut-off values for sit-and-reach among men and women were 33.2 (area under the curve [AUC], 0.711; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.666–0.756; sensitivity, 61.7%; specificity, 69.7%) and 39.2 (AUC, 0.639; 95% CI, 0.592–0.686; sensitivity, 61.1%; specificity, 62.0%) cm, respectively. Conclusion Our results indicate that flexibility-arterial stiffness relationship is not affected by BP, which is a major confounding factor. In addition, sex differences are observed in this relationship; poor trunk flexibility increases arterial stiffness in young, middle-aged, and older men, whereas the relationship in women is found only in the elderly. Also, the sit-and-reach test can offer a simple method of predicting arterial stiffness at

  6. Improved parameters of metabolic glycaemic and immune function and arterial stiffness with naltrexone implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Here the dramatic and rapid response of a 54-year-old obese hypertensive man with poorly controlled insulin-dependent diabetes with a 33 year history of high dose heroin use, a 1 year history of refractory ulceration of his hands, ankles and feet, treated coronary artery disease, and the metabolic syndrome, to implantation with long-acting naltrexone implants is presented. In particular his hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, proinflammatory state, evidence of hepatic and renal insufficiency, arterial stiffness, and extensive and chronic cutaneous ulceration all improved dramatically over just 13 weeks, in association with complete control of his heroin, benzodiazepine, tobacco and cannabis use. The metabolic and vascular benefits were all highly statistically significant. The case is the first to document dramatic and rapid metabolic, immune and vascular improvements in association with clinical naltrexone therapy and are consistent with its likely effects in restoring addiction-related stem cell and immunological deficits. PMID:21687046

  7. A novel blood pressure-independent arterial wall stiffness parameter; cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI).

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kohji; Utino, Junji; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Takata, Masanobu

    2006-04-01

    To measure the stiffness of the aorta, femoral artery and tibial artery noninvasively, cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) which is independent of blood pressure was developed. The formula for measuring this index is; CAVI=a{(2rho/DeltaP) x ln(Ps/Pd)PWV(2)} + b where, Ps and Pd are systolic and diastolic blood pressures respectively, PWV is pulse wave velocity between the heart and ankle, DeltaP is Ps - Pd, rho is blood density, and a and b are constants. This equation was derived from Bramwell-Hill's equation(1)), and stiffness parameter(2)). To elucidate the clinical utility of CAVI, the reproducibility and dependence on blood pressure were studied using VaSera (Fukuda Denshi Co., Ltd.). Furthermore, CAVI in hemodialysis patients with or without atherosclerotic diseases was measured. The average coefficient of variation for five measurements among 22 persons was 3.8%. In hemodialysis patients (n = 482), CAVI was correlated weakly with systolic and diastolic blood pressures (R = 0.175, 0.006), while brachial-ankle PWV was correlated strongly with systolic and diastolic blood pressures (R = 0.463, 0.335). CAVI in hemodialysis patients without signs of atherosclerotic diseases (NA) was 8.1 +/- 0.3 (mean +/- SD). That in patients receiving percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty was 8.8 +/- 0.3 (p < 0.05 vs. NA). CAVI in patients with ischemic change in their electrocardiogram (ECG) was 8.5 +/- 0.3 (p < 0.05 vs. NA). That in patients with diabetes mellitus was 8.5 +/- 0.3 (p < 0.002 vs. NA). CAVI in the patients with all three complications was 8.9 +/- 0.35 (p < 0.001 vs. NA). These results suggested that CAVI could reflect arteriosclerosis of the aorta, femoral artery and tibial artery quantitatively. PMID:16733298

  8. The predictive value of arterial stiffness on major adverse cardiovascular events in individuals with mildly impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jie; Wang, Xiaona; Ye, Ping; Cao, Ruihua; Yang, Xu; Xiao, Wenkai; Zhang, Yun; Bai, Yongyi; Wu, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Despite growing evidence that arterial stiffness has important predictive value for cardiovascular disease in patients with advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, the predictive significance of arterial stiffness in individuals with mildly impaired renal function has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of arterial stiffness on cardiovascular disease in this specific population. Materials and methods We analyzed measurements of arterial stiffness (carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity [cf-PWV]) and the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) in 1,499 subjects from a 4.8-year longitudinal study. Results A multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis showed that in individuals with normal renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2), the baseline cf-PWV was not associated with occurrence of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.398, 95% confidence interval 0.748–2.613; P=0.293). In individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2), a higher baseline cf-PWV level was associated with a higher risk of MACEs (hazard ratio 2.334, 95% confidence interval 1.082–5.036; P=0.031). Conclusion Arterial stiffness is a moderate and independent predictive factor for MACEs in individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2). PMID:27621605

  9. The Role of Monitoring Arterial Stiffness with Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index in the Control of Lifestyle-Related Diseases.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kohji; Saiki, Atsuhito; Nagayama, Daiji; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Mao

    2015-09-01

    Arteriosclerosis is a major contributor to cardiovascular diseases. One of the difficulties in controlling those diseases is the lack of a suitable indicator of arteriosclerosis or arterial injury in routine clinical practice. Arterial stiffness was supposed to be one of the monitoring indexes of arteriosclerosis. Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is reflecting the stiffness of the arterial tree from the origin of the aorta to the ankle, and one of the features of CAVI is independency from blood pressure at a measuring time. When doxazosin, an α1-adrenergic blocker, was administered, CAVI decreased, indicating that arterial stiffness is composed of both organic stiffness and functional stiffness, which reflects the contraction of arterial smooth muscle. CAVI shows a high value with aging and in many arteriosclerotic diseases, and is also high in persons possessing main coronary risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, hypertension and smoking. Furthermore, when the most of those risk factors were controlled by proper methods, CAVI improved. Furthermore, the co-relationship between CAVI and heart function was demonstrated during treatment of heart failure. This paper reviews the principle and rationale of CAVI, and discusses the meaning of monitoring CAVI in following up so-called lifestyle-related diseases and cardiac dysfunction in routine clinical practice. PMID:26587461

  10. Different Contributions of Physical Activity on Arterial Stiffness between Diabetics and Non-Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Jiro; Watanabe, Masafumi; Murasawa, Takahide; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Background We compared the contribution of physical activity to the change in arterial stiffness between patients with and without diabetes in ischemic heart disease. Methods We studied 96 (diabetes) and 109 (without diabetes) patients with ischemic heart disease treated by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Arterial stiffness was assessed by cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) at the first diagnosis of significant coronary ischemia and 6 months after PCI and optimal medical therapy. Physical activity was evaluated using the long form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Results CAVI values increased more for diabetic patients than for non-diabetic. The IPAQ scores did not differ between the two groups. During follow-up, CAVI values did not significantly change in either group. In diabetic patients, the CAVI score for 48 patients did not change (NC-group) and 48 patients improved (Improved-group). Physical activity scores were 937.9 ± 923.2 and 1524.6 ± 1166.2 in the NC- and Improved-groups, respectively. IPAQ scores and uric acid levels significantly affect CAVI improvement after adjusting for age, sex, baseline CAVI, total cholesterol, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Conclusion Determining factors influencing CAVI improvement during follow-up were significantly different between patients with and without diabetes. IPAQ scores and uric acid levels were significantly correlated with CAVI changes. PMID:27508936

  11. Increased aortic stiffness and related factors in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Mariella; Scandale, Giovanni; Carzaniga, Gianni; Cinquini, Michela; Minola, Marzio; Dimitrov, Gabriel; Carotta, Maria

    2013-10-01

    A number of conditions have been associated with functional changes of large arteries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors associated with aortic stiffness in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The authors studied 86 patients with PAD (ankle-brachial pressure index [ABPI] ≤0.9) and 86 controls. Aortic stiffness was determined by pulse wave velocity (aPWV) using applanation tonometry. In PAD patients, aPWV was higher compared with controls (11 ± 3 vs 9.8 ± 1.8; P=.002). In multiple regression analysis, aPWV was independently associated with pulse pressure (β=0.05, P=.01) in the PAD patients and with age in the control group (β=0.08, P=.0005). The results of this study confirm an aPWV increase in patients with PAD and emphasize the association between blood pressure and aPWV. Further studies are necessary to assess whether higher aortic stiffening adds prognostic value to ABPI, which is the most powerful prognostic indicator in PAD. PMID:24088278

  12. Factors associated with arterial stiffness in children aged 9-10 years

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Milena Santos; Mill, José Geraldo; Pereira, Taisa Sabrina Silva; Fernandes, Carolina Dadalto Rocha; Molina, Maria del Carmen Bisi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the factors associated with stiffness of the great arteries in prepubertal children. METHODS This study with convenience sample of 231 schoolchildren aged 9-10 years enrolled in public and private schools in Vitória, ES, Southeastern Brazil, in 2010-2011. Anthropometric and hemodynamic data, blood pressure, and pulse wave velocity in the carotid-femoral segment were obtained. Data on current and previous health conditions were obtained by questionnaire and notes on the child’s health card. Multiple linear regression was applied to identify the partial and total contribution of the factors in determining the pulse wave velocity values. RESULTS Among the students, 50.2% were female and 55.4% were 10 years old. Among those classified in the last tertile of pulse wave velocity, 60.0% were overweight, with higher mean blood pressure, waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio. Birth weight was not associated with pulse wave velocity. After multiple linear regression analysis, body mass index (BMI) and diastolic blood pressure remained in the model. CONCLUSIONS BMI was the most important factor in determining arterial stiffness in children aged 9-10 years. PMID:25902563

  13. Ratio between carotid artery stiffness and blood flow – a new ultrasound index of ischemic leukoaraiosis

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Monika; Zaletel, Marjan; Pretnar-Oblak, Janja

    2016-01-01

    Background Ischemic leukoaraiosis (ILA) is associated with cognitive decline and aging. Its pathophysiology is believed to be ischemic in origin due to its association with cerebrovascular risk factors and similarity in location to lacunar infarctions. ILA diagnosis is still based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as exclusion of other causes of white matter hyperintensities. So far, there are no known confirming diagnostic tests of ILA. Ultrasound studies have recently shown increased large artery stiffness, increased cerebrovascular resistance, and lower cerebral blood flow in patients with ILA. Increased arterial stiffness and decreased blood flow could have a synergistic effect, and their ratio could be a useful diagnostic index of ILA. Methods In this post hoc analysis, we introduced new ILA indices (ILAi) that are ratios of the carotid stiffness parameters (pulse wave velocity beta [PWVβ], pressure–strain elasticity modulus [Ep], β index), and diastolic and mean blood flows in the internal carotid artery: Q-ICAd and Q-ICAm. We compared the ILAi of 52 patients with ILA and 44 sex- and risk factor-matched controls with normal MRI of the head. ILA diagnosis was based on MRI and exclusion of other causes of white matter hyperintensities. The diagnostic significance of ILAi for the prediction of ILA was analyzed. Results All ILAi significantly differed between the groups; the most significant were PWVβ/Q-ICAd (ILA group: 1.96±0.64 vs control group: 1.56±0.40, P=0.001) and PWVβ/Q-ICAm (ILA group: 1.13±0.32 vs control group: 0.94±0.25, P=0.003). All ILAi were significantly associated with ILA (P<0.01) and were significant independent predictors of ILA. All ILAi were also sensitive and specific for predicting ILA (area under the curve: 0.632–0.683, P<0.05). Conclusion The new ultrasound indices significantly differed between patients with ILA and the control group and were significant predictors of ILA. A combination of lower carotid blood flow

  14. Increased Red Blood Cell Stiffness Increases Pulmonary Vascular Resistance and Pulmonary Arterial Pressure.

    PubMed

    Schreier, David A; Forouzan, Omid; Hacker, Timothy A; Sheehan, John; Chesler, Naomi

    2016-02-01

    Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCD) and pulmonary hypertension (PH) have a significantly increased risk of sudden death compared to patients with SCD alone. Sickled red blood cells (RBCs) are stiffer, more dense, more frequently undergo hemolysis, and have a sixfold shorter lifespan compared to normal RBCs. Here, we sought to investigate the impact of increased RBC stiffness, independent of other SCD-related biological and mechanical RBC abnormalities, on the hemodynamic changes that ultimately cause PH and increase mortality in SCD. To do so, pulmonary vascular impedance (PVZ) measures were recorded in control C57BL6 mice before and after ∼50 μl of blood (Hct = 45%) was extracted and replaced with an equal volume of blood containing either untreated RBCs or RBCs chemically stiffened with glutaraldehyde (Hct = 45%). Chemically stiffened RBCs increased mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) (13.5 ± 0.6 mmHg at baseline to 23.2 ± 0.7 mmHg after the third injection), pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) (1.23 ± 0.11 mmHg*min/ml at baseline to 2.24 ± 0.14 mmHg*min/ml after the third injection), and wave reflections (0.31 ± 0.02 at baseline to 0.43 ± 0.03 after the third injection). Chemically stiffened RBCs also decreased cardiac output, but did not change hematocrit, blood viscosity, pulmonary arterial compliance, or heart rate. The main finding of this study is that increased RBC stiffness alone affects pulmonary pulsatile hemodynamics, which suggests that RBC stiffness plays an important role in the development of PH in patients with SCD. PMID:26638883

  15. High-Dose versus Low-Dose Vitamin D Supplementation and Arterial Stiffness among Individuals with Prehypertension and Vitamin D Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zaleski, Amanda; Panza, Gregory; Swales, Heather; Arora, Pankaj; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Wang, Thomas; Thompson, Paul D.; Taylor, Beth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with the onset and progression of hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, mechanisms underlying vitamin D deficiency-mediated increased risk of CVD remain unknown. We sought to examine the differential effect of high-dose versus low-dose vitamin D supplementation on markers of arterial stiffness among ~40 vitamin D deficient adults with prehypertension. Methods. Participants were randomized to high-dose (4000 IU/d) versus low-dose (400 IU/d) oral vitamin D3 for 6 months. 24 hr ambulatory blood pressure (BP), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and pulse wave analyses were obtained at baseline and after 6 months of vitamin D supplementation. Results. There were no changes in resting BP or pulse wave velocity over 6 mo regardless of vitamin D dose (all p > 0.202). High-dose vitamin D decreased augmentation index and pressure by 12.3 ± 5.3% (p = 0.047) and 4.0 ± 1.5 mmHg (p = 0.02), respectively. However, these decreases in arterial stiffness were not associated with increases in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D over 6 mo (p = 0.425). Conclusion. High-dose vitamin D supplementation appears to lower surrogate measures of arterial stiffness but not indices of central pulse wave velocity. Clinical Trial Registration. This trial is registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (Unique Identifier: NCT01240512). PMID:26451070

  16. Impaired renal function impacts negatively on vascular stiffness in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are independently associated with increased vascular stiffness. We examined whether renal function contributes to vascular stiffness independently of CAD status. Methods We studied 160 patients with CAD and 169 subjects without CAD. The 4-variable MDRD formula was used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); impaired renal function was defined as eGFR <60 mL/min. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with the SphygmoCor® device. Circulating biomarkers were assessed in plasma using xMAP® multiplexing technology. Results Patients with CAD and impaired renal function had greater PWV compared to those with CAD and normal renal function (10.2 [9.1;11.2] vs 7.3 [6.9;7.7] m/s; P < 0.001). In all patients, PWV was a function of eGFR (β = −0.293; P < 0.001) even after adjustment for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, body mass index and presence or absence of CAD. Patients with CAD and impaired renal function had higher levels of adhesion and inflammatory molecules including E-selectin and osteopontin (all P < 0.05) compared to those with CAD alone, but had similar levels of markers of oxidative stress. Conclusions Renal function is a determinant of vascular stiffness even in patients with severe atherosclerotic disease. This was paralleled by differences in markers of cell adhesion and inflammation. Increased vascular stiffness may therefore be linked to inflammatory remodeling of the vasculature in people with impaired renal function, irrespective of concomitant atherosclerotic disease. PMID:23937620

  17. Central retinal artery pressure and carotid artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    SUN, RAN; PENG, XIAO-YAN; YOU, QI-SHENG; JIAO, LI-QUN; JONAS, JOST B.

    2016-01-01

    The central retinal artery (CRA), which can be non-invasively examined with ophthalmoscopy, may be regarded as an extracranial part of the cerebrovascular system. Assessment of CRA pressure may be of help in assessing the impediment of the intracranial blood circulation in patients with a carotid artery stenosis (CAS). The aim of this study was to explore the potential associations between diastolic central retinal artery pressure (diastCRAP) and CAS. The prospective longitudinal clinical observational study included patients with CAS and a control group without CAS. diastCRAP was assessed using ophthalmodynamometry. The study group consisted of 95 patients with CAS (50 of whom had >75%CAS and underwent surgery; the surgical study group) and a control group of 64 individuals without CAS. In all study participants, a lower diastCRAP was significantly associated with a higher degree of CAS (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated that a higher CAS degree was significantly (correlation coefficient: r=0.75) associated with a higher brachial diastolic blood pressure (P<0.001) and lower diastCRAP (P<0.001). Within the surgical study group at the baseline of the study, diastCRAP was significantly lower at the surgical side than at the contralateral side (P=0.02). The diastCRAP on the surgical side increased significantly (P<0.001) after surgery. In the surgical study group at baseline, diastCRAP on the surgical side was not significantly associated with brachial diastolic blood pressure (P=0.22), whereas after surgery, diastCRAP was significantly associated with brachial diastolic blood pressure (P=0.001). DiastCRAP was found to be significantly and linearly correlated with the degree of CAS in intra-individual inter-eye, inter-individual and intra-individual follow-up comparisons. The strong and linear association between diastCRAP and the degree of CAS suggest that diastCRAP should be explored further for use as an indicator of cerebrovascular status. PMID:26998005

  18. Increased postflight carotid artery stiffness and inflight insulin resistance resulting from 6-mo spaceflight in male and female astronauts.

    PubMed

    Hughson, Richard L; Robertson, Andrew D; Arbeille, Philippe; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Rush, James W E; Fraser, Katelyn S; Greaves, Danielle K

    2016-03-01

    Removal of the normal head-to-foot gravity vector and chronic weightlessness during spaceflight might induce cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations related to changes in arterial pressure and reduction in physical activity. We tested hypotheses that stiffness of arteries located above the heart would be increased postflight, and that blood biomarkers inflight would be consistent with changes in vascular function. Possible sex differences in responses were explored in four male and four female astronauts who lived on the International Space Station for 6 mo. Carotid artery distensibility coefficient (P = 0.005) and β-stiffness index (P = 0.006) reflected 17-30% increases in arterial stiffness when measured within 38 h of return to Earth compared with preflight. Spaceflight-by-sex interaction effects were found with greater changes in β-stiffness index in women (P = 0.017), but greater changes in pulse wave transit time in men (P = 0.006). Several blood biomarkers were changed from preflight to inflight, including an increase in an index of insulin resistance (P < 0.001) with a spaceflight-by-sex term suggesting greater change in men (P = 0.034). Spaceflight-by-sex interactions for renin (P = 0.016) and aldosterone (P = 0.010) indicated greater increases in women than men. Six-month spaceflight caused increased arterial stiffness. Altered hydrostatic arterial pressure gradients as well as changes in insulin resistance and other biomarkers might have contributed to alterations in arterial properties, including sex differences between male and female astronauts. PMID:26747504

  19. Vitamin D3 mediated effects on postprandial leukocyte activation and arterial stiffness in men and women.

    PubMed

    Klop, B; van de Geijn, G-J M; Birnie, E; Njo, T L; Janssen, H W; Jansen, H G; Jukema, J W; Elte, J W F; Castro Cabezas, M

    2014-05-01

    Postprandial inflammation is considered to be pro-atherogenic. Vitamin D can reduce inflammation and arterial stiffness. We hypothesized that vitamin D3 improves postprandial arterial elasticity by the modulation of leukocyte activation. Healthy volunteers underwent two oral fat-loading tests (OFLTs). The augmentation index (AIx) and flow cytometric quantification of leukocyte activation markers were measured. After the first OFLT, 100 000 IU of vitamin D3 was administered and a second OFLT was carried out 7 days later. Six men and six women were included. A favorable reduction in AIx was found after vitamin D3 supplementation (P=0.042) in both genders. After vitamin D3, exclusively in women a reduction in the area under the postprandial curve for monocytes CD11b and CD35 by 10.5% (P=0.016) and 12.5% (P=0.04) and neutrophil CD11b by 17.0% (P=0.014) was observed. In conclusion, vitamin D3 probably increased postprandial arterial elasticity in men and women, but reduced postprandial leukocyte activation exclusively in women. PMID:24619107

  20. Morning blood pressure surge is associated with arterial stiffness and sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity in hypertensive seniors

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yoshiyuki; Galbreath, M. Melyn; Shibata, Shigeki; Jarvis, Sara S.; Bivens, Tiffany B.; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Levine, Benjamin D.

    2013-01-01

    Morning blood pressure (BP) surge is considered to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We tested the hypothesis that increased large-artery stiffness and impaired sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) contribute to augmented morning surge in elderly hypertensive subjects. Morning surge was assessed as morning systolic BP averaged for 2 h just after waking up minus minimal sleeping systolic BP by using ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) in 40 untreated hypertensive [68 ± 1 (SE) yr] and 30 normotensive (68 ± 1 yr) subjects. Beat-by-beat finger BP and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were recorded in the supine position and at 60° upright tilt. We assessed arterial stiffness with carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) and sympathetic BRS during spontaneous breathing. Awake and asleep ABPM-BPs and morning surge were higher in hypertensive than normotensive subjects (all P < 0.001). cfPWV was higher (P = 0.002) and sympathetic BRS was lower (P = 0.096) in hypertensive than normotensive subjects. Hypertensive subjects with morning surge ≥35 mmHg (median value) had higher cfPWV (11.9 ± 0.5 vs. 9.9 ± 0.4 m/s, P = 0.002) and lower sympathetic BRS (supine: −2.71 ± 0.25 vs. −3.73 ± 0.29, P = 0.011; upright: −2.62 ± 0.22 vs. −3.51 ± 0.35 bursts·100 beats−1·mmHg−1, P = 0.052) than those with morning surge <35 mmHg. MSNA indices were similar between groups (all P > 0.05), while upright total peripheral resistance was higher in hypertensive subjects with greater morning surge than those with lesser morning surge (P = 0.050). Morning surge was correlated positively with cfPWV (r = 0.59, P < 0.001) and negatively with sympathetic BRS (r = 0.51, P < 0.001) in hypertensive subjects only. Thus, morning BP surge is associated with arterial stiffness and sympathetic BRS, as well as vasoreactivity during orthostasis in hypertensive seniors. PMID:23832695

  1. The impact of change in physical activity on change in arterial stiffness in overweight or obese sedentary young adults

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Marquis; Gabriel, Kelley P; Cooper, Jennifer; Storti, Kristi L; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Kriska, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality. Lifestyle factors such as physical activity may reduce arterial stiffness. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of change in physical activity (PA) on one-year change in arterial stiffness in 274 overweight/obese sedentary young adults. The Slow Adverse Vascular Effects of excess weight (SAVE) trial was a study evaluating the relationships between weight loss, dietary sodium, and vascular health. PA was measured with the ActiGraph AM7164 accelerometer. Intensity of activity was determined using established cutpoints. Arterial stiffness was assessed by brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) using an automated device. Analysis of Covariance compared changes in total accelerometer counts, minutes/day in light intensity PA (LPA), and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), and sedentary time, by categories of change in baPWV. Models were adjusted for time since baseline visit, age, sex, race, homeostatis model of assessment of insulin resistance, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and weight change. Total accelerometer counts and time spent in MVPA increased from baseline to 12 months while time spent in LPA significantly decreased. Mean baPWV was similar at each time point. Those that showed decreased baPWV also showed an increase in total accelerometer counts per day and time spent in MVPA in the fully adjusted models (p<0.001). Changes in sedentary time and time spent in LPA were not associated with changes in baPWV. These results indicate that even modest increases in MVPA can reduce arterial stiffness, a risk factor for future cardiovascular events. PMID:24879662

  2. Infant Arterial Stiffness and Maternal Iron Status in Pregnancy: A UK Birth Cohort (Baby VIP Study)

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, Nisreen A.; Cade, Janet E.; McArdle, Harry J.; Greenwood, Darren C.; Hayes, Helen E.; Ciantar, Etienne; Simpson, Nigel A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background In animal studies, iron deficiency during pregnancy has been linked to increased offspring cardiovascular risk. No previous population studies have measured arterial stiffness early in life to examine its association with maternal iron status. Objective This study aimed to examine the association between maternal iron status in early pregnancy with infant brachio-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). Methods The Baby VIP (Baby's Vascular Health and Iron in Pregnancy) study is a UK-based birth cohort which recruited 362 women after delivery from the Leeds Teaching Hospitals postnatal wards. Ferritin and transferrin receptor levels were measured in maternal serum samples previously obtained in the first trimester. Infant brachio-femoral PWV was measured during a home visit at 2–6 weeks. Results Iron depletion (ferritin <15 µg/l) was detected in 79 (23%) women in early pregnancy. Infant PWV (mean = 6.7 m/s, SD = 1.3, n = 284) was neither associated with maternal ferritin (adjusted change per 10 µg/l = 0.02, 95% CI: −0.01, 0.1), nor with iron depletion (adjusted change = −0.2, 95% CI: −0.6, 0.2). No evidence of association was observed between maternal serum transferrin receptor level and its ratio to ferritin with infant PWV. Maternal anaemia (<11 g/dl) at <20 weeks’ gestation was associated with a 1.0-m/s increase in infant PWV (adjusted 95% CI: 0.1, 1.9). Conclusion This is the largest study to date which has assessed peripheral PWV as a measure of arterial stiffness in infants. There was no evidence of an association between markers of maternal iron status early in pregnancy and infant PWV. PMID:25790854

  3. Vitamin D is a regulator of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and arterial stiffness in mice.

    PubMed

    Andrukhova, Olena; Slavic, Svetlana; Zeitz, Ute; Riesen, Sabine C; Heppelmann, Monika S; Ambrisko, Tamas D; Markovic, Mato; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Erben, Reinhold G

    2014-01-01

    The vitamin D hormone 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] is essential for the preservation of serum calcium and phosphate levels but may also be important for the regulation of cardiovascular function. Epidemiological data in humans have shown that vitamin D insufficiency is associated with hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy, increased arterial stiffness, and endothelial dysfunction in normal subjects and in patients with chronic kidney disease and type 2 diabetes. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these associations remain largely unexplained. In this study, we aimed to decipher the mechanisms by which 1,25(OH)2D3 may regulate systemic vascular tone and cardiac function, using mice carrying a mutant, functionally inactive vitamin D receptor (VDR). To normalize calcium homeostasis in VDR mutant mice, we fed the mice lifelong with the so-called rescue diet enriched with calcium, phosphate, and lactose. Here, we report that VDR mutant mice are characterized by lower bioavailability of the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) due to reduced expression of the key NO synthesizing enzyme, endothelial NO synthase, leading to endothelial dysfunction, increased arterial stiffness, increased aortic impedance, structural remodeling of the aorta, and impaired systolic and diastolic heart function at later ages, independent of changes in the renin-angiotensin system. We further demonstrate that 1,25(OH)2D3 is a direct transcriptional regulator of endothelial NO synthase. Our data demonstrate the importance of intact VDR signaling in the preservation of vascular function and may provide a mechanistic explanation for epidemiological data in humans showing that vitamin D insufficiency is associated with hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:24284821

  4. Relation between endothelial progenitor cells and arterial stiffness in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju-Hua; Chen, Yan; Zhen, Zhe; Yeung, Chi-Keung; Chan, Johnny; Chan, Henry H; Tse, Hung-Fat; Yiu, Kai-Hang

    2016-08-01

    Patients with psoriasis are prone to premature atherosclerosis. We hypothesize that depletion of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) is related to patients with psoriasis and can contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. Thirty-five plaque-type psoriasis patients (41.9 ± 5.5 years, 30 men) and 20 age- and sex-matched controls were studied. Four subpopulations of EPC, namely, CD34(+) EPC, CD133(+) EPC, CD34(+) /kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR)(+) EPC and CD133(+) /KDR(+) EPC were measured by flow cytometry. Arterial stiffness in psoriasis patients was assessed by heart to ankle pulse wave velocity (haPWV), augmentation index (AI) and carotid intima media thickness (IMT). Patients with psoriasis had a lower level of CD34(+) EPC (7.85 ± 2.49% vs 6.26 ± 2.13%, P = 0.02) compared with healthy controls. In patients with psoriasis, level of CD34(+) EPC was negatively related with haPWV (r = -0.43 P = 0.01) and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (r = -0.39 P = 0.02). Multivariate regression analysis further demonstrated that haPWV was independently associated with level of CD34(+) EPC. Each percentage decrease in CD34(+) EPC accounted for an increase in haPWV of +0.02 m/s. The result demonstrated that patients with psoriasis had reduced CD34(+) EPC compared with controls. Importantly, CD34(+) EPC was independently related with haPWV in these patients. This finding suggests that EPC reduction is associated with the development of arterial stiffness in patients with psoriasis. PMID:26704131

  5. Relationship between C242T polymorphism and arterial stiffness in an apparently healthy population.

    PubMed

    Ji, Y; Ge, J; Zhu, Z; Wang, F; Jiang, J; Cao, H

    2016-08-01

    Superoxide production is modulated by the C242T polymorphism of the CYBA gene. A major source of the superoxide anion that contributes to arterial stiffness is oxidase. We investigated the relationship between the C242T polymorphism and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in an apparently healthy population, while controlling for the amount of consumed cigarette. We measured baPWV non-invasively, recorded the detailed history of smoking and genotyped the C242T polymorphism in 856 participants. The CC genotype was related to a higher value of baPWV than the CT/TT genotype (1438.7±11.9 vs 1371.0±32.4 cm s(-1), β=-0.069, P=0.03) after adjustment for covariates. Further investigation showed an interaction between C242T polymorphism and smoking status with respect to baPWV (P<0.0001). For smokers, the CC genotype of C242T polymorphism was correlated with higher baPWV values compared with CT/TT genotype (1344.2±17.4 vs 1126.8±22.5 cm s(-1), β=-0.279, P<0.0001), whereas this relationship in the non-smokers was not significant (1485.5±15.1 vs 1499.0±41.5 cm s(-1), β=0.027, P=0.48). Additionally, for smokers who smoked at least 180 cigarette-years, the CC genotype participants showed higher values of baPWV compared with CT/TT polymorphism carriers (P⩽0.011). Our findings suggest that the C242T gene polymorphism is associated with arterial stiffness. Additionally, this relationship could be modified by smoking dose. PMID:26467818

  6. Circulating concentrations of vitamin E isomers: Association with bone turnover and arterial stiffness in post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Hampson, G; Edwards, S; Sankaralingam, A; Harrington, D J; Voong, K; Fogelman, I; Frost, M L

    2015-12-01

    The effects of vitamin E on cardiovascular and bone health are conflicting with beneficial and detrimental findings reported. To investigate this further, we carried out a cross-sectional study to determine the relationship between circulating concentrations of the 2 vitamin E isomers, α- and γ-tocopherol (TP) with bone turnover and arterial stiffness. Two hundred and seventy eight post-menopausal women with mean age [SD] 60.9 [6.0] years were studied. Fasting serum α-TP and γ-TP, bone turnover markers; procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide (P1NP) and C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTX), parathyroid hormone (PTH), total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG) were measured. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and central augmentation index (AI) as markers of arterial stiffness were also determined. A positive correlation was observed between α-TP and γ-TP (r=0.14, p=0.022). A significant negative association between α-TP and P1NP only was seen in multiple linear regression analysis following adjustment for serum TC and TG (p=0.016). In a full multi-linear regression model, following correction for age, years since menopause, smoking habits, alcohol intake, use of calcium supplements, BMI, PTH, serum calcium, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the association between α-TP and P1NP remained significant (p=0.011). We did not observe any significant association between γ-TP or α-TP/γ-TP ratio with P1NP or CTX. P1NP was significantly lower in subjects with α-TP concentrations of >30 μmol/L (α-TP >30 μmol/L; P1NP: 57.5 [20.7], α-TP<30 μmol/L; P1NP: 65.7 [24.9] μg/L, p=0.005). PWV was significantly associated with α-TP/γ-TP ratio (p=0.04) but not with serum α-TP or γ-TP in a full multi-linear regression model adjusting for serum lipids, age, and blood pressure. The data suggest that high serum concentrations of α-TP may have a negative effect on bone formation. The balance of α-TP and γ-TP may be important in maintaining

  7. Association between plasma sLOX-1 concentration and arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older individuals.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Takeshi; Maeda, Seiji; Mukai, Jun; Ohki, Makoto; Nakanishi, Mamoru; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2015-09-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is implicated in vascular endothelial function. Vascular endothelial function is a potent regulator of arterial stiffness, an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, it is unknown whether LOX-1 is associated with arterial stiffness. Plasma concentrations of soluble LOX-1 (sLOX-1) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, an index of arterial stiffness) were measured in 143 individuals between 51 and 83 years of age. Plasma sLOX-1 concentration was correlated with baPWV (r = 0.288, p = 0.0005). In stepwise regression analysis, plasma sLOX-1 concentration was associated with baPWV, after adjusting for age; body mass index; blood pressure; heart rate; blood levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and insulin; sex; and use of antihypertensives, lipid-lowering agents, and other medications (R (2) = 0.575, p<0.0001). Multiple logistic regression demonstrated that plasma sLOX-1 concentration was independently associated with elevated baPWV (≥14.0 m/s; odds ratio, 1.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.03; p = 0.03). These results suggest that LOX-1 is associated with arterial stiffness. PMID:26388674

  8. Effects of aerobic exercise on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness of female patients with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seol-Jung; Kim,, Eon-ho; Ko, Kwang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness or female patients with metabolic syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise group (n=12) or a control group (n=11). Subjects in the exercise group performed aerobic exercise at 60–80% of maximum heart rate for 40 min 5 times a week for 12 weeks. The changes in metabolic syndrome risk factors, resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness were measured and analyzed before and after initiation of the exercise program to determine the effect of exercise. Arterial stiffness was assessed based on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV). [Results] Compared to the control group; The metabolic syndrome risk factors (weight, % body fat, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and HDL-Cholesterol) were significantly improved in the exercise: resting heart rate was significantly decreased; VO2max, muscle strength and muscle endurance were significantly increased; and ba-PWV was significantly decreased. [Conclusion] Aerobic exercise had beneficial effects on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness of patients with metabolic syndrome. PMID:27390411

  9. Effects of aerobic exercise on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness of female patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seol-Jung; Kim, Eon-Ho; Ko, Kwang-Jun

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness or female patients with metabolic syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise group (n=12) or a control group (n=11). Subjects in the exercise group performed aerobic exercise at 60-80% of maximum heart rate for 40 min 5 times a week for 12 weeks. The changes in metabolic syndrome risk factors, resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness were measured and analyzed before and after initiation of the exercise program to determine the effect of exercise. Arterial stiffness was assessed based on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV). [Results] Compared to the control group; The metabolic syndrome risk factors (weight, % body fat, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and HDL-Cholesterol) were significantly improved in the exercise: resting heart rate was significantly decreased; VO2max, muscle strength and muscle endurance were significantly increased; and ba-PWV was significantly decreased. [Conclusion] Aerobic exercise had beneficial effects on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness of patients with metabolic syndrome. PMID:27390411

  10. Evaluation of Blood Pressure Control using a New Arterial Stiffness Parameter, Cardio-ankle Vascular Index (CAVI)

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Kohji; Utino, Junji; Saiki, Atsuhito; Endo, Kei; Ohira, Masahiro; Nagayama, Daiji; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Mao; Takahara, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Arterial stiffness has been known to be a surrogate marker of arteriosclerosis, and also of vascular function. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) had been the most popular index and was known to be a predictor of cardiovascular events. But, it depends on blood pressure at measuring time. To overcome this problem, cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is developed. CAVI is derived from stiffness parameter β by Hayashi, and the equation of Bramwell-Hill, and is independent from blood pressure at a measuring time. Then, CAVI might reflect the proper change of arterial wall by antihypertensive agents. CAVI shows high value with aging and in many arteriosclerotic diseases and is also high in persons with main coronary risk factors. Furthermore, CAVI is decreased by an administration of α1 blocker, doxazosin for 2-4 hours, Those results suggested that CAVI reflected the arterial stiffness composed of organic components and of smooth muscle cell contracture. Angiotensin II receptor blocker, olmesartan decreased CAVI much more than that of calcium channel antagonist, amlodipine, even though the rates of decreased blood pressure were almost same. CAVI might differentiate the blood pressure-lowering agents from the point of the effects on proper arterial stiffness. This paper reviewed the principle and rationale of CAVI, and the possibilities of clinical applications, especially in the studies of hypertension. PMID:23807874

  11. Menaquinone-7 supplementation improves arterial stiffness in healthy postmenopausal women. A double-blind randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Knapen, Marjo H J; Braam, Lavienja A J L M; Drummen, Nadja E; Bekers, Otto; Hoeks, Arnold P G; Vermeer, Cees

    2015-05-01

    Observational data suggest a link between menaquinone (MK, vitamin K2) intake and cardiovascular (CV) health. However, MK intervention trials with vascular endpoints are lacking. We investigated long-term effects of MK-7 (180 µg MenaQ7/day) supplementation on arterial stiffness in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Healthy postmenopausal women (n=244) received either placebo (n=124) or MK-7 (n=120) for three years. Indices of local carotid stiffness (intima-media thickness IMT, Diameter end-diastole and Distension) were measured by echotracking. Regional aortic stiffness (carotid-femoral and carotid-radial Pulse Wave Velocity, cfPWV and crPWV, respectively) was measured using mechanotransducers. Circulating desphospho-uncarboxylated matrix Gla-protein (dp-ucMGP) as well as acute phase markers Interleukin-6 (IL-6), high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and markers for endothelial dysfunction Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule (VCAM), E-selectin, and Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) were measured. At baseline dp-ucMGP was associated with IMT, Diameter, cfPWV and with the mean z-scores of acute phase markers (APMscore) and of markers for endothelial dysfunction (EDFscore). After three year MK-7 supplementation cfPWV and the Stiffness Index βsignificantly decreased in the total group, whereas distension, compliance, distensibility, Young's Modulus, and the local carotid PWV (cPWV) improved in women having a baseline Stiffness Index β above the median of 10.8. MK-7 decreased dp-ucMGP by 50 % compared to placebo, but did not influence the markers for acute phase and endothelial dysfunction. In conclusion, long-term use of MK-7 supplements improves arterial stiffness in healthy postmenopausal women, especially in women having a high arterial stiffness. PMID:25694037

  12. Noninvasive pulse transit time measurement for arterial stiffness monitoring in microgravity.

    PubMed

    McCall, Corey; Rostosky, Rea; Wiard, Richard M; Inan, Omer T; Giovangrandi, Laurent; Cuttino, Charles Marsh; Kovacs, Gregory T A

    2015-08-01

    The use of a noninvasive hemodynamic monitor to estimate arterial stiffness, by measurement of pulse transit time (PTT), was demonstrated in microgravity. The monitor's utility for space applications was shown by establishing the correlation between ground-based and microgravity-based measurements. The system consists of a scale-based ballistocardiogram (BCG) and a toe-mounted photoplethysmogram (PPG). PTT was measured from the BCG I-wave to the intersecting tangents of the first trough and maximum first derivative of the PPG waveforms of each subject. The system was tested on a recent series of parabolic flights in which the PTT of nine subjects was measured on the ground and in microgravity. An average of 60.2 ms PTT increase from ground to microgravity environments was shown, and was consistent across all test subjects (standard deviation = 32.9 ms). This increase in PTT could be explained by a number of factors associated with microgravity and reported in previous research, including elimination of hydrostatic pressure, reduction of intrathoracic pressure, and reduction of mean arterial pressure induced by vasodilation. PMID:26737764

  13. Maraviroc Reduces Arterial Stiffness in PI-Treated HIV-infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Piconi, Stefania; Pocaterra, Daria; Rainone, Veronica; Cossu, Maria; Masetti, Michela; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Clerici, Mario; Trabattoni, Daria

    2016-01-01

    The Δ32-CCR5 deletion of the CCR5 receptor is protective toward coronary artery pathology and myocardial infarction. Maraviroc (MVC), a CCR5 antagonist, was recently introduced in the therapy of HIV infection; we evaluated whether this drug could modulate the atherosclerotic burden in aviremic PI-treated HIV-positive individuals who underwent MVC intensification. Thus, the effect of MVC on intima media thickness, arterial stiffness, metabolic parameters, pro-inflammatory cytokines, endothelial dysfunction, and microbial traslocation markers was analyzed in 6 aviremic PI-treated HIV-positive individuals and were compared to those obtained in 9 additional aviremic PI-treated subjects that were enrolled retrospectively from our outpatients cohort. MVC intensification resulted in a significant reduction in intima media thickness, pulse wave velocity and triglycerides compared to baseline. Notably, MVC was also associated with a significant reduction of IL-6, microbial translocation indexes, sICAM and sVCAM; these changes were maintained throughout the 6 months of MVC intensification. No significant modifications were observed in CD4 counts, HIV viral load, and cholesterolemia. Results herein support a role of CCR5 antagonists in reducing the cardiovascular risk in HIV-infection. The hampering of inflammation, microbial translocation and the improvement of endothelial function could justify the protective role of CCR5 antagonists on atherosclerotic burden. PMID:27352838

  14. Maraviroc Reduces Arterial Stiffness in PI-Treated HIV-infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Piconi, Stefania; Pocaterra, Daria; Rainone, Veronica; Cossu, Maria; Masetti, Michela; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Clerici, Mario; Trabattoni, Daria

    2016-01-01

    The Δ32-CCR5 deletion of the CCR5 receptor is protective toward coronary artery pathology and myocardial infarction. Maraviroc (MVC), a CCR5 antagonist, was recently introduced in the therapy of HIV infection; we evaluated whether this drug could modulate the atherosclerotic burden in aviremic PI-treated HIV-positive individuals who underwent MVC intensification. Thus, the effect of MVC on intima media thickness, arterial stiffness, metabolic parameters, pro-inflammatory cytokines, endothelial dysfunction, and microbial traslocation markers was analyzed in 6 aviremic PI-treated HIV-positive individuals and were compared to those obtained in 9 additional aviremic PI-treated subjects that were enrolled retrospectively from our outpatients cohort. MVC intensification resulted in a significant reduction in intima media thickness, pulse wave velocity and triglycerides compared to baseline. Notably, MVC was also associated with a significant reduction of IL-6, microbial translocation indexes, sICAM and sVCAM; these changes were maintained throughout the 6 months of MVC intensification. No significant modifications were observed in CD4 counts, HIV viral load, and cholesterolemia. Results herein support a role of CCR5 antagonists in reducing the cardiovascular risk in HIV-infection. The hampering of inflammation, microbial translocation and the improvement of endothelial function could justify the protective role of CCR5 antagonists on atherosclerotic burden. PMID:27352838

  15. Impaired sodium-dependent adaptation of arterial stiffness in formerly preeclamptic women: the RETAP-vascular study.

    PubMed

    van der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Paauw, Nina D; Toering, Tsjitske J; Feelisch, Martin; Faas, Marijke M; Sutton, Thomas R; Minnion, Magdalena; Lefrandt, Joop D; Scherjon, Sicco A; Franx, Arie; Navis, Gerjan; Lely, A Titia

    2016-06-01

    Women with a history of preeclampsia have an increased risk for cardiovascular diseases later in life. Persistent vascular alterations in the postpartum period might contribute to this increased risk. The current study assessed arterial stiffness under low sodium (LS) and high sodium (HS) conditions in a well-characterized group of formerly early-onset preeclamptic (fPE) women and formerly pregnant (fHP) women. Eighteen fHP and 18 fPE women were studied at an average of 5 yr after pregnancy on 1 wk of LS (50 mmol Na(+)/day) and 1 wk of HS (200 mmol Na(+)/day) intake. Arterial stiffness was measured by pulse-wave analysis (aortic augmentation index, AIx) and carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (PWV). Circulating markers of the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS), extracellular volume (ECV), nitric oxide (NO), and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) were measured in an effort to identify potential mechanistic elements underlying adaptation of arterial stiffness. AIx was significantly lower in fHP women on LS compared with HS while no difference in AIx was apparent in fPE women. PWV remained unchanged upon different sodium loads in either group. Comparable sodium-dependent changes in RAAS, ECV, and NO/H2S were observed in fHP and fPE women. fPE women have an impaired ability to adapt their arterial stiffness in response to changes in sodium intake, independently of blood pressure, RAAS, ECV, and NO/H2S status. The pathways involved in impaired adaptation of arterial stiffness, and its possible contribution to the increased long-term risk for cardiovascular diseases in fPE women, remain to be investigated. PMID:27059075

  16. Arterial Stiffness Is Associated With Cardiovascular, Renal, Retinal, and Autonomic Disease in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Theilade, Simone; Lajer, Maria; Persson, Frederik; Joergensen, Christel; Rossing, Peter

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In patients with type 1 diabetes, we investigated the association between arterial stiffness and diabetes complications. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a cross-sectional study including 676 Caucasian patients with type 1 diabetes (374 [55%] men, aged 54 ± 13 years [mean ± SD]) and 51 nondiabetic controls (28 [55%] men, aged 47 ± 13 years). Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with SphygmoCor (AtCor Medical, Sydney, Australia) for 635 patients and all 51 controls. RESULTS PWVs (mean ± SD) in patients and controls were 10.4 ± 3.4 and 7.6 ± 1.9 m/s, respectively (P < 0.001). After multivariate adjustment, PWV correlated with age, diabetes duration, urinary albumin excretion rate, heart rate, and blood pressure (P < 0.05 for all). ANCOVA was used for comparisons between groups and adjusted for gender, age, estimated glomerular filtration rate, heart rate, HbA1c, and 24-h mean arterial pressure. PWVs in normoalbuminuric, microalbuminuric, and macroalbuminuric patients were 9.5 ± 3.2, 11.0 ± 3.6, and 11.4 ± 3.0 m/s, respectively (adjusted P < 0.001). PWV in patients with previous cardiovascular disease, versus patients without, was 12.1 ± 3.5 vs. 10.0 ± 3.2 m/s, respectively (adjusted P < 0.001). PWVs in patients with high (≥140/90 mmHg) versus intermediate (130–40/80–89 mmHg) and low (<130/80 mmHg) blood pressure were 11.8 ± 3.6, 10.0 ± 3.0, and 9.8 ± 3.3 m/s, respectively (adjusted P < 0.001). Furthermore, PWV increased with increasing degree of retinopathy: 8.0 ± 2.5 m/s (nil), 10.0 ± 2.8 m/s (simplex), 12.1 ± 3.5 m/s (proliferative), and 12.7 ± 2.4 m/s (blind), respectively (adjusted P < 0.001). Finally, PWV increased with abnormal heart rate variability: 11.5 ± 3.3 m/s vs. 10.1 ± 3.1 m/s (borderline) and 8.1 ± 2.1 m/s (normal) (adjusted P = 0.027). CONCLUSIONS Arterial stiffness increased with presence and duration of type 1 diabetes. Furthermore, PWV increased with all the investigated diabetes complications

  17. Serum Bilirubin Is Inversely Associated with Increased Arterial Stiffness in Men with Pre-Hypertension but Not Normotension

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yao-Hsien; Yang, Yi-Ching; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Sun, Zih-Jie; Wu, Jin-Shang; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Objective Serum bilirubin level has shown to be inversely associated with coronary atherosclerosis, and may serve as a protective biomarker of coronary artery disease. Serum bilirubin has also been shown to be negatively associated with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in men without a history of hypertension, and in men with hypertension. It is unknown whether such associations can be observed in the pre-hypertensive or normotensive population. This study thus aimed to investigate the relationship between serum bilirubin level and increased arterial stiffness in subjects with pre-hypertension and normotension for both genders. Methods A cross-sectional sample of 3,399 apparently healthy subjects undergoing a medical check-up at National Cheng Kung University Hospital was enrolled between October 2006 and August 2009, after excluding subjects with serum total bilirubin level greater than 20.52 μmol/L. Increased arterial stiffness was defined as baPWV of 1,400 cm/s or higher as the dichotomous variable and bilirubin as the continuous variable. Results Based on multiple linear regression analysis, serum bilirubin level was inversely associated with baPWV in non-hypertensive men (β = -0.066, p < 0.001) but not in non-hypertensive women. In addition, the inverse relationship between bilirubin level and baPWV was found statistically significant only in pre-hypertensive men (β = -0.110, p < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that serum bilirubin was inversely associated with increased arterial stiffness in men with pre-hypertension (odds ratio = 0.955, 95% confidence interval = 0.916–0.996, p < 0.05) but not normotension after adjustment for other confounding factors. However, the relationship between total bilirubin level and increased arterial stiffness did not reach statistical significance for female subjects with pre-hypertension and normotension. Conclusion Serum bilirubin is inversely associated with increased arterial stiffness in

  18. Assessment of Pulmonary Artery Stiffness of Repaired Congenital Heart Disease Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Namheon; Banerjee, Rajit; Taylor, Michael; Hor, Kan

    2012-10-01

    Surgical correction or palliation of congenital heart disease (CHD) often requires augmenting the main pulmonary artery (MPA) with non-native material or placing a cylindrical graft. The degree to which this intervention affects PA compliance is largely unknown. In this study, the MPA stiffness characteristics were assessed by its compliance, distensibility, and pressure-strain modulus. Coregistered velocity encoded phase-contrast MRI and cardiac catheterization data were available for a cohort of repaired CHD patients (n=8) and controls (n=3). All patients were repaired with either an RV-PA conduit or a RV outflow tract patch. We measured the MPA area change by MRI and MPA pressure during the cath. The measurements were taken through or just distal to the conduit. The MPA compliance and distensibility for the patients were significantly lower than the controls: compliance (9.8±10.8 vs 28.3±7.7mm^2/mmHg, p<0.05), distensibility (2.2±1.5 vs 6.6±2.1%Area change/mmHg, p=0.05). The patients had a significantly higher pressure-strain modulus (152.3±116.4mmHg, p<0.05) than the controls (35.8±10.6mmHg). The abnormally elevated PA stiffness due to the rigidity of the conduit or patch material may cause a compliance mismatch resulting in high stress levels contributing to the observed progressive PA dilatation. This may be a factor in the progressive RV dilatation seen in this cohort of repaired CHD patients.

  19. Stress phase angle depicts differences in arterial stiffness: phantom and in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Lili; Meng, Long; Xu, Lisheng; Liu, Jia; Wang, Qiwen; Xiao, Yang; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-06-01

    The endothelial cells (ECs) lining of a blood vessel wall are exposed to both the wall shear stress (WSS) of blood flow and the circumferential strain (CS) of pulsing artery wall motion. Both WSS and CS keep involved in the modulation of ECs’ biochemical response and function and the temporal phase angle between the two is called stress phase angle (SPA). Previous studies at the cellular level have indicated that SPA is highly negative at sites that are prone to atherosclerosis, and hypothesized that large SPA may contribute to atherogenesis. Till now, there is no experimental data to support this hypothesis, probably due to the lack of a proper tool for measuring WSS and CS simultaneously and real time. In this study, a non-invasive ultrasonic biomechanics method was utilized to quantitatively calculate the SPA and experimentally evaluate the role of SPA in predicting early atherosclerosis. Three silicon tubes with a stiffness of 1.15, 3.62, 9.38 MPa were assembled in a pulsatile flow circuit and the values of SPA were measured to be -101.86 ± 3.65°,-170.19 ± 17.77° and -260.63 ± 18.62°, respectively. For the PVA-c phantoms, stiffness was 162.45, 235.68 and 374.24 kPa, the SPA corresponding to -170.32 ± 17.55°,-207.56 ± 10.78° and -261.08 ± 10.90°, respectively. Both phantom studies results demonstrated that SPA was highly negative in stiffer arteries. Further, experiments were taken in healthy living rats as control group (n = 3), atherosclerotic model group (n = 3), and drug treated group (n = 3), and the results showed that SPA was most negative in the model group, and SPA was least negative in the control group. Together, this study suggested that highly negative SPA appeared to be a prominent mechanical feature of vessels prone to atherosclerotic disease.

  20. Association of subclinical myocardial injury with arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with subclinical myocardial injury although the underlying mechanism is uncertain. We postulated that arterial stiffness, endothelial dysfunction and subclinical atherosclerosis may contribute to subclinical myocardial injury in patients with T2DM. Methods Serum high-sensitivity troponin I (hs-TNI) an indicator of myocardial injury, was measured in 100 patients with T2DM without clinical evidence of macrovascular disease and 150 age and gender-matched controls. Elevated hs-TnI was defined as follow (derived from the 99th percentile from controls): Male >11.1 ng/L; female >7.6 ng/L. Measures that may contribute to myocardial damage in patients with T2DM, including brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV), brachial flow mediated dilatation (FMD) and carotid intima media thickness (IMT), were also assessed. Results The serum level of hs-TNI (5.7±9.2 μg/L vs. 3.2±1.9 μg/L, P< 0.01) and the prevalence of elevated hs-TNI (12% vs. 4%, P = 0.02) were significantly higher in patients with T2DM than controls. Patients with T2DM also had significantly worse ba-PWV (17.98±3.91ms-1 vs. 15.70±2.96 ms-1), brachial FMD (2.6±3.5% vs. 5.5±4.2%, P< 0.01) and carotid IMT (0.96±0.20 mm vs. 0.86±0.14 mm, P< 0.01). In patients with T2DM, hs-TNI was positively correlated with systolic blood pressure (r = 0.31, P<0.01), serum creatinine (r = 0.26, P = 0.01) and ba-PWV (r = 0.34, P< 0.01). Importantly, multiple regression revealed that only ba-PWV was independently associated with hs-TNI (β = 0.25, P = 0.04). Conclusion The results demonstrated an independent association between ba-PWV and hs-TNI in patients with T2DM with no clinical evidence of macrovascular disease. These findings suggest that increased arterial stiffness is closely related to subclinical myocardial injury in patients with T2DM. PMID:23799879

  1. Derived Arterial Stiffness is Increased in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Periodic Limb Movements during Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Drakatos, Panagis; Higgins, Sean; Pengo, Martino F.; Kent, Brian D.; Muza, Rex; Karkoulias, Kiriakos; Leschziner, Guy; Williams, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Both periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). OSA has also been linked to increased large arterial stiffness, which is considered an independent risk factor for CVD. We utilized a previously validated index of large artery stiffness (SIDVP) derived from the digital volume pulse (DVP) to seek comparison in patients with PLMS and OSA. Methods: Forty-nine adult male subjects, without known comorbidities that could affect arterial stiffness or on vasoactive medication, were retrospectively identified and categorized into controls (n = 8), PLMS (n = 13), OSA (n = 17), and OSA/PLMS (n = 11). The cutoff for PLMS was a periodic limb movement index (PLMI) > 15 events/h, and for OSA an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) > 10 events/h. SIDVP was derived from the raw data of photoplethysmography of the nocturnal polysomnography, averaged for 2 min prior to sleep study initiation (baseline), after completion in the morning, and every half hour after sleep onset. Results: The groups were age/body mass index-matched. Controls showed lower baseline, morning, and overall SIDVP compared to the other groups (p < 0.01). Patients with PLMS (PLMI: 50.69 ± 9.7 events/h) and the OSA group (AHI: 29.7 ± 2 events/h) demonstrated similar overall SIDVP (6.78 ± 0.08 versus 6.94 ± 0.04, respectively, p = 0.5), whereas the OSA/PLMS (AHI: 29.35 ± 8, PLMI: 50.63 ± 7.2) group demonstrated the highest (7.40 ± 0.06, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Based on an easily reproducible and applicable marker of large arterial stiffness, patients with significant PLMS had higher SIDVP when compared to controls and comparable to those with moderate/severe OSA. The OSA/PLMS group had the highest SIDVP, implying a possible additive effect of OSA and PLMS on arterial stiffness. Citation: Drakatos P, Higgins S, Pengo MF, Kent BD, Muza R, Karkoulias K, Leschziner G, Williams A. Derived arterial

  2. Increase of carotid artery stiffness and decrease of baroreflex sensitivity in exfoliation syndrome and glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Visontai, Z; Merisch, B; Kollai, M; Holló, G

    2006-01-01

    Aim To investigate the distensibility of the common carotid artery (CCA), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and its relation to plasma homocysteine concentration in exfoliation syndrome or exfoliation glaucoma (XFS/XFG). Methods Homocysteine concentrations were measured in 30 XFS/XFG patients and 18 age matched controls. In 21 patients and 17 controls the end diastolic diameter of the CCA and pulsatile distension were measured and BRS was calculated. Results There was no significant difference between the groups in sex distribution, age, heart rate, blood pressure, systemic diseases, or medication. In XFS/XFG patients homocysteine concentration was significantly elevated (unpaired t test, p = 0.023), and CCA stiffness was higher (p<0.05), while strain, cross sectional compliance coefficient, distensibility, and BRS were significantly reduced compared to the controls (Mann‐Whitney U test, p⩽0.013 for each parameter). In XFS/XFG patients a positive correlation was found between age and plasma homocysteine level (Pearson's correlation, r = 0.490, p = 0.007), and a negative correlation between age and BRS (Kendall's correlation r = −0.374, p = 0.021), as well as between homocysteine concentration and BRS (Kendall's correlation r = −0.377, p = 0.024). No correlation was seen between these variables in the control group. Conclusions These results suggest a pathological large artery function as well as altered parasympathetic vascular control in XFS/XFG which increases with age and with higher homocysteine concentration. PMID:16488931

  3. The role of perivascular adipose tissue in vasoconstriction, arterial stiffness, and aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Villacorta, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Since the “rediscovery” of brown adipose tissue in adult humans, significant scientific efforts are being pursued to identify the molecular mechanisms to promote a phenotypic change of white adipocytes into brown-like cells, a process called “browning”. It is well documented that white adipose tissue (WAT) mass and factors released from WAT influence the vascular function and positively correlate with cardiac arrest, stroke, and other cardiovascular complications. Similar to other fat depots, perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) is an active endocrine organ and anatomically surrounds vessels. Both brown-like and white-like PVAT secrete various adipokines, cytokines, and growth factors that either prevent or promote the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) depending on the relative abundance of each type and their bioactivity in the neighboring vasculature. Notably, pathophysiological conditions, such as obesity, hypertension, or diabetes, induce the imbalance of PVAT-derived vasoactive products that promote the infiltration of inflammatory cells. This then triggers derangements in vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cell dysfunction, resulting in the development of vascular diseases. In this review, we discuss the recent advances on the contribution of PVAT in CVDs. Specifically, we summarize the current proposed roles of PVAT in relationship with vascular contractility, endothelial dysfunction, neointimal formation, arterial stiffness, and aneurysm. PMID:25719334

  4. Endothelial function, arterial stiffness and adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Sauder, Katherine A; Proctor, David N; Chow, Mosuk; Troy, Lisa M; Wang, Na; Vita, Joseph A; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Mitchell, Gary F; Jacques, Paul F; Hamburg, Naomi M; West, Sheila G

    2015-06-14

    Endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness are early predictors of CVD. Intervention studies have suggested that diet is related to vascular health, but most prior studies have tested individual foods or nutrients and relied on small samples of younger adults. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationships between adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and vascular health in a large cross-sectional analysis. In 5887 adults in the Framingham Heart Study Offspring and Third Generation cohorts, diet quality was quantified with the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Adherence Index (DGAI-2010). Endothelial function was assessed via brachial artery ultrasound and arterial stiffness via arterial tonometry. In age-, sex- and cohort-adjusted analyses, a higher DGAI-2010 score (greater adherence) was modestly associated with a lower resting flow velocity, hyperaemic response, mean arterial pressure, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), and augmentation index, but not associated with resting arterial diameter or flow-mediated dilation (FMD). In multivariable models adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors, only the association of a higher DGAI-2010 score with a lower baseline flow velocity and augmentation index persisted (β = - 0·002, P= 0·003 and β = - 0·05 ± 0·02, P< 0·001, respectively). Age-stratified multivariate-adjusted analyses suggested that the relationship of higher DGAI-2010 scores with lower mean arterial pressure, PWV and augmentation index was more pronounced among adults younger than 50 years. Better adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, particularly in younger adults, is associated with a lower peripheral blood flow velocity and arterial wave reflection, but not FMD. The present results suggest a link between adherence to the Dietary Guidelines and favourable vascular health. PMID:25885520

  5. Adiposity, obesity, and arterial aging: longitudinal study of aortic stiffness in the Whitehall II cohort.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Eric J; Shipley, Martin J; Ahmadi-Abhari, Sara; Tabak, Adam G; McEniery, Carmel M; Wilkinson, Ian B; Marmot, Michael G; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Kivimaki, Mika

    2015-08-01

    We sought to determine whether adiposity in later midlife is an independent predictor of accelerated stiffening of the aorta. Whitehall II study participants (3789 men; 1383 women) underwent carotid-femoral applanation tonometry at the mean age of 66 and again 4 years later. General adiposity by body mass index, central adiposity by waist circumference and waist:hip ratio, and fat mass percent by body impedance were assessed 5 years before and at baseline. In linear mixed models adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, and mean arterial pressure, all adiposity measures were associated with aortic stiffening measured as increase in pulse wave velocity (PWV) between baseline and follow-up. The associations were similar in the metabolically healthy and unhealthy, according to Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria excluding waist circumference. C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 levels accounted for part of the longitudinal association between adiposity and PWV change. Adjusting for chronic disease, antihypertensive medication and risk factors, standardized effects of general and central adiposity and fat mass percent on PWV increase (m/s) were similar (0.14, 95% confidence interval: 0.05-0.24, P=0.003; 0.17, 0.08-0.27, P<0.001; 0.14, 0.05-0.22, P=0.002, respectively). Previous adiposity was associated with aortic stiffening independent of change in adiposity, glycaemia, and lipid levels across PWV assessments. We estimated that the body mass index-linked PWV increase will account for 12% of the projected increase in cardiovascular risk because of high body mass index. General and central adiposity in later midlife were strong independent predictors of aortic stiffening. Our findings suggest that adiposity is an important and potentially modifiable determinant of arterial aging. PMID:26056335

  6. Association between arterial stiffness, disease activity and functional impairment in ankylosing spondylitis patients: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Avram, Claudiu; Drăgoi, Răzvan Gabriel; Popoviciu, Horațiu; Drăgoi, Mihai; Avram, Adina; Amaricăi, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular risk is an important factor for increased morbidity and mortality in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The aim of this study is to assess arterial stiffness in relation to the disease activity and functional limitation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Twenty-four patients (mean age 45.8 ± 11.7 years) suffering of ankylosing spondylitis (disease duration 11.1 ± 5.1 years) and 24 gender and age-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Clinical, biological, and functional status of ankylosing spondylitis patients was recorded. Arterial stiffness was assessed by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis (PWA) was performed using applanation tonometry. We found significant differences between ankylosing spondylitis patients and healthy controls in regard to PWV (p = 0.047), aortic augmentation pressure-AP (p = 0.028), augmentation index-AIx (p = 0.038) and aortic augmentation index adjusted for heart rate-AIx75 (p = 0.011). PWV and AIx75 were significantly associated with the disease functioning score-BASFI (p = 0.012, r = 0.504; p = 0.041, r = 0.421). Aortic AP and augmentation indexes (AIx and AIx75) were all associated to ASDAS score (p = 0.028, r = 0.448; p = 0.005, r = 0.549; p = 0.025, r = 0.455). Our study showed that ankylosing spondylitis patients have a higher arterial stiffness than the age-matched controls, leading to an increased cardiovascular risk. We found that arterial stiffness is positively associated with disease activity and functional impairment. Chronic spondiloarthropaties should be screened for arterial stiffness, even in the absence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, in order to benefit from primary prevention measures. PMID:27169859

  7. The effect of empagliflozin on arterial stiffness and heart rate variability in subjects with uncomplicated type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus are at high risk for the development of hypertension, contributing to cardiovascular complications. Hyperglycaemia-mediated neurohormonal activation increases arterial stiffness, and is an important contributing factor for hypertension. Since the sodium glucose cotransport-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor empagliflozin lowers blood pressure and HbA1c in type 1 diabetes mellitus, we hypothesized that this agent would also reduce arterial stiffness and markers of sympathetic nervous system activity. Methods Blood pressure, arterial stiffness, heart rate variability (HRV) and circulating adrenergic mediators were measured during clamped euglycaemia (blood glucose 4–6 mmol/L) and hyperglycaemia (blood glucose 9–11 mmol/L) in 40 normotensive type 1 diabetes mellitus patients. Studies were repeated after 8 weeks of empagliflozin (25 mg once daily). Results In response to empagliflozin during clamped euglycaemia, systolic blood pressure (111 ± 9 to 109 ± 9 mmHg, p = 0.02) and augmentation indices at the radial (-52% ± 16 to -57% ± 17, p = 0.0001), carotid (+1.3 ± 1 7.0 to -5.7 ± 17.0%, p < 0.0001) and aortic positions (+0.1 ± 13.4 to -6.2 ± 14.3%, p < 0.0001) declined. Similar effects on arterial stiffness were observed during clamped hyperglycaemia without changing blood pressure under this condition. Carotid-radial pulse wave velocity decreased significantly under both glycemic conditions (p ≤ 0.0001), while declines in carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity were only significant during clamped hyperglycaemia (5.7 ± 1.1 to 5.2 ± 0.9 m/s, p = 0.0017). HRV, plasma noradrenalin and adrenaline remained unchanged under both clamped euglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions. Conclusions Empagliflozin is associated with a decline in arterial stiffness in young type 1 diabetes mellitus subjects. The underlying mechanisms may relate to pleiotropic actions of SGLT2 inhibition, including glucose

  8. Relationship Between Determinants of Arterial Stiffness Assessed by Diastolic and Suprasystolic Pulse Oscillometry

    PubMed Central

    Teren, Andrej; Beutner, Frank; Wirkner, Kerstin; Löffler, Markus; Scholz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AI) are independent predictors of cardiovascular health. However, the comparability of multiple oscillometric modalities currently available for their assessment was not studied in detail. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between indices of arterial stiffness assessed by diastolic and suprasystolic oscillometry. In total, 56 volunteers from the general population (23 males; median age 70 years [interquartile range: 65–72 years]) were recruited into observational feasibility study to evaluate the carotid-femoral/aortic PWV (cf/aoPWV), brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV), and AI assessed by 2 devices: Vicorder (VI) applying diastolic, right-sided oscillometry for the determination of all 3 indices, and Vascular explorer (VE) implementing single-point, suprasystolic brachial oscillometry (SSBO) pulse wave analysis for the assessment of cfPWV and AI. Within- and between-device correlations of measured parameters were analyzed. Furthermore, agreement of repeated measurements, intra- and inter-observer concordances were determined and compared for both devices. In VI, both baPWV and cfPWV inter-correlated well and showed good level of agreement with bilateral baPWV measured by VE (baPWV[VI]–baPWV[VE]R: overall concordance correlation coefficient [OCCC] = 0.484, mean difference = 1.94 m/s; cfPWV[VI]–baPWV[VE]R: OCCC = 0.493, mean difference = 1.0 m/s). In contrast, SSBO-derived aortic PWA (cf/aoPWA[VE]) displayed only weak correlation with cfPWV(VI) (r = 0.196; P = 0.04) and ipsilateral baPWV (cf/aoPWV[VE]R–baPWV[VE]R: r = 0.166; P = 0.08). cf/aoPWA(VE) correlated strongly with AI(VE) (right-sided: r = 0.725, P < 0.001). AI exhibited marginal between-device agreement (right-sided: OCCC = 0.298, mean difference: 6.12%). All considered parameters showed good-to-excellent repeatability giving OCCC > 0.9 for 2-point-PWV modes and right-sided AI

  9. Low-Sodium DASH Diet Reduces Blood Pressure, Arterial Stiffness, and Oxidative Stress in Hypertensive HFPEF

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Scott L.; Seymour, E. Mitchell; Brook, Robert D.; Kolias, Theodore J.; Sheth, Samar S.; Rosenblum, Hannah R.; Wells, Joanna M.; Weder, Alan B.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that oxidative stress and vascular dysfunction contribute to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). In ‘salt-sensitive’ HFPEF animal models, diets low in sodium and high in potassium, calcium, magnesium, and antioxidants attenuate oxidative stress and cardiovascular damage. We hypothesized that the sodium-restricted Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet (DASH/SRD) would have similar effects in human hypertensive HFPEF. Thirteen patients with treated hypertension and compensated HFPEF consumed the DASH/SRD for 21 days (all food/most beverages provided). The DASH/SRD reduced clinic systolic (155 to 138 mmHg, p=.02) and diastolic BP (79 to 72 mmHg, p=.04), 24-hour ambulatory systolic (130 to 123 mmHg, p=.02) and diastolic BP (67 to 62 mmHg, p=.02), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (12.4 to 11.0 m/s, p=.03). Urinary F2-isoprostanes decreased by 31% (209 to 144 pmol/mmol Cr, p=.02) despite increased urinary aldosterone excretion. The reduction in urinary F2-isoprostanes closely correlated with the reduction in urinary sodium excretion on the DASH/SRD. In this cohort of HFPEF patients with treated hypertension, the DASH/SRD reduced systemic blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and oxidative stress. These findings are characteristic of ‘salt-sensitive’ hypertension, a phenotype present in many HFPEF animal models, and suggest shared pathophysiological mechanisms linking these two conditions. Further dietary modification studies could provide insights into the development and progression of hypertensive HFPEF. PMID:23033371

  10. Long-Term Effects of Radiotherapy on Arterial Stiffness in Breast Cancer Women.

    PubMed

    Vallerio, Paola; Sarno, Laura; Stucchi, Miriam; Musca, Francesco; Casadei, Francesca; Maloberti, Alessandro; Lestuzzi, Chiara; Mancia, Giuseppe; Moreo, Antonella; Palazzi, Mauro; Giannattasio, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy for breast cancer may expose heart and vessels to late radiation-induced complications. Although recent technical progress in radiation therapy (RT) has been associated with drastic reduction in cardiovascular (CV) mortality, the prolonged life expectancy of patients with cancer requires CV evaluation for many years. The aim of our study was to evaluate local changes in vascular and cardiac function because of previous breast RT. We enrolled 43 patients treated with RT 15 years ago for breast cancer. CV risk factors and atherosclerotic carotid damage were investigated in all women. We divided patients into 2 groups: R (n = 25) treated to right breast and L (n = 18) to left breast. All subjects were submitted to standard echocardiography and functional arteries evaluation by carotid-radial pulse-wave velocity (crPWV; Complior) and AIx (Sphygmocor; Atcor Medical). Global mean age was 69.5 ± 8 years old. CV risk factors were equally allocated in 2 groups. No patients had history of cardiac or artery disease. R had a significantly increased crPWV (9.9 ± 1.4 vs 8.9 ± 1.1, p = 0.001) on right arm compared with left arm, and in L group, crPWV was similarly higher on the left arm than on right arm (9.6 ± 1.5 vs 8.9 ± 1.4, p = 0.011). AIx was significantly increased in the ipsilateral arm only in L (32.1 ± 7.6 vs 28.3 ± 6.8, p = 0.05). Central blood pressure estimation was not different in the right and left arms. No correlations were found with hormone therapy or chemotherapy. Our data show a local arterial stiffening because of radiation that can be involved in increased CV risk in breast cancer-treated patients. PMID:27392510

  11. Risk Factors for Metabolic Syndrome Independently Predict Arterial Stiffness and Endothelial Dysfunction in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Minimal Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Lilitkarntakul, Pajaree; Dhaun, Neeraj; Melville, Vanessa; Kerr, Debbie; Webb, David J.; Goddard, Jane

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Metabolic syndrome (MS) is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but its contribution to arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction in CKD is not well defined. We hypothesized that risk factors for MS would independently predict arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction in CKD patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Risk factors for MS, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CF-PWV) and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) as measures of arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction, respectively, were assessed in 113 minimally comorbid CKD patients and in 23 matched control subjects. RESULTS CF-PWV correlated with systolic blood pressure (SBP), waist circumference, and plasma glucose (r2 = 0.25, 0.09, and 0.09; P < 0.01 for all). FMD correlated with SBP (r2 = 0.09; P < 0.01) and waist circumference (r2 = 0.03; P < 0.05). CF-PWV increased progressively (r2 = 0.07; P < 0.01) with increasing number of risk factors for MS. In multiple linear regression, SBP and waist circumference were independent determinants of CF-PWV, whereas only SBP predicted FMD. CONCLUSIONS The number of MS risk factors is an important determinant of arterial stiffness in CKD patients irrespective of the degree of renal impairment. Although BP remains the major determinant of arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction, waist circumference independently predicts arterial stiffness. MS risk factors, particularly abdominal girth, are potential targets for future interventional studies in patients with CKD. PMID:22648437

  12. No association of dietary fiber intake with inflammation or arterial stiffness in youth with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jaacks, Lindsay M.; Crandell, Jamie; Liese, Angela D.; Lamichhane, Archana P.; Bell, Ronny A.; Dabelea, Dana; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Marcovina, Santica; Reynolds, Kristi; Shah, Amy S.; Urbina, Elaine M.; Wadwa, R. Paul; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To examine the association of dietary fiber intake with inflammation and arterial stiffness among youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the US. Methods Data are from youth ≥ 10 years old with clinically diagnosed T1D for ≥ 3 months and ≥ 1 positive diabetes autoantibody in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study. Fiber intake was assessed by food frequency questionnaire with measurement error (ME) accounted for by structural sub-models derived using additional 24-hour dietary recall data in a calibration sample and the respective exposure-disease model covariates. Markers of inflammation, measured at baseline, included IL-6 (n=1405), CRP (n=1387), and fibrinogen (n=1340); markers of arterial stiffness, measured approximately 19 months post-baseline, were available in a subset of participants and included augmentation index (n=180), pulse wave velocity (n=184), and brachial distensibility (n=177). Results Mean (SD) T1D duration was 47.9 (43.2) months; 12.5% of participants were obese. Mean (SD) ME-adjusted fiber intake was 15 (2.8) g/day. In multivariable analyses, fiber intake was not associated with inflammation or arterial stiffness. Conclusion Among youth with T1D, fiber intake does not meet recommendations and is not associated with measures of systemic inflammation or vascular stiffness. Further research is needed to evaluate whether fiber is associated with these outcomes in older individuals with T1D or among individuals with higher intakes than those observed in the present study. PMID:24613131

  13. Maximal Aerobic Capacity and the Oxygen Uptake Efficiency Slope as Predictors of Large Artery Stiffness in Apparently Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Arena, Ross; Arrowood, James A.; Fei, Ding-Yu; Helm, Shirley; Kraft, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE Large artery stiffness is now recognized as an important marker of cardiovascular health. The purpose of the present investigation was to assess the relationship between large artery stiffness and the oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) and to determine if the OUES is a viable surrogate for maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in a multivariate regression analysis developed to estimate large artery stiffness. METHODS Two hundred seventy-five apparently healthy subjects (149 males; age=48.1±15.8 yrs/126 females; age=47.0±15.3 yrs) participated in this study. Subjects underwent maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing to determine VO2max and the OUES. The OUES was calculated using 50% and 100% of the exercise data. Measurement of aortic wave velocity (AWV in meters/second) was obtained via magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS Pearson product moment correlation analysis revealed VO2max (r = -0.49, P<.001), the OUES calculation using 50% of exercise data (r = -0.25, P<.001) and the OUES calculation using 100% of the exercise data (r = -0.34, P<.001) were all significantly related to AWV. However, only VO2max was retained in a linear regression (also including age and resting systolic blood pressure) used to predict AWV. DISCUSSION Previous research has demonstrated a relationship between VO2max and AWV, which was also found in the present study. While the OUES was significantly correlated with AWV, it does not appear to be an adequate replacement for VO2max when attempting to gauge large artery compliance. PMID:19451829

  14. Muscle size and arterial stiffness after blood flow-restricted low-intensity resistance training in older adults.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, T; Fukumura, K; Fukuda, T; Uchida, Y; Iida, H; Meguro, M; Sato, Y; Yamasoba, T; Nakajima, T

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that blood flow-restricted low-intensity resistance training (BFR-RT) causes muscle hypertrophy while maintaining arterial function in young adults. We examined the effects of BFR-RT on muscle size and arterial stiffness in older adults. Healthy subjects (ages 61-84 years) were divided into BFR-RT (n = 9) or non-training control (CON; n = 10) groups. The BFR-RT group performed 20% and 30%, respectively, of one-repetition maximal (1-RM) knee extension and leg press exercises, 2 days/wk for 12 weeks. The BFR-RT group wore elastic cuffs (120-270 mmHg) on both legs during training. Magnetic resonance imaging-measured muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), 1-RM strength, chair stand (CS) test, and cardio-ankle vascular index testing (CAVI), an index of arterial stiffness, were measured before and 3-5 days after the final training session. Muscle CSA of the quadriceps (8.0%), adductors (6.5%), and gluteus maximus (4.4%), leg extension and leg press 1-RM strength (26.1% and 33.4%), and CS performance (18.3%) improved (P < 0.05) in the BFR-RT group, but not in the CON group. In CAVI testing, there were no changes in both two groups. In conclusion, BFR-RT improves muscle CSA as well as maximal muscle strength, but does not negatively affect arterial stiffness or humeral coagulation factors in older adults. PMID:23730848

  15. Serial assessment of arterial stiffness by cardio-ankle vascular index for prediction of future cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Kenichiro; Fukuda, Shota; Shimada, Kenei; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakanishi, Koki; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2014-11-01

    Arterial stiffness is a significant predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the risk of which is modified by medications for atherosclerotic risk factors and life-style changes. Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) provides noninvasive, objective information on arterial stiffness, independent of blood pressure. This study aimed to investigate changes in CAVI after management of atherosclerotic risk factors, and the impact of these changes on future CVD outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The study consisted of 211 CAD patients (65 ± 10 years, 118 men) with impaired CAVI. CAVI examination was repeated 6 months later. Impaired CAVI was defined as greater than the mean plus 1 s.d. of the age- and gender-specific normal CAVI values, according to results obtained in 5188 healthy subjects. All patients were followed for > 1 year or until the occurrence of a CVD event. Of the 211 patients, CAVI improved in 106 (50%) patients after 6 months, but remained high in 105 (50%) patients. During follow-up (2.9 ± 1.0 years), CVD events occurred in 28 (13%) patients. Persistently impaired CAVI was an independent predictor of future CVD events (P = 0.01), independent of baseline CAVI. CVD outcomes were worse in patients with persistently impaired CAVI than in those with improved CAVI (P < 0.001). Among patients with a normalized CAVI after treatment (n = 22) only one suffered a CVD event. This study was the first to demonstrate that persistent impairment of arterial stiffness was an independent risk factor of future CVD events. Serial measurements of CAVI provide important prognostic information regarding patients with CAD in clinical practice. PMID:25007768

  16. Stabilizing the Central Part of Tropomyosin Increases the Bending Stiffness of the Thin Filament

    PubMed Central

    Nabiev, Salavat R.; Ovsyannikov, Denis A.; Kopylova, Galina V.; Shchepkin, Daniil V.; Matyushenko, Alexander M.; Koubassova, Natalia A.; Levitsky, Dmitrii I.; Tsaturyan, Andrey K.; Bershitsky, Sergey Y.

    2015-01-01

    A two-beam optical trap was used to measure the bending stiffness of F-actin and reconstructed thin filaments. A dumbbell was formed by a filament segment attached to two beads that were held in the two optical traps. One trap was static and held a bead used as a force transducer, whereas an acoustooptical deflector moved the beam holding the second bead, causing stretch of the dumbbell. The distance between the beads was measured using image analysis of micrographs. An exact solution to the problem of bending of an elastic filament attached to two beads and subjected to a stretch was used for data analysis. Substitution of noncanonical residues in the central part of tropomyosin with canonical ones, G126R and D137L, and especially their combination, caused an increase in the bending stiffness of the thin filaments. The data confirm that the effect of these mutations on the regulation of actin-myosin interactions may be caused by an increase in tropomyosin stiffness. PMID:26200873

  17. Stabilizing the central part of tropomyosin increases the bending stiffness of the thin filament.

    PubMed

    Nabiev, Salavat R; Ovsyannikov, Denis A; Kopylova, Galina V; Shchepkin, Daniil V; Matyushenko, Alexander M; Koubassova, Natalia A; Levitsky, Dmitrii I; Tsaturyan, Andrey K; Bershitsky, Sergey Y

    2015-07-21

    A two-beam optical trap was used to measure the bending stiffness of F-actin and reconstructed thin filaments. A dumbbell was formed by a filament segment attached to two beads that were held in the two optical traps. One trap was static and held a bead used as a force transducer, whereas an acoustooptical deflector moved the beam holding the second bead, causing stretch of the dumbbell. The distance between the beads was measured using image analysis of micrographs. An exact solution to the problem of bending of an elastic filament attached to two beads and subjected to a stretch was used for data analysis. Substitution of noncanonical residues in the central part of tropomyosin with canonical ones, G126R and D137L, and especially their combination, caused an increase in the bending stiffness of the thin filaments. The data confirm that the effect of these mutations on the regulation of actin-myosin interactions may be caused by an increase in tropomyosin stiffness. PMID:26200873

  18. The shear-stress intensity factor for a centrally cracked stiff-flanged shear web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    By use of the principle of superposition the stiff-flanged shear web is modeled mathematically by an infinite elastic strip with fixed longitudinal edges. The shear-stress intensity factor for a central longitudinal crack is calculated for various values of the ratio of strip width to crack length, h/a, in the range 0.1-10. The interaction of the crack with the boundaries is illustrated by boundary shear-stress distributions for three values of h/a. Some implications of the results for the design of damage-tolerant shear webs are discussed briefly.

  19. Central arterial pressure assessment with intensity POF sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Cátia; Gonçalves, Steve; Antunes, Paulo; Bastos, José M.; Pinto, João. L.; André, Paulo

    2015-09-01

    The central pressure monitoring is considered a new key factor in hypertension assessment and cardiovascular prevention. In this work, it is presented the central arterial systolic pressure assessment with an intensity based POF sensor. The device was tested in four subjects, and stable pulse waves were obtained, allowing the calculation of the central pressure for all the subjects. The results shown that the sensor performs reliably, being a simple and low-cost solution to the intended application.

  20. Vascular Health Assessment of The Hypertensive Patients (VASOTENS) Registry: Study Protocol of an International, Web-Based Telemonitoring Registry for Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Parati, Gianfranco; Avolio, Alberto; Rogoza, Anatoly N; Kotovskaya, Yulia V; Mulè, Giuseppe; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Orlova, Iana A; Grigoricheva, Elena A; Cardona Muñoz, Ernesto; Zelveian, Parounak H; Pereira, Telmo; Peixoto Maldonado, João Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension guidelines recommend ambulatory blood pressure (ABP), central aortic pressure (CAP), and pulse wave velocity (PWV) as parameters for estimating blood pressure (BP) control and vascular impairment. Recent advances in technology have enabled devices to combine non-invasive estimation of these parameters over the 24-hour ABP monitoring. However, currently there is limited evidence on the usefulness of such an approach for routine hypertension management. Objective We recently launched an investigator-initiated, international, multicenter, observational, prospective study, the Vascular health Assessment Of The Hypertensive patients (VASOTENS) Registry, aimed at (1) evaluating non-invasive 24-hour ABP and arterial stiffness estimates (through 24-hour pulse wave analysis, PWA) in hypertensive subjects undergoing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for clinical reasons; (2) assessing the changes in estimates following treatment; (3) weighing the impact of 24-hour PWA on target organ damage and cardiovascular prognosis; (4) assessing the relationship between arterial stiffness, BP absolute mean level and variability, and prognosis; and (5) validating the use of a 24-hour PWA electronic health (e-health) solution for hypertension screening. Methods Approximately 2000 subjects, referred to 20 hypertension clinics for routine diagnostic evaluation and follow-up of hypertension of any severity or stage, will be recruited. Data collection will include ABPM, performed with a device allowing simultaneous non-invasive assessment of 24-hour CAP and arterial stiffness (BPLab), and clinical data (including cardiovascular outcomes). As recommended by current guidelines, each patient will be followed-up with visits occurring at regular intervals (ideally every 6 months, and not less than once a year depending on disease severity). A Web-based telemedicine platform (THOLOMEUS) will be used for data collection. The use of the telemedicine system will allow

  1. The Association of Endothelin-1 with Markers of Arterial Stiffness in Black South African Women: The SABPA Study

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Hugo Willem; Kruger, Ruan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Limited data exist regarding endothelin-1 (ET-1), a vasoactive contributor in vascular tone, in a population subjected to early vascular deterioration. We compared ET-1 levels and explored its association with markers of arterial stiffness in black and white South Africans. Methodology. This cross-sectional substudy included 195 black (men: n = 99; women: n = 95) and 197 white (men: n = 99; women: n = 98) South Africans. Serum ET-1 levels were measured as well as markers of arterial stiffness (blood pressure, pulse wave velocity, and arterial compliance). ET-1 levels were higher in black men and white women compared to their counterparts after adjusting for C-reactive protein. In both single and partial (adjusting for body mass index and gamma glutamyl transferase) regression analyses ET-1 correlated with age, interleukin-6, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and pulse wave velocity in black women. In multivariate regression analyses the independent association of ET-1 with systolic blood pressure (Adj. R2 = 0.13; β = 0.28, p < 0.01) and pulse pressure (Adj. R2 = 0.11; β = 0.27, p < 0.01) was confirmed in black women only. ET-1 additionally associated with interleukin-6 in black women (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Our result suggests that ET-1 and its link with subclinical arteriosclerosis are potentially driven by low-grade inflammation as depicted by the association with interleukin-6 in the black female cohort. PMID:26823980

  2. Vitamin D Level is Associated with Increased Left Ventricular Mass and Arterial Stiffness in Older Patients with Impaired Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jing; Ye, Xiao-Guang; Hou, Yuan-Ping; Wu, Jin-Ling; Li, Sheng-Li; Sun, Qian-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired renal function is common among older patients. Deficiency of vitamin D is a frequent phenomenon among patients with impaired renal function, who are likely to develop cardiovascular diseases. This study aimed to explore the association of 25 (OH) D levels with left ventricular mass and arterial stiffness in older patients with impaired renal function. Material/Methods Based on their admission estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 273 inpatients (≥65 years) were allocated into a normal eGFR group (≥60 ml/min) and an impaired eGFR group (<60 ml/min). The 25 (OH) D levels were measured and the left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was estimated. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was used to explore arterial stiffness. Results The 25 (OH) D levels of patients in the impaired eGFR group were significantly lower than in the normal eGFR group [(11.92±6.01) μg/L vs. (18.14±8.07) μg/L, p<0.05). LVMI and PWV were both significantly higher in the impaired eGFR group than in the normal eGFR group [(104.89±33.50) g/m2 vs. (92.95±18.95) g/m2, P<0.05; (15.99±3.10) m/s vs. (13.62±2.90) m/s, P<0.05]. After adjusting for age, sex, eGFR, cardiovascular risk factors, serum calcium, and iPTH levels, the inverse association between LVMI and 25 (OH) D, PWV, and 25 (OH) D were statistically significant. Conclusions Vitamin D level is lower in older patients with impaired renal function. Lower vitamin D levels were correlated with higher left ventricular mass and increased arterial stiffness in older patients. PMID:26691016

  3. A pilot study of scanning acoustic microscopy as a tool for measuring arterial stiffness in aortic biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Riaz; Cruickshank, J. Kennedy; Zhao, Xuegen; Derby, Brian; Weber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the use of scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) as a potential tool for characterisation of arterial stiffness using aortic biopsies. SAM data is presented for human tissue collected during aortic bypass graft surgery for multi-vessel coronary artery disease. Acoustic wave speed as determined by SAM was compared to clinical data for the patients namely, pulse wave velocity (PWV), blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose levels. There was no obvious trend relating acoustic wave speed to PWV values, and an inverse relationship was found between systolic and diastolic blood pressure and acoustic wave speed. However, in patients with a higher cholesterol or glucose level, the acoustic wave speed increased. A more detailed investigation is needed to relate SAM data to clinical measurements. PMID:26985242

  4. Changes in arterial stiffness and nitric oxide production with Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation in middle-aged and older individuals

    PubMed Central

    Otsuki, Takeshi; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Chlorella is a unicellular green alga, which contains a variety of nutrients including amino acids, dietary fibers, n-3 unsaturated fatty acid, vitamins, and minerals. We previously demonstrated that Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation decreases arterial stiffness in young men. However, mechanisms underlying the reduction in arterial stiffness by Chlorella-derived supplementation and the effect in middle-aged and older individuals have remained unexplored. This study tested our hypothesis that Chlorella-derived supplementation improves arterial stiffness via an increase in nitric oxide (NO, a endothelium-derived relaxing factor) production in middle-aged and older individuals. Thirty-two subjects between 45 and 75 years of age assigned to placebo and Chlorella groups in a double-blinded manner and took respective tablets for 4 weeks. Before and after the supplementations, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, an index of arterial stiffness) and plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx, end product of NO) concentration were measured. There was no difference in baPWV between before and after the placebo intake, but baPWV decreased after the Chlorella supplementation. Changes in baPWV with the Chlorella supplementation were correlated with those in plasma NOx concentration. We concluded that Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation decreases arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older individuals. It may be associated with increase in NO production by vascular endothelium. PMID:26566309

  5. Changes in arterial stiffness and nitric oxide production with Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation in middle-aged and older individuals.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Takeshi; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Seiji

    2015-11-01

    Chlorella is a unicellular green alga, which contains a variety of nutrients including amino acids, dietary fibers, n-3 unsaturated fatty acid, vitamins, and minerals. We previously demonstrated that Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation decreases arterial stiffness in young men. However, mechanisms underlying the reduction in arterial stiffness by Chlorella-derived supplementation and the effect in middle-aged and older individuals have remained unexplored. This study tested our hypothesis that Chlorella-derived supplementation improves arterial stiffness via an increase in nitric oxide (NO, a endothelium-derived relaxing factor) production in middle-aged and older individuals. Thirty-two subjects between 45 and 75 years of age assigned to placebo and Chlorella groups in a double-blinded manner and took respective tablets for 4 weeks. Before and after the supplementations, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, an index of arterial stiffness) and plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx, end product of NO) concentration were measured. There was no difference in baPWV between before and after the placebo intake, but baPWV decreased after the Chlorella supplementation. Changes in baPWV with the Chlorella supplementation were correlated with those in plasma NOx concentration. We concluded that Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation decreases arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older individuals. It may be associated with increase in NO production by vascular endothelium. PMID:26566309

  6. Congestive cardiac failure: central role of the arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, P

    1987-01-01

    A review of the history of our knowledge and understanding of the peripheral oedema of congestive cardiac failure points to the conclusion that an inability of the heart to maintain the arterial pressure is of central importance in this condition. Although the function of the circulation is to perfuse the tissues, the body monitors the adequacy of its perfusion, not not through metabolic messengers carried from the tissues in the blood stream, but by sensing the arterial pressure; and the mechanisms evoked act to maintain the arterial pressure. In the short term this is achieved by autonomic regulation of the heart and blood vessels; in the longer term the arterial pressure is maintained through an increase in the blood volume by a retention of salt and water by the kidney. To support the latter process, intrinsic renal mechanisms are successively magnified by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and by the activities of the sympathetic system and vasopressin. The natriuretic influence mediated through volume receptors and the release of atrial peptide is overruled by the arterial baroreceptors, so that the body maintains the arterial pressure at the expense of an increase in blood volume. In these ways the syndrome of congestive cardiac failure may be regarded as one which arises when the heart becomes chronically unable to maintain an appropriate arterial pressure without support. PMID:3311096

  7. Tau leaping of stiff stochastic chemical systems via local central limit approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yushu; Rathinam, Muruhan

    2013-06-01

    Stiffness manifests in stochastic dynamic systems in a more complex manner than in deterministic systems; it is not only important for a time-stepping method to remain stable but it is also important for the method to capture the asymptotic variances accurately. In the context of stochastic chemical systems, time stepping methods are known as tau leaping. Well known existing tau leaping methods have shortcomings in this regard. The implicit tau method is far more stable than the trapezoidal tau method but underestimates the asymptotic variance. On the other hand, the trapezoidal tau method which estimates the asymptotic variance exactly for linear systems suffers from the fact that the transients of the method do not decay fast enough in the context of very stiff systems. We propose a tau leaping method that possesses the same stability properties as the implicit method while it also captures the asymptotic variance with reasonable accuracy at least for the test system S{sub 1}↔S{sub 2}. The proposed method uses a central limit approximation (CLA) locally over the tau leaping interval and is referred to as the LCLA-τ. The CLA predicts the mean and covariance as solutions of certain differential equations (ODEs) and for efficiency we solve these using a single time step of a suitable low order method. We perform a mean/covariance stability analysis of various possible low order schemes to determine the best scheme. Numerical experiments presented show that LCLA-τ performs favorably for stiff systems and that the LCLA-τ is also able to capture bimodal distributions unlike the CLA itself. The proposed LCLA-τ method uses a split implicit step to compute the mean update. We also prove that any tau leaping method employing a split implicit step converges in the fluid limit to the implicit Euler method as applied to the fluid limit differential equation.

  8. Tau leaping of stiff stochastic chemical systems via local central limit approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yushu; Rathinam, Muruhan

    2013-06-01

    Stiffness manifests in stochastic dynamic systems in a more complex manner than in deterministic systems; it is not only important for a time-stepping method to remain stable but it is also important for the method to capture the asymptotic variances accurately. In the context of stochastic chemical systems, time stepping methods are known as tau leaping. Well known existing tau leaping methods have shortcomings in this regard. The implicit tau method is far more stable than the trapezoidal tau method but underestimates the asymptotic variance. On the other hand, the trapezoidal tau method which estimates the asymptotic variance exactly for linear systems suffers from the fact that the transients of the method do not decay fast enough in the context of very stiff systems. We propose a tau leaping method that possesses the same stability properties as the implicit method while it also captures the asymptotic variance with reasonable accuracy at least for the test system S1↔S2. The proposed method uses a central limit approximation (CLA) locally over the tau leaping interval and is referred to as the LCLA-τ. The CLA predicts the mean and covariance as solutions of certain differential equations (ODEs) and for efficiency we solve these using a single time step of a suitable low order method. We perform a mean/covariance stability analysis of various possible low order schemes to determine the best scheme. Numerical experiments presented show that LCLA-τ performs favorably for stiff systems and that the LCLA-τ is also able to capture bimodal distributions unlike the CLA itself. The proposed LCLA-τ method uses a split implicit step to compute the mean update. We also prove that any tau leaping method employing a split implicit step converges in the fluid limit to the implicit Euler method as applied to the fluid limit differential equation.

  9. Progressive vascular remodelling, endothelial dysfunction and stiffness in mesenteric resistance arteries in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Quek, K J; Boyd, R; Ameer, O Z; Zangerl, B; Butlin, M; Murphy, T V; Avolio, A P; Phillips, J K

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and hypertension are co-morbid conditions both associated with altered resistance artery structure, biomechanics and function. We examined these characteristics in mesenteric artery together with renal function and systolic blood pressure (SBP) changes in the Lewis polycystic kidney (LPK) rat model of CKD. Animals were studied at early (6-weeks), intermediate (12-weeks), and late (18-weeks) time-points (n=21), relative to age-matched Lewis controls (n=29). At 12 and 18-weeks, LPK arteries exhibited eutrophic and hypertrophic inward remodelling characterised by thickened medial smooth muscle, decreased lumen diameter, and unchanged or increased media cross-sectional area, respectively. At these later time points, endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation was also compromised, associated with impaired endothelium-dependent hyperpolarisation and reduced nitric oxide synthase activity. Stiffness, elastic-modulus/stress slopes and collagen/elastin ratios were increased in 6 and 18-week-old-LPK, in contrast to greater arterial compliance at 12weeks. Multiple linear regression analysis highlighted SBP as the main predictor of wall-lumen ratio (r=0.536, P<0.001 n=46 pairs). Concentration-response curves revealed increased sensitivity to phenylephrine but not potassium chloride in 18-week-LPK. Our results indicate that impairment in LPK resistance vasculature is evident at 6weeks, and worsens with hypertension and progression of renal disease. PMID:26771067

  10. Relation between alcohol consumption and arterial stiffness: A cross-sectional study of middle-aged Japanese women and men.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Sachiko; Yoshioka, Eiji; Saijo, Yasuaki; Kita, Toshiko; Okada, Eisaku; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Kishi, Reiko

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological data indicate the existence of a J-shaped association between alcohol consumption and cardiovascular mobility and mortality. However, studies assessing the relationship between alcohol consumption and pulse wave velocity (PWV) as a marker of arterial stiffness have provided inconsistent results. In addition, data regarding the effect of alcohol on arterial stiffness in women has been limited. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between alcohol consumption and PWV among female and male workers in Japan. Study participants were local government employees in Hokkaido, Japan, who underwent annual health check-ups. All data were collected using self-administered questionnaires. The average daily alcohol consumption of the previous month, based on the alcohol concentration of each beverage type (g/day, ethanol equivalent), was estimated according to the frequency and amount of consumption. Data from 3893 participants (812 women and 3081 men) were analyzed. In women, non-drinkers had significantly higher PWV than women who consumed <10 g/day of alcohol. In men, compared with those who reportedly drank 20-39 g/day, non-drinkers and those who drank <20 g/day and ≥60 g/day had significantly higher PWV. Alcohol consumption showed a J-shaped association with PWV in men (p for quadratic term < 0.036) and marginally in women (p < 0.056). The results of stratified analyses by age groups showed a significant J-shaped association, which was most notable for men ≥45 years (p < 0.005). In middle-aged Japanese women and men, light-to-moderate alcohol consumption is associated with lower PWV, which in turn correlates with a reduction in vascular stiffness. PMID:24239150

  11. Differential effects of age on large artery stiffness and minimal vascular resistance in normotensive and mildly hypertensive individuals.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Morten B; Khatir, Dinah S; Peters, Christian D; Christensen, Kent L; Buus, Niels H

    2015-09-01

    Large artery stiffness and small artery structural changes are both cardiovascular risk factors. Arterial stiffness increases with age and blood pressure (BP), but it is unclear in which way large artery pulse wave velocity (PWV) and peripheral vascular resistance are related and whether age has any influence. In a cross-sectional study, PWV and forearm minimum vascular resistance (Rmin ) was compared with emphasis on the impact of age. Normotensive (n = 53) and untreated hypertensive (n = 23) subjects were included based on 24-h BP measurements. Age ranged from 21 to 79 years with an even distribution from each age decade. PWV was assessed using tonometry. Forearm Rmin was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography at maximal vasodilatation induced by 10 min of ischaemia in combination with skin heating and hand grip exercise. In both normotensive and hypertensive subjects, PWV correlated significantly with age and BP. Based on median age, both groups were assigned into two equally large subgroups. Normotensive older (66 ± 7 years) and younger (35 ± 10 years) persons had different carotid-femoral PWV (7.9 ± 1.8 versus 5.7 ± 0.9 m/s, P<0.01), but similar Rmin values (3.7 ± 0.9 versus 3.6 ± 1.2 mmHg/ml/min/100 ml). Hypertensive older (63 ± 6 years) and younger (40 ± 10 years) also had different PWV (8.0 ± 1.5 versus 6.7 ± 1.1 m/s, P<0.05), but the older had lower Rmin (3.1 ± 0.8 versus 4.7 ± 2.2 mmHg/ml/min/100 ml, P<0.05). In a regression analysis adjusting for age, BP, gender and heart rate, no correlation was seen between PWV and Rmin . The data suggest that age differentially affects PWV and Rmin and that BP can increase in older persons without affecting Rmin . PMID:24863666

  12. Club Cell-16 and RelB as Novel Determinants of Arterial Stiffness in Exacerbating COPD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Labonté, Laura E.; Bourbeau, Jean; Daskalopoulou, Stella S.; Zhang, Michele; Coulombe, Patrick; Garland, Katie; Baglole, Carolyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are acute events of worsened respiratory symptoms that may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), a leading cause of mortality amongst COPD patients. The utility of lung-specific inflammatory mediators such as club cell protein-16 (CC-16) and surfactant protein D (SPD) and that of a novel marker of CV outcomes in COPD- RelB- in predicting adverse cardiovascular events during exacerbation is not known. Methods Thirty-eight subjects with COPD admitted to the hospital for severe exacerbation were included in this analysis. Clinical, physiological and arterial stiffness measurements were performed within 72 hours of admission; this was followed by measurements taken every 3 days until hospital discharge, then once a week until 30 days after discharge, and then again at 90 and 180 days. Plasma concentrations of inflammatory mediators were measured from peripheral venous blood taken at admission, and at days 15, 30, 90 and 180. Results CC-16 and RelB concentrations were increased at day 15 of exacerbations whereas SPD concentrations were decreased. The course of change in CC-16 and RelB levels over time was inversely associated with that of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, the gold-standard measure of arterial stiffness. Increases in CC-16 could predict a decreased number of subsequent exacerbations during follow-up. Conclusions Lung-specific (CC-16) and novel (RelB) biomarkers are associated with systemic cardiovascular changes over time. CC-16 can predict subsequent exacerbations in subjects with severe COPD and may be an important biomarker of pulmonary and systemic stress in COPD. PMID:26914709

  13. Relationship of serum osteoprotegerin with arterial stiffness, preclinical atherosclerosis, and disease activity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Serdaroğlu Beyazal, Münevver; Erdoğan, Turan; Türkyılmaz, Aysegül Kücükali; Devrimsel, Gül; Cüre, Medine Cumhur; Beyazal, Mehmet; Sahin, Ismail

    2016-09-01

    Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) reportedly have a higher mortality and morbidity risk. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) was recently defined as an important cardiovascular (CV) marker in the general population. We aimed to assess the relationship of serum OPG levels with arterial stiffness, carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), and clinical and laboratory data in AS patients. We examined 60 AS patients without CV disease or risk factors and 50 healthy controls. Disease activity was evaluated using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS), whereas functional capacity was evaluated using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). Serum OPG levels were measured with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) was used as an indicator of arterial stiffness, whereas CIMT (examined via carotid ultrasonography) was used to evaluate preclinical atherosclerosis. The mean serum OPG level, PWV, and CIMT were significantly higher in AS patients than in controls (106.7 ± 50.9 vs. 58.1 ± 12.7 pg/mL; 7.4 ± 1.8 vs. 6.2 ± 1.2 m/s; 0.72 ± 0.13 vs. 0.57 ± 0.07 mm, respectively; P < 0.001 for all). In AS patients, the serum OPG levels were not significantly correlated with PWV and CIMT but were significantly correlated with erthrocyte sedimentation rate, BASFI, and ASDAS. AS patients without CV disease or risk exhibited high OPG levels and increased PWV and CIMT values. Although OPG levels were not significantly correlated with PWV or CIMT, future long-term follow-up studies will help define the predictive value of OPG in these patients. PMID:26847856

  14. Serum carboxymethyl-lysine, an advanced glycation end product, is associated with arterial stiffness in older adults

    PubMed Central

    SEMBA, Richard D.; SUN, Kai; SCHWARTZ, Ann V.; VARADHAN, Ravi; HARRIS, Tamara B.; SATTERFIELD, Suzanne; GARCIA, Melissa; FERRUCCI, Luigi; NEWMAN, Anne B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship of serum carboxymethyl-lysine (CML), an advanced glycation end product (AGE), with pulse pressure (PP), aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), and hypertension in older adults. Background AGEs are bioactive molecules that accumulate in tissues with aging and can both cross-link collagen and induce inflammation in model systems. The relationship of AGEs with arterial stiffness and hypertension has not been well characterized in community-dwelling older adults. Methods We measured serum CML and blood pressure in 3044 adults, aged 70–79 y, who participated in the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study, a population-based study of aging in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Memphis, Tennessee. aPWV was measured in 2468 participants. Results Participants in the highest tertile of serum CML had higher PP (highest tertile: beta = 2.85, SE = 0.82, P = 0.0005; middle tertile: beta = 0.60, SE = 0.80, P = 0.45), and higher aPWV (highest tertile: beta = 51.4, SE = 20.1, P = 0.01; middle tertile: beta = 3.2, SE = 19.8, P = 0.87) compared with those in the lowest tertile in multivariable linear regression models adjusting for age, sex, race, education, BMI, smoking, alcohol use, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease. Participants in the highest and middle tertiles of serum CML had higher odds of hypertension (Odds Ratio [O.R.] 1.32, 95% Confidence Interval [C.I.] 1.06, 1.60, P = 0.005; O.R. 1.27, 95% C.I. 1.05, 1.53, P = 0.01, respectively) compared with the lowest tertile in a multivariable logistic regression model adjusting for the same covariates. Conclusions Elevated serum CML was associated with arterial stiffness, as reflected by higher PP and aPWV, in older, community-dwelling adults. PMID:25915884

  15. Intra-arterial thrombolysis of central retinal artery occlusion following percutaneous atrial septal defect closure.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Pyeong; Cho, Young Dae; Han, Moon Hee

    2016-07-01

    Use of percutaneous devices for atrial septal defect (ASD) closure is growing, given the minimally invasive nature and the long-term durability of this approach. The reported rate of thrombus formation after catheter closure is 1.2%. Thrombotic risk varies according to closure device and Dacron-covered nitinol Amplatzer devices carry a 0-0.3% rate of thrombus formation; but central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is rarely implicated as an adverse event. Herein, we report the first successful intra-arterial thrombolytic treatment of CRAO developing after ASD closure via Amplatzer device. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26153142

  16. Do arterial stiffness and wave reflection underlie cardiovascular risk in ethnic minorities?

    PubMed

    Faconti, Luca; Nanino, Elisa; Mills, Charlotte E; Cruickshank, Kennedy J

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that remarkable differences in cardiovascular risk between ethnic groups cannot be fully explained by traditional risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes or dislipidemia measured in midlife. Therefore, the underlying pathophysiology leading to this "excess risk" in ethnic minority groups is still poorly understood, and one way to address this issue is to shift the focus from "risk" to examine target organs, particularly blood vessels and their arterial properties more directly. In fact, structural and functional changes of the vascular system may be identifiable at very early stages of life when traditional factors are not yet developed. Arterial stiffening, measured as aortic pulse wave velocity, and wave reflection parameters, especially augmentation index, seem to be an important pathophysiological mechanism for the development of cardiovascular disease and predict mortality independent of other risk factors. However, data regarding these arterial indices in ethnic minorities are relatively rare and the heterogeneity between populations, techniques and statistical methods make it difficult to fully understand their role. PMID:27540482

  17. Do arterial stiffness and wave reflection underlie cardiovascular risk in ethnic minorities?

    PubMed Central

    Nanino, Elisa; Mills, Charlotte E; Cruickshank, Kennedy J

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that remarkable differences in cardiovascular risk between ethnic groups cannot be fully explained by traditional risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes or dislipidemia measured in midlife. Therefore, the underlying pathophysiology leading to this “excess risk” in ethnic minority groups is still poorly understood, and one way to address this issue is to shift the focus from “risk” to examine target organs, particularly blood vessels and their arterial properties more directly. In fact, structural and functional changes of the vascular system may be identifiable at very early stages of life when traditional factors are not yet developed. Arterial stiffening, measured as aortic pulse wave velocity, and wave reflection parameters, especially augmentation index, seem to be an important pathophysiological mechanism for the development of cardiovascular disease and predict mortality independent of other risk factors. However, data regarding these arterial indices in ethnic minorities are relatively rare and the heterogeneity between populations, techniques and statistical methods make it difficult to fully understand their role. PMID:27540482

  18. The association of central retinal artery occlusion and extracranial carotid artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, D J; Schuler, J J; Buchbinder, D; Dillon, B C; Flanigan, D P

    1988-01-01

    To determine the incidence of associated carotid artery disease and the effect of carotid endarterectomy on subsequent neurologic sequelae, a retrospective study of 66 patients with central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) was undertaken. Ipsilateral extracranial carotid artery disease was present in 23 of 33 patients (70%) who had carotid arteriography. Sixteen patients had carotid endarterectomy following their CRAO (Group I) and 50 did not (Group II). Seven of the 40 patients available for follow-up in Group II had a subsequent stroke (mean follow-up: 54 months). Of the seven Group II patients shown to have associated carotid disease (Group IIs), three (43%) had a subsequent stroke during follow-up (mean: 28.3 months) compared to zero in Group I (p = 0.033; mean follow-up: 18.7 months). Because of the strong association between CRAO and ipsilateral carotid artery disease and because of the significantly higher incidence of subsequent ipsilateral stroke in CRAO patients with carotid disease who did not undergo endarterectomy, thorough evaluation of the carotid arteries followed by carotid endarterectomy, if indicated, is warranted in CRAO patients who have no other obvious etiology for the occlusion. PMID:3389947

  19. Non-contact measurement of carotid arterial stiffness by two-point heart-pulse laser detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, M.; Favalli, V.; Mariano, A.; Rebrova, N.; Consoli, A.; Ayadi, J.; Gilardi, L.; Perna, M.; Minzioni, P.; Arbustini, E.; Giuliani, G.

    2016-02-01

    Arterial stiffness (AS) is a recognized predictor of cardiovascular risk and mortality, and a potential marker for monitoring the beneficial effects of medical treatments for arterial diseases. AS is typically evaluated indirectly, by assessing the so called pulse wave velocity (PWV), i.e. the speed at which the pressure wave created by the heart contraction travels along the aorta and other arteries. PWV is generally measured using piezoelectric transducers, or via a complex ultrasound technique, but in both cases it requires a direct contact with the patient, which could also modify the measured parameters. In the EU project "NISTAS" (Non-invasive screening of the status of the vascular system) [1], we develop a contactless system allowing to measure the PWV thanks to a technology derived from laser triangulation devices. The measurement principle consists in the detection of the small (around 100μm) displacement of the neck skin, induced by the transit of the pressure wave in the carotid. By simultaneously measuring the displacement caused by the pulse wave in two distinct points along the carotid, the time required by the pressure wave to travel a certain distance can be measured, and the PWV can then be easily calculated. The chosen technique for the skin displacement measurement is laser triangulation in its 2D variant (i.e. "laser profilometry"), which is robust to slight movements of the target, it does not suffer from speckle-pattern signal fading, and it can be conveniently implemented using low-cost optical components. Two light lines, emitted by two blue LEDs are projected on the target (the patient's neck skin), and the skin displacement versus time is measured using a high-frame-rate CMOS camera. In this manuscript we present the results obtained by measuring the PWV of 10 volunteers. It is foreseen that this technique can become a simple and widespread point-of-care method for large-scale cardiovascular system screening over large populations.

  20. Arterial Stiffness Alterations and Inflammatory Response Following Endovascular Aortic Repair: Based on a Presentation at the 2013 VEITH Symposium, November 19-23, 2013 (New York, NY, USA).

    PubMed

    Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Mylonas, Spyridon N; Kakisis, John; Kadoglou, Nikolaos P E; Papadakis, Ioannis; Sfyroeras, George S; Antonopoulos, Constantine C N; Mantas, George; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Liapis, Christos D

    2015-04-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and thoracic aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR) have been widely incorporated into clinical practice. However, changes in arterial stiffness and post-implantation syndrome after aortic endografting remain important issues under investigation. The aneurysm sac wall motion after successful EVAR and TEVAR reflects complex interactions between all the components of the excluded aneurysm, including true compliance of the aneurysm wall itself, intra-aneurysm sac pressure, remodeling of the thrombus, and mechanical characteristics of the endograft. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that aortic endografting results in increased arterial stiffness in animal models. It can be assumed that the alterations of aortic mechanical properties can have a direct impact on heart output. The long-term impact of these mechanical changes on cardiovascular outcomes and the potential effects of different endografts on hemodynamics are important issues under investigation. Post-implantation syndrome (PIS) is a systemic inflammatory response frequently observed after endovascular treatment of aortic pathologies. The main features of PIS include fever, leukocytosis, elevated C-reactive protein levels, and coagulation disturbances. Endograft design appears to influence this inflammatory response following aortic endografting; woven polyester endografts have been shown to be associated with greater inflammatory response compared to PTFE stent grafts. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature to elucidate arterial stiffness alterations and inflammatory response after EVAR and TEVAR and the impact of endograft design on aortic stiffness and the post-inflammatory response. PMID:26798761

  1. The Effects of Rituximab on Lipids, Arterial Stiffness and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine lipid profiles, arterial stiffness (AS), carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), in 55 women with RA without overt cardiovascular disease (СVD) treated with rituximab (RTX).The following parameters were recorded before and 24 weeks after RTX therapy (2 infusions of 500 or 1,000 mg RTX intravenously, fortnightly): plasma total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides, DAS 28-ESR, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), RF IgM, AS (SI - stiffness index, RI – reflection index) by digital volume pulse contour analysis (Micro Medical, UK), and common cIMT by high-resolution B-mode carotid ultrasound. Based on the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria, patients were divided into two groups: 1) moderate/good response to RTX therapy after 24 weeks (41 patients, 75%), 2) no response to RTX therapy (14 patients, 25%). Effective RTX therapy resulted in 9% increase in TC, 23% increase in HDL-C and 14% decrease in atherogenic index, 57% decrease in SI and 24% decrease in RI. We observed a 9% decrease of cIMTmax at 24 weeks. The improvement of cardiovascular parameters was accompanied by statistically significant decreases of CRP, ESR, RF IgM and DAS 28 in group 1 (P < 0.05). There were not significant changes in lipid profile, AS parameters, and cIMT in group 2. Two infusions of RTX in case of moderate/good EULAR effect of therapy exerted favorable effects on lipid profile, AS and cIMT in women with RA without overt CVD. PMID:26839473

  2. The Effects of Rituximab on Lipids, Arterial Stiffness and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Diana S; Popkova, Tatiana V; Lukina, Galina V; Luchikhina, Elena L; Karateev, Dmitry E; Volkov, Alexander V; Novikov, Alexander A; Aleksandrova, Elena N; Nasonov, Evgeny L

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine lipid profiles, arterial stiffness (AS), carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), in 55 women with RA without overt cardiovascular disease (СVD) treated with rituximab (RTX).The following parameters were recorded before and 24 weeks after RTX therapy (2 infusions of 500 or 1,000 mg RTX intravenously, fortnightly): plasma total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides, DAS 28-ESR, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), RF IgM, AS (SI - stiffness index, RI - reflection index) by digital volume pulse contour analysis (Micro Medical, UK), and common cIMT by high-resolution B-mode carotid ultrasound. Based on the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria, patients were divided into two groups: 1) moderate/good response to RTX therapy after 24 weeks (41 patients, 75%), 2) no response to RTX therapy (14 patients, 25%). Effective RTX therapy resulted in 9% increase in TC, 23% increase in HDL-C and 14% decrease in atherogenic index, 57% decrease in SI and 24% decrease in RI. We observed a 9% decrease of cIMTmax at 24 weeks. The improvement of cardiovascular parameters was accompanied by statistically significant decreases of CRP, ESR, RF IgM and DAS 28 in group 1 (P < 0.05). There were not significant changes in lipid profile, AS parameters, and cIMT in group 2. Two infusions of RTX in case of moderate/good EULAR effect of therapy exerted favorable effects on lipid profile, AS and cIMT in women with RA without overt CVD. PMID:26839473

  3. Closure Using a Surgical Closure Device of Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Punctures During Central Venous Catheter Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Berlet, Matthew H.; Steffen, Diana; Shaughness, George; Hanner, James

    2001-03-15

    Severe complications can and do occur when central venous catheters are inadvertently placed into subclavian arteries. Two cases are discussed that describe how these inadvertent arterial punctures can be closed using the Perclose device (Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA, USA)

  4. Pulmonary Artery Stiffness Is Independently Associated with Right Ventricular Mass and Function: A Cardiac MR Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Timothy J W; Gandhi, Ajay; de Marvao, Antonio; Buzaco, Rui; Tokarczuk, Paweł; Quinlan, Marina; Durighel, Giuliana; Diamond, Tamara; Monje Garcia, Laura; de Cesare, Alain; Cook, Stuart A; O'Regan, Declan P

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between pulmonary artery (PA) stiffness and both right ventricular (RV) mass and function with cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the local research ethics committee, and all participants gave written informed consent. Cardiac MR imaging was performed at 1.5 T in 156 healthy volunteers (63% women; age range, 19-61 years; mean age, 36.1 years). High-temporal-resolution phase-contrast imaging was performed in the main and right PAs. Pulmonary pulse wave velocity (PWV) was determined by the interval between arterial systolic upslopes. RV function was assessed with feature tracking to derive peak systolic strain and strain rate, as well as peak early-diastolic strain rate. RV volumes, ejection fraction (RVEF), and mass were measured from the cine images. The association of pulmonary PWV with RV function and mass was quantified with univariate linear regression. Interstudy repeatability was assessed with intraclass correlation. Results The repeatability coefficient for pulmonary PWV was 0.96. Increases in pulmonary PWV and RVEF were associated with increases in age (r = 0.32, P < .001 and r = 0.18, P = .025, respectively). After adjusting for age (P = .090), body surface area (P = .073), and sex (P = .005), pulmonary PWV demonstrated an independent positive association with RVEF (r = 0.34, P = .026). Significant associations were also seen with RV mass (r = 0.41, P = .004), RV radial strain (r = 0.38, P = .022), and strain rate (r = 0.35, P = .002), and independent negative associations were seen with radial (r = 0.27, P = .003), longitudinal (r = 0.40, P = .007), and circumferential (r = 0.31, P = .005) peak early-diastolic strain rate with the same covariates. Conclusion Pulmonary PWV is reliably assessed with cardiac MR imaging. In subjects with no known cardiovascular disease, increasing PA stiffness is associated with increasing age and is also moderately associated with

  5. Impact of Vitamin D Supplementation on Arterial Vasomotion, Stiffness and Endothelial Biomarkers in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chitalia, Nihil; Ismail, Tuan; Tooth, Laura; Boa, Frances; Hampson, Geeta; Goldsmith, David; Kaski, Juan Carlos; Banerjee, Debasish

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular events are frequent and vascular endothelial function is abnormal in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We demonstrated endothelial dysfunction with vitamin D deficiency in CKD patients; however the impact of cholecalciferol supplementation on vascular stiffness and vasomotor function, endothelial and bone biomarkers in CKD patients with low 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] is unknown, which this study investigated. Methods We assessed non-diabetic patients with CKD stage 3/4, age 17–80 years and serum 25(OH)D <75 nmol/L. Brachial artery Flow Mediated Dilation (FMD), Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV), Augmentation Index (AI) and circulating blood biomarkers were evaluated at baseline and at 16 weeks. Oral 300,000 units cholecalciferol was administered at baseline and 8-weeks. Results Clinical characteristics of 26 patients were: age 50±14 (mean±1SD) years, eGFR 41±11 ml/min/1.73 m2, males 73%, dyslipidaemia 36%, smokers 23% and hypertensives 87%. At 16-week serum 25(OH)D and calcium increased (43±16 to 84±29 nmol/L, p<0.001 and 2.37±0.09 to 2.42±0.09 mmol/L; p = 0.004, respectively) and parathyroid hormone decreased (10.8±8.6 to 7.4±4.4; p = 0.001). FMD improved from 3.1±3.3% to 6.1±3.7%, p = 0.001. Endothelial biomarker concentrations decreased: E-Selectin from 5666±2123 to 5256±2058 pg/mL; p = 0.032, ICAM-1, 3.45±0.01 to 3.10±1.04 ng/mL; p = 0.038 and VCAM-1, 54±33 to 42±33 ng/mL; p = 0.006. eGFR, BP, PWV, AI, hsCRP, von Willebrand factor and Fibroblast Growth Factor-23, remained unchanged. Conclusion This study demonstrates for the first time improvement of endothelial vasomotor and secretory functions with vitamin D in CKD patients without significant adverse effects on arterial stiffness, serum calcium or FGF-23. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02005718 PMID:24646518

  6. Effect of Spinach, a High Dietary Nitrate Source, on Arterial Stiffness and Related Hemodynamic Measures: A Randomized, Controlled Trial in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovski, Elena; Bosco, Laura; Khan, Kashif; Au-Yeung, Fei; Ho, Hoang; Zurbau, Andreea; Jenkins, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Diets rich in fruits and vegetables reduce risk of adverse cardiovascular events. However, the constituents responsible for this effect have not been well established. Lately, the attention has been brought to vegetables with high nitrate content with evidence that this might represent a source of vasoprotective nitric oxide. We hypothesized that short-term consumption of spinach, a vegetable having high dietary nitrate content, can affect the arterial waveform indicative of arterial stiffness, as well as central and peripheral blood pressure (BP). Using a placebo-controlled, crossover design, 27 healthy participants were randomly assigned to receive either a high-nitrate (spinach; 845 mg nitrate/day) or low-nitrate soup (asparagus; 0.6 mg nitrate/day) for 7 days with a 1-week washout period. On days 1 and 7, profiles of augmentation index, central, and brachial BP were obtained over 180 min post-consumption in 4 fasted visits. A postprandial reduction in augmentation index was observed at 180 min on high-nitrate compared to low-nitrate intervention (-6.54 ± 9.7% vs. -0.82 ± 8.0%, p = 0.01) on Day 1, and from baseline on Day 7 (-6.93 ± 8.7%, p < 0.001; high vs. low: -2.28 ± 12.5%, p = 0.35), suggesting that the nitrate intervention is not associated with the development of tolerance for at least 7 days of continued supplementation. High vs. low-nitrate intervention also reduced central systolic (-3.39 ± 5.6 mmHg, p = 0.004) and diastolic BP (-2.60 ± 5.8 mmHg, p = 0.028) and brachial systolic BP (-3.48 ± 7.4 mmHg, p = 0.022) at 180 min following 7-day supplementation only. These findings suggest that dietary nitrate from spinach may contribute to beneficial hemodynamic effects of vegetable-rich diets and highlights the potential of developing a targeted dietary approach in the management of elevated BP. PMID:26251834

  7. Effect of Spinach, a High Dietary Nitrate Source, on Arterial Stiffness and Related Hemodynamic Measures: A Randomized, Controlled Trial in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Jovanovski, Elena; Bosco, Laura; Khan, Kashif; Au-Yeung, Fei; Ho, Hoang; Zurbau, Andreea; Jenkins, Alexandra L; Vuksan, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    Diets rich in fruits and vegetables reduce risk of adverse cardiovascular events. However, the constituents responsible for this effect have not been well established. Lately, the attention has been brought to vegetables with high nitrate content with evidence that this might represent a source of vasoprotective nitric oxide. We hypothesized that short-term consumption of spinach, a vegetable having high dietary nitrate content, can affect the arterial waveform indicative of arterial stiffness, as well as central and peripheral blood pressure (BP). Using a placebo-controlled, crossover design, 27 healthy participants were randomly assigned to receive either a high-nitrate (spinach; 845 mg nitrate/day) or low-nitrate soup (asparagus; 0.6 mg nitrate/day) for 7 days with a 1-week washout period. On days 1 and 7, profiles of augmentation index, central, and brachial BP were obtained over 180 min post-consumption in 4 fasted visits. A postprandial reduction in augmentation index was observed at 180 min on high-nitrate compared to low-nitrate intervention (-6.54 ± 9.7% vs. -0.82 ± 8.0%, p = 0.01) on Day 1, and from baseline on Day 7 (-6.93 ± 8.7%, p < 0.001; high vs. low: -2.28 ± 12.5%, p = 0.35), suggesting that the nitrate intervention is not associated with the development of tolerance for at least 7 days of continued supplementation. High vs. low-nitrate intervention also reduced central systolic (-3.39 ± 5.6 mmHg, p = 0.004) and diastolic BP (-2.60 ± 5.8 mmHg, p = 0.028) and brachial systolic BP (-3.48 ± 7.4 mmHg, p = 0.022) at 180 min following 7-day supplementation only. These findings suggest that dietary nitrate from spinach may contribute to beneficial hemodynamic effects of vegetable-rich diets and highlights the potential of developing a targeted dietary approach in the management of elevated BP. PMID:26251834

  8. Pentraxin 3 Is a Predictor for Fibrosis and Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Kadir; Kurt, Omer; Dogan, Tolga; Ozen, Alptug; Demirci, Hakan; Yesildal, Fatih; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Turker, Turker; Guler, Ahmet Kerem; Karslioglu, Yıldırım; Altun, Battal; Uygun, Ahmet; Bagci, Sait

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether pentraxin 3 (PTX3) can be a new noninvasive marker for prediction of liver fibrosis in patients with NAFLD. We also aimed to evaluate the relationship between PTX3 and atherosclerosis in patients with NAFLD. Method. Fifty-four male patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD and 20 apparently healthy male volunteers were included. PTX3 levels were determined, using an ELISA method (R&D Sysytems, Quantikine ELISA, USA). To detect the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis in NAFLD, measurements of CIMT, FMD, and cf-PWV levels were performed. Results. PTX3 levels in NAFLD patients with fibrosis were higher than both NAFLD patients without fibrosis and controls (P = 0.032 and P = 0.028, respectively), but there was no difference between controls and NAFLD patients without fibrosis in terms of PTX3 levels (P = 0.903). PTX3 levels were strongly correlated with cf-PWV (r = 0.359, P = 0.003), whereas no significant correlation was found with other atherosclerosis markers, CIMT and FMD. Conclusion. Elevated plasma PTX3 levels are associated with the presence of fibrosis in patients with NAFLD, independently of metabolic syndrome components. This study demonstrated that for the first time there is a close association between elevated PTX3 levels and increased arterial stiffness in patients with NAFLD. PMID:26997950

  9. Diagnosis of Clinically Significant Portal Hypertension in Patients with Cirrhosis: Splenic Arterial Resistive Index versus Liver Stiffness Measurement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Min; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Lim, Sanghyeok; Kim, Yongsoo; Kim, Jinoo; Kim, Tae Yeob; Sohn, Joo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the splenic arterial resistive index (SARI) with that of liver stiffness measurement (LSM) for identifying patients with clinically significant portal hypertension (CSPH). We included 47 patients (M:F = 37:10) who underwent Doppler ultrasonography, LSM and hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) on the same day. We investigated whether the SARI and LSM were correlated with the HVPG, and compared area under the curve (AUC) values for the abilities of SARI and LSM to diagnose CSPH. We also performed a sub-group analysis. The SARI and LSM were all moderately correlated with HVPG overall in patients. The AUC of SARI and LSM were 0.873 and 0.745, respectively. In patients without splenomegaly, SARI was strongly correlated with HVPG (r = 0.830), but LSM was moderately correlated with HVPG (r = 0.601). The AUC was also higher for SARI than for LSM. Therefore, SARI is potentially an excellent non-invasive measurement method for diagnosing CSPH, especially those without splenomegaly. PMID:27045219

  10. Secondhand tobacco smoke, arterial stiffness, and altered circadian blood pressure patterns are associated with lung inflammation and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Nicole J; Weber, Lynn P

    2012-02-01

    Chronic smoking and secondhand tobacco smoke exposure are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease that are known to adversely alter the structural and mechanical properties of arteries. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of subchronic secondhand tobacco smoke exposure on circadian blood pressure patterns, arterial stiffness, and possible sources of oxidative stress in conscious, unsedated radiotelemetry-implanted rats. Pulse wave change in pressure over time (dP/dt) was used an indicator of arterial stiffness and was compared with both structural (wall thickness) and functional (nitric oxide production and bioactivity and endothelin-1 levels) features of the arterial wall. In addition, histology of lung, heart, and liver was examined as well as pulmonary and hepatic detoxifying enzyme activity (cytochrome P450, specifically CYP1A1). Subchronic secondhand tobacco smoke exposure altered the circadian pattern of heart rate and blood pressure, with a loss in the normal dipping pattern of blood pressure during sleep. Secondhand tobacco smoke exposure also increased pulse wave dP/dt in the absence of any structural modifications in the arterial wall. Furthermore, although nitric oxide production and endothelin-1 levels were not altered by secondhand tobacco smoke, there was increased inactivation of nitric oxide as indicated by peroxynitrite production. Increased lung neutrophils or pulmonary CYP1A1 may be responsible for the increase in oxidative stress in rats exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke. In turn, this may be related to the observed failure of blood pressure to dip during periods of sleep and a possible increase in arterial stiffness. PMID:22140051

  11. Vitamin D Status in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Inflammation, Arterial Stiffness and Circulating Progenitor Cell Number

    PubMed Central

    Bagnato, Gianluca; Aragona, Caterina Oriana; Imbalzano, Egidio; D’Ascola, Angela; Rotondo, Francesco; Cinquegrani, Antonella; Mormina, Enricomaria; Saitta, Carlo; Versace, Antonio Giovanni; Sardo, Maria Adriana; Lo Gullo, Renato; Loddo, Saverio; Saitta, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Suboptimal vitamin D status was recently acknowledged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular diseases and all-cause mortality in several clinical settings, and its serum levels are commonly reduced in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Patients affected by RA present accelerated atherosclerosis and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality with respect to the general population. In RA, it has been reported an impairment of the number and the activity of circulating proangiogenic haematopoietic cells (PHCs), including CD34+, that may play a role in endothelial homeostasis. The purpose of the study is to investigate the association between vitamin D levels and PHCs, inflammatory markers, and arterial stiffening in patients with RA. Methods and Results CD34+ cells were isolated from 27 RA patients and 41 controls. Vitamin D levels, C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) were also evaluated. CD34+ count and vitamin D levels were lower in RA patients as compared to controls, while fibrinogen, CRP, PWV and cIMT were higher in RA patients. CD34+ cell number appeared to be associated with vitamin D levels, and negatively correlated to fibrinogen and early atherosclerosis markers (PWV and cIMT); vitamin D levels appear also to be inversely associated to fibrinogen. Conclusions RA patients with moderate disease activity presented with low vitamin D levels, low CD34+ cell count, increased PWV and cIMT; we found that vitamin D deficiency is associated to CD34+ cell reduction in peripheral blood, and with fibrinogen levels. This suggests that vitamin D might contribute to endothelial homeostasis in patients with RA. PMID:26241902

  12. Metabolic Syndrome-Associated Risk Factors and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Independently Predict Arterial stiffness in 9903 Subjects With and Without Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Sung-Sheng; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Lin, Chia-Pin; Hwang, Jawl-Shan; Wu, Lung-Sheng; Chu, Pao-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Metabolic syndrome (MS), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are related to cardiovascular diseases. Although MS is common in CKD subjects, the contribution of MS-associated risk factors and hs-CRP to arterial stiffness in CKD has not been well studied. In this cross-sectional cohort study, we enrolled 9903 subjects who underwent brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) measurements from our database of Health Care Center. CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Comparing those grouped with and without CKD, multivariate linear regression analyses were used. Overall, baPWV was found to have an inverse relationship with eGFR (P for trend <0.001), which increased progressively with the presence of CKD, increasing number of MS-associated risk factors and hs-CRP (P for trend <0.001). In the non-CKD group, age, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), fasting glucose, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and hs-CRP independently predicted baPWV, whereas in CKD, eGFR, age, gender, body mass index, SBP, DBP, and fasting glucose remained predictors. The number of MS-associated risk factors and hs-CRP remains a determinant of arterial stiffness in both CKD and non-CKD groups. The decline of renal function contributes to arterial stiffness only in CKD but not in non-CKD. Our findings suggest that for CKD subjects, renal function, BP, and glycemic control are potential targets for further interventional studies of arterial stiffness. PMID:26356694

  13. Association between airflow limitation severity and arterial stiffness as determined by the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Oda, Masako; Omori, Hisamitsu; Onoue, Ayumi; Cui, Xiaoyi; Lu, Xi; Yada, Hironori; Hisada, Aya; Miyazaki, Wataru; Higashi, Noritaka; Ogata, Yasuhiro; Katoh, Takahiko

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often associated with concomitant systemic manifestations and comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease. There are limited data regarding airflow limitation (AL) and atherosclerosis in Japanese patients, and the potential association between AL and arterial stiffness has not yet been investigated in Japanese patients. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the association between AL severity and arterial stiffness using the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Methods This cross-sectional study included 1,356 subjects aged 40-79 years without clinical cardiovascular diseases who underwent a comprehensive health screening that included spirometry, the baPWV measurement, and blood sampling during medical check-ups in 2009 at the Japanese Red Cross Kumamoto Health Care Center. AL was defined in accordance with the Global Initiative for COPD criteria (forced expiratory volume in one second / forced vital capacity of < 0.7). A cut-off baPWV value of >1,400 cm/s was used for risk prediction and screening. Results The average baPWV (SD) results were 1,578.0 (317.9), 1,647.3 (374.4), and 1,747.3 (320.1) cm/s in the patients with a normal pulmonary function, mild AL, and moderate-to-severe AL, respectively (p< 0.001). Using logistic regression models adjusted for the age, body mass index, smoking status, hypersensitive C-reactive protein levels, hypertension, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia, an increased baPWV (>1,400 cm/s) was significantly associated with moderate-to-severe AL compared with a normal pulmonary function (odds ratio=2.76; 95% confidence intervals, 1.37-5.55; p=0.004). Conclusion Our results indicated an association between AL and increased arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness may therefore worsen with an increase in the severity of AL. PMID:26466690

  14. Relationship Between Determinants of Arterial Stiffness Assessed by Diastolic and Suprasystolic Pulse Oscillometry: Comparison of Vicorder and Vascular Explorer.

    PubMed

    Teren, Andrej; Beutner, Frank; Wirkner, Kerstin; Löffler, Markus; Scholz, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AI) are independent predictors of cardiovascular health. However, the comparability of multiple oscillometric modalities currently available for their assessment was not studied in detail. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between indices of arterial stiffness assessed by diastolic and suprasystolic oscillometry.In total, 56 volunteers from the general population (23 males; median age 70 years [interquartile range: 65-72 years]) were recruited into observational feasibility study to evaluate the carotid-femoral/aortic PWV (cf/aoPWV), brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV), and AI assessed by 2 devices: Vicorder (VI) applying diastolic, right-sided oscillometry for the determination of all 3 indices, and Vascular explorer (VE) implementing single-point, suprasystolic brachial oscillometry (SSBO) pulse wave analysis for the assessment of cfPWV and AI. Within- and between-device correlations of measured parameters were analyzed. Furthermore, agreement of repeated measurements, intra- and inter-observer concordances were determined and compared for both devices.In VI, both baPWV and cfPWV inter-correlated well and showed good level of agreement with bilateral baPWV measured by VE (baPWV[VI]-baPWV[VE]R: overall concordance correlation coefficient [OCCC] = 0.484, mean difference = 1.94 m/s; cfPWV[VI]-baPWV[VE]R: OCCC = 0.493, mean difference = 1.0 m/s). In contrast, SSBO-derived aortic PWA (cf/aoPWA[VE]) displayed only weak correlation with cfPWV(VI) (r = 0.196; P = 0.04) and ipsilateral baPWV (cf/aoPWV[VE]R-baPWV[VE]R: r = 0.166; P = 0.08). cf/aoPWA(VE) correlated strongly with AI(VE) (right-sided: r = 0.725, P < 0.001). AI exhibited marginal between-device agreement (right-sided: OCCC = 0.298, mean difference: 6.12%). All considered parameters showed good-to-excellent repeatability giving OCCC > 0.9 for 2-point-PWV modes and right-sided AI(VE). Intra- and

  15. Compliance Index, a Marker of Peripheral Arterial Stiffness, may Predict Renal Function Decline in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Te-Hui; Yang, Deng-Chi; Lin, Wei-Hung; Tseng, Chin-Chung; Chen, Ju-Yi; Ho, Chin-Shan; Cheng, Meng-Fu; Tsai, Wei-Chuan; Wang, Ming-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Compliance index derived from digital volume pulse (CI-DVP), measuring the relationship between volume and pressure changes in fingertip, is a surrogate marker of peripheral arterial stiffness. This study investigated if CI-DVP can predict renal function deterioration, cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: In this prospective observational study, 149 CKD patients were included for final analysis. CI-DVP and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were measured, decline in renal function was assessed by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope. Composite renal and cardiovascular outcomes were evaluated, including ≥50% eGFR decline, start of renal replacement therapy, and major adverse events. Results: Patients in CKD stages 3b to 5 had higher baPWV and lower CI-DVP values than those in patients with CKD stages 1 to 3a. Stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis showed that lower CI-DVP (p =0.0001) and greater proteinuria (p =0.0023) were independent determinants of higher eGFR decline rate. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that CI-DVP (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.46-1.00), baseline eGFR (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.98) and serum albumin (HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.07-0.42) were independent predictors for composite renal and cardiovascular outcomes. Conclusions: Compliance index, CI-DVP, was significantly associated with renal function decline in patients with CKD. A higher CI-DVP may have independent prognostic value in slower renal function decline and better composite renal and cardiovascular outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:26180508

  16. Worsened arterial stiffness in high-risk cardiovascular patients with high habitual carbohydrate intake: a cross-sectional vascular function study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggested that high dietary carbohydrate intake is associated with increased cardiovascular risk through raised triglyceride and decreased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels. However, the relation between carbohydrate intake and arterial stiffness has not been established. The purpose of this study was to examine this relation among high-risk cardiovascular patients. Methods We studied the relation between dietary macronutrient intake and arterial stiffness in 364 patients with documented cardiovascular diseases or risk equivalent (coronary artery diseases 62%, ischemic stroke 13%, diabetes mellitus 55%) and in 93 age-and-sex matched control subjects. Dietary macronutrient intake was assessed using a validated food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for Chinese. Heart-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured non-invasively with a Vascular Profiling System (VP2000, Colin Corp. USA). A dietary pattern with ≥60% total energy intake derived from carbohydrates was defined as a high-carbohydrate diet according to the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) for Chinese. Results Subjects who consumed a high-carbohydrate diet had significantly higher mean PWV than those who did not consume a high-carbohydrate diet (P = 0.039). After adjustment for potential confounders, high-carbohydrate diet was associated with significantly increased PWV [B = 73.50 (10.81 to 136.19), P = 0.022]. However, there was no significant association between high-carbohydrate diet and PWV in controls (P = 0.634). Conclusions High-carbohydrate diet is associated with increased arterial stiffness in patients with established cardiovascular disease or risk equivalent. PMID:24559092

  17. Ocular neovascularization in eyes with a central retinal artery occlusion or a branch retinal artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Mason, John O; Patel, Shyam A; Feist, Richard M; Albert, Michael A; Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Thomley, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the ocular neovascularization (ONV) rate in eyes with a branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO) or a central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO), and to study factors that may influence the ONV rate secondary to CRAO. Methods This was a retrospective case series of consecutive patients (286 total eyes: 83 CRAOs and 203 BRAOs) who were diagnosed with a retinal artery occlusion from 1998 to 2013 at the Retina Consultants of Alabama and University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. Generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate the association between hypothesized risk factors and ONV development. Results Twelve (14.5%) of the 83 eyes with a CRAO developed ONV. Eleven of 12 eyes (91.7%) had iris neovascularization, ten of 12 eyes (83.3%) had neovascular glaucoma, and two of 12 eyes (16.7%) had neovascularization of the optic disc. The average time for ONV development secondary to CRAO was 30.7 days, ranging from the date of presentation to 137 days. Only two (<1.0%) of the 203 eyes with a BRAO developed iris neovascularization. Diabetes mellitus type 2 was a risk factor for ONV development following a CRAO with an adjusted odds ratio of 5.2 (95% confidence interval: 1.4–19.8) (P=0.02). Conclusion ONV is an important complication of CRAO and is a less-frequent complication of BRAO. Patients with a CRAO, especially those with diabetes mellitus type 2, should be closely monitored for the first 6 months for ONV. PMID:26089631

  18. Time course and factors predicting arterial stiffness reversal in patients with aldosterone-producing adenoma after adrenalectomy: prospective study of 102 patients

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Che-Wei; Lin, Lian-Yu; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Lin, Yen-Tin; Chang, Yi-Yao; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Wu, Vin-Cent; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Lin, Yen-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism not only results in hypertension but also stiffer arteries. The time course and factors predicting the reversal of arterial stiffness after treatment are unclear. We prospectively enrolled 102 patients with aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) from March 2006 to January 2012. We measured the pulse wave velocity (PWV) between brachial-ankle (baPWV) and heart-ankle (haPWV) before, 6 and 12 months after their adrenalectomy. After treatment, the PWV decreased significantly during the first 6 months (both p < 0.001), but no further reduction in the following 6 months. The determinant factors for baseline baPWV were age, duration of hypertension, and baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) in multivariate linear regression analysis, similar with baseline haPWV (determinants: age, duration of hypertension, baseline SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP)). In multivariate linear regression analysis, the decrease in DBP at 6 months (ΔDBP0-6mo) and baseline baPWV were significantly associated with the decrease in baPWV at 6 months (ΔbaPWV0-6mo). The associated factors of the change in haPWV at 6 months (ΔhaPWV0-6mo) were baseline haPWV, ΔDBP0-6mo and change in log-transformed plasma renin activity. Our result suggested that reversal of arterial stiffness in APA patients occurred early after adrenalectomy and determined by baseline vascular condition, hemodynamic factors, and humoral factors. PMID:26883298

  19. Effects of amlodipine and candesartan on arterial stiffness estimated by cardio-ankle vascular index in patients with essential hypertension: A 24-week study

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Mie; Okura, Takafumi; Watanabe, Sanae; Irita, Jun; Enomoto, Daijiro; Johtoku, Masanori; Miyoshi, Ken-ichi; Koresawa, Mitsuko; Fukuoka, Tomikazu; Higaki, Jitsuo

    2008-01-01

    Background: Aortic stiffness assessed by brachio-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) can be used to predict cardiovascular events. However, baPWV is dependent on blood pressure. Antihypertensive drugs have been reported to reduce baPWV; but it is difficult to determine if this effect is associated with lowered blood pressure or reduced arterial stiffness. Objectives: The primary end point of this study was to assess whether antihypertensive drugs reduce arterial stiffness as estimated by cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). The secondary end point was to compare the effects of 2 widely used drugs, the calcium-channel blocker amlodipine and the angiotensin II receptor blocker candesartan, on arterial stiffness. Methods: Between October 2005 and September 2006, consecutive Japanese outpatients with essential hypertension (EHT) (defined as using antihypertensive drugs at screening, systolic blood pressure [SBP] > 140 mm Hg, or diastolic BP [DBP] >90 mm Hg) were assigned to treatment for 24 weeks with either amlodipine (5–10 mg/d) or candesartan (8–12 mg/d). Arterial stiffness was evaluated with CAVI before and after 24 weeks of treatment. Relative change in arterial stiffness from baseline was also compared. The evaluator was blinded to treatment. Results: Twenty patients (11 men, 9 women; mean [SD] age, 62 [10] years) were included in the study. There were no significant differences in clinical characteristics between the 2 groups. At baseline, mean (SD) CAVI was not significantly different in the amlodipine group compared with the candesartan group (8.93 [0.93] vs 8.46 [1.34], respectively). During the 24-week treatment period, mean SBP and DBP decreased significantly in both the amlodipine (14/10 mm Hg; P = 0.006 and P = 0.005) and the candesartan groups (13/11 mm Hg; P = 0.033 and P = 0.005). Amlodipine was associated with a significant change in CAVI from baseline (8.93 [0.93] vs 8.60 [1.50]; P = 0.017), whereas candesartan was not (8.46 [1.34] vs 8.81 [1

  20. Effects of the small molecule SIRT1 activator, SRT2104 on arterial stiffness in otherwise healthy cigarette smokers and subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Venkatasubramanian, Sowmya; Noh, Radzi M; Daga, Shruti; Langrish, Jeremy P; Mills, Nicholas L; Waterhouse, Brian R; Hoffmann, Ethan; Jacobson, Eric W; Lang, Ninian N; Frier, Brian M; Newby, David E

    2016-01-01

    Objective Arterial stiffness increases with age, and is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcome including increased mortality. The effect of the oral small molecule SIRT1 activator, SRT2104, on arterial stiffness was examined in otherwise healthy cigarette smokers and participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods 24 otherwise healthy cigarette smokers and 15 people with stable type 2 diabetes were randomised in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial and received 28 days of oral SRT2104 (2.0 g/day) or matched placebo. Blood pressure was measured using non-invasive oscillatory sphygmomanometry. Pulse wave analysis and velocity were measured using applanation tonometry at baseline and the end of each treatment period. Owing to the small sample size and similar trends for both groups, data for the two groups were pooled (post hoc analysis). Results Compared to placebo, treatment with SRT2104 was associated with a significant reduction in augmentation pressure (p=0.0273) and a trend towards improvement in the augmentation index and corrected augmentation index (p>0.05 for both). However, no changes were observed in pulse wave velocity and time to wave reflection (p>0.05). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures remained unchanged throughout the study. Treatment by cohort interaction was not significant for any of the pulse wave parameters, suggesting that the response to SRT2104 in otherwise healthy smokers and people with diabetes was consistent. Conclusions SRT2104 may improve measures of arterial stiffness in otherwise healthy cigarette smokers and in participants with type 2 diabetes. Definitive conclusions are not possible given the small sample size and exploratory nature of this analysis. Trial registration number NCT01031108. PMID:27239324

  1. Higher plasma homocysteine concentration is associated with more advanced systemic arterial stiffness and greater blood pressure response to stress in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Tayama, Jun; Munakata, Masanori; Yoshinaga, Kaoru; Toyota, Takayoshi

    2006-06-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia has been reported to be associated with both vascular structure alteration and increased cardiovascular risk. This study examined whether hyperhomocysteinemia causes increased systemic arterial stiffness, thereby enhancing blood pressure response to stress in hypertensive patients. In 50 treated hypertensive patients, we studied brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV), a new measure for arterial stiffness, blood pressure response to stress, and blood pressure recovery after stress. Autonomic nervous activities were examined by spectral analysis of blood pressure and RR interval variabilities. Total plasma homocysteine and neurohumoral parameters were determined from fasting blood. Brachial-ankle PWV correlated with age (r=0.64, p<0.001), plasma homocysteine concentration (r=0.35, p<0.05), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) (r=0.62, p<0.001). Higher plasma homocysteine concentration was independently associated with greater brachial-ankle PWV (beta=0.388, p=0.01). We classified the subjects into high homocysteine (7.3 nmol/ml or over) and low homocysteine (7.2 nmol/ml or below) groups. Baseline SBP, plasma renin activity, aldosterone, and norepinephrine concentrations were similar between the two groups. However, the SBP values during stress and the recovery periods were higher in the high homocysteine group than the low homocysteine group even after adjusting for sex and age. The behavior of sympathetic vasomotor activity did not differ between the two groups. These data suggest that higher plasma homocysteine concentration is associated with increased systemic arterial stiffness, which may enhance blood pressure reactivity to stress in hypertensive patients. PMID:16940702

  2. Rationale and study design of the Prospective comparison of Angiotensin Receptor neprilysin inhibitor with Angiotensin receptor blocker MEasuring arterial sTiffness in the eldERly (PARAMETER) study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Bryan; Cockcroft, John R; Kario, Kazuomi; Zappe, Dion H; Cardenas, Pamela; Hester, Allen; Brunel, Patrick; Zhang, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension in elderly people is characterised by elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) and increased pulse pressure (PP), which indicate large artery ageing and stiffness. LCZ696, a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI), is being developed to treat hypertension and heart failure. The Prospective comparison of Angiotensin Receptor neprilysin inhibitor with Angiotensin receptor blocker MEasuring arterial sTiffness in the eldERly (PARAMETER) study will assess the efficacy of LCZ696 versus olmesartan on aortic stiffness and central aortic haemodynamics. Methods and analysis In this 52-week multicentre study, patients with hypertension aged ≥60 years with a mean sitting (ms) SBP ≥150 to <180 and a PP>60 mm Hg will be randomised to once daily LCZ696 200 mg or olmesartan 20 mg for 4 weeks, followed by a forced-titration to double the initial doses for the next 8 weeks. At 12–24 weeks, if the BP target has not been attained (msSBP <140  and ms diastolic BP <90 mm Hg), amlodipine (2.5–5 mg) and subsequently hydrochlorothiazide (6.25–25 mg) can be added. The primary and secondary endpoints are changes from baseline in central aortic systolic pressure (CASP) and central aortic PP (CAPP) at week 12, respectively. Other secondary endpoints are the changes in CASP and CAPP at week 52. A sample size of 432 randomised patients is estimated to ensure a power of 90% to assess the superiority of LCZ696 over olmesartan at week 12 in the change from baseline of mean CASP, assuming an SD of 19 mm Hg, the difference of 6.5 mm Hg and a 15% dropout rate. The primary variable will be analysed using a two-way analysis of covariance. Ethics and dissemination The study was initiated in December 2012 and final results are expected in 2015. The results of this study will impact the design of future phase III studies assessing cardiovascular protection. Clinical trials identifier EUDract number 2012

  3. Acute, food-induced moderate elevation of plasma uric acid protects against hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress and increase in arterial stiffness in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Vukovic, Jonatan; Modun, Darko; Budimir, Danijela; Sutlovic, Davorka; Salamunic, Ilza; Zaja, Ivan; Boban, Mladen

    2009-11-01

    We examined the effects of acute, food-induced moderate increase of plasma uric acid (UA) on arterial stiffness and markers of oxidative damage in plasma in healthy males exposed to 100% normobaric oxygen. Acute elevation of plasma UA was induced by consumption of red wine, combination of ethanol and glycerol, or fructose. By using these beverages we were able to separate the effects of UA, wine polyphenols and ethanol. Water was used as a control beverage. Ten males randomly consumed test beverages in a cross-over design over the period of 4 weeks, one beverage per week. They breathed 100% O(2) between 60(th) and 90(th)min of the 4-h study protocol. Pulse wave augmentation index (AIx) at brachial and radial arteries, plasma antioxidant capacity (AOC), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) assessed by xylenol orange method, UA and blood ethanol concentrations were determined before and 60, 90, 120, 150 and 240 min after beverage consumption. Consumption of the beverages did not affect the AIx, TBARS or LOOH values during 60 min before exposure to hyperoxia, while AOC and plasma UA increased except in the water group. Significant increase of AIx, plasma TBARS and LOOH, which occurred during 30 min of hyperoxia in the water group, was largely prevented in the groups that consumed red wine, glycerol+ethanol or fructose. In contrast to chronic hyperuricemia, generally considered as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome, acute increase of UA acts protectively against hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress and related increase of arterial stiffness in large peripheral arteries. PMID:19457484

  4. Interactions between plasma homocysteine and arterial stiffness in chronic kidney disease in community-dwelling individuals: The Maine-Syracuse Study.

    PubMed

    Elias, M F; Crichton, G E; Abhayaratna, W P

    2015-12-01

    Plasma homocysteine (tHcy) is associated with kidney disease. However, few, if any, studies have examined homocysteine in relation to arterial stiffness, with stratification by the presence or absence of early-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study was to examine prospective associations between tHcy and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) in persons with and without early-stage CKD in a sample of community-living individuals free from end-stage renal disease, dialysis, stroke and dementia. We conducted a prospective study with 498 participants of the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study (mean age 61 years). Levels of tHcy were positively related to PWV measured 4-5 years later for participants with early-stage CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml min(-1) per 1.73 m(2)). Statistical adjustment was made for multiple confounders, including demographic factors, PWV-related variables and cardiovascular risk factors (b=4.27, 95% confidence interval: 0.23-8.31, P=0.04). These associations were not observed in persons free from CKD. Plasma tHcy is an important predictor of arterial stiffness, as indexed by PWV, in community-living individuals with modest CKD. PMID:25787778

  5. Fluid-structure interaction analysis on the effect of vessel wall hypertrophy and stiffness on the blood flow in carotid artery bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Choi, Hyoung Gwon; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2012-11-01

    The effect of artery wall hypertrophy and stiffness on the flow field is investigated using three-dimensional finite element method for simulating the blood flow. To avoid the complexity due to the necessity of additional mechanical constraints, we use the combined formulation which includes both the fluid and structural equations of motion into single coupled variational equation. A P2P1 Galerkin finite element method is used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for fluid flow and arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is used to achieve mesh movement. The Newmark method is employed for solving the dynamic equilibrium equations for linear elastic solid mechanics. The pulsatile, incompressible flows of Newtonian fluids constrained in the flexible wall are analyzed with Womersley velocity profile at the inlet and constant pressure at the outlet. The study shows that the stiffness of carotid artery wall affects significantly the flow phenomena during the pulse cycle. Similarly, it is found that the flow field is also strongly influenced by wall hypertrophy. This work was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program and Priority Research Centers Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2009-0079936 & 2011-0029613).

  6. Arterial stiffness determined according to the cardio-ankle vascular index is associated with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Toru; Doi, Masayuki; Noda, Yoko; Ohno, Yuko; Sakane, Kosuke; Kamikawa, Shigeshi; Noguchi, Youko; Ito, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Background Several lines of evidence suggest that atrial fibrillation (AF) may be a consequence of vascular disease. We investigated the relationship between cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), a new index of arterial stiffness, and the presence of paroxysmal AF (PAF). Methods and results 181 outpatients (91 patients with PAF and 90 age- and gender-matched subjects without PAF) were analysed for their sinus rhythm. The CAVI was significantly higher in patients with PAF than in subjects without PAF (9.0±1.0 vs 8.7±0.8, p<0.01). In all subjects, the CAVI was significantly correlated with the left ventricular mass index (r=0.30, p<0.01), left atrial diameter (r=0.22, p<0.01), and augmentation index, a parameter of wave reflection (r=0.32, p<0.01), in addition to age, systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure. Logistic analysis demonstrated that the CAVI was independently associated with PAF even after adjustment for confounding factors. The adjusted OR of PAF was 1.8 for each unit increase in the CAVI (p=0.01). Conclusions Our finding suggests that increased arterial stiffness may be involved in the maintenance of AF.

  7. Black Raspberry Extract Increased Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Improved Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Han Saem; Kim, Sohyeon; Hong, Soon Jun; Choi, Seung Cheol; Choi, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Park, Chi-Yeon; Cho, Jae Young; Lee, Tae-Bum; Kwon, Ji-Wung; Joo, Hyung Joon; Park, Jae Hyoung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Lim, Do-Sun

    2016-04-01

    Administration of black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis) is known to improve vascular endothelial function in patients at a high risk for cardiovascular (CV) disease. We investigated short-term effects of black raspberry on circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and arterial stiffness in patients with metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome (n = 51) were prospectively randomized into the black raspberry group (n = 26, 750 mg/day) and placebo group (n = 25) during the 12-week follow-up. Central blood pressure, augmentation index, and EPCs, such as CD34/KDR(+), CD34/CD117(+), and CD34/CD133(+), were measured at baseline and at 12-week follow-up. Radial augmentation indexes were significantly decreased in the black raspberry group compared to the placebo group (-5% ± 10% vs. 3% ± 14%, P < .05). CD34/CD133(+) cells at 12-week follow-up were significantly higher in the black raspberry group compared to the placebo group (19 ± 109/μL vs. -28 ± 57/μL, P < .05). Decreases from the baseline in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were significantly greater in the black raspberry group compared to the placebo group (-0.5 ± 1.4 pg/mL vs. -0.1 ± 1.1 pg/mL, P < .05 and -5.4 ± 4.5 pg/mL vs. -0.8 ± 4.0 pg/mL, P < .05, respectively). Increases from the baseline in adiponectin levels (2.9 ± 2.1 μg/mL vs. -0.2 ± 2.5 μg/mL, P < .05) were significant in the black raspberry group. The use of black raspberry significantly lowered the augmentation index and increased circulating EPCs, thereby improving CV risks in patients with metabolic syndrome during the 12-week follow-up. PMID:26891216

  8. Peripheral Endothelial (Dys)Function, Arterial Stiffness and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Patients after Kawasaki Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Sanne M.; Tacke, Carline E. A.; Hutten, Barbara A.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic pediatric vasculitis. Its main complication is the development of coronary arterial aneurysms (CAA), causing an increased risk for ischemia and myocardial infarction. It is unclear whether KD patients, apart from the presence of CAA, have an increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk due to the previous systemic vasculitis. The aim of this study was to systematically review and meta-analyse the literature regarding surrogate markers for CVD risk in KD patients. Methods Medline and Embase were searched for articles comparing endothelial dysfunction (flow-mediated dilation, nitroglycerin-mediated dilation and peripheral arterial tonometry), vascular stiffness (stiffness index, pulse wave velocity) and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) between patients and controls. Two investigators assessed the articles for eligibility and evaluated quality. Results Thirty studies were included. For all outcomes, moderate to high heterogeneity between studies was found. Most studies reported a decreased flow-mediated dilation in the whole KD- and CAA-positive group compared to controls, while data on CAA-negative patients were conflicting. The stiffness index was increased in the majority of studies evaluating the whole KD- and CAA-positive group, but not in most studies on CAA-negative patients. Mean cIMT was neither significantly increased in the whole KD-group nor in the CAA-positive group nor in most studies studying CAA-negative patients. Studies measuring maximum cIMT were conflicting. Conclusion Literature suggests that surrogate markers for CVD risk in KD patients are increased in CAA-positive but not in CAA-negative patients. This may indicate that CAA-positive patients should be monitored for CVD in later life. The results of this review have to be interpreted with care due to substantial heterogeneity between studies and methodological limitations, as well as the lack of long-term follow-up studies. PMID:26161871

  9. Effects of Exercise Modalities on Arterial Stiffness and Wave Reflection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ashor, Ammar W.; Lara, Jose; Siervo, Mario; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Mathers, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Physical activity is associated with lower cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. However, the effects of different exercise modalities on arterial stiffness are currently unclear. Our objectives were to investigate the effects of exercise modalities (aerobic, resistance or combined) on pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx), and to determine whether the effects on these indices differed according to the participants' or exercise characteristics. Methods We searched the Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library databases from inception until April 2014 for randomized controlled trials lasting ≥4 weeks investigating the effects of exercise modalities on PWV and AIx in adults aged ≥18 years. Results Forty-two studies (1627 participants) were included in this analysis. Aerobic exercise improved both PWV (WMD: −0.63 m/s, 95% CI: −0.90, −0.35) and AIx (WMD:−2.63%, 95% CI: −5.25 to −0.02) significantly. Aerobic exercise training showed significantly greater reduction in brachial-ankle (WMD: −1.01 m/s, 95% CI: −1.57, −0.44) than in carotid-femoral (WMD: -0.39 m/s, 95% CI: −0.52, −0.27) PWV. Higher aerobic exercise intensity was associated with larger reductions in AIx (β: −1.55%, CI −3.09, 0.0001). In addition, aerobic exercise had a significantly larger effect in reducing PWV (WMD:−1.0 m/s, 95% CI: −1.43, −0.57) in participants with stiffer arteries (PWV ≥8 m/s). Resistance exercise had no effect on PWV and AIx. There was no significant effect of combined exercise on PWV and AIx. Conclusions We conclude that aerobic exercise improved arterial stiffness significantly and that the effect was enhanced with higher aerobic exercise intensity and in participants with greater arterial stiffness at baseline. Trial Registration PROSPERO Database registration: CRD42014009744,. PMID:25333969

  10. Indirect measure of visceral adiposity ‘A Body Shape Index’ (ABSI) is associated with arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bouchi, Ryotaro; Asakawa, Masahiro; Ohara, Norihiko; Nakano, Yujiro; Takeuchi, Takato; Murakami, Masanori; Sasahara, Yuriko; Numasawa, Mitsuyuki; Minami, Isao; Izumiyama, Hajime; Hashimoto, Koshi; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective Among indirect measures of visceral adiposity, A Body Shape Index (ABSI), which is defined as waist circumference (WC)/(body mass index (BMI)2/3×height1/2), is unique in that ABSI is positively correlated with visceral adiposity and is supposed to be independent of BMI. ABSI has been also shown to be linearly and positively associated with visceral fat mass and all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the general population. It is, however, uncertain whether ABSI could be associated with arterial stiffness in patients with diabetes. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 607 patients with type 2 diabetes (mean age 64±12 years; 40.0% female). Visceral fat area (VFA, cm2) and subcutaneous fat area (SFA, cm2) were assessed with a dual-impedance analyzer. In order to estimate the risk for CVD, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, cm) was used for the assessment of arterial stiffness. Results ABSI was significantly and positively correlated with VFA (r=0.138, p=0.001) and negatively associated with BMI (r=−0.085, p=0.037). The correlation of z-score for ABSI with VFA remained significant (r=0.170, p<0.001) but not with BMI (r=0.009, p=0.820). ABSI (standardized β 0.095, p=0.043) but not WC (standardized β −0.060, p=0.200) was significantly and positively correlated with baPWV in the multivariate model including BMI as a covariate. Conclusions ABSI appears to reflect visceral adiposity independently of BMI and to be a substantial marker of arterial stiffening in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27026809

  11. l-Citrulline supplementation attenuates blood pressure, wave reflection and arterial stiffness responses to metaboreflex and cold stress in overweight men.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Arturo; Alvarez-Alvarado, Stacey; Jaime, Salvador J; Kalfon, Roy

    2016-07-01

    Combined isometric exercise or metaboreflex activation (post-exercise muscle ischaemia (PEMI)) and cold pressor test (CPT) increase cardiac afterload, which may lead to adverse cardiovascular events. l-Citrulline supplementation (l-CIT) reduces systemic arterial stiffness (brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV)) at rest and aortic haemodynamic responses to CPT. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of l-CIT on aortic haemodynamic and baPWV responses to PEMI+CPT. In all, sixteen healthy, overweight/obese males (age 24 (sem 6) years; BMI 29·3 (sem 4·0) kg/m2) were randomly assigned to placebo or l-CIT (6 g/d) for 14 d in a cross-over design. Brachial and aortic systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), aortic augmented pressure (AP), augmentation index (AIx), baPWV, reflection timing (Tr) and heart rate (HR) were evaluated at rest and during isometric handgrip exercise (IHG), PEMI and PEMI+CPT at baseline and after 14 d. No significant effects were evident after l-CIT at rest. l-CIT attenuated the increases in aortic SBP and wave reflection (AP and AIx) during IHG, aortic DBP, MAP and AIx during PEMI, and aortic SBP, DBP, MAP, AP, AIx and baPWV during PEMI+CPT compared with placebo. HR and Tr were unaffected by l-CIT in all conditions. Our findings demonstrate that l-CIT attenuates aortic blood pressure and wave reflection responses to exercise-related metabolites. Moreover, l-CIT attenuates the exaggerated arterial stiffness response to combined metaboreflex activation and cold exposure, suggesting a protective effect against increased cardiac afterload during physical stress. PMID:27160957

  12. Sustained Improvement of Arterial Stiffness and Blood Pressure after Long-Term Rosuvastatin Treatment in Patients with Inflammatory Joint Diseases: Results from the RORA-AS Study

    PubMed Central

    Ikdahl, Eirik; Rollefstad, Silvia; Hisdal, Jonny; Olsen, Inge C.; Pedersen, Terje R.; Kvien, Tore K.; Semb, Anne Grete

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) have a high prevalence of hypertension and increased arterial stiffness. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of long-term rosuvastatin treatment on arterial stiffness, measured by augmentation index (AIx) and aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), and blood pressure (BP) in IJD patients with established atherosclerosis. Methods Eighty-nine statin naïve IJD patients with carotid atherosclerotic plaque(s) (rheumatoid arthritis n = 55, ankylosing spondylitis n = 23, psoriatic arthritis n = 11) received rosuvastatin for 18 months to achieve low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal ≤1.8 mmol/L. Change in AIx (ΔAIx), aPWV (ΔaPWV), systolic BP (ΔsBP) and diastolic BP (ΔdBP) from baseline to study end was assessed by paired samples t-tests. Linear regression was applied to evaluate associations between cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, rheumatic disease specific variables and medication, and ΔAIx, ΔaPWV, ΔsBP and ΔdBP. Results AIx, aPWV, sBP and dBP were significantly reduced from baseline to study end. The mean (95%CI) changes were: ΔAIx: -0.34 (-0.03, -0.65)% (p = 0.03), ΔaPWV: -1.69 (-0.21, -3.17)m/s2 (p = 0.03), ΔsBP: -5.27 (-1.61, -8.93)mmHg (p = 0.004) and ΔdBP -2.93 (-0.86, -5.00)mmHg (p = 0.01). In linear regression models, ∆aPWV was significantly correlated with ΔsBP and ΔdBP (for all: p<0.001). Conclusions There is an unmet need of studies evaluating CVD prevention in IJD patients. We have shown for the first time that long-term intensive lipid lowering with rosuvastatin improved arterial stiffness and induced a clinically significant BP reduction in patients with IJD. These improvements were linearly correlated and may represent novel insight into the pleiotropic effects by statins. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01389388 PMID:27093159

  13. Effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and aerobic exercise training on arterial stiffness and autonomic functions in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Dobšák, Petr; Tomandl, Josef; Spinarova, Lenka; Vitovec, Jiri; Dusek, Ladislav; Novakova, Marie; Jarkovsky, Jiri; Krejci, Jan; Hude, Petr; Honek, Tomáš; Siegelova, Jarmila; Homolka, Pavel

    2012-10-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) of leg muscles has been introduced in clinical practice as a rehabilitation (RHB) method in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF); however, the role of NMES on the reduction of arterial stiffness and autonomic disbalance in these patients has not yet been studied. Sixty-one patients with stable CHF (mean age 58.9 [2.1] years; mean ejection fraction 31 [4.2]%, New York Heart Association II-III) were randomly assigned into two groups. Patients in (i) exercise training group (ET; n = 30) underwent 12 weeks of bicycle ET (3 × 40 min/week); (ii) group NMES (n = 31) performed 12 weeks of NMES of quadriceps and calf muscles (frequency 10 Hz, mode "20 s on-20 s off," intensity 60 mA), 2 × 60 min/day. Noninvasive assessment of arterial stiffness was done using the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). CAVI and heart rate variability (HRV) and ·VO(2peak) were evaluated before and after RHB program. Both types of RHB reduced significantly CAVI (ET from 9.6 [0.2] to 8.9 [0.2], P < 0.012; NMES from 9.3 [0.2] to 8.7 [0.2], P < 0.013), increased high frequency (HF) component of HRV (+65.6%; P = 0.001) and decreased ratio of low frequency (LF) component with HF component (LF/HF ratio) in group ET (-39.8%; P < 0.001). Changes of HRV parameters in group NMES were not significant; however, a marked tendency to autonomic stabilization was present. Both types of RHB led also to significant increase of ·VO(2peak) (ET from 18.7 [0.7] to 20.8 [0.7] mL/kg/min, P < 0.004; NMES from 17.3 [0.7] to 19.0 [0.7] mL/kg/min, P < 0.001). ET or NMES has been shown to improve significantly arterial stiffness and to stabilize autonomic balance. PMID:22882472

  14. The influence of central arterial compliance on cerebrovascular hemodynamics: insights from endurance training intervention.

    PubMed

    Tomoto, Tsubasa; Sugawara, Jun; Nogami, Yoshie; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Maeda, Seiji

    2015-09-01

    Normally, central elastic arteries (e.g., aorta and common carotid artery) effectively buffer cardiac pulsation-induced flow/pressure fluctuations. With advancing age, arterial stiffening deteriorates this function and produces the greater cerebral hemodynamic pulsatility that impacts vulnerable brain tissue. It is well known that the buffering function of the central artery is improved by regular aerobic exercise, but the influence of endurance training on the pulsatile component of cerebral hemodynamics remains poorly understood. To characterize the functional role of the central artery at the heart-brain hemodynamic connection comprehensively, we assessed relations among the endurance training-induced changes in the left ventricle (LV), carotid arterial compliance, and cerebral hemodynamics. Thirteen collegiate tennis players (20 ± 1 yr) underwent a 16-wk endurance training intervention designed for improving cardiovascular function. Expectedly, maximal oxygen uptake (V̇o2peak), LV ejection velocity (via Doppler ultrasound), and the maximal rate of pressure increase of estimated aortic pressure waveform (via general transfer function) improved after the training intervention, whereas middle cerebral arterial (MCA) hemodynamics (via transcranial Doppler), such as mean and pulsatile flow velocities, remained unchanged. Carotid arterial compliance (via ultrasound and applanation tonometry) increased after the training intervention, and a larger increase in carotid arterial compliance was significantly associated with the greater attenuations of pulsatile MCA velocity (r = -0.621) normalized by mean MCA velocity. These results suggest that the training-induced improvement of carotid artery Windkessel function might offset the expected increase in the pulsatile component of cerebral perfusion induced by the enhanced LV systolic function. PMID:26139214

  15. Influence of central venous pressure upon sinus node responses to arterial baroreflex stimulation in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, A. L.; Takeshita, A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Abboud, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements were made of sinus node responses to arterial baroreceptor stimulation with phenylephrine injection or neck suction, before and during changes of central venous pressure provoked by lower body negative pressure or leg and lower truck elevation. Variations of central venous pressure between 1.1 and 9.0 mm Hg did not influence arterial baroreflex mediated bradycardia. Baroreflex sinus node responses were augmented by intravenous propranolol, but the level of responses after propranolol was comparable during the control state, lower body negative pressure, and leg and trunk elevation. Sinus node responses to very brief baroreceptor stimuli applied during the transitions of central venous pressure also were comparable in the three states. The authors conclude that physiological variations of central venous pressure do not influence sinus node responses to arterial baroreceptor stimulation in man.

  16. Long sleep duration: a nonconventional indicator of arterial stiffness in Japanese at high risk of cardiovascular disease: the J-HOP study.

    PubMed

    Niijima, Satoshi; Nagai, Michiaki; Hoshide, Satoshi; Takahashi, Mami; Shimpo, Masahisa; Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-05-01

    Long and short sleep durations were reported as independently associated with hypertension, aortic stiffness, and cardiovascular disease. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was shown to be associated with increased aortic stiffness. Here, we investigated the relationship between self-reported sleep duration and pulse wave velocity (PWV) in the elderly at high risk of cardiovascular disease. We also investigated whether hs-CRP moderates this relationship. Among 4310 patients with ≥1 cardiovascular risks recruited for the Japan Morning Surge-Home Blood Pressure Study, a questionnaire including items on daily sleep duration was completed. We measured the brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) and hs-CRP levels in 2304 of these patients (mean age 64.7 years, 49.6% males). In accord with the patients' sleep duration (<6 hours, ≥6 to <8 hours, and ≥8 hours per night), significant associations between sleep duration and the PWV were observed (1594 vs. 1644 vs. 1763 cm/s, P < .0001). In the multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, body mass index, total cholesterol, HbA1c and clinic systolic blood pressure, long sleep duration (≥8 hours per night) (P < .05), and log hs-CRP (P < .05) were significantly positively associated with PWV when the patients with 6- to 8-hour sleep duration were defined as a reference group. Significant interactions of long sleep duration by age and that by antihypertensive medication for baPWV were observed. The effect of long sleep on PWV was greatest in the oldest age group. Long sleep duration and hs-CRP were significant indicators of increased baPWV in this elderly high-risk Japanese population. Age and antihypertensive medication use were significant modulators of the relationship between long sleep duration and arterial stiffness. PMID:27151211

  17. A high-fat meal enriched with eicosapentaenoic acid reduces postprandial arterial stiffness measured by digital volume pulse analysis in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wendy L; Sanders, Katie A; Sanders, Thomas A B; Chowienczyk, Philip J

    2008-02-01

    Diets rich in eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA; 20:5(n-3)] are associated with decreased arterial stiffness, but postprandial effects on vascular function are unknown. We investigated whether an EPA-enriched high-fat meal could improve postprandial vascular function. Seventeen healthy men ingested 2 test meals (51 g fat), 1 wk apart, in random order: 5 g EPA plus high-oleic sunflower oil (HOS) vs. HOS only. A second high-fat meal (44 g fat), the same on both study days, was provided 4 h later. Blood pressure and arterial function were measured using digital volume pulse (DVP) to derive a stiffness index (DVP-SI) and reflection index in fasting subjects at 3 and 6 h following the test meal. Blood samples were taken following the test meal for plasma 8-isoprostane F2alpha, nitric oxide (NO) metabolites (NOx), glucose, insulin, triacylglycerol, and fatty acid analysis. The plasma EPA concentration (mean +/- SD) reached a peak of 2.10 +/- 0.99 mmol/L following the EPA meal (5 h) and did not rise above 0.27 +/- 0.16 mmol/L 1 h following the placebo meal. DeltaDVP-SI did not differ between the 2 test meals at 3 h but was greater at 6 h following EPA (6 h -0.65 +/- 0.65 m/s) compared with placebo (6 h -0.33 +/- 1.26 m/s). Plasma 8-isoprostane F2alpha concentrations increased by 48% at 6 h compared with baseline following the EPA meal and plasma NOx decreased following both meals, with no differences between the meals in the changes. Changes in other variables measured also did not differ after subjects consumed the 2 meals. In conclusion, adding EPA to a high-fat meal results in acute changes in vascular tone, independent of changes in oxidative stress. PMID:18203893

  18. Use of CPAP to reduce arterial stiffness in moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnoea, without excessive daytime sleepiness (STIFFSLEEP): an observational cohort study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mineiro, Maria Alexandra; Marques da Silva, Pedro; Alves, Marta; Virella, Daniel; Marques Gomes, Maria João; Cardoso, João

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sleepiness is a cardinal symptom in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) but most patients have unspecific symptoms. Arterial stiffness, evaluated by pulse wave velocity (PWV), is related to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular (CV) risk. Arterial stiffness was reported to be higher in patients with OSA, improving after treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). This study aims to assess whether the same effect occurs in patients with OSA and without sleepiness. Methods and analysis This observational study assesses the CV effect of CPAP therapy on a cohort of patients with moderate-to-severe OSA; the effect on the subcohorts of sleepy and non-sleepy patients will be compared. A systematic and consecutive sample of patients advised CPAP therapy will be recruited from a single outpatient sleep clinic (Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central—CHLC, Portugal). Eligible patients are male, younger than 65 years, with confirmed moderate-to-severe OSA and apnoea–hypopnea index (AHI) above 15/hour. Other sleep disorders, diabetes or any CV disease other than hypertension are exclusion criteria. Clinical evaluation at baseline includes Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and sleepiness is defined as ESS above 10. OSA will be confirmed by polygraphic study (cardiorespiratory, level 3). Participants are advised to undertake an assessment of carotid-femoral PWV (cf-PWV) and 24 hours evaluation of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), at baseline and after 4 months of CPAP therapy. Compliance and effectiveness of CPAP will be assessed. The main outcome is the variation of cf-PWV over time. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved by the Ethics Committees of CHLC (reference number 84/2012) and NOVA Medical School (number36/2014/CEFCM), Lisbon. Informed, written consent will be obtained. Its results will be presented at conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number NCT02273089; Pre-results. PMID:27406645

  19. Effects of Low-Load, Elastic Band Resistance Training Combined With Blood Flow Restriction on Muscle Size and Arterial Stiffness in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Tomohiro; Fukumura, Kazuya; Uchida, Yusuke; Koshi, Hitomi; Iida, Haruko; Masamune, Ken; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Sato, Yoshiaki; Nakajima, Toshiaki

    2015-08-01

    We examined the effect of low-load, elastic band resistance training with blood flow restriction (BFR) on muscle size and arterial stiffness in older adults. Healthy older adults (aged 61-85 years) were divided into BFR training (BFR-T, n = 9) or non-BFR training (CON-T, n = 8) groups. Both groups performed low-load arm curl and triceps down exercises (four sets, total 75 repetitions for each) using an elastic band, 2 d/wk for 12 weeks. The BFR-T group wore inflated pneumatic elastic cuffs (120-270 mm Hg) on both arms during training. Magnetic resonance imaging-measured muscle cross-sectional area of the upper arm, maximum voluntary isometric contraction of the elbow flexors and extensors, cardio-ankle vascular index testing, and ankle-brachial pressure index were measured before and 3-5 days after the final training session. Muscle cross-sectional area of the elbow flexors (17.6%) and extensors (17.4%) increased, as did elbow flexion and elbow extension maximum voluntary isometric contraction (7.8% and 16.1%, respectively) improved (p < .05) in the BFR-T group, but not in the CON-T group. In cardio-ankle vascular index and ankle-brachial pressure index testing, there were no changes between pre- and post-results in either group. In conclusion, elastic band BFR-T improves muscle cross-sectional area as well as maximal muscle strength but does not negatively affect arterial stiffness in older adults. PMID:24917178

  20. Arterial stiffness, as monitored by cardio–ankle vascular index, is affected by obstructive sleep apnea, blood glucose control, and body weight – a case with 8 years follow up

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Shirai, Kohji

    2016-01-01

    The cardio–ankle vascular index (CAVI) is an indicator of arterial stiffness from the heart to the ankles. The CAVI increases as arteriosclerosis progresses, but it can be decreased by appropriate treatment. There are several risk factors for coronary artery disease, however, the degree of stress caused by each separate risk factor to arteries cannot be assessed. CAVI increases with age and according to the severity of atherosclerosis. We found that CAVI also changes in response to the control of risk factors, which may be associated with the functional stiffness of arteries. CAVI can be a useful indicator of risk control for coronary artery disease. We followed a patient aged 71 years who had diabetes mellitus and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by measuring CAVI for 8 years from age 63. He underwent coronary artery bypass grafting due to angina pectoris when he was 63 years old. Before coronary artery bypass grafting, CAVI was 11.8 on the right and 11.5 on the left. Three years later he was found to have OSA and received treatment with continuous positive airway pressure. There was a marked improvement in CAVI after continuous positive airway pressure (age 68; right 10.4, left 10.2). However, following a gradual increase in body weight and worsening of diabetes mellitus, CAVI showed an increasing trend. CAVI decreased with biguanides treatment, but increased again with an increase in body weight. In conclusion, CAVI responded to the patient’s conditions including obesity, diabetes mellitus, and OSA. CAVI is not only a marker of arterial stiffness, but can also be a useful indicator of physiological status; it may be effective in total risk control for coronary artery disease. PMID:27563259

  1. Arterial stiffness, as monitored by cardio-ankle vascular index, is affected by obstructive sleep apnea, blood glucose control, and body weight - a case with 8 years follow up.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Shirai, Kohji

    2016-01-01

    The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is an indicator of arterial stiffness from the heart to the ankles. The CAVI increases as arteriosclerosis progresses, but it can be decreased by appropriate treatment. There are several risk factors for coronary artery disease, however, the degree of stress caused by each separate risk factor to arteries cannot be assessed. CAVI increases with age and according to the severity of atherosclerosis. We found that CAVI also changes in response to the control of risk factors, which may be associated with the functional stiffness of arteries. CAVI can be a useful indicator of risk control for coronary artery disease. We followed a patient aged 71 years who had diabetes mellitus and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by measuring CAVI for 8 years from age 63. He underwent coronary artery bypass grafting due to angina pectoris when he was 63 years old. Before coronary artery bypass grafting, CAVI was 11.8 on the right and 11.5 on the left. Three years later he was found to have OSA and received treatment with continuous positive airway pressure. There was a marked improvement in CAVI after continuous positive airway pressure (age 68; right 10.4, left 10.2). However, following a gradual increase in body weight and worsening of diabetes mellitus, CAVI showed an increasing trend. CAVI decreased with biguanides treatment, but increased again with an increase in body weight. In conclusion, CAVI responded to the patient's conditions including obesity, diabetes mellitus, and OSA. CAVI is not only a marker of arterial stiffness, but can also be a useful indicator of physiological status; it may be effective in total risk control for coronary artery disease. PMID:27563259

  2. Unilateral sequential papillophlebitis and central retinal artery occlusion in a young healthy patient

    PubMed Central

    Demirok, Gülizar; Kocamaz, Mehmet Fatih; Topalak, Yasemin; Şengün, Ahmet; Hasanreisoğlu, Berati

    2015-01-01

    A 23-year-old girl presented to the clinic with metamorphopsia and photopsia in her left eye. After detailed ophthalmic examination, central retinal vein occlusion with optic disc edema was detected in that eye. Three days after diagnosis, the patient returned to our clinic with visual acuity decrease. Central retinal artery occlusion sparing cilioretinal artery was detected. All the laboratory tests were normal except for heterozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutation (A1298C genotypes) and an indefinite Lyme disease seropositivity. Symptoms and visual disturbance recovered without any further treatment other than acetylsalicylic acid for prophylaxis. PMID:26862099

  3. Characterization and calibration of the central arterial pressure waveform obtained from vibrocardiographic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casacanditella, L.; Cosoli, G.; Casaccia, S.; Rohrbaugh, J. W.; Scalise, L.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2016-06-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) has been demonstrated to be a non-contact technique with high sensitivity, able to measure the skin vibrations related to cardiac activity. The obtainable mechanical signal (i.e. a velocity signal), VibroCardioGram (VCG), is able to provide significant physiological parameters, such as Heart Rate (HR). In this work, the authors aim to present a non-contact measurement method to obtain the arterial blood pressure signal from the mechanical vibrations assessed by LDV, in a central district of the arterial tree, such as carotid artery. In fact, in this way it is possible to indirectly assess Central Arterial Blood Pressure (CABP), which indicates the hemodynamic load on the heart, so that it is considered an important index predicting the cardiac risk of a subject. The measurement setup involves the use of an oscillometric cuff, to measure peripheral blood pressure at the radial artery level. Diastolic and Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) at radial level were used to calibrate the integrated LDV signal (i.e. a displacement signal). As regard calibration, an exponential mathematical model was adopted to derive the pressure waveform from the displacement of the vessel detected by LDV. Results show an average difference of around 20% between systolic pressure measured at brachial level (i.e. peripheral pressure value) and systolic pressure derived from VCG signal measured over the carotid artery (i.e. central pressure). This is a physiological difference, consistent with the literature about the physiological increase of Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP) and Pressure Pulse (PP) at increased distances from the heart. However, this non-contact technique is affected by movement artifacts and by reflection phenomena not related to the studied vessel and so it is necessary to account of such issues in the results.

  4. [Sudden left-sided vision loss. Occlusion of the left central retinal artery].

    PubMed

    Stebler, J; Oechslin, E; Bernasconi, P; Greminger, P

    2001-05-23

    A 77 year old female patient was admitted to our hospital because of a rapid onset left-sided visual loss. Occlusion of the left central retinal artery was confirmed by the consultant ophthalmologist. The patient was further evaluated to exclude a thromboembolic event. Chest x-ray was consistent with pulmonary hypertension. Doppler echocardiography revealed a secundum atrial septal defect with a bi-directional shunt. In this 77 year old patient, arterio-arterial embolism from atherosclerotic plaques is the most probable cause of her central retinal artery occlusion. Yet, paradoxical embolism might be another reason for acute visual loss in this setting, which, however, is difficult to confirm definitively. PMID:11441708

  5. Reproducibility of arterial stiffness and wave reflections in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the contribution of lung hyperinflation and a comparison of techniques.

    PubMed

    Stone, Ian S; John, Leonette; Petersen, Steffen E; Barnes, Neil C

    2013-11-01

    Significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality exists in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Arterial stiffness is raised in COPD and may be a mechanistic link. Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness has the potential to be a surrogate outcome measure, although no reproducibility data exists in COPD patients. Two studies (23 and 33 COPD patients) were undertaken to 1) assess the Vicorder reproducibility of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and Augmentation index in COPD; 2) compare it to SphygmoCor; and 3) assess the contribution of lung hyperinflation to measurement variability. There were excellent correlations and good agreement between repeat Vicorder measurements for carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (r = 0.96 (p < 0.001); mean difference ±SD = -0.03 ± 0.36 m/s (p = 0.65); co-efficient of reproducibility = 4.02%; limits of agreement = -0.68-0.75 m/s). Augmentation index significantly correlated (r = 0.736 (p < 0.001); mean difference ±SD = 0.72 ± 4.86% (p = 0.48), however limits of agreement were only 10.42-9.02%, with co-efficient of reproducibility of 27.93%. Comparing devices, Vicorder values were lower but there was satisfactory agreement. There were no correlation between lung hyperinflation (as measured by residual volume percent predicted, total lung capacity percent predicted or the ratio of inspiratory capacity to residual volume) and variability of measurements in either study. In COPD, measurement of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity is highly reproducible, not affected by lung hyperinflation and suitable as a surrogate endpoint in research studies. Day-to-day variation in augmentation index highlights the importance of such studies prior to the planning and undertaking of clinical COPD research. PMID:23920329

  6. Effects of different types of antihypertensive agents on arterial stiffness: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiahuan; Huang, Bo; Li, Xueying

    2015-01-01

    Background This system review and meta-analysis was conducted to systematically review and analyze the clinical benefits of different antihypertensive agents in improving arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients. Methods PubMed database was searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) or other types of antihypertensive agents on pulse wave velocity (PWV). The main indicators were the improvements of PWV and augmentation index (AI) before and after randomized treatments with antihypertensive agents. For the studies that only provided the mean and standard deviation of the indicators before and after randomization, the standardized mean difference (SMD) method was directly applied to combine the mean and standard deviation of various indicators after the treatment. For the studies provided the mean and standard deviation of the changes of the indicators, the weighted mean difference (MD) method was applied to combine the mean and standard deviation of the therapeutic effect. Results Ten RCT studies were included and the sample sizes range from 40 to 201 (total: 938). Four studies provided the changes of PWV before and after randomization, the pooled analysis showed that the changes of PWV in ARB group were not significantly higher than other antihypertensive agents [MD: 125.76, 95% confidence interval (CI): −78.70 to 330.23, P=0.23]; 4 studies provided the PWV values before and after randomization, the PWV values in ARB group were not significantly superior (SMD: 0.04, 95% CI: −0.16 to 0.24, P=0.71). Three studies provided the changes of AI before and after randomization, the ability of ARB to lower the level of the AI was superior to other antihypertensive agents (MD: 8.94, 95% CI: 2.18–5.71, P=0.01); 2 studies provided the AI value after randomization, the abilities of ARB and other anti-hypertensive agents to improve the AI were similar (SMD: 0.03, 95% CI: −1.20 to 1.26, P=0

  7. Arterial stiffness from monitoring of timing of korotkoff sounds predicts the occurrence of cardiovascular events independently of left ventricular mass in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Gosse, Philippe; Cremer, Antoine; Papaioannou, Georgios; Yeim, Sunthareth

    2013-07-01

    Several studies have established that the increase in arterial stiffness (AS) is a cardiovascular risk factor but to date no studies have evaluated in hypertensive patients its prognostic value in comparison with another powerful risk factor, left ventricular mass (LVM) as measured by echocardiography. We prospectively evaluated the prognostic value of AS and LVM in patients with essential hypertension. The population studied comprised 793 patients (56% men) aged 54±14 years. For 519 patients, baseline measurements were made before any antihypertensive treatment, for 274 patients, the measurement were obtained during the follow-up period under antihypertensive treatment. AS was assessed from ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure and timing of Korottkoff sounds. Left ventricular mass was measured in 523 patients. After a mean follow-up of 97 months, 122 cardiovascular events were recorded in the whole population and 74 in the group with LVM determination. AS as continuous or discontinuous variable was independently related to cardiovascular events. The existence or not of antihypertensive treatment at the time of its measurement did not affect its prognostic value. When LVM was forced in the model, AS remained significantly related to cardiovascular events. Thus, AS has an independent prognostic value in the hypertensive, whether measured before or after the administration of antihypertensive treatment. This prognostic value persists after taking LVM into account. PMID:23690349

  8. Central Retinal and Posterior Ciliary Artery Occlusion After Intralesional Injection of Sclerosant to Glabellar Subcutaneous Hemangioma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Gobara, Hideo; Mimura, Hidefumi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-03-15

    The aim of this study is to describe vision loss caused by central retinal artery and posterior ciliary artery occlusion as a consequence of sclerotherapy with a polidocanol injection to a glabellar hemangioma. An 18-year-old man underwent direct injection with a 23-gauge needle of 1 mL of a polidocanol-carbon dioxide emulsion into the glabellar subcutaneous hemangioma under ultrasound visualization of the needle tip by radiologists. He developed lid swelling the next day, and 3 days later at referral, the visual acuity in the left eye was no light perception. Funduscopy revealed central retinal artery occlusion and fluorescein angiography disclosed no perfusion at all in the left fundus, indicating concurrent posterior ciliary artery occlusion. The patient also showed mydriasis, blepharoptosis, and total external ophthalmoplegia on the left side. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the swollen medial rectus muscle. In a month, blepharoptosis and ophthalmoplegia resolved but the visual acuity remained no light perception. Sclerosing therapy for facial hemangioma may develop a severe complication such as permanent visual loss.

  9. Central Retinal Artery Occlusion: A Literature Review and the Rationale for Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

    PubMed

    Olson, Evan A; Lentz, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Central retinal artery occlusion is visually devastating and has no proven treatments. The therapeutic interval between symptom onset and potentially sight-saving intervention is narrow. Traditional conservative approaches include digital massage, administration of systemic vasodilators and diuretics, and lowering of intraocular pressure. Systemic and targeted fibrinolytic therapy is under investigation but is associated with significant adverse reactions. We report a case in which hyperbaric oxygen therapy restored retinal perfusion, and the patient's vision was improved. PMID:27039492

  10. Inadvertent subclavian artery cannulation with a central venous catheter; successful retrieval using a minimally invasive technique.

    PubMed

    Redmond, C E; O'Donohoe, R; Breslin, D; Brophy, D P

    2014-10-01

    A 48-year-old lady was referred to our department as an emergency following an unsuccessful attempt at central venous catheter insertion, resulting in cannulation of the subclavian artery. She underwent angiography with removal of the catheter and closure of the arteriotomy using an Angio-Seal device. While the optimal management of this scenario has yet to be defined, the use of this minimally invasive technique warrants consideration. PMID:25507120

  11. Inadvertent subclavian artery cannulation with a central venous catheter; successful retrieval using a minimally invasive technique.

    PubMed

    Redmond, C E; O'Donohoe, R; Breslin, D; Brophy, D P

    2014-10-01

    A 48-year-old lady was referred to our department as an emergency following an unsuccessful attempt at central venous catheter insertion, resulting in cannulation of the subclavian artery. She underwent angiography with removal of the catheter and closure of the arteriotomy using an Angio-Seal device. While the optimal management of this scenario has yet to be defined, the use of this minimally invasive technique warrants consideration. PMID:25417392

  12. Selective Heart Rate Reduction With Ivabradine Increases Central Blood Pressure in Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Stefano F; Messerli, Franz H; Cerny, David; Gloekler, Steffen; Traupe, Tobias; Laurent, Stéphane; Seiler, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Heart rate (HR) lowering by β-blockade was shown to be beneficial after myocardial infarction. In contrast, HR lowering with ivabradine was found to confer no benefits in 2 prospective randomized trials in patients with coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that this inefficacy could be in part related to ivabradine's effect on central (aortic) pressure. Our study included 46 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease who were randomly allocated to placebo (n=23) or ivabradine (n=23) in a single-blinded fashion for 6 months. Concomitant baseline medication was continued unchanged throughout the study except for β-blockers, which were stopped during the study period. Central blood pressure and stroke volume were measured directly by left heart catheterization at baseline and after 6 months. For the determination of resting HR at baseline and at follow-up, 24-hour ECG monitoring was performed. Patients on ivabradine showed an increase of 11 mm Hg in central systolic pressure from 129±22 mm Hg to 140±26 mm Hg (P=0.02) and in stroke volume by 86±21.8 to 107.2±30.0 mL (P=0.002). In the placebo group, central systolic pressure and stroke volume remained unchanged. Estimates of myocardial oxygen consumption (HR×systolic pressure and time-tension index) remained unchanged with ivabradine.The decrease in HR from baseline to follow-up correlated with the concomitant increase in central systolic pressure (r=-0.41, P=0.009) and in stroke volume (r=-0.61, P<0.001). In conclusion, the decrease in HR with ivabradine was associated with an increase in central systolic pressure, which may have antagonized possible benefits of HR lowering in coronary artery disease patients. CLINICAL TRIALSURL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier NCT01039389. PMID:27091900

  13. Blood pressure and arterial stiffness in patients with high sodium intake in relation to sodium handling and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction status.

    PubMed

    Cwynar, M; Gąsowski, J; Stompór, T; Bartoń, H; Wizner, B; Dubiel, M; Głuszewska, A; Królczyk, J; Franczuk, P; Grodzicki, T

    2015-10-01

    In a population with high sodium consumption, we assessed relation between brachial and central blood pressures, elastic properties of large arteries, echocardiographic left ventricular diastolic function and sodium reabsorption as fractional urinary lithium excretion in proximal (FELi) and fractional sodium reabsorption in distal tubules assessed using the endogenous lithium clearance. Mean±s.d. age of 131 treated hypertensive patients (66 men and 65 women) was 61.9±7.5 years. We found significant interaction between left ventricular diastolic function and FELi with respect to the values of brachial blood pressure: systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean blood pressure (MBP) (all PINT<0.03). In patients with FELi below the median value and impaired left ventricular diastolic function, the values of SBP (149.3 vs 132.5 mm Hg; P=0.005), DBP (85.1 vs 76.1 mm Hg; P=0.001), MBP (106.5 vs 94.9 mm Hg; P=0.001), central SBP (SBPC) (137.4 vs 122.0 mm Hg; P=0.01), central DBP (DBPC) (84.8 vs 76.0 mm Hg; P=0.003), central MBP (MBPC) (106.9 vs 95.9 mm Hg; P=0.007), aortic pulse wave augmentation (18.0 vs 13.5 mm Hg; P=0.03), pulse wave velocity (14.6 vs 12.5 m s(-1); P=0.02) and central aortic pulse wave augmentation index (155.7% vs 140.9%; P=0.01) were significantly higher than in patients with normal left ventricular diastolic function. Such relationships were not observed in the entire group and patients with FELi above the median value. In the hypertensive population with high sodium intake, increased sodium reabsorption in proximal tubules may affect blood pressure parameters and arterial wall damage, thus contributing to the development of left ventricular diastolic function impairment. PMID:25631217

  14. NAFLD and Increased Aortic Stiffness: Parallel or Common Physiopathological Mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane A.; Leite, Nathalie C.; Cardoso, Claudia R. L.; Salles, Gil F.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. Liver inflammation and fibrosis related to NAFLD contribute to disease progression and increasing liver-related mortality and morbidity. Increasing data suggest that NAFLD may be linked to atherosclerotic vascular disease independent of other established cardiovascular risk factors. Central arterial stiffness has been recognized as a measure of cumulative cardiovascular risk marker load, and the measure of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) is regarded as the gold standard assessment of aortic stiffness. It has been shown that increased aortic stiffness predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several clinical settings, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, a well-known condition associated with advanced stages of NAFLD. Furthermore, recently-published studies reported a strong association between NAFLD and increased arterial stiffness, suggesting a possible link in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and NAFLD. We sought to review the published data on the associations between NAFLD and aortic stiffness, in order to better understand the interplay between these two conditions and identify possible common physiopathological mechanisms. PMID:27104526

  15. Sex comparisons in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and arterial pressure oscillations during progressive central hypovolemia

    PubMed Central

    Carter III, Robert; Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Convertino, Victor A

    2015-01-01

    Increased tolerance to central hypovolemia is generally associated with greater sympathoexcitation, high-frequency oscillatory patterns of mean arterial pressure (MAP), and tachycardia. On average, women are less tolerant to central hypovolemia than men; however, the autonomic mechanisms governing these comparisons are not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that women with relatively high tolerance (HT) to central hypovolemia would display similar physiological reserve capacity for sympathoexcitation and oscillations in MAP at presyncope compared to HT men. About 10 men and five women were exposed to progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) until the presence of presyncopal symptoms. Based on our previous classification system, all subjects were classified as HT because they completed at least −60 mmHg LBNP. Muscle sympathetic serve activity (MSNA) was measured directly from the peroneal nerve via microneurography and arterial pressure (AP) was measured at the finger by photoplethysmography. LBNP time to presyncope was less (P < 0.01) in women (1727 ± 70 sec) than in men (2022 ± 201 sec). At presyncope, average MSNA in men (50 ± 12 bursts/min) and women (51 ± 7 bursts/min) was similar (P = 0.87). Coincident with similar stroke volume (SV) at presyncope, women had similar MAP and heart rates. However, women had less physiological reserve capacity for SV, AP-MSNA coherence, and oscillations in the high-frequency (HF) components of arterial pressure compared to men. Contrary to our hypothesis, lower tolerance to central hypovolemia in women was not associated with sympathoexcitation, but can be explained, in part by lower physiological reserve to elicit oscillatory patterns in AP, maintenance of AP-MSNA coherence and SV when compared to men. PMID:26109186

  16. Sex comparisons in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and arterial pressure oscillations during progressive central hypovolemia.

    PubMed

    Carter, Robert; Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Convertino, Victor A

    2015-06-01

    Increased tolerance to central hypovolemia is generally associated with greater sympathoexcitation, high-frequency oscillatory patterns of mean arterial pressure (MAP), and tachycardia. On average, women are less tolerant to central hypovolemia than men; however, the autonomic mechanisms governing these comparisons are not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that women with relatively high tolerance (HT) to central hypovolemia would display similar physiological reserve capacity for sympathoexcitation and oscillations in MAP at presyncope compared to HT men. About 10 men and five women were exposed to progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) until the presence of presyncopal symptoms. Based on our previous classification system, all subjects were classified as HT because they completed at least -60 mmHg LBNP. Muscle sympathetic serve activity (MSNA) was measured directly from the peroneal nerve via microneurography and arterial pressure (AP) was measured at the finger by photoplethysmography. LBNP time to presyncope was less (P < 0.01) in women (1727 ± 70 sec) than in men (2022 ± 201 sec). At presyncope, average MSNA in men (50 ± 12 bursts/min) and women (51 ± 7 bursts/min) was similar (P = 0.87). Coincident with similar stroke volume (SV) at presyncope, women had similar MAP and heart rates. However, women had less physiological reserve capacity for SV, AP-MSNA coherence, and oscillations in the high-frequency (HF) components of arterial pressure compared to men. Contrary to our hypothesis, lower tolerance to central hypovolemia in women was not associated with sympathoexcitation, but can be explained, in part by lower physiological reserve to elicit oscillatory patterns in AP, maintenance of AP-MSNA coherence and SV when compared to men. PMID:26109186

  17. Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) and anti-GAD-related CNS degenerations: protean additions to the autoimmune central neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Ali, Fatima; Rowley, Merrill; Jayakrishnan, Bindu; Teuber, Suzanne; Gershwin, M Eric; Mackay, Ian R

    2011-09-01

    Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS) is a rare autoimmune neurological disease attributable to autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD) more usually associated with the islet beta cell destruction of autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D). SPS is characterized by interference in neurons with the synthesis/activity of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) resulting in the prototypic progressive spasmodic muscular rigidity of SPS, or diverse neurological syndromes, cerebellar ataxia, intractable epilepsy, myoclonus and several others. Remarkably, a single autoantibody, anti-GAD, can be common to widely different disease expressions, i.e. T1D and SPS. One explanation for these data is the differences in epitope engagement between the anti-GAD reactivity in SPS and T1D: in both diseases, anti-GAD antibody reactivity is predominantly to a conformational epitope region in the PLP- and C-terminal domains of the 65 kDa isoform but, additionally in SPS, there is reactivity to conformational epitope(s) on GAD67, and short linear epitopes in the C-terminal region and at the N-terminus of GAD65. Another explanation for disease expressions in SPS includes ready access of anti-GAD to antigen sites due to immune responsiveness within the CNS itself according to intrathecal anti-GAD-specific B cells and autoantibody. Closer study of the mysterious stiff-person syndrome should enhance the understanding of this disease itself, and autoimmunity in general. PMID:21680149

  18. The association between oxidative stress, activator protein-1, inflammatory, total antioxidant status and artery stiffness and the efficacy of olmesartan in elderly patients with mild-to-moderate essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qunwei; Han, Limin; Du, Qiufan; Zhang, Ming; Zhou, Shenghua; Shen, Xiangqian

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the change of oxidative stress, activator protein-1 (AP-1), inflammatory, total antioxidant status (TAS) and artery stiffness, and explored the relationship between these characteristics and the efficacy of olmesartan intervention in elderly patients with mild-to-moderate essential hypertension (EH). In total, 386 elderly patients with EH and 353 normotensive controls were recruited. All study subjects had oxidative stress markers, AP-1, inflammatory factors, TAS and brancial-ankle artery pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) measured. In total, 193 elderly patients with EH were randomized to olmesartan and were matched with 193 normotensive controls to observe the change of index above mentioned before and after the treatment. Compared with the controls, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and TAS were significantly reduced in patients with EH, and malondialdehyde (MDA), AP-1, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1), heart rate, endothelin-1 (ET-1), TAS and ba-PWV were significantly increased (P < 0.01 for all). Pearson's correlation analysis showed that SOD and TAS were negatively related to AP-1 (P < 0.05 for all), and that blood pressure (BP), age, MDA, Hs-CRP, MCP-1, ET-1 were positively related to AP-1 (P < 0.01 for all). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that BP, SOD, MDA, AP-1, Hs-CRP, MCP-1, ET-1, TAS, heart rate and age were independent risk factors for ba-PWV. After treatment with olmesartan, SOD and TAS were increased, while BP, heart rate, AP-1 and inflammatory factors were reduced with significant improvement in ba-PWV (P < 0.05 for all). More increase of arterial stiffness was reported in elderly hypertensive patients with greater oxidative stress, inflammatory, AP-1, heart rate, and lower TAS. Higher oxidative stress, AP-1 and inflammatory may predict higher arterial stiffness. Olmesartan may increase TAS, yet inhibit oxidative stress, AP-1, inflammatory, and heart rate with

  19. Effect of Improving Dietary Quality on Arterial Stiffness in Subjects with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: A 12 Months Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Kristina S.; Clifton, Peter M.; Lister, Natalie; Keogh, Jennifer B.

    2016-01-01

    People with diabetes have accelerated arterial stiffening. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of increasing fruit, vegetable and dairy intake for 12 months on carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), augmentation index (AIx), and central blood pressure (cBP), compared to a usual diet control, in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In a 12 months randomised controlled trial, cfPWV, AIx and cBP were measured every 3 months. The intervention group received dietary counselling to increase consumption of fruit (+1 serving/day; 150 g/day), vegetables (+2 servings/day; 150 g/day) and dairy (+1 serving/day; 200–250 g/day) at baseline, 1, 3, 6 and 9 months. The control group continued on their usual diet. One hundred and nine participants were randomised and 92 (intervention n = 45; control n = 47) completed. At 3 months, fruit (184 g/day; p = 0.001) and dairy (83 g/day; p = 0.037) intake increased in the intervention group compared with the control group but this increase was not maintained at 12 months. After adjustment for baseline measurements there was no time by treatment effect for central systolic or diastolic BP, AIx or cfPWV. A time effect existed for AIx which modestly increased over time. Peripheral diastolic BP and central pulse pressure were improved in the intervention group compared with the control group at 12 months. In the cohort with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, improving dietary quality by increasing consumption of fruit, vegetables and dairy did not improve cBP, AIx or cfPWV, compared with a control group continuing on their usual diet, after 12 months. PMID:27338467

  20. Clinical Significance of Arterial Stiffness and Thickness Biomarkers in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Up-To-Date Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yapei, Yang; Xiaoyan, Ren; Sha, Zeng; Li, Pan; Xiao, Meng; Shuangfeng, Chen; Lexin, Wang; Lianqun, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous studies explored the association of T2DM with arterial stiffness and thickness biomarkers including the augmentation index (AIX), aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV), carotid intima-media wall thickness (IMT) as well as blood pressure (BP), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C); however the conclusions are either inconsistent or incomprehensive. Material/Methods The average differences of each included trial were expressed as the standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Analyses of carotid IMT, aPWV, baPWV and AIX Systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), LDL-C and HDL-C were independently performed. Furthermore, subgroup analyses by ethnicity (Caucasian or Asian) were conducted. Begg’s and Egger’s tests were performed for potential publication biases detection. Results A total of 14 case-control eligible studies with 1222 T2DM patients and 1094 control subjects were included. In the overall analysis, significant associations were observed between the carotid IMT, aPWV, baPWV, LDL-C, HDL-C, SBP, and DBP with T2DM (IMT: p=1.1*10−12; aPWV: p=1.1*10−7; baPWV: p=1.8*10−33; LDL-C: p=3.1*10−8; HDL-C: p=6.1*10−18; SBP: p=3.9*10−21; DBP: p=4.8*10−5). No association was detected for AIX (p=0.09). Subgroup analyses indicated that aPWV, baPWV, SBP, LDL-C, and HDL-C were associated with T2DM in both white and Asian populations (p<0.05). The significant associations of IMT, AIX and DBP with T2DM were only observed in the Asian subgroup. Conclusions Carotid IMT, aPWV, baPWV, as well as LDL-C, HDL-C, SBP, and DBP but not AIX were useful noninvasive early markers for T2DM vascular dysfunction detection. PMID:26295503

  1. Experimental occlusion of the central artery of the retina. IV: Retinal tolerance time to acute ischaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, S. S.; Weingeist, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    Ophthalmoscopic, fluorescein angiographic, electrophysiological, and morphological studies on 63 eyes of rhesus monkeys with acute transient experimental occlusion of the central artery of the retina (OCAR) showed that the retina suffered irreparable damage after ischaemia of 105 minutes but recovered well after ischaemia of 97-98 minutes. The tolerance time of the brain to acute transient ischaemia is many times shorter than that of the retina. The metabolism of ischaemic neurones (in the retina and brain) is discussed with a view to explaining this difference, and also the various factors possibly responsible for the retina's longer tolerance to ischaemia, as compared to the brain. PMID:7426553

  2. Finger Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Oosterhoff, Thijs C H; Nota, Sjoerd P F T; Ring, David

    2015-06-01

    Background Finger stiffness varies substantially in patients with hand and upper extremity illness and can be notably more than expected for a given pathophysiology. In prior studies, pain intensity and magnitude of disability consistently correlate with coping strategies such as catastrophic thinking and kinesiophobia, which can be characterized as overprotectiveness. In this retrospective study we address the primary research question whether patients with finger stiffness are more often overprotective when the primary pathology is outside the hand (e.g. distal radius fracture) than when it is located within the hand. Methods In an orthopaedic hand surgery department 160 patients diagnosed with more finger stiffness than expected for a given pathophysiology or time point of recovery between December 2006 and September 2012 were analyzed to compare the proportion of patients characterized as overprotective for differences by site of pathology: (1) inside the hand, (2) outside the hand, and (3) psychiatric etiology (e.g. clenched fist). Results Among 160 subjects with more finger stiffness than expected, 132 (82 %) were characterized as overprotective including 88 of 108 (81 %) with pathology in the hand, 39 of 44 (89 %) with pathology outside the hand, and 5 of 8 (63 %) with psychiatric etiology. These differences were not significant. Conclusions Overprotectiveness is common in patients with more finger stiffness than expected regardless the site and type of primary pathology. It seems worthwhile to recognize and treat maladaptive coping strategies early during recovery to limit impairment, symptoms, and disability. PMID:26078497

  3. Central retinal artery occlusion following laser treatment for ocular ischemic aortic arch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Payal J.; Ellis, Brian; DiGiovine, Lauren R.; Hogg, Jeffery P.; Leys, Monique J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Ocular ischemic syndrome is a rare blinding condition generally caused by disease of the carotid artery. We describe a 69-year-old female with a 50 pack-year smoking history with aortic arch syndrome causing bilateral ocular ischemic syndrome. Methods: The patient presented with progressive visual loss and temple pain. Slit lamp biomicroscopy revealed bilateral iris neovascularization. This finding prompted a cardiovascular work up. Panretinal photocoagulation with retrobulbar block was performed in the right eye. Results: A temporal artery biopsy was negative. The carotid duplex ultrasound showed only a 1–39% stenosis. MRA revealed a more proximal occlusion of the aortic branch for which she underwent subclavian carotid bypass surgery. At the one month follow up, the right eye suffered profound vision loss secondary to a central retinal artery occlusion. Conclusion: Ocular neovascularization may be one of the clinical manifestations of aortic arch syndrome. This case also illustrates the limitations of relying solely on carotid duplex ultrasound testing. We caution against overly aggressive panretinal photocoagulation utilizing retrobulbar anesthesia.

  4. Estrogen synthesis in the central nucleus of the amygdala following middle cerebral artery occlusion: role in modulating neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Saleh, T M; Connell, B J; Legge, C; Cribb, A E

    2005-01-01

    Stroke-induced lesions of the insular cortex in the brain have been linked to autonomic dysfunction (sympathoexcitation) leading to arrhythmogenesis and sudden cardiac death. In experimental models, systemic estrogen administration in male rats has been shown to reduce stroke-induced cell death in the insular cortex as well as prevent sympathoexcitation. The central nucleus of the amygdala has been postulated to mediate sympathoexcitatory output from the insular cortex. We therefore set out to determine if endogenous estrogen levels within the central nucleus of the amygdala are altered following stroke and if microinjection of estrogen into the central nucleus of the amygdala modulates autonomic tone. Plasma estrogen concentrations were not altered by middle cerebral artery occlusion (22.86+/-0.14 pg/ml vs. 21.24+/-0.33 pg/ml; P>0.05). In contrast, estrogen concentrations in the central nucleus of the amygdala increased significantly following middle cerebral artery occlusion (from 20.83+/-0.54 pg/ml to 76.67+/-1.59 pg/ml; P<0.05). Local infusion of an aromatase inhibitor, letrozole, into the central nucleus of the amygdala at the time of middle cerebral artery occlusion prevented the increase in estrogen concentration suggesting that this increase was dependent on aromatization from testosterone. Furthermore, bilateral microinjection of estrogen (0.5 microM in 200 nl) directly into the central nucleus of the amygdala significantly decreased arterial pressure and sympathetic tone and increased baroreflex sensitivity, and these effects were enhanced following co-injection with either an N-methyl-D-aspartate or non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist. Taken together, the results suggest that middle cerebral artery occlusion resulted in synthesis of estrogen within the central nucleus of the amygdala and that this enhanced estrogen level may act to attenuate overstimulation of central nucleus of the amygdala neurons to prevent middle cerebral artery occlusion

  5. [Central hemodynamics and cerebrovascular disorders in patients with idiopathic arterial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Foniakin, A V; Mashin, V Vl; Ataian, A S; Saprygina, L V

    2012-01-01

    A total of 65 patients (mean age 40.2 +/- 8.1 yr) with neurologic and neuropsychological disorders associated with long-term idiopathic arterial hypotension (IAH) were studied to estimate the state of their central blood circulation. Neuropsychological conditions were estimated from the state of higher psychic functions, such as memory speech, gnosis, praxis, cognition, attention, counting, writing, and reading abilities. Central hemodynamics was studied by 24 hr monitoring arterial pressure and echocardiography. Group 1 included patients without neurologic problems (n = 19), group 2 consisted of patients with early manifestations of chronic cerebrovascular insufficiency (n = 46, 71%). They were older than patients of group 1 and had a long history of IAH. It was shown that most patients presented with stably reduced systolic and diastolic AP and non-dipper type of low 24-hour SAD index. The cardiac index was elevated due to increased left ventricular ejection fraction (group 1) or increased heart rate (group 2). The severity of neuropsychic disorder was negatively related to SAD and DAD indices and positively to systolic hypotension time. PMID:23516869

  6. In the trail of a fiber Bragg grating sensor to assess the central arterial pressure wave profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Cátia; Antunes, Paulo; Bastos, José M.; André, Paulo; Pinto, João. L.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the primary causes of death in the world. Hemodynamics is the study of the blood propagation and the physics aspects concerned to it, relating pressure, flow and resistance. One of the most important topics on hemodynamics is the evaluation of arterial wave reflections. Recently this physical parameter of the pressure wave propagation through the arterial tree was considered as a novel strong risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Arterial pressure reflections can be quantified by central pressure profile analysis. In this work we study in the trial of an optical fibre Bragg grating based sensor of assess the central pressure profile, with the goal of to achieve a superior sensitivity, with a better signal quality than electromechanical probes, measured directly in the carotid artery.

  7. Comparison of Computed Tomography and Cineangiography in the Demonstration of Central Pulmonary Arteries in Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Taneja, Karuna; Sharma, Sanjiv; Kumar, Krishan; Rajani, Mira

    1996-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) for central pulmonary artery pathology in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) and right ventricular outflow obstruction. Methods: We compared contrast-enhanced CT and cine pulmonary arteriography in 24 patients with CCHD to assess central pulmonary arteries including the confluence. Both investigations were interpreted by a cardiac radiologist in a double-blinded manner at an interval of 3 weeks. Angiography was used as the gold standard for comparison. Results: The sensitivity for visualization of main pulmonary artery (MPA), right pulmonary artery (RPA), left pulmonary artery (LPA), and confluence on CT was 94%, 100%, 92.8%, and 92.8%, respectively. Diagnostic specificity for the same entities was 28.5%, 100%, 80%, and 50%, respectively. The positive predictive value for each was 76.2%, 100%, 94.1%, and 72.2%, respectively. The low specificity of CT in the evaluation of the MPA and the confluence is perhaps due to distorted right ventricular outflow anatomy in CCHD. Large aortopulmonary collaterals in this region were mistaken for the MPA in some patients with pulmonary atresia. Conclusion: CT is a useful, relatively noninvasive, imaging technique for the central pulmonary arteries in selected patients. It can supplement diagnostic information from angiography but cannot replace it. LPA demonstration on axial images alone is inadequate.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Arterial Stiffening

    PubMed Central

    Cecelja, Marina; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Stiffening of large arteries is a hallmark of vascular aging and one of the most important determinants of the age-related increase in blood pressure and cardiovascular disease events. Despite a substantial genetic component, the molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic variability in arterial stiffness remain unknown. Previous genetic studies have identified several genetic variants that are associated with measures of arterial stiffness. Here, we review the relevant advances in the identification of pathways underlying arterial stiffness from genomic studies. PMID:27493903

  9. Chronoecological health watch of arterial stiffness and neuro-cardio-pulmonary function in elderly community at high altitude (3524 m), compared with Japanese town.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, K; Norboo, T; Otsuka, Y; Higuchi, H; Hayajiri, M; Narushima, C; Sato, Y; Tsugoshi, T; Murakami, S; Wada, T; Ishine, M; Okumiya, K; Matsubayashi, K; Yano, S; Chogyal, T; Angchuk, D; Ichihara, K; Cornélissen, G; Halberg, F

    2005-10-01

    Effects of high altitude on arterial stiffness and neuro-cardio-pulmonary function were studied. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were measured in a sitting position on resting Ladakhis, living at an altitude of 3250-4647 m (Phey village, 3250 m: 17 men and 55 women; Chumathang village, 4193 m: 29 men and 47 women; Sumdo village, 4540 m: 38 men and 57 women; and Korzok village, 4647 m: 84 men and 70 women). The neuro-cardio-pulmonary function, including the Kohs block design test, the Up and Go, the Functional Reach and the Button tests, was examined in 40 elderly subjects (19 men and 21 women, mean age: 74.7 +/- 3.3 years) in Leh, Ladakh (altitude: 3524 m), for comparison with 324 elderly citizens (97 men and 227 women, mean age: 80.7 +/- 4.7 years) of Tosa, Japan (altitude: 250 m). Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index (CAVI) was measured as the heart-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) in these subjects using a VaSera CAVI instrument (Fukuda Denshi, Tokyo). SpO(2) decreased while Hb and diastolic BP increased with increasing altitude. At higher altitude, residents were younger and leaner. Women in Leh vs. Tosa had a poorer cognitive function, estimated by the Kohs block design test (3.7 +/- 3.6 vs. 16.4 +/- 9.6 points, P < 0.0001) and poorer ADL functions (Functional Reach: 13.7 +/- 7.0 cm vs. 25.3 +/- 8.7 cm, P < 0.0001; Button test: 22.5 +/- 4.8 vs. 14.8 +/- 5.7 s, P < 0.0001). Time estimation was shorter at high altitude (60-s estimation with counting: 41.1% shorter in men and 23.0% shorter in women). A higher voltage of the QRS complex was observed in the ECG of Leh residents, but two times measurement of CAVI showed no statistically significant differences between Leh and Tosa (two times of CAVI measures; 9.49 vs. 10.01 m/s and 9.41 vs. 10.05 m/s, respectively), suggesting that most residents succeed to adapt sufficiently to the high-altitude environment. However, correlation of CAVI with age shows several cases who show an extreme increase in CAVI. Thus, for the

  10. Central retinal artery occlusion following orbital tumor resection: Is rapid intervention effective?

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Mohammad Taher; Naderan, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Seyed Ziaeddin Tabatabaei; Rajabi, Mohammad Bagher

    2015-08-01

    A 52-year-old male patient presented at our hospital with unilateral proptosis and vision loss in his left eye. Imaging evaluations showed orbital tumor, so the patient underwent surgery. About an hour later after tumor removal, patient developed sudden vision loss and became no light perception. Fundus evaluation revealed central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO). The patient was treated immediately with ocular massage and anterior chamber paracentesis as well as systemic therapy with mannitol and intravenous administration of acetazolamide. After thirty minutes, he recovered perception to light and then hand motion and 2 h later, it was improved to 1 m counting finger. CRAO following orbital tumor has not been reported before. We recommend ocular examination in all patients that undergo orbital surgery immediately to 2-3 h after surgery. PMID:26576528

  11. A comparison of the priming properties of two central venous catheters and one pulmonary artery catheter.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, P M

    1995-01-01

    The time taken to prime the individual lumina of two multilumen central venous catheters (Viggo-Spectramed 14G 20 cm Hydrocath and Vialon 14G 20 cm Deltacath) and one pulmonary artery catheter (Viggo-Spectramed 110 cm 7.5F Pentacath) at flows between 5 ml.h-1 and 99 ml.h-1 is reported. The catheters supplied by different manufacturers but of identical length and gauge have significantly different priming times (p < 0.001). A protocol which may be used to prime the individual lumina of the three catheters studied is described. By means of an in vitro test the accuracy of this protocol is validated. PMID:7702147

  12. Impact of leg blood flow restriction during walking on central arterial hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Jun; Tomoto, Tsubasa; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2015-10-01

    Walking exercise with limb blood flow restriction (BFR) has been shown to increase muscular mass and strength even if it is performed at low exercise intensities. Despite mounting evidence for its efficacy and the increasing popularity, the safety of BFR exercise in relation to cardiac loads has not been established. The aim of this study was to determine the response of central hemodynamics during the BFR exercise to assess its impact on cardiac load. Fifteen apparently healthy sedentary or recreationally active adults (10 men and 5 women, 27 ± 1 yr) underwent five bouts of 2-min constant treadmill walking at 2 mph with 1-min rest intervals either with or without BFR on both proximal thighs. Beat-by-beat blood pressure and hemodynamics (via Modelflow method) were measured, and central arterial hemodynamics were evaluated with pulse wave analyses via general transfer function. Incident wave amplitude (IWA) and reflected wave amplitude (RWA) were obtained by the wave separation analysis. Peripheral systolic blood pressure (SBP) increased more substantially during walking with BFR (43 ± 5% vs. baseline) than without BFR (11 ± 4% vs. baseline). Aortic SBP did not change significantly during walking without BFR, but there was a substantial elevation in aortic SBP (43 ± 5% vs. baseline) during walking with BFR. Significant effect of BFR was seen in IWA but not in RWA. These findings suggest that even during slow-speed walking, leg BFR induces substantial hypertensive responses in the aorta. However, this response could not be explained by the augmented wave reflection. PMID:26246503

  13. Stormwater permitting for a large construction project: NPDES and Boston's Central Artery/Tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, B.B. )

    1993-01-01

    The promulgation of EPA's NPDES stormwater discharge regulations occurred during the latter planning stages for Boston's Central Artery/Tunnel Project, making this project, one of the largest single urban highway projects ever built, one of the first to be permitted under new regulations. The Project consists of 128 land miles of new highway, including numerous ramps and interchanges, and a harbor tunnel, with stormwater discharging during construction from at least 38 separate points. Complicating the permitting situation, stormwater is combined with dewatering discharges from excavations in filled and former industrial areas. Working closely with EPA Region 1 and the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, the Massachusetts Highway Department submitted a permit application combining estimates of dewatering discharge quality derived from groundwater sampling with all the elements of a NPDES application for construction stormwater. The resulting permit contained two separate sets of monitoring requirements for the same discharge points, one for stormwater and one for dewatering. Quarterly monitoring was required for both dewatering and stormwater for metals, suspended solids, TPH, and VOC. Limits of 50 mg/1 TSS and 5 mg/1 TPH were established for dewatering only.

  14. Cardiovascular system identification: Simulation study using arterial and central venous pressures.

    PubMed

    Karamolegkos, Nikolaos; Vicario, Francesco; Chbat, Nicolas W

    2015-08-01

    The paper presents a study of the identifiability of a lumped model of the cardiovascular system. The significance of this work from the existing literature is in the potential advantage of using both arterial and central venous (CVP) pressures, two signals that are frequently monitored in the critical care unit. The analysis is done on the system's state-space representation via control theory and system identification techniques. Non-parametric state-space identification is preferred over other identification techniques as it optimally assesses the order of a model, which best describes the input-output data, without any prior knowledge about the system. In particular, a recent system identification algorithm, namely Observer Kalman Filter Identification with Deterministic Projection, is used to identify a simplified version of an existing cardiopulmonary model. The outcome of the study highlights the following two facts. In the deterministic (noiseless) case, the theoretical indicators report that the model is fully identifiable, whereas the stochastic case reveals the difficulty in determining the complete system's dynamics. This suggests that even with the use of CVP as an additional pressure signal, the identification of a more detailed (high order) model of the circulatory system remains a challenging task. PMID:26736432

  15. Impact of the augmentation time ratio on direct measurement of central aortic pressure in the presence of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Atsushi; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Nishizaki, Yuji; Yamazoe, Masahiro; Komatsu, Ikki; Asano, Taku; Mitsuhashi, Hirotsugu; Nishi, Yutaro; Niwa, Koichiro; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    The augmentation index measured by using the central artery pressure is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, no study has examined the role of the time duration of the central artery pressure on CAD. Therefore, we evaluated the relationship between the central blood pressure time duration and the presence of CAD. All patients without a history of revascularization or prior myocardial infarction who underwent an elective coronary angiography at one of the two hospitals from January to September 2013 were analyzed. CAD was defined as a significant stenosis in one of the main coronary branches. The augmentation time ratio was defined as the ratio of the reflection to peak systolic time T2T1 duration divided by the peak systolic time to aortic notch T3T2 duration. We analyzed the relationship between the central pressure waveform (not only augmentation pressure) and the presence of CAD. A total of 146 (57.3%) out of 255 patients had a significant CAD. T2T1 duration was longer in the CAD group than the no CAD group, and the T3T2 duration was shorter in the CAD group than the no CAD group. The augmentation time ratio (T2T1/T3T2) was significantly larger in the CAD group than in the no CAD group. The augmentation index and augmentation pressure were lower in the no CAD group, but this difference was not statistically significant. The augmentation time ratio was an independent factor related to no CAD, especially in patients with a high augmentation index (odds ratio, 2.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-4.63). The augmentation time ratio was an independent factor related to the presence of CAD. PMID:25854988

  16. Evaluation of Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Behçet's Disease by Using Noninvasive Radiological Methods such as Intima-Media Thickness of the Carotid, Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index, Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring, and Their Relation to Serum Fetuin-A Levels: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Solak, Aynur; Genç, Berhan; Akyıldız, Muhittin; Şahin, Neslin; Uyar, İhsan Sami; Saklamaz, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic, recurrent inflammatory systemic vasculitis. Evidence for increased atherosclerosis in BD has been observed. The relation between cardiovascular risk factors and increased atherosclerosis in patients with BD is still controversial. Objective We performed this study to evaluate arterial stiffness in patients with BD by using noninvasive radiological methods such as carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT), ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI), coronary artery calcium score (CACaS), and their relation to serum fetuin-A levels, which was recently found to be important in vascular calcification. Methods This prospective study included 26 patients with BD and 25 control subjects. In all patients, the CIMT, ABPI, CACaS, and serum fetuin-A levels were examined. Results The CIMT and CACaS were statistically higher and the ABPI was statistically lower in BD patients than in the control group. All p-values were <0.001. Positive correlations were found between the CACaS and CIMT, and negative correlations were found between the CACaS and ABPI. Although the values of fetuin-A were higher in BD, the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.064). However, the correlations found between fetuin-A levels and CIMT and between fetuin-A levels and CACaS were significant. Conclusion The CIMT, CACaS, and ABPI are all useful in detecting structural and functional vascular damage in BD. PMID:26719639

  17. Vision Loss due to Central Retinal Artery Occlusion Following Embolization in a Case of a Giant Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Mihir; Desai, Roshani J; Potdar, Nayana A; Shinde, Chhaya A; Ukirde, Vivek; Bhuta, Maunil; Nair, Akshay Gopinathan

    2015-07-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a benign, vascular, and locally aggressive tumor that arises in the nasal cavity, extending into the nasopharynx and often in to the orbit. It may rarely present to the ophthalmologist with proptosis and optic neuropathy. Preoperative embolization of JNA is done before surgical resection. In this communication, the authors report a rare occurrence of ipsilateral central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) following embolization with polyvinyl alcohol in a 13-year-old boy with right-sided JNA. Retrospective review of the angiograms pointed out to a suspicious communication between the external carotid artery and the ophthalmic vessels. Pre-embolization detailed study of the angiograms is necessary to avoid such devastating complications. Although rare, vision loss is a possible complication arising from embolization of nasopharyngeal and intracranial tumors, and all patients undergoing these procedures should be informed of the risk of visual loss because it has a lasting impact on the quality of life. PMID:26167999

  18. Anterior chamber paracentesis after central retinal artery occlusion: a tenable therapy?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to investigate the visual outcome of acute central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) after current standard therapy with and without paracentesis. In addition, we investigated whether there was a dependence of the resulting visual acuity on the time between first symptoms and implementation of paracentesis. Finally, we analysed risk factors for CRAO. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of data from patients with CRAO who received standard in-patient therapy with and without paracentesis at the Dr. Horst Schmidt Clinics in Wiesbaden, Germany between 2000 and 2012. The primary endpoint was the change of visual acuity 3 days after the initiation of intervention. Results Data from 74 patients with CRAO were included in the study. Fifteen patients were treated conservatively and 59 patients received additional paracentesis. Clinically significant improvement of BCVA (logMAR ≥ 0.3) after 3 days was observed in 26.7% of patients without paracentesis, 36.4% of patients with paracentesis within 6 hours, 20% of patients with paracentesis within 7–24 hours, and 23.1% of patients with paracentesis more than 24 hours after the onset of symptoms. There was no significant difference in the outcome between patients with (BCVA 1.9 ± 0.31) and without paracentesis (BCVA 1.75 ± 0.32) (p = 0.9), nor among the groups with paracentesis (p = 0.8). One patient suffered a lens injury due to the paracentesis, with subsequent need for cataract surgery. Conclusions There was no added gain in visual acuity by performing a paracentesis, independent of the time elapsed between first symptoms and the implementation of paracentesis. In the absence of any tangible effectiveness of paracentesis and the inherent risks of paracentesis such as intraocular infection and injury, paracentesis does not appear to be warranted as a treatment of CRAO. PMID:24612658

  19. New Insight into Effects of β-Blockers on Arterial Functions

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The effects of β-blockers on arterial properties are not well investigated. In our recent study, we compared the effects of the two β-blockers celiprolol and bisoprolol on blood pressure, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), flow-mediated vasodilatation, and vascular stiffness. We found that bisoprolol achieved a greater reduction in the pulse rate and improved BRS and vascular stiffness, whereas celiprolol reduced the central blood pressure level. In this review, the mechanisms of different types of β-blockers and their effects on arteries are discussed, and the appropriate use of β-blockers in hypertensive subjects will be proposed. PMID:27195240

  20. Activation of Central Angiotensin Type 2 Receptors by Compound 21 Improves Arterial Baroreflex Sensitivity in Rats With Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Juan; Zucker, Irving H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In a previous study we demonstrated that central administration of compound 21 (C21), a nonpeptide AT2R agonist, inhibited sympathetic tone in normal rats. In this study, we hypothesized that C21 exerts a similar effect in rats with coronary ligation–induced heart failure (HF). METHODS C21 was intracerebroventricularly infused for 7 days by osmotic mini pump. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded by radiotelemetry in the conscious state to measure spontaneous arterial baroreflex sensitivity. Urine was collected for measurement of norepinephrine excretion. On the last day of C21 treatment, renal sympathetic nerve activity, BP, and HR were directly recorded under anesthesia, and the induced arterial baroreflex sensitivity was evaluated. Protein expressions of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) in the subfornical organ, paraventricular nucleus, rostral ventrolateral medulla, and nucleus tractus solitarius were determined by Western blot analysis. RESULTS C21-treated HF rats displayed significantly less norepinephrine excretion (2,385.6±121.1 vs. 3,677.3±147.6ng/24 hours; P < 0.05) and lower renal sympathetic nerve activity (50.2±1.9% of max vs. 70.9±8.2% of max; P < 0.05) than vehicle-treated HF rats. C21-treated rats also exhibited improved spontaneous arterial baroreflex sensitivity and induced arterial baroreflex sensitivity. Bolus intracerebroventricular injection of angiotensin II–evoked pressor and sympatho-excitatory responses were attenuated in the C21-treated HF rats, which displayed upregulated nNOS and downregulated AT1R expression in the subfornical organ, paraventricular nucleus, and rostral ventrolateral medulla. CONCLUSIONS Activation of central angiotensin II type 2 receptor AT2R by C21 suppresses sympathetic outflow in rats with HF by improving baroreflex sensitivity and may provide important benefit in the HF syndrome. PMID:24687998

  1. Reduced large elastic artery stiffness with regular aerobic exercise in middle-aged and older adults: potential role of suppressed nuclear factor κ B signalling

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Kristen L.; Donato, Anthony J.; Fleenor, Bradley S.; Nowlan, Molly J.; Walker, Ashley E.; Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Ballak, Dov B.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Aortic pulse-wave velocity (aPWV) increases with age and is a strong independent predictor of incident cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in healthy middle-aged and older adults. aPWV is lower in middle-aged and older adults who perform regular aerobic exercise than in their sedentary peers. As exercise is associated with reduced systemic inflammation, we hypothesized that suppression of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κ B (NFκB) may mediate this process. Methods aPWV was measured in young sedentary [n =10, blood pressure (BP) 108 ± 3/59 ± 2 mmHg; mean ± SEM], middle-aged and older sedentary (n =9, 124 ± 7/73 ± 5 mmHg) and middle-aged and older aerobic exercise-trained (n =12, 110 ± 4/67 ± 2 mmHg) healthy, nonhypertensive men and women. Results Baseline aPWV increased with age [626 ± 14 (young sedentary) vs. 859 ± 49 (middle-aged and older sedentary) cm/s, P <0.001] but was 20% lower in middle-aged and older trained (686 ± 30 cm/s) than in middle-aged and older sedentary (P <0.005). Short-term (4 days × 2500–4500 mg) treatment with the NFκB inhibitor salsalate (randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over design) reduced aPWV (to 783 ± 44 cm/s, P <0.05) without changing BP (P =0.40) or heart rate (P =0.90) in middle-aged and older sedentary, but had no effect in young sedentary (623 ± 19) or middle-aged and older trained (699 ± 30). Following salsalate treatment, aPWV no longer was significantly different in middle-aged and older sedentary vs. middle-aged and older trained (P =0.29). The reduction in aPWV with salsalate administration was inversely related to baseline (placebo) aPWV (r = −0.60, P <0.001). Conclusion These results support the hypothesis that suppressed NFκB signalling may partially mediate the lower aortic stiffness in middle-aged and older adults who regularly perform aerobic exercise. Because aPWV predicts incident cardiovascular events in this population, this suggests that tonic suppression of

  2. Technical Validation of ARTSENS–An Image Free Device for Evaluation of Vascular Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Ravikumar; Kusmakar, Shitanshu; Thrivikraman, Arya Sree; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2015-01-01

    Vascular stiffness is an indicator of cardiovascular health, with carotid artery stiffness having established correlation to coronary heart disease and utility in cardiovascular diagnosis and screening. State of art equipment for stiffness evaluation are expensive, require expertise to operate and not amenable for field deployment. In this context, we developed ARTerial Stiffness Evaluation for Noninvasive Screening (ARTSENS), a device for image free, noninvasive, automated evaluation of vascular stiffness amenable for field use. ARTSENS has a frugal hardware design, utilizing a single ultrasound transducer to interrogate the carotid artery, integrated with robust algorithms that extract arterial dimensions and compute clinically accepted measures of arterial stiffness. The ability of ARTSENS to measure vascular stiffness in vivo was validated by performing measurements on 125 subjects. The accuracy of results was verified with the state-of-the-art ultrasound imaging-based echo-tracking system. The relation between arterial stiffness measurements performed in sitting posture for ARTSENS measurement and sitting/supine postures for imaging system was also investigated to examine feasibility of performing ARTSENS measurements in the sitting posture for field deployment. This paper verified the feasibility of the novel ARTSENS device in performing accurate in vivo measurements of arterial stiffness. As a portable device that performs automated measurement of carotid artery stiffness with minimal operator input, ARTSENS has strong potential for use in large-scale screening. PMID:27170892

  3. Central Arterial Hemodynamic Effects of Dark Chocolate Ingestion in Young Healthy People: A Randomized and Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, T.; Maldonado, J.; Laranjeiro, M.; Coutinho, R.; Cardoso, E.; Andrade, I.; Conde, J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to assess the vascular benefits of dark chocolate in healthy and young individuals. Methods. A randomized and controlled trial was carried out involving 60 healthy volunteers, randomized into two groups: control group (CG; n = 30) and intervention group (IG; n = 30). The IG ingested a daily dosage of 10 g of dark chocolate (>75% cocoa) for a month. Blood pressure (BP), flow-mediated dilation (FMD), arterial stiffness index (ASI), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), and pulse wave analysis (PWA) were assessed at baseline and one week after the one-month intervention period. Results. Arterial function improved after intervention in the IG, with PWV decreasing from 6.13 ± 0.41 m/s to 5.83 ± 0.53 m/s (P = 0.02), with no significant differences observed in the CG. A significant decrease in ASI (0.16 ± 0.01 to 0.13 ± 0.01; P < 0.001) and AiX (−15.88 ± 10.75 to −22.57 ± 11.16; P = 0.07) was also depicted for the IG. Endothelial function improved in the IG, with the FMD increasing 9.31% after the 1-month intervention (P < 0.001), with no significant variation in the CG. Conclusion. The daily ingestion of 10 g dark chocolate (>75% cocoa) during a month significantly improves vascular function in young and healthy individuals. PMID:24982813

  4. Central venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide gradient as a marker of occult tissue hypoperfusion after major surgery.

    PubMed

    Silbert, B I; Litton, E; Ho, K M

    2015-09-01

    The central venous-arterial carbon dioxide tension gradient ('CO₂gap') has been shown to correlate with cardiac output and tissue perfusion in septic shock. Compared to central venous oxygen saturation (SCVO2), the CO₂gap is less susceptible to the effect of hyperoxia and may be particularly useful as an adjunctive haemodynamic target in the perioperative period. This study investigated whether a high CO₂gap was associated with an increased systemic oxygen extraction (O2ER >0.3) or occult tissue hypoperfusion in 201 patients in the immediate postoperative period. The median CO₂gap of all patients was 8 mmHg (IQR 6 to 9), and a large CO₂gap was very common (> 6mmHg in 139 patients [69%], 95% CI 63 to 75; >5 mmHg in 170 patients [85%], 95% CI 79 to 89). A CO₂ gap >5 mmHg had a higher sensitivity (93%) and negative predictive value (74%) than a CO₂gap >6 mmHg in excluding occult tissue hypoperfusion. Of the four variables that were predictive of an increased O₂ER in the multivariate analysis-CO₂gap, arterial pH, haemoglobin and arterial lactate concentrations-the CO₂gap (odds ratio 4.41 per mmHg increment, 95% CI 1.7 to 11.2, P=0.002) was most important and explained about 34% of the variability in the risk of occult tissue hypoperfusion. In conclusion, a normal CO₂ gap (<5 mmHg) had a high sensitivity and negative predictive value in excluding inadequate systemic oxygen delivery and may be useful as an adjunct to other haemodynamic targets in avoiding occult tissue hypoperfusion in the perioperative setting when high inspired oxygen concentrations are used. PMID:26310414

  5. Stiff skin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Geng, S; Lei, X; Toyohara, J P; Zhan, P; Wang, J; Tan, S

    2006-07-01

    Stiff skin syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by pronounced skin induration, mild hypertrichosis and limited joint mobility, predominantly on the buttocks and thighs. Many heterogeneous cases have been reported under the name of stiff skin syndrome. We present a case of stiff skin syndrome from China, the diagnosis based on the patient's typical clinical and histopathological features. PMID:16836505

  6. Arterial structure and function in vascular ageing: are you as old as your arteries?

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Carter, Sophie E; Green, Daniel J

    2016-04-15

    Advancing age may be the most potent independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, a relationship that is not fully explained by time-related changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Since some arteries exhibit differential susceptibility to atherosclerosis, generalisations regarding the impact of ageing in humans may be overly simplistic, whereas in vivo assessment of arterial function and health provide direct insight. Coronary and peripheral (conduit, resistance and skin) arteries demonstrate a gradual, age-related impairment in vascular function that is likely to be related to a reduction in endothelium-derived nitric oxide bioavailability and/or increased production of vasoconstrictors (e.g. endothelin-1). Increased exposure and impaired ability for defence mechanisms to resist oxidative stress and inflammation, but also cellular senescence processes, may contribute to age-related changes in vascular function and health. Arteries also undergo structural changes as they age. Gradual thickening of the arterial wall, changes in wall content (i.e. less elastin, advanced glycation end-products) and increase in conduit artery diameter are observed with older age and occur similarly in central and peripheral arteries. These changes in structure have important interactive effects on artery function, with increases in small and large arterial stiffness representing a characteristic change with older age. Importantly, direct measures of arterial function and structure predict future cardiovascular events, independent of age or other cardiovascular risk factors. Taken together, and given the differential susceptibility of arteries to atherosclerosis in humans, direct measurement of arterial function and health may help to distinguish between biological and chronological age-related change in arterial health in humans. PMID:26140618

  7. [Vascular aging, arterial hypertension and physical activity].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Trucksäss, A; Weisser, B

    2011-11-01

    The present review delineates the significance of intima-media-thickness, arterial stiffness and endothelial function for vascular aging. There is profound evidence for an increase in intima-media-thickness and vascular stiffness not only during healthy aging but induced also by cardiovascular risk factors. There is a central role of arterial hypertension for this progression in both structural factors. In addition, both parameters are strongly associated with cardiovascular risk. Endothelial function measured as postischemic flow-mediated vasodilatation is a functional parameter which is decreased both in healthy aging and by cardiovascular risk factors. Physical activity modifies the influence of aging and risk factors on endothelial function. A positive influence of endurance exercise on vascular stiffness and endothelial function has been demonstrated in numerous studies. In long-term studies, regular physical activity has been shown to reduce the progression of intima-media-thickness. Thus, arterial hypertension accelerates vascular aging, while physical activity has a positive influence on a variety of vascular parameters associated with vascular aging. PMID:22068448

  8. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Lampi, Marsha C.; Faber, Courtney J.; Huynh, John; Bordeleau, Francois; Zanotelli, Matthew R.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening. PMID:26761203

  9. Manifestations of central retinal artery occlusion revealed by fundus fluorescein angiography are associated with the degree of visual loss

    PubMed Central

    GONG, HONGXIA; SONG, QIUYING; WANG, LANHUI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between central visual impairment and the characteristics of fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) in patients with central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO). A total of 63 patients were diagnosed with CRAO by FFA. The visual dysfunction was classified into severe, mild and light degrees. Tropicamide was administered for mydriasis. FFA examination was performed using Heidelberg retinal tomography. The associations of age, gender and disease course with CRAO type were analyzed. Three types of manifestations were identified by FFA in 63 eyes, including poor perfusion (18 cases), exudation (22 cases) and mixed types (23 cases) of CRAO. No significant difference was found in age (F=0.171, P=0.844) and disease course (F=0.016, P=0.984) among the three types of CRAO. Similarly, no significant difference was found in gender among the three types of CRAO (χ2=0.176, P=0.916). The damage to vision caused by the exudation type of CRAO was not as severe as that caused by the poor perfusion and mixed types of CRAO. The distributions of damage severity caused by the poor perfusion and mixed types of CRAO were similar. In conclusion, the FFA observations for CRAO can be classified into three types of manifestations. The damage to vision in patients with CRAO is likely to be associated with poor perfusion in the retinal artery rather than exudation affecting the retina or optic disc. The patterns of clinical manifestations are not associated with age, gender or disease course. PMID:27313672

  10. Increased aortic stiffness and blood pressure in non-classic Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Wens, Stephan C A; Kuperus, Esther; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Kruijshaar, Michelle E; Brusse, Esther; van Montfort, Kees C A G M; de Boer, Marjan Scheltens-; Sijbrands, Eric J G; van der Ploeg, Ans T; van Doorn, Pieter A

    2014-05-01

    Vascular abnormalities and glycogen accumulation in vascular smooth muscle fibres have been described in Pompe disease. Using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), the gold standard methodology for determining aortic stiffness, we studied whether aortic stiffness is increased in patients with Pompe disease. Eighty-four adult Pompe patients and 179 age- and gender-matched volunteers participated in this cross-sectional case-controlled study. Intima media thickness and the distensibility of the right common carotid artery were measured using a Duplex scanner. Aortic augmentation index, central pulse pressure, aortic reflexion time and cfPWV were assessed using the SphygmoCor® system. CfPWV was higher in patients than in volunteers (8.8 versus 7.4 m/s, p < 0.001). This difference was still present after adjustment for age, gender, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate and diabetes mellitus (p = 0.001), and was shown by subgroup analysis to apply to the 40-59 years age group (p = 0.004) and 60+ years age group (p = 0.01), but not to younger age groups (p = 0.99). Except for a shorter aortic reflexion time (p = 0.02), indirect indicators of arterial stiffness did not differ between patients and volunteers. Relative to volunteers (20%), more Pompe patients had a history of hypertension (36%, p = 0.005), and the MAP was higher than in volunteers (100 versus 92 mmHg, p < 0.001). This study shows that patients with non-classic Pompe disease have increased aortic stiffness and blood pressure. Whether this is due to glycogen accumulation requires further investigation. To reduce the potential risk of cardiovascular diseases, we recommend that blood pressure and other common cardiovascular risk factors are monitored regularly. PMID:24407465

  11. Patterns of central venous oxygen saturation, lactate and veno-arterial CO2 difference in patients with septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Rubina Khullar; Peter, John Victor; John, George; Graham, Petra L.; Rao, Shoma V.; Pinsky, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Tissue hypoperfusion is reflected by metabolic parameters such as lactate, central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) and the veno-arterial CO2 (vaCO2) difference. We studied the relation of these parameters over time and with outcome in patients with severe septic shock. Materials and Methods: In this single-center, prospective observational cohort study, adult patients (≥18 years) with circulatory shock were included. Echocardiography and simultaneous arterial and venous blood gases were done on enrolment (0 h) and at 24, 48 and 72 h. The partial pressure of CO2, lactate and ScvO2 were recorded from the central venous blood samples. The vaCO2 was calculated as the difference in CO2 between paired venous and arterial blood gas samples. Results: Of the 104 patients with circulatory shock, 79 patients (44 males) with septic shock aged 49.8 (standard deviation ± 14.6) years and with sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score of 11.0 ± 3.4 were included. 71 patients (89.9%) were ventilated (11.4 ± 12.3 ventilator-free days). The duration of hospitalization was 16.6 ± 12.8 days and hospital mortality 50.6%. Lactate significantly decreased over time with a greater decrement in survivors than nonsurvivors (−0.35 vs. −0.10, P < 0.001). For every l/min increase in cardiac output, vaCO2 decreased by 0.34 mmHg (P = 0.006). There was no association between ScvO2 and mortality (P = 0.930). 0 h SOFA and vaCO2 ≤6 mmHg were strongly associated (P = 0.005, P = 0.018, respectively) with higher odds of mortality. However, this association was evident only in those with ScvO2 >70% and not in ScvO2 ≤70%. Conclusion: In septic shock, vaCO2 ≤6 mmHg is independently associated with mortality, particularly in those with normalized ScvO2 consistent with metabolic microcirculatory abnormalities in these patients. PMID:26628822

  12. Changes of central haemodynamic parameters during mental stress and acute bouts of static and dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Lydakis, C; Momen, A; Blaha, C; Gugoff, S; Gray, K; Herr, M; Leuenberger, U A; Sinoway, L I

    2008-05-01

    Chronic dynamic (aerobic) exercise decreases central arterial stiffness, whereas chronic resistance exercise evokes the opposite effect. Nevertheless, there is little information available on the effects of acute bouts of exercise. Also, there is limited data showing an increase of central arterial stiffness during acute mental stress. This study aimed to determine the effect of acute mental and physical (static and dynamic exercise) stress on indices of central arterial stiffness. Fifteen young healthy volunteers were studied. The following paradigms were performed: (1) 2 min of mental arithmetic, (2) short bouts (20 s) of static handgrip at 20 and 70% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), (3) fatiguing handgrip at 40% MVC and (4) incremental dynamic knee extensor exercise. Central aortic waveforms were assessed using SphygmoCor software. As compared to baseline, pulse wave transit time decreased significantly for all four interventions indicating that central arterial stiffness increased. During fatiguing handgrip there was a fall in the ratio of peripheral to central pulse pressure from 1.69+/-0.02 at baseline to 1.56+/-0.05 (P<0.05). In the knee extensor protocol a non-significant trend for the opposite effect was noted. The augmentation index increased significantly during the arithmetic, short static and fatiguing handgrip protocols, whereas there was no change in the knee extensor protocol. We conclude that (1) during all types of acute stress tested in this study (including dynamic exercise) estimated central stiffness increased, (2) during static exercise the workload posed on the left ventricle (expressed as change in central pulse pressure) is relatively higher than that posed during dynamic exercise (given the same pulse pressure change in the periphery). PMID:18273040

  13. Acute benefits of the microbial-derived isoflavone metabolite equol on arterial stiffness in men prospectively recruited according to equol producer phenotype: a double-blind randomized controlled trial12

    PubMed Central

    Hazim, Sara; Curtis, Peter J; Schär, Manuel Y; Ostertag, Luisa M; Kay, Colin D; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Cassidy, Aedín

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is much speculation with regard to the potential cardioprotective benefits of equol, a microbial-derived metabolite of the isoflavone daidzein, which is produced in the large intestine after soy intake in 30% of Western populations. Although cross-sectional and retrospective data support favorable associations between the equol producer (EP) phenotype and cardiometabolic health, few studies have prospectively recruited EPs to confirm this association. Objective: The aim was to determine whether the acute vascular benefits of isoflavones differ according to EP phenotype and subsequently investigate the effect of providing commercially produced S-(–)equol to non-EPs. Design: We prospectively recruited male EPs and non-EPs (n = 14/group) at moderate cardiovascular risk into a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study to examine the acute effects of soy isoflavones (80-mg aglycone equivalents) on arterial stiffness [carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (cfPWV)], blood pressure, endothelial function (measured by using the EndoPAT 2000; Itamar Medical), and nitric oxide at baseline (0 h) and 6 and 24 h after intake. In a separate assessment, non-EPs consumed 40 mg S-(–)equol with identical vascular measurements performed 2 h after intake. Results: After soy intake, cfPWV significantly improved in EPs at 24 h (cfPWV change from 0 h: isoflavone, −0.2 ± 0.2 m/s; placebo, 0.6 ± 0.2 m/s; P < 0.01), which was significantly associated with plasma equol concentrations (R = −0.36, P = 0.01). No vascular effects were observed in EPs at 6 h or in non-EPs at any time point. Similarly, no benefit of commercially produced S-(–)equol was observed in non-EPs despite mean plasma equol concentrations reaching 3.2 μmol/L. Conclusions: Acute soy intake improved cfPWV in EPs, equating to an 11–12% reduced risk of cardiovascular disease if sustained. However, a single dose of commercially produced equol had no cardiovascular benefits in non-EPs. These

  14. Combined Central Retinal Artery and Vein Occlusion Associated with Factor V Leiden Mutation and Treated with Hyperbaric Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, José Alberto; Teixeira, Carla; Carvalho, Rui; Fernandes, Tiago

    2015-01-01

    Background Combined central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) is an uncommon retinal vascular disease which causes sudden visual acuity loss and is associated with poor prognosis and the development of severe complications. We report a very rare case of combined CRAO and CRVO in a patient with factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation (only 3 cases published). To our knowledge, this is the first case of combined CRAO and CRVO treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). Case and Results A 49-year-old woman presented with complaints of sudden loss of vision in her left eye (LE), with best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 1/20. A complete ophthalmic evaluation with fundus angiography showed combined CRAO and CRVO. The patient was urgently treated with HBOT (she completed a total of 9 sessions in 7 days), with marked visual acuity and angiographic improvement (BCVA of 10/10). Forty-five days later, she developed a new LE CRVO, and BCVA decreased to 5/10 and later to <1/20 because of significant macular edema. A detailed investigation showed an abnormal resistance to activated protein C, and a genetic study showed homozygosity for FVL mutation. The patient was submitted to 3 monthly injections of 1.25 mg bevacizumab. After 10 months, the patient is in a stable condition with BCVA of 6/10. Conclusions Combined CRAO and CRVO in young adults should be investigated thoroughly for embolic sources, thrombophilic disorders and local ocular conditions. This is the first case of this severe disease that was treated with HBOT, and the visual result was very good. PMID:26955350

  15. Assessment of conduit artery vasomotion using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanders, Karlis; Grabovskis, Andris; Marcinkevics, Zbignevs; Aivars, Juris Imants

    2013-11-01

    Vasomotion is a spontaneous oscillation of vascular tone. The phenomenon has been observed in small arterioles and capillaries as well as in the large conduit arteries. The layer of smooth muscle cells that surrounds a blood vessel can spontaneously and periodically change its tension and thereby the arterial wall stiffness also changes. As the understanding of the phenomenon is still rather obscure, researchers would benefit from a low-cost and reliable investigation technique such as photoplethysmography (PPG). PPG is an optical blood pulsation measurement technique that can offer substantial information about the arterial stiffness. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the usefulness of the PPG technique in the research of vasomotion and to investigate vasomotion in the relatively large conduit arteries. Continuous 15 minute long measurements of posterior tibial artery wall stiffness were taken. Artery diameter, electrocardiogram, blood pressure and respiration were also simultaneously registered. Fast Fourier Transform power spectra were calculated to identify unique stiffness oscillations that did not correspond to fluctuations in the systemic parameters and thus would indicate vasomotion. We concluded that photoplethysmography is a convenient method for the research of the vasomotion in large arteries. Local stiffness parameter b/a is more accurate to use and easier to measure than the pulse wave velocity which describes stiffness of a segment of an artery. Conduit arteries might exhibit a low amplitude high frequency vasomotion ( 9 to 27 cycles per minute). Low frequency vasomotion is problematic to distinguish from the passive oscillations imposed by the arterial pressure.

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen for the treatment of the rare combination of central retinal vein occlusion and cilioretinal artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Ali Riza Cenk; Kilavuzoglu, Ayse Ebru; Altiparmak, Ugur Emrah; Cosar, C Banu; Ozkiris, Abdullah

    2016-03-01

    A 43-year-old male presented with sudden onset of painless, blurred vision in his left eye. Dilated fundoscopic examination showed signs consistent with the diagnosis of a combination of central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO). He received daily 2-h sessions of hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT), 253 kPa for 14 days. At the end of the HBOT course, the patient's left visual acuity had improved from 20/200 to 20/20. Dilated fundoscopic examination showed that the intra-retinal haemorrhages in the entire retina and the retinal whitening along the course of the CLRA seen at presentation had completely resolved. The combination of CLRAO and CRVO comprises a discrete clinical entity. Even though there are many hypotheses concerning this condition, it is most likely the result of elevated intraluminal pressure in the retinal capillaries due to CRVO that exceeds the pressure in the CLRA. HBOT may be an effective treatment for CRVO-associated CLRAO. PMID:27044464

  17. Hierarchies of plant stiffness.

    PubMed

    Brulé, Veronique; Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Pasini, Damiano; Western, Tamara L

    2016-09-01

    Plants must meet mechanical as well as physiological and reproductive requirements for survival. Management of internal and external stresses is achieved through their unique hierarchical architecture. Stiffness is determined by a combination of morphological (geometrical) and compositional variables that vary across multiple length scales ranging from the whole plant to organ, tissue, cell and cell wall levels. These parameters include, among others, organ diameter, tissue organization, cell size, density and turgor pressure, and the thickness and composition of cell walls. These structural parameters and their consequences on plant stiffness are reviewed in the context of work on stems of the genetic reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), and the suitability of Arabidopsis as a model system for consistent investigation of factors controlling plant stiffness is put forward. Moving beyond Arabidopsis, the presence of morphological parameters causing stiffness gradients across length-scales leads to beneficial emergent properties such as increased load-bearing capacity and reversible actuation. Tailoring of plant stiffness for old and new purposes in agriculture and forestry can be achieved through bioengineering based on the knowledge of the morphological and compositional parameters of plant stiffness in combination with gene identification through the use of genetics. PMID:27457986

  18. Stiff limb syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Stiff limb syndrome is a clinical feature of the stiff person syndrome, which is a rare and disabling neurologic disorder characterized by muscle rigidity and episodic spasms that involve axial and limb musculature. It is an autoimmune disorder resulting in a malfunction of aminobutyric acid mediated inhibitory networks in the central nervous system. We describe a patient diagnosed by neurological symptoms of stiff limb syndrome with a good outcome after treatment, and a review of the related literature. Case presentation A 49-year-old male patient presented with a progressive stiffness and painful spasms of his both legs resulting in a difficulty of standing up and walking. The diagnosis of stiff limb syndrome was supported by the dramatically positive response to treatment using diazepam 25 mg/day and baclofen 30 mg/day. Conclusion This clinical case highlights the importance of a therapeutic test to confirm the diagnosis of stiff limb syndrome especially when there is a high clinical suspicion with unremarkable electromyography PMID:20205913

  19. A database of virtual healthy subjects to assess the accuracy of foot-to-foot pulse wave velocities for estimation of aortic stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Chowienczyk, Phil; Alastruey, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    While central (carotid-femoral) foot-to-foot pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered to be the gold standard for the estimation of aortic arterial stiffness, peripheral foot-to-foot PWV (brachial-ankle, femoral-ankle, and carotid-radial) are being studied as substitutes of this central measurement. We present a novel methodology to assess theoretically these computed indexes and the hemodynamics mechanisms relating them. We created a database of 3,325 virtual healthy adult subjects using a validated one-dimensional model of the arterial hemodynamics, with cardiac and arterial parameters varied within physiological healthy ranges. For each virtual subject, foot-to-foot PWV was computed from numerical pressure waveforms at the same locations where clinical measurements are commonly taken. Our numerical results confirm clinical observations: 1) carotid-femoral PWV is a good indicator of aortic stiffness and correlates well with aortic PWV; 2) brachial-ankle PWV overestimates aortic PWV and is related to the stiffness and geometry of both elastic and muscular arteries; and 3) muscular PWV (carotid-radial, femoral-ankle) does not capture the stiffening of the aorta and should therefore not be used as a surrogate for aortic stiffness. In addition, our analysis highlights that the foot-to-foot PWV algorithm is sensitive to the presence of reflected waves in late diastole, which introduce errors in the PWV estimates. In this study, we have created a database of virtual healthy subjects, which can be used to assess theoretically the efficiency of physiological indexes based on pulse wave analysis. PMID:26055792

  20. C-Reactive Protein is Associated with Aortic Stiffness in a Cohort of African American and White Women Transitioning through Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Woodard, Genevieve A.; Mehta, Vinay G.; Mackey, Rachel H.; Tepper, Ping; Kelsey, Sheryl F.; Newman, Anne B.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Objective Arterial stiffness is a marker of cardiovascular health. Arterial stiffness and C-reactive protein (CRP) are linked to cardiovascular outcomes. Increases in both inflammation and arterial stiffness are known to occur with menopause. The association between CRP and arterial stiffness is well accepted; however, no study has determined whether there are differences in this association by menopause status and race, independent of age. Methods The cross-sectional association between CRP and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), a validated measure of central arterial stiffening, was evaluated in 307 African American and White women enrolled in an ancillary study to the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation. Women were categorized into premenopausal or early perimenopausal (Pre/EP, n=185) and late perimenopausal or postmenopausal (LP/Post, n=122). Results Natural log transformed CRP was not associated with PWV in a linear regression model adjusted for age and cardiovascular risk factors (β=15.9, p=0.11). Moreover, models stratified by menopausal status showed a linear relationship between CRP and PWV among LP/Post women (β=36.2, p=0.049), but not for Pre/EP women (β=5.9, p=0.61). The menopausal status*logCRP and menopausal status*race interactions were significant in their respective models adjusted for age and risk factors (p=0.03 for both), however, when combined into one model, the two interactions were slightly attenuated (p=0.063 and 0.052, respectively). Conclusion Menopause is strengthening the association between CRP and PWV, independent of age, and this effect seems to be stronger among African American women. This study provides a potential mechanism for the increased risk of cardiovascular disease among postmenopausal women. PMID:21892111

  1. Reflectional transformation for structural stiffness

    SciTech Connect

    Vashi, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a structural reflection-related transformation for structural stiffness. The stiffness transformation addresses reflection of a structure about any of the three coordinate planes and renders the desired stiffness matrix using a stiffness matrix for the same structure before reflection. This transformation is elegant and simple, provides an efficient and technically rigorous approach to derive the required stiffness matrix without structural remodeling, and can be readily programmed to quickly perform the required matrix manipulations. 2 figs.

  2. Prognostic Significance of Central Pulse Pressure for Mortality in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Receiving Repeated Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mao-Jen; Chen, Chun-Yu; Lin, Hau-De; Lin, Chung-Sheng; Wu, Han-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a life-threatening medical emergency which needs urgent medical attention. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is common and necessary for patients with CAD, but it has not completely evaluated in cases with repeated PCI. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the risk factors and prognosis in patients with CAD requiring repeated PCI. This is a prospective observational study. A total of 1126 patients with CAD requiring PCI took part in this study. Clinical parameters including baseline characteristics, hemodynamic data, location of vascular lesions, SYNTAX score, left ventricular ejection fraction, central pulse pressure (CPP), central aortic systolic pressure (CSP), risk factors, and invasive strategies were analyzed to identify the risk factors for patients requiring repeated PCI. We further analyzed the prognosis, including risk for myocardial infarction (MI), cardiovascular (CV) mortality, and all-cause mortality, in patients with repeated PCI. Among patients with PCI, 276 received repeated PCI. Patients in the repeated PCI group had a higher CPP (66.7 vs 62.5 mm Hg; P = 0.006), CSP (139.9 vs 135.9 mm Hg; P = 0.017), and male preponderance (P = 0.012). Drugs including diuretics, beta-blockers (BBs), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), and aspirin were all used more frequently in the repeated PCI group (all P < 0.05). Freedom from MI was lower in the repeated PCI group than in the single PCI group (P < 0.001). Logistic regression revealed that CPP, CSP, number of diseased vessels, male sex, usage of diuretics, BBs, ACEIs, and MI were all predictors for requiring repeated PCI (all P < 0.05). In addition, CPP was a predictor for MI attack, CV mortality, and all-cause mortality in the repeated PCI group (P = 0.010, P = 0.041, P = 0.004, respectively). Elevated CPP, CSP, male sex, multiple diseased vessels, and the usage of diuretics, BBs, ACEIs, and MI

  3. Prognostic Significance of Central Pulse Pressure for Mortality in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Receiving Repeated Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mao-Jen; Chen, Chun-Yu; Lin, Hau-De; Lin, Chung-Sheng; Wu, Han-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a life-threatening medical emergency which needs urgent medical attention. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is common and necessary for patients with CAD, but it has not completely evaluated in cases with repeated PCI. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the risk factors and prognosis in patients with CAD requiring repeated PCI.This is a prospective observational study. A total of 1126 patients with CAD requiring PCI took part in this study. Clinical parameters including baseline characteristics, hemodynamic data, location of vascular lesions, SYNTAX score, left ventricular ejection fraction, central pulse pressure (CPP), central aortic systolic pressure (CSP), risk factors, and invasive strategies were analyzed to identify the risk factors for patients requiring repeated PCI. We further analyzed the prognosis, including risk for myocardial infarction (MI), cardiovascular (CV) mortality, and all-cause mortality, in patients with repeated PCI.Among patients with PCI, 276 received repeated PCI. Patients in the repeated PCI group had a higher CPP (66.7 vs 62.5 mm Hg; P = 0.006), CSP (139.9 vs 135.9 mm Hg; P = 0.017), and male preponderance (P = 0.012). Drugs including diuretics, beta-blockers (BBs), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), and aspirin were all used more frequently in the repeated PCI group (all P < 0.05). Freedom from MI was lower in the repeated PCI group than in the single PCI group (P < 0.001). Logistic regression revealed that CPP, CSP, number of diseased vessels, male sex, usage of diuretics, BBs, ACEIs, and MI were all predictors for requiring repeated PCI (all P < 0.05). In addition, CPP was a predictor for MI attack, CV mortality, and all-cause mortality in the repeated PCI group (P = 0.010, P = 0.041, P = 0.004, respectively).Elevated CPP, CSP, male sex, multiple diseased vessels, and the usage of diuretics, BBs, ACEIs, and MI were predictors

  4. Sensitivity of overall vehicle stiffness to local joint stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chon, Choon T.

    1987-01-01

    How overall vehicle stiffness is affected by local joint stiffness is discussed. By using the principle of virtual work and the minimum strain energy theorem, a closed form expression for the sensitivity coefficient was derived. The insensitivity of the vehicle stiffness to a particular joint, when its stiffness exceeds a certain value (or threshold value), was proven mathematically. In order to investigate the sensitivity of the structure to the joint stiffness, a so-called stick model was created, and the modeling technique is briefly described. Some data on joint stiffness of tested vehicles are also presented.

  5. [An accidental puncture of a small artery behind the internal jugular vein in real-time ultrasound-guided pediatric central venous cannulation].

    PubMed

    Kayashima, Kenji

    2013-02-01

    A baby girl, 15-month-old, 75.6 cm in height, and 7.5 kg in weight, was scheduled to undergo ventricular septal defect repair. The right IJV, 3.0 mm in thickness and 7.0 mm in depth, was punctured to place a central venous catheter with a 19-mm-long 24G puncture needle. Non-pulsatile bright red blood appeared during the 15.8-mm-long needle insertion and dark red blood appeared during the 14.7-mm-long needle insertion. The vertebral artery, 3.9 mm in width, lay 14.1 mm in depth. The 15.8-mm-long needle inserted at a 45-degree angle could reach about 11.3 mm deep perpendicularly from the skin surface. The 14.7-mm-long needle inserted at a 45-degree angle reached about 10.4 mm, which is near the posterior wall of the IJV It seemed that a small artery behind the IJV was punctured mistakenly. In withdrawing blood from a cyanotic patient, it may be difficult to judge if the blood was arterial because it was non-pulsatile when it appeared. We should be careful to know the existence of small arteries behind IJVs and to confirm which vessels the returned blood comes from. PMID:23479923

  6. Mechanisms of Improved Aortic Stiffness by Arotinolol in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wugang; Hong, Mona; Zhang, Ke; Chen, Dongrui; Han, Weiqing; Shen, Weili; Zhu, Dingliang; Gao, Pingjin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates the effects on aortic stiffness and vasodilation by arotinolol and the underlying mechanisms in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Methods The vasodilations of rat aortas, renal and mesenteric arteries were evaluated by isometric force recording. Nitric oxide (NO) was measured in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) by fluorescent probes. Sixteen-week old SHRs were treated with metoprolol (200 mg·kg-1·d-1), arotinolol (30 mg·kg-1·d-1) for 8 weeks. Central arterial pressure (CAP) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were evaluated via catheter pressure transducers. Collagen was assessed by immunohistochemistry and biochemistry assay, while endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and eNOS phosphorylation (p-eNOS) of HAECs or aortas were analyzed by western blotting. Results Arotinolol relaxed vascular rings and the relaxations were attenuated by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, NO synthase inhibitor) and the absence of endothelium. Furthermore, arotinolol-induced relaxations were attenuated by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, Kv channels blocker). Arotinolol produced more nitric oxide compared to metoprolol and increased the expression of p-eNOS in HAECs. These results indicated that arotinolol-induced vasodilation involves endothelium-derived NO and Kv channels. The treatement with arotinolol in 8 weeks, but not metoprolol, markedly decreased CAP and PWV. Biochemistry assay and immunohistochemistry showed that aortic collagen depositions in the arotinolol groups were reduced compared with SHRs with metoprolol. Moreover, eNOS phosphorylation was significantly increased in aortinolol-treated SHR compared with SHRs with metoprolol. Conclusions Arotinolol improves arterial stiffness in SHR, which involved in increasing NO and decreasing collagen contents in large arteries. PMID:24533142

  7. Measuring graphene's bending stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blees, Melina; Barnard, Arthur; Roberts, Samantha; Kevek, Joshua W.; Ruyack, Alexander; Wardini, Jenna; Ong, Peijie; Zaretski, Aliaksandr; Wang, Siping; McEuen, Paul L.

    2013-03-01

    Graphene's unusual combination of in-plane strength and out-of-plane flexibility makes it promising for mechanical applications. A key value is the bending stiffness, which microscopic theories and measurements of phonon modes in graphite put at κ0 = 1.2 eV.1 However, theories of the effects of thermal fluctuations in 2D membranes predict that the bending stiffness at longer length scales could be orders of magnitude higher.2,3 This macroscopic value has not been measured. Here we present the first direct measurement of monolayer graphene's bending stiffness, made by mechanically lifting graphene off a surface in a liquid and observing both motion induced by thermal fluctuations and the deflection caused by gravity's effect on added weights. These experiments reveal a value κeff = 12 keV at room temperature -- four orders of magnitude higher than κ0. These results closely match theoretical predictions of the effects of thermally-induced fluctuations which effectively thicken the membrane, dramatically increasing its bending stiffness at macroscopic length scales.

  8. Arterial Wave Reflection and Aortic Valve Calcification in an Elderly Community-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Sera, Fusako; Russo, Cesare; Iwata, Shinichi; Jin, Zhezhen; Rundek, Tatjana; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Homma, Shunichi; Sacco, Ralph L.; Di Tullio, Marco R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aortic valve calcification (AVC) without stenosis is common in the elderly, is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and may progress to aortic valve stenosis. Arterial stiffness and pulse wave reflection are important components of proximal aortic hemodynamics, but their relationship with AVC is not established. Methods To investigate the relationship of arterial wave reflection and stiffness with AVC, pulse wave analysis and AVC evaluation by echocardiography were performed in 867 participants from the Cardiovascular Abnormalities and Brain Lesions (CABL) study. Participants were divided into 4 categories based on the severity and extent of AVC: 1) none or mild focal AVC; 2) mild diffuse AVC; 3) moderate-severe focal AVC; and 4) moderate-severe diffuse AVC. Central blood pressures and pulse pressure, total arterial compliance, augmentation index, and time to wave reflection were assessed using applanation tonometry. Results Indicators of arterial stiffness and wave reflection were significantly associated with AVC severity, except for central systolic and diastolic pressures and time to reflection. After adjustment for pertinent covariates (age, sex, race/ethnicity, and eGFR), only augmentation pressure (P = .02) and augmentation index (P = .002) were associated with the severity of AVC. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that augmentation pressure (odds ratio per mmHg = 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.02–1.27; P = .02) and augmentation index (odds ratio per percentage point = 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 1.01–1.13; P = .02) were associated with an increase risk of moderate-severe diffuse AVC, even when central blood pressure value was included in the same model. Conclusions Arterial wave reflection is associated with AVC severity, independent of blood pressure values. Increased contribution of wave reflection to central blood pressure could be involved in the process leading to AVC. PMID:25600036

  9. Translocation of left inferior lobe pulmonary artery to the pulmonary artery trunk for central type non-small cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yifeng; Yang, Yang; Chen, Yong; Pan, Xufeng; Yang, Yu; Gao, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to report on a technique for translocation of the left inferior lobar pulmonary artery (PA) to the PA trunk associated with bronchial sleeve resection of the left superior lobe in the treatment of bronchogenic cancer. Methods The clinical data of four non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with translocation of the left inferior lobar PA to the PA trunk associated with bronchial sleeve resection of the left superior lobe was retrospectively reviewed between June 13, 2014 and June 8, 2015. A reconstruction of the left pulmonary arteries was performed by translocating the left inferior lobar PA to the PA trunk with end-to-side anastomosis, sleeve resection of bronchus, and systemic lymphadenectomy. Results Histology confirmed squamous carcinoma in these four cases. Stage pT3N2M0-IIIA was confirmed in 2 cases, pT3N1M0-IIIA in 1 case, and pT3N0M0-IIB in 1 case. No perioperative deaths or complications were observed. Four patients underwent postoperative chemotherapies, and the end of follow-ups date was Oct. 21, 2015. Conclusions Translocation of the left inferior lobar PA to the PA trunk is practicable as a lung-sparing procedure, despite being technically challenging. PMID:27162655

  10. Carotid and Aortic Stiffness in Patients with Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Meshkov, Alexey N.; Rozhkova, Tatyana A.; Kalinina, Maria V.; Deev, Alexander D.; Rogoza, Anatoliy N.; Balakhonova, Tatyana V.; Boytsov, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of plasma cholesterol in impairing arterial function and elasticity remains unclear. We evaluated arterial stiffness, measured locally in the common carotid artery by high-resolution echo-tracking, and aortic stiffness, using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) (the “gold-standard” measurement of arterial stiffness), in treatment-naive patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Methods The study included 66 patients with FH (10–66 years old) and 57 first-degree relatives without FH (11–61 years old). Carotid-femoral PWV was determined by SphygmoCor (AtCor, Australia). The parameters of carotid stiffness β-index, Peterson elastic modulus and local PWV were assessed with regard to the common carotid artery at a distance of 1cm from the bifurcation (AlokaProsound Alpha7, Japan). Results FH patients showed significantly higher β-index (6.3(4.8–8.2) vs. 5.2(4.2–6.4), p = 0.005), Ep (78(53–111) kPa vs. 62(48–79) kPa, p = 0.006), local PWV (5.4(4.5–6.4) m/c vs. 4.7(4.2–5.4) m/c, p = 0.005), but comparable values of carotid-femoral PWV (6.76(7.0–7.92) m/c vs. 6.48(6.16–7.12) m/c, p = 0.138). Carotid arteries and the aorta stiffened with age in patients with FH, but after 30 years, carotid arteries stiffened more significantly than the aorta. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that treatment-naive patients with FH had stiffer carotid arteries than their relatives, but showed no difference in aortic stiffness. We also found out that the rate of reduction of elasticity of the aorta and carotid arteries in FH patients varies: it is observed earlier in carotid arteries than in the aorta. PMID:27434535

  11. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  12. Stiff person syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, Shahrzad; Noyce, Alastair J; Leslie, R David; Giovannoni, Gavin

    2011-10-01

    Stiff person syndrome (SPS) is a rare disorder, characterised by fluctuating rigidity and stiffness of the axial and proximal lower limb muscles, with superimposed painful spasms and continuous motor unit activity on electromyography. Although rare in general neurology practice, once observed it is unforgettable. The general neurologist may see only one or two cases during his or her career and as such it remains underdiagnosed. Left untreated, SPS symptoms can progress to cause significant disability. Patients have a poor quality of life and an excess rate of comorbidity and mortality. The severity of symptoms and lack of public awareness of the condition create anxiety and uncertainty for people with the disease. This review aims to raise awareness of SPS and to improve the likelihood of its earlier diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21921002

  13. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  14. Tectorial Membrane Stiffness Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Emadi, Gulam; Getnick, Geoffrey; Quesnel, Alicia; Dallos, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear processes sound with high sensitivity and fine resolution over a wide frequency range. The underlying mechanism for this remarkable ability is the “cochlear amplifier”, which operates by modifying cochlear micromechanics. However, it is largely unknown how the cochlea implements this modification. Although gradual improvements in experimental techniques have yielded ever-better descriptions of gross basilar membrane vibration, the internal workings of the organ of Corti and of the tectorial membrane have resisted exploration. Although measurements of cochlear function in mice with a gene mutation for α-tectorin indicate the tectorial membrane's key role in the mechanoelectrical transformation by the inner ear, direct experimental data on the tectorial membrane's physical properties are limited, and only a few direct measurements on tectorial micromechanics are available. Using the hemicochlea, we are able to show that a tectorial membrane stiffness gradient exists along the cochlea, similar to that of the basilar membrane. In artificial perilymph (but with low calcium), the transversal and radial driving point stiffnesses change at a rate of –4.0 dB/mm and −4.9 dB/mm, respectively, along the length of the cochlear spiral. In artificial endolymph, the stiffness gradient for the transversal component was –3.4 dB/mm. Combined with the changes in tectorial membrane dimensions from base to apex, the radial stiffness changes would be able to provide a second frequency-place map in the cochlea. Young's modulus, which was obtained from measurements performed in the transversal direction, decreased by −2.6 dB/mm from base to apex. PMID:17496047

  15. [Time-delay to avoid: delayed recovery of a percutaneous central venous catheter fractured and embolized in the pulmonary artery].

    PubMed

    Sauro, Luigi; Sauro, Rosario; Manganelli, Fiore; Rotondi, Francesco

    2011-11-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old man with a fracture of the catheter of a port-a-cath, dislodged into the right atrium. Two days after the diagnosis, the fragment embolized into the lobar artery of the left lower lung lobe. The catheter was removed using a gooseneck snare. PMID:22120781

  16. Dynamically variable negative stiffness structures.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Christopher B; Shahan, David W; Smith, Sloan P; Keefe, Andrew C; McKnight, Geoffrey P

    2016-02-01

    Variable stiffness structures that enable a wide range of efficient load-bearing and dexterous activity are ubiquitous in mammalian musculoskeletal systems but are rare in engineered systems because of their complexity, power, and cost. We present a new negative stiffness-based load-bearing structure with dynamically tunable stiffness. Negative stiffness, traditionally used to achieve novel response from passive structures, is a powerful tool to achieve dynamic stiffness changes when configured with an active component. Using relatively simple hardware and low-power, low-frequency actuation, we show an assembly capable of fast (<10 ms) and useful (>100×) dynamic stiffness control. This approach mitigates limitations of conventional tunable stiffness structures that exhibit either small (<30%) stiffness change, high friction, poor load/torque transmission at low stiffness, or high power active control at the frequencies of interest. We experimentally demonstrate actively tunable vibration isolation and stiffness tuning independent of supported loads, enhancing applications such as humanoid robotic limbs and lightweight adaptive vibration isolators. PMID:26989771

  17. PC-PLC/sphingomyelin synthase activity plays a central role in the development of myogenic tone in murine resistance arteries

    PubMed Central

    Zacharia, Joseph; Fairfax, Seth; Wier, Withrow Gil

    2015-01-01

    Myogenic tone is an intrinsic property of the vasculature that contributes to blood pressure control and tissue perfusion. Earlier investigations assigned a key role in myogenic tone to phospholipase C (PLC) and its products, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG). Here, we used the PLC inhibitor, U-73122, and two other, specific inhibitors of PLC subtypes (PI-PLC and PC-PLC) to delineate the role of PLC in myogenic tone of pressurized murine mesenteric arteries. U-73122 inhibited depolarization-induced contractions (high external K+ concentration), thus confirming reports of nonspecific actions of U-73122 and its limited utility for studies of myogenic tone. Edelfosine, a specific inhibitor of PI-PLC, did not affect depolarization-induced contractions but modulated myogenic tone. Because PI-PLC produces IP3, we investigated the effect of blocking IP3 receptor-mediated Ca2+ release on myogenic tone. Incubation of arteries with xestospongin C did not affect tone, consistent with the virtual absence of Ca2+ waves in arteries with myogenic tone. D-609, an inhibitor of PC-PLC and sphingomyelin synthase, strongly inhibited myogenic tone and had no effect on depolarization-induced contraction. D-609 appeared to act by lowering cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration to levels below those that activate contraction. Importantly, incubation of pressurized arteries with a membrane-permeable analog of DAG induced vasoconstriction. The results therefore mandate a reexamination of the signaling pathways activated by the Bayliss mechanism. Our results suggest that PI-PLC and IP3 are not required in maintaining myogenic tone, but DAG, produced by PC-PLC and/or SM synthase, is likely through multiple mechanisms to increase Ca2+ entry and promote vasoconstriction. PMID:25888510

  18. Molecular Stiffness of Selectins*

    PubMed Central

    Sarangapani, Krishna K.; Marshall, Bryan T.; McEver, Rodger P.; Zhu, Cheng

    2011-01-01

    During inflammation, selectin-ligand interactions provide forces for circulating leukocytes to adhere to vascular surfaces, which stretch the interacting molecules, suggesting that mechanical properties may be pertinent to their biological function. From mechanical measurements with atomic force microscopy, we analyzed the molecular characteristics of selectins complexed with ligands and antibodies. Respective stiffness of L-, E-, and P-selectins (4.2, 1.4, and 0.85 piconewton/nm) correlated inversely with the number (2, 6, and 9) of consensus repeats in the selectin structures that acted as springs in series to dominate their compliance. After reconstitution into a lipid bilayer, purified membrane P-selectin remained a dimer, capable of forming dimeric bonds with P-selectin glycoprotein ligand (PSGL)-1, endoglycan-Ig, and a dimeric form of a glycosulfopeptide modeled after the N terminus of PSGL-1. By comparison, purified membrane L- and E-selectin formed only monomeric bonds under identical conditions. Ligands and antibodies were much less stretchable than selectins. The length of endoglycan-Ig was found to be 51 ± 12 nm. These results provide a comprehensive characterization of the molecular stiffness of selectins and illustrate how mechanical measurements can be utilized for molecular analysis, e.g. evaluating the multimericity of selectins and determining the molecular length of endoglycan. PMID:21216951

  19. Intra-aortic balloon pumping reduces the increased arterial load caused by acute cardiac depression, modifying central and peripheral load determinants in a time- and flow-related way.

    PubMed

    Bia, Daniel; Cabrera-Fischer, Edmundo I; Zócalo, Yanina; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2012-09-01

    The mechanisms that explain intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP) effects are not completely understood, and attributing them only to pressure-associated changes in cardiac function would be an oversimplification. Since IABP modifies the aortic and systemic blood-flow pattern, flow-related effects could be expected. To characterize effects of acute heart failure (AHF) on the arterial biomechanics; IABP effects on the arterial biomechanics during AHF, and their potential time-dependence; the association between hemodynamics and biomechanical changes during AHF and IABP. Sheep (n = 6) aortic pressure, flow, and diameter were measured: (1) before (Basal) and (2) 1-3 (HF(1-3)) and 28-30 (HF(28-30)) min after starting halothane to induce AHF; and (3) at specific times (1-3, 14-15 and 28-30 min) during IABP assistance. Calculus: aortic characteristic impedance (Z(c)), beta stiffness (β), incremental (E(INC)) and pressure-strain elastic modulus (E(P)); total arterial compliance (C(G)), total systemic vascular resistance and wave propagation parameters. (1) AHF resulted in an acute increase in aortic and systemic stiffness (HF(28-30) % changes with respect to Basal conditions: β +217%, E (P) +143%, E(INC) +101%, Z(c) +52%, C(G) -13%), associated with the reduction in the aortic blood flow; (2) during AHF IABP resulted in acute beneficial changes aortic and systemic biomechanics (% changes in IABP(1-3) with respect HF(28-30): β -62%, E(P) -68%, E (INC) -66%, Z(c) -38%, C(G) 66%), and in wave propagation parameters, (3) IABP-related changes were time-dependent and associated with changes in aortic blood flow. Aortic and systemic biomechanical and impedance properties are detrimentally modified during AHF, being the changes rapidly reverted during IABP. IABP-related beneficial changes in arterial biomechanics were time-dependent and associated with IABP capability to increase blood flow. PMID:22068608

  20. Vascular Smooth Muscle Sirtuin-1 Protects Against Diet-Induced Aortic Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Fry, Jessica L; Al Sayah, Leona; Weisbrod, Robert M; Van Roy, Isabelle; Weng, Xiang; Cohen, Richard A; Bachschmid, Markus M; Seta, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Arterial stiffness, a major cardiovascular risk factor, develops within 2 months in mice fed a high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet, serving as a model of human metabolic syndrome, and it is associated with activation of proinflammatory and oxidant pathways in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. Sirtuin-1 (SirT1) is an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase regulated by the cellular metabolic status. Our goal was to study the effects of VSM SirT1 on arterial stiffness in the context of diet-induced metabolic syndrome. Overnight fasting acutely decreased arterial stiffness, measured in vivo by pulse wave velocity, in mice fed HFHS for 2 or 8 months, but not in mice lacking SirT1 in VSM (SMKO). Similarly, VSM-specific genetic SirT1 overexpression (SMTG) prevented pulse wave velocity increases induced by HFHS feeding, during 8 months. Administration of resveratrol or S17834, 2 polyphenolic compounds known to activate SirT1, prevented HFHS-induced arterial stiffness and were mimicked by global SirT1 overexpression (SirT1 bacterial artificial chromosome overexpressor), without evident metabolic improvements. In addition, HFHS-induced pulse wave velocity increases were reversed by 1-week treatment with a specific, small molecule SirT1 activator (SRT1720). These beneficial effects of pharmacological or genetic SirT1 activation, against HFHS-induced arterial stiffness, were associated with a decrease in nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) activation and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) and p47phox protein expressions, in aorta and VSM cells. In conclusion, VSM SirT1 activation decreases arterial stiffness in the setting of obesity by stimulating anti-inflammatory and antioxidant pathways in the aorta. SirT1 activators may represent a novel therapeutic approach to prevent arterial stiffness and associated cardiovascular complications in overweight/obese individuals with metabolic syndrome. PMID:27432859

  1. Central hemodynamics in risk assessment strategies: additive value over and above brachial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Yannoutsos, Alexandra; Rinaldi, Elisa R; Zhang, Yi; Protogerou, Athanassios D; Safar, Michel E; Blacher, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Although the clinical relevance of brachial blood pressure (BP) measurement for cardiovascular (CV) risk stratification is nowadays widely accepted, this approach can nevertheless present several limitations. Pulse pressure (PP) amplification accounts for the notable increase in PP from central to peripheral arterial sites. Target organs are more greatly exposed to central hemodynamic changes than peripheral organs. The pathophysiological significance of local BP pulsatility, which has a role in the pathogenesis of target organ damage in both the macro- and the microcirculation, may therefore not be accurately captured by brachial BP as traditionally evaluated with cuff measurements. The predictive value of central systolic BP and PP over brachial BP for major clinical outcomes has been demonstrated in the general population, in elderly adults and in patients at high CV risk, irrespective of the invasive or non-invasive methods used to assess central BP. Aortic stiffness, timing and intensity of wave reflections, and cardiac performance appear as major factors influencing central PP. Great emphasis has been placed on the role of aortic stiffness, disturbed arterial wave reflections and their intercorrelation in the pathophysiological mechanisms of CV diseases as well as on their capacity to predict target organ damage and clinical events. Comorbidities and age-related changes, together with gender-related specificities of arterial and cardiac parameters, are known to affect the predictive ability of central hemodynamics on individual CV risk. PMID:25341861

  2. Dynamically variable negative stiffness structures

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Christopher B.; Shahan, David W.; Smith, Sloan P.; Keefe, Andrew C.; McKnight, Geoffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Variable stiffness structures that enable a wide range of efficient load-bearing and dexterous activity are ubiquitous in mammalian musculoskeletal systems but are rare in engineered systems because of their complexity, power, and cost. We present a new negative stiffness–based load-bearing structure with dynamically tunable stiffness. Negative stiffness, traditionally used to achieve novel response from passive structures, is a powerful tool to achieve dynamic stiffness changes when configured with an active component. Using relatively simple hardware and low-power, low-frequency actuation, we show an assembly capable of fast (<10 ms) and useful (>100×) dynamic stiffness control. This approach mitigates limitations of conventional tunable stiffness structures that exhibit either small (<30%) stiffness change, high friction, poor load/torque transmission at low stiffness, or high power active control at the frequencies of interest. We experimentally demonstrate actively tunable vibration isolation and stiffness tuning independent of supported loads, enhancing applications such as humanoid robotic limbs and lightweight adaptive vibration isolators. PMID:26989771

  3. A new noninvasive device for measuring central ejection dP/dt mathematical foundation of cardiac dP/dt measurement using a model for a collapsible artery.

    PubMed

    Gorenberg, Miguel; Rotztein, Hector; Marmor, Alon

    2009-03-01

    We have developed a novel non-invasive device for the measurement of one of the most sensitive indices of myocardial contractility as represented by the rate of increase of intraventricular pressure (left ventricular dP/dt and arterial dP/dt performance index (dP/dt(ejc)). Up till now, these parameters could be obtained only by invasive catheterization methods. The new technique is based on the concept of applying multiple successive occlusive pressures on the brachial artery from peak systole to diastole using a inflatable cuff and plotting the values against time intervals that leads to the reconstruction of the central aortic pressure noninvasively. The following describes the computer simulator developed for providing a mathematical foundation of the new sensor. At the core of the simulator lies a hemodynamic model of the blood flow on an artery under externally applied pressure. The purpose of the model is to reproduce the experimental results obtained in studies on patients (Gorenberg et al. in Cardiovasc Eng: 305-311, 2004; Gorenberg et al. in Emerg med J 22 (7): 486-489, 2005) and a animal model where ischemia resulted from balloon inflation during coronary catheterization (Gorenberg and Marmor in J Med Eng Technol, 2006) and to describe correlations between the dP/dt(ejc) and other hemodynamic variables. The model has successfully reproduced the trends observed experimentally, providing a solid in-depth understanding of the hemodynamics involved in the new measurement. A high correlation between the dP/dt(ejc) and the rate of pressure rise in the aorta during the ejection phase was observed. dP/dt(ejc) dependence on other hemodynamic parameters was also investigated. PMID:19259812

  4. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ta-Chen; Torng, Pao-Ling; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chen, Ming-Fong; Liau, Chiau-Suong

    2011-01-01

    Background: Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited. Methods: This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD), compliance (BAC), and resistance (BAR). Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured. Results: Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity. Conclusion: Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than omnivores. Prevention of vitamin B12 deficiency might be beneficial for cardiovascular health in vegetarians. PMID:21915169

  5. Thoracic epidural anesthesia during coronary artery bypass surgery: effects on cardiac sympathetic activity, myocardial blood flow and metabolism, and central hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kirnö, K; Friberg, P; Grzegorczyk, A; Milocco, I; Ricksten, S E; Lundin, S

    1994-12-01

    The effects of high thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity, myocardial blood flow and metabolism, and central hemodynamics were studied in 20 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). In 10 of the patients, TEA (T1-5 block) was used as an adjunct to a standardized fentanyl-nitrous oxide anesthesia. Hemodynamic measurements and blood sampling were performed after induction of anesthesia but prior to skin incision and after sternotomy. Assessment of total and cardiac sympathetic activity was performed by means of the norepinephrine kinetic approach. Prior to surgery, mean arterial pressure (MAP), great cardiac vein flow (GCVF), and regional myocardial oxygen consumption (Reg-MVO2) were lower in the TEA group compared to the control group. During sternotomy there was a pronounced increase in cardiac norepinephrine spillover, MAP, systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), GCVF, and Reg-MVO2 in the control group. These changes were clearly attenuated in the TEA group. None of the patients in the TEA group had metabolic (lactate) or electrocardiographic signs of myocardial ischemia. Three patients in the control group had indices of myocardial ischemia prior to and/or during surgery. We conclude that TEA attenuates the surgically mediated sympathetic stress response to sternotomy, thereby preventing the increase in myocardial oxygen demand in the pre-bypass period without jeopardizing myocardial perfusion. PMID:7978429

  6. Pulmonary vascular wall stiffness: An important contributor to the increased right ventricular afterload with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijie; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with structural and mechanical changes in the pulmonary vascular bed that increase right ventricular (RV) afterload. These changes, characterized by narrowing and stiffening, occur in both proximal and distal pulmonary arteries (PAs). An important consequence of arterial narrowing is increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Arterial stiffening, which can occur in both the proximal and distal pulmonary arteries, is an important index of disease progression and is a significant contributor to increased RV afterload in PH. In particular, arterial narrowing and stiffening increase the RV afterload by increasing steady and oscillatory RV work, respectively. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the causes and consequences of pulmonary arterial stiffening in PH and its impact on RV function. We review direct and indirect techniques for measuring proximal and distal pulmonary arterial stiffness, measures of arterial stiffness including elastic modulus, incremental elastic modulus, stiffness coefficient β and others, the changes in cellular function and the extracellular matrix proteins that contribute to pulmonary arterial stiffening, the consequences of PA stiffening for RV function and the clinical implications of pulmonary vascular stiffening for PH progression. Future investigation of the relationship between PA stiffening and RV dysfunction may facilitate new therapies aimed at improving RV function and thus ultimately reducing mortality in PH. PMID:22034607

  7. The relationship between adiposity-associated inflammation and coronary artery and abdominal aortic calcium differs by strata of central adiposity: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    PubMed

    Hughes-Austin, Jan M; Wassel, Christina L; Jiménez, Jessica; Criqui, Michael H; Ix, Joachim H; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Budoff, Matthew J; Jenny, Nancy S; Allison, Matthew A

    2014-06-01

    Adipokines regulate metabolic processes linked to coronary artery (CAC) and abdominal aorta calcification (AAC). Because adipokine and other adiposity-associated inflammatory marker (AAIM) secretions differ between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue, we hypothesized that central adiposity modifies associations between AAIMs and CAC and AAC. We evaluated 1878 MESA participants with complete measures of AAIMs, anthropometry, CAC, and AAC. Associations of AAIMs with CAC and AAC prevalence and severity were analyzed per standard deviation of predictors (SD) using log binomial and linear regression models. The waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) was dichotomized at median WHR values based on sex/ethnicity. CAC and AAC prevalence were defined as any calcium (Agatston score >0). Severity was defined as ln (Agatston score). Analyses examined interactions with WHR and were adjusted for traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. Each SD higher interleukin-6 (IL-6), fibrinogen and CRP was associated with 5% higher CAC prevalence; and each SD higher IL-6 and fibrinogen was associated with 4% higher AAC prevalence. Associations of IL-6 and fibrinogen with CAC severity, but not CAC prevalence, were significantly different among WHR strata. Median-and-above WHR: each SD higher IL-6 was associated with 24.8% higher CAC severity. Below-median WHR: no association (p interaction=0.012). Median-and-above WHR: each SD higher fibrinogen was associated with 19.6% higher CAC severity. Below-median WHR: no association (p interaction=0.034). Adiponectin, leptin, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were not associated with CAC or AAC prevalence or severity. These results support findings that adiposity-associated inflammation is associated with arterial calcification, and further add that central adiposity may modify this association. PMID:24907349

  8. Effect of Pressure on Liver Stiffness During the Development of Liver Fibrosis in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen Bo; Xu, Qing Hua; Jiao, Zi Yu; Wu, Rong; Song, Qing; Luo, Yu Kun

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether hepatic arterial pressure and portal pressure have an effect on liver stiffness during the development of liver fibrosis. Liver fibrosis was induced in 50 healthy New Zealand white rabbits. Laparotomy was performed to measure liver stiffness, and the portal vein and hepatic artery were successively ligated to repeat the measurements. A significant difference was observed among liver stiffness values measured at different time points (F = 22.82, p < 0.001). Differences between original liver stiffness and liver stiffness measured after portal ligation were positively correlated with portal pressure (r = 0.801, p < 0.001). In animals with grade 4 liver fibrosis, the increase in liver stiffness caused by pressure was greater than that caused by extracellular matrix accumulation (p = 0.002). In conclusion, hepatic arterial pressure and portal pressure have a significant effect on liver stiffness during the development of liver fibrosis. PMID:26497767

  9. Rho-kinase mediated cytoskeletal stiffness in skinned smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Bo; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jenny; Pascoe, Chris D.; Norris, Brandon A.; Liu, Jeffrey C.-Y.; Solomon, Dennis; Paré, Peter D.; Deng, Linhong

    2013-01-01

    The structurally dynamic cytoskeleton is important in many cell functions. Large gaps still exist in our knowledge regarding what regulates cytoskeletal dynamics and what underlies the structural plasticity. Because Rho-kinase is an upstream regulator of signaling events leading to phosphorylation of many cytoskeletal proteins in many cell types, we have chosen this kinase as the focus of the present study. In detergent skinned tracheal smooth muscle preparations, we quantified the proteins eluted from the muscle cells over time and monitored the muscle's ability to respond to acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation to produce force and stiffness. In a partially skinned preparation not able to generate active force but could still stiffen upon ACh stimulation, we found that the ACh-induced stiffness was independent of calcium and myosin light chain phosphorylation. This indicates that the myosin light chain-dependent actively cycling crossbridges are not likely the source of the stiffness. The results also indicate that Rho-kinase is central to the ACh-induced stiffness, because inhibition of the kinase by H1152 (1 μM) abolished the stiffening. Furthermore, the rate of relaxation of calcium-induced stiffness in the skinned preparation was faster than that of ACh-induced stiffness, with or without calcium, suggesting that different signaling pathways lead to different means of maintenance of stiffness in the skinned preparation. PMID:24072407

  10. The Use of the Ratio between the Veno-arterial Carbon Dioxide Difference and the Arterial-venous Oxygen Difference to Guide Resuscitation in Cardiac Surgery Patients with Hyperlactatemia and Normal Central Venous Oxygen Saturation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Long, Yun; Wang, Xiao-Ting; Liu, Da-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background: After cardiac surgery, central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) and serum lactate concentration are often used to guide resuscitation; however, neither are completely reliable indicators of global tissue hypoxia. This observational study aimed to establish whether the ratio between the veno-arterial carbon dioxide and the arterial-venous oxygen differences (P(v−a)CO2/C(a−v)O2) could predict whether patients would respond to resuscitation by increasing oxygen delivery (DO2). Methods: We selected 72 patients from a cohort of 290 who had undergone cardiac surgery in our institution between January 2012 and August 2014. The selected patients were managed postoperatively on the Intensive Care Unit, had a normal ScvO2, elevated serum lactate concentration, and responded to resuscitation by increasing DO2 by >10%. As a consequence, 48 patients responded with an increase in oxygen consumption (VO2) while VO2 was static or fell in 24. Results: At baseline and before resuscitative intervention in postoperative cardiac surgery patients, a P(v−a)CO2/C(a−v)O2 ratio ≥1.6 mmHg/ml predicted a positive VO2 response to an increase in DO2 of >10% with a sensitivity of 68.8% and a specificity of 87.5%. Conclusions: P(v−a)CO2/C(a−v)O2 ratio appears to be a reliable marker of global anaerobic metabolism and predicts response to DO2 challenge. Thus, patients likely to benefit from resuscitation can be identified promptly, the P(v−a)CO2/C(a−v)O2 ratio may, therefore, be a useful resuscitation target. PMID:25963349

  11. DPP-4 Inhibitor Reduces Central Blood Pressure in a Diabetic and Hypertensive Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cosenso-Martin, Luciana Neves; Giollo-Junior, Luiz Tadeu; Vilela-Martin, José Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) are among the main risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease. Pharmacotherapy for DM should not only improve blood glucose control, but also provide beneficial glucose-independent cardiovascular effects. The central systolic blood pressure (SBP) has become more important than the brachial SBP in the assessment of cardiovascular risk.This case report describes the effect of vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, on the central SBP in a 54-year-old woman with hypertension and DM. She was submitted to applanation tonometry (AT) before and after vildagliptin association. AT of the radial artery is a non-invasive method that indirectly assesses arterial stiffness by calculating the central SBP and the augmentation index (AIx).After 3 months of follow-up using vildagliptin, central SBP and AIx were improved. Moreover, she presented better glycemic control.This case suggests an effect of DPP-4 inhibitor on arterial stiffness parameter (central SBP) in a hypertensive and diabetic patient, which shows a glucose-independent beneficial cardiovascular effect of this group of drugs. PMID:26166078

  12. Arterial embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... the artery (arterial bypass) to create a second source of blood supply Clot removal through a balloon catheter placed into the affected artery or through open surgery on the artery (embolectomy) Opening of the ...

  13. Stiffness adaptations in shod running.

    PubMed

    Divert, Carolyn; Baur, Heiner; Mornieux, Guillaume; Mayer, Frank; Belli, Alain

    2005-11-01

    When mechanical parameters of running are measured, runners have to be accustomed to testing conditions. Nevertheless, habituated runners could still show slight evolutions of their patterns at the beginning of each new running bout. This study investigated runners' stiffness adjustments during shoe and barefoot running and stiffness evolutions of shoes. Twenty-two runners performed two 4-minute bouts at 3.61 m.s-1 shod and barefoot after a 4-min warm-up period. Vertical and leg stiffness decreased during the shoe condition but remained stable in the barefoot condition, p < 0.001. Moreover, an impactor test showed that shoe stiffness increased significantly during the first 4 minutes, p < 0.001. Beyond the 4th minute, shoe properties remained stable. Even if runners were accustomed to the testing condition, as running pattern remained stable during barefoot running, they adjusted their leg and vertical stiffness during shoe running. Moreover, as measurements were taken after a 4-min warm-up period, it could be assumed that shoe properties were stable. Then the stiffness adjustment observed during shoe running might be due to further habituations of the runners to the shod condition. To conclude, it makes sense to run at least 4 minutes before taking measurements in order to avoid runners' stiffness alteration due to shoe property modifications. However, runners could still adapt to the shoe. PMID:16498177

  14. Stiffness characteristics of longwall shields

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M.; Schwemmer, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Since longwall strata activity is characterized by roof-to-floor and face-to-waste displacements, a model with two degrees of freedom was used to describe the load-displacement relationship of the shield structure. The model considers the support as an elastic body and relates horizontal and vertical resultant forces acting on the support to associated displacements as a function of the stiffness of the support structure. Stiffness coefficients under full canopy and base contact configurations were determined by controlled displacement loading of longwall shields in the Bureau's Mine Roof Simulator. These two-legged longwall shields of different manufacture were investigated. The stiffness characteristics of these shields were evaluated relative to two parameters, namely, shield height and setting pressure. The tests results indicate a reduction in shield stiffness for increasing height. Setting pressure was found to have less of an effect on shield stiffness, producing only a slight increase in stiffness as setting pressure increased. Similar trends were observed for all three shields, indicating a similarity in stiffness characteristics for shields of the same basic configuration.

  15. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  16. Stiffness characteristics of longwall shields

    SciTech Connect

    Bayczak, T.M.; Schwemmer, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The stiffness characteristics of longwall shields have been investigated the this study. Since longwall strata activity is characterized by roof-to-floor and face-to-waste displacements, a model with two degrees of freedom is used to describe the load-displacement relationship of the shield structure. The model considers the support as an elastic body and relates horizontal and vertical resultant forces acting on the support to associated displacements as a function of the stiffness of the support structure. Stiffness coefficients under full canopy and base contact configurations have been determined.

  17. Arterial Remodeling Associates with CKD Progression

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Cédric; Karras, Alexandre; Laurent, Stéphane; Bozec, Erwan; Jacquot, Christian; Stengel, Bénédicte; Houillier, Pascal; Froissart, Marc; Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    In CKD, large arteries remodel and become increasingly stiff. The greater pulsatile pressure reaching the glomerulus as a result of increased aortic stiffness could induce renal damage, suggesting that the stiffening and remodeling of large arteries could affect the progression of CKD. We measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, aortic pressure and carotid remodeling and stiffness parameters in 180 patients with CKD (mean measured GFR, 32 ml/min per 1.73 m2) and followed them prospectively for a mean of 3.1 years. During follow-up, carotid stiffness significantly increased (+0.28 ± 0.05 m/s; P < 0.0001) but aortic stiffness did not. Carotid intima-media thickness decreased significantly during follow-up and the internal diameter of the carotid increased, producing increased circumferential wall stress (+2.08 ± 0.43 kPa/yr; P < 0.0001). In a linear mixed model, circumferential wall stress significantly associated with faster GFR decline after adjustment for risk factors of cardiovascular disease and progression of CKD. In a multivariable Cox model, carotid circumferential wall stress and pulse pressure independently associated with higher risk for ESRD. None of the arterial stiffness parameters associated with progression of CKD. In conclusion, maladaptive remodeling of the carotid artery and increased pulse pressure independently associate with faster decline of renal function and progression to ESRD. PMID:21493771

  18. Sedentary Behavior and Light Physical Activity Are Associated with Brachial and Central Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gerage, Aline M.; Benedetti, Tania R. B.; Farah, Breno Q.; Santana, Fábio da S.; Ohara, David; Andersen, Lars B.; Ritti-Dias, Raphael M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical activity is recommended as a part of a comprehensive lifestyle approach in the treatment of hypertension, but there is a lack of data about the relationship between different intensities of physical activity and cardiovascular parameters in hypertensive patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between the time spent in physical activities of different intensities and blood pressure levels, arterial stiffness and autonomic modulation in hypertensive patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 87 hypertensive patients (57.5 ± 9.9 years of age) had their physical activity assessed over a 7 day period using an accelerometer and the time spent in sedentary activities, light physical activities, moderate physical activities and moderate-to-vigorous physical activities was obtained. The primary outcomes were brachial and central blood pressure. Arterial stiffness parameters (augmentation index and pulse wave velocity) and cardiac autonomic modulation (sympathetic and parasympathetic modulation in the heart) were also obtained as secondary outcomes. Results Sedentary activities and light physical activities were positively and inversely associated, respectively, with brachial systolic (r = 0.56; P < 0.01), central systolic (r = 0.51; P < 0.05), brachial diastolic (r = 0.45; P < 0.01) and central diastolic (r = 0.42; P < 0.05) blood pressures, after adjustment for sex, age, trunk fat, number of antihypertensive drugs, accelerometer wear time and moderate-to-vigorous physical activities. Arterial stiffness parameters and cardiac autonomic modulation were not associated with the time spent in sedentary activities and in light physical activities (P > 0.05). Conclusion Lower time spent in sedentary activities and higher time spent in light physical activities are associated with lower blood pressure, without affecting arterial stiffness and cardiac autonomic modulation in hypertensive patients. PMID:26717310

  19. Women Have Significantly Greater Difference Between Central and Peripheral Arterial Pressure Compared to Men: The Bogalusa Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Rebecca Clark; Sander, Gary; Fernandez, Camilo; Chen, Wei; Berenson, Gerald; Giles, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Gender differences in the relationship between central and peripheral BP are not well described. We sought to investigate gender differences between central systolic blood pressure (cSBP) and peripheral systolic blood pressure (pSBP) in adults in the Bogalusa study population. Methods This study enrolled adults in a cross sectional survey conducted in 2007–2010. BP was measured with a standard cuff and Omron applanation tonometer. Data were available from 876 participants. Results Participants were 57.9% female and 42.1% male (mean age 43.5 years ± 4.4). Mean (SD) for cSBP-pSBP was 1.0 (6.9) for males and 7.4 (5.2) for females (p<0.001). Augmentation index (AI) was higher in women (men: 70.8±14 vs. women: 85.5±13; p<0.01), as well as augmentation index standardized to heart rate (HR) of 75 (AI@75) (men: 68.5±13 vs. women: 84.4±11.8; p<0.01). Conclusions Female participants had greater difference between cSBP and pSBP than males. This suggests that given similar peripheral BP females might be at higher risk for developing target organ damage. Women in this study had higher AI, which may contribute to the difference found between cSBP and pSBP. These findings may explain why women have more age-related left ventricular hypertrophy, and poorer prognosis following myocardial infarction compared to males. PMID:23850194

  20. Effect of Different Phases of Menstrual Cycle on Reflection Index, Stiffness index and Pulse wave velocity in Healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    TA, Sandhya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Arterial compliance will result in stabilizing the fluctuations in arterial pressure and blood flow. So arterial stiffness can be a good indicator for monitoring the cardiovascular system. Arterial stiffness can be measured using indices like reflection index (RI), stiffness index (SI) and Brachial Finger Pulse Wave Velocity (BFPWV). Objectives: Aim of our study was to evaluate the changes in RI, SI and BFPWV during different phases of the menstrual cycle and to correlate RI with SI in healthy female subjects between the age group of 18-30 years from Bangalore, India. Materials and Methods: Basal recordings of RI and SI were determined by Photo Pulse Plethysmography (PPG) picked up from the fingertip using BIOPAC system and BFPWV was obtained using Doppler. Recordings were obtained at three different time points during the menstrual cycle. Analysis was done using repeated measures ANOVA with Bonferroni correction. Result: There was a significant decrease in above parameters p <0.05 during the mid-cycle. Correlation between RI and SI was also significant p<0.05. Conclusion: These findings suggests that the menstrual cycle affects the arterial stiffness and one of the factor is oestrogen. Hence, women are less prone to the incidence of cardiovascular diseases before menopause. Screening for arterial stiffness in a general population, using these indices is valid, economical and reliable. PMID:25386420

  1. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of a Transparent Antimicrobial Dressing for Managing Central Venous and Arterial Catheters in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Bernatchez, Stéphanie F.; Ruckly, Stéphane; Timsit, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Objective To model the cost-effectiveness impact of routine use of an antimicrobial chlorhexidine gluconate-containing securement dressing compared to non-antimicrobial transparent dressings for the protection of central vascular lines in intensive care unit patients. Design This study uses a novel health economic model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of using the chlorhexidine gluconate dressing versus transparent dressings in a French intensive care unit scenario. The 30-day time non-homogeneous markovian model comprises eight health states. The probabilities of events derive from a multicentre (12 French intensive care units) randomized controlled trial. 1,000 Monte Carlo simulations of 1,000 patients per dressing strategy are used for probabilistic sensitivity analysis and 95% confidence intervals calculations. The outcome is the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections avoided. Costs of intensive care unit stay are based on a recent French multicentre study and the cost-effectiveness criterion is the cost per catheter-related bloodstream infections avoided. The incremental net monetary benefit per patient is also estimated. Patients 1000 patients per group simulated based on the source randomized controlled trial involving 1,879 adults expected to require intravascular catheterization for 48 hours. Intervention Chlorhexidine Gluconate-containing securement dressing compared to non-antimicrobial transparent dressings. Results The chlorhexidine gluconate dressing prevents 11.8 infections /1,000 patients (95% confidence interval: [3.85; 19.64]) with a number needed to treat of 85 patients. The mean cost difference per patient of €141 is not statistically significant (95% confidence interval: [€-975; €1,258]). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is of €12,046 per catheter-related bloodstream infection prevented, and the incremental net monetary benefit per patient is of €344.88. Conclusions According to the base case scenario, the

  2. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ELBOW STIFFNESS

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Luis Alfredo Gómez; Dal Molin, Fabio Farina; Visco, Adalberto; Fernandes, Luis Filipe Daneu; dos Santos, Murilo Cunha Rafael; Cardozo Filho, Nivaldo Souza; Gómez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    To present the arthroscopic surgical technique and the evaluation of the results from this technique for treating elbow stiffness. Methods: Between April 2007 and January 2010, ten elbows of ten patients with elbow stiffness underwent arthroscopic treatment to release the range of motion. The minimum follow-up was 11 months, with an average of 27 months. All the patients were male and their average age was 32.8 years (ranging from 22 to 48 years). After the arthroscopic treatment, they were followed up weekly in the first month and every three months thereafter. The clinical evaluation was made using the criteria of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Results: All the patients were satisfied with the results from the arthroscopic treatment. The average UCLA score was 33.8 points. Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment for elbow stiffness is a minimally invasive surgical technique that was shown to be efficient for treating this complication. PMID:27027027

  3. Arterial stick

    MedlinePlus

    ... venous blood) mainly in its content of dissolved gases . Testing arterial blood shows the makeup of the ... arteries. Blood samples are mainly taken to measure gases in the arteries. Abnormal results may point to ...

  4. Growing-Related Changes in Arterial Properties of Healthy Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Nonexposed to Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Analysis of Gender-Related Differences.

    PubMed

    Curcio, S; García-Espinosa, V; Arana, M; Farro, I; Chiesa, P; Giachetto, G; Zócalo, Y; Bia, D

    2016-01-01

    The aims of our work were to determine normal aging rates for structural and functional arterial parameters in healthy children, adolescents, and young adults and to identify gender-related differences in these aging rates. Methods. 161 subjects (mean: 15 years (range: 4-28 years), 69 females) were studied. Subjects included had no congenital or chronic diseases, nor had they been previously exposed to traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Arterial parameters assessed were (1) central blood pressure (BP) and aortic pulse wave analysis, (2) arterial local (pressure-strain elastic modulus) and regional (pulse wave velocity, PWV) stiffness, and (3) arterial diameters and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). Simple linear regression models (age as the independent variable) were obtained for all the parameters and the resulting rates of change were compared between genders. Results. No gender-related differences were found in mean values of arterial structural and functional parameters in prepubertal ages (4-8 years), but they started to appear at ~15 years. Boys showed a greater rate of change for central systolic BP, central pulse pressure, CIMT, and carotid-femoral PWV. Conclusion. Gender-related differences in arterial characteristics of adults can be explained on the basis of different growing-related patterns between boys and girls, with no existing differences in prepubertal ages. PMID:26989504

  5. Growing-Related Changes in Arterial Properties of Healthy Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Nonexposed to Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Analysis of Gender-Related Differences

    PubMed Central

    Curcio, S.; García-Espinosa, V.; Arana, M.; Farro, I.; Chiesa, P.; Giachetto, G.; Zócalo, Y.; Bia, D.

    2016-01-01

    The aims of our work were to determine normal aging rates for structural and functional arterial parameters in healthy children, adolescents, and young adults and to identify gender-related differences in these aging rates. Methods. 161 subjects (mean: 15 years (range: 4–28 years), 69 females) were studied. Subjects included had no congenital or chronic diseases, nor had they been previously exposed to traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Arterial parameters assessed were (1) central blood pressure (BP) and aortic pulse wave analysis, (2) arterial local (pressure-strain elastic modulus) and regional (pulse wave velocity, PWV) stiffness, and (3) arterial diameters and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). Simple linear regression models (age as the independent variable) were obtained for all the parameters and the resulting rates of change were compared between genders. Results. No gender-related differences were found in mean values of arterial structural and functional parameters in prepubertal ages (4–8 years), but they started to appear at ~15 years. Boys showed a greater rate of change for central systolic BP, central pulse pressure, CIMT, and carotid-femoral PWV. Conclusion. Gender-related differences in arterial characteristics of adults can be explained on the basis of different growing-related patterns between boys and girls, with no existing differences in prepubertal ages. PMID:26989504

  6. Lase Ultrasonic Web Stiffness tester

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Patterson, Ph.D., IPST at Ga Tech

    2009-01-12

    The objective is to provide a sensor that uses non-contact, laser ultrasonics to measure the stiffness of paper during the manufacturing process. This will allow the manufacturer to adjust the production process in real time, increase filler content, modify fiber refining and as result produce a quality product using less energy. The sensor operates by moving back and forth across the paper web, at pre-selected locations firing a laser at the sheet, measuring the out-of-plane velocity of the sheet then using that measurement to calculate sheet stiffness.

  7. Cerebral air embolism and subsequent transient neurologic abnormalities in a liver transplant recipient following the removal of the pulmonary artery catheter from the central venous access device: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Key; Jun, In-Gu; Jang, Dong-Min; Lim, Jinwook; Hwang, Gyu-Sam

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral air embolism is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. We experienced a living-donor liver transplant recipient who presented with unexpected cerebral air embolism and transient neurologic abnormalities that subsequently developed just after the removal of the pulmonary artery catheter from the central venous access device. One day after the initial event, the patient's neurologic status gradually improved. The patient was discharged 30 days after liver transplantation without neurologic sequelae. PMID:26885308

  8. Impact of biological aging on arterial aging in American Indians: findings from the Strong Heart Family Study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hao; Zhu, Yun; Yeh, Fawn; Cole, Shelley A; Best, Lyle G; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Devereux, Richard B; Roman, Mary J; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V; Zhao, Jinying

    2016-08-01

    Telomere length, a marker of biological aging, has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increased arterial stiffness, an indicator of arterial aging, predicts adverse CVD outcomes. However, the relationship between telomere length and arterial stiffness is less well studied. Here we examined the cross-sectional association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and arterial stiffness in 2,165 American Indians in the Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS). LTL was measured by qPCR. Arterial stiffness was assessed by stiffness index β. The association between LTL and arterial stiffness was assessed by generalized estimating equation model, adjusting for sociodemographics (age, sex, education level), study site, metabolic factors (fasting glucose, lipids, systolic blood pressure, and kidney function), lifestyle (BMI, smoking, drinking, and physical activity), and prevalent CVD. Results showed that longer LTL was significantly associated with a decreased arterial stiffness (β=-0.070, P=0.007). This association did not attenuate after further adjustment for hsCRP (β=-0.071, P=0.005) or excluding participants with overt CVD (β=-0.068, P=0.012), diabetes (β=-0.070, P=0.005), or chronic kidney disease (β=-0.090, P=0.001). In summary, shorter LTL was significantly associated with an increased arterial stiffness, independent of known risk factors. This finding may shed light on the potential role of biological aging in arterial aging in American Indians. PMID:27540694

  9. Modulation of ankle stiffness during postural sway.

    PubMed

    Lang, Christopher B; Kearney, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Ankle stiffness is a nonlinear, time-varying system which contributes to the control of human upright stance. This study sought to examine the nature of the contribution of stiffness to postural control by determining how intrinsic and reflex stiffnesses varied with sway. Subjects were instructed to stand quietly on a bilateral electro-hydraulic actuator while perturbations were applied about the ankle. Subjects performed three types of trials: normal stance, forward lean, and backward lean. Position, torque, and EMGs from the tibialis anterior and triceps surae were recorded. Background torque, intrinsic stiffness and reflex stiffness were calculated for each perturbation. Intrinsic and reflex stiffnesses were heavily modulated by postural sway. Moreover, they were modulated in a complimentary manner; intrinsic stiffness was lowest when reflex gain was highest, and vice versa. These findings suggest that intrinsic stiffness is modulated simultaneously with reflex stiffness to optimize the control of balance. PMID:25570884

  10. Distinct effects of losartan and atenolol on vascular stiffness in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Ami B; Buck, J Stewart; Zuflacht, Jonah P; Milian, Jessica; Kadivar, Samoneh; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Singh, Michael N; Creager, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    We conducted a randomized, double-blind trial of losartan (100 mg QD) versus atenolol (50 mg QD) for 6 months in adults with Marfan syndrome. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), central augmentation index (AIx), aortic diameter and left ventricular (LV) function were assessed with arterial tonometry and echocardiography. Thirty-four subjects (18 female; median age 35 years, IQR 27, 45) were randomized. Central systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased comparably with atenolol and losartan (p = 0.64 and 0.31, respectively); heart rate decreased with atenolol (p = 0.02), but not with losartan. PWV decreased in patients treated with atenolol (-1.15 ± 1.68 m/s; p = 0.01), but not in those treated with losartan (-0.22 ± 0.59 m/s; p = 0.15; between-group difference p = 0.04). In contrast, AIx decreased in the losartan group (-9.6 ± 8.6%; p < 0.001) but not in the atenolol group (0.9 ± 6.2%, p = 0.57; between-group difference p < 0.001). There was no significant change in aortic diameters or LV ejection fraction in either treatment group. In adults with Marfan syndrome, 6 months of treatment with atenolol improves PWV, whereas losartan reduces the AIx. By improving vascular stiffness via distinct mechanisms of action, there is physiologic value to considering the use of both medications in individuals with Marfan syndrome. PMID:25795452

  11. Bending Stiffness of Multiwall Sandwich

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical and experimental study was carried out to understand the extensional and flexural behavior of multiwall sandwich, a metallic insulation composed of alternate layers of flat and dimpled foil. The multiwall sandwich was structurally analyzed by using several simplifying assumptions combined with a finite element analysis. The simplifying assumptions made in this analysis were evaluated by bending and tensile tests. Test results validate the assumption that flat sheets in compression do not significantly contribute to the flexural stiffness of multiwall sandwich for the multiwall geometry tested. However, calculations show that thicker flat sheets may contribute significantly to bending stiffness and cannot be ignored. Results of this analytical approach compare well with test data; both show that the extensional stiffness of the dimpled sheet in he 0 deg direction is about 30 percent of that for a flat sheet, and that in the 45 deg direction, it is about 10 percent. The analytical and experimental multiwall bending stiffness showed good agreement for the particular geometry tested.

  12. Quantification of plaque stiffness by Brillouin microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonacci, Giuseppe; Pedrigi, Ryan; Krams, Rob; Török, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous Brillouin scattering is an inelastic scattering process arising from inherent thermal density fluctuations, or acoustic phonons, propagating in a medium. Over the last few years, Brillouin spectroscopy has shown great potential to become a reliable non-invasive diagnostic tool due to its unique capability of retrieving viscoelastic properties of materials such as strain and stiffness. The detection of the weak scattered light, in addition to the resolution of the Brillouin peaks (typically shifted by few GHz from the central peak) represent one of the greatest challenges in Brillouin. The recent development of high sensitivity CCD cameras has brought Brillouin spectroscopy from a point sampling technique to a new imaging modality. Furthermore, the application of Virtually Imaged Phased Array (VIPA) etalons has dramatically reduced insertion loss simultaneously allowing fast (<1s) collection of the entire spectrum. Hitherto Brillouin microscopy has been shown the ability to provide unique stiffness maps of biological samples, such as the human lens, in a non-destructive manner. In this work, we present results obtained using our Brillouin microscope to map the stiffness variations in the walls of blood vessels in particular when atherosclerotic plaques are formed. The stiffness of the membrane that covers the plaques is critical in developing acute myocardial infarction yet it is not currently possible to credibly assess its stiffness due to lack of suitable methods.

  13. Central blood pressure as an index of antihypertensive control: determinants and potential value.

    PubMed

    Trudeau, Luc

    2014-05-01

    The measurement of central blood pressure has generated interest as a tool in predicting cardiovascular events. The purpose of this article is to review the meaning and measurement of the central blood pressure and consider its potential value as an index of the antihypertensive response. Indirect estimation of central aortic pressures is obtained by the study of the radial pulse wave compared with a central pulse wave contour measured at the carotid or femoral artery level. The sum of the forward pressure wave created by ventricular contraction and of the reflected pressure wave from the peripheral arterial system produce the peak systolic blood pressure in the aorta. Measurement of the peripheral reflected-wave contribution to aortic blood pressure can be quantified as the augmentation index. Also, the increase in the rapidity of this travelling wave can be measured as the pulse wave velocity. These 2 parameters are considered to be valid indices of the peripheral arterial stiffness. Along with the calculation of systolic and diastolic aortic pressures, these measurements can give a better understanding of the actual central blood pressure to which core organs like heart, brain, and kidneys are submitted. There is tantalizing evidence for the potential value of central blood pressure as a useful index of antihypertensive action, but until clear evidence is obtained, its use should continue to be considered exploratory. PMID:24750979

  14. Order stars and stiff integrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hairer, Ernst; Wanner, Gerhard

    2000-12-01

    Order stars, introduced in G. Wanner, E. Hairer, S.P. Nørsett (Order stars and stability theorems, BIT 18 (1978) 475-489), have become a fundamental tool for the understanding of order and stability properties of numerical methods for stiff differential equations. This survey retraces their discovery and their principal achievements. We also sketch some later extensions and describe some recent developments.

  15. Normal Pregnancy Is Associated with Changes in Central Hemodynamics and Enhanced Recruitable, but Not Resting, Endothelial Function.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Juan; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Ignacio; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and reactive hyperemia-related changes in carotid-to-radial pulse wave velocity (ΔPWVcr%) could offer complementary information about both "recruitability" and "resting" endothelial function (EF). Carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and pulse wave analysis-derived parameters (i.e., AIx@75) are the gold standard methods for noninvasive evaluation of aortic stiffness and central hemodynamics. If healthy pregnancy is associated with both changes in resting and recruitable EF, as well as in several arterial parameters, it remains unknown and/or controversial. Objectives. To simultaneously and noninvasively assess in healthy pregnant (HP) and nonpregnant (NP) women central parameters in conjunction with "basal and recruitable" EF, employing new complementary approaches. Methods. HP (n = 11, 34.2 ± 3.3 weeks of gestation) and age- and cardiovascular risk factors-matched NP (n = 22) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), AIx@75, PWVcf, common carotid stiffness, and intima-media thickness, as well as FMD, L-FMC, and ΔPWVcr %, were measured. Results. Aortic BP, stiffness, and AIx@75 were reduced in HP. ΔPWVcr% and FMD were enhanced in HP in comparison to NP. No differences were found in L-FMC between groups. Conclusion. HP is associated with reduced aortic stiffness, central BP, wave reflections, and enhanced recruitable, but not resting, EF. PMID:26421317

  16. Normal Pregnancy Is Associated with Changes in Central Hemodynamics and Enhanced Recruitable, but Not Resting, Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Torrado, Juan; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Ignacio; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and reactive hyperemia-related changes in carotid-to-radial pulse wave velocity (ΔPWVcr%) could offer complementary information about both “recruitability” and “resting” endothelial function (EF). Carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and pulse wave analysis-derived parameters (i.e., AIx@75) are the gold standard methods for noninvasive evaluation of aortic stiffness and central hemodynamics. If healthy pregnancy is associated with both changes in resting and recruitable EF, as well as in several arterial parameters, it remains unknown and/or controversial. Objectives. To simultaneously and noninvasively assess in healthy pregnant (HP) and nonpregnant (NP) women central parameters in conjunction with “basal and recruitable” EF, employing new complementary approaches. Methods. HP (n = 11, 34.2 ± 3.3 weeks of gestation) and age- and cardiovascular risk factors-matched NP (n = 22) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), AIx@75, PWVcf, common carotid stiffness, and intima-media thickness, as well as FMD, L-FMC, and ΔPWVcr %, were measured. Results. Aortic BP, stiffness, and AIx@75 were reduced in HP. ΔPWVcr% and FMD were enhanced in HP in comparison to NP. No differences were found in L-FMC between groups. Conclusion. HP is associated with reduced aortic stiffness, central BP, wave reflections, and enhanced recruitable, but not resting, EF. PMID:26421317

  17. Analysis of Arterial Mechanics During Head-Down-Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Morgan B.; Martin, David S.; Westby, Christian M.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Carotid, brachial, and tibial arteries reacted differently to HDTBR. Previous studies have not analyzed the mechanical properties of the human brachial or anterior tibial arteries. After slight variations during bed-rest, arterial mechanical properties and IMT returned to pre-bed rest values, with the exception of tibial stiffness and PSE, which continued to be reduced post-bed rest while the DC remained elevated. The tibial artery remodeling was probably due to decreased pressure and volume. Resulting implications for longer duration spaceflight are unclear. Arterial health may be affected by microgravity, as shown by increased thoracic aorta stiffness in other ground based simulations (Aubert).

  18. Arterial Stiffening and Clinical Outcomes in Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Kato, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) is more efficient to handily assess arteriosclerosis than aortic PWV. The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is also a novel blood pressure-independent arterial stiffness parameter. In dialysis patients, both baPWV and CAVI are increased compared to general subjects. Several studies have demonstrated that increased baPWV is associated with carotid atherosclerosis and diastolic left ventricular dysfunction in hemodialysis (HD) patients. In addition, higher baPWV is related to all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality. CAVI is similarly associated with CVD. However, baPWV is superior to CAVI as a predictor of CV outcomes in HD patients. Besides these outcomes, a close relationship exists between sarcopenia, abdominal visceral obesity and arterial stiffening. Reduction of thigh muscle mass is inversely correlated with baPWV and CAVI in males. Abdominal fatness is also associated with increased arterial stiffness in females. These observations provide further evidence of higher risk of CV events in HD patients with sarcopenic obesity. In addition, arterial stiffness is associated with cerebral small vessel disease and decreased cognitive function in the elderly. However, it is unknown whether arterial stiffness may be useful as an early indicator of cognitive decline in dialysis patients. Because dialysis patients are at risk of developing dementia, more studies are needed to elucidate the causal link between arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment. PMID:26587457

  19. Effects of Clopidogrel Therapy on Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, Vascular Function and Progenitor Cells in Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Ronnie; Dhawan, Saurabh S.; Syed, Hamid; Pohlel, F. Khan; Binongo, Jose Nilo G.; Ghazzal, Ziyad B.; Quyyumi, Arshed A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditional cardiovascular risk factors lead to endothelial injury and activation of leucocytes and platelets that initiate and propagate atherosclerosis. We proposed that clopidogrel therapy in patients with stable CAD imparts a pleiotropic effect that extends beyond anti-platelet aggregation to other athero-protective processes. Methods Forty-one subjects were randomized in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study to either clopidogrel 75 mg daily or placebo for 6-weeks, and then transitioned immediately to the other treatment for an additional 6 weeks. We assessed 1) endothelial function as flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery, 2) arterial stiffness and central augmentation index using applanation tonometry, 3) vascular function as fingertip reactive hyperemia index, 4) inflammation by measuring plasma CD40 ligand and serum high-sensitivity c-reactive protein levels, 5) oxidative stress by measuring plasma aminothiols, and 6) circulating progenitor cells, at baseline and at the end of each 6-week treatment period. Results Clopidogrel therapy resulted in a significant reduction in soluble CD40 ligand (p=0.03), a pro-thrombotic and pro-inflammatory molecule derived mainly from activated platelets. However, clopidogrel therapy had no effect on endothelial function, arterial stiffness, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, or progenitor cells. Conclusions Our findings suggest a solitary anti-platelet effect of clopidogrel therapy in patients with stable CAD, with no effect on other sub-clinical markers of cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:24336012

  20. Experimental stiffness of tapered bore seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The stiffness of tapered-bore ring seals was measured with air as the sealed fluid. Static stiffness agreed fairly well with results of a previous analysis. Cross-coupled stiffness due to shaft rotation was much less than predicted. It is suggested that part of the disparity may be due to simplifying assumptions in the analysis; however, these do not appear to account for the entire difference observed.

  1. Nebivolol increases arterial distensibility in vivo.

    PubMed

    McEniery, Carmel M; Schmitt, Matthias; Qasem, Ahmad; Webb, David J; Avolio, Alberto P; Wilkinson, Ian B; Cockcroft, John R

    2004-09-01

    Arterial stiffness is a key determinant of cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients. beta-Blockers appear to be less effective than other drugs in improving outcome in hypertensive patients, and a potential explanation may be that beta-blockers are less effective in reducing arterial stiffness. The aim of this study was to assess the direct effect of beta-blockade on pulse wave velocity (PWV), a robust measure of arterial distensibility, using a local, ovine, hind-limb model. In addition, we hypothesized that the vasodilating beta-blocker nebivolol, but not atenolol, would increase arterial distensibility in vivo. All studies were conducted in anesthetized sheep. PWV was recorded in vivo using a dual pressure-sensing catheter placed in the common iliac artery. Intraarterial infusion of nebivolol reduced PWV by 6+/-3% at the higher dose (P<0.001), but did not alter mean arterial pressure (change of -1+/-3 mm Hg, P=0.1). In contrast, atenolol had no effect on PWV (P=0.11) despite a small drop in mean pressure (change of -5+/-3 mm Hg, P<0.01). Infusion of glyceryl trinitrate led to a dose-dependent fall in PWV, and 2 nmol/min produced a similar reduction in PWV to the higher dose of nebivolol (500 nmol/min). The effect of nebivolol on PWV was significantly attenuated during coinfusion of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (P=0.003) and also during coinfusion of butoxamine (P=0.02). These results demonstrate that nebivolol, but not atenolol, increases arterial distensibility. This effect of nebivolol is mediated through the release of NO via a beta2 adrenoceptor-dependent mechanism. Thus, nebivolol may be of benefit in conditions of increased large artery stiffness, such as isolated systolic hypertension. PMID:15262912

  2. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  3. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  4. Arthroscopic Treatment of Stiff Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Blonna, Davide; Bellato, Enrico; Marini, Eleonora; Scelsi, Michele; Castoldi, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    Contracture of the elbow represents a disabling condition that can impair a person's quality of life. Regardless of the event that causes an elbow contracture, the conservative or surgical treatment is usually considered technically difficult and associated with complications. When the conservative treatment fails to restore an acceptable range of motion in the elbow, open techniques have been shown to be successful options. More recently the use of arthroscopy has become more popular for several reasons. These reasons include better visualization of intra-articular structures, less tissue trauma from open incisions, and potentially the ability to begin early postoperative motion. The purpose of this paper is to review the indications, complications, and results of arthroscopic management of a stiff elbow. PMID:22084755

  5. Coarse-graining stiff bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Español, P.; de la Torre, J. A.; Ferrario, M.; Ciccotti, G.

    2011-11-01

    The method of constraints in molecular dynamics is useful because it avoids the resolution of high frequency motions with very small time steps. However, the price to pay is that both the dynamics and the statistics of a constrained system differ from those of the unconstrained one. Instead of using constraints, we propose to dispose of high frequency motions by a coarse-graining procedure in which fast variables are eliminated. These fast variables are thus modeled as friction and thermal fluctuations. We illustrate the methodology with a simple model case, a diatomic molecule in a monoatomic solvent, in which the bond between the atoms of a diatomic molecule is stiff. Although the example is very simple and does not display the interesting effects of "wrong" statistics of the constrained system (i.e. the well-known issue connected to the Fixman potential), it is well suited to give the proof of concept of the whole procedure.

  6. Multi-scale computational model of three-dimensional hemodynamics within a deformable full-body arterial network

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Nan; Humphrey, Jay D.; Figueroa, C. Alberto

    2013-07-01

    In this article, we present a computational multi-scale model of fully three-dimensional and unsteady hemodynamics within the primary large arteries in the human. Computed tomography image data from two different patients were used to reconstruct a nearly complete network of the major arteries from head to foot. A linearized coupled-momentum method for fluid–structure-interaction was used to describe vessel wall deformability and a multi-domain method for outflow boundary condition specification was used to account for the distal circulation. We demonstrated that physiologically realistic results can be obtained from the model by comparing simulated quantities such as regional blood flow, pressure and flow waveforms, and pulse wave velocities to known values in the literature. We also simulated the impact of age-related arterial stiffening on wave propagation phenomena by progressively increasing the stiffness of the central arteries and found that the predicted effects on pressure amplification and pulse wave velocity are in agreement with findings in the clinical literature. This work demonstrates the feasibility of three-dimensional techniques for simulating hemodynamics in a full-body compliant arterial network.

  7. Load to Failure and Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel, Amanda O.; Duncan, Douglas D.; Dobrasevic, Nikola; Marsh, Stephanie M.; Lemos, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tendinopathy is a frequent cause of shoulder pain that can lead to decreased strength and range of motion. Failures after using the single-row technique of rotator cuff repair have led to the development of the double-row technique, which is said to allow for more anatomical restoration of the footprint. Purpose: To compare 5 different types of suture patterns while maintaining equality in number of anchors. The hypothesis was that the Mason-Allen–crossed cruciform transosseous-equivalent technique is superior to other suture configurations while maintaining equality in suture limbs and anchors. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A total of 25 fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were randomized into 5 suture configuration groups: single-row repair with simple stitch technique; single-row repair with modified Mason-Allen technique; double-row Mason-Allen technique; double-row cross-bridge technique; and double-row suture bridge technique. Load and displacement were recorded at 100 Hz until failure. Stiffness and bone mineral density were also measured. Results: There was no significant difference in peak load at failure, stiffness, maximum displacement at failure, or mean bone mineral density among the 5 suture configuration groups (P < .05). Conclusion: According to study results, when choosing a repair technique, other factors such as number of sutures in the repair should be considered to judge the strength of the repair. Clinical Relevance: Previous in vitro studies have shown the double-row rotator cuff repair to be superior to the single-row repair; however, clinical research does not necessarily support this. This study found no difference when comparing 5 different repair methods, supporting research that suggests the number of sutures and not the pattern can affect biomechanical properties. PMID:26665053

  8. Low levels of adiponectin predict worsening of arterial morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Störk, Stefan; Bots, Michiel L; Angerer, Peter; von Schacky, Clemens; Grobbee, Diederick E; Angermann, Christiane E; Seufert, Jochen

    2007-10-01

    Adipocytokines are under investigation as mediators of cardiovascular risk. In 142 non-diabetic postmenopausal women, we investigated whether plasma levels of adiponectin and leptin are associated with changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and distensibility as assessed by high-resolution ultrasound. Adiponectin but not leptin correlated weakly with baseline measures of IMT and distensibility. After 12 months, carotid IMT showed a significant progression [0.023 mm (95% CI, 0.014-0.031 mm)] whereas stiffness was unaltered. A threshold was identified for the relation of adiponectin with both progression of IMT and stiffness. Age-adjusted adiponectin levels in the lowest quartile versus second to fourth quartile were related to progression of IMT (odds ratio, 2.99; 95% CI, 1.81-5.09) and stiffness (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.19-4.07). Adjustment for possible confounding factors and intermediates weakened this association only to a minor degree. No such associations were observed for leptin. We conclude that low levels of adiponectin are associated with adverse changes in morphology and function of central arteries over time independently of other cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal non-diabetic women. PMID:17239889

  9. Difference in carotid artery elasticity in subjects with different brachial artery kinetic of vasodilatation.

    PubMed

    Tripolino, C; Gnasso, A; Carallo, C; Scavelli, F B; Irace, C

    2016-08-01

    Increased carotid stiffness and impaired brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) associate with cardiovascular events. We have previously reported three FMD patterns based on the time of maximal dilatation. The aim of the present study was to verify whether different FMD patterns associate with carotid artery stiffness. In all, 133 subjects were enrolled. All participants underwent complete clinical examination, blood sampling and ultrasound study. FMD was used as a measure of endothelial function. Based on the maximal brachial artery FMD, subjects were divided into Early dilators (peak FMD at 50 s), Late dilators (peak FMD over 50 s) and No dilators. Echo-Doppler evaluation of carotid arteries was performed in order to calculate elastic indexes (strain, β-stiffness index and distensibility). In all, 64 subjects were classified as Early FMD, 36 as Late FMD and 33 as No dilators. Age, gender and cardiovascular risk factors were comparable among three groups. Early FMD had higher values of strain compared with both Late and no Dilators (P<0.001). Furthermore, Early dilators showed a significantly lower stiffness and higher distensibility compared with Late and No dilators. No significant differences between Late FMD and No Dilators were detected. Our results demonstrate that common carotid artery elasticity indexes significantly differ among Early, Late and No dilators. Subjects with delayed or absent brachial artery dilatation have stiffer common carotid arteries compared with subjects with early dilatation. In conclusion, our research suggests that the assessment of the kinetics of FMD in a clinical setting might represent a useful screening tool to improve the cardiovascular risk stratification. PMID:26467820

  10. Role of central and peripheral opiate receptors in the effects of fentanyl on analgesia, ventilation and arterial blood-gas chemistry in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Fraser; May, Walter J; Gruber, Ryan B; Discala, Joseph F; Puskovic, Veljko; Young, Alex P; Baby, Santhosh M; Lewis, Stephen J

    2014-01-15

    This study determined the effects of the peripherally restricted μ-opiate receptor (μ-OR) antagonist, naloxone methiodide (NLXmi) on fentanyl (25μg/kg, i.v.)-induced changes in (1) analgesia, (2) arterial blood gas chemistry (ABG) and alveolar-arterial gradient (A-a gradient), and (3) ventilatory parameters, in conscious rats. The fentanyl-induced increase in analgesia was minimally affected by a 1.5mg/kg of NLXmi but was attenuated by a 5.0mg/kg dose. Fentanyl decreased arterial blood pH, pO2 and sO2 and increased pCO2 and A-a gradient. These responses were markedly diminished in NLXmi (1.5mg/kg)-pretreated rats. Fentanyl caused ventilatory depression (e.g., decreases in tidal volume and peak inspiratory flow). Pretreatment with NLXmi (1.5mg/kg, i.v.) antagonized the fentanyl decrease in tidal volume but minimally affected the other responses. These findings suggest that (1) the analgesia and ventilatory depression caused by fentanyl involve peripheral μ-ORs and (2) NLXmi prevents the fentanyl effects on ABG by blocking the negative actions of the opioid on tidal volume and A-a gradient. PMID:24284037

  11. Role of central and peripheral opiate receptors in the effects of fentanyl on analgesia, ventilation and arterial blood-gas chemistry in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Fraser; May, Walter J.; Gruber, Ryan B.; Discala, Joseph F.; Puscovic, Veljko; Young, Alex P.; Baby, Santhosh M.; Lewis, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the effects of the peripherally restricted µ-opiate receptor (µ-OR) antagonist, naloxone methiodide (NLXmi) on fentanyl (25 µg/kg, i.v.)-induced changes in (1) analgesia, (2) arterial blood gas chemistry (ABG) and alveolar-arterial gradient (A-a gradient), and (3) ventilatory parameters, in conscious rats. The fentanyl-induced increase in analgesia was minimally affected by a 1.5 mg/kg of NLXmi but was attenuated by a 5.0 mg/kg dose. Fentanyl decreased arterial blood pH, pO2 and sO2 and increased pCO2 and A-a gradient. These responses were markedly diminished in NLXmi (1.5 mg/kg)-pretreated rats. Fentanyl caused ventilatory depression (e.g., decreases in tidal volume and peak inspiratory flow). Pretreatment with NLXmi (1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) antagonized the fentanyl decrease in tidal volume but minimally affected the other responses. These findings suggest that (1) the analgesia and ventilatory depression caused by fentanyl involve peripheral µ-ORs and (2) NLXmi prevents the fentanyl effects on ABG by blocking the negative actions of the opioid on tidal volume and A-a gradient. PMID:24284037

  12. Analysis of Arterial Mechanics During Head-down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, Morgan; Martin, David S.; Westby, Christian M.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Arterial health may be affected by microgravity or ground based analogs of spaceflight, as shown by an increase in thoracic aorta stiffness1. Head-down tilt bed rest (HDTBR) is often used as a ground-based simulation of spaceflight because it induces physiological changes similar to those that occur in space2, 3. This abstract details an analysis of arterial stiffness (a subclinical measure of atherosclerosis), the distensibility coefficient (DC), and the pressure-strain elastic modulus (PSE) of the arterial walls during HDTBR. This project may help determine how spaceflight differentially affects arterial function in the upper vs. lower body.

  13. Arterial stick

    MedlinePlus

    ... limit tissue damage. Alternative Names Blood sample - arterial ... by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, ...

  14. Arterial Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... rial line can provide valuable information to adjust oxygen therapy or mechanical ventilator (respirator; breathing machine) settings. The blood oxygen pres- sure measures from an arterial line give ...

  15. Relative stiffness of flat-conductor cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Bending moment data were taken on ten different cable samples and normalized to express all stiffness factors in terms of cable 5.1 cm in width. Relative stiffness data and nominal physical characteristics are tabulated and presented in graphical form for designers who may be interested in finding torques exerted on critical components by short lengths of cable.

  16. Concept for design of variable stiffness damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohr, J. J.

    1967-01-01

    Damping mechanism, containing polymeric-like materials is applicable to a wide range of shock and vibration. The polymeric-like material changes from a relatively stiff material to a relatively soft, rubbery material in the region of their glass transition temperatures. The energy absorption characteristics and stiffness are controllable with temperature.

  17. Nonparticipatory Stiffness in the Male Perioral Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Shin-Ying; Barlow, Steven M.; Lee, Jaehoon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to extend previous published findings in the authors' laboratory using a new automated technology to quantitatively characterize nonparticipatory perioral stiffness in healthy male adults. Method: Quantitative measures of perioral stiffness were sampled during a nonparticipatory task using a…

  18. The posttraumatic stiff elbow: an update.

    PubMed

    Mellema, Jos J; Lindenhovius, Anneluuk L C; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2016-06-01

    Posttraumatic elbow stiffness is a disabling condition that remains challenging to treat despite improvement of our understanding of the pathogenesis of posttraumatic contractures and new treatment regimens. This review provides an update and overview of the etiology of posttraumatic elbow stiffness, its classification, evaluation, nonoperative and operative treatment, and postoperative management. PMID:26984466

  19. Negative-stiffness-mechanism vibration isolation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platus, David L.

    1992-02-01

    A new type of vibration isolation system offers significant improvement in performance compared with current state-of-the-art systems. The system uses negative-stiffness mechanisms to cancel the stiffness of a spring suspension. Reduction in stiffness magnifies the damping inherent in the system creating a practical means for achieving high hysteretic damping. The result is a simple, compact 6-DOF passive isolation system capable of system resonant frequencies below 0.2 Hz and first isolator resonances above 100 Hz. Resonant transmissibilities below 1.4 can be achieved with transmissibilities at the higher frequencies close to that of the ideal undamped system. The negative-stiffness mechanisms can cancel the stiffness of power cables, hoses or other lines connected to payloads. This paper develops the theory, describes typical configurations and summarizes test data with prototype systems.

  20. Rolling Element Bearing Stiffness Matrix Determination (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Parker, R.

    2014-01-01

    Current theoretical bearing models differ in their stiffness estimates because of different model assumptions. In this study, a finite element/contact mechanics model is developed for rolling element bearings with the focus of obtaining accurate bearing stiffness for a wide range of bearing types and parameters. A combined surface integral and finite element method is used to solve for the contact mechanics between the rolling elements and races. This model captures the time-dependent characteristics of the bearing contact due to the orbital motion of the rolling elements. A numerical method is developed to determine the full bearing stiffness matrix corresponding to two radial, one axial, and two angular coordinates; the rotation about the shaft axis is free by design. This proposed stiffness determination method is validated against experiments in the literature and compared to existing analytical models and widely used advanced computational methods. The fully-populated stiffness matrix demonstrates the coupling between bearing radial, axial, and tilting bearing deflections.

  1. Pulmonary vascular stiffness: measurement, modeling, and implications in normal and hypertensive pulmonary circulations.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Kendall S; Lammers, Steven R; Shandas, Robin

    2011-07-01

    This article introduces the concept of pulmonary vascular stiffness, discusses its increasingly recognized importance as a diagnostic marker in the evaluation of pulmonary vascular disease, and describes methods to measure and model it clinically, experimentally, and computationally. It begins with a description of systems-level methods to evaluate pulmonary vascular compliance and recent clinical efforts in applying such techniques to better predict patient outcomes in pulmonary arterial hypertension. It then progresses from the systems-level to the local level, discusses proposed methods by which upstream pulmonary vessels increase in stiffness, introduces concepts around vascular mechanics, and concludes by describing recent work incorporating advanced numerical methods to more thoroughly evaluate changes in local mechanical properties of pulmonary arteries. PMID:23733649

  2. Pulmonary Vascular Stiffness: Measurement, Modeling, and Implications in Normal and Hypertensive Pulmonary Circulations

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Kendall S.; Lammers, Steven R.; Shandas, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of pulmonary vascular stiffness, discusses its increasingly recognized importance as a diagnostic marker in the evaluation of pulmonary vascular disease, and describes methods to measure and model it clinically, experimentally, and computationally. It begins with a description of systems-level methods to evaluate pulmonary vascular compliance and recent clinical efforts in applying such techniques to better predict patient outcomes in pulmonary arterial hypertension. It then progresses from the systems-level to the local level, discusses proposed methods by which upstream pulmonary vessels increase in stiffness, introduces concepts around vascular mechanics, and concludes by describing recent work incorporating advanced numerical methods to more thoroughly evaluate changes in local mechanical properties of pulmonary arteries. PMID:23733649

  3. A Biomechanical Model of Artery Buckling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hai-Chao

    2010-01-01

    The stability of arteries under blood pressure load is essential to the maintenance of normal arterial function and the loss of stability can lead to tortuosity and kinking that are associated with significant clinical complications. However, mechanical analysis of arterial bent buckling is lacking. To address this issue, this paper presents a biomechanical model of arterial buckling. Using a linear elastic cylindrical arterial model, the mechanical equations for arterial buckling were developed and the critical buckling pressure was found to be a function of the wall stiffness (Young’s modulus), arterial radius, length, wall thickness, and the axial strain. Both the model equations and experimental results demonstrated that the critical pressure is related to the axial strain. Arteries may buckle and become tortuous due to reduced (sub-physiological) axial strain, hypertensive pressure, and a weakened wall. These results are in accordance with, and provide a possible explanation to the clinical observations that these changes are the risk factors for arterial tortuosity and kinking. The current model is also applicable to veins and ureters. PMID:17689541

  4. Quantification of plaque stiffness by Brillouin microscopy in experimental thin cap fibroatheroma.

    PubMed

    Antonacci, Giuseppe; Pedrigi, Ryan M; Kondiboyina, Avinash; Mehta, Vikram V; de Silva, Ranil; Paterson, Carl; Krams, Rob; Török, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Plaques vulnerable to rupture are characterized by a thin and stiff fibrous cap overlaying a soft lipid-rich necrotic core. The ability to measure local plaque stiffness directly to quantify plaque stress and predict rupture potential would be very attractive, but no current technology does so. This study seeks to validate the use of Brillouin microscopy to measure the Brillouin frequency shift, which is related to stiffness, within vulnerable plaques. The left carotid artery of an ApoE(-/-)mouse was instrumented with a cuff that induced vulnerable plaque development in nine weeks. Adjacent histological sections from the instrumented and control arteries were stained for either lipids or collagen content, or imaged with confocal Brillouin microscopy. Mean Brillouin frequency shift was 15.79 ± 0.09 GHz in the plaque compared with 16.24 ± 0.15 (p < 0.002) and 17.16 ± 0.56 GHz (p < 0.002) in the media of the diseased and control vessel sections, respectively. In addition, frequency shift exhibited a strong inverse correlation with lipid area of -0.67 ± 0.06 (p < 0.01) and strong direct correlation with collagen area of 0.71 ± 0.15 (p < 0.05). This is the first study, to the best of our knowledge, to apply Brillouin spectroscopy to quantify atherosclerotic plaque stiffness, which motivates combining this technology with intravascular imaging to improve detection of vulnerable plaques in patients. PMID:26559685

  5. Jacobian and stiffness analysis of a novel class of six-DOF parallel minimanipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Tashmasebi, F. . Goddard Space Flight Center); Tsai, Lung-Wen . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    The Jacobian and stiffness matrices of two types of novel, six-DOF parallel minimanipulators are derived. A minimanipulator consists of three inextensible limbs, each of which is driven by a two-DOF driver. Bilinear stepper motors are used as drivers in the first type minimanipulator, whereas five-bar linkages are used as drivers in the second type minimanipulator. All of the minimanipulator actuators are base-mounted. Inextensible limbs (and five-bar linkage drivers in the second type minimanipulator) improve positional resolution and stiffness of the minimanipulators in certain directions. It is shown that, at the central configuration, the stiffness matrix of the first type minimanipulator can be diagonalized (decoupled). It is also shown that the first type minimanipulator can be designed to possess direct or torsional isotropic stiffness properties. Moreover, guidelines for designing the drivers of the second type minimanipulator are established. 20 refs.

  6. Jacobian and stiffness analysis of a novel class of six-DOF parallel minimanipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Tashmasebi, F.; Tsai, Lung-Wen

    1992-08-01

    The Jacobian and stiffness matrices of two types of novel, six-DOF parallel minimanipulators are derived. A minimanipulator consists of three inextensible limbs, each of which is driven by a two-DOF driver. Bilinear stepper motors are used as drivers in the first type minimanipulator, whereas five-bar linkages are used as drivers in the second type minimanipulator. All of the minimanipulator actuators are base-mounted. Inextensible limbs (and five-bar linkage drivers in the second type minimanipulator) improve positional resolution and stiffness of the minimanipulators in certain directions. It is shown that, at the central configuration, the stiffness matrix of the first type minimanipulator can be diagonalized (decoupled). It is also shown that the first type minimanipulator can be designed to possess direct or torsional isotropic stiffness properties. Moreover, guidelines for designing the drivers of the second type minimanipulator are established. 20 refs.

  7. Effects of Stent Design and Atherosclerotic Plaque Composition on Arterial Wall Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Timmins, Lucas H.; Meyer, Clark A.; Moreno, Michael R.; Moore, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the solid mechanical effects of varying stent design and atherosclerotic plaque stiffness on the biomechanical environment induced in a diseased artery wall model. Methods: Computational modeling techniques were employed to investigate the final radius of the lumen and artery wall stresses after stent implantation. Two stent designs were studied (one stiff and one less stiff). The stenotic artery was modeled as an axisymmetrical diseased vessel with a 20% stenosis by diameter. The material properties of the diseased tissue in the artery models varied. Atherosclerotic plaques half as stiff (0.5×), of equal stiffness (1.0×), or twice as stiff (2.0×) as the artery wall were investigated. Results: Final lumen radius was dependent on stent design, and the stiffer stent deformed the artery to an approximately 10% greater radius than the more compliant design. Alternatively, circumferential stress levels were dependent on both stent design and plaque material properties. Overall, the stiffer stent subjected the artery wall to much higher stress values than the more compliant design, with differences in peak values of 0.50, 0.31, and 0.09 MPa for the 2.0×, 1.0×, and 0.5× stiff plaques, respectively. Conclusion: Evidence suggests that a judicious choice of stent design can minimize stress while maintaining a patent lumen in stenotic arteries. If confronted with a rigid, calcified plaque, stent design is more important, as design differences can impose dramatically different stress fields, while still providing arterial patency. Alternatively, stent design is not as much of an issue when treating a soft, lipid-laden plaque, as stress fields do not vary significantly among stent designs. PMID:19090628

  8. Wave Propagation of Myocardial Stretch: Correlation with Myocardial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Pislaru, Cristina; Pellikka, Patricia A.; Pislaru, Sorin V.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of flow propagation during diastole in the left ventricle (LV) has been well described. Little is known about the associated waves propagating along the heart wall s. These waves may have a mechanism similar to pulse wave propagation in arteries. The major goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of myocardial stiffness and preload on this wave transmission. Methods Longitudinal late diastolic deformation and wave speed (Vp) of myocardial stretch in the anterior LV wall were measured using sonomicrometry in sixteen pigs. Animals with normal and altered myocardial stiffness (acute myocardial infarction) were studied with and without preload alterations. Elastic modulus estimated from Vp (EVP; Moens-Korteweg equation) was compared to incremental elastic modulus obtained from exponential end -diastolic stress-strain relation (ESS). Myocardial distensibility and α-and β-coefficients of stress-strain relations were calculated. Results Vp was higher at reperfusion compared to baseline (2.6±1.3 m/s vs. 1.3±0.4 m/s; p=0.005) and best correlated with ESS (r 2=0.80, p<0.0001), β-coefficient (r2=0.78, p<0.0001), distensibility (r2=0.47, p=0.005), and wall thickness/diameter ratio (r2=0.42, p=0.009). Elastic moduli (EVP and ESS) were strongly correlated (r2=0.83, p<0.0001). Increasing preload increased Vp and EVP and decreased distensibility. At multivariate analysis, ESS, wall thickness, and end-diastolic and systolic LV pressures were independent predictors of Vp (r2model=0.83, p<0.0001). Conclusions The main determinants of wave propagation of longitudinal myocardial stretch were myocardial stiffness and LV geometry and pressure. This local wave speed could potentially be measured noninvasively by echocardiography. PMID:25193091

  9. High performance composites with active stiffness control.

    PubMed

    Tridech, Charnwit; Maples, Henry A; Robinson, Paul; Bismarck, Alexander

    2013-09-25

    High performance carbon fiber reinforced composites with controllable stiffness could revolutionize the use of composite materials in structural applications. Here we describe a structural material, which has a stiffness that can be actively controlled on demand. Such a material could have applications in morphing wings or deployable structures. A carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy composite is described that can undergo an 88% reduction in flexural stiffness at elevated temperatures and fully recover when cooled, with no discernible damage or loss in properties. Once the stiffness has been reduced, the required deformations can be achieved at much lower actuation forces. For this proof-of-concept study a thin polyacrylamide (PAAm) layer was electrocoated onto carbon fibers that were then embedded into an epoxy matrix via resin infusion. Heating the PAAm coating above its glass transition temperature caused it to soften and allowed the fibers to slide within the matrix. To produce the stiffness change the carbon fibers were used as resistance heating elements by passing a current through them. When the PAAm coating had softened, the ability of the interphase to transfer load to the fibers was significantly reduced, greatly lowering the flexural stiffness of the composite. By changing the moisture content in PAAm fiber coating, the temperature at which the PAAm softens and the composites undergo a reduction in stiffness can be tuned. PMID:23978266

  10. Angioplasty and stent placement -- peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery; PTA - peripheral artery; Angioplasty - peripheral arteries; Iliac artery -angioplasty; Femoral artery - angioplasty; Popliteal artery - angioplasty; Tibial artery - angioplasty; Peroneal artery - ...

  11. Basic study of intrinsic elastography: Relationship between tissue stiffness and propagation velocity of deformation induced by pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Ryo; Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Arakawa, Mototaka; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2015-07-01

    We proposed an estimation method for a tissue stiffness from deformations induced by arterial pulsation, and named this proposed method intrinsic elastography (IE). In IE, assuming that the velocity of the deformation propagation in tissues is closely related to the stiffness, the propagation velocity (PV) was estimated by spatial compound ultrasound imaging with a high temporal resolution of 1 ms. However, the relationship between tissue stiffness and PV has not been revealed yet. In this study, the PV of the deformation induced by the pulsatile pump was measured by IE in three different poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) phantoms of different stiffnesses. The measured PV was compared with the shear wave velocity (SWV) measured by shear wave imaging (SWI). The measured PV has trends similar to the measured SWV. These results obtained by IE in a healthy male show the possibility that the mechanical properties of living tissues could be evaluated by IE.

  12. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dead bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery ... The arteries that supply blood to the intestines run directly from the aorta, the main artery from the heart. ...

  13. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  14. Dynamic stiffness formulation for free orthotropic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbel, O.; Casimir, J. B.; Hammami, L.; Tawfiq, I.; Haddar, M.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a procedure for developing the dynamic stiffness matrix of a free orthotropic Kirchhoff plate. The dynamic stiffness matrix is computed for free edge boundary conditions of the plate that allow assembly procedures. The method is based on a strong formulation of Kirchhoff plate equations and series solutions, taking advantage of the symmetry and Gorman type decomposition of the free boundary conditions. The performances of the so-called Dynamic Stiffness Method (DSM) are evaluated by comparing the harmonic responses of an orthotropic Kirchhoff plate with those obtained from the Finite Element Method using four noded quadrilateral elements.

  15. Materials analogue of zero-stiffness structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arun; Subramaniam, Anandh

    2011-04-01

    Anglepoise lamps and certain tensegrities are examples of zero-stiffness structures. These structures are in a state of neutral equilibrium with respect to changes in configuration of the system. Using Eshelby's example of an edge dislocation in a thin plate that can bend, we report the discovery of a non-trivial new class of material structures as an analogue to zero-stiffness structures. For extended positions of the edge dislocation in these structures, the dislocation experiences a zero image force. Salient features of these material structures along with the key differences from conventional zero-stiffness structures are pointed out.

  16. Physiotherapy assessment of shoulder stiffness and how it influences management

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Common causes of shoulder stiffness include osteoarthritis, trauma, rheumatological conditions and stiffness secondary to soft tissue adaptation. Physiotherapy assessment of the stiff shoulder aims to ascertain the key causative factors of stiffness to inform effective management planning. Identification of whether a patient presents with pain or stiffness as their predominant symptom further guides treatment selection. The current evidence base underpins a management algorithm which has been developed to guide the assessment and management of patients presenting with shoulder stiffness.

  17. Structural remodeling of coronary resistance arteries: effects of age and exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Mina A.; Taylor, Curtis R.; Chen, Bei; La, Hae-Sun; Maraj, Joshua J.; Kilar, Cody R.; Behnke, Bradley J.; Delp, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Age is known to induce remodeling and stiffening of large-conduit arteries; however, little is known of the effects of age on remodeling and mechanical properties of coronary resistance arteries. We employed a rat model of aging to investigate whether 1) age increases wall thickness and stiffness of coronary resistance arteries, and 2) exercise training reverses putative age-induced increases in wall thickness and stiffness of coronary resistance arteries. Young (4 mo) and old (21 mo) Fischer 344 rats remained sedentary or underwent 10 wk of treadmill exercise training. Coronary resistance arteries were isolated for determination of wall-to-lumen ratio, effective elastic modulus, and active and passive responses to changes in intraluminal pressure. Elastin and collagen content of the vascular wall were assessed histologically. Wall-to-lumen ratio increased with age, but this increase was reversed by exercise training. In contrast, age reduced stiffness, and exercise training increased stiffness in coronary resistance arteries from old rats. Myogenic responsiveness was reduced with age and restored by exercise training. Collagen-to-elastin ratio (C/E) of the wall did not change with age and was reduced with exercise training in arteries from old rats. Thus age induces hypertrophic remodeling of the vessel wall and reduces the stiffness and myogenic function of coronary resistance arteries. Exercise training reduces wall-to-lumen ratio, increases wall stiffness, and restores myogenic function in aged coronary resistance arteries. The restorative effect of exercise training on myogenic function of coronary resistance arteries may be due to both changes in vascular smooth muscle phenotype and expression of extracellular matrix proteins. PMID:25059239

  18. Vascular stiffness in insulin resistance and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; Aroor, Annayya R.; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Meininger, Gerald A.; Sowers, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes are associated with a substantially increased prevalence of vascular fibrosis and stiffness, with attendant increased risk of cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Although the underlying mechanisms and mediators of vascular stiffness are not well understood, accumulating evidence supports the role of metabolic and immune dysregulation related to increased adiposity, activation of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system, reduced bioavailable nitric oxide, increased vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) and ECM remodeling in the pathogenesis of vascular stiffness. This review will give a brief overview of the relationship between obesity, insulin resistance and increased vascular stiffness to provide a contemporary understanding of the proposed underlying mechanisms and potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26321962

  19. Programmable variable stiffness 2D surface design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabia, Sarah; Hwang, Taeseon; Yim, Woosoon

    2014-03-01

    Variable stiffness features can contribute to many engineering applications ranging from robotic joints to shock and vibration mitigation. In addition, variable stiffness can be used in the tactile feedback to provide the sense of touch to the user. A key component in the proposed device is the Biased Magnetorheological Elastomer (B-MRE) where iron particles within the elastomer compound develop a dipole interaction energy. A novel feature of this device is to introduce a field induced shear modulus bias via a permanent magnet which provides an offset with a current input to the electromagnetic control coil to change the compliance or modulus of a base elastomer in both directions (softer or harder). The B-MRE units can lead to the design of a variable stiffness surface. In this preliminary work, both computational and experimental results of the B-MRE are presented along with a preliminary design of the programmable variable stiffness surface design.

  20. Dynamic influences of changing gear tooth stiffness

    SciTech Connect

    Morguel, O.K.; Esat, I.

    1997-07-01

    One of the principal sources of vibratory excitation of gear a system is due to the angular speed fluctuation of meshing gears due to non-linearities and profile errors and tooth and supporting bearings flexibility. The transmission error is also influenced by the varying force at the contact point of the meshing gear teeth. The varying contact force itself is influenced by the varying tooth stiffness due to change of orientation of teeth relative to each other, during the contact phase of each pair. This paper presents a simplified single degree of freedom gear system. It is assumed that one member of the gear pair is rigid and flexibility of the gear tooth is attributed only to one section of the gear system. This enables the equation to be simplified to a single degree of freedom system. The resulting non-linear equation is solved iteratively by employing a method which combines piecewise linearization for the stiffness and resulting contact orientation shift due to shaft and tooth flexibility. The contact shift will be referred as the phase shift in this report. The early finding indicates that there are significant differences between the response of the system incorporating three different tooth stiffness, namely, constant tooth stiffness, rectangular wave tooth stiffness and sinusoidal tooth stiffness. The results also implies that any design specification associated with gears has to include gear tooth influences, especially if the excitation is of a major concern. The rectangular stiffness variation which most accurately describes the tooth stiffness gives a response fluctuation, studied in the frequency domain shows that the effective natural frequencies fluctuates between certain upper and lower limits. Thus the paper suggest that any design study should consider these limits.

  1. An analysis of traction drive torsional stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, D. A.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    The tangential compliance of elastic bodies in concentrated contact applied to traction drive elements to determine their torsional stiffness was analyzed. Static loading and rotating conditions are considered. The effects of several design variables are shown. The theoretical torsional stiffness of a fixed ratio multiroller drive is computed and compared to experimental values. It is shown that the torsional compliance of the traction contacts themselves is a relatively small portion of the overall drive system compliance.

  2. Coronary Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... side of the heart is smaller because it pumps blood only to the lungs. The left coronary artery, ... heart is larger and more muscular because it pumps blood to the rest of the body. Updated August ...

  3. Artery Buckling: New Phenotypes, Models, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hai-Chao; Chesnutt, Jennifer K. W.; Garcia, Justin R.; Liu, Qin; Wen, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Arteries are under significant mechanical loads from blood pressure, flow, tissue tethering, and body movement. It is critical that arteries remain patent and stable under these loads. This review summarizes the common forms of buckling that occur in blood vessels including cross-sectional collapse, longitudinal twist buckling, and bent buckling. The phenomena, model analyses, experimental measurements, effects on blood flow, and clinical relevance are discussed. It is concluded that mechanical buckling is an important issue for vasculature, in addition to wall stiffness and strength, and requires further studies to address the challenges. Studies of vessel buckling not only enrich vascular biomechanics but also have important clinical applications. PMID:23192265

  4. OroSTIFF: Face-referenced measurement of perioral stiffness in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Shin-Ying; Kieweg, Douglas; Lee, Jaehoon

    2010-01-01

    A new device and automated measurement technology known as OroSTIFF is described to characterize non-participatory perioral stiffness in healthy adults for eventual application to patients with orofacial movement disorders associated with neuromotor disease, traumatic injury, or congenital clefts of the upper lip. Previous studies of perioral biomechanics required head stabilization for extended periods of time during measurement which precluded sampling patients with involuntary body/head movements (dyskinesias), or pediatric subjects. The OroSTIFF device is face-referenced and avoids the complications associated with head-restraint. Supporting data of non-participatory perioral tissue stiffness using OroSTIFF are included from 10 male and 10 female healthy subjects. The OroSTIFF device incorporates a pneumatic glass air cylinder actuator instrumented for pressure, and an integrated subminiature displacement sensor to encode lip aperture. Perioral electromyograms were simultaneously sampled to confirm passive muscle state for the superior and inferior divisions of the orbicularis oris muscles. Perioral stiffness, derived as a quotient from resultant force (ΔF) and interangle span (ΔX), was modeled with multilevel regression techniques. Real-time calculation of the perioral stiffness function demonstrated a significant quadratic relation between imposed interangle stretch and resultant force. This stiffness growth function also differed significantly between males and females. This study demonstrates the OroSTIFF ‘proof-of-concept’ for cost-effective non-invasive stimulus generation and derivation of perioral stiffness in a group of healthy unrestrained adults, and a case study to illustrate the dose-dependent effects of Levodopa on perioral stiffness in an individual with advanced Parkinson’s disease who exhibited marked dyskinesia and rigidity. PMID:20185131

  5. Stiffness of Railway Soil-Steel Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machelski, Czesław

    2015-12-01

    The considerable influence of the soil backfill properties and that of the method of compacting it on the stiffness of soil-steel structures is characteristic of the latter. The above factors (exhibiting randomness) become apparent in shell deformation measurements conducted during construction and proof test loading. A definition of soil-shell structure stiffness, calculated on the basis of shell deflection under the service load, is proposed in the paper. It is demonstrated that the stiffness is the inverse of the deflection influence function used in structural mechanics. The moving load methodology is shown to be useful for testing, since it makes it possible to map the shell deflection influence line also in the case of group loads (concentrated forces), as in bridges. The analyzed cases show that the shell's span, geometry (static scheme) and the height of earth fill influence the stiffness of the structure. The soil-steel structure's characteristic parameter in the form of stiffness k is more suitable for assessing the quality of construction works than the proposed in code geometric index ω applied to beam structures. As shown in the given examples, parameter k is more effective than stiffness parameter λ used to estimate the deformation of soil-steel structures under construction. Although the examples concern railway structures, the methodology proposed in the paper is suitable also for road bridges.

  6. Comparative study of diastolic filling under varying left ventricular wall stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekala, Pritam; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2014-11-01

    Pathological remodeling of the human cardiac left ventricle (LV) is observed in hypertensive heart failure as a result of pressure overload. Myocardial stiffening occurs in these patients prior to chronic maladaptive changes, resulting in increased LV wall stiffness. The goal of this study was to investigate the change in intraventricular filling fluid dynamics inside a physical model of the LV as a function of wall stiffness. Three LV models of varying wall stiffness were incorporated into an in vitro flow circuit driven by a programmable piston pump. Windkessel elements were used to tune the inflow and systemic pressure in the model with least stiffness to match healthy conditions. Models with stiffer walls were comparatively tested maintaining circuit compliance, resistance and pump amplitude constant. 2D phase-locked PIV measurements along the central plane showed that with increase in wall stiffness, the peak velocity and cardiac output inside the LV decreased. Further, inflow vortex ring propagation toward the LV apex was reduced with increasing stiffness. The above findings indicate the importance of considering LV wall relaxation characteristics in pathological studies of filling fluid dynamics.

  7. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  8. Central Pseudo-Aneurysm Formation Following Arterial Closure with a StarClose SE Device: When a StarClose Doesn’t Completely Close

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Sehrish; Ball, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 77 Final Diagnosis: Femoral artery pseudoaneurysm Symptoms: None Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cardiac catheterization and coronary stenting with Starclose vascular closure Specialty: Interventional Cardiology Objective: Educational Purpose (only if useful for a systematic review or synthesis) Background: Vascular closure devices (VCDs) are frequently used for hemostasis with endovascular procedures by employing sutures or plug devices (using collagen or hydrogel) or through the use of a metal clip made of nickel and titanium, such as the StarClose SE device. In comparison to manual compression (MC), VCDs are associated with earlier time to discharge and ambulation, improved patient comfort, and better cost-effectiveness. Case Report: A 77-year-old man with history of ischemic cardiomyopathy with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) underwent diagnostic cardiac catheterization with deployment of a StarClose SE vascular closure device for hemostasis. Upon repeat access 4 days later for coronary intervention, retrograde sheath angiography revealed a pseudo-aneurysm emanating from the center of the StarClose clip. Conclusions: A review of the literature shows VCDs to be non-inferior to MC, with an overall high success rate. Major and minor complications rates are comparable to those with MC, and pseudo-aneurysm is an infrequent complication. PMID:27026227

  9. Waves in geomaterials exhibiting negative stiffness behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esin, Maxim; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Negative stiffness denotes the type of material behaviour when the force applied to the body decreases the body's deformation increases. Some geomaterials, for instance, rocks, demonstrate behaviour of this type at certain loads: during the compression tests the loading curves exhibit descending branch (post-peak softening). One of the possible mechanisms of the negative stiffness appearance in geomaterials is rotation of non-spherical grains. It is important to emphasize that in this case the descending branch may be reversible given that the testing machine is stiff enough (in general case it means an importance of boundary conditions). Existence of geomaterials with a negative modulus associated with rotations may have significant importance. In particular, important is understanding of the wave propagation in such materials. We study the stability of geomaterials with negative stiffness inclusions and wave propagation in it using two approaches: Cosserat continuum and discrete mass-spring models. In both cases we consider the rotational degrees of freedom in addition to the conventional translational ones. We show that despite non positiveness of the energy the materials with negative stiffness elements can be stable if certain conditions are met. In the case of Cosserat continuum the Cosserat shear modulus (the modulus relating the non-symmetrical part of shear stress and internal rotations) is allowed to assume negative values as long as its value does not exceed the value of the standard (positive) shear modulus. In the case of discrete mass-spring systems (with translational and rotational springs) the concentration of negative stiffness springs and the absolute values of negative spring stiffness are limited. The critical concentration when the system loses stability and the amplitude of the oscillations tends to infinity is equal to 1/2 and 3/5 for two- and three-dimensional cases respectively.

  10. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery associated with monocular blindness and external carotid-vertebral artery anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Suo; Zhang, Hong T.; Zhang, Dao P.; Zhang, Shu L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present 2 rare cases of persistent embryonic anastomoses. In one case, the patient presented with persistent trigeminal artery along with multiple foci of cerebral infarction as well as central retinal artery thrombosis. In the other case, the patient had direct anastomosis of the vertebral artery with ipsilateral external carotid artery as well as pontine infarction, aneurysm, and unilateral hypoplasia of the vertebral artery. The findings in these cases may shed light on the clinical presentation of such persistent anastomoses and aid their detection in clinical settings. PMID:25935186

  11. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery associated with monocular blindness and external carotid-vertebral artery anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Suo; Zhang, Hong T; Zhang, Dao P; Zhang, Shu L

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present 2 rare cases of persistent embryonic anastomoses. In one case, the patient presented with persistent trigeminal artery along with multiple foci of cerebral infarction as well as central retinal artery thrombosis. In the other case, the patient had direct anastomosis of the vertebral artery with ipsilateral external carotid artery as well as pontine infarction, aneurysm, and unilateral hypoplasia of the vertebral artery. The findings in these cases may shed light on the clinical presentation of such persistent anastomoses and aid their detection in clinical settings. PMID:25935186

  12. Post-traumatic elbow rotational stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Samuel KK; Faan, Yan Sui; Lui, Paulina WY; Ngai, Wai Kit

    2014-01-01

    Background The elbow is an important but complex structure, with movement in both the sagittal plane in flexion and extension, as well as the rotational plane in forearm supination and pronation. Trauma is a common cause of elbow stiffness, which significantly hampers daily function. There are currently no gold-standard management guidelines for post-traumatic elbow stiffness, and most of the published literature focuses solely on the sagittal plane of motion. Methods This is a retrospective case series reviewing all patients who underwent a surgical release for treatment of post-traumatic elbow stiffness during a 36-month period. Motion range and the shortened version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scores were serially measured and analyzed. Results The results obtained showed that both the sagittal and rotational range of motion directly influenced upper limb function; however, the relationship between these two motion planes was weak, meaning that both sagittal and rotational motion in the elbow need be addressed individually. Post-traumatic elbow stiffness could be aptly managed by various surgical approaches, including arthroscopic-assisted procedures; these were all effective in increasing both the sagittal and rotational range of motion. More importantly, this gain in range translated to a statistically significant improvement in upper limb function. Conclusions Management of elbow stiffness needs to be tackled in both the sagittal and rotational motion planes.

  13. The impact of exercise on derived measures of central pressure and augmentation index obtained from the SphygmoCor device.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Ellen A; Black, Mark A; Pybis, Jennifer; Cable, N Timothy; Green, Daniel J

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether measures derived from the SphygmoCor device and its associated transfer function are influenced by exercise-induced alterations in vascular tone. Measurements were taken from either the exercised or the contralateral nonexercised limb during repeated and identical incremental hand-grip protocols. Eight male subjects performed three 3-min bouts of hand-grip exercise on two occasions. The exercise intensities were set at 3 kg, 5 kg, with a final 1.5-kg bout performed during cuff ischemia (1.5Isch). Blood pressure waveforms were recorded from the radial artery of either the exercised or nonexercised limb using applanation tonometry (SphygmoCor) during a 90-s rest period immediately after each exercise bout. Central blood pressures and augmentation indexes (AIx), an index of arterial stiffness, were derived using the peripheral waveform and the inbuilt SphygmoCor transfer function (TF). AIx was consistently approximately 10% higher in the exercised arm during all trials compared with the nonexercised limb. Similarly, there was a consistent and significant difference ( approximately 3 mmHg; P < 0.05) between exercised and nonexercised arms for the derived central systolic and mean arterial blood pressures. Despite identical bouts of exercise, AIx and central systolic and mean arterial blood pressures derived from applanation tonometry at the peripheral radial artery were statistically different when assessed at the exercising arm vs. the nonexercising arm. Changes in vascular tone with exercise may modify the intrinsic characteristics of the vessel wall and could compromise the assumptions underlying transfer functions used to derive central measures using applanation tonometry. PMID:19342433

  14. Hyper-damping properties of a stiff and stable linear oscillator with a negative stiffness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, I.; Chronopoulos, D.; Spitas, V.; Koulocheris, D.

    2015-06-01

    A simple, stiff, statically and dynamically stable linear oscillator incorporating a negative stiffness element is used as a template to provide a generic theoretical basis for a novel vibration damping and isolation concept. This oscillator is designed to present the same overall static stiffness, the same mass and to use the same damping element as a reference classical linear SDoF oscillator. Thus, no increase of the structure mass or the viscous damping is needed, as in the case of a traditional linear isolator, no decrease of the overall structure stiffness is required as in the case of 'zero-stiffness' oscillators with embedded negative stiffness elements. The difference from these two templates consists entirely in the proper redistribution and reallocation of the stiffness and the damping elements of the system. Once such an oscillator is optimally designed, it is shown to exhibit an extraordinary apparent damping ratio, which is even several orders of magnitude higher than that of the original SDoF system, especially in cases where the original damping of the SDoF system is extremely low. This extraordinary damping behavior is a result of the phase difference between the positive and the negative stiffness elastic forces, which is in turn a consequence of the proper redistribution of the stiffness and the damping elements. This fact ensures that an adequate level of elastic forces exists throughout the entire frequency range, able to counteract the inertial and the excitation forces. Consequently, a resonance phenomenon, which is inherent in the original linear SDoF system, cannot emerge in the proposed oscillator. The optimal parameter selection for the design of the negative stiffness oscillator is discussed. To further exhibit the advantages that such a design can generate, the suggested oscillator is implemented within a periodic acoustic metamaterial structure, inducing a radical increase in the damping of the propagating acoustic waves. The concept

  15. Nanoscale directional motion towards regions of stiffness.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tienchong; Zhang, Hongwei; Guo, Zhengrong; Guo, Xingming; Gao, Huajian

    2015-01-01

    How to induce nanoscale directional motion via some intrinsic mechanisms pertaining to a nanosystem remains a challenge in nanotechnology. Here we show via molecular dynamics simulations that there exists a fundamental driving force for a nanoscale object to move from a region of lower stiffness toward one of higher stiffness on a substrate. Such nanoscale directional motion is induced by the difference in effective van der Waals potential energy due to the variation in stiffness of the substrate; i.e., all other conditions being equal, a nanoscale object on a stiffer substrate has lower van der Waals potential energy. This fundamental law of nanoscale directional motion could lead to promising routes for nanoscale actuation and energy conversion. PMID:25615480

  16. Nanoscale Directional Motion towards Regions of Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tienchong; Zhang, Hongwei; Guo, Zhengrong; Guo, Xingming; Gao, Huajian

    2015-01-01

    How to induce nanoscale directional motion via some intrinsic mechanisms pertaining to a nanosystem remains a challenge in nanotechnology. Here we show via molecular dynamics simulations that there exists a fundamental driving force for a nanoscale object to move from a region of lower stiffness toward one of higher stiffness on a substrate. Such nanoscale directional motion is induced by the difference in effective van der Waals potential energy due to the variation in stiffness of the substrate; i.e., all other conditions being equal, a nanoscale object on a stiffer substrate has lower van der Waals potential energy. This fundamental law of nanoscale directional motion could lead to promising routes for nanoscale actuation and energy conversion.

  17. Hepatic and Splenic Stiffness Augmentation Assessed with MR Elastography in an in vivo Porcine Portal Hypertension Model

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Meng; Kolipaka, Arunark; Woodrum, David A.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Romano, Anthony J; Manduca, Armando; Talwalkar, Jayant A.; Araoz, Philip A.; McGee, Kiaran P.; Anavekar, Nandan S.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the influence of portal pressure on the shear stiffness of the liver and spleen in a well-controlled in vivo porcine model with MR Elastography (MRE). A significant correlation between portal pressure and tissue stiffness could be used to noninvasively assess increased portal venous pressure (portal hypertension), which is a frequent clinical condition caused by cirrhosis of the liver and is responsible for the development of many lethal complications. Materials and Methods During multiple intra-arterial infusions of Dextran-40 in three adult domestic pigs in vivo, 3-D abdominal MRE was performed with left ventricle and portal catheters measuring blood pressure simultaneously. Least-squares linear regressions were used to analyze the relationship between tissue stiffness and portal pressure. Results Liver and spleen stiffness have a dynamic component that increases significantly following an increase in portal or left ventricular pressure. Correlation coefficients with the linear regressions between stiffness and pressure exceeded 0.8 in most cases. Conclusion The observed stiffness-pressure relationship of the liver and spleen could provide a promising noninvasive method for assessing portal pressure. Using MRE to study the tissue mechanics associated with portal pressure may provide new insights into the natural history and pathophysiology of hepatic diseases and may have significant diagnostic value in the future. PMID:23418135

  18. The compressive stiffness of human pediatric heads.

    PubMed

    Loyd, Andre Matthew; Nightingale, Roger W; Luck, Jason F; Song, Yin; Fronheiser, Lucy; Cutcliffe, Hattie; Myers, Barry S; Dale Bass, Cameron R

    2015-11-01

    Head injury is a persistent and costly problem for both children and adults. Globally, approximately 10 million people are hospitalized each year for head injuries. Knowing the structural properties of the head is important for modeling the response of the head in impact, and for providing insights into mechanisms of head injury. Hence, the goal of this study was to measure the sub-injurious structural stiffness of whole pediatric heads. 12 cadaveric pediatric (20-week-gestation to 16 years old) heads were tested in a battery of viscoelastic compression tests. The heads were compressed in both the lateral and anterior-posterior directions to 5% of gauge length at normalized deformation rates of 0.0005/s, 0.01/s, 0.1/s, and 0.3/s. Because of the non-linear nature of the response, linear regression models were used to calculate toe region (<2.5%) and elastic region (>2.5%) stiffness separately so that meaningful comparisons could be made across rate, age, and direction. The results showed that age was the dominant factor in predicting the structural stiffness of the human head. A large and statistically significant increase in the stiffness of both the toe region and the elastic region was observed with increasing age (p<0.0001), but no significant difference was seen across direction or normalized deformation rate. The stiffness of the elastic region increased from as low as 5 N/mm in the neonate to >4500 N/mm in the 16 year old. The changes in stiffness with age may be attributed to the disappearance of soft sutures and the thickening of skull bones with age. PMID:26476760

  19. Non-axial muscle stress and stiffness.

    PubMed

    Zahalak, G I

    1996-09-01

    A generalization is developed of the classic two-state Huxley cross-bridge model to account for non-axial active stress and stiffness. The main ingredients of the model are: (i) a relation between the general three-dimensional deformation of an element of muscle and the deformations of the cross-bridges, that assumes macroscopic deformation is transmitted to the myofibrils, (ii) radial as well as axial cross-bridge stiffness, and (iii) variations of the attachment and detachment rates with lateral filament spacing. The theory leads to a generalized Huxley rate equation on the bond-distribution function, n(zeta, theta, t), of the form [equation: see text] where the Dij are the components of the relative velocity gradient and rho and ñ are functions of the polar angle, theta, and time that describe, respectively, the deformation of the myofilament lattice and the distribution of accessible actin sites (both of these functions can be calculated from the macroscopic deformation). Explicit expressions, in terms of n, are derived for the nine components of the active stress tensor, and the 21 non-vanishing components of the active stiffness tensor; the active stress tensor is found to be unsymmetric. The theory predicts that in general non-axial deformations will modify active axial stress and stiffness, and also give rise to non-axial (e.g., shearing) components. Under most circumstances the magnitudes of the non-axial stress and stiffness components will be small compared with the axial and, further, the effects of non-axial deformation rates will be small compared with those of the axial rate. Large transverse deformations may, however, greatly reduce the axial force and stiffness. The theory suggests a significant mechanical role for the non-contractile proteins in muscle, namely that of equilibrating the unsymmetric active stresses. Some simple applications of the theory are provided to illustrate its physical content. PMID:8917737