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1

Death Valley, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is an image of Death Valley, California, centered at 36.629 degrees north latitude, 117.069 degrees west longitude. The image shows Furnace Creek alluvial fan and Furnace Creek Ranch at the far right, and the sand dunes near Stove Pipe Wells at the center. The dark fork-shaped feature between Furnace Creek fan and the dunes is a smooth flood-plain which encloses Cottonball Basin. The bright dots near the center of the image are corner refectors that have been set-up to calibrate the radar as the Shuttle passes overhead with the SIR-C/X-SAR system. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43883.

1994-01-01

2

Death Valley California as seen from STS-59  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This oblique handheld Hasselblad 70mm photo shows Death Valley, near California's border with Nevada. The valley -- the central feature of Death Valley National Monument -- extends north to south for some 140 miles (225 kilometers). Hemmed in to the east by the Amargosa Range and to the west by the Panamints, its width varies from 5 to 15 miles (8 to 24 kilometers).

1994-01-01

3

Age and Elevations of High-Level OIS2 Pluvial Lake Manly Shorelines, Northern and Central Death Valley: Implications for Lacustrine Sequence Stratigraphy in Southern Death Valley and the OIS6 Pluvial Lake Level  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New 14C ages of algal tufa from high-level Lake Manly shorelines at the Beatty Bar Complex (BBC) in Northern Death Valley (NDV) and on the west flank of the Black Mountains in Central Death Valley (CDV) indicate that shoreline features at elevations of up to 46 m and 61 m, respectively, formed during the latest- Pleistocene, OIS2 pluvial-lake cycle rather than the earlier OIS6 lake cycle as commonly interpreted. In-situ algal tufa clast coatings in the highest shoreline gravel bar at the BBC yielded an age of 26.97±0.62 14C kyrs B.P. The prominent horizon of tufa coatings lies ~1.5 m below the bar crest (46 m) and is interpreted to mark the static elevation of the OIS2 Lake Manly highstand. The tufa age is consistent with the gravel bar's youthful geomorphic expression and generally weak soil development, a previously reported TL age of 24.0±2.5 ka from fine-grained lagoonal(?) deposits behind this same gravel bar (45 m), a thinolitc-tufa age of 16.40-15.75 cal yrs B.P. from Mesquite Flat (37 m), and U-series ages (9.6±3.3 and 30.1±3.3 ka) and associated deep-lake ostracodes from core in CDV. In CDV, 2.5 km north of Badwater, prominent shoreline beach rock and algal tufa lie in deposition against the steep footwall escarpment of Black Mountains fault zone (BMFZ) to an elevation of ~61 m. Algal tufa collected at ~55 m yielded an age of 24.55±0.33 14C kyrs B.P. indicating that OIS2 Lake Manly highstand shorelines in CDV now lie at least 15 m higher than in NDV. The lack of major vertical-slip-rate faults in NDV suggests absolute footwall uplift adjacent to the prominent BMFZ (ala Borah Peak) may account for the difference. In Southern Death Valley (SDV), new mapping and tephra ages have defined a series of 3 lacustrine sequences well exposed along eastern traces of the Southern Death Valley fault zone (SDVFZ): 1) a lower sequence of highly-folded, late-Pliocene strata containing ~3.4 Ma Mesquite Springs tephra (correlative to strata in the eastern Noble Hills); 2) a gently- folded middle sequence of early-to-middle-Pleistocene strata containing Glass Mountain (1.2-0.9 Ma) and Lava Creek (0.64 Ma) tephra (age-correlative to strata in the Confidence Hills); and 3) a non-folded upper sequence, which is not dated, but clearly unconformably overlies the folded middle sequence. The upper sequence also shows only minor displacement along the SDVFZ. The upper sequence lies at a maximum elevation of ~45 m, the same as the BBC highstand gravel bar 100 km to the north. Hence, we correlate the undeformed upper lacustrine sequence in SDV to the OIS2 phase of Lake Manly. Although previously dated OIS6 shorelines (120-186 ka) along the Black Mountains escarpment lie at an elevation of ~90 m, we have yet to identify an OIS6 sequence of lacustrine deposits in SDV. Again, following the concept of absolute footwall uplift along the BMFZ, it is possible that the OIS6 Lake Manly highstand was considerably lower than 90 m and didn't spill into SDV. A relatively lower OIS6 lake level (<46 m OIS2) is consistent with our current understanding of the regional paleohydrology. During the OIS6 lake phase, the Amargosa River terminated in Lake Tecopa, and major flow into Death Valley was perhaps limited to spillover from the Owens-Searles- Panamint lake chain. During the OIS2 lake phase, both the Amargosa and Mojave rivers flowed into Death Valley.

Caskey, S.; Lackey, H. G.; Klinger, R. E.; Wan, E.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A.

2006-12-01

4

Geology of Death Valley National Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site of the United States Geologic Survey (USGS) and the National Park Service (NPS) highlights the geologic history of Death Valley National Park in Nevada and California. The story begins 1.8 billion years ago with the formation of rocks and continues through uplift, faulting, volcanism, early animals of the area, glaciers, and the making of deserts and dunes. A geologic timescale connects to specific events in the history of Death Valley. There are topographic maps of the area, a field trip of the park, an image gallery, and technical papers available to download.

5

Interseismic deformation and geologic evolution of the Death Valley Fault Zone  

E-print Network

-slip faults and normal faults accommodating between 2 to 6 mm/yr of motion [Dixon et al., 1995; Bennett et al]. The BMFZ, also referred to as the Central Death Valley fault zone, is a normal and strike-slip fault systemInterseismic deformation and geologic evolution of the Death Valley Fault Zone Cecilia Del Pardo,1

Blewitt, Geoffrey

6

Geology Fieldnotes: Death Valley National Park, California/Nevada  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Death Valley National Park site contains park geology information, park maps, photographs, visitor information, and teacher features (resources for teaching geology using National Park examples). The Park Geology section contains an exaggerated cross-section showing the vertical rise within Death Valley. A link is provided to Death Valley's expanded geology page.

7

Surficial Geologic Map of the Death Valley Junction 30' x 60' Quadrangle, California and Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This surficial geologic map of the Death Valley Junction 30' x 60' quadrangle was compiled digitally at 1:100,000 scale. The map area covers the central part of Death Valley and adjacent mountain ranges - the Panamint Range on the west and the Funeral Mountains on the east - as well as areas east of Death Valley including some of the Amargosa Desert, the Spring Mountains and Pahrump Valley. Shaded relief delineates the topography and appears as gray tones in the mountain ranges where the bedrock is undifferentiated and depicted as a single unit.

Slate, Janet L.; Berry, Margaret E.; Menges, Christopher M.

2009-01-01

8

Space Radar Image of Death Valley, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image shows Death Valley, California, centered at 36.629 degrees north latitude, 117.069 degrees west longitude. The image shows Furnace Creek alluvial fan and Furnace Creek Ranch at the far right, and the sand dunes near Stove Pipe Wells at the center. The dark fork-shaped feature between Furnace Creek fan and the dunes is a smooth flood-plain which encloses Cottonball Basin. This SIR-C/X-SAR supersite is an area of extensive field investigations and has been visited by both Space Radar Lab astronaut crews. Elevations in the valley range from 70 meters (230 feet) below sea level, the lowest in the United States, to more than 3,300 meters (10,800 feet) above sea level. Scientists are using SIR-C/X-SAR data from Death Valley to help answer a number of different questions about Earth's geology. One question concerns how alluvial fans are formed and change through time under the influence of climatic changes and earthquakes. Alluvial fans are gravel deposits that wash down from the mountains over time. They are visible in the image as circular, fan-shaped bright areas extending into the darker valley floor from the mountains. Information about the alluvial fans helps scientists study Earth's ancient climate. Scientists know the fans are built up through climatic and tectonic processes and they will use the SIR-C/X-SAR data to understand the nature and rates of weathering processes on the fans, soil formation and the transport of sand and dust by the wind. SIR-C/X-SAR's sensitivity to centimeter-scale (inch-scale) roughness provides detailed maps of surface texture. Such information can be used to study the occurrence and movement of dust storms and sand dunes. The goal of these studies is to gain a better understanding of the record of past climatic changes and the effects of those changes on a sensitive environment. This may lead to a better ability to predict future response of the land to different potential global climate-change scenarios. Death Valley is also one of the primary calibration sites for SIR-C/X-SAR. The bright dots near the center of the image are corner reflectors that have been set-up to calibrate the radar as the shuttle passes overhead. Thirty triangular-shaped reflectors (they look like aluminum pyramids) have been deployed by the calibration team from JPL over a 40- by 40-kilometer (25- by 25-mile) area in and around Death Valley. The calibration team will also deploy transponders (electronic reflectors) and receivers to measure the radar signals from SIR-C/X-SAR on the ground. SIR-C/X-SAR is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI).

1999-01-01

9

Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California  

E-print Network

chinook salmon life history. Redding, California: CH2M Hill.history of salmon and people in the Central Valley region of California.history of salmon and people in the Central Valley region of California.

Williams, John G.

2006-01-01

10

3D View of Death Valley, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This 3-D perspective view looking north over Death Valley, California, was produced by draping ASTER nighttime thermal infrared data over topographic data from the US Geological Survey. The ASTER data were acquired April 7, 2000 with the multi-spectral thermal infrared channels, and cover an area of 60 by 80 km (37 by 50 miles). Bands 13, 12, and 10 are displayed in red, green and blue respectively. The data have been computer enhanced to exaggerate the color variations that highlight differences in types of surface materials. Salt deposits on the floor of Death Valley appear in shades of yellow, green, purple, and pink, indicating presence of carbonate, sulfate, and chloride minerals. The Panamint Mtns. to the west, and the Black Mtns. to the east, are made up of sedimentary limestones, sandstones, shales, and metamorphic rocks. The bright red areas are dominated by the mineral quartz, such as is found in sandstones; green areas are limestones. In the lower center part of the image is Badwater, the lowest point in North America.

Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties, wetlands Evaluation, thermal pollution monitoring, coral reef degradation, surface temperature mapping of soils and geology, and measuring surface heat balance.

2000-01-01

11

The Shape of Trail Canyon Alluvial Fan, Death Valley  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A modified conic equation has been fit to high-resolution digital topographic data for Trail Canyon alluvial fan in Death Valley, California. Fits were accomplished for 3 individual fan units of different age.

Farr, Tom G.; Dohrenwend, John C.

1993-01-01

12

Life in Death Valley: The Mystery of the Racing Rocks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This PBS site provides information of the mysterious sliding rocks in Death Valley, reviews competing hypotheses, and features the work of a geologist using GPS in her investigation. The site includes a photo of a rock and its track.

2010-06-29

13

Curie Point Depth Estimates from Aeromagnetic Data from Death Valley and Surrounding Regions, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aeromagnetic data were analyzed to determine the Curie point depth (CPD) by power density spectral and three-dimensional inversion methods within and surrounding Death Valley in southern California. We calculated the CPD for 0.5° regions using 2D power density spectral methods and found that the CPDs varied between 8 and 17 km. However, the 0.5° region may average areas that include shallow and deep CPDs, and because of this limitation, we used the 3D inversion method to determine if this method may provide better resolution of the CPDs. The final 3D model indicates that the depth to the bottom of the magnetic susceptible bodies varies between 5 and 23 km. Even though both methods produced roughly similar results, the 3D inversion method produced a higher lateral resolution of the CPDs. The shallowest CPDs occur within the central and southern Death Valley, Panamint Valley, Coso geothermal field and the Tecopa hot springs region. Deeper (>15 km) CPDs occur over outcropping granitic and Precambrian lithologies in the Panamint Range, Grapevine Mountains, Black Mountains and the Argus Range. The shallowest CPD occurs within the central Death Valley over a possible seismically imaged magma body and slightly deeper values occur within the Panamint Valley, southern Death Valley and Tecopa Hot Springs. The shallow CPD values suggest that partially molten material may also be found in these latter regions. The CPD computed heat flow values for the region suggest that the entire area has high heat flow values (>100 mW m-2), on the other hand, locally extremely high values (>200 mW m-2) occur within the Panamint Valley, the southern and central Death Valley and Tecopa Hot Springs region. These locally high heat flow values may be related to midcrustal magma bodies; but additional geophysical experiments are needed to determine if the magma bodies exist.

Hussein, Musa; Mickus, Kevin; Serpa, Laura F.

2013-04-01

14

October 14, 2011 One road out of ,,the Valley of Death  

E-print Network

October 14, 2011 One road out of ,,the Valley of Death Rosibel Ochoa, Geert Schmid-Schonbein & John? You wouldnt if youd ever heard of the "Valley of Death." The Valley of Death represents the funding are developing "proof of concept" centers that help startup companies survive the Valley of Death. One

Russell, Lynn

15

Comparative Study of Pull-Apart Basins: The Salton Trough and Death Valley, California Regions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To unravel the forces and better understand the processes that drive continental rifting, we integrate new and previously collected data from two Californian pull-apart basins: the Salton Trough and Death Valley. In particular, we compute receiver functions and process gravity and aeromagnetic data to constrain crustal structure, and then compare the results from the two rift areas. South of the Salton Sea, the Moho is 22 km deep and deepens to 30 km in the region west of the Salton Trough. In Death Valley, the Moho is 24 km deep in the central part of the basin, deepens to 32 km out of the basin, and is dome shaped because of magmatic activity in the lower crust and upper mantle. The density of the lower crust for the Salton Trough and for Death Valley is similar (2950 kg/m3 and 2900 kg/m3, respectively), while the density of the upper crust varies from 2650 kg/m3 to 2450 kg/m3 in the Salton Trough and from 2600 kg/m3 to 2250 kg/m3 in Death Valley. Rifting style and magnitude vary significantly between the two areas. The Salton Trough is generally a wide, well developed rift that is moving toward sea floor spreading. A combination of thermal and sedimentation drive rifting processes in the Salton Trough. In contrast Death Valley is smaller in size than the Salton Trough and it is a narrow depression. Death Valley is in the initial stage of rifting and magmatic (thermal) forces appears to drive the rifting process in Death Valley.

Hussein, M. J.; Velasco, A. A.; Serpa, L. F.

2010-12-01

16

G-SRT Mt. Whitney to Death Valley  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: The Morris family is on a road trip through California. One day they are driving from Death Valley to Sequoia National Park. Death Valley is home to th...

17

The Black Mountains turtlebacks: Rosetta stones of Death Valley tectonics  

E-print Network

The Black Mountains turtlebacks: Rosetta stones of Death Valley tectonics Marli B. Miller a, United States Accepted 1 April 2005 Abstract The Black Mountains turtlebacks expose mid-crustal rock along the western front of the Black Mountains. As such, they provide keys to understanding the Tertiary

Miller, Marli Bryant

18

Precambrian-Cambrian transition: Death Valley, United States  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Death Valley region contains one of the best exposed and often visited Precambrian-Cambrian successions in the world, but the chronostratigraphic framework necessary for understanding the critical biologic and geologic events recorded in these sections has been inadequate. The recent discovery of Treptichnus (Phycodes) pedum within the uppermost parasequence of the lower member of the Wood Canyon Formation allows correlation of the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary to this region and provides a necessary global tie point for the Death Valley section. New carbon isotope chemostratigraphic profiles bracket this biostratigraphic datum and record the classic negative carbon isotope excursion at the boundary. For the first time, biostratigraphic, chemostratigraphic, and lithostratigraphic information from pretrilobite strata in this region can be directly compared with similar data from other key sections that record the precursors of the Cambrian explosion. Few Precambrian-Cambrian boundary sections contain both the facies-restricted boundary fossil T. pedum and carbon isotope data, as found in Death Valley. Thus, the Death Valley succession provides a critical link toward our understanding of the correlation between siliciclastic-dominated and carbonate-dominated Precambrian-Cambrian transition sections.

Corsetti, Frank A.; Hagadorn, James W.

2000-04-01

19

Kinematics at Death Valley-Garlock fault zone junction  

SciTech Connect

The Garlock and Death Valley fault zones in southeast California are two active strike-slip faults that come together on the east side of the Avawatz Mountains. The kinematics of this intersection, and the possible continuation of either fault zone, is being investigated using a combination of detailed field mapping, and processing and interpretation of remotely sensed image data from satellite and aircraft platforms. Regional and local relationships are derivable from the thematic Mapper data (30 m resolution), including discrimination and relative age dating of alluvial fans, bedrock mapping, and fault mapping. Aircraft data provide higher spatial resolution data over more limited areas. Hypotheses that are being considered are (1) the Garlock fault extends east of the intersection; (2) the Garlock fault terminates at the intersection and the Death Valley fault continues southeastward; and (3) the Garlock fault has been offset right laterally by the Death Valley fault that continues to the southeast. Preliminary work indicates that the first hypothesis is invalid. Kinematic considerations, image analysis, and field work results favor the third hypothesis. The projected continuation of the Death Valley zone defines the boundary between the Mojave crustal block and the Basin and Range block.

Abrams, R.B.; Verosub, K.; Finnerty, A.

1987-08-01

20

State Partnership for Energy Efficient Demonstrations: Market Transformation Partnerships for Crossing the "Valley of Death"  

E-print Network

for Crossing the "Valley of Death" Karl Johnson, California Institute for Energy and Environment David succumb to the "valley of death," a set of perilous barriers to market introduction that can prevent best

California at Davis, University of

21

Microscopic identification of prokaryotes in modern and ancient halite, Saline Valley and Death Valley, California.  

PubMed

Primary fluid inclusions in halite crystallized in Saline Valley, California, in 1980, 2004-2005, and 2007, contain rod- and coccoid-shaped microparticles the same size and morphology as archaea and bacteria living in modern brines. Primary fluid inclusions from a well-dated (0-100,000 years), 90 m long salt core from Badwater Basin, Death Valley, California, also contain microparticles, here interpreted as halophilic and halotolerant prokaryotes. Prokaryotes are distinguished from crystals on the basis of morphology, optical properties (birefringence), and uniformity of size. Electron micrographs of microparticles from filtered modern brine (Saline Valley), dissolved modern halite crystals (Saline Valley), and dissolved ancient halite crystals (Death Valley) support in situ microscopic observations that prokaryotes are present in fluid inclusions in ancient halite. In the Death Valley salt core, prokaryotes in fluid inclusions occur almost exclusively in halite precipitated in perennial saline lakes 10,000 to 35,000 years ago. This suggests that trapping and preservation of prokaryotes in fluid inclusions is influenced by the surface environment in which the halite originally precipitated. In all cases, prokaryotes in fluid inclusions in halite from the Death Valley salt core are miniaturized (<1 microm diameter cocci, <2.5 microm long, very rare rod shapes), which supports interpretations that the prokaryotes are indigenous to the halite and starvation survival may be the normal response of some prokaryotes to entrapment in fluid inclusions for millennia. These results reinforce the view that fluid inclusions in halite and possibly other evaporites are important repositories of microbial life and should be carefully examined in the search for ancient microorganisms on Earth, Mars, and elsewhere in the Solar System. PMID:19566426

Schubert, Brian A; Lowenstein, Tim K; Timofeeff, Michael N

2009-06-01

22

Imaging Radar Applications in the Death Valley Region  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Death Valley has had a long history as a testbed for remote sensing techniques (Gillespie, this conference). Along with visible-near infrared and thermal IR sensors, imaging radars have flown and orbited over the valley since the 1970's, yielding new insights into the geologic applications of that technology. More recently, radar interferometry has been used to derive digital topographic maps of the area, supplementing the USGS 7.5' digital quadrangles currently available for nearly the entire area. As for their shorter-wavelength brethren, imaging radars were tested early in their civilian history in Death Valley because it has a variety of surface types in a small area without the confounding effects of vegetation. In one of the classic references of these early radar studies, in a semi-quantitative way the response of an imaging radar to surface roughness near the radar wavelength, which typically ranges from about 1 cm to 1 m was explained. This laid the groundwork for applications of airborne and spaceborne radars to geologic problems in and regions. Radar's main advantages over other sensors stems from its active nature- supplying its own illumination makes it independent of solar illumination and it can also control the imaging geometry more accurately. Finally, its long wavelength allows it to peer through clouds, eliminating some of the problems of optical sensors, especially in perennially cloudy and polar areas.

Farr, Tom G.

1996-01-01

23

Into the valley of death: research to innovation.  

PubMed

The phase between research and successful innovation is known as the valley of death. Increasingly, researchers from the pharmaceutical industry and academia are working together, often encouraged by governments, to cross this 'valley' as they seek to bring basic research to the market. This is consistent with newer models of innovation policy that stress interaction between the different agents across the innovation process. Here, we examine this interaction in the UK, the EU and the USA using several specific examples, suggesting that cooperation is still far from perfect and that the return for academia on its research investment is relatively small. Countries are also beginning to use research as a tool of industrial economic policy. PMID:23402848

Hudson, John; Khazragui, Hanan F

2013-07-01

24

Principal facts for gravity stations in the Death Valley region, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Observed gravity values, station locations, terrain corrections, and Bouguer gravity data are provided in tabular form for approximately 1,500 gravity observations in eastern California. Coverage includes Saline Valley, Panamint Valley, Searles Basin, Death Valley, the southern Amargosa Desert and the enclosed and adjoining highlands. These data were used in preparation of -- Mabey, Don R., 1963, Complete Bouguer anomaly map of the Death Valley region, California: U.S. Geol. Survey Geophys. Inv. Map GP-305.

Mabey, Don R.

1972-01-01

25

Imaging Radar in the Mojave Desert-Death Valley Region  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mojave Desert-Death Valley region has had a long history as a test bed for remote sensing techniques. Along with visible-near infrared and thermal IR sensors, imaging radars have flown and orbited over the area since the 1970's, yielding new insights into the geologic applications of these technologies. More recently, radar interferometry has been used to derive digital topographic maps of the area, supplementing the USGS 7.5' digital quadrangles currently available for nearly the entire area. As for their shorter-wavelength brethren, imaging radars were tested early in their civilian history in the Mojave Desert-Death Valley region because it contains a variety of surface types in a small area without the confounding effects of vegetation. The earliest imaging radars to be flown over the region included military tests of short-wavelength (3 cm) X-band sensors. Later, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory began its development of imaging radars with an airborne sensor, followed by the Seasat orbital radar in 1978. These systems were L-band (25 cm). Following Seasat, JPL embarked upon a series of Space Shuttle Imaging Radars: SIRA (1981), SIR-B (1984), and SIR-C (1994). The most recent in the series was the most capable radar sensor flown in space and acquired large numbers of data swaths in a variety of test areas around the world. The Mojave Desert-Death Valley region was one of those test areas, and was covered very well with 3 wavelengths, multiple polarizations, and at multiple angles. At the same time, the JPL aircraft radar program continued improving and collecting data over the Mojave Desert Death Valley region. Now called AIRSAR, the system includes 3 bands (P-band, 67 cm; L-band, 25 cm; C-band, 5 cm). Each band can collect all possible polarizations in a mode called polarimetry. In addition, AIRSAR can be operated in the TOPSAR mode wherein 2 antennas collect data interferometrically, yielding a digital elevation model (DEM). Both L-band and C-band can be operated in this way, with horizontal resolution of about 5 m and vertical errors less than 2 m. The findings and developments of these earlier investigations are discussed.

Farr, Tom G.

2001-01-01

26

Color Image of Death Valley, California from SIR-C  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This radar image shows the area of Death Valley, California and the different surface types in the area. Radar is sensitive to surface roughness with rough areas showing up brighter than smooth areas, which appear dark. This is seen in the contrast between the bright mountains that surround the dark, smooth basins and valleys of Death Valley. The image shows Furnace Creek alluvial fan (green crescent feature) at the far right, and the sand dunes near Stove Pipe Wells at the center. Alluvial fans are gravel deposits that wash down from the mountains over time. Several other alluvial fans (semicircular features) can be seen along the mountain fronts in this image. The dark wrench-shaped feature between Furnace Creek fan and the dunes is a smooth flood-plain which encloses Cottonball Basin. Elevations in the valley range from 70 meters (230 feet) below sea level, the lowest in the United States, to more than 3,300 meters (10,800 feet) above sea level. Scientists are using these radar data to help answer a number of different questions about Earth's geology including how alluvial fans form and change through time in response to climatic changes and earthquakes. The image is centered at 36.629 degrees north latitude, 117.069 degrees west longitude. Colors in the image represent different radar channels as follows: red =L-band horizontally polarized transmitted, horizontally polarized received (LHH); green =L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received (LHV) and blue = CHV.

SIR-C/X-SAR is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI).

1999-01-01

27

In the Death Valley region of the Mojave Desert, the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian boundary  

E-print Network

ABSTRACT In the Death Valley region of the Mojave Desert, the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian boundary lies States. In the Death Valley region of the southwestern Mojave Desert, the Neoproterozoic. Locality map. Inset map shows state of Nevada, with Nye County indicated in black. #12;Stirling Quartzite

Hagadorn, Whitey

28

Factors influencing species diversity in saline waters of Death Valley, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Salinity is a major factor influencing the distributions and abundances of aquatic macroinvertebrates of saline waters in Death Valley, California, USA. A general pattern of declining numbers of species with increasing salinity is seen in Death Valley waters. Some species are restricted to low salinities, others are found only in highly saline pools, and still others are widely distributed over

Elizabeth A. Colburn

1988-01-01

29

Space Radar Image of Death Valley in 3-D  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This picture is a three-dimensional perspective view of Death Valley, California. This view was constructed by overlaying a SIR-C radar image on a U.S. Geological Survey digital elevation map. The SIR-C image is centered at 36.629 degrees north latitude and 117.069 degrees west longitude. We are looking at Stove Pipe Wells, which is the bright rectangle located in the center of the picture frame. Our vantage point is located atop a large alluvial fan centered at the mouth of Cottonwood Canyon. In the foreground on the left, we can see the sand dunes near Stove Pipe Wells. In the background on the left, the Valley floor gradually falls in elevation toward Badwater, the lowest spot in the United States. In the background on the right we can see Tucki Mountain. This SIR-C/X-SAR supersite is an area of extensive field investigations and has been visited by both Space Radar Lab astronaut crews. Elevations in the Valley range from 70 meters (230 feet) below sea level, the lowest in the United States, to more than 3,300 meters (10,800 feet) above sea level. Scientists are using SIR-C/X-SAR data from Death Valley to help the answer a number of different questions about Earth's geology. One question concerns how alluvial fans are formed and change through time under the influence of climatic changes and earthquakes. Alluvial fans are gravel deposits that wash down from the mountains over time. They are visible in the image as circular, fan-shaped bright areas extending into the darker valley floor from the mountains. Information about the alluvial fans helps scientists study Earth's ancient climate. Scientists know the fans are built up through climatic and tectonic processes and they will use the SIR-C/X-SAR data to understand the nature and rates of weathering processes on the fans, soil formation and the transport of sand and dust by the wind. SIR-C/X-SAR's sensitivity to centimeter-scale (inch-scale) roughness provides detailed maps of surface texture. Such information can be used to study the occurrence and movement of dust storms and sand dunes. The goal of these studies is to gain a better understanding of the record of past climatic changes and the effects of those changes on a sensitive environment. This may lead to a better ability to predict future response of the land to different potential global climate-change scenarios. Vertical exaggeration is 1.87 times; exaggeration of relief is a common tool scientists use to detect relationships between structure (for example, faults and fractures) and topography. Death Valley is also one of the primary calibration sites for SIR-C/X-SAR. In the lower right quadrant of the picture frame two bright dots can be seen which form a line extending to Stove Pipe Wells. These dots are corner reflectors that have been set up to calibrate the radar as the shuttle passes overhead. Thirty triangular-shaped reflectors (they look like aluminum pyramids) have been deployed by the calibration team from JPL over a 40- by 40-kilometer (25- by 25-mile) area in and around Death Valley. The signatures of these reflectors were analyzed by JPL scientists to calibrate the image used in this picture. The calibration team here also deployed transponders (electronic reflectors) and receivers to measure the radar signals from SIR-C/X-SAR on the ground. SIR-C/X-SAR radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, in conjunction with aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche

1999-01-01

30

California's Central Valley Groundwater Study: A Powerful New Tool to Assess Water Resources in California's Central Valley  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Competition for water resources is growing throughout California, particularly in the Central Valley. Since 1980, the Central Valley's population has nearly doubled to 3.8 million people. It is expected to increase to 6 million by 2020. Statewide population growth, anticipated reductions in Colorado River water deliveries, drought, and the ecological crisis in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta have created an intense demand for water. Tools and information can be used to help manage the Central Valley aquifer system, an important State and national resource.

Faunt, Claudia C.; Hanson, Randall T.; Belitz, Kenneth; Rogers, Laurel

2009-01-01

31

ANALYSIS OF LOTIC MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES IN CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY  

EPA Science Inventory

Using multivariate and cluster analyses, we examined the relaitonships between chemical and physical characteristics and macroinvertebrate assemblages at sites sampled by R-EMAP in California's Central Valley. By contrasting results where community structure was summarized as met...

32

A REGIONAL ASSESSMENT OF METHYLMERCURY DISCHARGES FROM MUNICIPAL TREATMENT PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY  

Microsoft Academic Search

This regional study of methylmercury in effluent and receiving waters of Central Valley dischargers was initiated by Central Valley Clean Water Association (CVCWA) in response to an order issued by California's Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (Water Board). The order requires Central Valley NPDES permit holders to monitor for methylmercury in their effluent discharges. According to the order,

K. E. Abu-Saba; J. Leng; W. Tellefson; J. McCall; A. O'Brien; Tony Pirondini; M. Paulucci; V. Fry; S. Gittings; C. Hartinger; T. Grovhoug; T. Dunham

33

Geostatistical estimates of future recharge for the Death Valley region  

SciTech Connect

Spatially distributed estimates of regional ground water recharge rates under both current and potential future climates are needed to evaluate a potential geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which is located within the Death Valley ground-water region (DVGWR). Determining the spatial distribution of recharge is important for regional saturated-zone ground-water flow models. In the southern Nevada region, the Maxey-Eakin method has been used for estimating recharge based on average annual precipitation. Although this method does not directly account for a variety of location-specific factors which control recharge (such as bedrock permeability, soil cover, and net radiation), precipitation is the primary factor that controls in the region. Estimates of recharge obtained by using the Maxey-Eakin method are comparable to estimates of recharge obtained by using chloride balance studies. The authors consider the Maxey-Eakin approach as a relatively simple method of obtaining preliminary estimates of recharge on a regional scale.

Hevesi, J.A. [Geological Survey, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Flint, A.L. [Geological Survey, Sacramento, CA (United States)

1998-12-01

34

Morphological and Geomicrobiological Characteristics of an Endolithic Microbial Community from the Badwater Basin, Death Valley, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

ESEM-EDS studies of an endolithic evaporite community from Death Valley revealed its ability to sequester water and affect the partitioning of trace metals in this environment. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

Douglas, S.

2001-01-01

35

Causes of Death among Aka Pygmies of the Central  

E-print Network

questioned about the illness (bokono) that caused the death oftheir parent spouse, or child, the approximateCauses of Death among Aka Pygmies of the Central African Republicl Barry S. Hewlett, Jan M. H. and Maria van de Koppel, van de Koppel Death comes like the rain, suddenlv 3.1. Aims of the Investigation

36

Sediment Flux Variation in Two Central Valley Rivers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physical processes such as water and sediment movement exert strong influences on species and habitats in Central Valley streams and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. In particular, accrual of sediment is critical to restoring ecological function to those areas that have previously been isolated from streams by levees. The present work quantifies the differences in flow and sediment flux regimes in

E. Fleenor; S. Geoffrey Schladow

37

The Decline of Amphibians in California's Great Central Valley  

Microsoft Academic Search

Declines in amphibian populations are rarely reported on the community or ecosystem level. We combined broad-scale field sampling with historical analyses of museum records to quantify amphibian de- clines in California's Great Central Valley. Overall, amphibians showed an unambiguous pattern of decline, although the intensity of decline varied both geographically and taxonomically. The greatest geographical de- cline was detected in

Robert N. Fisher; H. Bradley Shaffer

1996-01-01

38

78 FR 75332 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; California Central Valley Angler Survey  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...California Central Valley Angler Survey AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric...Central Valley steelhead). The survey is intended to estimate the economic...complete a voluntary mail-based survey questionnaire. III. Data OMB Control...

2013-12-11

39

Geologic map of the southern Funeral Mountains including nearby groundwater discharge sites in Death Valley National Park, California and Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This 1:50,000-scale geologic map covers the southern part of the Funeral Mountains, and adjoining parts of four structural basins—Furnace Creek, Amargosa Valley, Opera House, and central Death Valley—in California and Nevada. It extends over three full 7.5-minute quadrangles, and parts of eleven others—an area of about 1,000 square kilometers (km2). The boundaries of this map were drawn to include all of the known proximal hydrogeologic features that may affect the flow of groundwater that discharges from springs of the Furnace Creek basin, in the west-central part of the map. These springs provide the main potable water supply for Death Valley National Park. Major hydrogeologic features shown on this map include: (1) springs of the Furnace Creek basin, (2) a large Pleistocene groundwater discharge mound in the northeastern part of the map, (3) the exposed extent of limestones and dolomites that constitute the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer, and (4) the exposed extent of the alluvial conglomerates that constitute the Funeral Formation aquifer.

Fridrich, C.J.; Thompson, R.A.; Slate, J.L.; Berry, M.E.; Machette, M.N.

2012-01-01

40

Structure and petrology of gouge and breccia bearing shallow crustal shear zones of detachment faults in Death Valley, California.  

E-print Network

??The Black Mountain (Death Valley, CA) low angle normal, detachment faults place Pliocene-Quaternary sediment against crystalline rocks. High angle normal faults extend the sedimentary section… (more)

Hayman, Nicholas W

2005-01-01

41

Mapping playa evaporite minerals with AVIRIS data - A first report from Death Valley, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility of using imaging spectrometry in studies of playa evaporites is demonstrated by mapping efflorescent salt crusts in Death Valley (California), using Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data and a recently developed least-squares spectral band-fitting algorithm. It is shown that it was possible to remotely identify eight different saline minerals, including three borates that have not been previously reported for the Death Valley efflorescent crusts: hydroboracite, pinnoite, and rivadavite. The three borates are locally important phases in the crusts; at least one of them, rivadavite, appears to be forming directly from brine.

Crowley, James K.

1993-01-01

42

Shewanella diversity and abundance in Keane Wonder Spring, Death Valley National Park Alexander B. Michaud1, Duane P. Moser2  

E-print Network

Shewanella diversity and abundance in Keane Wonder Spring, Death Valley National Park Alexander B, 89119 Shewanella diversity and abundance in Keane Wonder Spring, Death Valley National Park Alexander B North KWL Image courtesy of Google Earth 0 50000 100000 150000 200000 250000 KWU KWM KWL Sample Site

Walker, Lawrence R.

43

Winter habitat associations of diurnal raptors in Californias Central Valley  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The wintering raptors of California's Central Valley are abundant and diverse. Despite this, little information exists on the habitats used by these birds in winter. We recorded diurnal raptors along 19 roadside survey routes throughout the Central Valley for three consecutive winters between 2007 and 2010. We obtained data sufficient to determine significant positive and negative habitat associations for the White-tailed Kite (Elanus leucurus), Bald Eagle {Haliaeetus leucocephalus), Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus), Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), Ferruginous Hawk (Buteo regalis), Rough-legged Hawk (Buteo lagopus), American Kestrel (Falco sparverius), and Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus). The Prairie Falcon and Ferruginous and Rough-legged hawks showed expected strong positive associations with grasslands. The Bald Eagle and Northern Harrier were positively associated not only with wetlands but also with rice. The strongest positive association for the White-tailed Kite was with wetlands. The Red-tailed Hawk was positively associated with a variety of habitat types but most strongly with wetlands and rice. The American Kestrel, Northern Harrier, and White-tailed Kite were positively associated with alfalfa. Nearly all species were negatively associated with urbanized landscapes, orchards, and other intensive forms of agriculture. The White-tailed Kite, Northern Harrier, Redtailed Hawk, Ferruginous Hawk, and American Kestrel showed significant negative associations with oak savanna. Given the rapid conversion of the Central Valley to urban and intensive agricultural uses over the past few decades, these results have important implications for conservation of these wintering raptors in this region.

Pandolrno, E.R.; Herzog, M.P.; Hooper, S.L.; Smith, Z.

2011-01-01

44

Comparison of inversion models using AIRSAR data for Death Valley, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data were collected for the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) over Death Valley, California, USA, in September 1989. AIRSAR is a four-look, quid-polarizaiton, three frequency instrument. It collects measurements at C-band (5.66 cm), L-band (23.98 cm), and P-band (68.13 cm), and has a GIFOV of 10 meters and a swath width of 12 kilometers. Because the radar measures at three wavelengths, different scales of surface roughness are measured. Also, dielectric constants can be calculated from the data. The scene used in this study is in Death Valley, California and is located over Trail Canyon alluvial fan, the valley floor, and Artists Drive alluvial fan. The fans are very different in mineralogic makeup, size, and surface roughness. Trail Canyon fan is located on the west side of the valley at the base of the Panamint Range and is a large fan with older areas of desert pavement and younger active channels. The source for the material on southern part of the fan is mostly quartzites and there is an area of carbonate source on the northern part of the fan. Artists Drive fan is located at the base of the Black Mountains on the east side of the valley and is a smaller, young fan with its source mostly from volcanic rocks. The valley floor contains playa and salt deposits that range from smooth to Devil's Golf course type salt pinnacles.

Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.

1993-01-01

45

Mapping playa evaporite minerals and associated sediments in Death Valley, California, with multispectral thermal infrared images  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effiorescent salt crusts and associated sediments in Death Valley, California, were studied with remote-sensing data acquired by the NASA thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS). Nine spectral classes that represent a variety of surface materials were distinguished, including several classes that reflect important aspects of the playa groundwater chemistry and hydrology. Evaporite crusts containing abundant thenardite (sodium sulfate) were mapped along

James K. Crowley; Simon J. Hook

1996-01-01

46

Isostatic gravity map of the Death Valley ground-water model area, Nevada and California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An isostatic gravity map of the Death Valley groundwater model area was prepared from over 40,0000 gravity stations as part of an interagency effort by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Department of Energy to help characterize the geology and hydrology of southwest Nevada and parts of California.

Ponce, D.A.; Blakely, R.J.; Morin, R.L.; Mankinen, E.A.

2001-01-01

47

Central Pit Craters with Interior Valley Networks on Mars: Characteristics and Formation Processes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Valley networks in central pit craters are examined to characterize their morphology and morphometry, assess their hydrology and formative conditions, and investigate the relationship of valley initiation to the formation of the host craters.

Peel, S. E.; Fassett, C. I.

2012-03-01

48

A new hypothesis for the amount and distribution of dextral displacement along the Fish Lake Valley-northern Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault zone, California-Nevada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Fish Lake Valley-northern Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault zone, a ~250 km long, predominantly right-lateral structure in California and Nevada, is a key element in tectonic reconstructions of the Death Valley area, Eastern California Shear Zone and Walker Lane, and central Basin and Range Province. Total displacement on the fault zone is contested, however, with estimates ranging from ~30 to ~63 km or more. Here we present a new synthesis of available constraints. Preextensional thrust faults, folds, and igneous rocks indicate that offset reaches a maximum of ~50 km. Neogene rocks constrain its partitioning over time. Most offset is interpreted as ? ~13-10 Ma, accruing at ~3-5 mm/yr in the middle of the fault zone and more slowly toward the tips. The offset markers imply ~68 ± 14 km of translation between the Cottonwood Mountains and Resting Spring-Nopah Range (~60 ± 14 km since ~15 Ma) through a combination of strike slip and crustal extension. This suggests that a previous interpretation of ~104 ± 7 km, based on the middle Miocene Eagle Mountain Formation, is an overestimate by ~50%. Our results also help to mitigate a discrepancy in the ~12-0 Ma strain budget for the Eastern California Shear Zone. Displacement has previously been estimated at ~100 ± 10 km and ~67 ± 6 km for the Basin and Range and Mojave portions of the shear zone, respectively. Our new estimate of ~74 ± 17 km for the Basin and Range is within the uncertainty of the Mojave estimate.

Renik, Byrdie; Christie-Blick, Nicholas

2013-03-01

49

Effects of groundwater development on uranium: Central Valley, California, USA.  

PubMed

Uranium (U) concentrations in groundwater in several parts of the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California, have exceeded federal and state drinking water standards during the last 20 years. The San Joaquin Valley is located within the Central Valley of California and is one of the most productive agricultural areas in the world. Increased irrigation and pumping associated with agricultural and urban development during the last 100 years have changed the chemistry and magnitude of groundwater recharge, and increased the rate of downward groundwater movement. Strong correlations between U and bicarbonate suggest that U is leached from shallow sediments by high bicarbonate water, consistent with findings of previous work in Modesto, California. Summer irrigation of crops in agricultural areas and, to lesser extent, of landscape plants and grasses in urban areas, has increased Pco(2) concentrations in the soil zone and caused higher temperature and salinity of groundwater recharge. Coupled with groundwater pumping, this process, as evidenced by increasing bicarbonate concentrations in groundwater over the last 100 years, has caused shallow, young groundwater with high U concentrations to migrate to deeper parts of the groundwater system that are tapped by public-supply wells. Continued downward migration of U-affected groundwater and expansion of urban centers into agricultural areas will likely be associated with increased U concentrations in public-supply wells. The results from this study illustrate the potential long-term effects of groundwater development and irrigation-supported agriculture on water quality in arid and semiarid regions around the world. PMID:19788559

Jurgens, Bryant C; Fram, Miranda S; Belitz, Kenneth; Burow, Karen R; Landon, Matthew K

2010-01-01

50

Permian-Triassic plutonism and tectonics, Death Valley region, California and Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Significant contractional structures that deform Permian rocks but predate an Early Triassic overlap sequence are recognized within the Cordilleran orogen, western US. Thrusting in the Death Valley region of the orogen, however, has been regarded as Middle Triassic or younger and thus kinematically distinct. The authors present new isotopic age limits on two posttectonic stocks that intrude major structures of the Death Valley thrust belt. The stocks are no younger than Middle Triassic, but are likely Late Permian in age, consistent with stratigraphic and structural data suggesting that thrusting predates the overlap sequence. The authors hypothesize that Permian shortening may have affected more than 700 km of the Cordilleran orogen at the same time arc activity began within cratonic North America but prior to Early Triassic emplacement of the structurally higher Sonomian arc terrane.

Snow, J.K.; Asmerom, Y. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Lux, D.R. (Univ. of Maine, Orono (USA))

1991-06-01

51

Ground-Water Modeling of the Death Valley Region, Nevada and California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) of southern Nevada and eastern California covers an area of about 100,000 square kilometers and contains very complex geology and hydrology. Using a computer model to represent the complex system, the U.S. Geological Survey simulated ground-water flow in the Death Valley region for use with U.S. Department of Energy projects in southern Nevada. The model was created to help address contaminant cleanup activities associated with the underground nuclear testing conducted from 1951 to 1992 at the Nevada Test Site and to support the licensing process for the proposed geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

Belcher, W.R.; Faunt, C.C.; Sweetkind, D.S.; Blainey, J.B.; San Juan, C. A.; Laczniak, R.J.; Hill, M.C.

2006-01-01

52

Quantitative analysis of surface characteristics and morphology in Death Valley, California using AIRSAR data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (JPL-AIRSAR) is used to collect full polarimetric measurements at P-, L-, and C-bands. These data are analyzed using the radar analysis and visualization environment (RAVEN). The AIRSAR data are calibrated using in-scene corner reflectors to allow for quantitative analysis of the radar backscatter. RAVEN is used to extract surface characteristics. Inversion models are used to calculate quantitative surface roughness values and fractal dimensions. These values are used to generate synthetic surface plots that represent the small-scale surface structure of areas in Death Valley. These procedures are applied to a playa, smooth salt-pan, and alluvial fan surfaces in Death Valley. Field measurements of surface roughness are used to verify the accuracy.

Kierein-Young, K. S.; Kruse, F. A.; Lefkoff, A. B.

1992-01-01

53

Insiders Views of the Valley of Death Behavioral and Institutional Perspectives  

SciTech Connect

Valley of death describes the metaphorical depths to which promising science and technology too often plunge, never to emerge and reach their full potential. Behavioral and institutional perspectives help in understanding the implications of choices that inadvertently lead into rather than over the valley of death. A workshop conducted among a diverse set of scientists, managers, and technology transfer staff at a U.S. national laboratory is a point of departure for discussing behavioral and institutional elements that promote or impede the pathway from research toward use, and for suggesting actionable measures that can facilitate the flow of information and products from research toward use. In the complex systems that comprise research institutions, where competing pressures can create barriers to information or technology transfer, one recommendation is to re-frame the process as a more active ushering toward use.

Wolfe, Amy K [ORNL] [ORNL; Bjornstad, David J [ORNL] [ORNL; Shumpert, Barry L [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Stephanie [ORNL] [ORNL; Lenhardt, W Christopher [ORNL] [ORNL; Campa Ayala, Maria F [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01

54

Geochemistry and petrogenesis of Proterozoic diabase in the southern Death Valley region of California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabase sills and dikes of Proterozoic age intrude crystalline basement and the overlying Crystal Spring Formation in the southern Death Valley region of California. Despite pervasive deuteric alteration, analyses of relict plagioclase (An66-45), titaniferous augite, and ilmenite permit the calculation of initial crystallization temperatures of 1,165±25° C for plagioclase and 1,110±25° C for augite with an oxygen fugacity of 10-11

Janet G. Hammond

1986-01-01

55

Discrimination of geologic units in Death Valley using dual frequency and polarization imaging radar data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Simultaneous analysis of dual frequency and dual polarization radar imagery of a portion of Death Valley, California has yielded a nearly complete discrimination of surficial geologic units. Radar imagery in like polarized L-band (i.e., 25 cm wavelength), crosspolarized L-band and like polarized X-band (i.e., 3 cm wavelength) were digitally combined and ratioed to enhance the variation in the backscatter cross-section

M. Daily; C. Elachi; T. Farr; G. Schaber

1978-01-01

56

Are the Benches at Mormon Point, Death Valley, California, USA, Scarps or Strandlines?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The benches and risers at Mormon Point, Death Valley, USA, have long been interpreted as strandlines cut by still-stands of pluvial lakes correlative with oxygen isotope stage (OIS) 5e\\/6 (120,000–186,000 yr B.P.) and OIS-2 (10,000–35,000 yr B.P.). This study presents geologic mapping and geomorphic analyses (Gilbert's criteria, longitudinal profiles), which indicate that only the highest bench at Mormon Point (?90

Jeffrey R. Knott; John C. Tinsley; Stephen G. Wells

2002-01-01

57

200 k.y. paleoclimate record from Death Valley salt core  

SciTech Connect

A 186-m-long core (DV93-1) from Death Valley, California, composed of interbedded salts and muds contains a 200 k.y. record of closed-basin environments and paleoclimates, interpreted on the basis of sedimentology, ostracodes, homogenization temperatures of fluid inclusions in halite, and correlation with shoreline tufa. The 200 k.y. paleoclimate record is dominated by two dry and/or warm and wet and cold cycles that occurred on a 100 k.y. time scale. These cycles begin with mud-flat deposits (192 ka to bottom of core, and 60 ka to 120 ka). Wetter and/or colder conditions produced greater effective moisture; saline pan and shallow saline lake evaporites overlie mud-flat sediments (186 ka to 192 ka and 35 ka to 60 ks). Eventually, enough water entered Death Valley to sustain perennial lakes that had fluctuating water levels and salinities (120 ka to 186 ka and 10 ka to 35 ka). When more arid conditions returned, mud-flat deposits accumulated on top of the perennial lake sediments, completing the cycle (120 ka and 10 ka). Of particular significance are the major lacustrine phases, 10 ka to 35 ka and 120 ka to 186 ka (oxygen isotope stages 2 and 5e--6), which represent markedly colder and wetter conditions than those of modern Death Valley. Of the two major lake periods, the penultimate glacial lakes were deeper and far longer lasting than those of the last glacial.

Lowenstein, T.K.; Li, J.; Brown, C. [State Univ. of New York, Binghamton, NY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies] [State Univ. of New York, Binghamton, NY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies; Roberts, S.M. [Western Montana Coll., Dillon, MT (United States). Environmental Sciences Dept.] [Western Montana Coll., Dillon, MT (United States). Environmental Sciences Dept.; Ku, T.L.; Luo, S. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences] [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Yang, W. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Marine Science Research Center] [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Marine Science Research Center

1999-01-01

58

A History of Salmon and People in the Central Valley Region of California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) formerly occurred in great abundance within the California Central Valley drainage and were a correspondingly important part of the subsistence economics and cultures of the indigenous peoples of that region. Salmon and other fishery resources on the Central Valley floor were part of a resource base that enabled resident Native American groups to attain some of

Ronald M. Yoshiyama

1999-01-01

59

Students, Teachers, and Schools in California's Central Valley. Research Brief. Issue #62  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research brief provides an overview of the statistics presented in a report by Anne Danenberg, Christopher Jepsen, and Pedro Cerdan, "Student and School Indicators for Youth in California's Central Valley" (2002) [ED497305]. Twenty percent of California's public-school students attend schools in the Central Valley. Many of these students are…

Public Policy Institute of California, 2002

2002-01-01

60

Groundwater depletion and sustainability of irrigation in the US High Plains and Central Valley  

E-print Network

Groundwater depletion and sustainability of irrigation in the US High Plains and Central Valley impact crop produc- tion in the United States because 60% of irrigation relies on groundwater. Groundwater depletion in the irrigated High Plains and California Central Valley accounts for 50

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

61

An Impact Crater in Palm Valley, Central Australia?  

E-print Network

We explore the origin of a ~280 m wide, heavily eroded circular depression in Palm Valley, Northern Territory, Australia using gravity, morphological, and mineralogical data collected from a field survey in September 2009. From the analysis of the survey, we debate probable formation processes, namely erosion and impact, as no evidence of volcanism is found in the region or reported in the literature. We argue that the depression was not formed by erosion and consider an impact origin, although we acknowledge that diagnostics required to identify it as such (e.g. meteorite fragments, shatter cones, shocked quartz) are lacking, leaving the formation process uncertain. We encourage further discussion of the depression's origin and stress a need to develop recognition criteria that can help identify small, ancient impact craters. We also encourage systematic searches for impact craters in Central Australia as it is probable that many more remain to be discovered.

Hamacher, Duane W; O'Neill, Craig; Britton, Tui R

2012-01-01

62

A hydrogeologic map of the Death Valley region, Nevada, and California, developed using GIS techniques  

SciTech Connect

In support of Yucca Mountain site characterization studies, a hydrogeologic framework was developed, and a hydrogeologic map was constructed for the Death Valley region. The region, covering approximately 100,000 km{sup 2} along the Nevada-California border near Las Vegas, is characterized by isolated mountain ranges juxtaposed against broad, alluvium-filled valleys. Geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range Province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. The regional ground-water flow system can best be described as a series of connected intermontane basins in which ground-water flow occurs in basin-fill deposits, carbonate rocks, clastic rocks, and volcanic rocks. Previous investigations have developed more site-specific hydrogeologic relationships; however, few have described all the lithologies within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. Information required to characterize the hydrogeologic units in the region was obtained from regional geologic maps and reports. Map data were digitized from regional geologic maps and combined into a composite map using a geographic information system. This map was simplified to show 10 laterally extensive hydrogeologic units with distinct hydrologic properties. The hydraulic conductivity values for the hydrogeologic units range over 15 orders of magnitude due to the variability in burial depth and degree of fracturing.

Faunt, C.C.; D`Agnese, F.A.; Turner, A.K.

1997-12-31

63

A Hydrogeologic Map of the Death Valley Region, Nevada and California, Developed Using GIS Techniques  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In support of Yucca Mountain site characterization studies, a hydrogeologic framework was developed, and a hydrogeologic map was constructed for the Death Valley region. The region, covering approximately 100,000 km 2 along the Nevada-California border near Las Vegas, is characterized by isolated mountain ranges juxtaposed against broad, alluvium-filled valleys. Geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range Province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. The regional ground-water flow system can best be described as a series of connected intermontane basins in which ground-water flow occurs in basin-fill deposits, carbonate rocks, clastic rocks, and volcanic rocks. Previous investigations have developed more site-specific hydrogeologic relationships; however, few have described all the lithologies within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. Information required to characterize the hydrogeologic units in the region was obtained from regional geologic maps and reports. Map data were digitized from regional geologic maps and combined into a composite map using a geographic information system. This map was simplified to show 10 laterally extensive hydrogeologic units with distinct hydrologic properties. The hydraulic conductivity values for the hydrogeologic units range over 15 orders of magnitude due to the variability in burial depth and degree of fracturing.

Faunt, Claudia C.; D'Agnese, Frank A.; Turner, A. Keith

1997-01-01

64

Appraisal of the water resources of Death Valley, California-Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The hydrologic system in Death Valley is probably in a steady-state condition--that is, recharge and discharge are equal, and net changes in the quantity of ground water in storage are not occurring. Recharge to ground water in the valley is derived from interbasin underflow and from local precipitation. The two sources may be of the same magnitude. Ground water beneath the valley moves toward the lowest area, a 200-square-mile saltpan, much of which is underlain by rock salt and other saline minerals, probably to depths of hundreds of feet or even more than 1,000 feet. Some water discharges from the saltpan by evaportranspiration. Water beneath the valley floor, excluding the saltpan, typically contains between 3,000 and 5,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids. Water from most springs and seeps in the mountains contains a few hundred to several hundred milligrams per liter of dissolved solids. Water from large springs that probably discharge from interbasin flow systems typically contains between 500 and 1,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids. Present sites of intensive use by man are supplied by springs, with the exception of the Stovepipe Wells Hotel area. Potential sources of supply for this area include (1) Emigrant Spring area, (2) Cottonwood Spring, and (3) northern Mesquite Flat. (Woodard-USGS)

Miller, Glenn Allen

1977-01-01

65

Interbasin flow in the Great Basin with special reference to the southern Funeral Mountains and the source of Furnace Creek springs, Death Valley, California, U.S.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SummaryInterbasin flow in the Great Basin has been established by scientific studies during the past century. While not occurring uniformly between all basins, its occurrence is common and is a function of the hydraulic gradient between basins and hydraulic conductivity of the intervening rocks. The Furnace Creek springs in Death Valley, California are an example of large volume springs that are widely accepted as being the discharge points of regional interbasin flow. The flow path has been interpreted historically to be through consolidated Paleozoic carbonate rocks in the southern Funeral Mountains. This work reviews the preponderance of evidence supporting the concept of interbasin flow in the Death Valley region and the Great Basin and addresses the conceptual model of pluvial and recent recharge [Nelson, S.T., Anderson, K., Mayo, A.L., 2004. Testing the interbasin flow hypothesis at Death Valley, California. EOS 85, 349; Anderson, K., Nelson, S., Mayo, A., Tingey, D., 2006. Interbasin flow revisited: the contribution of local recharge to high-discharge springs, Death Valley, California. Journal of Hydrology 323, 276-302] as the source of the Furnace Creek springs. We find that there is insufficient modern recharge and insufficient storage potential and permeability within the basin-fill units in the Furnace Creek basin for these to serve as a local aquifer. Further, the lack of high sulfate content in the spring waters argues against significant flow through basin-fill sediments and instead suggests flow through underlying consolidated carbonate rocks. The maximum temperature of the spring discharge appears to require deep circulation through consolidated rocks; the Tertiary basin fill is of insufficient thickness to generate such temperatures as a result of local fluid circulation. Finally, the stable isotope data and chemical mass balance modeling actually support the interbasin flow conceptual model rather than the alternative presented in Nelson et al. [Nelson, S.T., Anderson, K., Mayo, A.L., 2004. Testing the interbasin flow hypothesis at Death Valley, California. EOS 85, 349] and Anderson et al. [Anderson, K., Nelson, S., Mayo, A., Tingey, D., 2006. Interbasin flow revisited: the contribution of local recharge to high-discharge springs, Death Valley, California. Journal of Hydrology 323, 276-302]. In light of these inconsistencies, interbasin flow is the only readily apparent explanation for the large spring discharges at Furnace Creek and, in our view, is the likely explanation for most large volume, low elevation springs in the Great Basin. An understanding of hydrogeologic processes that control the rate and direction of ground-water flow in eastern and central Nevada is necessary component of regional water-resource planning and management of alluvial and bedrock aquifers.

Belcher, Wayne R.; Bedinger, M. S.; Back, Jennifer T.; Sweetkind, Donald S.

2009-05-01

66

Hydrogeology of Palm Valley, central Australia; a Pleistocene flora refuge?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Palm Valley Oasis (Finke Gorge National Park) in arid central Australia is characterised by large stands of red cabbage palm trees ( Livistona mariae). How these unique plants, over 1000 km away from nearest relatives in the tropical parts of northern Australia persist, has long fascinated visitors. The hydrogeology of this area helps explain this phenomenon. Stable isotope (? 2H, ? 8O) analyses shows groundwater to have a uniform composition that plots on or near a local meteoric water line. Carbon-14 results are observed to vary throughout this aquifer from effectively dead (<4%) to 87% modern carbon. Ratios of chlorine-36 to chloride range from 130 to 290×10 -1536Cl/Cl. In this region atmospheric 36Cl/Cl ratio is around 300×10 -15. Thus an age range of around 300 ka is indicated if, as is apparent radioactive decay is the only significant cause of 36Cl/Cl variation within the aquifer. The classic homogenous aquifer with varying surface topography flow model is the simplest conceptual model that need be invoked to explain these data. Complexities, associated with local topography flow cells superimposed on the regional gradient, may mean groundwater with markedly different flow path lengths has been sampled. This potential flow path complexity, which is also evidenced by slight variation in groundwater cation ratios, can account for the distribution of isotope age data throughout the aquifer. Given the likely very slow travel times indicated by this aquifer's hydraulic properties, age differences of the magnitude indicated from chlorine-36 data are feasible. The likely slow travel times (>100 ka) along some flow paths indicate groundwater discharge would endure through arid phases associated with Quaternary climate oscillations. Such a flow system can explain the persistence of this population of Palms and also highlight the possibility that Palm Valley has acted as a flora refuge since at least the mid Pleistocene.

Wischusen, John D. H.; Fifield, L. Keith; Cresswell, Richard G.

2004-06-01

67

Late Cenozoic crustal extension and magmatism, southern Death Valley region, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The late Cenozoic geologic history of the southern Death Valley region is characterized by coeval crustal extension and magamatism. Crustal extension is accommodated by numerous listric and planar normal faults as well as right- and left-lateral strike slip faults. The normal faults sip 30°-50° near the surface and flatten and merge leozoic miogeoclinal rocks; the strike-slip faults act as tear faults between crustal blocks that have extended at different times and at different rates. Crustal extension began 13.4-13.1 Ma and migrated northwestward with time; undeformed basalt flows and lacustrine deposits suggest that extension stopped in this region (but continued north of the Death Valley graben) between 5 and 7 Ma. Estimates of crustal extension in this region vary from 30-50 percent to more than 100 percent. Magmatic rocks syntectonic with crustal extension in the southern Death Valley region include 12.4-6.4 Ma granitic rocks as well as bimodal 14.0-4.0 Ma volcanic rocks. Geochemical and isotopic evidence suggest that the granitic rocks get younger and less alkalic from south to north; the volcanic rocks become more mafic with less evidence of crustal interaction as they get younger. The close spatial and temporal relation between crustal extension and magmatism suggest a genetic and probably a dynamic relation between these geologic processes. We propose a rectonic-magmatic model that requires heat to be transported into the crust by mantle-derived mafic magmas. These magmas pond at lithologic or rheologic boundaries, begin the crystallize, and partially melt the surrounding crustal rocks. With time, the thermally weakened crust is extended (given a regional extensional stress field) concurrent with granitic magmatism and bimodal volcanism.

Calzia, J.P.; Rämö, O.T.

2000-01-01

68

AVIRIS study of Death Valley evaporite deposits using least-squares band-fitting methods  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Minerals found in playa evaporite deposits reflect the chemically diverse origins of ground waters in arid regions. Recently, it was discovered that many playa minerals exhibit diagnostic visible and near-infrared (0.4-2.5 micron) absorption bands that provide a remote sensing basis for observing important compositional details of desert ground water systems. The study of such systems is relevant to understanding solute acquisition, transport, and fractionation processes that are active in the subsurface. Observations of playa evaporites may also be useful for monitoring the hydrologic response of desert basins to changing climatic conditions on regional and global scales. Ongoing work using Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data to map evaporite minerals in the Death Valley salt pan is described. The AVIRIS data point to differences in inflow water chemistry in different parts of the Death Valley playa system and have led to the discovery of at least two new North American mineral occurrences. Seven segments of AVIRIS data were acquired over Death Valley on 31 July 1990, and were calibrated to reflectance by using the spectrum of a uniform area of alluvium near the salt pan. The calibrated data were subsequently analyzed by using least-squares spectral band-fitting methods, first described by Clark and others. In the band-fitting procedure, AVIRIS spectra are fit compared over selected wavelength intervals to a series of library reference spectra. Output images showing the degree of fit, band depth, and fit times the band depth are generated for each reference spectrum. The reference spectra used in the study included laboratory data for 35 pure evaporite spectra extracted from the AVIRIS image cube. Additional details of the band-fitting technique are provided by Clark and others elsewhere in this volume.

Crowley, J. K.; Clark, R. N.

1992-01-01

69

Mapping playa evaporite minerals with AVIRIS data: A first report from death valley, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Efflorescent salt crusts in Death Valley, California, were mapped by using Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data and a recently developed least-squares spectral band-fitting algorithm. Eight different saline minerals were remotely identified, including three borates, hydroboracite, pinnoite, and rivadavite, that have not been previously reported from the Death Valley efflorescent crusts. The three borates are locally important phases in the crusts, and at least one of the minerals, rivadavite, appears to be forming directly from brine. Borates and other evaporite minerals provide a basis for making remote chemical measurements of desert hydrologic systems. For example, in the Eagle Borax Spring area, the AVIRIS mineral maps pointed to elevated magnesium and boron levels in the ground waters, and to the action of chemical divides causing subsurface fractionation of calcium. Many other chemical aspects of playa brines should have an expression in the associated evaporite assemblages. Certain anhydrous evaporites, including anhydrite, glauberite, and thenardite, lack absorption bands in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range, and crusts composed of these minerals could not be characterized by using AVIRIS. In these situations, thermal-infrared remote sensing data may complement visible and near-infrared data for mapping evaporites. Another problem occurred in wet areas of Death Valley, where water absorption caused low signal levels in the 2.0-2.5 ??m wavelength region that obscured any spectral features of evaporite minerals. Despite these difficulties, the results of this study demonstrate the potential for using AVIRIS and other imaging spectrometer data to study playa chemistry. Such data can be useful for understanding chemical linkages between evaporites and ground waters, and will facilitate studies of how desert ground-water regimes change through time in response to climatic and other variables. ?? 1993.

Crowley, J.K.

1993-01-01

70

Mapping playa evaporite minerals and associated sediments in Death Valley, California, with multispectral thermal infrared images  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Efflorescent salt crusts and associated sediments in Death Valley, California, were studied with remote-sensing data acquired by the NASA thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS). Nine spectral classes that represent a variety of surface materials were distinguished, including several classes that reflect important aspects of the playa groundwater chemistry and hydrology. Evaporite crusts containing abundant thenardite (sodium sulfate) were mapped along the northern and eastern margins of the Cottonball Basin, areas where the inflow waters are rich in sodium. Gypsum (calcium sulfate) crusts were more common in the Badwater Basin, particularly near springs associated with calcic groundwaters along the western basin margin. Evaporite-rich crusts generally marked areas where groundwater is periodically near the surface and thus able to replenish the crusts though capillary evaporation. Detrital silicate minerals were prevalent in other parts of the salt pan where shallow groundwater does not affect the surface composition. The surface features in Death Valley change in response to climatic variations on several different timescales. For example, salt crusts on low-lying mudflats form and redissolve during seasonal-to-interannual cycles of wetting and desiccation. In contrast, recent flooding and erosion of rough-salt surfaces in Death Valley probably reflect increased regional precipitation spanning several decades. Remote-sensing observations of playas can provide a means for monitoring changes in evaporite facies and for better understanding the associated climatic processes. At present, such studies are limited by the availability of suitable airborne scanner data. However, with the launch of the Earth Observing System (EOS) AM-1 Platform in 1998, multispectral visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared remote-sensing data will become globally available. Copyright 1996 by the American Geophysical Union.

Crowley, J.K.; Hook, S.J.

1996-01-01

71

Declining rock movement at Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park: An indicator of climate change?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have inspected Racetrack Playa at Death Valley over the last 7 years and have not observed major episodes of rock movement and trail generation. We compare this null observation with the literature record of the rock movement using a Monte Carlo method and find 4-to-1 odds that the rock movement probability has systematically declined. This statistically significant drop in movement rate may indicate a change in the probability of the required conditions for movement: we note decline in the occurrence of strong winds and in ice-forming cold in nearby weather records. Rock movement and trail formation may serve as an indicator of climate change.

Lorenz, Ralph D.; Jackson, Brian K.

2014-04-01

72

The Valley of Death in anticancer drug development: a re-assessment  

PubMed Central

The past decade has seen an explosion in our understanding of cancer biology and with it many new potential disease targets. Yet our ability to translate these advances into therapies is poor, with a failure rate approaching 90%. Much discussion has been devoted to this so-called ‘Valley of Death’ in anticancer drug development, but the problem persists. Could we have overlooked some straight-forward explanations to this highly complex problem? Important aspects of tumor physiology, drug pharmacokinetics, preclinical models, drug delivery, and clinical translation are not often emphasized and could be critical. This perspective summarizes current views on the problem and suggests feasible alternatives. PMID:22410081

Adams, David J.

2012-01-01

73

From Research to Flight: Surviving the TRL Valley of Death for Robotic and Human Space Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There must be a plan or opportunities for flight validation: a) To reduce the bottleneck of new technologies at the TRL Valley of Death; b) To allow frequent infusion of new technologies into flight missions. Risk must be tolerated for new technology flight experiments. Risk must also be accepted on early-adopting missions to enable new capabilities. Fundamental research is critical to taking the next giant leap in the scientific exploration of space. Technology push is often required to meet current mission requirements. Technology management requires more than issuing NRAs and overseeing contracts.

Johnson, Les

2009-01-01

74

Mapping alluvial fans in Death Valley, California, using multichannel thermal infrared images  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Alluvial fans have been mapped in Death Valley, California using NASA's 8-12 micron six-channel airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS). Both composition and relative age differences were recognized. Age unit boundries are generally consistent with those obtained by conventional mapping. Composition was verified by field investigation and comparison with existing geologic maps. Bedrock and its young derived fan gravels have similar emissivities. The original composition of the fans is modified by differential erosion and weathering, permitting relative age mapping with TIMS.

Gillespie, A. R.; Kahle, A. B.; Pallluconi, F. D.

1984-01-01

75

Characterization of the Mid Summer Drought in the Central Valley of Costa Rica, Central America  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The IAS region is characterized by climate features of unique nature, one of them is the Mid-Summer Drought (MSD) or "veranillo", an atmospheric feature rarely observed in other tropical regions. On the Pacific slope of Central America, the precipitation annual cycle is characterized by two rainfall maxima in June and September-October, an extended dry season from November to May, and a secondary precipitation minima during July-August (MSD). Three daily gauge stations records, e.g. La Argentina, Fabio Baudrit and Juan Santamaria, located in the Central Valley of Costa Rica were studied to characterize the MSD from 1937 to 2010. Among the aspects considered are the MSD duration, intensity, timing and seasonal predictability. The modulation of these aspects by climate variability sources as Equatorial Eastern Pacific and Tropical North Atlantic was lately explored, including their interannual and decadal variability. The MSD signal strongly impact social and economic life in the region like energy and the agriculture sector. Additionally, the Central Valley of Costa Rica hosts most of the Costa Rican population with the higher level of exposure and vulnerability to hydro-meteorological hazards.

Alfaro, E.

2013-05-01

76

Emission rates of organics from vegetation in California's Central Valley  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rates of emission of speciated hydrocarbons have been determined for more than 30 of the most dominant (based on acreage) agricultural and natural plant types found in California's Central Valley. These measurements employed flow-through Teflon chambers, sample collection on solid adsorbent and thermal desorption gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry analysis to identify more than 40 individual organic compounds. In addition to isoprene and the monoterpenes, we observed sesquiterpenes, alcohols, acetates, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, esters, alkanes, alkenes and aromatics as emissions from these plant species. Mean emission rates for total monoterpenes ranged from none detected in the case of beans, grapes, rice and wheat, to as high as 12-30 ?g h -1 g -1 for pistachio and tomato (normalized to dry leaf and total biomass, respectively). Other agricultural species exhibiting substantial rates of emission of monoterpenes included carrot, cotton, lemon, orange and walnut. All of the plant species studied showed total assigned compound emission rates in the range between 0.1 and 36 ?g h -1 g -1.

Winer, Arthur M.; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger; Aschmann, Sara M.; Long, William D.; Morrison, C. Lynn; Olszyk, David M.

77

Effect of faulting on ground-water movement in the Death Valley region, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect

This study characterizes the hydrogeologic system of the Death Valley region, an area covering approximately 100,000 square kilometers. The study also characterizes the effects of faults on ground-water movement in the Death Valley region by synthesizing crustal stress, fracture mechanics,a nd structural geologic data. The geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range Province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. Faulting and associated fracturing is pervasive and greatly affects ground-water flow patterns. Faults may become preferred conduits or barriers to flow depending on whether they are in relative tension, compression, or shear and other factors such as the degree of dislocations of geologic units caused by faulting, the rock types involved, the fault zone materials, and the depth below the surface. The current crustal stress field was combined with fault orientations to predict potential effects of faults on the regional ground-water flow regime. Numerous examples of fault-controlled ground-water flow exist within the study area. Hydrologic data provided an independent method for checking some of the assumptions concerning preferential flow paths. 97 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

Faunt, C.C.

1997-12-31

78

Reconnaissance geology of the Central Mastuj Valley, Chitral State, Pakistan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Mastuj Valley in Chitral State is a part of the Hindu Kush Range, and is one of the structurally most complicated areas in northern Pakistan. Sedimentary rocks ranging from at least Middle Devonian to Cretaceous, and perhaps Early Tertiary age lie between ridge-forming granodiorite intrusions and are cut by thrust faults. The thrust planes dip 10? to 40? to the north- west. Movement of the upper thrust plates has been toward the southeast relative to the lower blocks. If this area is structurally typical of the Hindu-Kush and Karakoram Ranges, then these mountains are much more tectonically disturbed than previously recorded, and suggest compression on a scale compatible with the hypothesis that the Himalayan, Karakoram, and Hindu Kush Ranges form part of a continental collision zone. The thrust faults outline two plates consisting of distinctive sedimentary rocks. The lower thrust plate is about 3,000 feet thick and consists of the isoclinally folded Upper Cretaceous to perhaps lower Tertiary Reshun Formation. It has overridden the Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks of the Chitral Slate unit. This thrust plate is, in turn, overridden by an 8,000-foot thick sequence consisting largely of Devonian to Carboniferous limestones and quartzites. A key factor in the tectonic processes has been the relatively soft and plastic lithology of the siltstone layers in the Reshun Formation which have acted as lubricants along the principal thrust faults, where they are commonly found today as fault slices and smears. The stratigraphic sequence, in the central Mastuj Valley was tentatively divided into 9 mapped units. The fossiliferous shales and carbonates of the recently defined Shogram Formation and the clastlcs of the Reshun Formation have been fitted into a sequence of sedimentary rocks that has a total thick- ness of at least 13,000 feet and ranges in age from Devonian to Neogene. Minerals of potential economic significance include antimony sulfides which have been mined elsewhere in Chitral, the tungstate, scheelite, which occurs in relatively high concentrations in heavy-mineral fractions of stream sands, and an iron-rich lateritic rock.

Stauffer, Karl W.

1975-01-01

79

ANALYSIS OF MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES IN RELATION TO ENVIRONMENTAL GRADIENTS AMONG LOTIC HABITATS OF CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY  

EPA Science Inventory

We analyzed relationships between environmental characteristics and macroinvertebrate assemblages in lotic habitats of California's Central Valley with community metric and multivariate statistical approaches. Using canonical ordination analyses, we contrasted results when asse...

80

Geologic application of thermal inertia imaging using HCMM data. [Death Valley and Piggah Crater, California and Goldfield, Nevada  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. The day infrared and visible HCMM satellite data for Death Valley taken on 31 May 1978 were compared with aircraft data of the same area taken in March of the same year. In the visible image, it is possible to note the drying of the valley floor during the two month period between acquisition of the two data sets. On the IR image however, the valley floor remains cool, probably indicating that while the standing water has disappeared, the floor is still moist.

Paley, H. N.; Kahle, A. B. (principal investigators)

1979-01-01

81

Holocene fluvial geomorphic change in the central Mississippi Valley  

SciTech Connect

Four distinct Mississippi River (MR) channel patterns are distinguished on the basis of geomorphic expression and cross-cutting relationships between the Missouri River mouth and Thebes Gap (TG). In order of decreasing age, they are (1) a multi-channeled braided system superimposed on a sandy substrate that correlates with the Kingston Terrace (KT); (2) a relatively large amplitude, large sinuosity, meandering system; (3) a smaller amplitude, smaller sinuosity, meandering system with a marked increase in associated overbank sheetwash and splays; and, (4) an island-braided pattern aligned with the modern (MR). After the (KT) formed, the (MR) had a net westward migration and episodically decreased in sinuosity. Decreasing sinuosity is possibly in response to a general decrease in sediment yield. Channel pattern changes are bracketed somewhat by available radiocarbon ages and the geomorphic location of archaeological deposit with temporally diagnostic artifacts. The KT formed between about 10,400 and 9800 B.P.; the superimposed braid pattern has fill consisting of Lake Superior source reddish brown clay deposited by large, and possibly catastrophic, floods between 9800 and 9500 B.P. The large sinuosity meandering pattern was active from before 4400 B.P. until about 2400 B.P. at the latest. It was probably initiated millennia earlier. The small sinuosity meandering pattern was initiated by about 2500 B.P. and abandoned before 1100 B.P. The geomorphic mapping is the first component of a geoarchaeological investigation to aid cultural resource management to aid cultural resource management in the central MR Valley. At the same time, it provides some constraints on the origin and age of some long-recognized landforms, such as the TG.

Hajic, E.R. (Illinois State Museum, Springfield, IL (United States))

1992-01-01

82

Cenozoic tectonic reorganizations of the Death Valley region, southeast California and southwest Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Death Valley region, of southeast California and southwest Nevada, is distinct relative to adjacent regions in its structural style and resulting topography, as well as in the timing of basin-range extension. Cenozoic basin-fill strata, ranging in age from greater than or equal to 40 to approximately 2 million years are common within mountain-range uplifts in this region. The tectonic fragmentation and local uplift of these abandoned basin-fills indicate a multistage history of basin-range tectonism. Additionally, the oldest of these strata record an earlier, pre-basin-range interval of weak extension that formed broad shallow basins that trapped sediments, without forming basin-range topography. The Cenozoic basin-fill strata record distinct stratigraphic breaks that regionally cluster into tight age ranges, constrained by well-dated interbedded volcanic units. Many of these stratigraphic breaks are long recognized formation boundaries. Most are angular unconformities that coincide with abrupt changes in depositional environment. Deposits that bound these unconformities indicate they are weakly diachronous; they span about 1 to 2 million years and generally decrease in age to the west within individual basins and regionally, across basin boundaries. Across these unconformities, major changes are found in the distribution and provenance of basin-fill strata, and in patterns of internal facies. These features indicate rapid, regionally coordinated changes in strain patterns defined by major active basin-bounding faults, coincident with step-wise migrations of the belt of active basin-range tectonism. The regionally correlative unconformities thus record short intervals of radical tectonic change, here termed "tectonic reorganizations." The intervening, longer (about 3- to 5-million-year) interval of gradual, monotonic evolution in the locus and style of tectonism are called "tectonic stages." The belt of active tectonism in the Death Valley region has abruptly stepped westward during three successive tectonic reorganizations that intervened between four stages of basin-range tectonism, the youngest of which is ongoing. These three tectonic reorganizations also intervened between four stages of volcanic activity, each of which has been distinct in the compositions of magmas erupted, in eruption rates, and in the locus of volcanic activity—which has stepped progressively westward, in close coordination with the step-wise migrations in the locus of basin-range extension. The timing of the Cenozoic tectonic reorganizations in the Death Valley region correlates closely with the documented timing of episodic reorganizations of the boundary between the Pacific and North American plates, to the west and southwest. This supports models that explain the widely distributed transtensional tectonism in southwestern North America since approximately 40 million years ago as resulting from traction imposed by the adjacent, divergent Pacific plate.

Fridrich, Christopher J.; Thompson, Ren A.

2011-01-01

83

High-angle origin of the currently low-angle Badwater Turtleback fault, Death Valley, California  

SciTech Connect

The late Cenozoic Badwater Turtleback fault separates an upper plate of volcanic and sedimentary rocks from a lower plate of predominantly mylonitic plutonic and metamorphic rocks. The Turtleback fault, however, is not a single continuous surface, but consists of a least three generations of faults. These faults occur as discrete, crosscutting segments that progressively decrease in age and increase in dip to the west. Therefore, they probably began at moderate to steep angles but rotated to lower angles with extensional strain. If so, lower plate mylonitic rocks also restore to steeper dips and suggest that transport of the upper plate occurred on moderate to steeply dipping surfaces in the middle and upper crust. The crosscutting nature of the fault segments and their initial moderate to steep dips, plus a possible offset marker on one of the segments, are most consistent with moderate amounts of extension in the Death Valley region.

Miller, M.G. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

1991-04-01

84

Characterizing the hydrogeologic framework of the Death Valley region, Southern Nevada and California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Three-dimensional (3-D) hydrogeologic modeling of the complex geology of the Death Valley region requires the application of a number of Geoscientific Information System (GSIS) techniques. This study, funded by United States Department of Energy as a part of the Yucca Mountain Project, focuses on an area of approximately 100,000 square kilometers (three degrees of latitude by three degrees of longitude) and extends up to ten kilometers in depth. The geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. GSIS techniques allow the synthesis of geologic, hydrologic and climatic information gathered from many sources, including satellite imagery and published maps and cross-sections. Construction of a 3-D hydrogeological model is possible with the combined use of software products available from several vendors, including traditional GIS products and sophisticated contouring, interpolation, visualization, and numerical modeling packages.

Faunt, Claudia; D'Agnese, Frank; Downey, Joe S.; Turner, A. Keith

1993-01-01

85

GEOLOGY AND ORIGIN OF THE DEATH VALLEY URANIUM DEPOSIT, SEWARD PENINSULA, ALASKA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A uranium deposit discovered in 1977 in western Alaska, by means of airborne radiometric data, is the largest known in Alaska on the basis of industry reserve estimates. The deposit is apparently of epigenetic and supergene origin. The uranium was derived from the Cretaceous granite of the Darby pluton that forms part of the western side of Death Valley. Uranium from primary mineralization is in the subsurface in a marginal facies of the Tertiary sedimentary basin where nearshore coarse clastic rocks are interbedded with coal and lacustrine clay. The supergene enrichment is related to a soil horizon at the present ground surface. Extensive exploratory drilling took place from 1979 to 1981. The average grade of the potential ore is 0. 27 percent U//3O//8 and the average thickness is 3 m. The calculated reserves are 1,000,000 lbs U//3O//8; additional drilling would probably add to this figure. Additional study results are discussed.

Dickinson, Kendell A.; Cunningham, Kenneth D.; Ager, Thomas A.

1987-01-01

86

Death Valley regional groundwater flow model calibration using optimal parameter estimation methods and geoscientific information systems  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A three-layer Death Valley regional groundwater flow model was constructed to evaluate potential regional groundwater flow paths in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Geoscientific information systems were used to characterize the complex surface and subsurface hydrogeological conditions of the area, and this characterization was used to construct likely conceptual models of the flow system. The high contrasts and abrupt contacts of the different hydrogeological units in the subsurface make zonation the logical choice for representing the hydraulic conductivity distribution. Hydraulic head and spring flow data were used to test different conceptual models by using nonlinear regression to determine parameter values that currently provide the best match between the measured and simulated heads and flows.

D'Agnese, F. A.; Faunt, C.C.; Hill, M.C.; Turner, A.K.

1996-01-01

87

HELIOTHERMAL LAKE MODEL OF BORATE DEPOSITION IN THE MIOCENE FURNACE CREEK FORMATION, DEATH VALLEY REGION, CALIFORNIA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Heliothermal lakes are density-stratified with shallow submerged margins surrounding areally restricted deep pool(s) containing a dense brine overlain by a much less dense brine. The reflective brine interface allows solar energy to be trapped in the dense brine which may warm to over 90 degree C. Carbonate precipitated from the dense brine is the typical sediment produced in warm deep pool. Miocene borate deposits of the Death Valley region are typically contained within areally limited carbonate-rich pods that interfinger with a finely interlaminated (varve-like) mudstone and limestone. Primary borates there are predominately either Na-Ca borates or Ca-borates. This bimodal evaporite assemblage suggests that brine chemistries and (or) crystallization paths varied significantly in temporally and spatially related portions of this apparently continuous lacustrine deposit.

Barker, Charles E.; Barker, James M.

1988-01-01

88

Estimated ground-water discharge by evapotranspiration from Death Valley, California, 1997-2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service and Inyo County, Calif., collected field data from 1997 through 2001 to accurately estimate the amount of annual ground-water discharge by evapotranspiration (ET) from the floor of Death Valley, California. Multispectral satellite-imagery and National Wetlands Inventory data are used to delineate evaporative ground-water discharge areas on the Death Valley floor. These areas are divided into five general units where ground-water discharge from ET is considered to be significant. Based upon similarities in soil type, soil moisture, vegetation type, and vegetation density; the ET units are salt-encrusted playa (21,287 acres), bare-soil playa (75,922 acres), low-density vegetation (6,625 acres), moderate-density vegetation (5,019 acres), and high-density vegetation (1,522 acres). Annual ET was computed for ET units with micrometeorological data which were continuously measured at six instrumented sites. Total ET was determined at sites that were chosen for their soil- and vegetated-surface conditions, which include salt-encrusted playa (extensive salt encrustation) 0.17 feet per year, bare-soil playa (silt and salt encrustation) 0.21 feet per year, pickleweed (pickleweed plants, low-density vegetation) 0.60 feet per year, Eagle Borax (arrowweed plants and salt grass, moderate-density vegetation) 1.99 feet per year, Mesquite Flat (mesquite trees, high-density vegetation) 2.86 feet per year, and Mesquite Flat mixed grasses (mixed meadow grasses, high-density vegetation) 3.90 feet per year. Precipitation, flooding, and ground-water discharge satisfy ET demand in Death Valley. Ground-water discharge is estimated by deducting local precipitation and flooding from cumulative ET estimates. Discharge rates from ET units were not estimated directly because the range of vegetation units far exceeded the five specific vegetation units that were measured. The rate of annual ground-water discharge by ET for each ET unit was determined by fitting the annual ground-water ET for each site with the variability in vegetation density in each ET unit. The ET rate representing the midpoint of each ET unit was used as the representative value. The rate of annual ground-water ET for the playa sites did not require scaling in this manner. Annual ground-water discharge by ET was determined for all five ET units: salt-encrusted playa (0.13 foot), bare-soil playa (0.15 foot), low-density vegetation (1.0 foot), moderate-density vegetation (2.0 feet), and high-density vegetation (3.0 feet), and an area of vegetation or bare soil not contributing to ground-water discharge unclassified (0.0 foot). The total ground-water discharge from ET for the Death Valley floor is about 35,000 acre-feet and was computed by summing the products of the area of each ET unit multiplied by a corresponding ET rate for each unit.

DeMeo, Guy A.; Laczniak, Randell J.; Boyd, Robert A.; Smith, J. LaRue; Nylund, Walter E.

2003-01-01

89

Tectonic map of the Death Valley ground-water model area, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this map is to provide tectonic interpretations in the Death Valley ground-water model area to be incorporated into a transient ground-water flow model by the U.S. Geological Survey (D'Agnese, 2000; D'Agnese and Faunt, 1999; Faunt and others, 1999; and O'Brien and others, 1999). This work has been conducted in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy in order to assess regional ground-water flow near the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the potential radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The map is centered on the NTS and its perimeter encircles the entire boundary of the numerical flow model area, covering a total area of 57,000 square kilometers. This tectonic map is a derivative map of the geologic map of the Death Valley ground-water model, Nevada and California (Workman and others, 2002). Structures portrayed on the tectonic map were selected from the geologic map based upon several criteria including amount of offset on faults, regional significance of structures, fault juxtaposition of rocks with significantly different hydrologic properties, and the hydrologic properties of the structures themselves. Inferred buried structures in the basins were included on the map (blue and light blue dotted lines) based on interpretation of geophysical data (Ponce and others, 2001; Ponce and Blakely, 2001; Blakely and Ponce, 2001). In addition, various regional trends of fault zones have been delineated which are composed of multiple smaller scale features. In some cases, these structures are deeply buried and their location is based primarily on geophysical evidence. In all cases, these zones (shown as broad red and blue stippled bands on the map) are significant structures in the region. Finally, surface exposures of Precambrian crystalline rocks and igneous intrusions of various ages are highlighted (red and blue patterns) on the map; these rocks generally act as barriers to groundwater flow unless significantly fractured.

J.B. Workman; C.M. Menges; W.R. Page; E.B. Ekren; P.D. Rowley; G.L. Dixon

2002-10-17

90

Interseismic deformation and geologic evolution of the Death Valley Fault Zone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Death Valley Fault Zone (DVFZ), located in southeastern California, is an active fault system with an evolved pull-apart basin that has been deforming over the past 6 Myr. We present a study of the interseismic motion and long-term stress accumulation rates to better understand the nature of both past and present-day loading conditions of the DVFZ. Using a 3-D semi-analytic viscoelastic deformation model, combined with geodetic velocities derived from the Mobile Array of GPS for Nevada Transtension (MAGNET) network and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) Crustal Motion Map version 4 (CMMv4) GPS data, we establish parameters for interseismic slip rate and apparent locking depth for four DVFZ fault segments. Our preferred model provides good fit to the data (1.0 mm/yr and 1.5 mm/yr RMS misfit in the fault-perpendicular and fault-parallel directions, respectively) and yields apparent locking depths between 9.8-17.1 km and strike-slip rates of 3-7 mm/yr for the segments. We also determine subsidence (0.5-0.8 mm/yr) and extension (1.0-1.2 mm/yr) rates in the pull-apart basin region. With these parameters, we construct a DVFZ evolution model for the last 6 Myr that recreates the motion of the fault blocks involved in the formation of the present-day geological structures in Death Valley. Finally, using Coulomb stress accumulation rates derived from our model (0.25-0.49 MPa/100 yr), combined with earthquake recurrence interval estimates of 500 to 2600 years, we assess present-day seismic hazards with calculated moment magnitudes ranging from 6.7-7.7.

Del Pardo, Cecilia; Smith-Konter, Bridget R.; Serpa, Laura F.; Kreemer, Corné; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Hammond, William C.

2012-06-01

91

Guidelines for model calibration and application to flow simulation in the Death Valley regional groundwater system  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fourteen guidelines are described which are intended to produce calibrated groundwater models likely to represent the associated real systems more accurately than typically used methods. The 14 guidelines are discussed in the context of the calibration of a regional groundwater flow model of the Death Valley region in the southwestern United States. This groundwater flow system contains two sites of national significance from which the subsurface transport of contaminants could be or is of concern: Yucca Mountain, which is the potential site of the United States high-level nuclear-waste disposal; and the Nevada Test Site, which contains a number of underground nuclear-testing locations. This application of the guidelines demonstrates how they may be used for model calibration and evaluation, and also to direct further model development and data collection.Fourteen guidelines are described which are intended to produce calibrated groundwater models likely to represent the associated real systems more accurately than typically used methods. The 14 guidelines are discussed in the context of the calibration of a regional groundwater flow model of the Death Valley region in the southwestern United States. This groundwater flow system contains two sites of national significance from which the subsurface transport of contaminants could be or is of concern: Yucca Mountain, which is the potential site of the United States high-level nuclear-waste disposal; and the Nevada Test Site, which contains a number of underground nuclear-testing locations. This application of the guidelines demonstrates how they may be used for model calibration and evaluation, and also to direct further model development and data collection.

Hill, M.C.; D'Agnese, F. A.; Faunt, C.C.

2000-01-01

92

Map showing depth to pre-Cenozoic basement in the Death Valley ground-water model area, Nevada and California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A depth to basement map of the Death Valley groundwater model area was prepared using over 40,0000 gravity stations as part of an interagency effort by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Department of Energy to help characterize the geology and hydrology of southwest Nevada and parts of California.

Blakely, R.J.; Ponce, D.A.

2001-01-01

93

Kinematics at the intersection of the Garlock and Death Valley fault zones, California: Integration of TM data and field studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Garlock and Death Valley fault zones in SE California are two active strike-slip faults coming together on the east side of the Avawatz Mtns. The kinematics of this intersection, and the possible continuation of either fault zone, are being investigated using a combination of field mapping, and processing and interpretation of remotely sensed image data. Regional and local relationships are derivable from Thematic Mapper data (30 m resolution), including discrimination and relative age dating of alluvial fans, bedrock mapping, and fault mapping. Aircraft data provide higher spatial resolution over more limited areas. Hypotheses being considered are: (1) the Garlock fault extends east of the intersection; (2) the Garlock fault terminates at the intersection and the Death Valley fault continues southeastward; and (3) the Garlock fault has been offset right laterally by the Death Valley fault which continues to the southeast. Preliminary work indicates that the first hypothesis is invalid. From kinematic considerations, image analysis, and field work the third hypothesis is favored. The projected continuation of the Death Valley zone defines the boundary between the Mojave crustal block and the Basin and Range block.

Abrams, Michael; Verosub, Ken; Finnerty, Tony; Brady, Roland

1987-01-01

94

Assessment of Computer-based Geologic Mapping of Rock Units in the LANDSAT-4 Scene of Northern Death Valley, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results from a series of geologic classifications conducted on a thematic mapper subscene of the northern Death Valley, California are reported. Measurements of accuracy are made through comparison with the 1977 edition of the Death Valley geologic sheet. This employs a simplified map version which is registered by computer to the image data base, allowing a pixel by pixel match with the classified scene. The results show accuracy ranges from 36 to 79% depending on the type of classifier used and the statistical adjustments made to the data. Accuracy values in identifying geologic units were 2 to 3 times higher for those in the relatively flat valleys than for units in the rugged mountainous terrain. Improvements in accuracy will be sought by correcting for slope/aspect variations in mountainous terrain using topographic data recorded in Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) tapes. The above classification results will also be compared with ratio and principal component image classifications made from the same scene.

Short, N. M.

1984-01-01

95

Interbasin flow revisited: The contribution of local recharge to high-discharge springs, Death Valley, CA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Springs in the Furnace Creek area (Texas, Travertine, and Nevares Springs) of Death Valley National Park exhibit high discharge rates and depleted ?18O VSMOW (˜-13‰) and ?D VSMOW (˜-102‰) values. Isotopic depletion of this magnitude and large spring fluxes (˜10,000 L/min) suggests that modern local recharge in the arid Furnace Creek drainage cannot be responsible for spring fluxes. An alternate explanation, interbasin flow, is difficult to envisage due to the stratigraphic and structural relationships of bedrock in intervening ranges, although it is the most common conceptual model for Furnace Creek spring flows. High-flux springs at Furnace Creek nonetheless respond modestly to modern climate in terms of discharge rate and isotopic composition. Hydrographs show a climate response and variations in time-series stable isotope data of widely spaced springs track one another. Small, but measurable quantities of tritium (<0.2 TU) were found at Nevares Spring, also suggesting a component of modern recharge. Thus, whatever the main source of water for these springs may be, there appears to be a subtle, but recent climatic influence. Estimates of flow at nearby mountain springs produce discharge rates per square kilometer of catchment that, by analogy, could support from 20 to 300% of the flow at large Death Valley springs under the current climate. Yet, 14C model ages suggest valley-bottom springs at Furnace Creek (5500-14,500 yr) contain a large component of older water, suggesting that much of the water was recharged during a pluvial period (Younger Dryas?) when net infiltration would have been much higher and isotopically depleted. 14C model ages are also of similar age, or younger, than many 'up gradient' waters, rather than being older as would be expected for interbasin flow. Chemical evolution models of solutes are consistent with both local recharge and interbasin transfer from Ash Meadows. However, when considered with isotopic constraints, interbasin flow becomes obviously untenable. Estimates of the thickness of alluvium and semi-consolidated Tertiary units in the Furnace Creek drainage seem to provide adequate storage, confinement, and upward leakage to accommodate current discharge. Thus, although Death Valley is the ultimate discharge location for regional groundwaters in terms of potential, careful study of these springs suggests that most of their flux is supported by local pluvial recharge, suggesting that a careful re-evaluation of the interbasin transfers be conducted on a case-by-case basis. Furthermore, regional flow models that are built on the concept of interbasin flow provide boundary flux conditions for site-scale models for the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Thus, site-scale models may over-predict the potential transport of waste from the Yucca Mountain facility.

Anderson, Katherine; Nelson, Stephen; Mayo, Alan; Tingey, David

2006-05-01

96

Historical Population Structure of Central Valley Steelhead and its Alteration by Dams  

E-print Network

under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (1973). Myriad problems afflict steelhead in the Central Valley Steelhead, O. mykiss, endangered species, population structure, dispersal, habitat model, dams, Central were identified as an evolutionarily significant unit (ESU) and listed in 1998 as a threatened species

May, Bernie

97

Ground-water discharge determined from estimates of evapotranspiration, Death Valley regional flow system, Nevada and California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Death Valley regional flow system (DVRFS) is one of the larger ground-water flow systems in the southwestern United States and includes much of southern Nevada and the Death Valley region of eastern California. Centrally located within the ground-water flow system is the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS, a large tract covering about 1,375 square miles, historically has been used for testing nuclear devices and currently is being studied as a potential repository for the long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste generated in the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as mandated by Federal and State regulators, is evaluating the risk associated with contaminants that have been or may be introduced into the subsurface as a consequence of any past or future activities at the NTS. Because subsurface contaminants can be transported away from the NTS by ground water, components of the ground-water budget are of great interest. One such component is regional ground-water discharge. Most of the ground water leaving the DVRFS is limited to local areas where geologic and hydrologic conditions force ground water upward toward the surface to discharge at springs and seeps. Available estimates of ground-water discharge are based primarily on early work done as part of regional reconnaissance studies. These early efforts covered large, geologically complex areas and often applied substantially different techniques to estimate ground-water discharge. This report describes the results of a study that provides more consistent, accurate, and scientifically defensible measures of regional ground-water losses from each of the major discharge areas of the DVRFS. Estimates of ground-water discharge presented in this report are based on a rigorous quantification of local evapotranspiration (ET). The study identifies areas of ongoing ground-water ET, delineates different ET areas based on similarities in vegetation and soil-moisture conditions, and determines an ET rate for each delineated area. Each area, referred to as an ET unit, generally consists of one or more assemblages of local phreatophytes or a unique moist soil environment. Ten ET units are identified throughout the DVRFS based on differences in spectral-reflectance characteristics. Spectral differences are determined from satellite imagery acquired June 21, 1989, and June 13, 1992. The units identified include areas of open playa, moist bare soils, sparse to dense vegetation, and open water. ET rates estimated for each ET unit range from a few tenths of a foot per year for open playa to nearly 9 feet per year for open water. Mean annual ET estimates are computed for each discharge area by summing estimates of annual ET from each ET unit within a discharge area. The estimate of annual ET from each ET unit is computed as the product of an ET unit's acreage and estimated ET rate. Estimates of mean annual ET range from 450 acre-feet in the Franklin Well area to 30,000 acre-feet in Sarcobatus Flat. Ground-water discharge is estimated as annual ET minus that part of ET attributed to local precipitation. Mean annual ground-water discharge estimates range from 350 acre-feet in the Franklin Well area to 18,000 acre-feet in Ash Meadows. Generally, these estimates are greater for the northern discharge areas (Sarcobatus Flat and Oasis Valley) and less for the southern discharge areas (Franklin Lake, Shoshone area, and Tecopa/ California Valley area) than those previously reported.

Laczniak, Randell J.; Smith, J. LaRue; Elliott, Peggy E.; DeMeo, Guy A.; Chatigny, Melissa A.; Roemer, Gaius J.

2001-01-01

98

Winter fog is decreasing in the fruit growing region of the Central Valley of California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Central Valley of California is home to a variety of fruit and nut trees. These trees account for 95% of the U.S. production, but they need a sufficient amount of winter chill to achieve rest and quiescence for the next season's buds and flowers. In prior work, we reported that the accumulation of winter chill is declining in the Central Valley. We hypothesize that a reduction in winter fog is cooccurring and is contributing to the reduction in winter chill. We examined a 33 year record of satellite remote sensing to develop a fog climatology for the Central Valley. We find that the number of winter fog events, integrated spatially, decreased 46%, on average, over 32 winters, with much year to year variability. Less fog means warmer air and an increase in the energy balance on buds, which amplifies their warming, reducing their chill accumulation more.

Baldocchi, Dennis; Waller, Eric

2014-05-01

99

Stress Accumulation and Interseismic Deformation of the Death Valley Fault Zone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Death Valley Fault Zone (DVFZ), located in southeastern California, is an active fault system with an evolved pull-apart basin that has been deforming over the last 15 Myr. Our objectives are to study the interseismic motion and long-term stress accumulation of the DVFZ in order to better understand the nature of present-day loading conditions of the fault zone. Using a 3-D semi-analytic viscoelastic deformation model, constrained by geodetic velocities, we aim to establish best-fitting model parameters for interseismic slip rate, apparent locking depth, elastic plate thickness and mantle viscosity. We allow the model to accommodate variable locking depths (8-14 km) and slip rates (2-5 mm/yr) and tune the model to fit a set of local EarthScope continuous and campaign geodetic velocities. Our best fitting preliminary model, consisting of 200 fault elements, provides a good fit to the data (0.63 mm/yr fault-perpendicular RMS misfit and 1.00 mm/yr fault-parallel RMS misfit) and reveals an appropriate sensitivity to fault geometry. In particular, we obtain rates of 0.3-0.4 mm/yr of subsidence and 1.0-1.2 mm/yr of extension in the Death Valley pull-apart basin. We compare these modeled rates to geologic estimates of 15 Myr of basin evolution, a 3 km basin depth (including sediment fill), and a 15 km basin width, which yield geologic deformation rates of 0.2-0.3 mm/yr of subsidence and 0.3-1 mm/yr of extension. We also compute shear and normal stresses along the major fault strands and use these to compute present-day Coulomb stress accumulation rates for the primary DVFZ segments. Using a coefficient of friction of 0.6, we obtain stress accumulation rates of 0.4-0.6 MPa per century, in agreement with long-term estimates of earthquake recurrence intervals on the order of 1000 years, assuming typical stress drops of 4 MPa or higher for major DVFZ earthquakes. We are developing a stress and deformation time series model that reconstructs opening of the pull-apart basin based on present-day observations and the geologic history of the DVFZ region.

Del Pardo, C.; Smith-Konter, B. R.; Serpa, L. F.

2009-12-01

100

Geologic Map of the Warm Spring Canyon Area, Death Valley National Park, Inyo County, California, With a Discussion of the Regional Significance of the Stratigraphy and Structure  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Warm Spring Canyon is located in the southeastern part of the Panamint Range in east-central California, 54 km south of Death Valley National Park headquarters at Furnace Creek Ranch. For the relatively small size of the area mapped (57 km2), an unusual variety of Proterozoic and Phanerozoic rocks is present. The outcrop distribution of these rocks largely resulted from movement on the east-west-striking, south-directed Butte Valley Thrust Fault of Jurassic age. The upper plate of the thrust fault comprises a basement of Paleoproterozoic schist and gneiss overlain by a thick sequence of Mesoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic rocks, the latter of which includes diamictite generally considered to be of glacial origin. The lower plate is composed of Devonian to Permian marine formations overlain by Jurassic volcanic and sedimentary rocks. Late Jurassic or Early Cretaceous plutons intrude rocks of the area, and one pluton intrudes the Butte Valley Thrust Fault. Low-angle detachment faults of presumed Tertiary age underlie large masses of Neoproterozoic dolomite in parts of the area. Movement on these faults predated emplacement of middle Miocene volcanic rocks in deep, east-striking paleovalleys. Excellent exposures of all the rocks and structural features in the area result from sparse vegetation in the dry desert climate and from deep erosion along Warm Spring Canyon and its tributaries.

Wrucke, Chester T.; Stone, Paul; Stevens, Calvin H.

2007-01-01

101

Sliding Rocks on Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park: First Observation of Rocks in Motion  

PubMed Central

The engraved trails of rocks on the nearly flat, dry mud surface of Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park, have excited speculation about the movement mechanism since the 1940s. Rock movement has been variously attributed to high winds, liquid water, ice, or ice flotation, but has not been previously observed in action. We recorded the first direct scientific observation of rock movements using GPS-instrumented rocks and photography, in conjunction with a weather station and time-lapse cameras. The largest observed rock movement involved >60 rocks on December 20, 2013 and some instrumented rocks moved up to 224 m between December 2013 and January 2014 in multiple move events. In contrast with previous hypotheses of powerful winds or thick ice floating rocks off the playa surface, the process of rock movement that we have observed occurs when the thin, 3 to 6 mm, “windowpane” ice sheet covering the playa pool begins to melt in late morning sun and breaks up under light winds of ?4–5 m/s. Floating ice panels 10 s of meters in size push multiple rocks at low speeds of 2–5 m/min. along trajectories determined by the direction and velocity of the wind as well as that of the water flowing under the ice. PMID:25162535

Lorenz, Ralph D.; Ray, Jib; Jackson, Brian

2014-01-01

102

Structural evolution of the virgin spring phase of the amargosa chaos, Death Valley, California, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Amargosa Chaos and Fault of Death Valley are complex features that play important roles in various tectonic models. Some recent models claim the fault is a regional detachment accommodating 80 km of NW-directed transport that produced the Chaos in its hangingwall. I offer an alternative interpretation: the chaos is a product of multiphase deformation that likely spanned the late Mesozoic and Cenozoic. The Amargosa Fault represents just one of six deformation events. The accompanying map (supplemental file) shows the cross-cutting relationships among fault populations: (D1) 25% north-northwest directed shortening across an imbricate thrust and tight fold system; (D2) E-SE extension on five normal faults; (D3) extension-related folding, which folded the D2 faults; (D4) normal-oblique slip on the Amargosa Fault; (D5) E-W extension on domino faults; (D6) extension on the Black Mountains Frontal Fault. The D2 faults, not the Amargosa, created the enigmatic attenuation observed in the Chaos.

Castonguay, Samuel Robert

103

Trail formation by ice-shoved "sailing stones" observed at Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Trails in the usually-hard mud of Racetrack Playa in Death Valley National Park attest to the seemingly-improbable movement of massive rocks on an exceptionally flat surface. The movement of these rocks, previously described as "sliding stones", "playa scrapers", "sailing stones" etc., has been the subject of speculation for almost a century but is an exceptionally rare phenomenon and until now has not been directly observed. Here we report documentation of multiple rock movement and trail formation events in the winter of 2013-2014 by in situ observation, video, timelapse cameras, a dedicated meteorological station and GPS tracking of instrumented rocks. Movement involved dozens of rocks, forming fresh trails typically of 10s of meters length at speeds of ~5 cm s-1 and were caused by wind stress on a transient thin layer of floating ice. Fracture and local thinning of the ice decouples some rocks from the ice movement, such that only a subset of rocks move in a given event.

Lorenz, R. D.; Norris, J. M.; Jackson, B. K.; Norris, R. D.; Chadbourne, J. W.; Ray, J.

2014-08-01

104

Diversity of Bacteria and Archaea in hypersaline sediment from Death Valley National Park, California  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to phylogenetically analyze microorganisms from the domains Bacteria and Archaea in hypersaline sediment from Death Valley National Park. Using domain-specific primers, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the product was subsequently used to create a clone library. A total of 243 bacterial clones, 99 archaeal clones, and 209 bacterial isolates were examined. The 243 clones from Bacteria were affiliated with the following groups: the Bacilli (59 clones) and Clostridia (1) of the Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes (90), Proteobacteria (27), Cyanobacteria (18), Gemmatimonadetes (41), candidate division OP1 (5), Actinobacteria (1), and the Deinococcus-Thermus division (1). Within the class Bacilli, 46 of 59 clones were tentatively identified as 10 unclassified species. The majority of bacterial isolates (130 of 209) were more closely related to the Bacillus subtilis–B. licheniformis clade than to any other recognized taxon, and an Ecotype Simulation analysis of B. subtilis relatives identified four previously unknown ecotypes. Several new genera were discovered within the Bacteroidetes (4) and the Gemmatimonadetes (2). Of the 99 archaeal clones, 94 were tentatively identified as belonging to 3 new genera within the Halobacteriaceae; other clones represented novel species within each of 4 established genera. PMID:22950020

Kim, Jong-Shik; Makama, Mfundi; Petito, Janine; Park, Nyun-Ho; Cohan, Frederick M; Dungan, Robert S

2012-01-01

105

Sliding rocks on Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park: first observation of rocks in motion.  

PubMed

The engraved trails of rocks on the nearly flat, dry mud surface of Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park, have excited speculation about the movement mechanism since the 1940s. Rock movement has been variously attributed to high winds, liquid water, ice, or ice flotation, but has not been previously observed in action. We recorded the first direct scientific observation of rock movements using GPS-instrumented rocks and photography, in conjunction with a weather station and time-lapse cameras. The largest observed rock movement involved > 60 rocks on December 20, 2013 and some instrumented rocks moved up to 224 m between December 2013 and January 2014 in multiple move events. In contrast with previous hypotheses of powerful winds or thick ice floating rocks off the playa surface, the process of rock movement that we have observed occurs when the thin, 3 to 6 mm, "windowpane" ice sheet covering the playa pool begins to melt in late morning sun and breaks up under light winds of -4-5 m/s. Floating ice panels 10 s of meters in size push multiple rocks at low speeds of 2-5 m/min. along trajectories determined by the direction and velocity of the wind as well as that of the water flowing under the ice. PMID:25162535

Norris, Richard D; Norris, James M; Lorenz, Ralph D; Ray, Jib; Jackson, Brian

2014-01-01

106

Potential hazards from floodflows in Grapevine Canyon, Death Valley National Monument, California and Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Grapevine Canyon is on the western slope of the Grapevine Mountains in the northern part of Death Valley National Monument , California and Nevada. Grapevine Canyon Road covers the entire width of the canyon floor in places and is a frequently traveled route to Scotty 's Castle in the canyon. The region is arid and subject to flash flooding because of infrequent but intense convective storms. When these storms occur, normally in the summer, the resulting floods may create a hazard to visitor safety and property. Historical data on rainfall and floodflow in Grapevine Canyon are sparse. Data from studies made for similar areas in the desert mountains of southern California provide the basis for estimating discharges and the corresponding frequency of floods in the study area. Results of this study indicate that high-velocity flows of water and debris , even at shallow depths, may scour and damage Grapevine Canyon Road. When discharge exceeds 4,900 cu ft/sec, expected at a recurrence interval of between 25 and 50 years, the Scotty 's Castle access road and bridge may be damaged and the parking lot partly inundated. A flood having a 100-year or greater recurrence interval probably would wash out the bridge and present a hazard to the stable and garage buildings but not to the castle buildings, whose foundations are higher than the predicted maximum flood level. (USGS)

Bowers, J.C.

1990-01-01

107

Mars remote-sensing analog studies in the Badwater Basin, Death Valley, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The search for evaporites on Mars has important implications for the role that liquid water has played in shaping the planet's geologic, climatic, and potential biologic history. Orbital investigations of surface mineralogy are crucial to this exploration effort. With the exception of coarse-grained gray hematite at a restricted number of sites and trace amounts of carbonate in globally distributed dust deposits, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) instruments have yet to find widespread mineralogical evidence of aqueously formed minerals. This may reflect the coarse spatial resolution of TES (3 × 5 km/pixel) and low spectral resolution of THEMIS (10 bands between 6.5 and 14.5 ?m). Spectral mapping in the Badwater Basin, Death Valley, California, was conducted to better understand the capabilities of TES and THEMIS in detecting evaporite minerals. High-resolution MODIS/ASTER Airborne Simulator (MASTER) data, degraded to TES and THEMIS spatial resolutions, were used to evaluate the detection limits of sulfates and carbonates. To assess the validity of this spectral remote sensing, a quantitative ground truth analysis of surface mineralogy in the Badwater Basin was performed. The analysis was based on thin section petrography, X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, and laboratory and field thermal emission spectrometer analyses. Taken together, the results of all five methods provided enough constraints for a robust interpretation that was in general agreement with the spectral remote-sensing mapping study for ~90% of the surface samples examined.

Baldridge, Alice M.; Farmer, Jack D.; Moersch, Jeffrey E.

2004-12-01

108

An ostracode based paleolimnologic and paleohydrologic history of Death Valley: 200 to 0 ka  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Death Valley, a complex tectonic and hydrologic basin, was cored from its lowest surface elevation to a depth of 186 m. The sediments range from bedded primary halite to black muds. Continental ostracodes found in the black muds indicate that those sediments were deposited in a variety of hydrologic settings ranging from deep, relatively fresh water to shallow saline lakes to spring discharge supported wetlands. The alkaline-enriched, calcium-depleted paleolake waters indicate extrabasinal streamflow and basin-margin spring discharge. The alkaline-depleted, calcium-enriched paleowetland waters indicate intrabasinal spring discharge. During Marine Isotope Stage 6 (MIS 6, ca. 180-140 ka) the hydrologic settings were highly variable, implying that complex relations existed between climate and basin hydrology. Termination II (MIS 6 to MIS 5E) was a complex multicyclic sequence of paleoenvironments, implying that climates oscillated between high and low effective moisture. MIS 4 (ca. 73-61 ka) was a spring discharge supported wetland complex. During MIS 2 (ca. 20-12 ka) the hydrologic settings were variable, although they are not fully understood because some black muds deposited during that time were lost during coring. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

Forester, R.M.; Lowenstein, T.K.; Spencer, R.J.

2005-01-01

109

Height changes along selected lines through the Death Valley region, California and Nevada, 1905-1984  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Comparisons among repeated levelings along selected lines through the Death Valley region of California and adjacent parts of Nevada have disclosed surprisingly large vertical displacements. The vertical control data in this lightly populated area is sparse; moreover, as much as a third of the recovered data is so thoroughly contaminated by systematic error and survey blunders that no attempt was made to correct these data and they were simply discarded. In spite of these limitations, generally episodic, commonly large vertical displacements are disclosed along a number of lines. Displacements in excess of 0.4 m, with respect to our selected control point at Beatty, Nevada, and differential displacements of about 0.7 m apparently occurred during the earlier years of the 20th century and continued episodically through at least 1943. While this area contains abundant evidence of continuing tectonic activity through latest Quaternary time, it is virtually devoid of historic seismicity. We have detected no clear connection between the described vertical displacements and fault zones reportedly active during Holocene time, although we sense some association with several more broadly defined tectonic features.

Castle, Robert O.; Gilmore, Thomas D.; Walker, James P.; Castle, Susan A.

2005-01-01

110

Extraction of quantitative surface characteristics from AIRSAR data for Death Valley, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data were collected for the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) over Death Valley, California, USA, in Sep. 1989. AIRSAR is a four-look, quad-polarization, three frequency instrument. It collects measurements at C-band (5.66 cm), L-band (23.98 cm), and P-band (68.13 cm), and has a GIFOV of 10 meters and a swath width of 12 kilometers. Because the radar measures at three wavelengths, different scales of surface roughness are measured. Also, dielectric constants can be calculated from the data. The AIRSAR data were calibrated using in-scene trihedral corner reflectors to remove cross-talk; and to calibrate the phase, amplitude, and co-channel gain imbalance. The calibration allows for the extraction of accurate values of rms surface roughness, dielectric constants, sigma(sub 0) backscatter, and polarization information. The radar data sets allow quantitative characterization of small scale surface structure of geologic units, providing information about the physical and chemical processes that control the surface morphology. Combining the quantitative information extracted from the radar data with other remotely sensed data sets allows discrimination, identification and mapping of geologic units that may be difficult to discern using conventional techniques.

Kierein-Young, K. S.; Kruse, F. A.

1992-01-01

111

Case Studies of Water Vapor and Surface Liquid Water from AVIRIS Data Measured Over Denver, CO and Death Valley, CA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High spatial resolution column atmospheric water vapor amounts and equivalent liquid water thicknesses of surface targets are retrieved from spectral data collected by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). The retrievals are made using a nonlinear least squares curve fitting technique. Two case studies from AVIRIS data acquired over Denver-Platteville area, Colorado and over Death Valley, California are presented. The column water vapor values derived from AVIRIS data over the Denver-Platteville area are compared with those obtained from radiosondes, ground level upward-looking microwave radiometers, and geostationary satellite measurements. The column water vapor image shows spatial variation patterns related to the passage of a weather front system. The column water vapor amounts derived from AVIRIS data over Death Valley decrease with increasing surface elevation. The derived liquid water image clearly shows surface drainage patterns.

Gao, B.-C.; Kierein-Young, K. S.; Goetz, A. F. H.; Westwater, E. R.; Stankov, B. B.; Birkenheuer, D.

1991-01-01

112

Thematic Mapper and field investigations at the intersection of the Death Valley and Garlock fault zones, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analysis of processed images and detailed field investigations have provided significant information concerning the late-Pliocene and Quaternary evolution of the intersection of the Garlock and Death Valley fault zones. The imagery was used to determine patterns of sedimentation and age relationships on alluvial fans and to determine the geometry, styles of deformation, and relative ages of movements on major and minor faults in the study area. The field investigation often confirmed the inferences drawn from the images and provided additional tectonic and geomorphologic data about the Quaternary deformation of the region. All the data gathered in the course of this project support the contention that the Garlock fault zone terminates in the Avawatz Mountains and that the Death Valley fault zone continues south of the intersection for at least 50 km, forming the eastern boundary of the Mojave province.

Brady, Roland H., III; Cregan, Alan; Clayton, Jeff; Troxel, Bennie W.; Verosub, Kenneth L.; Abrams, Michael

1989-01-01

113

Geologic application of thermal inertia imaging using HCMM data. [Death Valley and Pisgah Crater, California and Goldfield, Nevada  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the July to September 1980 quarter the final tapes were received completing the order and preliminary processing was done. Thermal Inertia images for each of the three test sites, Death Valley and Pisgah Crater, California and Goldfield, Nevada were created using registered HCMM day/night pairs and the JPL model. A comprehensive study and analysis of the geologic application of all acquired HCMM data is in progress.

Paley, H. N.; Kahle, A. B. (principal investigators)

1980-01-01

114

Death Valley Lower Carbonate Aquifer Monitoring Program Wells Down gradient of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect

Inyo County has participated in oversight activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository since 1987. The overall goal of these studies are the evaluation of far-field issues related to potential transport, by ground water, or radionuclides into Inyo County, including Death Valley, and the evaluation of a connection between the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the biosphere. Our oversight and completed Cooperative Agreement research, and a number of other investigators research indicate that there is groundwater flow between the alluvial and carbonate aquifers both at Yucca Mountain and in Inyo County. In addition to the potential of radionuclide transport through the LCA, Czarnecki (1997), with the US Geological Survey, research indicate potential radionuclide transport through the shallower Tertiary-age aquifer materials with ultimate discharge into the Franklin Lake Playa in Inyo County. The specific purpose of this Cooperative Agreement drilling program was to acquire geological, subsurface geology, and hydrologic data to: (1) establish the existence of inter-basin flow between the Amargosa Basin and Death Valley Basin; (2) characterize groundwater flow paths in the LCA through Southern Funeral Mountain Range, and (3) Evaluation the hydraulic connection between the Yucca Mountain repository and the major springs in Death Valley through the LCA.

Inyo County

2006-07-26

115

Historical Abundance and Decline of Chinook Salmon in the Central Valley Region of California  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Central Valley drainage of California formerly produced immense numbers of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. Four seasonal runs occur in this system—fall, late-fall, winter, and spring runs. Differences in life history timing and spatial distribution enabled the four runs to use the drainage to the fullest possible extent and once made it one of the richest regions in the world

Ronald M. Yoshiyama; Frank W. Fisher; Peter B. Moyle

1998-01-01

116

Historical and Present Distribution of Chinook Salmon in the Central Valley Drainage of California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) formerly were highly abundant and widely distributed in virtually all the major streams of California's Central Valley drainage—encompassing the Sacramento River basin in the north and San Joaquin River basin in the south. We used information from historical narratives and ethnographic accounts, fishery records and locations of in-stream natural barriers to determine the historical distributional limits

Ronald M. Yoshiyama; Eric R. Gerstung; Frank W. Fisher; Peter B. Moyle

117

Barriers to Coverage of Transborder Environmental Issues in the Ferghana Valley of Central Asia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three former Soviet republics occupy Central Asia's Ferghana Valley, a region of serious transborder environmental problems, especially ones that involve water and energy. Most news organizations in Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan provide little in-depth coverage of these issues. Journalists in one country usually do not seek news…

Freedman, Eric

2014-01-01

118

Spatially distributed pesticide exposure assessment in the Central Valley, California, USA  

E-print Network

Spatially distributed pesticide exposure assessment in the Central Valley, California, USA Yuzhou of pesticide sources. a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 24 September 2009 Received in revised level a b s t r a c t Field runoff is an important transport mechanism by which pesticides move

Zhang, Minghua

119

Are the benches at Mormon Point, Death Valley, California, USA, scarps or strandlines?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The benches and risers at Mormon Point, Death Valley, USA, have long been interpreted as strandlines cut by still-stands of pluvial lakes correlative with oxygen isotope stage (OIS) 5e/6 (120,000-186,000 yr B.P.) and OIS-2 (10,000-35,000 yr B.P.). This study presents geologic mapping and geomorphic analyses (Gilbert's criteria, longitudinal profiles), which indicate that only the highest bench at Mormon Point (~90 m above mean sea level (msl)) is a lake strandline. The other prominent benches on the north-descending slope immediately below this strandline are interpreted as fault scarps offsetting a lacustrine abrasion platform. The faults offsetting the abrasion platform most likely join downward into and slip sympathetically with the Mormon Point turtleback fault, implying late Quaternary slip on this low-angle normal fault. Our geomorphic reinterpretation implies that the OIS-5e/6 lake receded rapidly enough not to cut strandlines and was ~90 m deep. Consistent with independent core studies of the salt pan, no evidence of OIS-2 lake strandlines was found at Mormon Point, which indicates that the maximum elevation of the OIS-2 lake surface was -30 m msl. Thus, as measured by pluvial lake depth, the OIS-2 effective precipitation was significantly less than during OIS-5e/6, a finding that is more consistent with other studies in the region. The changed geomorphic context indicates that previous surface exposure dates on fault scarps and benches at Mormon Point are uninterpretable with respect to lake history. ?? 2002 University of Washington.

Knott, J.R.; Tinsley, J. C., III; Wells, S.G.

2002-01-01

120

Geophysical Data from Spring Valley to Delamar Valley, East-Central Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Cenozoic basins in eastern Nevada and western Utah constitute major ground-water recharge areas in the eastern part of the Great Basin and these were investigated to characterize the geologic framework of the region. Prior to these investigations, regional gravity coverage was variable over the region, adequate in some areas and very sparse in others. Cooperative studies described herein have established 1,447 new gravity stations in the region, providing a detailed description of density variations in the middle to upper crust. All previously available gravity data for the study area were evaluated to determine their reliability, prior to combining with our recent results and calculating an up-to-date isostatic residual gravity map of the area. A gravity inversion method was used to calculate depths to pre-Cenozoic basement rock and estimates of maximum alluvial/volcanic fill in the major valleys of the study area. The enhanced gravity coverage and the incorporation of lithologic information from several deep oil and gas wells yields a much improved view of subsurface shapes of these basins and provides insights useful for the development of hydrogeologic models for the region.

Mankinen, Edward A.; Roberts, Carter W.; McKee, Edwin H.; Chuchel, Bruce A.; Morin, Robert L.

2007-01-01

121

Clustering Regional Ozone Concentrations to Reveal Meteorological Regimes Influencing Air Quality in California's Central Valley  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

California's central valley suffers from serious ozone air pollution problems due to its unique geography as well as diverse emission sources from both local and upwind areas. The primary flows in the region are produced by the thermal contrast between the ocean and land, and between the valley and surrounding mountains. On typical summer days, westerly winds are funneled into the valley through gaps in the coastal range, along with the Bay area pollutants. During the day, the flow is directed up the Sierra Nevada Mountain slope, while at night it reverses and recirculates the local pollutants. Meteorological factors are important in governing the spatial distribution and variation of air pollutants in this region. Such knowledge is mainly obtained in previous studies using multi-year historical observations at limited measurement sites. There are concerns about spatial representativeness of these measurement locations, and confounding effects from changes in anthropogenic emissions over the analysis period. While modeling studies can control and minimize these limitations, the short simulation period usually makes temporally representative patterns difficult to discern. Our study simulates ozone formation in central California for the entire summer of 2000, with wide meteorological and air quality variations seen in both space and time, and thus provides a good opportunity to examine meteorological regimes that lead to different ozone production, transport, and accumulation in the Central valley. Using cluster analysis and principal component analysis, we determined distinctive meteorological regimes that are associated with different ozone spatial patterns in the Central Valley. In general, average ozone levels in the valley increase with temperature, while their spatial distribution depend on flow regimes, in particular, the strength of sea breezes and upslope flows. The regional meteorological effects are shown to explain the different ozone patterns in the valley, their dynamic relationship with each other, and their relationship to those in the upwind air basins. Our results can serve as a basis to study variability in ozone responses to emission controls and inter-basin pollutant transport under and across different temperature and flow regimes.

Jin, L.; Brown, N. J.; Harley, R. A.

2008-12-01

122

Groundwater depletion and sustainability of irrigation in the US High Plains and Central Valley  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Aquifer overexploitation could significantly impact crop production in the United States because 60% of irrigation relies on groundwater. Groundwater depletion in the irrigated High Plains and California Central Valley accounts for ~50% of groundwater depletion in the United States since 1900. A newly developed High Plains recharge map shows that high recharge in the northern High Plains results in sustainable pumpage, whereas lower recharge in the central and southern High Plains has resulted in focused depletion of 330 km3 of fossil groundwater, mostly recharged during the past 13,000 y. Depletion is highly localized with about a third of depletion occurring in 4% of the High Plains land area. Extrapolation of the current depletion rate suggests that 35% of the southern High Plains will be unable to support irrigation within the next 30 y. Reducing irrigation withdrawals could extend the lifespan of the aquifer but would not result in sustainable management of this fossil groundwater. The Central Valley is a more dynamic, engineered system, with north/south diversions of surface water since the 1950s contributing to ~7× higher recharge. However, these diversions are regulated because of impacts on endangered species. A newly developed Central Valley Hydrologic Model shows that groundwater depletion since the 1960s, totaling 80 km3, occurs mostly in the south (Tulare Basin) and primarily during droughts. Increasing water storage through artificial recharge of excess surface water in aquifers by up to 3 km3 shows promise for coping with droughts and improving sustainability of groundwater resources in the Central Valley.

Scanlon, Bridget R.; Faunt, Claudia C.; Longuevergne, Laurent; Reedy, Robert C.; Alley, William M.; McGuire, Virginia L.; McMahon, Peter B.

2012-01-01

123

Groundwater depletion and sustainability of irrigation in the US High Plains and Central Valley  

PubMed Central

Aquifer overexploitation could significantly impact crop production in the United States because 60% of irrigation relies on groundwater. Groundwater depletion in the irrigated High Plains and California Central Valley accounts for ?50% of groundwater depletion in the United States since 1900. A newly developed High Plains recharge map shows that high recharge in the northern High Plains results in sustainable pumpage, whereas lower recharge in the central and southern High Plains has resulted in focused depletion of 330 km3 of fossil groundwater, mostly recharged during the past 13,000 y. Depletion is highly localized with about a third of depletion occurring in 4% of the High Plains land area. Extrapolation of the current depletion rate suggests that 35% of the southern High Plains will be unable to support irrigation within the next 30 y. Reducing irrigation withdrawals could extend the lifespan of the aquifer but would not result in sustainable management of this fossil groundwater. The Central Valley is a more dynamic, engineered system, with north/south diversions of surface water since the 1950s contributing to ?7× higher recharge. However, these diversions are regulated because of impacts on endangered species. A newly developed Central Valley Hydrologic Model shows that groundwater depletion since the 1960s, totaling 80 km3, occurs mostly in the south (Tulare Basin) and primarily during droughts. Increasing water storage through artificial recharge of excess surface water in aquifers by up to 3 km3 shows promise for coping with droughts and improving sustainability of groundwater resources in the Central Valley. PMID:22645352

Scanlon, Bridget R.; Faunt, Claudia C.; Longuevergne, Laurent; Reedy, Robert C.; Alley, William M.; McGuire, Virginia L.; McMahon, Peter B.

2012-01-01

124

Hydrogeologic framework of Antelope Valley and Bedell Flat, Washoe County, west-central Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Description of the hydrogeologic framework of Antelope Valley and Bedell Flat in west-central Nevada adds to the general knowledge of regional ground-water flow north of the Reno-Sparks metropolitan area. The hydrogeologic framework is defined by the rocks and deposits that transmit ground water or impede its movement and by the combined thickness of Cenozoic deposits. When data are lacking about the subsurface geology of an area, geophysical methods can be used to provide additional information. In this study, gravimetric and seismic-refraction methods were used to infer the form of structural features and to estimate the thickness of Cenozoic deposits in each of the two valleys. In Antelope Valley, the thickness of these deposits probably does not exceed about 300 feet, suggesting that ground-water storage in the basin-fill aquifer is limited. Beneath Bedell Flat is an elongated, northeast-trending structural depression in the pre-Cenozoic basement; the maximum thickness of Cenozoic deposits is about 2,500 feet beneath the south-central part of the valley. Shallow ground water in the northwest corner of Bedell Flat may be a result of decreasing depth to the pre-Cenozoic basement.

Berger, D.L.; Ponce, D.A.; Ross, W.C.

2001-01-01

125

Pleistocene-Holocene transition in the central Mississippi River valley  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within the northern Mississippi embayment the ancestral Mississippi River flowed south through the Western Lowlands and the ancestral Ohio River flowed through the Eastern Lowlands for most of the Pleistocene. Previous investigators have mapped and dated the terraces of their respective braid belts. This current research investigates the three-dimensional aspect of the Quaternary alluvium north of Memphis, Tennessee, through the interpretation of 3374 geologic well logs that are 91.4 m (300 ft) deep. The braid belts are capped by a thin silt/clay horizon (Pleistocene loess) that overlies gravelly sand, which in turn overlies sandy gravel. The base of the Pleistocene alluvium beneath the Ash Hill (27.3-24.6 ka), Melville Ridge (41.6-34.5 ka), and Dudley (63.5-50.1 ka) terraces of the Western Lowland slope southerly by 0.275 m/km and all have an average basal elevation of 38 m. Near Beedeville, Arkansas, the bases of these terraces descend 20 m across a northeast-striking down-to-the-southeast fault that coincides with the western margin of the Cambrian Reelfoot rift. The maximum depth of flow (lowest elevation of base of alluvium) occurred in the Eastern Lowlands and appears to have been the downstream continuation of the ancestral Ohio River Cache valley course in southern Illinois. In traversing from west to east in the Eastern Lowlands, the Sikeston braid belt (19.7-17.8 ka) has a basal elevation averaging 7 m, the Kennett braid belt (16.1-14.4 ka) averages 13 m, the Morehouse (12 ka) braid belt averages 24 m, and the Holocene (? 10 ka) Mississippi River floodplain has the highest average basal elevation at 37 m. Along this easterly traverse the base of the Quaternary alluvium rises and the age of alluvium decreases. The eastward thinning of the floodplain alluvium in the Eastern Lowlands appears to be caused by decreasing Mississippi River discharge as it transitioned from the Wisconsinan glacial maximum to the Holocene. The base of the Holocene Mississippi River floodplain averages 23 m higher in elevation than the Pleistocene floodplain bases in the Eastern Lowlands. This high suballuvial surface (platform) is bound by the tectonically uplifted Joiner ridge, Blytheville arch, Charleston uplift, and Bluff Line fault. The spatial relationship and similar histories of the platform and bounding structures suggest that Quaternary erosion and tectonics are related.

Van Arsdale, Roy B.; Cupples, William B.; Csontos, Ryan M.

2014-06-01

126

Simulation of recharge for the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system using an integrated hydrologic model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A proof-of-concept study was conducted using the integrated hydrologic model, GSFLOW, to simulate spatially and temporally distributed recharge for the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS). GSFLOW is an integrated groundwater - surface water flow model that combines two modeling applications: the Precipitation-Runoff-Modeling-System (PRMS) and MODFLOW. Previous methods used to estimate recharge for the DVRFS include empirical models based on precipitation, applications of the chloride mass-balance method, and applications of a precipitation-runoff model, INFIL, which used a daily time step to simulate recharge as net infiltration through the root zone. The GSFLOW model offers several potential advantages compared to the previous methods including (1) the ability to simulate complex flow through a thick unsaturated zone (UZ), allowing for the dampening and time delay of recharge relative to the infiltration signal at the top of the UZ and also allowing for the redistribution of flow within the UZ, as enabled by the MODFLOW-NWT and UZF capabilities, (2) the simulation of rejected recharge in response to the dynamics of groundwater discharge and low permeability zones in the UZ, (3) a more explicit representation of streamflow and recharge processes in the mostly ephemeral stream channels that characterize the DVRFS, and (4) the ability to simulate complex flow paths for runoff occurring as both overland flow and shallow subsurface flow (interflow) in the soil zone using a network of cascades connecting hydrologic response units (HRUs). Simulations were done using a daily time step for water years 1980-2010. Preliminary estimates of recharge using GSFLOW indicate that the distribution of recharge is highly variable both spatially and temporally due to variability in precipitation, snowmelt, evapotranspiration, runoff, and the permeability of bedrock and alluvium underlying the root zone. Results averaged over the areas of subbasins were similar to results obtained from previous studies. However, estimates of recharge on the local scale of the HRUs indicate significant (greater than 100 percent) differences at some locations compared to results obtained using INFIL due to differences in (1) the geometry and scale of HRUs, (2) the layout of the cascading flow network and the location of stream channels, (3) the representation of the physical characteristics of the root zone, and (4) model processes controlling the simulation of evapotranspiration and the movement of water through the root zone.

Hevesi, J. A.; Regan, R. S.; Hill, M. C.; Heywood, C.; Kohn, M. S.

2012-12-01

127

Descriptions and chemical analyses for selected wells in the Central Sacramento Valley, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Sacramento Valley occupies the northern one-third of the Great Central Valley of California. The study area of this report includes about 1,200 square miles (3,100 square kilometers) adjacent to the Sacramento River from Knights Landing to Los Molinos, in parts of Yolo, Sutter, Colusa, Glenn, Butte, and Tehama Counties. Between April and August 1975, 559 wells were canvassed, and during September and October 1975, water samples were collected for chemical analysis from 209 of these wells. Field determinations of alkalinity, conductance, pH , and temperature were made on the site at the time of sampling. Samples were prepared in the field for shipment and analysis for individual constituents at the Geological Survey Central Laboratory, Salt Lake City, Utah. Descriptive data for water wells are listed, chemical data are tabulated, and the location of wells is shown on maps. (Woodard-USGS)

Fogelman, Ronald P.

1976-01-01

128

Surficial Geologic Mapping Using Digital Techniques Reveals Late-Phase Basin Evolution and Role of Paleoclimate, Death Valley Junction 30' × 60' Quadrangle, California and Nevada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recently released surficial geologic map of the Death Valley Junction 30' x 60' quadrangle at 1:100,000 scale (USGS SIM 3013) was simultaneously mapped and compiled using digital photogrammetric methods. The map area covers the central part of Death Valley and adjacent mountain ranges—the Panamint Range on the west and the Funeral Mountains on the east—as well as areas east of Death Valley including some of the Amargosa Desert, the Spring Mountains, and Pahrump Valley. We mapped six alluvial units, an eolian unit, three playa or playa-related units, lacustrine beach deposits, colluvium, and marl. Interpretation of surface morphology, tone, relative height, and map pattern in air photos enabled us to differentiate among the alluvial units, which make up about 80 percent of the surficial deposits in the map area. Systematic variations in alluvial surface morphology with age permit us to map and correlate geomorphic surfaces. Surface morphology is a product of depositional and post-depositional processes. Lithologic variations across the map area influence the tone of the alluvial units. Although young alluvial units are often light-toned due to an absence or paucity of rock varnish, they may appear dark where the source rocks are dark. Lithology also influences the development of rock varnish; fine-grained or aphanitic rocks, such as quartzite or basalt, tend to become varnished more quickly than rocks such as limestone or granite. Granite commonly disaggregates to grus before becoming varnished and limestone becomes etched. Relative height (topographic position) is useful for mapping in individual drainage basins near range fronts, but basinward, especially in tectonically inactive areas, most surfaces grade to the same base level, and relative height differs little among the alluvial units. Faulting, both the magnitude and location, also affects the map pattern of alluvial units. As faulting uplifts ranges relative to the basins, streams adjust to new base levels, abandoning and incising older alluvial units, thus preserving them on the footwall block of the fault. In tectonically inactive areas, streams continue to grade to the same level or aggrade, thus progressively burying older alluvial units. Therefore, map pattern of alluvial units is an important tool to evaluate late-phase basin evolution in the Basin and Range province. Determining the age of these alluvial units enables us to examine the role of paleoclimate during deposition. Six terrestrial cosmogenic-nuclide (TCN) 36Cl depth-profile dates of unit Qai fans along the west side of Death Valley range from about 40 ka to 100 ka (with a mean age of about 65 ka) and thus post-date the marine oxygen-isotope stage (MIS) 6 cycle of Pleistocene Lake Manly, but predate the lesser, MIS 2 successor. TCN 36Cl depth-profile dating establishes the age of a lacustrine bar complex at 30 m above sea level on the north side of Hanaupah Canyon to be 130 (+75/-39) ka and correlates with a deep lake at MIS 6. This bar predates units mapped as Qai and thus provides an important stratigraphic datum.

Slate, J.; Berry, M.; Menges, C. M.

2010-12-01

129

DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE OF LARGE SANDHILL CRANES, GRUS CANADENSIS, WINTERING IN CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distribution and abundance of large sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida, Greater Sandhill Crane, and Grus canadensis rowani, Canadian Sandhill Crane) were studied in California's Central Valley during October-February 1983-1984 and 1984-1985. We estimated that the population contained 6,000-6,800 cranes which were concentrated at eight geographic locations from Chico to Pixley National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) near Delano. Ninety-five percent of the

THOMAS H. POGSON; SUSAN M. LINDSTEDT

130

Parasitoid complex of citrus leafminer, Phyllocnistis citrella on lemon in the Central Jordan Valley  

Microsoft Academic Search

From March 1997 to June 1999, samples of lemonleaves infested with citrus leafminer (CLM),Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton(Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae), were collectedfrom the Al-Masalha Citrus Orchard in theCentral Jordan Valley in order to rear CLMparasitoids and to study their populationtrends. Nine species of eulophid parasitoidswere reared from CLM larvae; these were Cirrospilus ingenuus Gahan, C. pictusNees, Pnigalio agraules, Pnigalio sp. B,Pnigalio sp. C,

Mazen A. Ateyyat

2002-01-01

131

Hydrologic reconnaissance of the Dugway Valley-Government Creek area, West-Central Utah  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Dugway Valley-Government Creek area covers about 890 square miles (2,300 square kilometers) in west-central Utah. Total annual precipitation on the area averages about 380,000 acre-feet (470 cubic hectometers). Most streams are ephemeral except for a few in their upper reaches--all are ephemeral below the altitude of about 6,000 feet (1,830 meters). Surface-water development and use in the area are insignificant.

Stephens, Jerry C.; Sumsion, C.T.

1978-01-01

132

Groundwater Overdraft in California's Central Valley: Updated CALVIN Modeling Using Recent CVHM and C2VSIM Representations  

E-print Network

i Groundwater Overdraft in California's Central Valley: Updated CALVIN Modeling Using Recent CVHM water demands, groundwater availability, and local water management opportunities. This update project focused on improving groundwater representation in CALVIN, which included changing CALVIN groundwater

Lund, Jay R.

133

Food habits and migratory movements of the Common Snipe (Capella gallinago delicata) in the Central Brazos Valley of Texas  

E-print Network

FOOD HABITS AND MIGRATORY MOVEMENT'S OF THE COMMON SNIPE (CAPELLA GALLINAGO DELICATA) IN THE CENTRAL BRAZOS VALLEY OF TEXAS A Thesis DAVID JOSEPH JIROVEC Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment...

Jirovec, David Joseph

1971-01-01

134

Atmospheric transport of organophosphate pesticides from California's Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Atmospheric transport of organophosphate pesticides from California's Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada mountains was assessed by collecting air- and wet-deposition samples during December, January, February, and March, 1990 to 1991. Large-scale spraying of these pesticides occurs during December and January to control insect infestations in valley orchards. Sampling sites were placed at 114- (base of the foothills), 533-, and 1920-m elevations. Samples acquired at these sites contained chlorpyrifos [phosphorothioic acid; 0,0-diethyl 0-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyl) ester], parathion [phosphorothioic acid, 0-0-diethylo-(4-nitrophenyl) ester], diazinon {phosphorothioic acid, 0,0-diethyl 0-[6-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl)-4-pyrimidinyl] ester} diazinonoxon {phosphoric acid, 0,0-diethyl 0-[6-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl)-4-pyrimidinyl] ester}, and paraoxon [phosphoric acid, 0,0-diethyl 0-(4-nitrophenyl) ester] in both air and wet deposition samples. Air concentrations of chloropyrifos, diazinon and parathion ranged from 13 to 13 000 pg/m3 at the base of the foothills. At 533-m air concentrations were below the limit of quantification (1.4 pg/m3) to 83 pg/m3 and at 1920 m concentrations were below the limit of quantification. Concentrations in wet deposition varied with distance and elevation from the Central Valley. Rainwater concentrations at the base of the foot hills ranged from 16 to 7600 pg/mL. At 533-m rain and snow water concentrations ranged from below the limit of quantification (1.3 pg/mL) to 140 pg/mL and at 1920 m concentrations ranged from below the limit of quantification to 48 pg/mL. These findings indicate that atmospheric transport of pesticides applied in the valley to the Sierra Nevada mountains is occurring, but the levels decrease as distance and elevation increase from the valley floor.

Zabik, John M.; Seiber, James N.

1993-01-01

135

Evaluating Subsidence in the Central Valley, CA, using InSAR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) was used to identify and characterize ground-water-induced subsidence throughout the Central Valley of California where studies show that more than 9 meters of subsidence occurred between 1925 and 1977. Subsidence measured using InSAR imagery coincides in magnitude and extent with subsidence measured during land-based geodetic surveys. Four targets in the Central Valley were chosen for this study: Highways 152 and 198 in the San Joaquin Valley; Pixley in the Wasco-Tulare area 60 km north of Bakersfield; and Davis, 15 km west of Sacramento. Precise leveling and Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements in the San Joaquin Valley (completed by the California Spatial Reference Center's San Joaquin Valley Height Modernization Project) along Highways 152 and 198 show that 1 and 2 m, respectively, of subsidence occurred from 1988 to 2003. InSAR imagery from three independent satellite tracks show a greater than 60-km-wide feature across Highway 152 and a greater than 20-km-wide deformation feature across highway 198. InSAR detects a 15- x 15-km feature just south of Pixley subsiding at a rate of about 2 cm/year between 1992 and 1995. Two overlapping satellite tracks of interferograms for this area identify a small 1.5-km-wide subsidence feature located in the southwest part of the larger-scale subsidence bowl. The maximum subsidence rate of this small-scale localized feature is approximately 35 mm/year. The Bay Area Regional Deformation (BARD) GPS site UCD1 in Davis has had an average subsidence rate of 5.7 mm/year since the site was installed in 1997. Interferograms suggest a complex seasonal deformation feature that correlates, in part, with the GPS time series.

Brandt, J. T.; Bawden, G. W.; Sneed, M.

2005-12-01

136

Simulation of Net Infiltration and Potential Recharge Using a Distributed-Parameter Watershed Model of the Death Valley Region, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the development and application of the distributed-parameter watershed model, INFILv3, for estimating the temporal and spatial distribution of net infiltration and potential recharge in the Death Valley region, Nevada and California. The estimates of net infiltration quantify the downward drainage of water across the lower boundary of the root zone and are used to indicate potential recharge under variable climate conditions and drainage basin characteristics. Spatial variability in recharge in the Death Valley region likely is high owing to large differences in precipitation, potential evapotranspiration, bedrock permeability, soil thickness, vegetation characteristics, and contributions to recharge along active stream channels. The quantity and spatial distribution of recharge representing the effects of variable climatic conditions and drainage basin characteristics on recharge are needed to reduce uncertainty in modeling ground-water flow. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, developed a regional saturated-zone ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system to help evaluate the current hydrogeologic system and the potential effects of natural or human-induced changes. Although previous estimates of recharge have been made for most areas of the Death Valley region, including the area defined by the boundary of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, the uncertainty of these estimates is high, and the spatial and temporal variability of the recharge in these basins has not been quantified.

J.A. Hevesi; A.L. Flint; L.E. Flint

2003-09-30

137

Rapid uplift and crustal growth in extensional environments: An isotopic study from the Death Valley region, California  

SciTech Connect

The Willow Spring Diorite, in the Black Mountains of the central Death Valley extended terrain, yields a U-Pb zircon age of 11.6 {plus minus} 0.2 Ma. {sup 40}Ar-{sup 39}Ar analyses of hornblende and U-Pb analyses of sphene from this sample give ages of about 10 Ma, indicating that the batholith remained above about 500 C for about 1.5 m.y. after crystallization. Geologic relations indicate that the diorite was exposed to erosion by about 5 Ma, bracketing the evolution of the diorite within the time between onset of extension and uplift of the Black Mountain crustal block. Initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios range from 0.7060 (mafic diorite) to 0.7083 (felsic diorite) in samples collected from an area 200 x 100 m. These data, combined with structural and petrologic evidence, suggest that the batholith represents a rare view of a mid-crustal zone of mixing between mantle-derived magma and crustal material, often suggested to exist on the basis of observations of intermediate volcanic rocks. The Black Mountains may therefore expose a cross section through a continental rift magmatic system, from partially contaminated mafic to intermediate intrusive rocks in the deep crust up to their volcanic equivalents. The relatively low initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and high {epsilon}{sub Nd} ({minus}1.4) of the diorite, which is within Proterozoic basement with {epsilon}{sub Nd} {approximately}{minus}18, is consistent with significant amounts of mantle input in continental rifts inferred from geophysical data and measurement of He isotopic ratios. Such additions to the crust in continental rights may represent a significant process of crustal growth. Furthermore, the emplacement of igneous bodies with a large mantle component may help reconcile the large crustal pull apart in the Basin and Range (in excess of 140 km) with the fact that the crust still has as normal thickness of about 30-35 km.

Asmerom, Y.; Snow, J.K.; Holm, D.K.; Jacobsen, S.B.; Wernicke, B.P. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Lux, D.R. (Univ. of Maine, Orono (USA))

1990-03-01

138

Spatial Use by Wintering Greater White-Fronted Geese Relative to a Decade of Habitat Change in California's Central Valley  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract We investigated,the effect of recent,habitat changes,in California’s Central Valley on,wintering,Pacific greater,white-fronted,geese,(Anser albifrons frontalis) by comparing roost-to-feed distances, distributions, population range sizes, and habitat use during 1987–1990 and 1998– 2000. These habitat changes included wetland restoration and agricultural land enhancement,due to the 1990 implementation of the Central Valley Joint Venture, increased land area used for rice (Oryza sativa) production, and

JOSHUA T. ACKERMAN; JOHN Y. TAKEKAWA; DENNIS L. ORTHMEYER; JOSEPH P. FLESKES; JULIE L. YEE; KAMMIE L. KRUSE

2006-01-01

139

Estimated Ground-Water Withdrawals from the Death Valley Regional Flow System, Nevada and California, 1913-98  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water withdrawals from 1913 through 1998 from the Death Valley regional flow system have been compiled to support a regional, three-dimensional, transient ground-water flow model. Withdrawal locations and depths of production intervals were estimated and associated errors were reported for 9,300 wells. Withdrawals were grouped into three categories: mining, public-supply, and commercial water use; domestic water use; and irrigation water use. In this report, groupings were based on the method used to estimate pumpage. Cumulative ground-water withdrawals from 1913 through 1998 totaled 3 million acre-feet, most of which was used to irrigate alfalfa. Annual withdrawal for irrigation ranged from 80 to almost 100 percent of the total pumpage. About 75,000 acre-feet was withdrawn for irrigation in 1998. Annual irrigation withdrawals generally were estimated as the product of irrigated acreage and application rate. About 320 fields totaling 11,000 acres were identified in six hydrographic areas. Annual application rates for high water-use crops ranged from 5 feet in Penoyer Valley to 9 feet in Pahrump Valley. The uncertainty in the estimates of ground-water withdrawals was attributed primarily to the uncertainty of application rate estimates. Annual ground-water withdrawal was estimated at about 90,000 acre-feet in 1998 with an assigned uncertainty bounded by 60,000 to 130,000 acre-feet.

Moreo, Michael T.; Halford, Keith J.; La Camera, Richard J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

2003-01-01

140

Fog composition in the Central Valley of California over three decades  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerous fog studies have been conducted in the Central Valley of California since the 1980s, making it one of the most studied locations in the world in terms of fog chemistry. The present work reviews observational fog studies in the area and discusses overall chemical composition as well as spatial variability and temporal variability. Regionally there is a clear gradient in fog occurrence with less fog and lower density (liquid water content, LWC) fog in the southern part of the Valley (Bakersfield) compared to more northern locations like Fresno or Davis. Chemically, fogs in the southern valley have higher solute loadings and lower pH compared to more northern locations (Davis and Fresno). Overall fog chemistry is dominated in the valley by the ammonia-nitric acid-ammonium nitrate system with sulfate being a rather minor component, especially at more northern locations and in more recent years. Fog pH in recent years is consistently higher than 5, showing an absence of acid in fogs in this region. LWC values appear to have decreased over recent years (less dense fogs). An airport visibility assessment of fog frequency reveals that overall dense fogs (visibility of less than 1/4 mile) have decreased by ~ 50% over the last 30 years.

Herckes, P.; Marcotte, A. R.; Wang, Y.; Collett, J. L.

2015-01-01

141

Slip Rates, Recurrence Intervals and Earthquake Event Magnitudes for the southern Black Mountains Fault Zone, southern Death Valley, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The normal-oblique Black Mountain Fault zone (BMFZ) is part of the Death Valley fault system. Strong ground-motion generated by earthquakes on the BMFZ poses a serious threat to the Las Vegas, NV area (pop. ~1,428,690), the Death Valley National Park (max. pop. ~20,000) and Pahrump, NV (pop. 30,000). Fault scarps offset Holocene alluvial-fan deposits along most of the 80-km length of the BMFZ. However, slip rates, recurrence intervals, and event magnitudes for the BMFZ are poorly constrained due to a lack of age control. Also, Holocene scarp heights along the BMFZ range from <1 m to >6 m suggesting that geomorphic sections have different earthquake histories. Along the southernmost section, the BMFZ steps basinward preserving three post-late Pleistocene fault scarps. Surveys completed with a total station theodolite show scarp heights of 5.5, 5.0 and 2 meters offsetting the late Pleistocene, early to middle Holocene, to middle-late Holocene surfaces, respectively. Regression plots of vertical offset versus maximum scarp angle suggest event ages of <10 - 2 ka with a post-late Pleistocene slip rate of 0.1mm/yr to 0.3 mm/yr and recurrence of <3300 years/event. Regression equations for the estimated geomorphically constrained rupture length of the southernmost section and surveyed event displacements provides estimated moment magnitudes (Mw) between 6.6 and 7.3 for the BMFZ.

Fronterhouse Sohn, M.; Knott, J. R.; Bowman, D. D.

2005-12-01

142

Geochemistry of Mesozoic plutons, southern Death Valley region, California: Insights into the origin of Cordilleran interior magmatism  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mesozoic granitoid plutons in the southern Death Valley region of southeastern California reveal substantial compositional and isotopic diversity for Mesozoic magmatism in the southwestern US Cordillera. Jurassic plutons of the region are mainly calc-alkaline mafic granodiorites with ??Ndi of -5 to -16, 87Sr/86Sri of 0.707-0.726, and 206Pb/204Pbi of 17.5-20.0. Cretaceous granitoids of the region are mainly monzogranites with ??Ndi of -6 to -19, 87Sr/86Sri of 0.707-0.723, and 206Pb/204Pbi of 17.4-18.6. The granitoids were generated by mixing of mantle-derived mafic melts and pre-existing crust - some of the Cretaceous plutons represent melting of Paleoproterozoic crust that, in the southern Death Valley region, is exceptionally heterogeneous. A Cretaceous gabbro on the southern flank of the region has an unuasually juvenile composition (??Ndi -3.2, 87Sr/86Sri 0.7060). Geographic position of the Mesozoic plutons and comparison with Cordillera plutonism in the Mojave Desert show that the Precambrian lithosphere (craton margin) in the eastern Mojave Desert region may consists of two crustal blocks separated by a more juvenile terrane.

Ramo, O.T.; Calzia, J.P.; Kosunen, P.J.

2002-01-01

143

Hydrogeologic Framework and Ground Water in Basin-Fill Deposits of the Diamond Valley Flow System, Central Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Diamond Valley flow system, an area of about 3,120 square miles in central Nevada, consists of five hydrographic areas: Monitor, Antelope, Kobeh, and Diamond Valleys and Stevens Basin. Although these five areas are in a remote part of Nevada, local government officials and citizens are concerned that the water resources of the flow system eventually could be further developed for irrigation or mining purposes or potentially for municipal use outside the study area. In order to better understand the flow system, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with Eureka, Lander, and Nye Counties and the Nevada Division of Water Resources, is conducting a multi-phase study of the flow system. The principal aquifers of the Diamond Valley flow system are in basin-fill deposits that occupy structural basins comprised of carbonate rocks, siliciclastic sedimentary rocks, igneous intrusive rocks, and volcanic rocks. Carbonate rocks also function as aquifers, but their extent and interconnections with basin-fill aquifers are poorly understood. Ground-water flow in southern Monitor Valley is from the valley margins toward the valley axis and then northward to a large area of discharge by evapotranspiration (ET) that is formed south of a group of unnamed hills near the center of the valley. Ground-water flow from northern Monitor Valley, Antelope Valley, and northern and western parts of Kobeh Valley converges to an area of ground-water discharge by ET in central and eastern Kobeh Valley. Prior to irrigation development in the 1960s, ground-water flow in Diamond Valley was from valley margins toward the valley axis and then northward to a large discharge area at the north end of the valley. Stevens Basin is a small upland basin with internal drainage and is not connected with other parts of the flow system. After 40 years of irrigation pumping, a large area of ground-water decline has developed in southern Diamond Valley around the irrigated area. In this part of Diamond Valley, flow is from valley margins toward the irrigated area. In northern Diamond Valley, flow appears to remain generally northward to the large discharge area. Subsurface flow through mountain ranges has been identified from Garden Valley (outside the study area) through the Sulphur Springs Range to Diamond Valley and from southeastern Antelope Valley through the Fish Creek Range to Little Smoky Valley (outside the study area). In both cases, the flow is probably through carbonate rocks. Ground-water levels in the Diamond Valley flow system have changed during the past 40 years. These changes are the result of pumpage for irrigation, municipal, domestic, and mining uses, mostly in southern Diamond Valley, and annual and longer-term variations in precipitation in undeveloped parts of the study area. A large area of ground-water decline that underlies an area about 10 miles wide and 20 miles long has developed in the basin-fill aquifer of southern Diamond Valley. Water levels beneath the main part of the irrigated area have declined as much as 90 feet. In undeveloped parts of the study area, annual water-level fluctuations generally have been no more than a few feet.

Tumbusch, Mary L.; Plume, Russell W.

2006-01-01

144

Transient transport in central-valley-dominated ternary III V alloys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes results of an ensemble Monte Carlo study of ballistic transport and velocity overshoot in Al 0.25In 0.75As and Ga 0.4In 0.6As. Velocity overshoot in these materials is limited primarily by transport properties of the central valley. The transfer of carriers into higher-lying energy valleys occurs only after velocity overshoot has subsided. Instantaneous conduction-band occupancies, carrier positions, and carrier velocities are given as functions of time for electric field intensities of 10 and 40 kV/cm. These curves show that transient velocities exceed steady-state values by as much as 27 to one, that these transients persist over distances ranging from 0.22 to 0.79 ?m, and that average velocities during velocity overshoot are as large as 5.6 × 10 7 cm/sec. These results have important implications for submicron-device applications of these materials.

Massengill, L. W.; Glisson, T. H.; Hauser, J. R.; Littlejohn, M. A.

1986-07-01

145

Hydrology of Prairie Dog Creek Valley, Norton Dam to state line, north-central Kansas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Development of water resources has been a major factor in the economy of Prairie Dog Creek Valley in north-central Kansas. Releases from Norton Reservoir to the Almena Irrigation District averaged 6,900 acre-feet per year during 1967-76. The number of irrigation wells increased from 4 to 147 during 1947-78. Ground water in the valley is derived mostly from the alluvial aquifer. The effects of irrigation on the aquifer are indicated by water-level changes. The water in storage increased from 130,000 to 136,000 acre-feet during 1947-78 due to recharge from surface-water irrigation. A steady-state model of the aquifer prior to irrigation (1947) indicated that most recharge was from precipitation (88 percent) and most discharge was to streams (54 percent) and reparian transpiration (26 percent). Although aquifer storage increased in this area, storage generally decreased in other areas of western Kansas. (USGS)

Stullken, L.E.

1984-01-01

146

A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect

This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

2006-05-16

147

A guide for using the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

Blainey, Joan B.; Faunt, Claudia C.; Hill, Mary C.

2006-01-01

148

Preliminary estimates of spatially distributed net infiltration and recharge for the Death Valley region, Nevada-California  

SciTech Connect

A three-dimensional ground-water flow model has been developed to evaluate the Death Valley regional flow system, which includes ground water beneath the Nevada Test Site. Estimates of spatially distributed net infiltration and recharge are needed to define upper boundary conditions. This study presents a preliminary application of a conceptual and numerical model of net infiltration. The model was developed in studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which is located in the approximate center of the Death Valley ground-water flow system. The conceptual model describes the effects of precipitation, runoff, evapotranspiration, and redistribution of water in the shallow unsaturated zone on predicted rates of net infiltration; precipitation and soil depth are the two most significant variables. The conceptual model was tested using a preliminary numerical model based on energy- and water-balance calculations. Daily precipitation for 1980 through 1995, averaging 202 millimeters per year over the 39,556 square kilometers area of the ground-water flow model, was input to the numerical model to simulate net infiltration ranging from zero for a soil thickness greater than 6 meters to over 350 millimeters per year for thin soils at high elevations in the Spring Mountains overlying permeable bedrock. Estimated average net infiltration over the entire ground-water flow model domain is 7.8 millimeters per year. To evaluate the application of the net-infiltration model developed on a local scale at Yucca Mountain, to net-infiltration estimates representing the magnitude and distribution of recharge on a regional scale, the net-infiltration results were compared with recharge estimates obtained using empirical methods. Comparison of model results with previous estimates of basinwide recharge suggests that the net-infiltration estimates obtained using this model may overestimate recharge because of uncertainty in modeled precipitation, bedrock permeability, and soil properties for locations such as the Spring Mountains. Although this model is preliminary and uncalibrated, it provides a first approximation of the spatial distribution of net infiltration for the Death Valley region under current climatic conditions.

Hevesi, J.A.; Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.

2002-07-18

149

Aeromagnetic maps with geologic interpretations for the Tularosa Valley, south-central New Mexico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An aeromagnetic survey of the Tularosa Valley in south-central New Mexico has provided information on the igneous rocks that are buried beneath alluvium and colluvium. The data, compiled as residual magnetic anomalies, are shown on twelve maps at a scale of 1:62,500. Measurements of magnetic properties of samples collected in the valley and adjacent highlands give a basis for identifying the anomaly-producing rocks. Precambrian rocks of the crystalline basement have weakly induced magnetizations and produce anomalies having low magnetic intensities and low magnetic gradients. Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic intrusive rocks have moderately to strongly induced magnetizations. Precambrian rocks produce prominent magnetic anomalies having higher amplitudes and higher gradients. The Quaternary basalt has a strong remanent magnetization of normal polarity and produces narrow anomalies having high-magnetic gradients. Interpretations include an increase in elevation to the top of buried Precambrian rock in the northern part of the valley, a large Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic intrusive near Alamogordo, and a southern extension of the intrusive rock exposed in the Jarilla Mountains. Evidence for the southern extension comes from a quantitative analysis of the magnetic anomalies..

Bath, G.D.

1977-01-01

150

Long-term Geomorphic Effects of Dams on Rivers in the Central Valley of California: A Comprehensive and Comparative Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rivers of the Central Valley of California pose an unusual challenge and opportunity for the field of river restoration. The main challenge is that there are sixteen major dammed tributaries arranged in parallel, some of which have been significantly altered by hydraulic mining, dams, and gravel mining over the last 150 years. Dams of different sizes reduce flows to varying extents and likely create different downstream geomorphic effects. Partly because of these difficulties, much of the restoration work currently is being done river by river, with little reference to conditions or ongoing restoration efforts on neighboring rivers, and without being pieced together coherently as a parts of the larger-scale restoration of Central Valley rivers. Partly because of these challenges, however, there is an opportunity for the field of river restoration to learn much from the Central Valley about the effects of dams on gravel-bedded rivers and their restoration. For example, there has been a significant amount of geomorphic and ecological research compiled over the last twenty years that is available to be mined. In addition, some of the best hydrologic data exist in the Valley, stretching back over 100 years in many cases and allowing for excellent pre- and post-dam comparisons. A critical need in the Central Valley is a geomorphic framework within which to understand and prioritize individual restoration projects and the relative similarity between rivers. Using data from previous reports, hydrologic gages, and field work conducted during 2005-2006, a first-cut framework based on magnitude-frequency comparisons appears to work well when comparing the effects of different dams in the Central Valley. This is a work in progress that hopes to benefit future large-scale river restoration projects, particularly in the Central Valley, and also smaller-scale restoration efforts on individual rivers.

Minear, J.

2006-12-01

151

Water-level database update for the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system, Nevada and California, 1907-2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The water-level database for the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system in Nevada and California was updated. The database includes more than 54,000 water levels collected from 1907 to 2007, from more than 1,800 wells. Water levels were assigned a primary flag and multiple secondary flags that describe hydrologic conditions and trends at the time of the measurement and identify pertinent information about the well or water-level measurement. The flags provide a subjective measure of the relative accuracy of the measurements and are used to identify which water levels are appropriate for calculating head observations in a regional transient groundwater flow model. Included in the report appendix are all water-level data and their flags, selected well data, and an interactive spreadsheet for viewing hydrographs and well locations.

Pavelko, Michael T.

2010-01-01

152

The Valley-of-Death: reciprocal sign epistasis constrains adaptive trajectories in a constant, nutrient limiting environment.  

PubMed

The fitness landscape is a powerful metaphor for describing the relationship between genotype and phenotype for a population under selection. However, empirical data as to the topography of fitness landscapes are limited, owing to difficulties in measuring fitness for large numbers of genotypes under any condition. We previously reported a case of reciprocal sign epistasis (RSE), where two mutations individually increased yeast fitness in a glucose-limited environment, but reduced fitness when combined, suggesting the existence of two peaks on the fitness landscape. We sought to determine whether a ridge connected these peaks so that populations founded by one mutant could reach the peak created by the other, avoiding the low-fitness "Valley-of-Death" between them. Sequencing clones after 250 generations of further evolution provided no evidence for such a ridge, but did reveal many presumptive beneficial mutations, adding to a growing body of evidence that clonal interference pervades evolving microbial populations. PMID:25449178

Chiotti, Kami E; Kvitek, Daniel J; Schmidt, Karen H; Koniges, Gregory; Schwartz, Katja; Donckels, Elizabeth A; Rosenzweig, Frank; Sherlock, Gavin

2014-12-01

153

Geologic mapping in Death Valley, California/Nevada using NASA/JPL airborne systems (AVIRIS, TIMS, and AIRSAR)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A multi-sensor aircraft campaign called the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) conducted during 1989 resulted in acquisition of high quality multispectral images in the visible, near infrared, shortwave infrared, thermal infrared, and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The airborne data sets include the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), and the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). Ancillary data include Landsat Thematic Mapper, laboratory and field spectral measurements, and traditional geologic mapping. The GRSFE data for a site in the northern Death Valley, (California and Nevada) region were calibrated to physical units and geometrically registered to a map base. Various aspects of this experiment are briefly discussed.

Kruse, Fred A.; Dietz, John B.; Kiereinyoung, Kathryn S.

1991-01-01

154

A Comparison of Groundwater Storage Using GRACE Data, Groundwater Levels, and a Hydrological Model in Californias Central Valley  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) measures changes in total water storage (TWS) remotely, and may provide additional insight to the use of well-based data in California's agriculturally productive Central Valley region. Under current California law, well owners are not required to report groundwater extraction rates, making estimation of total groundwater extraction difficult. As a result, other groundwater change detection techniques may prove useful. From October 2002 to September 2009, GRACE was used to map changes in TWS for the three hydrological regions (the Sacramento River Basin, the San Joaquin River Basin, and the Tulare Lake Basin) encompassing the Central Valley aquifer. Net groundwater storage changes were calculated from the changes in TWS for each of the three hydrological regions and by incorporating estimates for additional components of the hydrological budget including precipitation, evapotranspiration, soil moisture, snow pack, and surface water storage. The calculated changes in groundwater storage were then compared to simulated values from the California Department of Water Resource's Central Valley Groundwater- Surface Water Simulation Model (C2VSIM) and their Water Data Library (WDL) Geographic Information System (GIS) change in storage tool. The results from the three methods were compared. Downscaling GRACE data into the 21 smaller Central Valley sub-regions included in C2VSIM was also evaluated. This work has the potential to improve California's groundwater resource management and use of existing hydrological models for the Central Valley.

Kuss, Amber; Brandt, William; Randall, Joshua; Floyd, Bridget; Bourai, Abdelwahab; Newcomer, Michelle; Skiles, Joseph; Schmidt, Cindy

2011-01-01

155

Quaternary tectonics in the central Interandean Valley, Ecuador: Fault-propagation folds, transfer faults and the Cotopaxi Volcano  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the Quaternary tectonics of the central Interandean Valley (IV, Ecuador), around the active Cotopaxi volcano, by field geological–structural survey, analysis of seismicity, precise levelling of river terraces and numerical modelling. North of the volcano, there are main Quaternary west-dipping reverse faults located along the western side of the valley. At the Cotopaxi foothills, we found NNE-SSW-striking, vertical, right-lateral

Emilia Fiorini; Alessandro Tibaldi

156

Hematology and plasma biochemistry values for the giant garter snake (Thamnophis gigas) and valley garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis fitchi) in the Central Valley of California.  

PubMed

Hematology and plasma biochemistry parameters are useful in the assessment and management of threatened and endangered species. Although reference ranges are readily available for many mammalian species, reference ranges for snakes are lacking for most species. We determined hematology and plasma biochemistry reference ranges for giant garter snakes (Thamnophis gigas) and valley garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis fitchi) living in four management areas in the Central Valley of California. White blood cell, heterophil, lymphocyte, and azurophil counts in giant garter snakes were approximately twice the values of valley garter snakes. Statistically significant differences in aspartate aminotransferase, globulin, and potassium between the two species did not appear clinically significant. No significant differences were found in the measured parameters between male and female giant garter snakes. Some differences were found among collection sites. These reference ranges provide baseline data for comparisons over time and between collection sites. PMID:22493106

Wack, Raymund F; Hansen, Eric; Small, Marilyn; Poppenga, Robert; Bunn, David; Johnson, Christine K

2012-04-01

157

Hydraulic-property estimates for use with a transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect

The Death Valley regional ground-water flow system encompasses an area of about 43,500 square kilometers in southeastern California and southern Nevada. The study area is underlain by Quaternary to Tertiary basin-fill sediments and mafic-lava flows; Tertiary volcanic, volcaniclastic, and sedimentary rocks; Tertiary to Jurassic granitic rocks; Triassic to Middle Proterozoic carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks; and Early Proterozoic igneous and metamorphic rocks. The rock assemblage in the Death Valley region is extensively faulted as a result of several episodes of tectonic activity. This study is comprised of published and unpublished estimates of transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storage coefficient, and anisotropy ratios for hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley region study area. Hydrogeologic units previously proposed for the Death Valley regional transient ground-water flow model, were recognized for the purpose of studying the distribution of hydraulic properties. Analyses of regression and covariance were used to assess if a relation existed between hydraulic conductivity and depth for most hydrogeologic units. Those analyses showed a weak, quantitatively indeterminate, relation between hydraulic conductivity and depth.

W.R. Belcher; P.E. Elliott; A.L. Geldon

2001-12-31

158

Hydraulic-property estimates for use with a transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Death Valley regional ground-water flow system encompasses an area of about 43,500 square kilometers in southeastern California and southern Nevada, between latitudes 35? and 38?15' north and longitudes 115? and 117?45' west. The study area is underlain by Quaternary to Tertiary basin-fill sediments and mafic-lava flows; Tertiary volcanic, volcaniclastic, and sedimentary rocks; Tertiary to Jurassic granitic rocks; Triassic to Middle Proterozoic carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks; and Early Proterozoic igneous and metamorphic rocks. The rock assemblage in the Death Valley region is extensively faulted as a result of several episodes of tectonic activity. This study is comprised of published and unpublished estimates of transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storage coefficient, and anisotropy ratios for hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley region study area. Hydrogeologic units previously proposed for the Death Valley regional transient ground-water flow model were recognized for the purpose of studying the distribution of hydraulic properties. Analyses of regression and covariance were used to assess if a relation existed between hydraulic conductivity and depth for most hydrogeologic units. Those analyses showed a weak, quantitatively indeterminate, relation between hydraulic conductivity and depth.

Belcher, Wayne R.; Elliott, Peggy E.; Geldon, Arthur L.

2001-01-01

159

New observations of VOC emissions and concentrations in, above, and around the Central Valley of California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large portions of the Central Valley of California are out of compliance with current state and federal air quality standards for ozone and particulate matter, and the relative importance of biogenic and anthropogenic VOC emissions to their photochemical production in this region remains uncertain. In 2009-2011 multiple measurement campaigns were completed investigating the VOC emission inventory and concentration distributions. In 2009 BVOC emissions from more than 20 species of major agricultural crops in California were measured in a greenhouse using branch enclosures by both PTRMS and in-situ GC. Overall, crops were found to emit low amounts of BVOC compared to the natural forests surrounding the valley. Crops mainly emitted methanol and terpenes, with a broad array of other species emitted at lower levels, and all the measured crops showed negligible emissions of isoprene. Navel oranges were the largest crop BVOC emitters measured so a full year of flux measurements were made in an orange grove near Visalia in 2010 by eddy covariance(EC)-PTRMS with two multi-week periods of concentration measurements by hourly in-situ GC, and one month of high mass resolution flux measurements by EC-PTR-TOF-MS. The dominant BVOC emissions from the orange grove were methanol and terpenes, followed by acetone, acetaldehyde, and a low level of emissions for many other species. In 2011 aircraft eddy covariance measurements of BVOC fluxes were made by EC-PTRMS covering a large area of California as part of the California Airborne Bvoc Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign aimed at improving BVOC emission models on regional scales, mainly profiling BVOC emissions from oak woodlands surrounding the Central Valley. In 2010, hourly in-situ VOC measurements were made via in-situ GC in Bakersfield, CA as part of the CalNex experiment. Additionally, in-situ measurements of fresh motor vehicle exhaust were made in Oakland's Caldecott tunnel. Measurements by in-situ GC included more than 200 anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs with a wide range of volatilities (up to 17 carbon atoms in size) and various functional groups (e.g. aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, halogens, sulfur, & nitrogen). Finally, in 2011 vertical profiles of VOC were made at 5 heights on a communication tower at Walnut Grove (~20 miles south of Sacramento) from 30' to 1550' by PTRMS. Results from all of these studies combined provide a novel overview of the distribution of VOC emissions and concentrations in, around, and above the Central Valley of California.

Goldstein, A. H.; Fares, S.; Gentner, D. R.; Park, J.; Weber, R.; Ormeno, E.; Holzinger, R.; Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T. R.; Guenther, A. B.; Fischer, M. L.; Harley, R. A.; Karlik, J. F.

2011-12-01

160

Recent land-use/land-cover change in the Central California Valley  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Open access to Landsat satellite data has enabled annual analyses of modern land-use and land-cover change (LULCC) for the Central California Valley ecoregion between 2005 and 2010. Our annual LULCC estimates capture landscape-level responses to water policy changes, climate, and economic instability. From 2005 to 2010, agriculture in the region fluctuated along with regulatory-driven changes in water allocation as well as persistent drought conditions. Grasslands and shrublands declined, while developed lands increased in former agricultural and grassland/shrublands. Development rates stagnated in 2007, coinciding with the onset of the historic foreclosure crisis in California and the global economic downturn. We utilized annual LULCC estimates to generate interval-based LULCC estimates (2000–2005 and 2005–2010) and extend existing 27 year interval-based land change monitoring through 2010. Resulting change data provides insights into the drivers of landscape change in the Central California Valley ecoregion and represents the first, continuous, 37 year mapping effort of its kind.

Soulard, Christopher E.; Wilson, Tamara S.

2013-01-01

161

Effects of hydrologic infrastructure on flow regimes of California's Central Valley rivers: Implications for fish populations  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Alteration of natural flow regimes is generally acknowledged to have negative effects on native biota; however, methods for defining ecologically appropriate flow regimes in managed river systems are only beginning to be developed. Understanding how past and present water management has affected rivers is an important part of developing such tools. In this paper, we evaluate how existing hydrologic infrastructure and management affect streamflow characteristics of rivers in the Central Valley, California and discuss those characteristics in the context of habitat requirements of native and alien fishes. We evaluated the effects of water management by comparing observed discharges with estimated discharges assuming no water management ("full natural runoff"). Rivers in the Sacramento River drainage were characterized by reduced winter–spring discharges and augmented discharges in other months. Rivers in the San Joaquin River drainage were characterized by reduced discharges in all months but particularly in winter and spring. Two largely unaltered streams had hydrographs similar to those based on full natural runoff of the regulated rivers. The reduced discharges in the San Joaquin River drainage streams are favourable for spawning of many alien species, which is consistent with observed patterns of fish distribution and abundance in the Central Valley. However, other factors, such as water temperature, are also important to the relative success of native and alien resident fishes. As water management changes in response to climate change and societal demands, interdisciplinary programs of research and monitoring will be essential for anticipating effects on fishes and to avoid unanticipated ecological outcomes.

Brown, Larry R.; Bauer, Marissa L.

2010-01-01

162

Spatially Distributed Exposure Assessment of Pesticide Sources in the Central Valley, California, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pesticides in agricultural runoff are considered as significant pollution from nonpoint sources in intensive agricultural regions such as California’s Central Valley. This study presents a spatially explicit modeling approach to extend field-scale pesticide transport model into basin level. The approach was applied to simulate chlorpyrifos use in the Central Valley during 2003-2007. Chlorpyrifos loadings were reported for each section (1×1 mi cell), and the simulation results were in general agreements with monitoring results at watershed level. The average value of loading as percent of use (LAPU) is 0.031% and varied with seasons and locations. Results of this study provide strong evidence that surface runoff generation and pesticide application timing are the two influencing factors on the spatial and temporal variability of chlorpyrifos sources from agricultural fields. This is one of the first studies in coupling GIS and field-scale models and providing simulations for the dynamics of pesticides over an agriculturally dominated landscape. The demonstrated modeling approach may be useful for assessment of the implementations of best management practice (BMPs) and total maximum daily load (TMDL).

Luo, Y.; Zhang, M.

2009-12-01

163

A summary of ground-water pumpage in the Central Valley, California, 1961-77  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the Central Valley of California, a great agricultural economy has been developed in a semiarid environment. This economy is supported by imported surface water and 9 to 15 million acre-feet per year of ground water. Estimates of ground-water pumpage computed from power consumption have been compiled and summarized. Under ideal conditions, the accuracy of the methods used is about 3 percent. This level of accuracy is not sustained over the entire study area. When pumpage for the entire area is mapped, the estimates seem to be consistent areally and through time. A multiple linear-regression model was used to synthesize data for the years 1961 through 1977, when power data were not available. The model used a relation between ground-water pumpage and climatic indexes to develop a full suite of pumpage data to be used as input to a digital ground-water model, one of the products of the Central Valley Aquifer Project. Statistical analysis of well-perforation data from drillers ' logs and water-temperature data was used to determine the percentage of pumpage that was withdrawn from each of two horizontal layers. (USGS)

Diamond, Jonathan; Williamson, A.K.

1983-01-01

164

Hydrogeologic framework and occurrence, movement, and chemical characterization of groundwater in Dixie Valley, west-central Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Dixie Valley, a primarily undeveloped basin in west-central Nevada, is being considered for groundwater exportation. Proposed pumping would occur from the basin-fill aquifer. In response to proposed exportation, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation and Churchill County, conducted a study to improve the understanding of groundwater resources in Dixie Valley. The objective of this report is to characterize the hydrogeologic framework, the occurrence and movement of groundwater, the general water quality of the basin-fill aquifer, and the potential mixing between basin-fill and geothermal aquifers in Dixie Valley. Various types of geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical data were compiled from previous studies and collected in support of this study. Hydrogeologic units in Dixie Valley were defined to characterize rocks and sediments with similar lithologies and hydraulic properties influencing groundwater flow. Hydraulic properties of the basin-fill deposits were characterized by transmissivity estimated from aquifer tests and specific-capacity tests. Groundwater-level measurements and hydrogeologic-unit data were combined to create a potentiometric surface map and to characterize groundwater occurrence and movement. Subsurface inflow from adjacent valleys into Dixie Valley through the basin-fill aquifer was evaluated using hydraulic gradients and Darcy flux computations. The chemical signature and groundwater quality of the Dixie Valley basin-fill aquifer, and potential mixing between basin-fill and geothermal aquifers, were evaluated using chemical data collected from wells and springs during the current study and from previous investigations. Dixie Valley is the terminus of the Dixie Valley flow system, which includes Pleasant, Jersey, Fairview, Stingaree, Cowkick, and Eastgate Valleys. The freshwater aquifer in the study area is composed of unconsolidated basin-fill deposits of Quaternary age. The basin-fill hydrogeologic unit can be several orders of magnitude more transmissive than surrounding and underlying consolidated rocks and Dixie Valley playa deposits. Transmissivity estimates in the basin fill throughout Dixie Valley ranged from 30 to 45,500 feet squared per day; however, a single transmissivity value of 0.1 foot squared per day was estimated for playa deposits. Groundwater generally flows from the mountain range uplands toward the central valley lowlands and eventually discharges near the playa edge. Potentiometric contours east and west of the playa indicate that groundwater is moving eastward from the Stillwater Range and westward from the Clan Alpine Mountains toward the playa. Similarly, groundwater flows from the southern and northern basin boundaries toward the basin center. Subsurface groundwater flow likely enters Dixie Valley from Fairview and Stingaree Valleys in the south and from Jersey and Pleasant Valleys in the north, but groundwater connections through basin-fill deposits were present only across the Fairview and Jersey Valley divides. Annual subsurface inflow from Fairview and Jersey Valleys ranges from 700 to 1,300 acre-feet per year and from 1,800 to 2,300 acre-feet per year, respectively. Groundwater flow between Dixie, Stingaree, and Pleasant Valleys could occur through less transmissive consolidated rocks, but only flow through basin fill was estimated in this study. Groundwater in the playa is distinct from the freshwater, basin-fill aquifer. Groundwater mixing between basin-fill and playa groundwater systems is physically limited by transmissivity contrasts of about four orders of magnitude. Total dissolved solids in playa deposit groundwater are nearly 440 times greater than total dissolved solids in the basin-fill groundwater. These distinctive physical and chemical flow restrictions indicate that groundwater interaction between the basin fill and playa sediments was minimal during this study period (water years 2009–11). Groundwater in Dixie Valley generally can be characterized as a sodium bicarbonate type, with greater proportions of chloride n

Huntington, Jena M.; Garcia, C. Amanda; Rosen, Michael R.

2014-01-01

165

Chronology, sedimentology, and microfauna of groundwater discharge deposits in the central Mojave Desert, Valley Wells, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the late Pleistocene, emergent groundwater supported persistent and long-lived desert wetlands in many broad valleys and basins in the American Southwest. When active, these systems provided important food and water sources for local fauna, supported hydrophilic and phreatophytic vegetation, and acted as catchments for eolian and alluvial sediments. Desert wetlands are represented in the geologic record by groundwater discharge deposits, which are also called spring or wetland deposits. Groundwater discharge deposits contain information on the timing and magnitude of past changes in water-table levels and, thus, are a source of paleohydrologic and paleoclimatic information. Here, we present the results of an investigation of extensive groundwater discharge deposits in the central Mojave Desert at Valley Wells, California. We used geologic mapping and stratigraphic relations to identify two distinct wetland sequences at Valley Wells, which we dated using radiocarbon, luminescence, and uranium-series techniques. We also analyzed the sediments and microfauna (ostracodes and gastropods) to reconstruct the specific environments in which they formed. Our results suggest that the earliest episode of high water-table conditions at Valley Wells began ca. 60 ka (thousands of calendar yr B.P.), and culminated in peak discharge between ca. 40 and 35 ka. During this time, cold (4–12 °C) emergent groundwater supported extensive wetlands that likely were composed of a wet, sedge-rush-tussock meadow mixed with mesic riparian forest. After ca. 35 ka, the water table dropped below the ground surface but was still shallow enough to support dense stands of phreatophytes through the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The water table dropped further after the LGM, and xeric conditions prevailed until modest wetlands returned briefly during the Younger Dryas cold event (13.0–11.6 ka). We did not observe any evidence of wet conditions during the Holocene at Valley Wells. The timing of these fluctuations is consistent with changes in other paleowetland systems in the Mojave Desert, the nearby Great Basin Desert, and in southeastern Arizona, near the border of the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts. The similarities in hydrologic conditions between these disparate locations suggest that changes in groundwater levels during the late Pleistocene in desert wetlands scattered throughout the American Southwest were likely driven by synoptic-scale climate processes.

Pigati, Jeffrey S.; Miller, David M.; Bright, Jordon E.; Mahan, Shannon A.; Nekola, Jeffrey C.; Paces, James B.

2011-01-01

166

Chronology, sedimentology, and microfauna of groundwater discharge deposits in the central Mojave Desert, Valley Wells, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

groundwater supported persistent and long-lived desert wetlands in many broad valleys and basins in the American Southwest. When active, these systems provided important food and water sources for local fauna, supported hydrophilic and phreatophytic vegetation, and acted as catchments for eolian and alluvial sediments. Desert wetlands are represented in the geologic record by groundwater discharge deposits, which are also called spring or wetland deposits. Groundwater discharge deposits contain information on the timing and magnitude of past changes in water-table levels and, thus, are a source of paleohydrologic and paleoclimatic information. Here, we present the results of an investigation of extensive groundwater discharge deposits in the central Mojave Desert at Valley Wells, California. We used geologic mapping and stratigraphic relations to identify two distinct wetland sequences at Valley Wells, which we dated using radiocarbon, luminescence, and uranium-series techniques. We also analyzed the sediments and microfauna (ostracodes and gastropods) to reconstruct the specific environments in which they formed. Our results suggest that the earliest episode of high water-table conditions at Valley Wells began ca. 60 ka (thousands of calendar yr B.P.), and culminated in peak discharge between ca. 40 and 35 ka. During this time, cold (4-12 ??C) emergent groundwater supported extensive wetlands that likely were composed of a wet, sedge-rush-tussock meadow mixed with mesic riparian forest. After ca. 35 ka, the water table dropped below the ground surface but was still shallow enough to support dense stands of phreatophytes through the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The water table dropped further after the LGM, and xeric conditions prevailed until modest wetlands returned briefly during the Younger Dryas cold event (13.0-11.6 ka). We did not observe any evidence of wet conditions during the Holocene at Valley Wells. The timing of these fluctuations is consistent with changes in other paleowetland systems in the Mojave Desert, the nearby Great Basin Desert, and in southeastern Arizona, near the border of the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts. The similarities in hydrologic conditions between these disparate locations suggest that changes in groundwater levels during the late Pleistocene in desert wetlands scattered throughout the American Southwest were likely driven by synopticscale climate processes. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

Pigati, J.S.; Miller, D.M.; Bright, J.E.; Mahan, S.A.; Nekola, J.C.; Paces, J.B.

2011-01-01

167

Chemistry, mineralogy and origin of the clay-hill nitrate deposits, Amargosa River valley, Death Valley region, California, U.S.A.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The clay-hill nitrate deposits of the Amargosa River valley, California, are caliche-type accumulations of water-soluble saline minerals in clay-rich soils on saline lake beds of Miocene, Pliocene(?) and Pleistocene age. The soils have a maximum thickness of ??? 50 cm, and commonly consist of three layers: (1) an upper 5-10 cm of saline-free soil; (2) an underlying 15-20 cm of rubbly saline soil; and (3) a hard nitrate-rich caliche, 10-20 cm thick, at the bottom of the soil profile. The saline constituents, which make up as much as 50% of the caliche, are chiefly Cl-, NO-3, SO2-4 and Na+. In addition are minor amounts of K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+, varying, though generally minor, amounts of B2O3 and CO2-3, and trace amounts of I (probably as IO-3), NO-2, CrO2-4 and Mo (probably as MoO2-4). The water-soluble saline materials have an I/Br ratio of ??? 1, which is much higher than nearly all other saline depostis. The principal saline minerals of the caliche are halite (NaCl), nitratite (NaNO3), darapskite (Na3(SO4)(NO3)??H2O), glauberite (Na2Ca(SO4)2), gypsum (CaSO4??2H2O) and anhydrite (CaSO4). Borax (Na2B4O5(OH)4??8H2O), tincalconite (Na2B4O5(OH)4??3H2O) and trona (Na3(CO3)(HCO3)??2H2O) are abundant locally. The clay-hill nitrate deposits are analogous to the well-known Chilean nitrate deposits, and probably are of similar origin. Whereas the Chilean deposits are in permeable soils of the nearly rainless Atacama Desert, the clay-hill deposits are in relatively impervious clay-rich soils that inhibited leaching by rain water. The annual rainfall in the Death Valley region of ??? 5 cm is sufficient to leach water-soluble minerals from the more permeable soils. The clay-hill deposits contain saline materials from the lake beds beneath the nitrate deposits are well as wind-transported materials from nearby clay-hill soils, playas and salt marshes. The nitrate is probably of organic origin, consisting of atmospheric nitrogen fixed as protein by photoautotrophic blue-green algae, which are thought to form crusts on soils at the sites of the deposits when moistened by rainfall. The protein is subsequently transformed to nitrate by autotophic bacteria. ?? 1988.

Ericksen, G.E.; Hosterman, J.W.; St., Amand, P.

1988-01-01

168

Estimated natural ground-water recharge, discharge, and budget for the Dixie Valley area, west-central Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Dixie Valley area includes seven valleys in west-central Nevada (Dixie, Fairview, Stingaree, Cowkick, Eastgate, Pleasant, and Jersey Valleys; total, 2,380 square miles). Dixie Valley receives surface-water and ground-water flow from Stingaree, Cowkick, Eastgate, Pleasant, and Jersey Valleys and subsurface flow from Fairview Valley, which is a topographically closed basin. The relation between precipitation and altitude was re-evaluated for the Dixie Valley area using new data, and empirical estimates of recharge were revised accordingly. The revised estimate of total recharge is 23,000 acre-feet per Re-evaluation of ground-water discharge focused on Dixie Valley as the largest basin in the study area. Phreatophytic vegetation was mapped and partitioned into nine zones on the basis of species composition and foliage density. For woody phreatophytes, annual evapotranspiration rates of 0.7 cubic feet of water per cubic foot of foliage for greasewood and 1.1 cubic feet of water per cubic foot of foliage for rabbitbrush were adapted from lysimeter studies near Winnemucca, Nevada. These rates were multiplied by the foliage density of the respective phreatophytes in each zone to estimate a specific rate for that zone. Rates for salt-grass (0.5 to 0.8 foot per year) and the playa surface (0.1 to 0.3 foot per year) were based on a range of rates. used in other recent studies in western and central Nevada. These rates were multiplied by the areas of the zones to produce estimates of the annual volume of ground water discharged. The discharge estimated for Dixie Valley is between 17,000 and 28,000 acre-feet per year. The revised discharge estimate for the entire Dixie Valley area is between 20,000 and 31,000 acre-feet per year. The revised ground-water budget for the entire Dixie Valley study area has a total recharge of about 23,000 acre-feet per year. This is within the range of estimates of natural discharge--from 20,000 to 31,000 acre-feet per year. For Dixie Valley alone, the total recharge of about 8,900 acre-feet per year and the estimated subsurface inflow from tributary areas of about 11,000 acre-feet per year produce an estimated total inflow of about 20,000 acre-feet per year. This compares with the discharge estimate of 17,000 to 28,000 acre-feet per year.

Harrill, J.R.; Hines, L.B.

1995-01-01

169

Chronology of late Quaternary glaciation in the Pindar valley, Alaknanda basin, Central Himalaya (India)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Palaeoglacial reconstruction based on geomorphological mapping in the Pindari glacier valley, Alaknanda basin (Central Himalaya), has revealed five glacial stages with decreasing magnitude. The oldest and most extensive stage-I glaciation deposited sediments at ˜2200 masl (Khati village). The stage-II glaciation was around 7 km long and luminescence dated to 25 ± 2 ka, and has deposits at 3200 masl (Phurkia village). Stage-III glaciation is represented by degraded linear moraine ridges and is dated to 6 ± 1 ka and its remnants can be found around 3850 masl. A sharp crested crescentic moraine extending from around 3650 masl to 3900 masl is attributed to stage-IV glaciation and is dated to 3 ± 1 ka. Following this, there appears to have been a gradual recession in Pindari glacier as indicated by four sharp crested unconsolidated moraines (stage-V) on the valley floor which abuts the stage-IV moraine. We suggest that the stage-I glaciation occurred during the cool and wet Marine Isotopic Stage 3/4 (MIS-3/4), stage-II glaciations began with the onset of MIS-2, whereas the stage-III and IV glaciations occurred during the mid-to late Holocene (MIS-1). We speculate that the first sharp crested unconsolidated moraines around 3600 masl correspond to the later phase of the Little Ice Age (LIA). Historical data suggests that the remaining three ridges represent Pindari glacier snout positions at 1906, 1958 and 1965. We argue that the late Quaternary glaciations in the Pindar valley were modulated by changing insolation and summer monsoon intensity including the LIA, whereas the 20th century recessional trends can be attributed to post-LIA warming.

Bali, Rameshwar; Nawaz Ali, S.; Agarwal, K. K.; Rastogi, Saurabh Kumar; Krishna, Kalyan; Srivastava, Pradeep

2013-04-01

170

Remediation of Mudboil Discharges in the Tully Valley of Central New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mudboils have been documented in the Tully Valley in Onondaga County, in central New York State, since the late 1890s and have continuously discharged sediment-laden (turbid) water into nearby Onondaga Creek since the 1950s. The discharge of sediment causes gradual land-surface subsidence that, in the past, necessitated rerouting a major petroleum pipeline and a buried telephone cable, and caused two road bridges to collapse. The turbid water discharged from mudboils can be either fresh or brackish (salty). Mudboil activity was first reported in the Syracuse, NY, Post Standard in a short article dated October 19, 1899: 'Tully Valley - A Miniature Volcano Few people are aware of the existence of a volcano in this town. It is a small one, to be sure, but very interesting. In the 20-rod gorge where the crossroad leads by the Tully Valley grist mill the hard highway bed has been rising foot after foot till the apex of a cone which has been booming has broken open and quicksand and water flow down the miniature mountain sides. It is an ever increasing cone obliterating wagon tracks as soon as crossed. The nearby bluff is slowly sinking. Probably the highway must sometime be changed on account of the sand and water volcano, unless it ceases its eruption.' This newspaper article accurately describes mudboil activity and presages the collapse of the Otisco Road bridge, 92 years later in 1991. The article indicates that land subsidence occurred nearby, but gives no indication that Onondaga Creek was turbid; this was either an oversight by the reporter or was not a concern at that time.

Kappel, William M.

2009-01-01

171

Reconstruction of Flooding Events for the Central Valley, California from Instrumental and Documentary Weather Records  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

All available instrumental winter precipitation data for the Central Valley of California back to 1850 were digitized and analyzed to construct continuous time series. Many of these data, in paper or microfilm format, extend prior to modern National Weather Service Cooperative Data Program and Historical Climate Network data, and were recorded by volunteer observers from networks such as the US Army Surgeon General, Smithsonian Institution, and US Army Signal Service. Given incomplete individual records temporally, detailed documentary data from newspapers, personal diaries and journals, ship logbooks, and weather enthusiasts’ instrumental data, were used in conjunction with instrumental data to reconstruct precipitation frequency per month and season, continuous days of precipitation, and to identify anomalous precipitation events. Multilinear regression techniques, using surrounding stations and the relationships between modern and historical records, bridge timeframes lacking data and provided homogeneous nature of time series. The metadata for each station was carefully screened, and notes were made about any possible changes to the instrumentation, location of instruments, or an untrained observer to verify that anomalous events were not recorded incorrectly. Precipitation in the Central Valley varies throughout the entire region, but waterways link the differing elevations and latitudes. This study integrates the individual station data with additional accounts of flood descriptions through unique newspaper and journal data. River heights and flood extent inundating cities, agricultural lands, and individual homes are often recorded within unique documentary sources, which add to the understanding of flood occurrence within this area. Comparisons were also made between dam and levee construction through time and how waters are diverted through cities in natural and anthropogenically changed environments. Some precipitation that lead to flooding events that occur in the Central Valley in the mid-19th century through the early 20th century are more outstanding at some particular stations than the modern records include. Several years that are included in the study are 1850, 1862, 1868, 1878, 1881, 1890, and 1907. These flood years were compared to the modern record and reconstructed through time series and maps. Incorporating the extent and effects these anomalous events in future climate studies could improve models and preparedness for the future floods.

Dodds, S. F.; Mock, C. J.

2009-12-01

172

Geomorphology and Tectonics at the Intersection of Silurian and Death Valleys, Southern California - 2005 Guidebook Pacific Cell Friends of the Pleistocene  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This publication describes results from new regional and detailed surficial geologic mapping, combined with geomorphologic, geochronologic, and tectonic studies, in Silurian Valley and Death Valley, California. The studies address a long-standing problem, the tectonic and geomorphic evolution of the intersection between three regional tectonic provinces: the eastern California shear zone, the Basin and Range region of southern Nevada and adjacent California, and the eastern Mojave Desert region. The chapters represent work presented on the 2005 Friends of the Pleistocene field trip and meeting as well as the field trip road log.

Miller, David M.; Valin, Zenon C.

2007-01-01

173

Death Valley regional groundwater flow system, Nevada and California-Hydrogeologic framework and transient groundwater flow model  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A numerical three-dimensional (3D) transient groundwater flow model of the Death Valley region was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site and at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Decades of study of aspects of the groundwater flow system and previous less extensive groundwater flow models were incorporated and reevaluated together with new data to provide greater detail for the complex, digital model. A 3D digital hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) was developed from digital elevation models, geologic maps, borehole information, geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections, and other 3D models to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units (HGUs). Structural features, such as faults and fractures, that affect groundwater flow also were added. The HFM represents Precambrian and Paleozoic crystalline and sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic to Cenozoic intrusive rocks, Cenozoic volcanic tuffs and lavas, and late Cenozoic sedimentary deposits of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS) region in 27 HGUs. Information from a series of investigations was compiled to conceptualize and quantify hydrologic components of the groundwater flow system within the DVRFS model domain and to provide hydraulic-property and head-observation data used in the calibration of the transient-flow model. These studies reevaluated natural groundwater discharge occurring through evapotranspiration (ET) and spring flow; the history of groundwater pumping from 1913 through 1998; groundwater recharge simulated as net infiltration; model boundary inflows and outflows based on regional hydraulic gradients and water budgets of surrounding areas; hydraulic conductivity and its relation to depth; and water levels appropriate for regional simulation of prepumped and pumped conditions within the DVRFS model domain. Simulation results appropriate for the regional extent and scale of the model were provided by acquiring additional data, by reevaluating existing data using current technology and concepts, and by refining earlier interpretations to reflect the current understanding of the regional groundwater flow system. Groundwater flow in the Death Valley region is composed of several interconnected, complex groundwater flow systems. Groundwater flow occurs in three subregions in relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper, regional flow paths. Regional groundwater flow is predominantly through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence affected by complex geologic structures from regional faulting and fracturing that can enhance or impede flow. Spring flow and ET are the dominant natural groundwater discharge processes. Groundwater also is withdrawn for agricultural, commercial, and domestic uses. Groundwater flow in the DVRFS was simulated using MODFLOW-2000, the U.S. Geological Survey 3D finitedifference modular groundwater flow modeling code that incorporates a nonlinear least-squares regression technique to estimate aquifer parameters. The DVRFS model has 16 layers of defined thickness, a finite-difference grid consisting of 194 rows and 160 columns, and uniform cells 1,500 meters (m) on each side. Prepumping conditions (before 1913) were used as the initial conditions for the transient-state calibration. The model uses annual stress periods with discrete recharge and discharge components. Recharge occurs mostly from infiltration of precipitation and runoff on high mountain ranges and from a small amount of underflow from adjacent basins. Discharge occurs primarily through ET and spring discharge (both simulated as drains) and water withdrawal by pumping and, to a lesser amount, by underflow to adjacent basins simulated by constant-head boundaries. All parameter values estimated by the regression are reasonable and within the range of expected values. The simulated hydraulic heads of the final calibrated transient mode

: Belcher, Wayne R., (Edited By); Sweetkind, Donald S.

2010-01-01

174

Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California -- hydrogeologic framework and transient ground-water flow model  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A numerical three-dimensional (3D) transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site and at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Decades of study of aspects of the ground-water flow system and previous less extensive ground-water flow models were incorporated and reevaluated together with new data to provide greater detail for the complex, digital model. A 3D digital hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) was developed from digital elevation models, geologic maps, borehole information, geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections, and other 3D models to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units (HGUs). Structural features, such as faults and fractures, that affect ground-water flow also were added. The HFM represents Precambrian and Paleozoic crystalline and sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic to Cenozoic intrusive rocks, Cenozoic volcanic tuffs and lavas, and late Cenozoic sedimentary deposits of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System (DVRFS) region in 27 HGUs. Information from a series of investigations was compiled to conceptualize and quantify hydrologic components of the ground-water flow system within the DVRFS model domain and to provide hydraulic-property and head-observation data used in the calibration of the transient-flow model. These studies reevaluated natural ground-water discharge occurring through evapotranspiration and spring flow; the history of ground-water pumping from 1913 through 1998; ground-water recharge simulated as net infiltration; model boundary inflows and outflows based on regional hydraulic gradients and water budgets of surrounding areas; hydraulic conductivity and its relation to depth; and water levels appropriate for regional simulation of prepumped and pumped conditions within the DVRFS model domain. Simulation results appropriate for the regional extent and scale of the model were provided by acquiring additional data, by reevaluating existing data using current technology and concepts, and by refining earlier interpretations to reflect the current understanding of the regional ground-water flow system. Ground-water flow in the Death Valley region is composed of several interconnected, complex ground-water flow systems. Ground-water flow occurs in three subregions in relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper, regional flow paths. Regional ground-water flow is predominantly through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence affected by complex geologic structures from regional faulting and fracturing that can enhance or impede flow. Spring flow and evapotranspiration (ET) are the dominant natural ground-water discharge processes. Ground water also is withdrawn for agricultural, commercial, and domestic uses. Ground-water flow in the DVRFS was simulated using MODFLOW-2000, a 3D finite-difference modular ground-water flow modeling code that incorporates a nonlinear least-squares regression technique to estimate aquifer parameters. The DVRFS model has 16 layers of defined thickness, a finite-difference grid consisting of 194 rows and 160 columns, and uniform cells 1,500 m on each side. Prepumping conditions (before 1913) were used as the initial conditions for the transient-state calibration. The model uses annual stress periods with discrete recharge and discharge components. Recharge occurs mostly from infiltration of precipitation and runoff on high mountain ranges and from a small amount of underflow from adjacent basins. Discharge occurs primarily through ET and spring discharge (both simulated as drains) and water withdrawal by pumping and, to a lesser amount, by underflow to adjacent basins, also simulated by drains. All parameter values estimated by the regression are reasonable and within the range of expected values. The simulated hydraulic heads of the final calibrated transient model gener

: Belcher, Wayne R., (Edited By)

2004-01-01

175

A plan to study the aquifer system of the Central Valley of California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Unconsolidated Quaternary alluvial deposits comprise a large complex aquifer system in the Central Valley of California. Millions of acre-feet of water is pumped from the system annually to support a large and expanding agribusiness industry. Since the 1950's, water levels have been steadily declining in many areas of the valley and concern has been expressed about the ability of the entire ground-water system to support agribusiness at current levels, not to mention its ability to function at projected expansion levels. At current levels of ground-water use, an estimated 1.5 to 2 million acre-feet is withdrawn from storage each year; that is, 1.5 to 2 million acre-feet of water is pumped annually in excess of annual replenishment. The U.S. Geological Survey has initiated a 4-year study to develop geologic, hydrologic, and hydraulic information and to establish a valleywide ground-water data base that will be used to build computer models of the ground-water flow system. Subsequently, these models may be used to evaluate the system response to various ground-water management alternatives. This report describes current problems, objectives of the study, and outlines the general work to be accomplished in the study area. A bibliography of about 600 references is included. (Kosco-USGS)

Bertoldi, Gilbert L.

1979-01-01

176

Buried paleoindian-age landscapes in stream valleys of the central plains, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A systematic study of late-Quaternary landscape evolution in the Central Plains documented widespread, deeply buried paleosols that represent Paleoindian-age landscapes in terrace fills of large streams (> 5th order), in alluvial fans, and in draws in areas of western Kansas with a thick loess mantle. Alluvial stratigraphic sections were investigated along a steep bio-climatic gradient extending from the moist-subhumid forest-prairie border of the east-central Plains to the dry-subhumid and semi-arid shortgrass prairie of the west-central Plains. Radiocarbon ages indicate that most large streams were characterized by slow aggradation accompanied by cumulic soil development from ca. 11,500 to 10,000 14C yr B.P. In the valleys of some large streams, such as the Ninnescah and Saline rivers, these processes continued into the early Holocene. The soil-stratigraphic record in the draws of western Kansas indicates slow aggradation punctuated by episodes of landscape stability and pedogenesis beginning as early as ca. 13,300 14C yr B.P. and spanning the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary. The development record of alluvial fans in western Kansas is similar to the record in the draws; slow aggradation was punctuated by multiple episodes of soil development between ca. 13,000 and 9000 14C yr B.P. In eastern Kansas and Nebraska, development of alluvial fans was common during the early and middle Holocene, but evidence shows fan development as early as ca. 11,300 14C yr B.P. Buried soils dating between ca. 12,600 and 9000 14C yr B.P. were documented in fans throughout the region. In stream valleys across the Central Plains, rapid alluviation after ca. 9000 14C yr B.P. resulted in deeply buried soils that may harbor Paleoindian cultural deposits. Hence, the paucity of recorded stratified Paleoindian sites in the Central Plains is probably related to poor visibility (i.e., deep burial in alluvial deposits) instead of limited human occupation in the region during the terminal Pleistocene and early Holocene. The thick, dark, cumulic A horizons of soils, representing buried Paleoindian-age landscapes, are targets for future archaeological surveys.

Mandel, Rolfe D.

2008-10-01

177

Depth to water, 1991, in the Rathdrum Prairie, Idaho; Spokane River valley, Washington; Moscow-Lewiston-Grangeville area, Idaho; and selected intermontane valleys, east-central Idaho  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This map report illustrates digitally generated depth-to-water zones for the Rathdrum Prairie in Idaho; part of the Spokane River Valley in eastern Washington; and the intermontane valleys of the upper Big Wood, Big Lost, Pahsimeroi, Little Lost, and Lemhi Rivers and Birch Creek in Idaho. Depth to water is 400 to 500 feet below land surface in the northern part of Rathdrum Prairie, 100 to 200 feet below land surface at the Idaho-Washington State line, and 0 to 250 feet below land surface in the Spokane area. Depth to water in the intermontane valleys in east-central Idaho is least (usually less than 50 feet) near streams and increases toward valley margins where mountain-front alluvial fans have formed. Depths to water shown in the Moscow-Lewiston-Grangeville area in Idaho are limited to point data at individual wells because most of the water levels measured were not representative of levels in the uppermost aquifer but of levels in deeper aquifers.

Berenbrock, Charles E.; Bassick, M.D.; Rogers, T.L.; Garcia, S.P.

1995-01-01

178

Ground water in the Corvallis-Albany area, central Willamette Valley, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Corvallis-Albany area is part of the alluvial plain that lies between the Cascade and Coast Ranges in the central Willamette Valley in northwestern Oregon. As used in this report, the Corvallis-Albany area consists of approximately 210 square miles and includes a part of the lower foothills of the Coast and Cascade Ranges. Volcanic and marine sedimentary units exposed in the foothills range in age from Eocene to Oligocene or Miocene. The volcanic rocks are primarily pillow lavas and basalt flows, which yield only small quantities of water generally adequate for domestic and stock use. Marine-deposited sandstone, siltstone, and shale of the older sedimentary units are fine grained, poorly permeable, and generally yield small volumes of water to wells. In the valley plain the older units are overlain by Pleistocene and Holocene alluvial deposits. The alluvial deposits (sand and gravel) of the valley plain contain the most productive aquifers in the area and are considered to be the only units feasible for large-scale development of ground-water supplies. Aquifers in the area are recharged principally by direct infiltration of precipitation. Most of the precipitation (about 38 in. per yr avg) occurs during late autumn and winter. Ground water is discharged naturally from the area by seepage and spring flow to streams, by evapotranspiration, by underflow, and artificially through wells. During 1971 the seasonal decline of water levels from winter to late summer averaged about 10 feet for the alluvial deposits. The seasonal change of storage in that year was estimated to be about 130,000 acre-feet. Of this volume, about 14,000 acre-feet was pumped from wells; the rest (about 116,000 acre-feet) was discharged through seeps and springs by evapotranspiration. The difference between pumpage and natural discharge indicates that a great quantity of additional water is available for development. The storage capacity of the alluvial aquifers in the area is estimated to be about 750,000 acre-feet between depths of 10 and 100 feet. Ground water from the alluvial deposits is chemically suitable for all uses, as is most of the water from perched-water bodies in the older sedimentary and volcanic rocks. However, the mineral content of water from the older sedimentary rocks, particularly from deeper producing zones in the valley plain, is greater than that from the alluvial deposits. Locally, some of the water from the older rocks is too saline for general use. Analysis of water samples for coliform bacteria indicates that ground-water pollution exists in parts of the Corvallis-Albany area. Further study is necessary to document fully the nature and extent of pollution.

Frank, Frank J.

1974-01-01

179

Chemical quality of ground water in the central Sacramento Valley, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The study area includes about 1,200 square miles in the central Sacramento Valley adjacent to the Sacramento River from Knights Landing to Los Molinos, Calif. With recent agricultural development in the area, additional land has been brought under irrigation from land which had been used primarily for dry farming and grazing. This report documents the chemical character of the ground water prior to water-level declines resulting from extensive pumping for irrigation or to changes caused by extensive use of imported surface water. Chemical analyses of samples from 209 wells show that most of the area is underlain by ground water of a quality suitable for most agricultural and domestic purposes. Most of the water sampled in the area has dissolved-solids concentrations ranging from 100 to 700 milligrams per liter. The general water types for the area are a calcium magnesium bicarbonate or magnesium calcium bicarbonate and there are negligible amounts of toxic trace elements. (Woodard-USGS)

Fogelman, Ronald P.

1978-01-01

180

MODELING THE CENTRAL VALLEY: Investigating the Effects of Irrigation on a Semi-Arid Hydrologic Cycle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Growing populations and increased aridity in the Central Valley of California, USA has led to a renewed interest regarding the effects of population and anthropogenic irrigation on the region's hydrologic cycle. This model deviates from previous studies in that it utilizes a fully integrated hydrologic model to incorporate surface and subsurface systems on a finely discretized grid and includes an explicit treatment of the mountain systems. A model of the Southern portion of the Central Valley of California was undertaken using ParFlow, an integrated hydrologic model that includes surface, groundwater, land-surface vegetation and snow processes, coupled with the Common Land Model (a land-surface model). The goal of this study was to develop a model that incorporated complex subsurface hydrogeology as well as a complex surface discretization and to complete a comparison study on the effects irrigation on the land-energy and hydrology balances. The resulting model was composed of a matrix of approximately 60,000 sq. km (269 by 219 km) at a 1km resolution run over a period of 4 total model years using parallel processing. This study incorporated irrigation during the summer months (April through September) and no irrigation during wet months (October through March). This study highlights some of the potential impacts that anthropogenic irrigation has on this region including temperature, evapotranspiration and water flow as well techniques for subsurface discretizations (through geological simplifications) and land use variability via the incorporation of both general regional land use modeling as well as detailed county land use maps. The model domain is pictured here shown with a general schematic of flow within the ParFlow system.

Wolfenden, S. A.; Maxwell, R. M.; Lopez, S. R.

2012-12-01

181

Analysis of microsatellite DNA resolves genetic structure and diversity of chinook salmon ( Oncorhynchus tshawytscha ) in California's Central Valley  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use 10 microsatellite DNA markers to assess genetic diversity within and among the four runs (winter, spring, fall, and late fall) of chinook salmon ( Oncorhynchus tshawytscha ) in California's Central Valley. Forty-one pop- ulation samples are studied, comprising naturally spawning and hatchery stocks collected from 1991 through 1997. Maximum likelihood methods are used to correct for kinship in

Michael A. Banks; Vanessa K. Rashbrook; Marco J. Calavetta; Cheryl A. Dean; Dennis Hedgecock

2000-01-01

182

Paleohydrological fluctuations and steppe vegetation during the last glacial maximum in the central Ebro valley (NE Spain)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Combined analysis of sedimentary facies, geochemistry and pollen from lake sediment records, and sedimentological and palynological studies from slope deposits allow the characterization of vegetation and lake level status during the Last Glacial (LGM) in the central Ebro valley (NE Spain). These records show the presence of phases of increased effective moisture, while regional vegetation was dominated by steppe species.

Blas L. Valero-Garcés; Penélope González-Sampériz; Ana Navas; Javier Mach??n; Antonio Delgado-Huertas; Jose Luis Peña-Monné; Carlos Sancho-Marcén; Tony Stevenson; Basil Davis

2004-01-01

183

Global climate change response program: Evaluation of central valley project water supply and delivery systems. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simple mass balance reservoir operation for the Central Valley Project (CVP) and State Water Project (SWP) water systems, California, was used to assess the possible global climate change impacts to the CVP. Historic hydrologic parameters were modified in an attempt to reflect possible hydrologic conditions under global climate change. Four different simulation cases were analyzed over a 57 year

J. Sandberg; P. Manza

1991-01-01

184

Sensitivity of winter chill models for fruit and nut trees to climatic changes expected in California's Central Valley  

E-print Network

Resources, University of Washington, Box 352100, Seattle, WA 98195, United States 1. Introduction Many fruit sites in California's Central Valley, we generated 100 years of synthetic hourly weather records models, which convert temperature records into a metric of coldness (Bennett, 1949; Richardson et al

Zhang, Minghua

185

Multi-Objective Analysis for Ecosystem Reconciliation on an Engineered Floodplain: The Yolo Bypass in California's Central Valley  

E-print Network

conservation and restoration (Keddy et al. 2009, Bayley 1995, Welcomme 2008). On the west coast of the United Bypass in California's Central Valley By ROBYN JEAN SUDDETH B.A. (University of California, Los Angeles) 2004 M.A. (University of California, Davis) 2009 DISSERTATION Submitted in partial satisfaction

Pasternack, Gregory B.

186

Scientific Innovation's Two Valleys of Death: How Blood and Tissue Banks Can Help to Bridge the Gap.  

PubMed

Abstract Most biomedical basic research in the United States takes place at universities and research institutes and is funded by federal grants. Basic research is awarded billions of federal dollars every year, enabling new discoveries and greater understanding of the fundamental science that makes new innovations and therapies possible. However, when basic research yields an invention of practical use and the research evolves from basic to applied, the playing field changes. Pre-technology licensing federal dollars all but disappear, and innovations rely predominantly on private funding to support the full path from bench to bedside. It is along this path that the scientific advance faces two Valleys of Death. These sometimes insurmountable development stages are the product of the innovation's inherent financial, business and investment risks. Well-planned and executed in vivo studies using quality biological materials demonstrating proof-of-concept is often the key to bridging these gaps, and blood and tissue banks offer unique services and resources to enable this process. PMID:25457967

Thompson, Sean D A

2014-12-01

187

Hydrogeologic evaluation and numerical simulation of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey is evaluating the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the ground-water system. The study area covers approximately 100,000 square kilometers between lat 35{degrees}N., long 115{degrees}W and lat 38{degrees}N., long 118{degrees}W and encompasses the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. Hydrology in the region is a result of both the and climatic conditions and the complex described as dominated by interbasinal flow and may be conceptualized as having two main components: a series of relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper regional flow paths. A significant component of the regional ground-water flow is through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence. Throughout the regional flow system, ground-water flow is probably controlled by extensive and prevalent structural features that result from regional faulting and fracturing. Hydrogeologic investigations over a large and hydrogeologically complex area impose severe demands on data management. This study utilized geographic information systems and geoscientific information systems to develop, store, manipulate, and analyze regional hydrogeologic data sets describing various components of the ground-water flow system.

D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K.; Hill, M.C.

1997-12-31

188

Simulated effects of climate change on the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect

The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, is evaluating the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the Death Valley regional flow system as part of the Yucca Mountain Project. As part of the hydrologic investigation, regional, three-dimensional conceptual and numerical ground-water-flow models have been developed to assess the potential effects of past and future climates on the regional flow system. A simulation that is based on climatic conditions 21,000 years ago was evaluated by comparing the simulated results to observation of paleodischarge sites. Following acceptable simulation of a past climate, a possible future ground-water-flow system, with climatic conditions that represent a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide, was simulated. The steady-state simulations were based on the present-day, steady-state, regional ground-water-flow model. The finite-difference model consisted of 163 rows, 153 columns, and 3 layers and was simulated using MODFLOWP. Climate changes were implemented in the regional ground-water-flow model by changing the distribution of ground-water recharge. Global-scale, average-annual, simulated precipitation for both past- and future-climate conditions developed elsewhere were resampled to the model-grid resolution. A polynomial function that represents the Maxey-Eakin method for estimating recharge from precipitation was used to develop recharge distributions for simulation.

D`Agnese, F.A.; O`Brien, G.M.; Faunt, C.C.; San Juan, C.A.

1999-04-01

189

Delineation and hydrologic effects of a gasoline leak at Stovepipe Wells Hotel, Death Valley National Monument, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground water is the only local source of water available to the Stovepipe Wells Hotel facilities of the Death Valley National Monument, California. A leak in a service station storage tank caused the formation of a gasoline layer overlying the water table, creating the potential for contamination of the water supply. The maximum horizontal extent of the gasoline layer was mathematically estimated to be 1,300 feet downgradient from the leaky gasoline tank. Exploratory drilling detected the gasoline layer between 900 and 1,400 feet downgradient and between 50 and 150 feet upgradient from the source. Traces of the soluble components of gasoline were also found in the aquifer 150 feet upgradient, and 250 feet distant from the source perpendicular to the direction of ground-water movement. The gasoline spill is not likely to have an effect on the supply wells located 0.4 mile south of the leak source, which is nearly perpendicular to the direction of ground-water movement and the primary direction of gasoline movement in the area. No effect on phreatophytes 2 miles downgradient from the layer is likely, but the potential effects of gasoline vapors within the unsaturated zone on local xerophytes are not known. (USGS)

Buono, A.; Packard, Elaine M.

1982-01-01

190

Evaluation of increases in dissolved solids in ground water, Stovepipe Wells Hotel, Death Valley National Monument, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Increases in dissolved solids have been monitored in two observation wells near Stovepipe Wells Hotel, Death Valley National Monument, California. One of the hotel 's supply wells delivers water to a reverse-osmosis treatment plant that produces the area 's potable water supply. Should water with increased dissolved solids reach the supply well, the costs of production of potable water will increase. The reverse-osmosis plant supply well is located about 0.4 mile south of one of the wells where increases have been monitored, and 0.8 mile southwest of the well where the most significant increases have been monitored. The direction of local ground-water movement is eastward, which reduces the probability of the supply well being affected. Honey mesquite, a phreatophyte located about 1.5 miles downgradient from the well where the most significant increases have been monitored, might be adversely affected should water with increased dissolved solids extend that far. Available data and data collected during this investigation do not indicate the source of the dissolved-solids increases. Continued ground-water-quality monitoring of existing wells and the installation of additional wells for water-quality monitoring would be necessary before the area affected by the increases, and the source and direction of movement of the water with increased dissolved solids, can be determined. (USGS)

Buono, Anthony; Packard, E.M.

1982-01-01

191

Assessment of Computer-based Geologic Mapping of Rock Units in the LANDSAT-4 Scene of Northern Death Valley, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Geologists obtain low accuracy levels when maps derived from LANDSAT MSS data are compared with those made by conventional methods. Procedures developed for the IDIMS computer system and used to classify a subset of a TM image of the Death Valley, California - Nevada border are described. Despite the superior resolution, broader spectral coverage, and greater sensitivity inherent to the TM, the actual recorded measured accuracy was in the same narrow range (30 to 60%) recorded for MSS data from earlier LANDSATs. The supervised classification approach appears to be superior to the unsupervised approach when applied to vegetation-sparse surfaces composed of spectrally contrasting rock/soil units distributed in relatively flat to low relief terrain. As spatial resolution improves and optimal spectral bands for identifying rock materials are specified, use of classified multispectral remote sensing data from air and space when coupled with supporting field calibration and checks should become the dominant way in which geologic mapping is carried out in future decades.

Short, N. M.

1985-01-01

192

Isolation and characterization of two serine proteases from metagenomic libraries of the Gobi and Death Valley deserts.  

PubMed

The screening of environmental DNA metagenome libraries for functional activities can provide an important source of new molecules and enzymes. In this study, we identified 17 potential protease-producing clones from two metagenomic libraries derived from samples of surface sand from the Gobi and Death Valley deserts. Two of the proteases, DV1 and M30, were purified and biochemically examined. These two proteases displayed a molecular mass of 41.5 kDa and 45.7 kDa, respectively, on SDS polyacrylamide gels. Alignments with known protease sequences showed less than 55% amino acid sequence identity. These two serine proteases appear to belong to the subtilisin (S8A) family and displayed several unique biochemical properties. Protease DV1 had an optimum pH of 8 and an optimal activity at 55°C, while protease M30 had an optimum pH >11 and optimal activity at 40°C. The properties of these enzymes make them potentially useful for biotechnological applications and again demonstrate that metagenomic approaches can be useful, especially when coupled with the study of novel environments such as deserts. PMID:21494865

Neveu, Julie; Regeard, Christophe; DuBow, Michael S

2011-08-01

193

An Integrated Geophysical Study of Hidden Valley, Central McCullough Range, NV: Characterization of a Volcanotectonic Terrain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hidden Valley is located in the north-central McCullough Range south of Las Vegas along the western edge of the Northern Colorado River extensional corridor (NCREC) in the central Basin and Range. The western portion of the NCREC is an area of highly extended crust, but the McCullough Range is a relatively unextended block. Hidden Valley is bound on all sides by volcanic rock of the central and northern McCullough Mountains. The evolution of Hidden Valley is still unresolved due to a lack inter-basin exposure. Four proposed models have been suggested for the formation of Hidden Valley. Models include a volcanic sag basin, half-graben, pull-apart basin, and antithetic synclinal accommodation zone. An east-west trending high-resolution seismic reflection/refraction profile and gravity measurements were collected in the valley to resolve the basin formation, determine the relationship between volcanism and extension in the area as well as to determine the basin structure. From the eastern edge of the basin moving west, a 2.18 km seismic profile was acquired in the summer of 2005 using a combination of alternating hammer source and 15-second linear vibroseis sweep. First arrivals were used to create a velocity model along this profile and integrated on the seismic reflection data. Gravity measurements were taken across the valley at 1 km spacing and at 250 m across the center of the valley during the winter of 2006. Gravity modeling was performed at the regional scale and local scale. Seismic reflection/refraction data were used for accurate gravity modeling and local well data was integrated into all data sets. Preliminary interpretations of the data sets show a thin basin fill on the eastern edge of the basin with basaltic basement rock on that side of the valley. The basin fill thickens to the middle of the valley, possibly associated with faulting. Results show little faulting and syn-tectonic volcanism, which would strengthen the evidence for volcanic sagging. Further refinement of the integrated data sets and modeling could reveal normal faulting, which alternatively would suggest a half-graben or accommodation zone. Faulting of Holocene sediments would indicate a possible seismic hazard for the growing population of the Las Vegas area.

Hirsch, A. C.; Snelson, C. M.; Smith, E. I.

2006-12-01

194

Tilt and rotation of the footwall of a major normal fault system: Paleomagnetism of the Black Mountains, Death Valley extended terrane, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paleomagnetic data have been obtained from Miocene intrusions, Proterozoic Paleomagnetic data have been obtained from Miocene intrusions, Proterozoic crystalline rocks and cross-cutting mafic to felsic dikes to evaluate footwall deformation during extension and unroofing of the crystalline core of the Black Mountains, Death Valley, California. Synrift intrusions contain a well-defined and, at the site level, well-grouped magnetization, interpreted to be

DANIEL K. HOLM; JOHN W. GEISSMAN; BRIAN WERNICKE

1993-01-01

195

Data on ground-water quality for the western Nevada part of the Death Valley 1 degree by 2 degree quadrangle  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water quality data for groundwater has been compiled for the Nevada part of the Death Valley 1 degree x 2 degree quadrangle which covers a portion of western Nevada. Chemical characteristics of the water are shown on a map (at a scale of 1:250,000) and on trilinear diagrams for the major ions. The data for the area are also presented in a table. (USGS)

Welch, Alan H.; Williams, Rhea P.

1987-01-01

196

Conservation Effects Assessment Project-Wetlands assessment in California's Central Valley and Upper Klamath River Basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Executive Summary-Ecosystem Services Derived from Wetlands Reserve Program Conservation Practices in California's Central Valley and Oregon's Upper Klamath River Basin. The Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP) is one of several programs implemented by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Since the WRP's inception in 1990, it has resulted in the restoration of approximately 29,000 hectares in California's Central Valley (CCV) and roughly 12,300 hectares in Oregon's Upper Klamath River Basin (UKRB). Both the CCV and UKRB are agricultural dominated landscapes that have experienced extensive wetland losses and hydrological alteration. Restored habitats in the CCV and UKRB are thought to provide a variety of ecosystem services, but little is known about the actual benefits afforded. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) California Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Unit in collaboration with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service surveyed 70 WRP sites and 12 National Wildlife Refuge sites in the CCV, and 11 sites in the UKRB to estimate ecosystem services provided. In the CCV, sites were selected along three primary gradients; (1) restoration age, (2) management intensity, and (3) latitude (climate). Sites in the UKRB were assessed along restoration age and management intensity gradients where possible. The management intensity gradient included information about the type and frequency of conservation practices applied at each site, which was then ranked into three categories that differentiated sites primarily along a hydrological gradient. Information collected was used to estimate the following ecosystem services: Soil and vegetation nutrient content, soil loss reduction, floodwater storage as well as avian, amphibian, fish, and pollinator use and habitat availability. Prior to this study, very little was known about WRP habitat morphology in the CCV and UKRB. Therefore in this study, we described these habitats and related them to ecosystem services provided. Our results indicate that although WRP in the CCV and UKRB provide a number of benefits, there may be management mediated trade-offs among ecosystem services. In this report, we considered ecosystem services at the site-specific scale; however, future work will extend to include effects of WRP relative to surrounding cropland.

2011-01-01

197

Mg- and K-bearing borates and associated evaporites at Eagle Borax spring, Death Valley, California: A spectroscopic exploration  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Efflorescent crusts at the Eagle Borax spring in Death Valley, California, contain an array of rare Mg and K borate minerals, several of which are only known from one or two other localities. The Mg- and/or K-bearing borates include aristarainite, hydroboracite, kaliborite, mcallisterite, pinnoite, rivadavite, and santite. Ulexite and probertite also occur in the area, although their distribution is different from that of the Mg and K borates. Other evaporite minerals in the spring vicinity include halite, thenardite, eugsterite, gypsum-anhydrite, hexahydrite, and bloedite. Whereas the first five of these minerals are found throughout Death Valley, the last two Mg sulfates are more restricted in occurrence and are indicative of Mg-enriched ground water. Mineral associations observed at the Eagle Borax spring, and at many other borate deposits worldwide, can be explained by the chemical fractionation of borate-precipitating waters during the course of evaporative concentration. The Mg sulfate and Mg borate minerals in the Eagle Borax efflorescent crusts point to the fractionation of Ca by the operation of a chemical divide involving Ca carbonate and Na-Ca borate precipitation in the subsurface sediments. At many other borate mining localities, the occurrence of ulexite in both Na borate (borax-kernite) and Ca borate (ulexite-colemanite) deposits similarly reflects ulexite's coprecipitation with Ca carbonate at an early concentration stage. Such ulexite may perhaps be converted to colemanite by later reaction with the coexisting Ca carbonate - the latter providing the additional Ca2+ ions needed for the conversion. Mg and Ca-Mg borates are the expected late-stage concentration products of waters forming ulexite-colemanite deposits and are therefore most likely to occur in the marginal zones or nearby mud facies of ulexite-colemanite orebodies. Under some circumstances, Mg and Ca-Mg borates might provide a useful prospecting guide for ulexite-colemanite deposits, although the high solubility of Mg borate minerals may prevent their formation in lacustrine settings and certainly inhibits their geologic preservation. The occurrence of Mg borates in borax-kernite deposits is also related to fractionation processes and points to the operation of an Mg borate chemical divide, characterized by Mg borate precipitation ahead of Mg carbonate. All of these considerations imply that Mg is a significant chemical component of many borate-depositing ground waters, even though Mg borate minerals may not be strongly evident in borate orebodies. The Eagle Borax spring borates and other evaporite minerals were studied using spectroscopic and X-ray powder diffraction methods, which were found to be highly complementary. Spectral reflectance measurements provide a sensitive means for detecting borates present in mixtures with other evaporites and can be used to screen samples rapidly for X-ray diffraction analysis. The apparently limited occurrence of Mg and K borate minerals compared to Ca and Na borates may stem partly from the inefficiency of X-ray diffraction methods for delineating the mineralogy of large and complex deposits. Spectral reflectance measurements can be made in the laboratory, in the field, on the mine face, and even remotely. Reflectance data should have an important role in studies of existing deposit mineralogy and related chemical fractionation processes, and perhaps in the discovery of new borate mineral resources.

Crowley, J.K.

1996-01-01

198

Evidence for a Putative Impact Structure in Palm Valley, Central Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introduction: We present evidence supporting the impact origin of a circular structure located in Palm Valley, Central Australia (24° 03' 06'' S, 132° 42' 34'' E). The ~280 m wide structure was discovered using a combination of Google Maps and a local Arrernte Aboriginal oral tradition regarding a star that fell into a waterhole called Puka in Palm Valley, Northern Territory [1][2] (see [3] for details of the discovery). Geophysical Evidence: A survey of the structure in September 2009 collected magnetic, gravity and topographic data. Geophysical modeling of the data revealed the structure has a bowl-shaped subsurface morphology, as expected for a simple impact crater. Though the structure sits within the Finke Gorge system, the models do not support an erosional origin for the structure, as no buried channels are observed. Nor does the modeling fit a volcanic origin, as the density structure at depth is consistent with fractured sandstone/sediments. Geological Evidence: One channel runs out of the crater to the south, consistent with outflow from crater-filling events, but again not with an erosional origin for the structure itself. The microstructure of rock samples collected from the site revealed the presence of planar deformation features in the quartz grains. The coincident angle of the fractures is consistent with the crystallographic fracture directions under mild-end shocks. These grains probably represent local focusing of stress as the shock wave moved through the heterogeneous grain matrix, suggesting the conditions were right for the shock pressure to locally exceed the ~7.5 GPa required to form the features, even though the bulk of the shock pressure was much less. Conclusion: Based on the level of erosion and the absence of shatter cones and meteorite fragments, we estimate the structure's age to be in the millions of years. While the presence of shocked-quartz is a direct indicator of a cosmic impact, we cannot rule out that the quartz was transported from an older structure into the Hermannsburg sandstone as it was deposited. The ~22 km wide Gosse's Bluff impact structure, located ~40 km from Palm Valley, postdates the Hermannsburg sandstone, leaving a distal unidentified impact event as a possibility. However, the bowl shaped morphology of the Palm Valley structure, as well as the fractures on the structure's walls, support an impact origin. References: [1] Austin-Broos, D., 2009, "Arrernte Past, Arrernte Present", University of Chicago Press, pp. 37-38. [2] Róheim, G., 1945, "The Eternal Ones of the Dream: a psychoanalytic interpretation of Australian myth and ritual", International Universities Press, New York, p. 183. [3] Hamacher, D.W. & Norris, R.P., 2010, Using Aboriginal Oral Traditions to locate meteorite falls and impact craters. In Ilgarijiri - things belonging to the sky, edited by R.P. Norris, Proceedings of the symposium on Indigenous Astronomy held on 27 November 2009 at Australian Institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Canberra, Australia (in press).

Hamacher, D. W.; O'Neill, C.; Buchel, A.; Britton, T. R.

2010-07-01

199

Ciliary neurotrophic factor prevents retrograde neuronal death in the adult central nervous system.  

PubMed Central

The neurocytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was described originally as an activity that supports the survival of neurons of the chicken ciliary ganglia in vitro. The widespread expression of CNTF and its principal binding protein, CNTF receptor alpha, in the central and peripheral nervous systems suggests a broader trophic role for this peptide. In the present study, we report that CNTF prevents axotomy-induced cell death of neurons in the anteroventral and anterodorsal thalamic nuclei of the adult rat. Using the polymerase chain reaction, we also demonstrate the presence of CNTF and CNTF receptor alpha mRNA in these same thalamic nuclei. The coincidence of CNTF and its receptor in a population of neurons responding to the factor suggests a paracrine function for CNTF. The present findings establish that CNTF has significant effects on neurons of the central nervous system in vivo and demonstrate that neurocytokines can prevent cell death in the adult central nervous system. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8460125

Clatterbuck, R E; Price, D L; Koliatsos, V E

1993-01-01

200

Movement of Salt and Nitrate in Shallow Groundwater in California's Central Valley - Large Scale Water, Salt, and Nitrate Balance Calculations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A large-scale analysis of salt and nitrate was performed for the shallow groundwater aquifer of the entire California Central Valley floor (about 20,000 square miles). This analysis combined many different platforms of data in order to complete water and mass balance calculations. Groundwater and surface water quality test data were used in combination with mass loading from a watershed model (the Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed Analysis Risk Management Framework, or WARMF), as well as an integrated hydrologic model that simulates the use and movement of water coupled between the landscape, surface water, and groundwater (the U.S. Geological Survey's Central Valley Hydrologic Model, or CVHM). For this analysis, the Central Valley floor was divided into 22 zones, and the movement of shallow groundwater, surface water, salt, and nitrate was simulated in, out, and between the zones on a quarterly basis for a 20-year simulation period. In this analysis, shallow groundwater is defined by an estimate of the vertical distance water will travel from the water table within 20 years. Fluxes of mass from deep ambient groundwater and ambient surface water quality were estimated from measured concentration data. Quantities of mass were acquired for recharge (from WARMF output) or calculated using concentrations and other water budget components. Flow and volume components were extracted by post-processing CVHM output data. This resulted in a transient water, salt, and nitrate budget for each of the 22 zones. Simulated shallow groundwater concentrations were calculated to investigate water quality trends for the Central Valley. Four zones were identified as areas with the highest concentrations of salt (TDS) in the southwestern portion of the Central Valley; and six zones were identified as areas with the highest nitrate concentrations, mostly in the southeastern portion of the Valley. Additional analyses intended to shift from the large-scale balance calculations to a higher resolution analysis of the movement of water, salt, and nitrate was performed as a 'proof of concept' for two focus areas located in Stanislaus/Merced Counties and the Kings Subbasin, using MODPATH and MODPATH-OBS. Particle tracking was employed for both focus areas to observe the movement of water, salt, and nitrate from recharge zones to monitored wells, or on a cell-by-cell/layer-by-layer basis.

Dalgish, B. A.; Boyle, D.; Kretsinger Grabert, V. J.

2013-12-01

201

Geothermal gradients in the Missoula and Bitterroot Valleys, west-central Montana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Temperature-depth profiles of six cased test holes in the Missoula and Bitterroot Valleys, west-central Montana, consist of linear segments, the intersections of which commonly correspond with lithologic boundaries. Geothermal gradients commonly decreased with depth, probably as a result of compaction and higher quartz content of the deeper sedimentary deposits. There is no evidence for hydrothermal discharge. A maximum temperature of 31.7 degrees Celsius was measured at a depth of 869 meters. Estimated temperatures at a depth of 1 kilometer at the drill sites ranged from about 34 to 63 degrees Celsius. Temperatures exceeding 90 degrees Celsius probably would not occur at depths less than 1,500 meters. Values of thermal conductivity needed to maintain an assumed regional heat flow of about 2.1 heat flow units along the measured geothermal gradients generally exceeded published values for the rock and soil penetrated by the wells. Laboratory determinations of the thermal conductivity of cores and cuttings would be useful to refine the estimates and to test the conclusion that the measured temperatures are not hotter than normal. (USGS)

Leonard, Robert B.; Wood, Wayne A.

1980-01-01

202

Modeling nitrate at domestic and public-supply well depths in the Central Valley, California.  

PubMed

Aquifer vulnerability models were developed to map groundwater nitrate concentration at domestic and public-supply well depths in the Central Valley, California. We compared three modeling methods for ability to predict nitrate concentration >4 mg/L: logistic regression (LR), random forest classification (RFC), and random forest regression (RFR). All three models indicated processes of nitrogen fertilizer input at the land surface, transmission through coarse-textured, well-drained soils, and transport in the aquifer to the well screen. The total percent correct predictions were similar among the three models (69-82%), but RFR had greater sensitivity (84% for shallow wells and 51% for deep wells). The results suggest that RFR can better identify areas with high nitrate concentration but that LR and RFC may better describe bulk conditions in the aquifer. A unique aspect of the modeling approach was inclusion of outputs from previous, physically based hydrologic and textural models as predictor variables, which were important to the models. Vertical water fluxes in the aquifer and percent coarse material above the well screen were ranked moderately high-to-high in the RFR models, and the average vertical water flux during the irrigation season was highly significant (p < 0.0001) in logistic regression. PMID:24779475

Nolan, Bernard T; Gronberg, JoAnn M; Faunt, Claudia C; Eberts, Sandra M; Belitz, Ken

2014-05-20

203

Data for ground-water test hole near Nicolaus, Central Valley aquifer project, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Preliminary data are provided for the third of seven test holes drilled as a part of the Central Valley Aquifer Project which is part of the National Regional Aquifer Systems Analysis Program. The test hole was drilled in the SW 1/4 NE 1/4 sec. 2, T.12N., R.3E., Sutter County, California, about 1 1/2 miles northwest of the town of Nicolaus. Drilled to a depth of 1,150 feet below land surface, the hole is cased to a depth of 100 feet and equipped with three piezometer tubes to depths of 311, 711, and 1,071 feet. A 5-foot well screen is set in sand at the bottom of each piezometer. Each screened interval has a cement plug above and below it to isolate it from other parts of the aquifer, and the well bore is filled between the plugs with sediment. Thirty-one cores and 34 sidewall cores were recovered. Laboratory tests were made for minerology, consolidation, grain-size distribution, Atterberg limits, X-ray diffraction, thermal conductivity, and chemical analysis of water. Geophysical and thermal gradient logs were made. The hole is sampled periodically for chemical analysis of the three tapped zones and measured for water level. This report presents methods used to obtain field samples, laboratory procedures, and the data obtained. (USGS)

French, James J.; Page, R.W.; Bertoldi, Gilbert L.

1983-01-01

204

Data for ground-water test hole near Zamora, Central Valley Aquifer Project, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Preliminary data are presented for the first of seven test holes drilled as a part of the Central Valley Aquifer Project which is part of the National Regional Aquifer Systems Analysis Program. The test hole was drilled in the SW 1/4 SE 1/4 sec. 34, T. 12 N. , R. 1 E., Yolo County, California, about 3 miles northeast of the town of Zamora. Drilled to a depth of 2,500 feet below land surface, the hole is cased to a depth of 190 feet and equipped with three piezometer tubes to depths of 947, 1,401, and 2,125 feet. A 5-foot well screen is at the bottom of each piezometer. Eighteen cores and 68 sidewall cores were recovered. Laboratory tests were made for mineralogy, hydraulic conductivity, porosity , consolidation, grain-size distribution, Atterberg limits, X-ray diffraction, diatom identification, thermal conductivity, and chemical analysis of water. Geophysical and thermal gradient logs were made. The hole is sampled periodically for chemical analysis and measured for water level in the three tapped zones. This report presents methods used to obtain field samples, laboratory procedures, and the data obtained. (USGS)

French, J.J.; Page, R.W.; Bertoldi, G.L.

1982-01-01

205

Data for ground-water test hole near Butte City, Central Valley aquifer project, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides preliminary data for the third of seven test holes drilled as part of the Central Valley Aquifer Project which is part of the National Regional Aquifer Systems Analysis Program. The test hole was drilled in the SW 1/4 NE 1/4 sec. 32, T. 19 N., R. 1 W., Glenn County, California, about one-half mile south of the town of Butte City. Drilled to a depth of 1,432 feet below land surface, the hole is cased to a depth of 82 feet and equipped with three piezometer tubes to depths of 592 feet, 968 feet, and 1,330 feet. A 5-foot well screen is at the bottom of each piezometer. Each screened interval has a cement plug above and below it to isolate it from other parts of the aquifer , and the well bore is filled between the plugs with sediment. Nine cores and 49 sidewall cores were recovered. Laboratory tests were made for mineralogy, hydraulic conductivity, porosity , consolidation, grain-size distribution, Atterberg limits, X-ray diffraction, and chemical quality of water. Geophysical and thermal gradient logs were made. The hole is sampled periodically for chemical analysis and measured for water level in the three tapped zones. This report presents methods used to obtain field samples, laboratory procedures, and the data obtained. (USGS)

French, James J.; Page, R.W.; Bertoldi, G.L.

1983-01-01

206

Comparison of two parametric methods to estimate pesticide mass loads in California's Central Valley  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mass loadings were calculated for four pesticides in two watersheds with different land uses in the Central Valley, California, by using two parametric models: (1) the Seasonal Wave model (SeaWave), in which a pulse signal is used to describe the annual cycle of pesticide occurrence in a stream, and (2) the Sine Wave model, in which first-order Fourier series sine and cosine terms are used to simulate seasonal mass loading patterns. The models were applied to data collected during water years 1997 through 2005. The pesticides modeled were carbaryl, diazinon, metolachlor, and molinate. Results from the two models show that the ability to capture seasonal variations in pesticide concentrations was affected by pesticide use patterns and the methods by which pesticides are transported to streams. Estimated seasonal loads compared well with results from previous studies for both models. Loads estimated by the two models did not differ significantly from each other, with the exceptions of carbaryl and molinate during the precipitation season, where loads were affected by application patterns and rainfall. However, in watersheds with variable and intermittent pesticide applications, the SeaWave model is more suitable for use on the basis of its robust capability of describing seasonal variation of pesticide concentrations.

Saleh, Dina K.; Lorenz, David L.; Domagalski, Joseph L.

2011-01-01

207

Comparison of Two Parametric Methods to Estimate Pesticide Mass Loads in California's Central Valley  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mass loadings were calculated for four pesticides in two watersheds with different land uses in the Central Valley, California, by using two parametric models: (1) the Seasonal Wave model (SeaWave), in which a pulse signal is used to describe the annual cycle of pesticide occurrence in a stream, and (2) the Sine Wave model, in which first-order Fourier series sine and cosine terms are used to simulate seasonal mass loading patterns. The models were applied to data collected during water years 1997 through 2005. The pesticides modeled were carbaryl, diazinon, metolachlor, and molinate. Results from the two models show that the ability to capture seasonal variations in pesticide concentrations was affected by pesticide use patterns and the methods by which pesticides are transported to streams. Estimated seasonal loads compared well with results from previous studies for both models. Loads estimated by the two models did not differ significantly from each other, with the exceptions of carbaryl and molinate during the precipitation season, where loads were affected by application patterns and rainfall. However, in watersheds with variable and intermittent pesticide applications, the SeaWave model is more suitable for use on the basis of its robust capability of describing seasonal variation of pesticide concentrations. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

Saleh, D.K.; Lorenz, D.L.; Domagalski, J.L.

2011-01-01

208

Drought resilience of the California Central Valley surface-groundwater-conveyance system  

SciTech Connect

A series of drought simulations were performed for the California Central Valley using computer applications developed by the California Department of Water Resources and historical datasets representing a range of droughts from mild to severe for time periods lasting up to 60 years. Land use, agricultural cropping patterns, and water demand were held fixed at the 2003 level and water supply was decreased by amounts ranging between 25 and 50%, representing light to severe drought types. Impacts were examined for four hydrologic subbasins, the Sacramento Basin, the San Joaquin Basin, the Tulare Basin, and the Eastside Drainage. Results suggest the greatest impacts are in the San Joaquin and Tulare Basins, regions that are heavily irrigated and are presently overdrafted in most years. Regional surface water diversions decrease by as much as 70%. Stream-to-aquifer flows and aquifer storage declines were proportional to drought severity. Most significant was the decline in ground water head for the severe drought cases, where results suggest that under these scenarios the water table is unlikely to recover within the 30-year model-simulated future. However, the overall response to such droughts is not as severe as anticipated and the Sacramento Basin may act as ground-water insurance to sustain California during extended dry periods.

Miller, N.L.; Dale, L.L.; Brush, C.; Vicuna, S.; Kadir, T.N.; Dogrul, E.C.; Chung, F.I.

2009-05-15

209

Sex-related differences in habitat associations of wintering American Kestrels in California's Central Valley  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We used roadside survey data collected from 19 routes over three consecutive winters from 200708 to 200910 to compare habitat associations of male and female American Kestrels (Falco sparverius) in the Central Valley of California to determine if segregation by sex was evident across this region. As a species, American Kestrels showed positive associations with alfalfa and other forage crops like hay and winter wheat, as well as grassland, irrigated pasture, and rice. Habitat associations of females were similar, with female densities in all these habitats except rice significantly higher than average. Male American Kestrels showed a positive association only with grassland and were present at densities well below those of females in alfalfa, other forage crops, and grassland. Males were present in higher densities than females in most habitats with negative associations for the species, such as orchards, urbanized areas, and oak savannah. The ratio of females to males for each route was positively correlated with the overall density of American Kestrels on that route. Our findings that females seem to occupy higher quality habitats in winter are consistent with observations from elsewhere in North America. ?? 2011 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

Pandolfino, E.R.; Herzog, M.P.; Smith, Z.

2011-01-01

210

Quality of ground water in agricultural areas of the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The quality of ground water in the principal agricultural areas of the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado was evaluated using chemical analyses of water collected from 57 wells completed in the unconfined aquifer and from 25 wells completed in the confined aquifer. Ground water in both aquifers generally contains dissolved-solids concentrations of less than 500 milligrams per liter. In most areas, calcium is the principal cation in the ground water. Nitrite plus nitrate concentrations expressed as nitrogen, are generally less than 1 milligram per liter. However, the quality of ground water in certain areas may pose health and agricultural hazards. Water in the unconfined aquifer near Center contains high nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen concentrations. The highest measured concentration in this area was 33 milligrams per liter. Water containing more than 1 milligram per liter of nitrite as nitrogen, or 10 milligrams per liter nitrate, as nitrogen, poses a potential health hazard for infants and should not be used for drinking. In addition, dissolved-solids concentration in the ground water in some areas is greater than 500 milligrams per liter and, if used for irrigation may reduce crop yields. (USGS)

Edelmann, Patrick; Buckles, D.R.

1984-01-01

211

Hydrology of Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tracts, central Utah, and potential effects of coal mining  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alkali Creek coal-lease tract includes about 2,150 acres in the Book Cliffs coal field in central Utah, and the Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tract includes about 3,360 acres in the Wasatch Plateau coal field, also in central Utah. Both the Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tracts are near areas where coal is currently (1987) mined by underground methods from the Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation. The Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge areas have intermittent streams in which flow after snowmelt runoff is locally sustained into midsummer by springflow. The only perennial stream is South Fork Corner Canyon Creek in the Castle Valley Ridge area. Peak flow in both areas generally is from snowmelt runoff; however, peak flow from thunderstorm runoff in the Alkali Creek area can exceed that from snowmelt runoff. Estimated annual source-area sediment yield was 0.5 acre-ft/sq mi in the Alkali Creek lease tract and it was 0.3 acre-ft/sq mi in the Castle Valley Ridge lease tract. Groundwater in the Alkali Creek area occurs in perched aquifers in the Flagstaff Limestone and in other formations above the coal-bearing Blackhawk Formation. The principal source of recharge to the aquifers is snowmelt on outcrops. Faults may be major conduits and control the movement of groundwater. Groundwater discharges at formation contacts, between zones of differing permeability within a formation, near faults and into mines. Water sampled from 13 springs in the Alkali Creek area contained dissolved solids at concentrations ranging from 273 to 5,210 mg/L. Water sampled from 17 springs in the Castle Valley Ridge area contained dissolved solids at concentrations ranging from 208 to 579 mg/L. The composition of water from a recently abandoned part of an active mine the Wasatch Plateau closely resembles that of water discharging from a nearby mine that has been abandoned for more than 30 years. Mining of the Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tracts likely will result in decreased pH and increased concentration of dissolved solids of the water that enters the mines. Even after mining, the water, especially in the Castle Valley Ridge area, may still meet Utah 's drinking water standards. (Lantz-PTT)

Seiler, R.L.; Baskin, R.L.

1988-01-01

212

Interpretation of the Last Chance thrust, Death Valley region, California, as an Early Permian décollement in a previously undeformed shale basin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Last Chance thrust, discontinuously exposed over an area of at least 2500 km 2 near the south end of the Cordilleran foreland thrust belt in the Death Valley region of east-central California, is controversial because of its poorly constrained age and its uncertain original geometry and extent. We interpret this thrust to be Early Permian in age, to extend throughout a sedimentary basin in which deep-water Mississippian shale overlain by Pennsylvanian and earliest Permian limestone turbidites accumulated, to represent about 30 km of eastward displacement, and to be related to convergence on a northeast-trending segment of the Early Permian continental margin. Last Chance deformation occurred between the times of the Antler and Sonoma orogenies of Late Devonian-Early Mississippian and Late Permian ages, respectively, and followed Early to Middle Pennsylvanian truncation of the continental margin by transform faulting. In the western part of the Mississippian shale basin in east-central California, the originally recognized exposures of the Last Chance thrust show Neoproterozoic and early Paleozoic strata above lower-plate Mississippian shale. Farther east, faults subparallel to bedding above, below, and within the Mississippian shale are interpreted to mark the thrust zone and to represent a regional décollement. At the eastern margin of the basin, upper-plate thrust slices of deep-water, late Paleozoic strata are interpreted to have piled up against the margin of the Mississippian carbonate shelf to form a large antiformal stack above the Lee Flat thrust, which we regard as the easternmost exposure of the Last Chance thrust. Thrust loading depressed the western part of the shelf, creating a new sedimentary basin in which about 3.5 km of younger Early Permian deep-water strata were deposited against the antiformal stack. Later, probably in the Late Permian, other thrusts, including the Inyo Crest thrust, which was subsequently overlapped by Early to Middle(?) Triassic marine strata, cut across the Last Chance thrust. We interpret the Last Chance thrust as similar in many ways to Appalachian-type décollements in which the zone of thrusting is localized along a shale interval. The Last Chance thrust, however, has been dismembered during later geologic events so that its original geometry has been obscured. Our model may have unrecognized analogs in other structurally complex shale basins in which the initial deformation was along a major shale unit.

Stevens, Calvin H.; Stone, Paul

2005-12-01

213

Middle Pleistocene palaeoenvironments and the late Lower-Middle Palaeolithic of the Hrazdan valley, central Armenia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The palaeogeographic importance of the southern Caucasus in the Pleistocene as a region of population expansion and contraction between Africa, the Levant and Eurasia is well established as a result of recent archaeological works in the Republics of Armenia and Georgia. Not only does the area have a unique Palaeolithic record, but the presence of volcanic layers in association with archaeological sites and off site sequences means that there is the potential for both high precision dating and correlation. The Hrazdan valley, central Armenia is a case in point. Late Lower to late Middle Palaeolithic sites found as a result of systematic survey and then explored in excavations in 2008-2011 are associated with various volcanogenic strata. 40K/40Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating in the 1970-2000s demonstrates the onset of volcanism in the adjacent Gegham range in the period 700-500ky BP, while recent 40Ar/39Ar dates on the latest lava from the Gutanasar volcano shows the latest effusive eruption to have occurred at c. 200 ky BP. Nine Middle Pleistocene lavas from the intervening period have been mapped in the Hrazdan valley in a 15km-long study area 12km north-east of Yerevan. Several of the basalts seal terrestrial strata, and thereby bury and 'fossilize' earlier landscapes. The most significant of these is sandwiched between basalts dating to 200 and 440ky BP, where a 135m-long exposure contains a palaeosol developing in floodplain alluvium and in situ archaeological material (Nor Geghi 1). Morphological and micromorphological examination of site strata suggest that hominin activity took place during a temperate episode, which 40Ar/39Ar dating of interbedded crypotephra suggests was MIS 9e. However, strata at other locales buried beneath the same 200ky BP basalt suggest that the landscape occupied by these hominids was a mosaic of river channels, floodplains and lakes. The fossilized MIS 9 landscape is not unique as further lacustrine deposits are buried beneath earlier Middle Pleistocene basalts, although earlier archaeological sites have yet to be found.

Wilkinson, Keith; Adler, Daniel; Nahapetyan, Samvel; Smith, Victoria; Mark, Darren; Mallol, Carolina; Blockley, Simon; Gasparian, Boris

2014-05-01

214

Estimation of Evapotranspiration of Almond orchards using Remote Sensing based SEBAL model in Central Valley, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evapotranspiration is one of the main components of the hydrologic cycle and its impact to hydrology, agriculture,forestry and environmental studies is very crucial. SEBAL (Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land) is an image-processing model comprised of twenty-five computational sub-models that computes actual evapotranspiration (ETa) and other energy exchanges as a component of energy balance which is used to derive the surface radiation balance equation for the net surface radiation flux (Rn) on a pixel-by-pixel basis. For this study, SEBAL method is applied to Level 1B dataset of visible, near-infrared and thermal infrared radiation channels of MASTER instrument on-board NASA-DC 8 flight. This paper uses the SEBAL method to (1) investigate the spatial distribution property of land surface temperature (Ls), NDVI, and ETa over the San Joaquin valley. (2) Estimate actual evapotranspiration of almond class on pixel-by-pixel basis in the Central valley, California. (3) Comparison of actual Evapotranspiration obtained from SEBAL model with reference evapotranspiration (Eto) using Penman Monteiths method based on the procedures and available data from California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS) stations. The results of the regression between extracted land surface temperature, NDVI and, evapotranspiration show negative (-) correlation. On the other hand Ls possessed a slightly stronger negative correlation with the ETa than with NDVI for Almond class. The correlation coefficient of actual ETa estimates from remote sensing with Reference ETo from Penmann Monteith are 0.8571. ETa estimated for almond crop from SEBAL were found to be almost same with the CIMIS_Penman Monteith method with bias of 0.77 mm and mean percentage difference is 0.10%. These results indicate that combination of MASTER data with surface meteorological data could provide an efficient tool for the estimation of regional actual ET used for water resources and irrigation scheduling and management. Keywords: Evapotranspiration, Hydrologic cycle, SEBAL, net surface radiation flux, MASTER, NDVI, Penman Monteith, CIMIS, Surface Temperature

Roy, S.; Ustin, S.; Kefauver, S. C.

2009-12-01

215

Stream seepage and groundwater levels, Wood River Valley, south-central Idaho, 2012-13  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Stream discharge and water levels in wells were measured at multiple sites in the Wood River Valley, south-central Idaho, in August 2012, October 2012, and March 2013, as a component of data collection for a groundwater-flow model of the Wood River Valley aquifer system. This model is a cooperative and collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources. Stream-discharge measurements for determination of seepage were made during several days on three occasions: August 27–28, 2012, October 22–24, 2012, and March 27–28, 2013. Discharge measurements were made at 49 sites in August and October, and 51 sites in March, on the Big Wood River, Silver Creek, their tributaries, and nearby canals. The Big Wood River generally gains flow between the Big Wood River near Ketchum streamgage (13135500) and the Big Wood River at Hailey streamgage (13139510), and loses flow between the Hailey streamgage and the Big Wood River at Stanton Crossing near Bellevue streamgage (13140800). Shorter reaches within these segments may differ in the direction or magnitude of seepage or may be indeterminate because of measurement uncertainty. Additional reaches were measured on Silver Creek, the North Fork Big Wood River, Warm Springs Creek, Trail Creek, and the East Fork Big Wood River. Discharge measurements also were made on the Hiawatha, Cove, District 45, Glendale, and Bypass Canals, and smaller tributaries to the Big Wood River and Silver Creek. Water levels in 93 wells completed in the Wood River Valley aquifer system were measured during October 22–24, 2012; these wells are part of a network established by the U.S. Geological Survey in 2006. Maps of the October 2012 water-table altitude in the unconfined aquifer and the potentiometric-surface altitude of the confined aquifer have similar topology to those on maps of October 2006 conditions. Between October 2006 and October 2012, water-table altitude in the unconfined aquifer rose by as much as 1.86 feet in 6 wells and declined by as much as 14.28 feet in 77 wells; average decline was 2.9 feet. A map of changes in the water?table altitude of the unconfined aquifer shows that the largest declines were in tributary canyons and in an area roughly between Baseline and Glendale Roads. From October 2006 to October 2012, the potentiometric-surface altitude in 10 wells completed in the confined aquifer declined between 0.12 and 20.50 feet; average decline was 6.8 feet. A map of changes in the potentiometric-surface altitude of the confined aquifer shows that the largest declines were in the southwestern part of the Bellevue fan. Reduced precipitation prior to the October 2012 water-level measurements likely is partially responsible for 2006–12 water-table declines in the unconfined aquifer; the relative contribution of precipitation deficit and groundwater withdrawals to the declines is not known. Although the confined aquifer may not receive direct recharge from precipitation or streams, groundwater withdrawal from the confined aquifer induces flow from the unconfined aquifer. Declines in the confined aquifer are likely due to groundwater withdrawals and declines in the water table of the unconfined aquifer. A statistical analysis of five long-term monitoring wells (three completed in the unconfined aquifer, one in the confined aquifer, and one outside the aquifer system boundary) showed statistically significant declining trends in four wells.

Bartolino, James R.

2014-01-01

216

Tilt and rotation of the footwall of a major normal fault system: Paleomagnetism of the Black Mountains, Death Valley extended terrane, California  

SciTech Connect

Paleomagnetic data have been obtained from Miocene intrusions, Proterozoic Paleomagnetic data have been obtained from Miocene intrusions, Proterozoic crystalline rocks and cross-cutting mafic to felsic dikes to evaluate footwall deformation during extension and unroofing of the crystalline core of the Black Mountains, Death Valley, California. Synrift intrusions contain a well-defined and, at the site level, well-grouped magnetization, interpreted to be of dual polarity, whose in situ direction is discordant in declination and inclination with an expected late Cenozoic reference direction. In situ site mean directions of this magnetization are directed towards the west and west-northwest with moderate to shallow positive and negative inclinations. The variation in magnetization direction, particularly inclination, with site locality around the turtleback structures along the western flank of the Black Mountains suggests folding of the intrusion after remanence acquisition. Two populations of in situ site means are identified: one with southwest declination and negative inclination, the other with northward declination and positive inclination. A preferred interpretation for footwall deformation involves, from oldest to youngest: (1) northeast-side up tilting of 20--40[degree] and local folding of the crystalline rocks associated with early structures (the Death Valley turtlebacks) between 11.6 and 8.7 Ma, (2) progressive east to west footwall unroofing between 8.7 and [approximately]6.5 Ma, and (3) large-scale clockwise rotation (50--80[degree]) after the core detached from stable terrane to the west. The authors interpret late rotation as oroflexure related to right-lateral shear along the Death Valley fault zone.

Holm, D.K. (Kent State Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Geology); Geissman, J.W. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geology and Planetary Sciences); Wernicke, B. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Planetary Sciences)

1993-04-01

217

A three-dimensional numerical model of predevelopment conditions in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect

In the early 1990's, two numerical models of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. In general, the two models were based on the same basic hydrogeologic data set. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy requested that the U.S. Geological Survey develop and maintain a ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region in support of U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of developing this ''second-generation'' regional model was to enhance the knowledge and understanding of the ground-water flow system as new information and tools are developed. The U.S. Geological Survey also was encouraged by the U.S. Department of Energy to cooperate to the fullest extent with other Federal, State, and local entities in the region to take advantage of the benefits of their knowledge and expertise. The short-term objective of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system project was to develop a steady-stat e representation of the predevelopment conditions of the ground-water flow system utilizing the two geologic interpretations used to develop the previous numerical models. The long-term objective of this project was to construct and calibrate a transient model that simulates the ground-water conditions of the study area over the historical record that utilizes a newly interpreted hydrogeologic conceptual model. This report describes the result of the predevelopment steady-state model construction and calibration.

D'Agnese, F.A.; O'Brien, G.M.; Faunt, C.C.; Belcher, W.R.; San Juan, Carma

2002-11-22

218

Covariance of structural and stratigraphic trends: Evidence for anticlockwise rotation within the Walker Lane belt Death Valley region, California and Nevada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large-magnitude relative rotations of range-scale structural blocks are inferred to be products of crustal extension in the Death Valley region, in California and Nevada. Reconstructions of the extended terrain restore pre-Tertiary contractile structures with currently diverse trends into a relatively simple, north-northeast trending thrust belt. We interpret trends of major contractile structures throughout the Death Valley region as characteristically discordant to, and thus geometrically independent from, stratigraphic trends. We compare trends of pre-Tertiary contractile structures with paleoflow orientations in Lower Cambrian strata throughout the extended terrain. Significant differences between mean paleoflow orientations are consistent in magnitude and sense with differences observed in the structural trends. Available evidence does not support interpretation of paleoflow data from apparently rotated areas as representing an original paleogeography distinct from that of adjacent areas. Facies variations are present within the contractile structures. We interpret the strong covariance throughout the study area between structural and paleoflow trends of diverse orientations as evidence for vertical axis rotations. Combined rotation estimates from these data indicate clockwise rotations of 85° ± 12° for Bare Mountain and 73° ± 24° for the Striped Hills but anticlockwise rotations of 30° ± 35° and 87° ± 29°, respectively, for the northern and southern Grapevine Mountains. Such large rotations of opposite sense may be related to north-south shortening accommodated by conjugate strike-slip faults during large-magnitude extension in the Death Valley region but are difficult to explain as products of regional dextral shear within the southern Walker Lane belt.

Snow, J. Kent; Prave, Anthony R.

1994-06-01

219

Ethiopian Central Rift Valley basin hydrologic modelling using HEC-HMS and ArcSWAT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) shall be applied to achieve a sustainable development, to increase population incomes without affecting lives of those who are highly dependent on the environment. First step should be to understand water dynamics at basin level, starting by modeling the basin water resources. For model implementation, a large number of data and parameters are required, but those are not always available, especially in some developing countries where different sources may have different data, there is lack of information on data collection, etc. The Ethiopian Central Rift Valley (CRV) is an endorheic basin covering an area of approximately 10,000 km2. For the period 1996-2005, the average annual volume of rainfall accounted for 9.1 Mm3, and evapotranspiration for 8 Mm3 (Jansen et al., 2007). From the environmental point of view, basin ecosystems are endangered due to human activities. Also, poverty is widespread all over the basin, with population mainly living from agriculture on a subsistence economy. Hence, there is an urgent need to set an IWRM, but datasets required for water dynamics simulation are not too reliable. In order to reduce uncertainty of numerical simulation, two semi-distributed open software hydrologic models were implemented: HEC-HMS and ArcSWAT. HEC-HMS was developed by the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACoE) Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC) to run precipitation-runoff simulations for a variety of applications in dendritic watershed systems. ArcSWAT includes the SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool, Arnold et al., 1998) model developed for the USDA Agricultural Research Service into ArcGIS (ESRI®). SWAT was developed to assess the impact of land management practices on large complex watersheds with varying soils, land use and management conditions over long periods of time (Neitsch et al., 2005). According to this, ArcSWAT would be the best option for IWRM implementation in the basin. However, considering data uncertainty and model complexity a previous hydrologic assessment of the basin based in HEC-HMS simulation is advisable. As a first approach HEC-HMS was implemented for basin modeling in order to get physical parameters of interest, results from HEC-HMS calibration were used to setup the accuracy of the ArcSWAT numerical modelling. References Arnold, J.G., Srinivasan, R., Muttiah, R.S. & Williams, J.R. (1998). Large Area Hydrologic Modeling and Assessment Part I: Model Development. JAWRA Journal of the American Water Resources Association, Vol. 34, No. 1, pp. 73-89. Jansen, H., Hengsdijk, H., Legesse, D., Ayenew, T., Hellegers, P. & Spliethoff, P. (2007). Land and water resources assessment in the Ethiopian Central Rift Valley. In Alterra report 1587. Wageningen: Alterra. p. 81. Neitsch, S.L., Arnold, J.G., Kiniry, J.R. & Williams, J.R. (2005). Soil and Water Assessment Tool Theoretical Documentation. Version 2005, Temple, Texas.

Pascual-Ferrer, Jordi; Candela, Lucila; Pérez-Foguet, Agustí

2013-04-01

220

Fluxes of BVOC and tropospheric ozone from a Citrus orchard in the California Central Valley  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Citrus plants, especially oranges, are widely cultivated in many countries experiencing Mediterranean climates. In many of these areas, orchards are often exposed to high levels of tropospheric ozone (O3) due to their location in polluted airsheds. Citrus take up O3 through their stomata and emit biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), which can contribute to non-stomatal O3 removal through fast gas-phase reactions with O3. The study was performed in a valencia orange orchard in Exeter, California. From fall 2009 to winter 2010, CO2 & water fluxes, together with O3 uptake and BVOC emissions were measured continuously in situ with specific sensors (e.g. fast ozone analyzer and Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer) using the eddy covariance techniques. Vertical concentration gradients of these compounds were also measured at 4 heights from the orchard floor to above the canopy. We observed high levels (up to 60 ppb) of volatile organic compounds including methanol, isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and some additional oxygenated BVOC. Methanol dominated BVOC emissions (up to 7 nmol m-2 s-1) followed by acetone. Monoterpenes fluxes were also recorded during the all vegetative period, with the highest emissions taking place during flowering periods, and in general highly temperature dependent. The orchard represented a sink for ozone, with uptake rates on the order of 10 nmol m-2 s-1 during the central hours of the day. We found that BVOC played a major role in removing ozone through chemical reactions in the gas-phase, while only up to 40 % of ozone was removed via stomatal uptake. The current research aimed at investigating the fate of BVOC emitted from orange trees will help understanding the role of Citrus orchards in the complex oxidation mechanisms taking place in the polluted atmosphere of the San Joaquin Valley (California).

Fares, S.; Park, J.; Weber, R.; Gentner, D. R.; Karlik, J. F.; Goldstein, A. H.

2011-12-01

221

Rainwater harvesting for small-scale irrigation of maize in the Central Rift Valley, Ethiopia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the Central Rift Valley of Ethiopia, small scale farmers mostly rely on rainfall for crop production. The erratic nature of rainfall causes frequent crop failures and makes the region structurally dependent on food aid. Rainwater Harvesting (RWH) is a technique to collect and store runoff that could provide water for livestock, domestic use or small scale irrigation. Usually, such irrigation is promoted for high value crops, but in the light of regional food security it may become interesting to invest in irrigation of maize. In this research, two cemented RWH cisterns were investigated to determine their economic and social potential for supplemental irrigation of maize using drip irrigation. For this, data from test fields with irrigated maize and monitoring of water levels of the cisterns were used, as well as a survey under 30 farmers living close to the experimental site. The results show that catchment size and management should be in balance with the designed RWH system, to prevent too little runoff or flooding. An analysis with Cropwat 8.0 was used to investigate the possibility of irrigating maize with the observed amounts of water in the RWH cisterns. This would suffice for 0.3-0.8 ha of maize. For a RWH cistern with a drip irrigation system to be economically viable, the production on this acreage should become 3-4 ton/ha; 2.5 times higher than the current yield. But the biggest challenge would be to change the perception of respondents, who don't find it logical to spend precious water on a common crop like maize. Therefore, if the Ethiopian government considers the irrigation of maize to be important for regional food security, it is recommended to either subsidize the construction of RWH cisterns or provide credit on favourable terms.

Keesstra, Saskia; Hartog, Maaike; Muluneh, Alemayehu; Stroosnijder, Leo

2013-04-01

222

Soil chemical changes under irrigated mango production in the Central São Francisco River Valley, Brazil.  

PubMed

Irrigated areas in Brazil's Central São Francisco River Valley have experienced declines in productivity, which may be a reflection of changes in soil chemical properties due to management. This study was conducted to compare the chemical composition of soil solutions and cation exchange complexes in a five-year-old grove of irrigated mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Tommy Atkins) with that of an adjacent clearing in the native caatinga vegetation. A detailed physiographic characterization of the area revealed a subsurface rock layer, which was more undulating than the current land surface, and identified the presence of a very saline and sodic (1045 microS cm(-1), sodium adsorption ratio [SAR] = 5.19) ground water table. While changes in concentrations of Ca, Mg, and K could be attributed to direct management inputs (fertilization and liming with dolomite), increases in Na suggested average annual capillary rise from the ground water table of 28 L m(-2). Accordingly, soil salinity levels appeared to be more dependent on surface elevation than the elevation of the rock layer or sediment thickness. The apparent influence of land surface curvature on water redistribution and the solution chemistry was more pronounced under irrigated mango production. In general, salinity levels had doubled in the mango grove and nearly tripled under the canopies, after only five years of irrigation. Though critical saline or sodic conditions were not encountered, the changes observed indicate a need for more adequate monitoring and management of water and salt inputs despite the excellent water quality of the São Francisco River. PMID:12931897

Heck, R J; Tiessen, H; Salcedo, I H; Santos, M C

2003-01-01

223

Evolution of Late Miocene to Contemporary Displacement Transfer Between the Northern Furnace Creek and Southern Fish Lake Valley Fault Zones and the Central Walker Lane, Western Great Basin, Nevada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Late Miocene to contemporary displacement transfer from the north Furnace Creek (FCF) and southern Fish Lake Valley (FLVF) faults to structures in the central Walker Lane was and continues to be accommodated by a belt of WNW-striking left-oblique fault zones in the northern part of the southern Walker Lane. The WNW fault zones are 2-9 km wide belts of anastomosing fault strands that intersect the NNW-striking FCF and southern FLVF in northern Death Valley and southern Fish Lake Valley, respectively. The WNW fault zones extend east for over 60 km where they merge with a 5-10 km wide belt of N10W striking faults that marks the eastern boundary of the southern Walker Lane. Left-oblique displacement on WNW faults progressively decreases to the east, as motion is successively transferred northeast on NNE-striking faults. NNE faults localize and internally deform extensional basins that each record cumulative net vertical displacements of between 3.0 and 5.2 km. The transcurrent faults and associated basins decrease in age from south to north. In the south, the WNW Sylvania Mountain fault system initiated left-oblique motion after 7 Ma but does not have evidence of contemporary displacement. Farther north, the left-oblique motion on the Palmetto Mountain fault system initiated after 6.0 to 4.0 Ma and has well-developed scarps in Quaternary deposits. Cumulative left-lateral displacement for the Sylvania Mountain fault system is 10-15 km, and is 8-12 km for the Palmetto fault system. The NNE-striking faults that emanate from the left-oblique faults merge with NNW transcurrent faults farther north in the eastern part of the Mina deflection, which links the Owens Valley fault of eastern California to the central Walker Lane. Left-oblique displacement on the Sylvania Mountain and Palmetto Mountain fault zones deformed the Furnace Creek and Fish Lake Valley faults. Left-oblique motion on Sylvania Mountain fault deflected the FCF into the 15 km wide Cucomungo Canyon restraining bend, segmented the >3.0 km deep basin underlying southern Fish Lake Valley, and formed a 2 km wide restraining bend in the FLVF. Part of the left-oblique motion on the Palmetto Mountain fault zone crosses Fish Lake Valley and offsets the FLVF in a 3 km wide restraining bend with the remainder being taken-up by NNW structures along the eastern side of southern Fish Lake Valley.

Oldow, J. S.; Geissman, J. W.

2013-12-01

224

Annual ground-water discharge by evapotranspiration from areas of spring-fed riparian vegetation along the eastern margin of Death Valley, 2000-02  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Flow from major springs and seeps along the eastern margin of Death Valley serves as the primary local water supply and sustains much of the unique habitat in Death Valley National Park. Together, these major spring complexes constitute the terminus of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System--one of the larger flow systems in the Southwestern United States. The Grapevine Springs complex is the least exploited for water supply and consequently contains the largest area of undisturbed riparian habitat in the park. Because few estimates exist that quantify ground-water discharge from these spring complexes, a study was initiated to better estimate the amount of ground water being discharged annually from these sensitive, spring-fed riparian areas. Results of this study can be used to establish a basis for estimating water rights and as a baseline from which to assess any future changes in ground-water discharge in the park. Evapotranspiration (ET) is estimated volumetrically as the product of ET-unit (general vegetation type) acreage and a representative ET rate. ET-unit acreage is determined from high-resolution multi-spectral imagery; and a representative ET rate is computed from data collected in the Grapevine Springs area using the Bowen-ratio solution to the energy budget, or from rates given in other ET studies in the Death Valley area. The ground-water component of ET is computed by removing the local precipitation component from the ET rate. Two different procedures, a modified soil-adjusted vegetation index using the percent reflectance of the red and near-infrared wavelengths and land-cover classification using multi-spectral imagery were used to delineate the ET units within each major spring-discharge area. On the basis of the more accurate procedure that uses the vegetation index, ET-unit acreage for the Grapevine Springs discharge area totaled about 192 acres--of which 80 acres were moderate-density vegetation and 112 acres were high-density vegetation. ET-unit acreage for two other discharge areas delineated in the Grapevine Springs area (Surprise Springs and Staininger Spring) totaled about 6 and 43 acres, respectively; and for the discharge areas delineated in the Furnace Creek area (Nevares Springs, Cow Creek-Salt Springs, Texas Spring, and Travertine Springs) totaled about 29, 13, 11, and 21 acres, respectively. In discharge areas other than Grapevine Springs, watering and spring diversions have altered the natural distribution of the vegetation. More...

Laczniak, Randell J.; Smith, J. LaRue; DeMeo, Guy A.

2006-01-01

225

Late Holocene glacial history of the Copper River Delta, coastal south-central Alaska, and controls on valley glacier fluctuations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fluctuations of four valley glaciers in coastal south-central Alaska are reconstructed for the past two millennia. Tree-ring crossdates on 216 glacially killed stumps and logs provide the primary age control, and are integrated with glacial stratigraphy, ages of living trees on extant landforms, and historic forefield photographs to constrain former ice margin positions. Sheridan Glacier shows four distinct phases of advance: in the 530s to c.640s in the First Millennium A.D., and the 1240s to 1280s, 1510s to 1700s, and c.1810s to 1860s during the Little Ice Age (LIA). The latter two LIA advances are also recorded on the forefields of nearby Scott, Sherman and Saddlebag glaciers. Comparison of the Sheridan record with other two-millennia long tree-ring constrained valley glacier histories from south-central Alaska and Switzerland shows the same four intervals of advance. These expansions were coeval with decreases in insolation, supporting solar irradiance as the primary pacemaker for centennial-scale fluctuations of mid-latitude valley glaciers prior to the 20th century. Volcanic aerosols, coupled atmospheric-oceanic systems, and local glacier-specific effects may be important to glacier fluctuations as supplemental forcing factors, for causing decadal-scale differences between regions, and as a climatic filter affecting the magnitude of advances.

Barclay, David J.; Yager, Elowyn M.; Graves, Jason; Kloczko, Michael; Calkin, Parker E.

2013-12-01

226

Data network, collection, and analysis in the Diamond Valley flow system, central Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Future groundwater development and its effect on future municipal, irrigation, and alternative energy uses in the Diamond Valley flow system are of concern for officials in Eureka County, Nevada. To provide a better understanding of the groundwater resources, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Eureka County, commenced a multi-phase study of the Diamond Valley flow system in 2005. Groundwater development primarily in southern Diamond Valley has resulted in water-level declines since the 1960s ranging from less than 5 to 100 feet. Groundwater resources in the Diamond Valley flow system outside of southern Diamond Valley have been relatively undeveloped. Data collected during phase 2 of the study (2006-09) included micrometeorological data at 4 evapotranspiration stations, 3 located in natural vegetation and 1 located in an agricultural field; groundwater levels in 95 wells; water-quality constituents in aquifers and springs at 21 locations; lithologic information from 7 recently drilled wells; and geophysical logs from 3 well sites. This report describes what was accomplished during phase 2 of the study, provides the data collected, and presents the approaches to strengthen relations between evapotranspiration rates measured at micrometeorological stations and spatially distributed groundwater discharge. This report also presents the approach to improve delineation of areas of groundwater discharge and describes the current methodology used to improve the accuracy of spatially distributed groundwater discharge rates in the Diamond Valley flow system.

Knochenmus, Lari A.; Berger, David L.; Moreo, Michael T.; Smith, J. LaRue

2011-01-01

227

Geologic map and upper Paleozoic stratigraphy of the Marble Canyon area, Cottonwood Canyon quadrangle, Death Valley National Park, Inyo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This geologic map and pamphlet focus on the stratigraphy, depositional history, and paleogeographic significance of upper Paleozoic rocks exposed in the Marble Canyon area in Death Valley National Park, California. Bedrock exposed in this area is composed of Mississippian to lower Permian (Cisuralian) marine sedimentary rocks and the Jurassic Hunter Mountain Quartz Monzonite. These units are overlain by Tertiary and Quaternary nonmarine sedimentary deposits that include a previously unrecognized tuff to which we tentatively assign an age of late middle Miocene (~12 Ma) based on tephrochronologic analysis, in addition to the previously recognized Pliocene tuff of Mesquite Spring. Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks in the Marble Canyon area represent deposition on the western continental shelf of North America. Mississippian limestone units in the area (Tin Mountain, Stone Canyon, and Santa Rosa Hills Limestones) accumulated on the outer part of a broad carbonate platform that extended southwest across Nevada into east-central California. Carbonate sedimentation was interrupted by a major eustatic sea-level fall that has been interpreted to record the onset of late Paleozoic glaciation in southern Gondwana. Following a brief period of Late Mississippian clastic sedimentation (Indian Springs Formation), a rise in eustatic sea level led to establishment of a new carbonate platform that covered most of the area previously occupied by the Mississippian platform. The Pennsylvanian Bird Spring Formation at Marble Canyon makes up the outer platform component of ten third-order (1 to 5 m.y. duration) stratigraphic sequences recently defined for the regional platform succession. The regional paleogeography was fundamentally changed by major tectonic activity along the continental margin beginning in middle early Permian time. As a result, the Pennsylvanian carbonate shelf at Marble Canyon subsided and was disconformably overlain by lower Permian units (Osborne Canyon and Darwin Canyon Formations) representing part of a deep-water turbidite basin filled primarily by fine-grained siliciclastic sediment derived from cratonal sources to the east. Deformation and sedimentation along the western part of this basin continued into late Permian time. The culminating phase was part of a regionally extensive late Permian thrust system that included the Marble Canyon thrust fault just west of the present map area.

Stone, Paul; Stevens, Calvin H.; Belasky, Paul; Montañez, Isabel P.; Martin, Lauren G.; Wardlaw, Bruce R.; Sandberg, Charles A.; Wan, Elmira; Olson, Holly A.; Priest, Susan S.

2014-01-01

228

Hydrochemistry of the Mahomet Bedrock Valley Aquifer, East-Central Illinois: indicators of recharge and ground-water flow  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A conceptual model of the ground-water flow and recharge to the Mahomet Bedrock Valley Aquifer (MVA), east-central Illinois, was developed using major ion chemistry and isotope geochemistry. The MVA is a 'basal' fill in the east-west trending buried bedrock valley composed of clean, permeable sand and gravel to thicknesses of up to 61 m. It is covered by a thick sequence of glacial till containing thinner bodies of interbedded sand and gravel. Ground water from the MVA was found to be characterized by clearly defined geochemical regions with three distinct ground-water types. A fourth ground-water type was found at the confluence of the MVA and the Mackinaw Bedrock Valley Aquifer (MAK) to the west. Ground water in the Onarga Valley, a northeastern tributary of the MVA, is of two types, a mixed cation-SO42- type and a mixed cation-HCO3- type. The ground water is enriched in Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, and SO42- which appears to be the result of an upward hydraulic gradient and interaction of deeper ground water with oxidized pyritic coals and shale. We suggest that recharge to the Onarga Valley and overlying aquifers is 100% from bedrock (leakage) and lateral flow from the MVA to the south. The central MVA (south of the Onarga Valley) is composed of relatively dilute ground water of a mixed cation-HCO3- type, with low total dissolved solids, and very low concentrations of Cl- and SO42-. Stratigraphic relationships of overlying aquifers and ground-water chemistry of these and the MVA suggest recharge to this region of the MVA (predominantly in Champaign County) is relatively rapid and primarily from the surface. Midway along the westerly flow path of the MVA (western MVA), ground water is a mixed cation-HCO3- type with relatively high Cl-, where Cl- increases abruptly by one to ??? two orders of magnitude. Data suggest that the increase in Cl- is the result of leakage of saline ground water from bedrock into the MVA. Mass-balance calculations indicate that approximately 9.5% of recharge in this area is from bedrock. Concentrations of Na+, HCO3-, As, and TDS also increase in the western MVA. Ground water in the MAK is of a Ca2+-HCO3- type. Mass-balance calculations, using Cl- as a natural, conservative tracer, indicate that approximately 17% of the ground water flowing from the confluence area is derived from the MVA.

Panno, S.V.; Hackley, K.C.; Cartwright, K.; Liu, C.-L.

1994-01-01

229

Update to the Ground-Water Withdrawals Database for the Death Valley REgional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California, 1913-2003  

SciTech Connect

Ground-water withdrawal estimates from 1913 through 2003 for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system are compiled in an electronic database to support a regional, three-dimensional, transient ground-water flow model. This database updates a previously published database that compiled estimates of ground-water withdrawals for 1913–1998. The same methodology is used to construct each database. Primary differences between the 2 databases are an additional 5 years of ground-water withdrawal data, well locations in the updated database are restricted to Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model boundary, and application rates are from 0 to 1.5 feet per year lower than original estimates. The lower application rates result from revised estimates of crop consumptive use, which are based on updated estimates of potential evapotranspiration. In 2003, about 55,700 acre-feet of ground water was pumped in the DVRFS, of which 69 percent was used for irrigation, 13 percent for domestic, and 18 percent for public supply, commercial, and mining activities.

Michael T. Moreo; and Leigh Justet

2008-07-02

230

Facies analysis of Tertiary basin-filling rocks of the Death Valley regional ground-water system and surrounding areas, Nevada and California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Existing hydrologic models of the Death Valley region typically have defined the Cenozoic basins as those areas that are covered by recent surficial deposits, and have treated the basin-fill deposits that are concealed under alluvium as a single unit with uniform hydrologic properties throughout the region, and with depth. Although this latter generalization was known to be flawed, it evidently was made because available geologic syntheses did not provide the basis for a more detailed characterization. As an initial attempt to address this problem, this report presents a compilation and synthesis of existing and new surface and subsurface data on the lithologic variations between and within the Cenozoic basin fills of this region. The most permeable lithologies in the Cenozoic basin fills are freshwater limestones, unaltered densely welded tuffs, and little-consolidated coarse alluvium. The least permeable lithologies are playa claystones, altered nonwelded tuffs, and tuffaceous and clay-matrix sediments of several types. In all but the youngest of the basin fills, permeability probably decreases strongly with depth owing to a typically increasing abundance of volcanic ash or clay in the matrices of the clastic sediments with increasing age (and therefore with increasing depth in general), and to increasing consolidation and alteration (both hydrothermal and diagenetic) with increasing depth and age. This report concludes with a categorization of the Cenozoic basins of the Death Valley region according to the predominant lithologies in the different basin fills and presents qualitative constraints on the hydrologic properties of these major lithologic categories.

Sweetkind, Donald S.; Fridrich, Christopher J.; Taylor, Emily

2001-01-01

231

Significance of orthogonal flow in the Funeral Mountains metamorphic core complex, Death Valley, California: Insights from geochronology and microstructural analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Funeral Mountains metamorphic core complex (FMMCC) in Death Valley, California, exposes middle to lower crustal rocks of the Sevier-Laramide orogen in the footwall of the Boundary Canyon detachment (BCD). Monarch Canyon, located in the northwest section of the Funeral Mountains, exposes the structurally deepest rocks in the FMMCC. These Mesoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic metasedimentary rocks record upper amphibolite facies metamorphism with migmatites developed at the deepest levels. The Monarch Spring fault (MSF) juxtaposes migmatitic paragneisses below against pelitic schists, calcsilicate schists, and marbles above, and represents a deformed anatectic front. In the footwall of the BCD above the MSF, distributed ductile deformation and stratigraphically localized high-strain zones, termed intracore shear zones, are responsible for attenuation and local stratigraphic omission during top-northwest non-coaxial deformation. The relative contributions of Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary and Miocene extensional strains which manifest in the top-northwest fabrics remains unclear, and is being addressed by ongoing and combined thermochronologic, microstructural, and EBSD studies. Our working hypothesis is a polystage extensional history in the FMMCC, with Late Cretaceous extensional intracore shear zones locally reactivated during the Miocene. Below the MSF, migmatitic paragneisses lack similar greenschist to lower amphibolite facies top-northwest fabrics. These rocks instead exhibit heterogeneous strain and a weak to moderately developed northeast-trending mineral lineation, and a local, strong fabric asymmetry indicative of a top-southwest sense of shear. We propose that the anatectic front is an apparent zone of structural decoupling between top-southwest shear below and top-northwest shear above the MSF. Structural and geochronologic studies are currently underway to establish whether the orthogonally directed flow above and below the anatectic front were coeval or developed in sequence with a progressive change in kinematics. Preliminary zircon U-Pb geochronology on leucogranite dikes and sills provide constraints on the timing of top-southwest shearing in paragneisses below the MSF. In lower Monarch Canyon, a strongly deformed pegmatitic muscovite granite sill that is folded with the surrounding rock provides an age of 68.1 × 0.3 Ma. A weakly deformed leucogranite dike in upper Monarch Canyon yields an age of 61.1 × 0.8 Ma, and an undeformed leucogranite dike that cross cuts the top-southwest fabric as well as the folded sills in lower Monarch Canyon yields an age of 57.2 × 0.9 Ma. These ages suggest that this phase of deformation below the MSF began after ~68 Ma, was in its waning stages at ~61 Ma, and had ceased by ~57 Ma. Currently, there are few constraints on the timing of top-northwest shearing above the MSF. If the top-northwest and top-southwest fabrics are determined to be coeval, we will test if the contact represents a distributed zone of decoupling or an attachment zone.

Sauer, K. M.; Wells, M. L.; Hoisch, T. D.

2013-12-01

232

Ecohydrology of Wetlands Occurring on Perched Seasonally Saturated Water Tables in the Central Valley of California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Central Valley, California has extensive areas of shallow perched groundwater systems associated with geomorphic terraces. Early season water supply is derived from precipitation (PPT) that has infiltrated into soils underlain by a near surface aquitard, typically at less than 2 m depth. Early season water input is regulated by the hydraulic conductivity of the (clay-) loamy soils and by surface and aquitard slope of the local catchments associated with these old alluvial landforms. Research on these landforms and shallow aquifers has identified a complex PPT and evapotranspiration (ET) sensitive system that includes shallow depressions that seasonally produce water table derived wetlands (“vernal pools”). These wetlands have been recognized for a very high level of plant and invertebrate species diversity including endangered species. Our work on these seasonal perched systems shows that as much as 80 percent of the soil column above the aquitard is saturated, during average to high rainfall years, for up to 90 to 120 days. Soil surface topographic depressions reduce the soil depth to the aquitard. Where the water table of this perched system intercepts the land surface, vernal pools develop. The perched groundwater drains into seasonal surface drainages that ultimately supply the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. At the end of the rainy season, both the vernal pools and the perched aquifer rapidly and synchronously disappear. Once the soil is unsaturated, water flow is vertically upward due to ET. Aquatic and wetland adapted plant species develop within the basins along a depth gradient. Variably saturated modeling of this system was conducted using HYDRUS 2D/3D. Climate inputs were from local and regional weather stations that measure and calculate daily PPT and ET, respectively. Initial conditions and calibration of the domain were based on field measurements using pressure transducers and soil moisture sensors. Soil pressure flux was measured using a matric potential soil sensor. Field measurements were taken throughout the local catchment and discharge points. The HYDRUS modeling has revealed a high level of sensitivity of the perched system to PPT and ET, with the first major seasonal PPT event generally establishing initial moisture saturation immediately above the aquitard. Plant species adapted to vernal pools were found to occur within narrow (5 to 10 cm) elevation zones in the pool basins and are correlated with specific hydroperiods of surface inundation. Annual variation in the amount and distribution of rainfall can cause a change the plant community composition. Longer term climate changes could result in regional shifts in plant community structure.

McCarten, N. F.; Harter, T.

2010-12-01

233

Groundwater quality in the Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s untreated groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Selected groundwater basins in the Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts constitute one of the study units being evaluated.

Parsons, Mary C.; Belitz, Kenneth

2014-01-01

234

Analysis of the quality of image data acquired by the LANDSAT-4 thematic mapper and multispectral scanners. [Central Valley, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Image products and numeric data were extracted from both TM and MSS data in an effort to evaluate the quality of these data for interpreting major agricultural resources and conditions in California's Central Valley. The utility of TM data appears excellent for meeting most of the inventory objectives of the agricultural resource specialist. These data should be extremely valuable for crop type and area proportion estimation, for updating agricultural land use survey maps at 1:24,000-scale and smaller, for field boundary definition, and for determining the size and location of individual farmsteads.

Colwell, R. N. (principal investigator)

1983-01-01

235

Effectiveness and Tradeoffs between Portfolios of Adaptation Strategies Addressing Future Climate and Socioeconomic Uncertainties in California's Central Valley  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Central Valley of California is one of the major agricultural areas in the United States. The Central Valley Project (CVP) is operated by the Bureau of Reclamation to serve multiple purposes including generating approximately 4.3 million gigawatt hours of hydropower and providing, on average, 5 million acre-feet of water per year to irrigate approximately 3 million acres of land in the Sacramento, San Joaquin, and Tulare Lake basins, 600,000 acre-feet per year of water for urban users, and 800,000 acre-feet of annual supplies for environmental purposes. The development of effective adaptation and mitigation strategies requires assessing multiple risks including potential climate changes as well as uncertainties in future socioeconomic conditions. In this study, a scenario-based analytical approach was employed by combining three potential 21st century socioeconomic futures with six representative climate and sea level change projections developed using a transient hybrid delta ensemble method from an archive of 112 bias corrected spatially downscaled CMIP3 global climate model simulations to form 18 future socioeconomic-climate scenarios. To better simulate the effects of climate changes on agricultural water demands, analyses of historical agricultural meteorological station records were employed to develop estimates of future changes in solar radiation and atmospheric humidity from the GCM simulated temperature and precipitation. Projected changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide were computed directly by weighting SRES emissions scenarios included in each representative climate projection. These results were used as inputs to a calibrated crop water use, growth and yield model to simulate the effects of climate changes on the evapotranspiration and yields of major crops grown in the Central Valley. Existing hydrologic, reservoir operations, water quality, hydropower, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and both urban and agricultural economic models were integrated into a suite of decision support tools to assess the impacts of future socioeconomic-climate uncertainties on key performance metrics for the CVP, State Water Project and other Central Valley water management systems under current regulatory requirements. Four thematic portfolios consisting of regional and local adaptation strategies including changes in reservoir operations, increased water conservation, storage and conveyance were developed and simulated to evaluate their potential effectiveness in meeting delivery reliability, water quality, environmental, hydropower, GHG, urban and agricultural economic performance criteria. The results indicate that the portfolios exhibit a considerable range of effectiveness depending on the socioeconomic-climate scenario. For most criteria, the portfolios were more sensitive to climate projections than socioeconomic assumptions. However, the results demonstrate that important tradeoffs occur between portfolios depending on the performance criteria considered.

Tansey, M. K.; Van Lienden, B.; Das, T.; Munevar, A.; Young, C. A.; Flores-Lopez, F.; Huntington, J. L.

2013-12-01

236

“Galectin-1 Induces Central and Peripheral Cell Death: Implications in T-Cell Physiopathology”  

PubMed Central

The immune system has a remarkable capacity to maintain a state of equilibrium even as it responds to a diverse array of foreign proteins and despite its contact exposure to self-antigens. Apoptosis is one of the mechanisms aimed at preserving the homeostasis after the completion of an immune response, thus returning the immune system to a basal state and warranting the elimination of autoagressive cells in both central and peripheral lymphoid organs. Targeted deletions in critical genes involved in the apoptotic death machinery together with natural spontaneous mutations have clearly shown the importance of apoptosis in the regulation of the immune response. This complex scenario of stimulatory and inhibitory genes has been enriched with the finding that galectin-1, a 14.5 kDa ?-galactoside-binding protein, is able to induce apoptosis of immature cortical thymocytes and mature T cells by cross-linking cell surface glycoconjugates. Galectin-1 is present not only in central and peripheral lymphoid organs, but also at sites of immune privilege. In the present article we will discuss the implications of galectin-1-induced apoptosis in T-cell physiopathology in an attempt to validate its therapeutic potential in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:11097206

Rabinovich, G. A.

2000-01-01

237

Geographical allozymes differentiation in wild Phaseolus lunatus L. of the Central Valley of Costa Rica and its implications for conservation and management of populations  

Microsoft Academic Search

To suggest a conservation and management strategy for wild Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.) in the Central Valley of Costa Rica, we examined the spatial distribution of genetic variation in 96 populations, using ten enzyme loci to analyse F-statistics and Moran?s I. These loci displayed 20 alleles, of which 5 with relatively high frequencies were exclusively localised in the central

Arsène Irié Zoro Bi; Jean-Pierre Baudoin

238

Lava flows vs. surface water: the geologic battle for the upper McKenzie valley, central Oregon Cascades  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past several thousand years, a battle for the upper McKenzie valley in the central Oregon Cascades has raged between, on one side, lava flows from the Sand Mountain volcanic chain and Belknap volcano, and on the other side, surface water fed by prolific springs. The north-south oriented upper McKenzie valley marks the boundary between the (old) western Cascades and the (active) high Cascades. The McKenzie valley hosted a glacier in the Pleistocene. In the Holocene, the valley has become a natural destination and conduit for both lava flows and surface water: it is downhill from volcanic vents, and as it follows the boundary between low (west) and high (east) porosity terrains, groundwater sourced from the high Cascades is forced to emerge in the valley. New surface age exposure dates, in conjunction with 14C dating, indicate that about 3000 years ago multiple lava flows from the Sand Mountain volcanic chain entered the valley from the east. The entire eruptive episode lasted several hundred years and caused massive disturbances to the ancestral McKenzie river. In the early stages of the eruptive episode, a lava flow dammed the McKenzie river, forming Clear Lake (modern source of the McKenzie river) and drowning a Douglas Fir forest. Relic drowned trees suggest that Clear Lake formed in two stages, as trees tops in the deepest part of the lake are consistently rotted off at a depth of 20 meters below water level, while trees in the shallower parts of the lake are rotted off at the surface. This suggests a paleo-lake level 20 meters below modern levels; lake levels are suspected to have reached modern levels later in the course of the eruptive episode when subsequent Sand Mountain lava flows entered the lake. In the years since the Sand Mountain eruptive episode, the McKenzie river re-established itself by adopting a lava channel. Considerable water also flows through the lava flows, emerging as springs along the river channel. The river also hosts two spectacular waterfalls at two lava flow fronts; these waterfalls appear to have retreated at least 50 meters since the lava flows were emplaced. In two unrelated volcanic episodes, lava flows from Belknap volcano entered the valley south of the Sand Mountain flows. A Belknap lava flow which predates the Sand Mountain lavas buried the river; today, the McKenzie river still disappears into the lava and reemerges at a spring several kilometers south. Younger Belknap lava flows did not reach the valley floor but resurface a considerable portion of the watershed. Thus, the upper McKenzie valley showcases strategic maneuvers by two great geologic fluids in the battle for domination: lava flows conquer by overwhelming the system, and water reaches a truce by adopting the enemy’s turf and flowing over and through it.

Deligne, N. I.; Conrey, R. M.; Cashman, K. V.; Grant, G. E.; Amidon, W. H.

2010-12-01

239

Gravity Data from Dry Lake and Delamar Valleys, east-central Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Cenozoic basins in eastern Nevada and western Utah constitute major ground-water recharge areas in the eastern part of the Great Basin, and our continuing studies are intended to characterize the geologic framework of the region. Prior to these investigations, regional gravity coverage was variable over the region, adequate in some areas and very sparse in others. The current study in Nevada provides additional high-resolution gravity along transects in Dry Lake and Delamar Valleys to supplement data we established previously in Cave and Muleshoe Valleys. We combine all previously available gravity data and calculate an up-to-date isostatic residual gravity map of the study area. Major density contrasts are identified, indicating zones where Cenozoic tectonic activity could have been accommodated. A gravity inversion method is used to calculate depths to pre-Cenozoic basement rock and to estimate maximum alluvial/volcanic fill in the valleys. Average depths of basin fill in the deeper parts of Cave, Muleshoe, Dry Lake, and Delamar Valleys are approximately 4 km, 2 km, 5 km, and 3 km, respectively.

Mankinen, Edward A.; Chuchel, Bruce A.; Moring, Barry C.

2008-01-01

240

HISTORY, PRESENT INCIDENCE, AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF CITRUS TRISTEZA VIRUS IN THE CALIFORNIA CENTRAL VALLEY  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) has been a primary concern in the San Joaquin Valley of California since its detection in 1956. Virus eradication was deemed necessary and was undertaken by the California Department of Food and Agriculture. Since 1963 the eradication program has been managed by the Cent...

241

Runoff simulation in the Ferghana Valley (Central Asia) using conceptual hydrological HBV-light model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glaciers and permafrost on the ranges of the Tien Shan mountain system are primary sources of water in the Ferghana Valley. The water artery of the valley is the Syr Darya River that is formed by confluence of the Naryn and Kara Darya rivers, which originate from the mountain glaciers of the Ak-Shyrak and the Ferghana ranges accordingly. The Ferghana Valley is densely populated and main activity of population is agriculture that heavily depends on irrigation especially in such arid region. The runoff reduction is projected in future due to global temperature rise and glacier shrinkage as a consequence. Therefore, it is essential to study climate change impact on water resources in the area both for ecological and economic aspects. The evaluation of comparative contribution of small upper catchments (n=24) with precipitation predominance in discharge and the large Naryn and Karadarya River basins, which are fed by glacial melt water, to the Fergana Valley water balance under current and future climatic conditions is general aim of the study. Appropriate understanding of the hydrological cycle under current climatic conditions is significant for prognosis of water resource availability in the future. Thus, conceptual hydrological HBV-light model was used for analysing of the water balance of the small upper catchments that surround the Ferghana Valley. Three trial catchments (the Kugart River basin, 1010 km²; the Kurshab River basin, 2010 km2; the Akbura River basin, 2260 km²) with relatively good temporal quality data were chosen to setup the model. Due to limitation of daily temperature data the MODAWEC weather generator, which converts monthly temperature data into daily based on correlation with rainfall, was tested and applied for the HBV-light model.

Radchenko, Iuliia; Breuer, Lutz; Forkutsa, Irina; Frede, Hans-Georg

2013-04-01

242

Assessment of regional change in nitrate concentrations in groundwater in the Central Valley, California, USA, 1950s-2000s  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A regional assessment of multi-decadal changes in nitrate concentrations was done using historical data and a spatially stratified non-biased approach. Data were stratified into physiographic subregions on the basis of geomorphology and soils data to represent zones of historical recharge and discharge patterns in the basin. Data were also stratified by depth to represent a shallow zone generally representing domestic drinking-water supplies and a deep zone generally representing public drinking-water supplies. These stratifications were designed to characterize the regional extent of groundwater with common redox and age characteristics, two factors expected to influence changes in nitrate concentrations over time. Overall, increasing trends in nitrate concentrations and the proportion of nitrate concentrations above 5 mg/L were observed in the east fans subregion of the Central Valley. Whereas the west fans subregion has elevated nitrate concentrations, temporal trends were not detected, likely due to the heterogeneous nature of the water quality in this area and geologic sources of nitrate, combined with sparse and uneven data coverage. Generally low nitrate concentrations in the basin subregion are consistent with reduced geochemical conditions resulting from low permeability soils and higher organic content, reflecting the distal portions of alluvial fans and historical groundwater discharge areas. Very small increases in the shallow aquifer in the basin subregion may reflect downgradient movement of high nitrate groundwater from adjacent areas or overlying intensive agricultural inputs. Because of the general lack of regionally extensive long-term monitoring networks, the results from this study highlight the importance of placing studies of trends in water quality into regional context. Earlier work concluded that nitrate concentrations were steadily increasing over time in the eastern San Joaquin Valley, but clearly those trends do not apply to other physiographic subregions within the Central Valley, even where land use and climate are similar.

Burow, Karen R.; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Belitz, Kenneth; Dubrovsky, Neil M.

2013-01-01

243

Single-Station Passive Seismic Stratigraphy for the characterization of subsurface structure of the Valtellina valley (central Alps, northern Italy)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The reconstruction of the subsurface structure of alpine valleys plays a key-role in the evaluation of their genesis, entrenchment and tectonic evolution. As a matter of fact, their characterization is strictly dependent on borehole data (water wells, shallow geognostic logs) and land based, deep seismic reflection/refraction lines; unfortunately, the availability of these datasets is often limited by economic and logistical limitations. In this work the subsurface structure of the Valtellina buried valley (central Alps, northern Italy) was investigated by the means of Single-Station Passive Seismic Stratigraphy (S-SPSS), which yields the 1D shear velocity (Vs) profiles, based on the Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratios (HVSR) of microtremors produced by Raleigh waves trapped in the ground and provided by measurements of the resonance frequencies produced by a layered seismic stratigraphy. The study area is the central part of Valtellina, W-E oriented along the Insubric line and drained by the Adda river. The sedimentary succession is known by shallow (

Mele, M.; Bini, A.; Bassi, S.; Giudici, M.; Monti, M.; Azzola, M.

2012-04-01

244

The Slow Death (Or Rebirth?) of Extended Star Formation in z ~ 0.1 Green Valley Early-type Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

UV observations in the local universe have uncovered a population of early-type galaxies with UV flux consistent with low-level recent or ongoing star formation. Understanding the origin of such star formation remains an open issue. We present resolved UV-optical photometry of a sample of 19 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) early-type galaxies at z ~ 0.1 drawn from the sample originally selected by Salim & Rich to lie in the bluer part of the green valley in the UV-optical color-magnitude diagram as measured by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). Utilizing high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) far-UV imaging provides unique insight into the distribution of UV light in these galaxies, which we call "extended star-forming early-type galaxies" (ESF-ETGs) because of extended UV emission that is indicative of recent star formation. The UV-optical color profiles of all ESF-ETGs show red centers and blue outer parts. Their outer colors require the existence of a significant underlying population of older stars in the UV-bright regions. An analysis of stacked SDSS spectra reveals weak LINER-like emission in their centers. Using a cross-matched SDSS DR7/GALEX GR6 catalog, we search for other green valley galaxies with similar properties to these ESF-ETGs and estimate that ?13% of dust-corrected green valley galaxies of similar stellar mass and UV-optical color are likely ESF-candidates, i.e., ESF-ETGs are not rare. Our results are consistent with star formation that is gradually declining in existing disks, i.e., the ESF-ETGs are evolving onto the red sequence for the first time, or with rejuvenated star formation due to accreted gas in older disks provided that the gas does not disrupt the structure of the galaxy and the resulting star formation is not too recent and bursty. ESF-ETGs may typify an important subpopulation of galaxies that can linger in the green valley for up to several Gyrs, based on their resemblance to nearby gas-rich green valley galaxies with low-level ongoing star formation.

Fang, Jerome J.; Faber, S. M.; Salim, Samir; Graves, Genevieve J.; Rich, R. Michael

2012-12-01

245

Wild food plants and wild edible fungi in two valleys of the Qinling Mountains (Shaanxi, central China)  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of the study was to investigate knowledge and use of wild food plants in two mountain valleys separated by Mount Taibai – the highest peak of northern China and one of its biodiversity hotspots, each adjacent to species-rich temperate forest vegetation. Methods Seventy two free lists were collected among the inhabitants of two mountain valleys (36 in each). All the studied households are within walking distance of primary forest vegetation, however the valleys differed in access to urban centers: Houzhenzi is very isolated, and the Dali valley has easier access to the cities of central Shaanxi. Results Altogether, 185 wild food plant species and 17 fungi folk taxa were mentioned. The mean number of freelisted wild foods was very high in Houzhenzi (mean 25) and slightly lower in Dali (mean 18). An average respondent listed many species of wild vegetables, a few wild fruits and very few fungi. Age and male gender had a positive but very low effect on the number of taxa listed. Twelve taxa of wild vegetables (Allium spp., Amaranthus spp., Caryopteris divaricata, Helwingia japonica, Matteucia struthiopteris, Pteridium aquilinum, Toona sinensis, Cardamine macrophylla, Celastrus orbiculatus, Chenopodium album, Pimpinella sp., Staphylea bumalda &S. holocarpa), two species of edible fruits (Akebia trifoliata, Schisandra sphenanthera) and none of the mushrooms were freelisted by at least half of the respondents in one or two of the valleys. Conclusion The high number of wild vegetables listed is due to the high cultural position of this type of food in China compared to other parts of the world, as well as the high biodiversity of the village surroundings. A very high proportion of woodland species (42%, double the number of the ruderal species used) among the listed taxa is contrary to the general stereotype that wild vegetables in Asia are mainly ruderal species. The very low interest in wild mushroom collecting is noteworthy and is difficult to explain. It may arise from the easy access to the cultivated Auricularia and Lentinula mushrooms and very steep terrain, making foraging for fungi difficult. PMID:23587149

2013-01-01

246

Surface atmospheric circulation patterns and associated minimum temperatures in the Maipo and Casablanca valleys, central Chile  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper analyzes the influence of circulation anomalies on the magnitude of minimum air temperature ( T min) at a daily scale in two important agricultural valleys of Chile (Maipo and Casablanca) during the period 2001-2007. A statistical classification of synoptic fields was performed, resulting in eight circulation patterns (CPs, 84 % of explained variance). The corresponding anomalies of T min (ATmin) of each CP were analyzed in order to understand their synoptic-scale forcing mechanisms. Results showed a direct association between ATmin and the synoptic structure. The average weakening in sea level pressure (SLP) yields positive ATmin, while negative ATmin is associated with a strengthening in SLP. In the latter case, it was also found that a synoptic structure (10.2 % of frequency) corresponding to a migratory high-pressure system passing eastward across the Andes led to the lowest ATmin and a higher probability of frost in both valleys (22 % on average) in winter and springtime.

Montes, Carlo; Muñoz, Ricardo C.; Perez-Quezada, Jorge F.

2013-01-01

247

Linear-Patterned Slopes in the Discontinuous Permafrost Zone of the Central Mackenzie River Valley  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Mackenzie River Valley between Norman Wells and Fort Simpson a study of the character, dlstribution and orientation of gently-inclined, linear-patterned slopes revealed that most northeast-facing, lichen-covered slopes have permafrost within about 10-25 inches of the surface, and display evidence that cryoturbation was once operative in the active layer. Most lineated slopes without near-surface permafrost face southwest, are surficially

C. B. CRAMPTON

248

Study of LANDSAT-D thematic mapper performance as applied to hydrocarbon exploration. [Southern Ontario, Lawton, Oklahoma; Owl Creek, Wyoming; Washington, D.C.; and Death Valley California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Improved delineation of known oil and gas fields in southern Ontario and a spectacularly high amount of structural information on the Owl Creek, Wyoming scene were obtained from analysis of TM data. The use of hue, saturation, and value image processing techniques on a Death Valley, California scene permitted direct comparison of TM processed imagery with existing 1:250,000 scale geological maps of the area and revealed small outcrops of Tertiary volcanic material overlying Paleozoic sections. Analysis of TM data over Lawton, Oklahoma suggests that the reducing chemical environment associated with hydrocarbon seepage change ferric iron to soluble ferrous iron, allowing it to be leached. Results of the band selection algorithm show a suprising consistency, with the 1,4,5 combination selected as optimal in most cases.

Everett, J. R. (principal investigator)

1983-01-01

249

Nd isotopic composition of cratonic rocks in the southern Death Valley region: Evidence for a substantial Archean source component in Mojavia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Thirty Early Proterozoic intermediate to silicic metasedimentary and metaigneous rocks in the southern Death Valley region and vicinity show ??(Nd) values of -1.6 to -6.3 at 1.7 Ga and Nd model ages of 2.1 to 2.6 Ga. These cratonic rocks thus reveal an older signature than so far reported for Nd province 1 of the western United States; as much as 30%-40% of their mass may be Archean crustal material. The Archean component was introduced in the form of sedimentary detritus that was probably subducted and mixed with juvenile material at a convergent margin. Three younger Precambrian rocks associated with the cratonic rocks also have a Nd isotopic composition of province 1 type.

Calzia, J.P.

1998-01-01

250

Rise and tilt of metamorphic rocks in the lower plate of a detachment fault in the Funeral Mountains, Death Valley, California  

SciTech Connect

The authors attempt to integrate new and old observations on the Funeral Mountains, in Death Valley, California, into an integrated model of the evolution of the lower plate in this region. This area consists of a detachment fault. Much effort has been directed toward explaining the development of detachment faults. Extensive petrologic, geochronologic and mapping evidence had been developed. The authors combine thermobarometric data on unsheared metamorphic rock in this region, kinematic analysis of folding in the area, and new geochronologic data from fission track measurements, K-Ar and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating measurements. Their conclusion is that the data supports the feature of models for detachment faulting which claim that a fault surface dips and undergoes a rotation to a horizontal orientation, accompanied by a comparable tilt of the lower plate. 64 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

Hoisch, T.D. (Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff (United States)); Simpson, C. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States))

1993-04-10

251

Expert system-based mineral mapping in northern Death Valley, California/Nevada, using the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Integrated analysis of imaging spectrometer data and field spectral measurements were used in conjunction with conventional geologic field mapping to characterize bedrock and surficial geology at the northern end of Death Valley, California and Nevada. A knowledge-based expert system was used to automatically produce image maps showing the principal surface mineralogy from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data. Linear spectral unmixing of the AVIRIS data allowed further determination of relative mineral, abundances and identification of mineral assemblages and mixtures. The imaging spectrometer data show the spatial distribution of spectrally distinct minerals occurring both as primary rockforming minerals and as alteration and weathering products. Field spectral measurements were used to verify the mineral maps and field mapping was used to extend the remote sensing results. Geographically referenced image maps produced from these data form new base maps from which to develop improved understanding of the processes of deposition and erosion affecting the present land surface.

Kruse, F. A.; Lefkoff, A. B.; Dietz, J. B.

1993-01-01

252

Kinematics at the intersection of the Garlock and Death Valley fault zones, California: Integration of TM data and field studies. LANDSAT TM investigation proposal TM-019  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Processing and interpretation of Thematic Mapper (TM) data, extensive field work, and processing of SPOT data were continued. Results of these analyses led to the testing and rejecting of several of the geologic/tectonic hypotheses concerning the continuation of the Garlock Fault Zone (GFZ). It was determined that the Death Valley Fault Zone (DVFZ) is the major through-going feature, extending at least 60 km SW of the Avawatz Mountains. Two 5 km wide fault zones were identified and characterized in the Soda and Bristol Mountains, forming a continuous zone of NW trending faulting. Geophysical measurements indicate a buried connection between the Avawatz and the Soda Mountains Fault Zone. Future work will involve continued field work and mapping at key locations, further analyses of TM data, and conclusion of the project.

Abrams, Michael; Verosub, Ken

1987-01-01

253

Heat flow in Railroad Valley, Nevada and implications for geothermal resources in the south-central Great Basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Great Basin is a province of high average heat flow (approximately 90 mW m-2), with higher values characteristic of some areas and relatively low heat flow (<60 mW m-2) characteristic of an area in south-central Nevada known as the Eureka Low. There is hydrologie and thermal evidence that the Eureka Low results from a relatively shallow, hydrologically controlled heat sink associated with interbasin water flow in the Paleozoic carbonate aquifers. Evaluating this hypothesis and investigating the thermal state of the Eureka Low at depth is a high priority for the US Geological Survey as it prepares a new national geothermal resource assessment. Part of this investigation is focused on Railroad Valley, the site of the largest petroleum reservoirs in Nevada and one of the few locations within the Eureka Low with a known geothermal system. Temperature and thermal conductivity data have been acquired from wells in Railroad Valley in order to determine heat flow in the basin. The results reveal a complex interaction of cooling due to shallow ground-water flow, relatively low (49 to 76 mW m-2) conductive heat flow at depth in most of the basin, and high (up to 234 mW m-2) heat flow associated with the 125??C geothermal system that encompasses the Bacon Flat and Grant Canyon oil fields. The presence of the Railroad Valley geothermal resource within the Eureka Low may be reflect the absence of deep ground-water flow sweeping heat out of the basin. If true, this suggests that other areas in the carbonate aquifer province may contain deep geothermal resources that are masked by ground-water flow.

Williams, C.F.; Sass, J.H.

2006-01-01

254

Climate change impact on future water resources availability for a semi-arid area (Ferghana Valley, Central Asia)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Considering increasing temperatures and glacier recession during the last decades, it is of high interest to study the climate change impact on water resources availability in semi-arid regions of Central Asia. The Ferghana Valley is surrounded by the Tien-Shan and Pamiro-Alay mountain systems that store big amounts of water in snowpacks and glaciers. In the valley the agricultural activity of local people strongly depends on available water from the Syrdarya River. The river is formed by the confluence of the Naryn and Karadarya Rivers, which are mainly fed by the glacier and snow melt from the Akshiirak and Ferghana ridges of the aforementioned mountain systems. The small upper river basins of the valley also contribute with runoff (~34 %) to the Syrdarya River. These small rivers are mainly fed by precipitation and seasonal snow melt. Thus, because of climate change and glacier decline, it is necessary to investigate the comparative contribution of the small catchments versus two big river basins to the Syrdarya River system, as these small upper catchments could become more important for future water consumption. In this study the conceptual hydrological HBV-light model has been calibrated and validated for the period 1980-1985 over 18 upper catchments that feed the Syrdarya River from the surrounding mountain ridges. Dynamically downscaled climate change scenarios were then applied up to the year 2100 for these basins. The scenarios were generated by means of Global Circulation Model (ECHAM5) and Regional Climate Model (REMO) with a baseline period from 1971 till 2000. We will present modelling results of water resources, the contribution of small rivers to the Syrdarya River and to what extent this contribution is likely to change in the future. Moreover, the results of simulated potential runoff will be used to develop future climate change adaptation strategies regarding socio-economic and environmental sustainable water use.

Radchenko, Iuliia; Breuer, Lutz; Mannig, Birgit; Frede, Hans-Georg

2014-05-01

255

Stable isotope and groundwater flow dynamics of agricultural irrigation recharge into groundwater resources of the Central Valley, California  

SciTech Connect

Intensive agricultural irrigation and overdraft of groundwater in the Central Valley of California profoundly affect the regional quality and availability of shallow groundwater resources. In the natural state, the {delta}{sup 18}O values of groundwater were relatively homogeneous (mostly -7.0 {+-} 0.5{per_thousand}), reflecting local meteoric recharge that slowly (1-3m/yr) flowed toward the valley axis. Today, on the west side of the valley, the isotope distribution is dominated by high {sup 18}O enclosures formed by recharge of evaporated irrigation waters, while the east side has bands of low {sup 18}O groundwater indicating induced recharge from rivers draining the Sierra Nevada mountains. Changes in {delta}{sup 18}O values caused by the agricultural recharge strongly correlate with elevated nitrate concentrations (5 to >100 mg/L) that form pervasive, non-point source pollutants. Small, west-side cities dependent solely on groundwater resources have experienced increases of >1.0 mg/L per year of nitrate for 10-30 years. The resultant high nitrates threaten the economical use of the groundwater for domestic purposes, and have forced some well shut-downs. Furthermore, since >80% of modern recharge is now derived from agricultural irrigation, and because modern recharge rates are {approximately}10 times those of the natural state, agricultural land retirement by urbanization will severely curtail the current safe-yields and promote overdraft pumping. Such overdrafting has occurred in the Sacramento metropolitan area for {approximately}40 years, creating cones of depression {approximately}25m deep. Today, groundwater withdrawal in Sacramento is approximately matched by infiltration of low {sup 18}O water (-11.0{per_thousand}) away from the Sacramento and American Rivers, which is estimated to occur at 100-300m/year from the sharp {sup 18}O gradients in our groundwater isotope map.

Davisson, M.L.; Criss, R.E.

1995-01-01

256

Comparison of sediment supply to San Francisco Bay from watersheds draining the Bay Area and the Central Valley of California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Quantifying suspended sediment loads is important for managing the world's estuaries in the context of navigation, pollutant transport, wetland restoration, and coastal erosion. To address these needs, a comprehensive analysis was completed on sediment supply to San Francisco Bay from fluvial sources. Suspended sediment, optical backscatter, velocity data near the head of the estuary, and discharge data obtained from the output of a water balance model were used to generate continuous suspended sediment concentration records and compute loads to the Bay from the large Central Valley watershed. Sediment loads from small tributary watersheds around the Bay were determined using 235 station-years of suspended sediment data from 38 watershed locations, regression analysis, and simple modeling. Over 16 years, net annual suspended sediment load to the head of the estuary from its 154,000 km2 Central Valley watershed varied from 0.13 to 2.58 (mean = 0.89) million metric t of suspended sediment, or an average yield of 11 metric t/km2/yr. Small tributaries, totaling 8145 km2, in the nine-county Bay Area discharged between 0.081 and 4.27 (mean = 1.39) million metric t with a mean yield of 212 metric t/km2/yr. The results indicate that the hundreds of urbanized and tectonically active tributaries adjacent to the Bay, which together account for just 5% of the total watershed area draining to the Bay and provide just 7% of the annual average fluvial flow, supply 61% of the suspended sediment. The small tributary loads are more variable (53-fold between years compared to 21-fold for the inland Central Valley rivers) and dominated fluvial sediment supply to the Bay during 10 out of 16 yr. If San Francisco Bay is typical of other estuaries in active tectonic or climatically variable coastal regimes, managers responsible for water quality, dredging and reusing sediment accumulating in shipping channels, or restoring wetlands in the world's estuaries may need to more carefully account for proximal small urbanized watersheds that may dominate sediment supply.

McKee, L.J.; Lewicki, M.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Ganju, N.K.

2013-01-01

257

Vivid valleys, pallid peaks? Hypsometric variations and rural–urban land change in the Central Peruvian Andes  

PubMed Central

What happens to the land cover within the hinterland's altitudinal belts while Central Andean cities are undergoing globalization and urban restructuring? What conclusions can be drawn about changes in human land use? By incorporating a regional altitudinal zonation model, direct field observations and GIS analyses of remotely sensed long term data, the present study examines these questions using the example of Huancayo Metropolitano – an emerging Peruvian mountain city of 420,000 inhabitants, situated at 3260 m asl in the Mantaro Valley. The study's results indicate that rapid urban growth during the late 1980s and early 1990s was followed by the agricultural intensification and peri-urban condominization at the valley floor (quechua) – since the beginning of Peru's neoliberal era. Moreover, regarding the adjoining steep slopes (suni) and subsequent grassland ecosystems (puna), the research output presents land cover change trajectories that clearly show an expansion of human land use, such as reforestation for wood production and range burning for livestock grazing, even at high altitudes – despite rural–urban migration trends and contrary to several results of extra-Andean studies. Consequently, rural–urban planners and policy makers are challenged to focus on the manifold impacts of globalization on human land use – at all altitudinal belts of the Andean city's hinterland: toward sustainable mountain development that bridges the social and physical gaps – from the bottom up. PMID:23564987

Haller, Andreas

2012-01-01

258

Vivid valleys, pallid peaks? Hypsometric variations and rural-urban land change in the Central Peruvian Andes.  

PubMed

What happens to the land cover within the hinterland's altitudinal belts while Central Andean cities are undergoing globalization and urban restructuring? What conclusions can be drawn about changes in human land use? By incorporating a regional altitudinal zonation model, direct field observations and GIS analyses of remotely sensed long term data, the present study examines these questions using the example of Huancayo Metropolitano - an emerging Peruvian mountain city of 420,000 inhabitants, situated at 3260 m asl in the Mantaro Valley. The study's results indicate that rapid urban growth during the late 1980s and early 1990s was followed by the agricultural intensification and peri-urban condominization at the valley floor (quechua) - since the beginning of Peru's neoliberal era. Moreover, regarding the adjoining steep slopes (suni) and subsequent grassland ecosystems (puna), the research output presents land cover change trajectories that clearly show an expansion of human land use, such as reforestation for wood production and range burning for livestock grazing, even at high altitudes - despite rural-urban migration trends and contrary to several results of extra-Andean studies. Consequently, rural-urban planners and policy makers are challenged to focus on the manifold impacts of globalization on human land use - at all altitudinal belts of the Andean city's hinterland: toward sustainable mountain development that bridges the social and physical gaps - from the bottom up. PMID:23564987

Haller, Andreas

2012-11-01

259

Adapting to climate variability and change: experiences from cereal-based farming in the central rift and Kobo Valleys, Ethiopia.  

PubMed

Small-holder farmers in Ethiopia are facing several climate related hazards, in particular highly variable rainfall with severe droughts which can have devastating effects on their livelihoods. Projected changes in climate are expected to aggravate the existing challenges. This study examines farmer perceptions on current climate variability and long-term changes, current adaptive strategies, and potential barriers for successful further adaptation in two case study regions-the Central Rift Valley (CRV) and Kobo Valley. The study was based on a household questionnaire, interviews with key stakeholders, and focus group discussions. The result revealed that about 99 % of the respondents at the CRV and 96 % at the Kobo Valley perceived an increase in temperature and 94 % at CRV and 91 % at the Kobo Valley perceived a decrease in rainfall over the last 20-30 years. Inter-annual and intraseasonal rainfall variability also has increased according to the farmers. The observed climate data (1977-2009) also showed an increasing trend in temperature and high inter-annual and intra-seasonal rainfall variability. In contrast to farmers' perceptions of a decrease in rainfall totals, observed rainfall data showed no statistically significant decline. The interaction among various bio-physical and socio-economic factors, changes in rainfall intensity and reduced water available to crops due to increased hot spells, may have influenced the perception of farmers with respect to rainfall trends. In recent decades, farmers in both the CRV and Kobo have changed farming practices to adapt to perceived climate change and variability, for example, through crop and variety choice, adjustment of cropping calendar, and in situ moisture conservation. These relatively low-cost changes in farm practices were within the limited adaptation capacity of farmers, which may be insufficient to deal with the impacts of future climate change. Anticipated climate change is expected to impose new risks outside the range of current experiences. To enable farmers to adapt to these impacts critical technological, institutional, and market-access constraints need to be removed. Inconsistencies between farmers' perceptions and observed climate trends (e.g., decrease in annual rainfall) could lead to sub-optimal or counterproductive adaptations, and therefore must be removed by better communication and capacity building, for example through Climate Field Schools. Enabling strategies, which are among others targeted at agricultural inputs, credit supply, market access, and strengthening of local knowledge and information services need to become integral part of government policies to assist farmers to adapt to the impacts of current and future climate change. PMID:23943096

Kassie, Belay Tseganeh; Hengsdijk, Huib; Rötter, Reimund; Kahiluoto, Helena; Asseng, Senthold; Van Ittersum, Martin

2013-11-01

260

Adapting to Climate Variability and Change: Experiences from Cereal-Based Farming in the Central Rift and Kobo Valleys, Ethiopia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Small-holder farmers in Ethiopia are facing several climate related hazards, in particular highly variable rainfall with severe droughts which can have devastating effects on their livelihoods. Projected changes in climate are expected to aggravate the existing challenges. This study examines farmer perceptions on current climate variability and long-term changes, current adaptive strategies, and potential barriers for successful further adaptation in two case study regions—the Central Rift Valley (CRV) and Kobo Valley. The study was based on a household questionnaire, interviews with key stakeholders, and focus group discussions. The result revealed that about 99 % of the respondents at the CRV and 96 % at the Kobo Valley perceived an increase in temperature and 94 % at CRV and 91 % at the Kobo Valley perceived a decrease in rainfall over the last 20-30 years. Inter-annual and intraseasonal rainfall variability also has increased according to the farmers. The observed climate data (1977-2009) also showed an increasing trend in temperature and high inter-annual and intra-seasonal rainfall variability. In contrast to farmers’ perceptions of a decrease in rainfall totals, observed rainfall data showed no statistically significant decline. The interaction among various bio-physical and socio-economic factors, changes in rainfall intensity and reduced water available to crops due to increased hot spells, may have influenced the perception of farmers with respect to rainfall trends. In recent decades, farmers in both the CRV and Kobo have changed farming practices to adapt to perceived climate change and variability, for example, through crop and variety choice, adjustment of cropping calendar, and in situ moisture conservation. These relatively low-cost changes in farm practices were within the limited adaptation capacity of farmers, which may be insufficient to deal with the impacts of future climate change. Anticipated climate change is expected to impose new risks outside the range of current experiences. To enable farmers to adapt to these impacts critical technological, institutional, and market-access constraints need to be removed. Inconsistencies between farmers’ perceptions and observed climate trends (e.g., decrease in annual rainfall) could lead to sub-optimal or counterproductive adaptations, and therefore must be removed by better communication and capacity building, for example through Climate Field Schools. Enabling strategies, which are among others targeted at agricultural inputs, credit supply, market access, and strengthening of local knowledge and information services need to become integral part of government policies to assist farmers to adapt to the impacts of current and future climate change.

Kassie, Belay Tseganeh; Hengsdijk, Huib; Rötter, Reimund; Kahiluoto, Helena; Asseng, Senthold; Van Ittersum, Martin

2013-11-01

261

Central Avra Valley Storage and Recovery Project (CAVSARP) Site, Tucson, Arizona: Floodwater and Soil Moisture Investigations with Extraterrestrial Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Planetary geologists, geomorphologists, and hydrologists have hypothesized that Mars is a dynamic, water-enriched planet since the Mariner and Viking missions based on geologic, geomorphic, and topographic information. Recent acquisition of Gamma Ray and Neutron Spectrometer information has added further credence to this hypothesis. A unique investigation is underway to work towards being able to successfully map the extent and depth of water on Mars. Researchers from the University of Arizona and members of the Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) have been compiling multiple layers of information in time and space at the Central Avra Valley Storage and Recovery Project (CAVSARP) site, Tucson, Arizona, for eventual comparative analysis. This information has been acquired from a variety of observational/scientific platforms in controlled conditions. CAVSARP facility:

Rucker, D. F.; Dohm, J. M.; Ferre, T. P. A.; Ip, Felipe; Baker, V. R.; Davies, A. G.; Castano, R.; Chien, S.; Doggett, T. C.

2004-01-01

262

Soilscape analysis at different scales using pattern indices in the Jarama-Henares interfluve and Henares River valley, Central Spain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Jarama-Henares interfluve is located south of the Ayllon range, one of the easternmost ranges of the "Sistema Central" mountains in central Spain. The Henares river valley is asymmetric, with 20 topographic benches along its right bank and a series of glacis-terraces on its left bank. We investigated the soil-geoform units in the Jarama-Henares interfluve and the Henares river valley using several indices to quantify and understand the evolution of soil and landscape patterns of the area during the Plio-Quaternary. Features such fragmentation, dominance, geopedologic unit diversity, relative spatial diversity, size and shape, neighbourhood and interaction were analysed in geopedologic maps prepared at two scales (1:18,000 and 1:50,000) using ancillary data, aerial photographs and field observations. Likewise, the taxonomic pedorichness and pedodiversity were assessed on plot maps at 1:100 scale representing three fluvial terrace areas of different age. Soil diversity analysis was carried out at the subgroup level of the USDA Soil Taxonomy using (1) the number of individuals included in a given pedotaxum, and (2) the areal proportion occupied by each soil taxum in a given map unit. One of the main findings was that the values of the indices were higher and the number of indices required to describe appropriately the soilscape patterns was smaller at the local than at the regional scale, the relative spatial diversity being one of the most useful indices. At the plot scale, taxonomic pedorichness and pedodiversity of soil subgroups increased from low/young to high/old terraces. Thus, pattern indices can be used to characterise soilscape evolution aspects such as diversification due to the behaviour of the depositional system or to relief dissection.

Saldaña, A.; Ibáñez, J. J.; Zinck, J. A.

2011-12-01

263

A Central Role for Carbon-Overflow Pathways in the Modulation of Bacterial Cell Death  

PubMed Central

Similar to developmental programs in eukaryotes, the death of a subpopulation of cells is thought to benefit bacterial biofilm development. However mechanisms that mediate a tight control over cell death are not clearly understood at the population level. Here we reveal that CidR dependent pyruvate oxidase (CidC) and ?-acetolactate synthase/decarboxylase (AlsSD) overflow metabolic pathways, which are active during staphylococcal biofilm development, modulate cell death to achieve optimal biofilm biomass. Whereas acetate derived from CidC activity potentiates cell death in cells by a mechanism dependent on intracellular acidification and respiratory inhibition, AlsSD activity effectively counters CidC action by diverting carbon flux towards neutral rather than acidic byproducts and consuming intracellular protons in the process. Furthermore, the physiological features that accompany metabolic activation of cell death bears remarkable similarities to hallmarks of eukaryotic programmed cell death, including the generation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage. Finally, we demonstrate that the metabolic modulation of cell death not only affects biofilm development but also biofilm-dependent disease outcomes. Given the ubiquity of such carbon overflow pathways in diverse bacterial species, we propose that the metabolic control of cell death may be a fundamental feature of prokaryotic development. PMID:24945831

Thomas, Vinai Chittezham; Sadykov, Marat R.; Chaudhari, Sujata S.; Jones, Joselyn; Endres, Jennifer L.; Widhelm, Todd J.; Ahn, Jong-Sam; Jawa, Randeep S.; Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Bayles, Kenneth W.

2014-01-01

264

A comparative study of scattering, intrinsic, and coda Q exp -1 for Hawaii, Long Valley, and central California between 1.5 and 15.0 Hz  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of scattering Q exp -1 and intrinsic Q exp -1 were separated from an analysis of the S wave and its coda in Hawaii, Long Valley, and central California by means of a novel method developed by Hoshiba et al. (1991). This method is based on the integration of the S-wave energy for three successive time windows as

Kevin Mayeda; Stuart Koyanagi; Mitsuyuki Hoshiba; Keiiti Aki; Yuehua Zeng

1992-01-01

265

SESSION B: CENTRAL VALLEY RIPARIAN HABITATS To the majority of people who responded to the first expressions of concern over the  

E-print Network

SESSION B: CENTRAL VALLEY RIPARIAN HABITATS To the majority of people who responded to the first expressions of concern over the catastrophic loss of riparian habitats in California, the focus was entirely in need of preservation. At the 1981 Riparian Systems Conference, a number of excellent papers described

Standiford, Richard B.

266

Alkaline Basalts of The Quaternary Buffalo Valley Volcanic Field, NW Fish Creek Mountains, North-central Nevada, Great Basin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Buffalo Valley volcanic field, 5 km southwest of Battle Mountain, consists of approximately 11 cinder cones and associated flows. Youthful volcanoes are rare in the region, and thus this field offers the opportunity to investigate mantle sources currently beneath the central Great Basin. Most of the eruptive centers are distributed along the northwestern margin of the Fish Creek Mountains, a mid-Tertiary caldera complex, along a 13-km-long northeasterly trend that is perpendicular to the regional stress field (or GPS velocity field), suggesting fault control or eruption from a now-buried fissure. The cones are geomorphologically youthful, with well-defined, commonly breached craters. At least one cone, situated slightly east of the main trend, consists of only a thin mantle of scoria and bombs overlying grey Paleozoic limestone. Previous K-Ar and Ar-Ar dating indicate that the cones are between 1.29 and 0.95 Ma in age. Two other nearby Quaternary volcanic centers lie northeast of the Fish Creek Mountains (K-Ar date of 3.3 Ma) and in the center of the Fish Creek caldera (age unknown). Rare Tertiary basalts and more common Tertiary andesites lie around the margin of the caldera. Lavas from the Buffalo Valley cones have vesicular flow tops and more massive interiors. All Quaternary centers are similar petrographically, including 1-2% olivine phenocrysts and megacrysts up to 1 cm in size, and characteristic plagioclase megacrysts that are rarely up to 4 cm long, commonly in a glassy matrix. Two cone samples are alkalic basalt and tephrite with Mg numbers of 0.55, high TiO2 (2.4%), K2O (2.0%), light REE, Nb (60 ppm), but low Cr and Ni (80 ppm), Pb (2 ppm), Ba (450 ppm) and 87Sr/86Sr (0.70375) compared to Late Pliocene/Quaternary volcanic rocks from the western Great Basin near Reno/Carson City/Fallon. The Buffalo Valley cones are similar chemically to lavas from the Pliocene-Quaternary Lunar Craters volcanic field in central Nevada, and are melts of mantle that is enriched in incompatible elements compared to MORB source mantles. This source is distinct from that currently beneath the western Great Basin where mantle sources include a significant subduction component.

Cousens, B.; Henry, C. D.

2008-12-01

267

Pesticide risk management using indicators for vineyards in the central valley of Chile.  

PubMed

The Apalta catchment is a wine-producing area of 1300 ha, lying south of Santiago, located in the Colchagua Valley, near Santa Cruz in the VI Region of Chile. The vineyards are planted on slopes of up to 22 degrees, the rows being aligned mainly down the slope. This cropping system and its management lead to a potential contamination of natural resources. To assess the risk of environmental contamination due to the application of pesticides in different pest control strategies, indicators at a field level were derived according to a step-by-step procedure. Using these indicators, runoff was found to be the main process of impact. The different pest control strategies in this catchment caused different potential risks, though these in general were low. PMID:20050034

Nario, Adriana; Capri, Ettore; Balderacchi, Matteo; Pino, Inés; Parada, Ana María; Videla, Ximena; Luzio, Walter; Casanova, Manuel; Seguel, Oscar

2009-07-01

268

Dabbling duck harvest dynamics in the Central Valley of California--implications for recruitment  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Age and sex ratios and body weights were obtained for northern pintails (Anas acuta), mallards (A. platyrhynchos), American wigeon (A. americana), green-winged teal (A. crecca), and northern shovelers (A. clypeata) shot at Mendota State Wildlife Area in the San Joaquin Valley (SANJV) and at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge in the Sacramento Valley (SACV) during 1982-83 and 1983-84. Age ratios were determined for pintails at four locations during 1980-83. Cooperative Waterfowl Parts Collection Survey (1982-84; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) and California preseason-banding data (1973-77, for mallards and pintails) also were used to measure age ratios of the California harvest. Harvest rate (ducks shot per day) was obtained and summed from all SACV and SANJV public hunting areas in 1982-84. All species except female wigeon and adult female mallards lost weight between October and January. Except for wigeon, harvest rate was high in October when hunting began. Harvest rates were low in November and December but rose markedly in January in the SACV for all species and for all except pintails in the SANJV. Proportion of adults in the bag as measured by all methods increased progressively through the hunting season. Proportion of adults in the harvest was higher in 1982-83 than in 1983-84 and was greater in the SACV than the SANJV both years for most species. Adult females formed a small component of total kill but 50% or more of female kill. The harvest of pintails at a SACV and a SANJV location consistently contained about half as many immatures per adult as that at two other California locations for 1980-83. The substantial harvest of adults in January eliminates the most productive breeders from the population. Thus, winter hunting mortality may influence age composition of the spring flight and, hence, recruitment potential of the breeding population.

Miller, M.R.; Beam, J.; Connelly, D.P.

1988-01-01

269

Chronology and climatic implications of Late Quaternary glaciations in the Goriganga valley, central Himalaya, India  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Goriganga valley, which is located in the transition zone between the dry steppe of the Tibetan plateau in the north and the sub-humid Himalayan climate in the south, has preserved four events of glaciation with decreasing magnitude. The oldest Stage-I glaciation is represented by a ˜12.5 km long discontinuous diamictite ridge which terminates north of Rilkot (˜3100 m asl). The Stage-II glaciation is represented by sub-rounded and partially eroded lateral moraines and terminates around Martoli village (˜3240 m asl). The Stage-III and IV glacial moraines are sharp crested, unstable and terminate proximal to the present day glacier at ˜3640 m asl and ˜3740 m asl respectively. The Stage-II moraines have been optically dated between 25 ± 2 ka and 22 ± 1 ka implying that glacier expanded during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). This is contrary to the suggestion that during Last Glacial maximum (LGM) glaciation was limited in extent due to weak Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) in the monsoon dominated regions of the Himalaya. We ascribe the LGM glaciations to a combination of the lowered temperature and enhanced mid-latitude westerlies. Following the LGM glaciation, Goriganga valley experienced two major pulses of deglaciation. The older event is dated between 16 and 12 ka and is coeval with the initiation of the ISM whereas the younger events (10-8 ka) represent the early to mid-Holocene strengthened ISM. The Stage-III and IV glaciations which terminated proximal to the modern glacier are speculated to occur during the mid-Holocene and Little Ice Age (LIA) respectively.

Nawaz Ali, S.; Biswas, R. H.; Shukla, A. D.; Juyal, N.

2013-08-01

270

The Slow Death (or Rebirth?) of Extended Star Formation in z~0.1 Green Valley Early-Type Galaxies  

E-print Network

UV observations in the local universe have uncovered a population of early-type galaxies with UV flux consistent with low-level recent or ongoing star formation. We present resolved UV-optical photometry of a sample of 19 SDSS early-type galaxies at z~0.1 drawn from the sample originally selected by Salim & Rich (2010) to lie in the bluer part of the green valley in the UV-optical color-magnitude diagram as measured by GALEX. Utilizing high-resolution HST far-UV imaging provides unique insight into the distribution of UV light in these galaxies, which we call "extended star-forming early-type galaxies" (ESF-ETGs) because of extended UV emission that is indicative of recent star formation. The UV-optical color profiles of all ESF-ETGs show red centers and blue outer parts. Their outer colors require the existence of a significant underlying population of older stars in the UV-bright regions. Analysis of stacked SDSS spectra reveals weak LINER-like emission in their centers. Using a cross-matched SDSS DR7/G...

Fang, Jerome J; Salim, Samir; Graves, Genevieve J; Rich, R Michael

2012-01-01

271

Neuronal cell death: an overview of its different forms in central and peripheral neurons.  

PubMed

The discovery of neuronal cell deathcell death dates back to the nineteenth century. Nowadays, after a very long period of conceptual difficulties, the notion that cell death is a phenomenon occurring during the entire life course of the nervous systemnervous system , from neurogenesisneurogenesis to adulthoodadulthood and senescencesenescence , is fully established. The dichotomy between apoptosisapoptosis , as the prototype of programmed cell deathprogrammed cell death (PCDPCD ), and necrosisnecrosis , as the prototype of death caused by an external insult, must be carefully reconsidered, as different types of PCD: apoptosis, autophagyautophagy , pyroptosispyroptosis , and oncosisoncosis have all been demonstrated in neuronsneurons (and gliaglia ). These modes of PCD may be triggered by different stimuli, but share some intracellularintracellular pathwayspathways such that different types of cell death may affect the same population of neurons according to several intrinsicintrinsic and extrinsicextrinsic factors. Therefore, a mixed morphologymorphology is often observed also depending on degrees of differentiationdifferentiation , activity,activity and injuryinjury . The main histologicalhistological and ultrastructuralultrastructural features of the different types of cell death in neurons are described and related to the cellular pathways that are specifically activated in any of these types of PCD. PMID:25431053

Lossi, Laura; Castagna, Claudia; Merighi, Adalberto

2015-01-01

272

Mammal Inventory of the Mojave Network Parks-Death Valley and Joshua Tree National Parks, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Manzanar National Historic Site, and Mojave National Preserve  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes the results of a mammal inventory study of National Park Service units in the Mojave Desert Network, including Death Valley National Park, Joshua Tree National Park, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Manzanar National Historic Site, and Mojave National Preserve. Fieldwork for the inventory focused on small mammals, primarily rodents and bats. Fieldwork for terrestrial small mammals used trapping with Sherman and Tomahawk small- and medium-sized mammal traps, along with visual surveys for diurnal species. The majority of sampling for terrestrial small mammals was carried out in 2002 and 2003. Methods used in field surveys for bats included mist-netting at tanks and other water bodies, along with acoustic surveys using Anabat. Most of the bat survey work was conducted in 2003. Because of extremely dry conditions in the first two survey years (and associated low mammal numbers), we extended field sampling into 2004, following a relatively wet winter. In addition to field sampling, we also reviewed, evaluated, and summarized museum and literature records of mammal species for all of the Park units. We documented a total of 59 mammal species as present at Death Valley National Park, with an additional five species that we consider of probable occurrence. At Joshua Tree, we also documented 50 species, and an additional four 'probable' species. At Lake Mead National Recreation Area, 57 mammal species have been positively documented, with 10 additional probable species. Manzanar National Historic Site had not been previously surveyed. We documented 19 mammal species at Manzanar, with an additional 11 probable species. Mojave National Preserve had not had a comprehensive list previously, either. There are now a total of 50 mammal species documented at Mojave, with three additional probable species. Of these totals, 23 occurrences are new at individual park units (positively documented for the first time), with most of these being at Manzanar. Noteworthy additions include western mastiff bat at Joshua Tree, house mouse at a number of wildland sites at Lake Mead, and San Diego pocket mouse at Mojave National Preserve. There are also species that have been lost from the Mojave Network parks. We discuss remaining questions, including the possible occurrence of additional species at each park area (most of these are marginal species whose distributional range may or may not edge into the boundaries of the area). Taxonomic changes are also discussed, along with potential erroneous species records.

Drost, Charles A.; Hart, Jan

2008-01-01

273

Socioeconomic effects of power marketing alternatives for the Central Valley and Washoe Projects: 2005 regional econmic impact analysis using IMPLAN  

SciTech Connect

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) was founded by the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 to market and transmit federal hydroelectric power in 15 western states outside the Pacific Northwest, which is served by the Bonneville Power Administration. Western is divided into four independent Customer Service Regions including the Sierra Nevada Region (Sierra Nevada), the focus of this report. The Central Valley Project (CVP) and the Washoe Project provide the primary power resources marketed by Sierra Nevada. Sierra Nevada also purchases and markets power generated by the Bonneville Power Administration, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E), and various power pools. Sierra Nevada currently markets approximately 1,480 megawatts of power to 77 customers in northern and central California. These customers include investor-owned utilities, public utilities, government agencies, military bases, and irrigation districts. Methods and conclusions from an economic analysis are summarized concerning distributional effects of alternative actions that Sierra Nevada could take with it`s new marketing plan.

Anderson, D.M.; Godoy-Kain, P.; Gu, A.Y.; Ulibarri, C.A.

1996-11-01

274

The cultural and chronological context of early Holocene maize and squash domestication in the Central Balsas River Valley, Mexico  

PubMed Central

Molecular evidence indicates that the wild ancestor of maize is presently native to the seasonally dry tropical forest of the Central Balsas watershed in southwestern Mexico. We report here on archaeological investigations in a region of the Central Balsas located near the Iguala Valley in Guerrero state that show for the first time a long sequence of human occupation and plant exploitation reaching back to the early Holocene. One of the sites excavated, the Xihuatoxtla Shelter, contains well-stratified deposits and a stone tool assemblage of bifacially flaked points, simple flake tools, and numerous handstones and milling stone bases radiocarbon dated to at least 8700 calendrical years B.P. As reported in a companion paper (Piperno DR, et al., in this issue of PNAS), starch grain and phytolith residues from the ground and chipped stone tools, plus phytoliths from directly associated sediments, provide evidence for maize (Zea mays L.) and domesticated squash (Cucurbita spp.) in contexts contemporaneous with and stratigraphically below the 8700 calendrical years B.P. date. The radiocarbon determinations, stratigraphic integrity of Xihuatoxtla's deposits, and characteristics of the stone tool assemblages associated with the maize and squash remains all indicate that these plants were early Holocene domesticates. Early agriculture in this region of Mexico appears to have involved small groups of cultivators who were shifting their settlements seasonally and engaging in a variety of subsistence pursuits. PMID:19307573

Ranere, Anthony J.; Piperno, Dolores R.; Holst, Irene; Dickau, Ruth; Iriarte, José

2009-01-01

275

Fluvial response to late Quaternary climatic fluctuations, central Kobuk Valley, northwestern Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Much of northwestern Alaska remained unglaciated during the Pleistocene and thus offers a favorable setting for examining long-term records of high-latitude geological and biological change. Epiguruk, a large cut bank 3.5 km long and up to 36 m high on the Kobuk River south of the Brooks Range in eastern Beringia, exposes complex sedimentary successions representing cycles of upper quaternary alluviation and eolian sedimentation, downcutting, and soil formation. A rich record of plants and mammals is also preserved in the section. Deposits of fluvial channels and flood plains, eolian dunes, sand sheets, loess, and ponds, as well as organic soils (Histosols) are represented. Parallel-bedded fine sand and coarse silt couplets that commonly contain root structures, ripple cross-lamination, silt drapes are flood-plain sediments apparently deposited at the interface of fluvial and eolian environments. Multiple fluvial-to-eolian depositional sequences were caused by influx of eolian sediment to the river from intermittently active dune fields south of the Kobuk River. Alluviation in the Kobuk Valley was coeval with glaciation in the Brooks Range, whereas downcutting occurred during interstadials when dune stabilization limited sediment supply. The depositional model developed at Epiguruk may be useful in interpreting some of the widespread subhorizontally stratified late-glacial deposits of Europe and North America.

Ashley, G.M. (Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Hamilton, T.D. (U.S. Geological Survey, Anchorage, AK (United States))

1993-09-01

276

An investigation of maternal deaths following public protests in a tribal district of Madhya Pradesh, central India.  

PubMed

Since 2005, the Government of India has initiated several interventions to address the issue of maternal mortality, including efforts to improve maternity services and train community health workers, and to give cash incentives to poor women if they deliver in a health facility. Following local protests against a high number of maternal deaths in 2010 in Barwani district in Madhya Pradesh, central India, we undertook a fact-finding visit in January 2011 to investigate the 27 maternal deaths reported in the district from April to November 2010. We found an absence of antenatal care despite high levels of anaemia, absence of skilled birth attendants, failure to carry out emergency obstetric care in obvious cases of need, and referrals that never resulted in treatment. We present two case histories as examples. We took our findings to district and state health officials and called for proven means of preventing maternal deaths to be implemented. We question the policy of giving cash to pregnant women to deliver in poor quality facilities without first ensuring quality of care and strengthening the facilities to cope with the increased patient loads. We documented lack of accountability, discrimination against and negligence of poor women, particularly tribal women, and a close link between poverty and maternal death. PMID:22789078

Sri B, Subha; Sarojini, N; Khanna, Renu

2012-06-01

277

Long-term impacts on macroinvertebrates downstream of reclaimed mountaintop mining valley fills in Central Appalachia.  

PubMed

Recent studies have documented adverse effects to biological communities downstream of mountaintop coal mining and valley fills (VF), but few data exist on the longevity of these impacts. We sampled 15 headwater streams with VFs reclaimed 11-33 years prior to 2011 and sampled seven local reference sites that had no VFs. We collected chemical, habitat, and benthic macroinvertebrate data in April 2011; additional chemical samples were collected in September 2011. To assess ecological condition, we compared VF and reference abiotic and biotic data using: (1) ordination to detect multivariate differences, (2) benthic indices (a multimetric index and an observed/expected predictive model) calibrated to state reference conditions to detect impairment, and (3) correlation and regression analysis to detect relationships between biotic and abiotic data. Although VF sites had good instream habitat, nearly 90 % of these streams exhibited biological impairment. VF sites with higher index scores were co-located near unaffected tributaries; we suggest that these tributaries were sources of sensitive taxa as drifting colonists. There were clear losses of expected taxa across most VF sites and two functional feeding groups (% scrapers and %shredders) were significantly altered. Percent VF and forested area were related to biological quality but varied more than individual ions and specific conductance. Within the subset of VF sites, other descriptors (e.g., VF age, site distance from VF, the presence of impoundments, % forest) had no detectable relationships with biological condition. Although these VFs were constructed pursuant to permits and regulatory programs that have as their stated goals that (1) mined land be reclaimed and restored to its original use or a use of higher value, and (2) mining does not cause or contribute to violations of water quality standards, we found sustained ecological damage in headwaters streams draining VFs long after reclamation was completed. PMID:24990807

Pond, Gregory J; Passmore, Margaret E; Pointon, Nancy D; Felbinger, John K; Walker, Craig A; Krock, Kelly J G; Fulton, Jennifer B; Nash, Whitney L

2014-10-01

278

Long-Term Impacts on Macroinvertebrates Downstream of Reclaimed Mountaintop Mining Valley Fills in Central Appalachia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent studies have documented adverse effects to biological communities downstream of mountaintop coal mining and valley fills (VF), but few data exist on the longevity of these impacts. We sampled 15 headwater streams with VFs reclaimed 11-33 years prior to 2011 and sampled seven local reference sites that had no VFs. We collected chemical, habitat, and benthic macroinvertebrate data in April 2011; additional chemical samples were collected in September 2011. To assess ecological condition, we compared VF and reference abiotic and biotic data using: (1) ordination to detect multivariate differences, (2) benthic indices (a multimetric index and an observed/expected predictive model) calibrated to state reference conditions to detect impairment, and (3) correlation and regression analysis to detect relationships between biotic and abiotic data. Although VF sites had good instream habitat, nearly 90 % of these streams exhibited biological impairment. VF sites with higher index scores were co-located near unaffected tributaries; we suggest that these tributaries were sources of sensitive taxa as drifting colonists. There were clear losses of expected taxa across most VF sites and two functional feeding groups (% scrapers and %shredders) were significantly altered. Percent VF and forested area were related to biological quality but varied more than individual ions and specific conductance. Within the subset of VF sites, other descriptors (e.g., VF age, site distance from VF, the presence of impoundments, % forest) had no detectable relationships with biological condition. Although these VFs were constructed pursuant to permits and regulatory programs that have as their stated goals that (1) mined land be reclaimed and restored to its original use or a use of higher value, and (2) mining does not cause or contribute to violations of water quality standards, we found sustained ecological damage in headwaters streams draining VFs long after reclamation was completed.

Pond, Gregory J.; Passmore, Margaret E.; Pointon, Nancy D.; Felbinger, John K.; Walker, Craig A.; Krock, Kelly J. G.; Fulton, Jennifer B.; Nash, Whitney L.

2014-10-01

279

Co-evolution of soils and vegetation in the Aísa Valley Experimental Station (Central Pyrenees)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soils and vegetation tend to evolve jointly in relation to climate evolution and the impacts of human activity. This study analyzes soil and vegetation characteristics under various plant covers, using information from the Aísa Valley Experimental Station (AVES), Spanish Pyrenees, from 1991 to 2010. The land uses considered were: dense shrub cover, grazing meadow, abandoned field, cereal (barley), abandoned shifting agriculture, active shifting agriculture, burnt1 and burnt2 plots, and in-fallow plot. All the plots were installed on a field abandoned 45 years ago. Some of the plots did not change in plant cover through the study period (e.g., the meadow, cereal and shifting agriculture plots), but others underwent changes in density and composition, such as: (i) The dense shrub cover plot represents the natural evolution of the abandoned field. When the AVES was equipped, this plot was completely dominated by Genista scorpius, with a few stands of Rosa gr. Canina. Twenty years later, Genista scorpius is affected of senescence and shows almost no regeneration capacity. (ii) The abandoned field had previously been cultivated with cereals until 1993. Once abandoned, the progression of plant colonization was very rapid. Firstly with grasses and, 10 years later, with Genista scorpius. At present, this latter occupies more than 50% of the plot. (iii) The evolution of plant colonization in the abandoned shifting agriculture plot was slower than that in the 'normal' abandoned field, mainly because of the differences in fertilization when they were cultivated. (iv) One of the burnt plots evolved from 0% to a coverage of almost 100% in a shot period, whereas the other plot remained with a shrub density of about 60% several years after the fire. Soil samples (superficial and depth) were analyzed to obtain physical and chemical properties: structure, texture, pH, CaCO3, Organic Matter and various anions and cations. The main purpose was to detect differences in the soil properties as a consequence of land cover/land uses.

Serrano Muela, Maria Pilar; Nadal Romero, Estela; Lasanta, Teodoro; María García Ruiz, José

2013-04-01

280

Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for the hydrogeologic units of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect

The use of geologic information such as lithology and rock properties is important to constrain conceptual and numerical hydrogeologic models. This geologic information is difficult to apply explicitly to numerical modeling and analyses because it tends to be qualitative rather than quantitative. This study uses a compilation of hydraulic-conductivity measurements to derive estimates of the probability distributions for several hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, a geologically and hydrologicaly complex region underlain by basin-fill sediments, volcanic, intrusive, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for general rock types have been studied previously; however, this study provides more detailed definition of hydrogeologic units based on lithostratigraphy, lithology, alteration, and fracturing and compares the probability distributions to the aquifer test data. Results suggest that these probability distributions can be used for studies involving, for example, numerical flow modeling, recharge, evapotranspiration, and rainfall runoff. These probability distributions can be used for such studies involving the hydrogeologic units in the region, as well as for similar rock types elsewhere. Within the study area, fracturing appears to have the greatest influence on the hydraulic conductivity of carbonate bedrock hydrogeologic units. Similar to earlier studies, we find that alteration and welding in the Tertiary volcanic rocks greatly influence conductivity. As alteration increases, hydraulic conductivity tends to decrease. Increasing degrees of welding appears to increase hydraulic conductivity because welding increases the brittleness of the volcanic rocks, thus increasing the amount of fracturing.

Belcher, W.R.; Sweetkind, D.S.; Elliott, P.E.

2002-11-19

281

Character and evolution of the ground-water flow system in the central part of the western San Joaquin Valley, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The occurrence of selenium in agricultural drain water derived from the western San Joaquin Valley, California, has focused concern on the groundwater flow system of the western valley. Previous work and recently collected texture and water level data were used to evaluate the character and evolution of the regional groundwater flow system in the central part of the western valley, with particular emphasis on the deposits overlying the Corcoran Clay Member of the Tulane Formation. The Corcoran Clay Member, where present, divides the flow system into an upper semiconfined zone and a lower confined zone. Above the Corcoran, three geohydrologic units can be recognized: Coast Range alluvium, Sierran sand, and flood-basin deposits. These units differ in texture, hydrologic properties, and oxidation state. The development of irrigated agriculture in the central part of the western valley has significantly altered the flow system. Percolation of irrigation water past crop roots has caused a rise in the altitude of the water table in mid-fan and distal-fan areas. Pumpage of groundwater from wells has caused a lowering of the water table beneath parts of the fanheads and a lowering of the potentiometric surface of the confined zone over much of the western valley. The combination of percolation and pumpage has resulted in development of a large downward hydraulic head gradient in the semi-confined zone and has created a groundwater divide along the western margin of the valley. Surface water deliveries from the California Aqueduct have allowed a decrease in pumpage and a consequent recovery in hydraulic head throughout the system. (Author 's abstract)

Belitz, K.R.

1988-01-01

282

Groundwater discharge by evapotranspiration, Dixie Valley, west-central Nevada, March 2009-September 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

With increasing population growth and land-use change, urban communities in the desert Southwest are progressively looking toward remote basins to supplement existing water supplies. Pending applications by Churchill County for groundwater appropriations from Dixie Valley, Nevada, a primarily undeveloped basin east of the Carson Desert, have prompted a reevaluation of the quantity of naturally discharging groundwater. The objective of this study was to develop a revised, independent estimate of groundwater discharge by evapotranspiration (ETg) from Dixie Valley using a combination of eddy-covariance evapotranspiration (ET) measurements and multispectral satellite imagery. Mean annual ETg was estimated during water years 2010 and 2011 at four eddy-covariance sites. Two sites were in phreatophytic shrubland dominated by greasewood, and two sites were on a playa. Estimates of total ET and ETg were supported with vegetation cover mapping, soil physics considerations, water?level measurements from wells, and isotopic water sourcing analyses to allow partitioning of ETg into evaporation and transpiration components. Site-based ETg estimates were scaled to the basin level by combining remotely sensed imagery with field reconnaissance. Enhanced vegetation index and brightness temperature data were compared with mapped vegetation cover to partition Dixie Valley into five discharging ET units and compute basin-scale ETg. Evapotranspiration units were defined within a delineated groundwater discharge area and were partitioned as (1) playa lake, (2) playa, (3) sparse shrubland, (4) moderate-to-dense shrubland, and (5) grassland. Groundwater ET is influenced primarily by phreatophytic vegetative cover, salinity of soil and groundwater within the playa, depth to groundwater, solar radiation, and air temperature. The annual groundwater contribution to site?scale ET ranged from 24 to 61 percent of total ET at vegetated sites and 4 to 15 percent of total ET at playa sites. Mean annual ETg from vegetated sites ranged from 53 millimeters (mm) (0.17 foot [ft], 7.3 percent vegetative cover) to 225 mm (0.74 ft, 24.8 percent vegetative cover). Cumulative liquid?water fluxes in the unsaturated zone indicate that ETg at vegetated sites was influenced primarily by plant transpiration. Binary mixing analyses of oxygen-18 isotopes in groundwater and shallow soil water indicate that plants predominantly use groundwater throughout the year. Groundwater fractions in greasewood stem water varied seasonally and ranged from 0.63 to 1.0. Mean annual playa ETg ranged from about 11 mm (0.04 ft) at the inner playa site (near-surface volumetric water content of 37–53 percent) to about 20 mm (0.07 ft) at the outer playa site located within 2 kilometers of the playa edge (near-surface volumetric water content of 25–38 percent), but playa ETg estimates were within the probable error (plus or minus [±] 20–23 mm; 0.06–0.08 ft). Varying playa ETg was influenced predominantly by salinity rather than depth to groundwater. Osmotic resistance and physical impediments to ET (such as surface salt crusts and salt precipitate in the soil pore space) increased with increasing salinity toward the playa center, whereas vapor pressure decreased. Mean annual basin-scale ETg totaled about 28 million cubic meters (Mm3) (23,000 acre-feet [acre-ft]), and represents the sum of ETg from all ET units. Annual groundwater ET from vegetated areas totaled about 26 Mm3 (21,000 acre-ft), and was dominated by the moderate-to-dense shrubland ET unit (54 percent), followed by sparse shrubland (37 percent) and grassland (9 percent) ET units. Senesced grasses observed in the northern most areas of the moderate-to-dense ET unit likely confounded the vegetation index and led to an overestimate of ETg for this ET unit. Therefore, mean annual ETg for moderate-to-dense shrubland presented here is likely an upper bound. Annual groundwater ET from the playa ET unit was 2.2 Mm3 (1,800 acre-ft), whereas groundwater ET from the playa lake ET unit was 0–0.1 Mm3 (0–100 acre-ft). Oxygen-18

Garcia, C. Amanda; Huntington, Jena M; Buto, Susan G.; Moreo, Michael T.; Smith, J. LaRue; Andraski, Brian J.

2014-01-01

283

Mixed carbonate-siliciclastic infilling of a Neogene carbonate shelf-valley system: Tampa Bay, West-Central Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

The shelf-valley system underlying Tampa Bay, Florida’s largest estuary, is situated in the middle of the Neogene carbonate Florida Platform. Compared to well-studied fluvially incised coastal plain valley systems, this shelf-valley system is unique in its karstic origin and its alternating carbonate-siliciclastic infill. A complex record of sea-level changes, paleo-fluvial variability and marine processes have controlled the timing and mechanisms

David S. Duncan; Stanley D. Locker; Gregg R. Brooks; Albert C. Hine; Larry J. Doyle

2003-01-01

284

Characterization of inland fog zone in the Chilean Central Valley (35-38 S, 71W)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work we document the frequency and distribution of an almost permanent fog layer that occurs in South Central Chile between the latitudes of 35 and 38 S. This phenomenon is popularly known by local people, but hardly studied before. The absence of previous work motivates the challenge to document the main observed characteristics of the phenomenon, and also try to understand its development. Using GOES data for years 2009 and 2010, in channels IR2, IR4 and visible, we document the spatial and and temporal variability of this fog. We find that topography influences the extent of the fog region that tends to be constrained below the 280 m.a.m.s.l. We will discuss the seasonal variations of this fog in relation to the seasonal cycle of clear sky solar radiation on top of the fog layer over the region. Also we will validate the satellite observations using available surface observations of dew point and relative humidity over the region. monthly frequency of fog during non-upper clouds days in June of 2010, for 23 local time (UTC-4) monthly frequency of low clouds during non-upper clouds for 10 local time (UTC-4) for June of 2010. Within the central area of this patter of low cloudiness, topographic contour of 285 m.a.s.l. is well adjusted (black contour).

Pizarro Andía, P. I.; Molina, A.; Rondanelli, R. F.

2012-12-01

285

Cosmogenic 10Be and 36Cl geochronology of offset alluvial fans along the northern Death Valley fault zone: Implications for transient strain in the eastern California shear zone  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The northern Death Valley fault zone (NDVFZ) has long been recognized as a major right-lateral strike-slip fault in the eastern California shear zone (ECSZ). However, its geologic slip rate has been difficult to determine. Using high-resolution digital topographic imagery and terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating, we present the first geochronologically determined slip rate for the NDVFZ. Our study focuses on the Red Wall Canyon alluvial fan, which exposes clean dextral offsets of seven channels. Analysis of airborne laser swath mapping data indicates ???297 ?? 9 m of right-lateral displacement on the fault system since the late Pleistocene. In situ terrestrial cosmogenic 10Be and 36C1 geochronology was used to date the Red Wall Canyon fan and a second, correlative fan also cut by the fault. Beryllium 10 dates from large cobbles and boulders provide a maximum age of 70 +22/-20 ka for the offset landforms. The minimum age of the alluvial fan deposits based on 36Cl depth profiles is 63 ?? 8 ka. Combining the offset measurement with the cosmogenic 10Be date yields a geologic fault slip rate of 4.2 +1.9/-1.1 mm yr-1, whereas the 36Cl data indicate 4.7 +0.9/-0.6 mm yr-1 of slip. Summing these slip rates with known rates on the Owens Valley, Hunter Mountain, and Stateline faults at similar latitudes suggests a total geologic slip rate across the northern ECSZ of ???8.5 to 10 mm yr-1. This rate is commensurate with the overall geodetic rate and implies that the apparent discrepancy between geologic and geodetic data observed in the Mojave section of the ECSZ does not extend north of the Garlock fault. Although the overall geodetic rates are similar, the best estimates based on geology predict higher strain rates in the eastern part of the ECSZ than to the west, whereas the observed geodetic strain is relatively constant. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

Frankel, K.L.; Brantley, K.S.; Dolan, J.F.; Finkel, R.C.; Klinger, R.E.; Knott, J.R.; Machette, M.N.; Owen, L.A.; Phillips, F.M.; Slate, J.L.; Wernicke, B.P.

2007-01-01

286

Modeling The Evolution Of A Regional Aquifer System With The California Central Valley Groundwater-Surface Water Simulation Model (C2VSIM)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The finite element application IWFM has been used to develop an integrated groundwater-surface water model for California's Central Valley, an area of ~50,000 km2, to simulate the evolution of the groundwater flow system and historical groundwater-surface water interactions on a monthly time step from October 1921 to September 2003. The Central Valley's hydrologic system changed significantly during this period. Prior to 1920, most surface water flowed unimpeded from source areas in the mountains surrounding the Central Valley through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to the Pacific Ocean, and groundwater largely flowed from recharge areas on the valley rim to discharge as evapotransipration in extensive marshes along the valley's axis. Rapid agricultural development led to increases in groundwater pumping from ~0.5 km3/yr in the early 1920's to 13-18 km3/yr in the 1940's to 1970's, resulting in strong vertical head gradients, significant head declines throughout the valley, and subsidence of >0.3 m over an area of 13,000 km2. Construction of numerous dams and development of an extensive surface water delivery network after 1950 altered the surface water flow regime and reduced groundwater pumping to the current ~10 km3/yr, increasing net recharge and leading to local head gradient reversals and water level recoveries. A model calibrated to the range of historical flow regimes in the Central Valley will provide robust estimations of stream-groundwater interactions for a range of projected future scenarios. C2VSIM uses the IWFM application to simulate a 3-D finite element groundwater flow process dynamically coupled with 1-D land surface, stream flow, lake and unsaturated zone processes. The groundwater flow system is represented with three layers each having 1393 elements. Land surface processes are simulated using 21 subregions corresponding to California DWR water-supply planning areas. The surface-water network is simulated using 431 stream nodes representing 72 stream reaches, with 108 deliveries specified at 80 diversion locations. Monthly land use, agricultural crops, urban demand, precipitation, evapotranspiration, boundary stream flows and surface water diversions are specified, and the land-surface process calculates crop water demands and routes runoff to streams and deep percolation to the unsaturated zone. The stream process routes surface water flows, allocates available water to meet specified deliveries, and calculates stream-groundwater interactions. Groundwater pumping (which is not metered in California) can be specified or calculated by the model. Model calibration included automated selection of optimum hydraulic parameters using PEST, and manual selection of the areal and vertical distribution of groundwater pumping, to obtain the best match to historical groundwater heads and stream flows. The calibrated model is being used to calculate stream accretions and depletions for use in CALSIM-III, a reservoir-river simulation tool used for planning and management of the State Water Project and Central Valley Project, large surface water distribution networks in California's Central Valley.

Brush, C. F.; Dogrul, E. C.; Kadir, T. N.; Moncrief, M. R.; Shultz, S.; Tonkin, M.; Wendell, D.

2006-12-01

287

West African and Amerindian ancestry and risk of myocardial infarction and metabolic syndrome in the Central Valley population of Costa Rica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic ancestry and environmental factors may contribute to the ethnic differences in risk of coronary heart disease (CHD),\\u000a metabolic syndrome (MS) or its individual components. The population of the Central Valley of Costa Rica offers a unique opportunity\\u000a to assess the role of genetic ancestry in these chronic diseases because it derived from the admixture of a relatively small\\u000a number

Edward A. Ruiz-Narváez; Lance Bare; Andre Arellano; Joseph Catanese; Hannia Campos

2010-01-01

288

Evidence for late-paleozoic brine migration in Cambrian carbonate rocks of the central and southern Appalachians: implications for Mississippi Valley-type sulfide mineralization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many Lower Paleozoic limestones and dolostones in the Valley and Ridge province of the central and southern Appalachians contain 10 to 25 weight percent authigenic potassium feldspar. This was considered to be a product of early diagenesis, however, ⁴°Ar\\/³⁹Ar analyses of overgrowths on detrital K-feldspar in Cambrian carbonate rocks from Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and Tennessee yield Late Carboniferous-Early Permian ages

P. P. Jr Hearn; J. F. Sutter; H. E. Belkin

1987-01-01

289

Principal oil and gas plays in the Appalachian Basin (Province 131) (Chapter I). Middle eocene intrusive igneous rocks of the central Appalachian Valley and Ridge Province: Setting, chemistry, and implications for crustal structure (Chapter J). Bulletin  

SciTech Connect

;Contents: Principal Oil and Gas Plays in the Appalachian Basin (Province 131); and Middle Eocene Intrusive Igneous Rocks of the Central Appalachian Valley and Ridge Province - Setting, Chemistry, and Implications for Crustal Structure.

de Witt, W.; Southworth, C.S.; Gray, K.J.; Sutter, J.F.

1993-12-31

290

Hydrogeologic Framework of the Southeastern Funeral Mountains, California-Nevada, and Implications for the Major Water-Supply Springs in Death Valley National Park  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are using a combination of geologic mapping, geophysical surveys, hydrologic computer modeling, and a drilling-and-testing program to evaluate the hydrologic framework of the southeastern Funeral Mountains. Our work addresses: (1) the hydrologic connection of the Furnace Creek springs on the south side of the Funeral Mountains to the regional aquifer system on the north side, and (2) potential impacts on these springs from human activities, including possible leakage from the proposed radioactive waste repository under Yucca Mountain, ~50 km to the northeast, and ongoing agricultural overdrafting of groundwater in the southern Amargosa Desert, ~25 km to the northeast. Discharge from the springs at Furnace Creek provides the major water supply for Death Valley National Park and, at 5000 acre-ft/yr, is at least 10 times larger than that attributable to recharge in the adjacent, arid Funeral Mountains. Moreover, hydrochemical data indicate that the spring water is derived mainly from interbasin groundwater flow through the regional carbonate aquifer. This aquifer extends northeastward across much of southeastern Nevada. Our geologic map data indicate that the carbonate aquifer is continuous under the southeastern Funeral Mountains. The base of this aquifer is, however, structurally uplifted under the axis of the range, to an elevation that is much higher than most of the springs at Furnace Creek, but that is locally lower than the water table on the opposite (northeast) side of the range. Rather than forming a barrier that blocks groundwater flow under the Funeral Mountains, as previously interpreted, this uplift evidently forms a spillway. The ~700 m drop in the water-table elevation across this range, into Death Valley, thus does not indicate the presence of any feature that would divert or slow groundwater flow. Because of the spillway mechanism, flow from the springs at Furnace Creek may be sensitive to the water-mining activities that have been progressively lowering the hydraulic head on the northeast side of the Funeral Mountains. DOE proposes to emplace nuclear waste in Yucca Mountain, above a volcanic aquifer, which is separated from the underlying regional carbonate aquifer by a leaky volcanic confining unit. An upward hydraulic gradient, from the carbonate aquifer to the overlying volcanic aquifer, has been measured in a single well. This upward gradient is inferred to act as a natural barrier that will keep radionuclides from leaking into the regional carbonate aquifer. There are reasons to question the efficacy and durability of this mechanism. First, with data from only one well penetration into the carbonates, it is unknowable whether the observed upward gradient is a regional feature, or a relatively local one. Second, if recent trends in water mining in this region are projected into the future, it is plausible that the current upward gradient, even if it is regionally effective today, could be reversed. We hope to shed some light on these issues by: (1) testing the chemistry of water in the carbonate aquifer under the Funeral Mountains to see if volcanic-aquifer water from nearby areas such as Yucca Mountain is entering the carbonate aquifer, and (2) developing better computer models of this hydrologic system that could be used to forecast potential long-term impacts of water mining.

Fridrich, C.; Workman, J.; Blakely, R.; Bredehoeft, J.; Jansen, J.; Thompson, R.; King, M.

2003-12-01

291

Death Valley 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS area, California and Nevada. Data report: National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance  

SciTech Connect

Results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Death Valley 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle are presented. Stream sediment samples were collected from small streams at 649 sites or at a nominal density of one site per 20 square kilometers. Ground water samples were collected at 62 sites or at a nominal density of one site per 220 square kilometers. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water and surface water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Key data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) scintillometer readings, and (3) elemental analyses (U, Br, Cl, F, He, Mn, Na, and V). Supplementary data include site descriptors, tabulated analytical data for Al, Dy, and Mg, and histograms and cumulative frequency plots for all elements. Key data from stream sediment sites include (1) water quality measurements (2) important elemental analyses, (U, Th, Hf, Ce, Fe, Mn, Sc, Na, Ti, and V), and (3) scintillometer readings. Supplementary data from stream sediment sites include sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.), additional elemental analyses (Dy, Eu, La, Lu, Sm, and Yb), and histograms and cumulative frequency plots for all elements.

Cook, J.R.

1980-04-01

292

A method for evaluating the importance of system state observations to model predictions, with application to the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We develop a new observation-prediction (OPR) statistic for evaluating the importance of system state observations to model predictions. The OPR statistic measures the change in prediction uncertainty produced when an observation is added to or removed from an existing monitoring network, and it can be used to guide refinement and enhancement of the network. Prediction uncertainty is approximated using a first-order second-moment method. We apply the OPR statistic to a model of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS) to evaluate the importance of existing and potential hydraulic head observations to predicted advective transport paths in the saturated zone underlying Yucca Mountain and underground testing areas on the Nevada Test Site. Important existing observations tend to be far from the predicted paths, and many unimportant observations are in areas of high observation density. These results can be used to select locations at which increased observation accuracy would be beneficial and locations that could be removed from the network. Important potential observations are mostly in areas of high hydraulic gradient far from the paths. Results for both existing and potential observations are related to the flow system dynamics and coarse parameter zonation in the DVRFS model. If system properties in different locations are as similar as the zonation assumes, then the OPR results illustrate a data collection opportunity whereby observations in distant, high-gradient areas can provide information about properties in flatter-gradient areas near the paths. If this similarity is suspect, then the analysis produces a different type of data collection opportunity involving testing of model assumptions critical to the OPR results.

Tiedeman, C.R.; Ely, D.M.; Hill, M.C.; O'Brien, G. M.

2004-01-01

293

A method for evaluating the importance of system state observations to model predictions, with application to the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We develop a new observation-prediction (OPR) statistic for evaluating the importance of system state observations to model predictions. The OPR statistic measures the change in prediction uncertainty produced when an observation is added to or removed from an existing monitoring network, and it can be used to guide refinement and enhancement of the network. Prediction uncertainty is approximated using a first-order second-moment method. We apply the OPR statistic to a model of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS) to evaluate the importance of existing and potential hydraulic head observations to predicted advective transport paths in the saturated zone underlying Yucca Mountain and underground testing areas on the Nevada Test Site. Important existing observations tend to be far from the predicted paths, and many unimportant observations are in areas of high observation density. These results can be used to select locations at which increased observation accuracy would be beneficial and locations that could be removed from the network. Important potential observations are mostly in areas of high hydraulic gradient far from the paths. Results for both existing and potential observations are related to the flow system dynamics and coarse parameter zonation in the DVRFS model. If system properties in different locations are as similar as the zonation assumes, then the OPR results illustrate a data collection opportunity whereby observations in distant, high-gradient areas can provide information about properties in flatter-gradient areas near the paths. If this similarity is suspect, then the analysis produces a different type of data collection opportunity involving testing of model assumptions critical to the OPR results.

Tiedeman, Claire R.; Ely, D. Matthew; Hill, Mary C.; O'Brien, Grady M.

2004-12-01

294

Late Pleistocene and Holocene environmental history of the Iguala Valley, Central Balsas Watershed of Mexico  

PubMed Central

The origin of agriculture was a signal development in human affairs and as such has occupied the attention of scholars from the natural and social sciences for well over a century. Historical studies of climate and vegetation are closely associated with crop plant evolution because they can reveal the ecological contexts of plant domestication together with the antiquity and effects of agricultural practices on the environment. In this article, we present paleoecological evidence from three lakes and a swamp located in the Central Balsas watershed of tropical southwestern Mexico that date from 14,000 B.P. to the modern era. [Dates expressed in B.P. years are radiocarbon ages. Calibrated (calendar) ages, expressed as cal B.P., are provided for dates in the text.] Previous molecular studies suggest that maize (Zea mays L.) and other important crops such as squashes (Cucurbita spp.) were domesticated in the region. Our combined pollen, phytolith, charcoal, and sedimentary studies indicate that during the late glacial period (14,000–10,000 B.P.), lake beds were dry, the climate was cooler and drier, and open vegetational communities were more widespread than after the Pleistocene ended. Zea was a continuous part of the vegetation since at least the terminal Pleistocene. During the Holocene, lakes became important foci of human activity, and cultural interference with a species-diverse tropical forest is indicated. Maize and squash were grown at lake edges starting between 10,000 and 5,000 B.P., most likely sometime during the first half of that period. Significant episodes of climatic drying evidenced between 1,800 B.P. and 900 B.P. appear to be coeval with those documented in the Classic Maya region and elsewhere, showing widespread instability in the late Holocene climate. PMID:17537917

Piperno, D. R.; Moreno, J. E.; Iriarte, J.; Holst, I.; Lachniet, M.; Jones, J. G.; Ranere, A. J.; Castanzo, R.

2007-01-01

295

Heritability of cognitive functions in families of successful cognitive aging probands from the Central Valley of Costa Rica.  

PubMed

We sought to identify cognitive phenotypes for family/genetic studies of successful cognitive aging (SCA; maintaining intact cognitive functioning while living to late old age). We administered a battery of neuropsychological tests to nondemented nonagenarians (n = 65; mean age = 93.4 ± 3.0) and their offspring (n = 188; mean age = 66.4 ± 5.0) from the Central Valley of Costa Rica. After covarying for age, gender, and years of education, as necessary, heritability was calculated for cognitive functions at three pre-defined levels of complexity: specific neuropsychological functions (e.g., delayed recall, sequencing), three higher level cognitive domains (memory, executive functions, attention), and an overall neuropsychological summary. The highest heritability was for delayed recall (h² = 0.74, se = 0.14, p < 0.0001) but significant heritabilities involving memory were also observed for immediate recall (h² = 0.50), memory as a cognitive domain (h² = 0.53), and the overall neuropsychological summary (h² = 0.42). Heritabilities for sequencing (h² = 0.42), fluency (h² = 0.39), abstraction (h² = 0.36), and the executive functions cognitive domain (h² = 0.35) were also significant. In contrast, the attention domain and memory recognition were not significantly heritable in these families. Among the heritable specific cognitive functions, a strong pleiotropic effect (i.e., evidence that these may be influenced by the same gene or set of genes) for delayed and immediate recall was identified (bivariate statistic = 0.934, p < 0.0001) and more modest but significant effects were found for four additional bivariate relationships. The results support the heritability of good cognitive function in old age and the utilization of several levels of phenotypes, and they suggest that several measures involving memory may be especially useful for family/genetic studies of SCA. PMID:21908911

Greenwood, Tiffany A; Beeri, Michal S; Schmeidler, James; Valerio, Daniel; Raventós, Henriette; Mora-Villalobos, Lara; Camacho, Karla; Carrión-Baralt, José R; Angelo, Gary; Almasy, Laura; Sano, Mary; Silverman, Jeremy M

2011-01-01

296

Central and systemic endotoxin challenges exacerbate the local inflammatory response and increase neuronal death during chronic neurodegeneration.  

PubMed

The contribution of inflammation to the progression of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and prion diseases is poorly understood. Brain inflammation in animal models of these diseases is dominated by chronic microglial activation with minimal proinflammatory cytokine expression. However, these inflammatory cells are "primed" to produce exaggerated inflammatory responses to subsequent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenges. We show that, using the ME7 model of prion disease, intracerebral challenge with LPS results in dramatic interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) expression, neutrophil infiltration, and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in the brain parenchyma of prion-diseased mice compared with the same challenge in normal mice. Systemic inflammation evoked by LPS also produced greater increases in proinflammatory cytokines, pentraxin 3, and inducible nitric oxide synthase transcription in prion-diseased mice than in control mice and induced microglial expression of IL-1beta. These systemic challenges also increased neuronal apoptosis in the brains of ME7 animals. Thus, both central and peripheral inflammation can exacerbate local brain inflammation and neuronal death. The finding that a single acute systemic inflammatory event can induce neuronal death in the CNS has implications for therapy in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:16207887

Cunningham, Colm; Wilcockson, David C; Campion, Suzanne; Lunnon, Katie; Perry, V Hugh

2005-10-01

297

Aquifer-test evaluation and potential effects of increased ground-water pumpage at the Stovepipe Wells Hotel area, Death Valley National Monument, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water use in the Stovepipe Wells Hotel area in Death Valley National Monument is expected to increase significantly if the nonpotable, as well as potable, water supply is treated by reverse osmosis. During the peak tourist season, October through March, ground-water pumpage could increase by 37,500 gallons per day, or 76%. The effects of this additional pumpage on water levels in the area, particularly near a strand of phreatophytes about 10,000 feet east of the well field, are of concern. In order to evaluate the effects of increased pumpage on water levels in the Stovepipe Wells Hotel area well field, two aquifer tests were performed at the well field to determine the transmissivity and storage coefficients of the aquifer. Analysis of the aquifer test determined that a transmissivity of 1,360 feet squared per day was representative of the aquifer. The estimated value of transmissivity and the storage-coefficient values that are representative of confined (1.2 x .0004) and unconfined (0.25) conditions were used in the Theis equation to calculate the additional drawdown that might occur after 1, 10, and 50 years of increased pumpage. The drawdown calculated by using the lower storage-coefficient value represents the maximum additional drawdown that might be expected from the assumed increase in pumpage; the drawdown calculated by using the higher storage-coefficient value represents the minimum additional drawdown. Calculated additional drawdowns after 50 years of pumping range from 7.8 feet near the pumped well to 2.4 feet at the phreatophyte stand assuming confined conditions, and from 5.7 feet near the pumped well to 0.3 foot at the phreatophyte stand assuming unconfined conditions. Actual drawdowns probably will be somewhere between these values. Drawdowns measured in observation wells during 1973-85, in response to an average pumpage of 34,200 gallons per day at the Stovepipe Wells Hotel well field, are similar to the drawdowns calculated by the Theis equation for the assumed increase in pumpage. (Author 's abstract)

Woolfenden, L.R.; Martin, Peter; Baharie, Brian

1988-01-01

298

Potential of public lands in California's central valley as habitat for the endangered San Joaquin kit fox. [Vulpes macrotis mutica  

SciTech Connect

As part of an assessment of the impacts of their activities on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox and its essential habitat, the Department of Energy and Bureau of Land Management investigated the potential of public lands in the San Joaquin Valley as suitable habitat for the San Joaquin kit fox. (ACR)

O'Farrell, T.P.; McCue, P.; Sauls, M.L.; Kato, T.

1982-01-01

299

Relation between extensional geometry of the northern Grant Range and oil occurrences in railroad valley, East-Central Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In the northern Grant Range, heterogeneous Neogene extension was dominated by synchronous arching and attenuation. Attenuation was accomplished along a stacked set of attenuation faults that formed at low angles to bedding as the Paleozoic carbonate and Paleogene rocks arched about a north-northwest axis. The style and amount of attenuation was controlled by lithologic character and structural depth of rock units and by geometry of the arch. On the steeper west side of the Grant Range arch, the curviplanar low-angle attenuation faults converge into a single shallowly west-dipping fault zone along which the stratigraphic juxtaposition of Mississippian units over Middle Cambrian units and Late Cretaceous granite marks the zone of maximum attenuation. Arching and heterogeneous extension resulted from uplift of the Grant Range relative to the structural basin of Railroad Valley to the west. This structural differentiation is a complex zone of subparallel-to-bedding, shallow-dipping attenuation faults rather than as a simple high-angle range-front fault. Seismic and drill-hole data indicate that low-angle attenuation faults in the range extend into Railroad Valley and control the structure buried in the valley. Mississippian and Paleocene to Eocene petroleum source rocks and Devonian to Oligocene reservoir rocks in Railroad Valley oil fields are in extensively fractured rocks of the upper plate to the major extensional fault system. Thus, relatively cold upper-plate rocks, immature with respect to hydrocarbon generation, were brought relatively down into contact with hotter lower-plate rocks by Neogene attenuation faulting. Oil in Railroad Valley, which is sourced from rocks as young as Eocene, was probably generated by this juxtaposition during Neogene crustal attenuation, and subsequently migrated into upper-plate fractured reservoirs. 101 refs., 10 figs.

Lund, K.; Perry, W.J. Jr. (Denver Federal Center, CO (United States)); Beard, L.S. (Geological Survey, Flagstaff (Azerbaijan))

1993-06-01

300

Surveillance of US deaths related to myelodysplastic syndromes, and the need for linkages with central cancer registries.  

PubMed

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of tumors with subgroups that differ in prognosis, including risk of transformation to leukemia and also in survival rate. An analysis was conducted of deaths in US residents with MDS coded on the death certificate, for surveillance of MDS-related death rates. MDS was coded for 18,304 deaths in 2005-2006 (age-standardized rate = 2.98 per 100,000 per year) using multiple causes of death vs 9,995 (age-standardized rate =1.63 per 100,000 per year) using only the underlying cause of death. For deaths with MDS mentioned as other than the underlying cause, the most common underlying causes were cancers (of which 65% were leukemia) and cardiovascular diseases. Thus, surveillance of MDS-related mortality is unusual in comparison to most types of cancer, in that use of multiple causes of death is required, as also previously reported for myeloproliferative neoplasms. Use of multiple causes improves estimation of the burden of MDS-related deaths in the population, which enhances the importance of MDS in planning cancer research and control efforts. Linkages with cancer registries should be conducted to evaluate the accuracy of data on MDS as a cause of death on death records, for use in interpreting surveillance data on MDS-related mortality. PMID:23270091

Polednak, Anthony P

2011-01-01

301

An 11 000-year-long record of fire and vegetation history at Beaver Lake, Oregon, central Willamette Valley  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-resolution macroscopic charcoal and pollen analysis were used to reconstruct an 11 000-year-long record of fire and vegetation history from Beaver Lake, Oregon, the first complete Holocene paleoecological record from the floor of the Willamette Valley. In the early Holocene (ca 11 000–7500 calendar years before present [cal yr BP]), warmer, drier summers than at present led to the establishment of xeric woodland of

Megan K. Walsh; Christopher A. Pearl; Cathy Whitlock; Patrick J. Bartlein; Marc A. Worona

2010-01-01

302

Natural heat storage in a brine-filled solar pond in the Tully Valley of central New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Tully Valley, located in southern Onondaga County, New York, has a long history of unusual natural hydrogeologic phenomena including mudboils (Kappel, 2009), landslides (Tamulonis and others, 2009; Pair and others, 2000), landsurface subsidence (Hackett and others, 2009; Kappel, 2009), and a brine-filled sinkhole or “Solar pond” (fig. 1), which is documented in this report. A solar pond is a pool of salty water (brine) which stores the sun’s energy in the form of heat. The saltwater naturally forms distinct layers with increasing density between transitional zones (haloclines) of rapidly changing specific conductance with depth. In a typical solar pond, the top layer has a low salt content and is often times referred to as the upper convective zone (Lu and others, 2002). The bottom layer is a concentrated brine that is either convective or temperature stratified dependent on the surrounding environment. Solar insolation is absorbed and stored in the lower, denser brine while the overlying halocline acts as an insulating layer and prevents heat from moving upwards from the lower zone (Lu and others, 2002). In the case of the Tully Valley solar pond, water within the pond can be over 90 degrees Fahrenheit (°F) in late summer and early fall. The purpose of this report is to summarize observations at the Tully Valley brine-filled sinkhole and provide supplemental climate data which might affect the pond salinity gradients insolation (solar energy).

Hayhurst, Brett; Kappel, William M.

2014-01-01

303

75 FR 30393 - The Effects of Mountaintop Mines and Valley Fills on Aquatic Ecosystems of the Central...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Coalfields and a Field-Based Aquatic Life Benchmark for Conductivity in Central Appalachian...and (2) ``A Field-based Aquatic Life Benchmark for Conductivity in Central Appalachian...Coalfields'' and ``A Field-based Aquatic Life Benchmark for Conductivity in Central...

2010-06-01

304

75 FR 51058 - The Effects of Mountaintop Mines and Valley Fills on Aquatic Ecosystems of the Central...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Coalfields and a Field-Based Aquatic Life Benchmark for Conductivity in Central Appalachian...and (2) ``A Field-based Aquatic Life Benchmark for Conductivity in Central Appalachian...Coalfields'' and ``A Field-based Aquatic Life Benchmark for Conductivity in Central...

2010-08-18

305

75 FR 18499 - The Effects of Mountaintop Mines and Valley Fills on Aquatic Ecosystems of the Central...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Coalfields and a Field-Based Aquatic Life Benchmark for Conductivity in Central Appalachian...and (2) ``A Field-based Aquatic Life Benchmark for Conductivity in Central Appalachian...Coalfields'' and ``A Field-based Aquatic Life Benchmark for Conductivity in Central...

2010-04-12

306

75 FR 39934 - The Effects of Mountaintop Mines and Valley Fills on Aquatic Ecosystems of the Central...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Coalfields and a Field-Based Aquatic Life Benchmark for Conductivity in Central Appalachian...and (2) ``A Field-based Aquatic Life Benchmark for Conductivity in Central Appalachian...Coalfields'' and ``A Field-based Aquatic Life Benchmark for Conductivity in Central...

2010-07-13

307

H. R. 3113: an act providing for the coordinated operation of the Central Valley project and the State water project in California. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, March 25, 1985  

SciTech Connect

The House Committee on Energy and Natural Resources rewrote the Bill coordinating operations of the Central Valley Project in California and the state water project, and limited the Secretary of the Interior to no more than 75% of the Central Valley Project's annual yield. The Bill specifies procedures for water delivery contracts and reimbursements. Title II deals with the preservation of the Suisin Marsh District; Title III with the reclamation of small projects; and Title IV with contract validation. The document contains both the original and the amended wording of H.R. 3113.

Not Available

1986-01-01

308

Regional soil geochemistry in the Ojailen Valley: a realm dominated by the industrial and mining city of Puertollano (South Central Spain)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Regional soil geochemistry in the Ojailén Valley: a realm dominated by the industrial and mining city of Puertollano (South Central Spain). Authors: Miguel A. López-Berdonces¹; Sergio Fernández Calderón¹; Pablo Higueras¹; José María Esbrí¹; Beatriz González-Corrochano¹; Eva Mª García-Noguero¹; Alba Martínez-Coronado¹; Carolina García Noguero¹ ¹Instituto de Geología Aplicada, Universidad de Castilla La Mancha, Almadén 13400 (Spain). Ojailén Valley is situated in South Central of Spain, an area where livestock, agriculture, mining and industry coexist. This work tries to assess the relationships between these activities and local environmental compartments: water, soils and heavy metal contents, and establish the most appropriate methodology of sample treatment and analytical techniques that can be employed on this kind of studies. For soil geochemistry, 152 samples were taken at two different depths, one at surface layer and another at 20 cm depth, and establish relationships between them and the possible sources. For this purpose, we determine soil parameters (pH, conductivity and organic matter) and total metal contents by Energy Dispersion of X Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF). Samples with higher nickel contents were analyzed with Inductive Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy (ICP-OES) after acid digestion. The study of surface waters includes 18 samples along the river and tributaries near mining and industrial areas. Water analysis was performed by ICP-OES. Soil samples shows pH between 6 and 8.5, highest located near on the east part of the valley, in the vicinity of petrochemical complex. Conductivity values show higher levels (1600 µS cm¯¹) in the vicinity of Puertollano and the industrial sites. Local reference value (LRV) for contaminated soils were determined according to the methodology proposed by Jimenez-Ballesta et al. (2010), using the equation: LRV=GM + 2SD, where LRV: Local Reference Value, GM: Geometric Mean, SD: Standard Deviation. Trace metals values are significantly higher than calculated LRV, especially for Zn, Pb, (Average content: 230 mg kg¯¹ and 249.9 mg kg¯¹ respectively), probable due to Pb-Zn mining in the nearest Alcudia valley. Other elements seem to be influenced by petrochemical industry (Ni, V, and Cu) with LRV: 199.9 mg kg¯¹, 39.2 mg kg¯¹ and 184.2 mg kg¯¹ respectively. Most water samples have metal contents higher than levels for drinking water (WHO, 2006), especially Fe and Pb with 20 µg l¯¹ and 10 µg l¯¹ respectively. Higher metal contents were located on three different sites: downstream an open-pit coal mine, in stagnant water where we can find an old sewage treatment plant, and downstream a photovoltaic plant built in 2008. We can consider that Ojailén Valley is not an area with high contents in heavy metals in the environment, but Puertollano and its petrochemical complex have contents in Pb, Zn, Cu, As, Ni above the LRV. A comparison of results obtained by ICP-MS and XRF related to Pb, Zn, Cr, Ni in thirty-four selected samples, we can conclude that both techniques are qualitatively agree, although XRF cannot be considered suitable for establishing reference legal limits. References Jiménez-Ballesta, R; Conde-Bueno,P; Martin-Rubí,J.A.; García-Jímenez,R. 2010. Geochemical baseline contents levels and soil quality reference values of trace elements in soils from the Mediterranean (Castilla-La Mancha, Spain). Central European Journal of Geosciences 2, 441-454. WHO2006. Guidelines for drinking- water quality, Vol.1, 3rd edition incorporating 1st and 2nd addenda. (http//www.who.int/entity/water_sanitation_health/dwq/fulltext.pdf) Geneve, Suiza.

López-Berdonces, Miguel; Fernandez-Calderón, Sergio; Higueras, Pablo; María Esbrí, Jose; Gonzalez-Corrochano, Beatríz; García-Noguero, Eva Mª; Martínez-Coronado, Alba; García-Noguero, Carolina

2013-04-01

309

Extensional geometries in the northern Grant Range, east-central Nevada - Implications for oil occurrences in Railroad Valley  

SciTech Connect

Tertiary heterogeneous extension in the northern Grant Range, Nevada, is manifested by a stacked array of curviplanar low-angle attenuation faults that formed concurrent with arching. Attenuation was controlled by lithologic character, structural depth, and geometry of the arch. Extension appears to be greater on the west side of the range than on the east. On the east side of the range, the stacked array of low-angle attenuation faults is subparallel to bedding and attenuation is distributed across many stacked fault zones; except at highest crustal levels, these faults are blind. On the west side of the range, the low-angle attenuation faults of the stacked array merge into a single, major down-to-the-west fault zone across which as much as 19,000 ft of strata are omitted. Arching of the fault array resulted in an extensional culmination. Cross sections incorporating seismic and drill-hole data suggest that the low-angle attenuation faults (particularly the major down-to-the-west attenuation fault) seen in the range extend into Railroad Valley on the west side of the range with no significant offset by high-angle normal faults. Thus, the topographic expression of Grant Range and Railroad Valley may be due to the synchronous arching and low-angle faulting. These data indicate that both petroleum source and reservoir rocks in Railroad Valley oil fields are located in relatively immature but extensively fractured rocks of the upper plate to the extensional ramp. Lower plate rocks are metamorphosed, illustrate ductile behavior, and lack significant porosity and permeability.

Lund, K.; Perry, W.J. Jr. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Beard, L.S. (Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States))

1991-06-01

310

Valley-Fill Sandstones in the Kootenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana  

SciTech Connect

Subsurface data continues to be collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared for the project. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview is being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map data have been successfully imported into Arcview and customized to meet the needs of this project. Log tops and other data from about ¾ of the exploration wells in the area have been incorporated into the data base. All of the four 30? X 60? geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface geologic data base for the Crow Reservation and all are nearing completion. Formal technical review prior to publication has been completed for all the quadrangles; Billings, Bridger; Hardin, and Lodge Grass. Final GIS edits are being made before being forwarded to the Bureau?s Publications Department. Field investigations were completed during the third quarter, 1997. With the help of a student field assistant from the Crow Tribe, the entire project area was inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits in the Kootenai Formation. Field inventory has resulted in the identification of nine exposures of thick valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least four major westward-trending valley systems. All the channel localities have been measured and described in detail and paleocurrent data has been collected from all but one locality. In addition, two stratigraphic sections were measured in areas where channels are absent. One channel has bee traced over a distance of about 60 miles and exhibits definite paleostructural control. An abstract describing this channel has been submitted and accepted for presentation at the Williston Basin Symposium in October, 1998.

David A. Lopez

1998-07-03

311

Digital tabulation of stratigraphic data from oil and gas wells in Cuyama Valley and surrounding areas, central California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Stratigraphic information from 391 oil and gas exploration wells from Cuyama Valley, California, and surrounding areas are herein compiled in digital form from reports that were released originally in paper form. The Cuyama Basin is located within the southeasternmost part of the Coast Ranges and north of the western Transverse Ranges, west of the San Andreas fault. Knowledge of the location and elevation of stratigraphic tops of formations throughout the basin is a first step toward understanding depositional trends and the structural evolution of the basin through time, and helps in understanding the slip history and partitioning of slip on San Andreas and related faults.

Sweetkind, Donald S.; Bova, Shiera C.; Langenheim, Victoria E.; Shumaker, Lauren E.; Scheirer, Daniel S.

2013-01-01

312

THE SLOW DEATH (OR REBIRTH?) OF EXTENDED STAR FORMATION IN z {approx} 0.1 GREEN VALLEY EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

UV observations in the local universe have uncovered a population of early-type galaxies with UV flux consistent with low-level recent or ongoing star formation. Understanding the origin of such star formation remains an open issue. We present resolved UV-optical photometry of a sample of 19 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) early-type galaxies at z {approx} 0.1 drawn from the sample originally selected by Salim and Rich to lie in the bluer part of the green valley in the UV-optical color-magnitude diagram as measured by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). Utilizing high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) far-UV imaging provides unique insight into the distribution of UV light in these galaxies, which we call ''extended star-forming early-type galaxies'' (ESF-ETGs) because of extended UV emission that is indicative of recent star formation. The UV-optical color profiles of all ESF-ETGs show red centers and blue outer parts. Their outer colors require the existence of a significant underlying population of older stars in the UV-bright regions. An analysis of stacked SDSS spectra reveals weak LINER-like emission in their centers. Using a cross-matched SDSS DR7/GALEX GR6 catalog, we search for other green valley galaxies with similar properties to these ESF-ETGs and estimate that Almost-Equal-To 13% of dust-corrected green valley galaxies of similar stellar mass and UV-optical color are likely ESF-candidates, i.e., ESF-ETGs are not rare. Our results are consistent with star formation that is gradually declining in existing disks, i.e., the ESF-ETGs are evolving onto the red sequence for the first time, or with rejuvenated star formation due to accreted gas in older disks provided that the gas does not disrupt the structure of the galaxy and the resulting star formation is not too recent and bursty. ESF-ETGs may typify an important subpopulation of galaxies that can linger in the green valley for up to several Gyrs, based on their resemblance to nearby gas-rich green valley galaxies with low-level ongoing star formation.

Fang, Jerome J.; Faber, S. M. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Salim, Samir [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47404 (United States); Graves, Genevieve J. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rich, R. Michael, E-mail: jjfang@ucolick.org [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-12-10

313

The Plio-Quaternary uplift of the Apennine chain: new data from the analysis of topography and river valleys in Central Italy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study aims at the reconstruction of magnitude and timing of surface uplift affecting a wide sector of the Central Apennines (Italy) by means of morphometric and morphostructural analyses. In the chain interiors (where stratigraphic and geomorphological markers of past sea-level positions are lacking) the study is based on analysis of erosional landforms and river valleys. A large-scale topographic analysis, by processing 90-m and 230-m DEMs, is performed. The spatial distribution of several morphometric parameters, together with characteristic wavelengths of relief, allowed the differentiation of three main regions affected by different cumulative surface uplift and tectonic/erosional fragmentation: a Peri-Tyrrhenian Belt, an Axial Belt and a Peri-Adriatic Belt. Particular attention is devoted to fluvial landforms, with analysis of longitudinal profiles and geometric pattern of the main drainage lines and their relations with the major structures. Major differences occur between the Tyrrhenian and Adriatic valley systems. The Tyrrhenian drainage mainly consists of longitudinal valleys displaying overall concave-up longitudinal profiles. The Adriatic drainage is mainly constituted by transverse streams and shows less regular longitudinal profiles. Topographic features and the river valley architecture seem related to different styles and amounts of uplift in the three belts. Within the study area, a coast to coast transect (Gaeta-Vasto Transect, GVT) has been investigated in detail, focusing the analysis on its axial sector, around the Apennines main divide (Main Divide Area, MDA). A possible scheme of Quaternary surface uplift along the GVT is proposed. In the MDA, the main stages of landscape evolution and drainage organization can be reconstructed by means of the analysis of paleosurfaces coupled with study of the relict and present-day drainage networks. This allowed the recognition of a major phase of surface uplift (exceeding 1500 m in the Meta-Mainarde massif) that occurred in response to thrusting during the Pliocene. For Quaternary surface uplift a minimum value of 400 m can be estimated. This study suggests that, during the Quaternary, the Peri-Tyrrhenian Belt suffered a subdued uplift acting over small wavelengths (10-15 km), while the Axial and Peri-Adriatic Belts were subject to a larger and long-wavelength (90 km) surface uplift, with maximum values (about 700 m) shifted to the NE of the Axial Belt and tapering to zero towards the Adriatic coast. The reconstructed pattern of uplift is coherent with the topographic properties of the three belts and with the observed drainage features.

Ascione, A.; Cinque, A.; Miccadei, E.; Villani, F.; Berti, C.

2008-11-01

314

Comagmatic contact relationships between the Rock Creek Gabbro and Round Valley Peak granodiorite, central Sierra Nevada, CA  

SciTech Connect

The Rock Creek Gabbro (RCG) in Little Lakes Valley, near Tom's Place, CA abuts three granodiorites with distinctive contact characteristics. Against within a cm in most places. The contact with Round Valley Peak (RVP) on the north, however, is a zone at least 3 km wide and records a mode of mafic magmatic enclave formation. A northward traverse of the zone begins 300--400 m within the RCG with progressively lighter, though still uniform rock. Next is a 100--200m wide jumble of sharp-edged angular 10--30m gabbroic xenoliths, variable in grainsize and plastic deformation and interspersed with stretched partially disaggregated enclaves in normal RVP granodiorite. Xenoliths are essentially absent from the RVP from here north; stretched enclaves with very consistent strikes paralleling (within 20[degree]) the mapped RCG-RVP contact and high angle dips (70--90[degree]), occur singly and in dense swarms and fall from 4% to 0.5% of outcrop area in the remaining traverse. Rock Creek gabbros including xenoliths at the contact cluster chemically with RVP enclaves on all major and trace element plots, suggesting a common parentage; some of each group show evidence of plagioclase flotation. Trace element data (esp. Zr/Nb) suggests that fractional crystallization dominates mixing in the evolution of the gabbroic/enclave magma.

Christensen, C.C.; Bown, C.J. (Hampshire College, Amherst, MA (United States). School of Natural Science)

1993-03-01

315

A regression model for the temporal development of soil pipes and associated gullies in the alluvial-fill valley of the Rio Puerco, central New Mexico  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On Mars, the association of gullied escarpments and chaotic terrain is evidence for failure and scarp retreat of poorly consolidated materials. Some martian gullies have no surface outlets and may have drained through subterranean channels. Similar features, though on a much smaller scale, can be seen in alluvium along terrestrial river banks in semiarid regions, such as the Rio Puerco Valley of central New Mexico. Many of the escarpments along the Rio Puerco are developing through formation of collapse gullies, which drain through soil pipes. Gully development can be monitored on aerial photographs taken in 1935, 1962, and 1980. A regression model was developed to quantify gully evolution over a known time span. Soil pipes and their associated collapse gullies make recognizable signatures on the air photos. The areal extent of this signature can be normalized to the scarp length of each pipe-gully system, which makes comparisons between systems possible.

Condit, C. D.; Elston, W. E.

1984-01-01

316

Burial and preservation of a 30,000 year old perennial snowbank in Red Creek valley, Ogilvie Mountains, central Yukon, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study describes the origin and age of a body of massive ground ice exposed in the headwall of a thaw slump in the Red Creek valley, central Yukon, Canada. The site is located beyond the limits of Pleistocene glaciation in central Yukon and within the southern limit of the modern continuous permafrost zone. The origin of the massive ground ice, which is preserved under a fine-grained diamicton containing thin layers of tephra, was determined through ice petrography, stable O-H isotope composition of the ice, and gas composition of occluded air entrapped in the ice. The age of the massive ground ice was established by identifying the overlying tephra and radiocarbon dating of a "muck" deposit preserved within the ice. Collectively, the results indicate that the massive ground ice formed by snow densification with limited melting-refreezing and is interpreted as being a buried perennial snowbank. The muck deposit within the ice, which yielded an age of 30,720 ± 340 14C a BP, and the Dawson tephra (25,300 14C a BP) overlying the perennial snowbank, indicates that the snowbank accumulated at roughly the transition between marine isotope stages 3 and 2. Dry climatic conditions at this time and possibly high winds enabled the snowbank to accumulate in the absence of extensive local valley glaciation as occurred in the mountains to the south. In addition to documenting the persistence of relict permafrost and ground ice to warming climate in regions where they are predicted to disappear by numerical models, this study presents evidence of an isotopic biosignature preserved in a body of massive ground ice.

Lacelle, Denis; St-Jean, Melanie; Lauriol, Bernard; Clark, Ian D.; Lewkowicz, Antoni; Froese, Duane G.; Kuehn, Stephen C.; Zazula, Grant

2009-12-01

317

CHIP, a carboxy terminus HSP-70 interacting protein, prevents cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress in the central nervous system  

PubMed Central

Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and protein misfolding are associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. ER stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptative response. However, severe ER stress can induce cell death. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase and co-chaperone Carboxyl Terminus HSP70/90 Interacting Protein (CHIP) prevents neuron death in the hippocampus induced by severe ER stress. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) were exposed to Tunicamycin, a pharmacological ER stress inducer, to trigger cell death. Overexpression of CHIP was achieved with a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) and significantly diminished ER stress-induced cell death, as shown by analysis of propidium iodide (PI) uptake, condensed chromatin, TUNEL and cleaved caspase 3 in the CA1 region of OHSCs. In addition, overexpression of CHIP prevented upregulation of both CHOP and p53 both pro-apoptotic pathways induced by ER stress. We also detected an attenuation of eIF2a phosphorylation promoted by ER stress. However, CHIP did not prevent upregulation of BiP/GRP78 induced by UPR. These data indicate that overexpression of CHIP attenuates ER-stress death response while maintain ER stress adaptative response in the central nervous system. These results indicate a neuroprotective role for CHIP upon UPR signaling. CHIP emerge as a candidate for clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases associated with ER stress.

Cabral Miranda, Felipe; Adão-Novaes, Juliana; Hauswirth, William W.; Linden, Rafael; Petrs-Silva, Hilda; Chiarini, Luciana B.

2015-01-01

318

Late Pleistocene Terraces in River Valleys of the Central Russian Plain: Morphology, Structure and History of Development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Morphology and sedimentary composition of low terraces of the Seim (the middle Dnieper catchment) and Khoper (the middle Don catchment) rivers were studied in the field (DGPS topographic profiling, hand and mechanical coring, examination of natural exposures) and in laboratory (grain size analysis, spore-pollen composition, 14C and OSL dating, microscopic study of quartz grains). Archaeological data have also been taken into account. It was found that Late Pleistocene river terraces were subject to complex reworking after the alluvial sedimentation had finished. Terraces may therefore contain sediments of different origin and terrace levels may vary according to the post-alluvial reworking. To establish terrace sedimentation mechanisms we supplemented lithological data collected in the field with quartz grains morphoscopy technique - microscopic study of quartz grains surfaces. The results exhibit wide participation of aeolian and slope wash sediments in terrace deposits, deep aeolian reworking of terrace alluvium during LGM that could be possible due to ground water lowering because of deep pre-LGM incision of rivers. The main difficulty in interpretation of morphoscopic results is that aeolian signals are sometimes not clear due to short duration of wind action over alluvial sands. River incision was detected within the interval since 50-60 to 25-30 ka BP (cal). High runoff increase is proposed as the reason of this incision, which is illustrated by formation of "big meanders" (macromeanders) in river valleys. There were probably several time spans of high runoff divided by low runoff intervals. By the time of LGM rivers had already been incised down to the modern river levels or deeper. The cryoaridic LGM time (20-23 ka BP cal) makes the most pronounced low runoff interval. After LGM, the last high runoff epoch started, which is dated to 13-18(19) ka BP (cal). Numerous now relict macromeanders were formed in river valleys at that time and considerable portions of modern floodplains were established. So the morphology of river valleys indicates contrasting runoff variations being the characteristic feature of the Valdai (Weichselian) cold stage.

Matlakhova, Ekaterina; Panin, Andrey

2014-05-01

319

Water circulation within a high-Arctic glaciated valley (Petunia Bay, Central Spitsbergen): Recharge of a glacial river  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article presents an investigation of the runoff of a glacial river located in the high Arctic region of Spitsbergen. The Ebba River runoff was measured during three melting seasons of 2007, 2008 and 2009. The most important component of the river recharge is the flow of melting water from glaciers (76-82% of total river runoff). However, the other components (surface water and groundwater) also made a significant contribution to the river recharge. The contribution of groundwater flow in total river runoff was estimated by measurements performed in four groups of piezometers located in different parts of the valley. The hydrogeological parameters that characterize shallow aquifer (thickness of the active layer, hydraulic conductivity, groundwater level fluctuations) were recognized by direct field measurements. The groundwater recharging river was the most variable recharge component, and ranged from 1% of the total runoff at the beginning of the melting season to even 27% at the end of summer.

Marciniak, Marek; Dragon, Krzysztof; Chudziak, ?ukasz

2014-05-01

320

An 11??000-year-long record of fire and vegetation history at Beaver Lake, Oregon, central Willamette Valley  

USGS Publications Warehouse

High-resolution macroscopic charcoal and pollen analysis were used to reconstruct an 11??000-year-long record of fire and vegetation history from Beaver Lake, Oregon, the first complete Holocene paleoecological record from the floor of the Willamette Valley. In the early Holocene (ca 11??000-7500 calendar years before present [cal??yr??BP]), warmer, drier summers than at present led to the establishment of xeric woodland of Quercus, Corylus, and Pseudotsuga near the site. Disturbances (i.e., floods, fires) were common at this time and as a result Alnus rubra grew nearby. High fire frequency occurred in the early Holocene from ca 11??200-9300??cal??yr??BP. Riparian forest and wet prairie developed in the middle Holocene (ca 7500??cal??yr??BP), likely the result of a decrease in the frequency of flooding and a shift to effectively cooler, wetter conditions than before. The vegetation at Beaver Lake remained generally unchanged into the late Holocene (from 4000??cal??yr??BP to present), with the exception of land clearance associated with Euro-American settlement of the valley (ca 160??cal??yr BP). Middle-to-late Holocene increases in fire frequency, coupled with abrupt shifts in fire-episode magnitude and charcoal composition, likely indicate the influence anthropogenic burning near the site. The paleoecological record from Beaver Lake, and in particular the general increase in fire frequency over the last 8500??years, differs significantly from other low-elevation sites in the Pacific Northwest, which suggests that local controls (e.g., shifts in vegetation structure, intensification of human land-use), rather than regional climatic controls, more strongly influenced its environmental history. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

Walsh, M.K.; Pearl, C.A.; Whitlock, C.; Bartlein, P.J.; Worona, M.A.

2010-01-01

321

Hydrology of the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer, south- central United States; a preliminary assessment of the regional flow system  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Data describing the aquifer framework and steady-state regional flow were assembled for the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer north of Vicksburg, Mississippi. The aquifer is part of the Mississippi embayment aquifer system. The 60 to 140 ft thick alluvial aquifer grades from gravel at the bottom to fine sand near the top. It is overlain by the Mississippi River Valley confining unit, which consists of 10 to 50 ft of silts, clays, and fine-grained sands. Underlying units consist of alternating sands and clays corresponding to regional hydrogeologic units of the Mississippi embayment aquifer system. The three-layer finite difference model was used to simulate two-dimensional confined or unconfined steady-state flow for predevelopment and 1972. Preliminary analysis of predevelopment flow indicates that recharge to the alluvial aquifer was from underlying aquifers and the confining unit. Rivers accounted for almost all discharge. Pumpage from the alluvial aquifer for irrigation substantially changed regional flow direction toward depressions in the potentiometric surface. Recharge from rivers and the confining unit increased and recharge from underlying aquifers decreased. Discharge to underlying aquifers increased and discharge to rivers decreased. Recharge from the confining unit reached a maximum of 1.3 inch/year for large parts of the aquifer. Nearly all drawdown exceeding 20 ft was at two locations in Arkansas--the Grande Prairie region, and west of Crowleys Ridge. Model results indicate the importance of leakage from rivers and the confining unite to providing recharge to sustain large amounts of pumpage from the alluvial aquifer. (USGS)

Ackerman, D.J.

1989-01-01

322

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA, FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2004  

SciTech Connect

This post-closure inspection and monitoring report has been prepared according to the stipulations laid out in the Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA)--Surface (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office [NNSA/NV], 2001), and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This report provides an analysis and summary of site inspections, subsidence surveys, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data for CAU 417, which is located in Hot Creek Valley, Nye County, Nevada. This report covers Calendar Year 2004. Inspections at CAU 417 are conducted quarterly to document the physical condition of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 soil covers, monuments, signs, fencing, and use restricted areas. The physical condition of fencing, monuments, and signs is noted, and any unusual conditions that could impact the integrity of the covers are reported. The objective of the soil moisture monitoring program is to monitor the stability of soil moisture conditions within the upper 1.2 meters (m) (4 feet [ft]) of the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) cover and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement exceeding the cover design performance expectations.

BECHTEL NEVADA; NNSA NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-04-01

323

Paleo erosion rates and climate shifts recorded by Quaternary cut-and-fill sequences in the Pisco valley, central Peru  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fluvial cut-and-fill sequences have frequently been reported from various sites on Earth. Nevertheless, the information about the past erosional regime and hydrological conditions have not yet been adequately deciphered from these archives. The Quaternary terrace sequences in the Pisco valley, located at ca. 13°S, offer a manifestation of an orbitally-driven cyclicity in terrace construction where phases of sediment accumulation have been related to the Minchin (48-36 ka) and Tauca (26-15 ka) lake level highstands on the Altiplano. Here, we present a 10Be-based sediment budget for the cut-and-fill terrace sequences in this valley to quantify the orbitally forced changes in precipitation and erosion. We find that the Minchin period was characterized by an erosional pulse along the Pacific coast where denudation rates reached values as high as 600±80 mm/ka for a relatively short time span lasting a few thousands of years. This contrasts to the younger pluvial periods and the modern situation when 10Be-based sediment budgets register nearly zero erosion at the Pacific coast. We relate these contrasts to different erosional conditions between the modern and the Minchin time. First, the sediment budget infers a precipitation pattern that matches with the modern climate ca. 1000 km farther north, where highly erratic and extreme El Niño-related precipitation results in fast erosion and flooding along the coast. Second, the formation of a thick terrace sequence requires sufficient material on catchment hillslopes to be stripped off by erosion. This was most likely the case immediately before the start of the Minchin period, because this erosional epoch was preceded by a >50 ka-long time span with poorly erosive climate conditions, allowing for sufficient regolith to build up on the hillslopes. Finally, this study suggests a strong control of orbitally and ice sheet forced latitudinal shifts of the ITCZ on the erosional gradients and sediment production on the western escarpment of the Peruvian Andes at 13° during the Minchin period.

Bekaddour, Toufik; Schlunegger, Fritz; Vogel, Hendrik; Delunel, Romain; Norton, Kevin P.; Akçar, Naki; Kubik, Peter

2014-03-01

324

Inferences on the hydrothermal system beneath the resurgent dome in Long Valley Caldera, east-central California, USA, from recent pumping tests and geochemical sampling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quaternary volcanic unrest has provided heat for episodic hydrothermal circulation in the Long Valley caldera, including the present-day hydrothermal system, which has been active over the past 40 kyr. The most recent period of crustal unrest in this region of east-central California began around 1980 and has included periods of intense seismicity and ground deformation. Uplift totaling more than 0.7 m has been centered on the caldera's resurgent dome, and is best modeled by a near-vertical ellipsoidal source centered at depths of 6-7 km. Modeling of both deformation and microgravity data now suggests that (1) there are two inflation sources beneath the caldera, a shallower source 7-10 km beneath the resurgent dome and a deeper source ˜15 km beneath the caldera's south moat and (2) the shallower source may contain components of magmatic brine and gas. The Long Valley Exploration Well (LVEW), completed in 1998 on the resurgent dome, penetrates to a depth of 3 km directly above this shallower source, but bottoms in a zone of 100°C fluid with zero vertical thermal gradient. Although these results preclude extrapolations of temperatures at depths below 3 km, other information obtained from flow tests and fluid sampling at this well indicates the presence of magmatic volatiles and fault-related permeability within the metamorphic basement rocks underlying the volcanic fill. In this paper, we present recently acquired data from LVEW and compare them with information from other drill holes and thermal springs in Long Valley to delineate the likely flow paths and fluid system properties under the resurgent dome. Additional information from mineralogical assemblages in core obtained from fracture zones in LVEW documents a previous period of more vigorous and energetic fluid circulation beneath the resurgent dome. Although this system apparently died off as a result of mineral deposition and cooling (and/or deepening) of magmatic heat sources, flow testing and tidal analyses of LVEW water level data show that relatively high permeability and strain sensitivity still exist in the steeply dipping principal fracture zone penetrated at a depth of 2.6 km. The hydraulic properties of this zone would allow a pressure change induced at distances of several kilometers below the well to be observable within a matter of days. This indicates that continuous fluid pressure monitoring in the well could provide direct evidence of future intrusions of magma or high-temperature fluids at depths of 5-7 km.

Farrar, Christopher D.; Sorey, Michael L.; Roeloffs, Evelyn; Galloway, Devin L.; Howle, James F.; Jacobson, Ronald

2003-10-01

325

Groundwater Quality, Age, and Probability of Contamination, Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Eagle River watershed is located near the destination resort town of Vail, Colorado. The area has a fastgrowing permanent population, and the resort industry is rapidly expanding. A large percentage of the land undergoing development to support that growth overlies the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer (ERWVFA), which likely has a high predisposition to groundwater contamination. As development continues, local organizations need tools to evaluate potential land-development effects on ground- and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. To help develop these tools, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority, conducted a study in 2006-2007 of the groundwater quality, age, and probability of contamination in the ERWVFA, north-central Colorado. Ground- and surface-water quality samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water, tritium, dissolved gases, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) determined with very low-level laboratory methods. The major-ion data indicate that groundwaters in the ERWVFA can be classified into two major groups: groundwater that was recharged by infiltration of surface water, and groundwater that had less immediate recharge from surface water and had elevated sulfate concentrations. Sulfate concentrations exceeded the USEPA National Secondary Drinking Water Regulations (250 milligrams per liter) in many wells near Eagle, Gypsum, and Dotsero. The predominant source of sulfate to groundwater in the Eagle River watershed is the Eagle Valley Evaporite, which is a gypsum deposit of Pennsylvanian age located predominantly in the western one-half of Eagle County.

Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

2009-01-01

326

Sedimentology and permeability architecture of Atokan Valley-Fill natural gas reservoirs, Boonsville Field, North-Central Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Boonsville {open_quotes}Bend Conglomerate{close_quotes} gas field in Jack and Wise Counties comprises numerous thin (10-20 ft) conglomeratic sandstone reservoirs within an approximately 1,000-ft-thick section of Atokan strata. Reservoir sandstone bodies commonly overlie sequence-boundary unconformities and exhibit overall upward-fining grain-size trends. Many represent incised valley-fill deposits that accumulated during postunconformity base-level rise. This stratal architectures is repeated at several levels throughout the Bend Conglomerate, suggesting that sediment accumulation occurred in a moderate- to low-accommodation setting and that base level fluctuated frequently. The reservoir units were deposited by low-sinuosity fluvial processes, causing a hierarchy of bed forms and grain-avalanche bar-front processes to produce complex grain-size variations. Permeability distribution is primarily controlled by depositional factors but may also be affected by secondary porosity created by the selective dissolution of chert clasts. High-permeability zones ({approximately}2.8 darcys) are characterized by macroscopic vugs composed of clast-shaped moldic voids ({approximately}5 mm in diameter). Tight (low-permeability) zones are heavily cemented by silica, calcite, dolomite, and ankerite and siderate cements. Minipermeameter, x-radiography, and petrographic studies and facies analysis conducted on cores from two Bend Conglomerate reservoirs (Threshold Development Company, I.G. Yates 33, and OXY U.S.A. Sealy {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} 2) illustrate the hierarchy of sedimentological and diagenetic controls on permeability architecture.

Burn, M.J.; Carr, D.L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Stuede, J. [Scientific Measurement Systems, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1994-12-31

327

Thrust faults of southern Diamond Mountains, central Nevada: Implications for hydrocarbons in Diamond Valley and at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

Overmature Mississippian hydrocarbon source rocks in the southern Diamond Mountains have been interpreted to be a klippe overlying less mature source rocks and represented as an analogy to similar conditions near Yucca Mountain (Chamberlain, 1991). Geologic evidence indicates an alternative interpretation. Paleogeologic mapping indicates the presence of a thrust fault, referred to here as the Moritz Nager Thrust Fault, with Devonian rocks emplaced over Permian to Mississippian strata folded into an upright to overturned syncline, and that the overmature rocks of the Diamond Mountains are in the footwall of this thrust. The upper plate has been eroded from most of the Diamond Mountains but remnants are present at the head of Moritz Nager Canyon and at Sentinel Mountain. Devonian rocks of the upper plate comprised the earliest landslide megabreccia. Later, megabreccias of Pennsylvanian and Permian rocks of the overturned syncline of the lower plate were deposited. By this interpretation the maturity of lower-plate source rocks in the southern Diamond Mountains, which have been increased by tectonic burial, is not indicative of conditions in Diamond Valley, adjacent to the west, where upper-plate source rocks might be present in generating conditions. The interpretation that overmature source rocks of the Diamond Mountains are in a lower plate rather than in a klippe means that this area is an inappropriate model for the Eleana Range near Yucca Mountain.

French, D.E.

1993-04-01

328

Creeping Deformation by the Precise Leveling Survey at the central part of the Longitudinal valley fault, Southeast Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We would like to know the distributed asperity for seismic hazard and forecast. It is closely related to slip distribution on the fault in interseismic. We focused on the accumulating process of the stress at the boundary between the creeping and the locking zone, to clear the behavior on the fault. The Longitudinal Valley Fault (LVF), 150 km long and NNE-SSW striking, passes through the eastern Taiwan, and represents the obvious surface expression of the collision boundary between the Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian continental plate. Owing to such a high deformation rate, many earthquakes have occurred along the LVF. The 1951 earthquake sequence represents a good example. The southern of LVF segment is observed to be high speed creeping based on the creep meter and leveling survey etc. The northern of LVF segment is not observed to be creeping and are found huge earthquakes evidence by paleo-seismology study in the trench. Yuili fault is one of the active segments of the longitudinal valley faults, is located around the boundary between creeping and locking area. It is reverse fault with east dip. We established about 30km leveling route from Yuli to Changbin to detect the vertical deformation in detail. Murase et al. (2009, 2010, and 2011) established about 30 km densely leveling route from Yuli to Changbin to detect the vertical deformation across the LVF for two years. As a result, the vertical displacement is 1.7 cm in 200 m across the LVF and 2.7 cm in 1000 m, referred to the west end of our route. In addition, a synclinal deformation is detected on the hanging wall side of the fault. This result is caused by the geometry of and the slipping distribution on the fault. The deformation detected in the period from 2009 to 2010 denotes the same tendency and rate of that from 2008 to 2009. We compared to the airphotographs which are taken by Taiwanese government at different age (1978 and 2007). If the creeping on the fault has continued for 30 years, the accumulation of displacement reaches about 1m, which is significantly-distinguishable by photogrammetric method. We measure profiles across the fault on 1978 and 2007 air-photograph by photogrammetric system respectively. The comparing result is shown that there are regional differences in deformation in relatively narrow region. About this result, we think two possibility; one is the creeping is not uniformity along the fault, second is the photogrammetry is not enough quality. We should actually check the creeping or not. We made thee new leveling survey lines in last year. In this August , we carried out second leveling survey in three area. We can show the variation of the deformation pattern and uplift rate across the LVF in this presentation.

Matta, N.; Murase, M.; Ishiguro, S.; Ozawa, K.; Lin, J.; Chen, W.; Lin, C.

2011-12-01

329

Earthquake Distribution and Mechanism of Faulting in the Rainbow Mountain-Dixie Valley-Fairview Peak Area, Central Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distribution of microearthquakes in west-central Nevada correlates well with fault-plane solutions for this area and defines a zigzag series of crustal fractures that vary in length from a few to several tens of kilometers. The main Fairview fault strikes northwest, and motion on this fault is right lateral oblique slip. In other parts of the active zone northeast-striking faults

Alan Ryall; Stephen D. Malone

1971-01-01

330

Farmers' perceptions of land degradation and their investments in land management: a case study in the Central Rift Valley of Ethiopia.  

PubMed

To combat land degradation in the Central Rift Valley (CRV) of Ethiopia, farmers are of crucial importance. If farmers perceive land degradation as a problem, the chance that they invest in land management measures will be enhanced. This study presents farmers' perceptions of land degradation and their investments in land management, and to what extent the latter are influenced by these perceptions. Water erosion and fertility depletion are taken as main indicators of land degradation, and the results show that farmers perceive an increase in both indicators over the last decade. They are aware of it and consider it as a problem. Nevertheless, farmers' investments to control water erosion and soil fertility depletion are very limited in the CRV. Results also show that farmers' awareness of both water erosion and soil fertility decline as a problem is not significantly associated with their investments in land management. Hence, even farmers who perceive land degradation on their fields and are concerned about its increase over the last decade do not significantly invest more in water erosion and soil fertility control measures than farmers who do not perceive these phenomena. Further research is needed to assess which other factors might influence farmers' investments in land management, especially factors related to socioeconomic characteristics of farm households and plot characteristics which were not addressed by this study. PMID:23511911

Adimassu, Zenebe; Kessler, Aad; Yirga, Chilot; Stroosnijder, Leo

2013-05-01

331

Combination of multi-sensor PSI monitoring data with a landslide damage inventory: the Tena Valley case study (Central Spanish Pyrenees) (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work illustrates the usefulness of integrating multi-sensor DInSAR monitoring data and landslide damage inventories for risk analysis. The approach has been applied in the Tena Valley (Central Spanish Pyrenees), where active landslides have caused significant damage on human structures over the last decade. Slope instability in this glacial trough is mainly related to very slow deep-seated slide-flows developed in Paleozoic slates. The PSI processing of ascending orbit ALOS PALSAR images (2006-2010), and descending orbit ERS & Envisat (2001-2007) and TerraSAR-X (2008) datasets, has provided heterogeneous displacement velocity measurements. The geometrical differences introduced by each satellite have been homogenized through the projection of the LOS displacements along the steepest slope gradient. Additionally, conventional DInSAR analysis of ALOS PALSAR images has permitted the detection of faster movements (up to 145cm yr-1) from 46 day interferograms (, increasing the number of detected landslides. Overall, the number of monitored landslides increased from 4% and 19%, using C- and X- band data, to 38% of the total (294) using L-band. In a subsequent phase, the multi-sensor velocities measured for the landslides are classified with respect to the magnitude of the road damage occurred in the 2008-2010 period. According to available measurements, minor or no damages are produced for landslide velocities smaller than 21 mm yr-1, moderate damages occurred between 21 and 160 mm yr-1, and major damages between 160 and 1450 mm yr-1.

Herrera, G.; Gutierrez, F.; García-Davalillo, J.; Galve, J.; Fernández-Merodo, J.; Cooksley, G.; Guerrero, J.; Duro, J.

2013-12-01

332

Trends in nitrate concentrations and determination of its origin using stable isotopes (18O and 15N) in groundwater of the Western Central Valley, Costa Rica.  

PubMed

A study was conducted to evaluate long-term trends in nitrate concentrations and to try to identify the origin of nitrate using stable isotopes (15N(NO3-) and 18O(NO3-)) in the aquifers of the western Central Valley, Costa Rica, where more than 1 million people depend on groundwater to satisfy their daily needs. Data from 20 sites periodically sampled for 4 to 17 years indicate an increasing trend in nitrate concentrations at five sites, which in a period ranging from 10 to 40 years, will exceed recommended maximum concentrations. Results of isotopic analysis indicate a correspondence between land use patterns and the isotopic signature of nitrate in groundwater and suggest that urbanization processes without adequate waste disposal systems, followed by coffee fertilization practices, are threatening water quality in the region. We conclude that groundwater management in this area is not sustainable, and that land use substitution processes from agricultural activity to residential occupation that do not have proper sewage disposal systems may cause a significant increment in the nitrate contaminant load. PMID:16989507

Reynolds-Vargas, Jenny; Fraile-Merino, Julio; Hirata, Ricardo

2006-08-01

333

Farmers' Perceptions of Land Degradation and Their Investments in Land Management: A Case Study in the Central Rift Valley of Ethiopia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To combat land degradation in the Central Rift Valley (CRV) of Ethiopia, farmers are of crucial importance. If farmers perceive land degradation as a problem, the chance that they invest in land management measures will be enhanced. This study presents farmers' perceptions of land degradation and their investments in land management, and to what extent the latter are influenced by these perceptions. Water erosion and fertility depletion are taken as main indicators of land degradation, and the results show that farmers perceive an increase in both indicators over the last decade. They are aware of it and consider it as a problem. Nevertheless, farmers' investments to control water erosion and soil fertility depletion are very limited in the CRV. Results also show that farmers' awareness of both water erosion and soil fertility decline as a problem is not significantly associated with their investments in land management. Hence, even farmers who perceive land degradation on their fields and are concerned about its increase over the last decade do not significantly invest more in water erosion and soil fertility control measures than farmers who do not perceive these phenomena. Further research is needed to assess which other factors might influence farmers' investments in land management, especially factors related to socioeconomic characteristics of farm households and plot characteristics which were not addressed by this study.

Adimassu, Zenebe; Kessler, Aad; Yirga, Chilot; Stroosnijder, Leo

2013-05-01

334

Potential and Limitations of Satellite Data to Identify Deaths of Individual Trees in a Central American Tropical Rain Forest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Logistical constraints on sample size and spatial scale limit individual-based field research on tropical trees. With remote sensing data, we may escape these limitations if fates of individuals can be tracked rigorously. We assessed the potential of readily available, commercial satellite data (QuickBird, 0.7 m pixels) obtained in 2003, to track the fate of individual crowns (> 40 m height) in tropical rain forest at La Selva, Costa Rica. The positions and shapes of these crowns in 1997 had been established using small-footprint LiDAR data with field verification. We focused first on a subset (n=180) of trees monitored in the field over the period 1997-2003. For the 60% of those trees whose crown positions and shapes could be tracked with confidence in the satellite image, we correctly recorded all 3 actual deaths. But we also incorrectly assigned 4 additional deaths to living individuals, due to the abundance of dark pixels in their crown areas. For the 40% of field-monitored trees for which our tracking in the satellite data was less confident (due to lack of image clarity), we correctly identified the one real death event, but incorrectly assigned 6 additional deaths to living trees. Thus, for the field-monitored trees, we grossly overestimated mortality in the satellite image (by 350%). Although currently available high resolution satellite imagery was not adequate for reliable monitoring of individuals, even for the largest forest trees, time series satellite data, rather than time series LiDAR to satellite data, might provide unbiased estimates of overall tree mortality rates if errors compensate. Satellite data may be also be useful as a labor and time saving complement to fieldwork on individual forest trees.

Thomas, R. Q.; Kellner, J. R.; Peart, D. R.

2005-12-01

335

Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada For Calendar Year 2006  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites, CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit, and CAS 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill, and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits (5), an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action.

None

2007-06-01

336

Late Quaternary alluvial fans of Emli Valley in the Ecemi? Fault Zone, south central Turkey: Insights from cosmogenic nuclides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Alluvial fans within the paraglacial Ecemi? River drainages on the Alada?lar Mountains in south central Turkey were studied using geomorphological, sedimentological, and chlorine-36 terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) surface exposure dating methods to examine the timing of alluvial fan abandonment/incision, and to understand the role of climatic and tectonic processes in the region. These alluvial fan complexes are among the best-preserved succession of alluvial fans in Turkey and they were offset by the major strike-slip Ecemi? Fault of the Central Anatolian Fault Zone. The alluvial fans are mostly composed of well-lithified limestone cobbles (5 to 25 cm in size), and comprise crudely stratified thick beds with a total thickness reaching up to about 80 m. TCN surface exposure dating indicates that the oldest alluvial fan surface (Yalak Fan) was likely formed and subsequently abandoned latest by 136.0 ± 23.4 ka ago, largely on the transition of the Penultimate Glaciation (Marine Isotope Stage 6, MIS 6) to the Last Interglacial (MIS 5) (i.e. Termination II). The second set of alluvial fan (Emli Fan) was possibly developed during the Last Interglacial (MIS 5), and incised twice by between roughly 97.0 ± 13.8 and 81.2 ± 13.2 ka ago. A younger alluvial fan deposit placed on relatively older erosional terraces of the Emli Fan suggests that it may have been produced during the Last Glacial Cycle (MIS 2). These events are similar to findings from other fluvial and lacustrine deposits throughout central Anatolia. The incision times of the Ecemi? alluvial fan surfaces largely coincide with major climatic shifts from the cooler glacial periods to warmer interglacial/interstadial conditions. This indicates that alluvial fans were produced by outwash sediments of paleoglaciers during cooler conditions, and, later, when glaciers started to retreat due to a major warming event, the excess water released from the glaciers incised the pre-existing fan surfaces. An alluvial fan in the study area was also cut by the Ecemi? Fault, highlighting the influence of tectonics on fan development. It was offset vertically 35 ± 3 m since at least 97.0 ± 13.8 ka, which suggests a 0.36 ± 0.06 mm a- 1 vertical slip-rate of the fault.

Akif Sar?kaya, M.; Y?ld?r?m, Cengiz; Çiner, Attila

2015-01-01

337

Rift Valley Fever Outbreak, Southern Mauritania, 2012  

PubMed Central

After a period of heavy rainfall, an outbreak of Rift Valley fever occurred in southern Mauritania during September–November 2012. A total of 41 human cases were confirmed, including 13 deaths, and 12 Rift Valley fever virus strains were isolated. Moudjeria and Temchecket Departments were the most affected areas. PMID:24447334

Sow, Abdourahmane; Faye, Ousmane; Ba, Yamar; Ba, Hampathé; Diallo, Diawo; Faye, Oumar; Loucoubar, Cheikh; Boushab, Mohamed; Barry, Yahya; Diallo, Mawlouth

2014-01-01

338

Death Imagery and Death Anxiety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated the relationship between death imagery and death anxiety among 179 undergraduate students. Results reveal subjects with low death anxiety scores had more positive death images. Subjects who imagined death to be young had a more positive image of death. Death was seen as male by majority of respondents. (Author/BL)

McDonald, Rita T.; Hilgendorf, William A.

1986-01-01

339

Source rock potential of Upper Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary (Maestrichtian-Danian) Moreno Formation, west-central San Joaquin Valley, California  

SciTech Connect

The Moreno Formation represents a base-of-slope to shelf-edge sedimentary sequence deposited along the central California continental margin during the late Maestrichtian to Danian (about 69-63 Ma). The formation consists of shales, mudstones, and siltstones with irregularly interbedded sandstones. The Marca Shale member of the Moreno Formation is particularly attractive as a potential petroleum source rock. The Marca contains sedimentologic, faunal, and geochemical evidence suggesting that it represents an anoxic depositional facies within the upper Moreno Formation. Submillimeter-scale depositional laminations are well preserved within the siliceous shale and diatomite of the Marca. Benthic foraminiferal biofacies are strikingly similar in patterns of abundance, dominance, and morphology to those found in Tertiary and Holocene sediments known or inferred to have been deposited under anoxic conditions. Also, total organic carbon (TOC) is as much as 7.25 wt.%. Laminated sediments contain kerogens of marine origin (Type II), whereas adjacent massive sediments contain organic matter dominated by kerogens of terrestrial origin (Type III). Data derived from this study indicate that the Moreno Formation has a significantly greater potential as a source of hydrocarbons than heretofore recognized. Rock-Eval pyrolysis and vitrinite reflectance data derived from core samples from a well near Coalinga show that the Marca shale is marginally mature at relatively shallow depths. To the northeast, the Moreno is more deeply buried beneath late Tertiary and Quaternary basin-fill sediments, and has probably reached generative levels of maturity. Sands within the Moreno Formation are productive in at least two small fields in the western San Joaquin Valley. Thus, the Cretaceous of the San Joaquin basin may represent an exploration frontier in an otherwise mature basin.

McGuire, D.J.

1986-04-01

340

The geochemistry of mercury in central Amazonian soils developed on the Alter-do-Chão formation of the lower Tapajós River Valley, Pará state, Brazil.  

PubMed

In an oxisol-spodosol system developed on the terrestrial surface of the lower Tapajós Valley, the determination of total mercury (Hg), organic carbon (C), iron and aluminum oxy-hydroxide (Fe(cdb) and Al(cdb)) concentrations in the surface soil horizons are used to characterise the geochemical processes controlling the accumulation of Hg in soils under natural vegetation cover and in deforested and cultivated sites. Oxisols from the plateau have homogeneous and relatively high background Hg contents and burdens constituting an important natural reservoir of Hg for the region (90-210 ng/g dry wt. and 19-33 mg/m2 for the first 20 cm). The Fe(cdb) and Al(cdb) contents associated with the fine fraction (< 63 microns) of the soil suggest that oxy-hydroxides and, particularly Al-substituted Fe oxy-hydroxides, control the Hg concentrations observed in all of the soils of the study region. Consequently, the geochemistry of these minerals along the slopes governs the accumulation or the release of the Hg according to the natural evolution of the soil cover and/or following the degradation of soils by erosion after deforestation and cultivation. These observations have important implications for the interpretation of Hg contamination patterns observed in Amazonian aquatic systems that could be linked to different drainage sources of Hg from the terrestrial surface. The sandification and podzolisation that is characteristic of the evolution of numerous pedological systems in the equatorial Amazon could be responsible for exportation of the naturally accumulated Hg, as for other metals, by acidic complexation and migration to the black waters of the Amazon. In the central Amazon region, as a result of the fragility of the soil cover, deforestation and cultivation, affecting principally the superficial soil, promote the selective erosion of fine particles enriched in oxides and Hg. The erosion of soil could be responsible for an important release of Hg, transported in particulate form by drainage waters. PMID:9850600

Roulet, M; Lucotte, M; Saint-Aubin, A; Tran, S; Rhéault, I; Farella, N; De Jesus Da silva, E; Dezencourt, J; Sousa Passos, C J; Santos Soares, G; Guimarães, J R; Mergler, D; Amorim, M

1998-11-01

341

Geologic cross section C-C' through the Appalachian basin from Erie County, north-central Ohio, to the Valley and Ridge province, Bedford County, south-central Pennsylvania  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geologic cross section C-C' is the third in a series of cross sections constructed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to document and improve understanding of the geologic framework and petroleum systems of the Appalachian basin. Cross section C-C' provides a regional view of the structural and stratigraphic framework of the Appalachian basin from north-central Ohio to the Valley and Ridge province in south-central Pennsylvania, a distance of approximately 260 miles (mi). This cross section is a companion to cross sections E-E' and D-D' that are located about 50 to 125 mi and 25 to 50 mi, respectively, to the southwest. Cross section C-C' contains much information that is useful for evaluating energy resources in the Appalachian basin. Although specific petroleum systems are not identified on the cross section, many of their key elements (such as source rocks, reservoir rocks, seals, and traps) can be inferred from lithologic units, unconformities, and geologic structures shown on the cross section. Other aspects of petroleum systems (such as the timing of petroleum generation and preferred migration pathways) may be evaluated by burial history, thermal history, and fluid flow models based on what is shown on the cross section. Cross section C-C' also provides a general framework (stratigraphic units and general rock types) for the coal-bearing section, although the cross section lacks the detail to illustrate key elements of coal systems (such as paleoclimate, coal quality, and coal rank). In addition, cross section C-C' may be used as a reconnaissance tool to identify plausible geologic structures and strata for the subsurface storage of liquid waste or for the sequestration of carbon dioxide.

Ryder, Robert T.; Trippi, Michael H.; Swezey, Christopher S.; Crangle, Robert D., Jr.; Hope, Rebecca S.; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Lentz, Erika E.

2012-01-01

342

Ground-water flow and recharge in the Mahomet Bedrock Valley Aquifer, east-central Illinois: A conceptual model based on hydrochemistry  

SciTech Connect

Major-ion and isotopic analyses of ground water have been used to develop a conceptual model of flow and recharge to the Mahomet Bedrock Valley Aquifer (MVA). The MVA is composed of clean, permeable sands and gravels and forms a basal'' fill up to 60 m thick in a buried, west-trending bedrock valley. A thick succession of glacial tills, some containing interbedded lenses of sand and gravel, covers the MVA. Three regions within the MVA have hydrochemically distinct ground-water types. A fourth ground-water type was found at the confluence of the MVA and the Mackinaw Bedrock Valley Aquifer (MAK) to the west.

Panno, S.V.; Hackley, K.C.; Cartwright, K.; Liu, C.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

1994-04-01

343

Estimates of natural ground-water discharge and characterization of water quality in Dry Valley, Washoe County, West-Central Nevada, 2002-2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Dry Valley Hydrographic Area is being considered as a potential source area for additional water supplies for the Reno-Sparks area, which is about 25 miles south of Dry Valley. Current estimates of annual ground-water recharge to Dry Valley have a considerable range. In undeveloped valleys, such as Dry Valley, long-term ground-water discharge can be assumed the same as long-term ground-water recharge. Because estimating ground-water discharge has more certainty than estimating ground-water recharge from precipitation, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Washoe County, began a three-year study to re-evaluate the ground-water resources by estimating natural ground-water discharge and characterize ground-water quality in Dry Valley. In Dry Valley, natural ground-water discharge occurs as subsurface outflow and by ground-water evapotranspiration. The amount of subsurface outflow from the upper part of Dry Valley to Winnemucca and Honey Lake Valleys likely is small. Subsurface outflow from Dry Valley westward to Long Valley, California was estimated using Darcy's Law. Analysis of two aquifer tests show the transmissivity of poorly sorted sediments near the western side of Dry Valley is 1,200 to 1,500 square feet per day. The width of unconsolidated sediments is about 4,000 feet between exposures of tuffaceous deposits along the State line, and decreases to about 1,500 feet (0.5 mile) west of the State line. The hydraulic gradient east and west of the State line ranges from 0.003 to 0.005 foot per foot. Using these values, subsurface outflow to Long Valley is estimated to be 50 to 250 acre-feet per year. Areas of ground-water evapotranspiration were field mapped and partitioned into zones of plant cover using relations derived from Landsat imagery acquired July 8, 2002. Evapotranspiration rates for each plant-cover zone were multiplied by the corresponding area and summed to estimate annual ground-water evapotranspiration. About 640 to 790 acre-feet per year of ground water is lost to evapotranspiration in Dry Valley. Combining subsurface-outflow estimates with ground-water evapotranspiration estimates, total natural ground-water discharge from Dry Valley ranges from a minimum of about 700 acre-feet to a maximum of about 1,000 acre-feet annually. Water quality in Dry Valley generally is good and primary drinking-water standards were not exceeded in any samples collected. The secondary standard for manganese was exceeded in three ground-water samples. One spring sample and two surface-water samples exceeded the secondary standard for pH. Dry Valley has two primary types of water chemistry that are distinguishable by cation ratios and related to the two volcanic-rock units that make up much of the surrounding mountains. In addition, two secondary types of water chemistry appear to have evolved by evaporation of the primary water types. Ground water near the State line appears to be an equal mixture of the two primary water chemistries and has as an isotopic characteristic similar to evaporated surface water.

Berger, David L.; Maurer, Douglas K.; Lopes, Thomas J.; Halford, Keith J.

2004-01-01

344

A new hypothesis for the amount and distribution of dextral displacement along the Fish Lake Valleynorthern Death  

E-print Network

­northern Death Valley­Furnace Creek fault zone, California-Nevada Byrdie Renik1,2 and Nicholas Christie-Blick1­northern Death Valley­Furnace Creek fault zone, a ~250 km long, predominantly right-lateral structure in California and Nevada, is a key element in tectonic reconstructions of the Death Valley area, Eastern

Christie-Blick, Nicholas

345

Spatial variability of ammonia and methane dairy emissions in the Central Valley, California with open-path mobile measurements during NASA DISCOVER-AQ 2013  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) is an important fine aerosol gas-phase precursor, with implications for regional air quality and climate change. Atmospheric methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas, with high uncertainties in the partitioning of various emission sources. Ammonia and methane agricultural emissions are highly variable in space and time and are highly uncertain, with a lack of widespread, in-situ measurements. We characterize the spatial variability of dairy livestock emissions by performing high resolution (5 Hz), in-situ, on-road mobile measurements of NH3, CH4, CO2, N2O, CO and H2O simultaneously with open-path sensors mounted on a passenger vehicle. This suite of multiple trace gas measurements allows for emission ratio calculations and separation of agricultural, petrochemical and combustion emission signatures. Mobile measurements were performed in the Tulare County dairy farm region (~120 dairy farms sampled downwind) in the Central Valley, California during NASA DISCOVER-AQ in winter 2013. We calculate the ?NH3/?CH4 and ?NH3/?CO2 emission ratios for each dairy farm sampled downwind. Emission plumes from individual farms are isolated based on known dairy farm locations and high resolution (1 km) surface wind field simulations. Background concentrations are subtracted to calculate the emission ratios. We find high spatial variability of ammonia and methane concentrations, with localized maximums of >1 ppmv NH3 downwind of individual dairy farms. The spatial extent of individual farm emission plumes are evaluated for NH3, CH4 and CO2, which all show well-defined enhancements localized to the dairy farms near the roadside (typical sampling proximity of ? 50 m). The NH3 concentrations are correlated with the distance from each dairy farm. The observed median concentration within 100 m downwind of the dairy farms is 63 ppbv NH3, with the 95th percentile at 417 ppbv NH3 and decreases to background conditions at ~500 m distance downwind. The diurnal variability of NH3 and CH4 background concentrations at the same locations sampled on multiple days is also evaluated; including a case study of a strong morning temperature inversion. Finally, we find the NH3/CH4 ratios at the sub-farm scale vary by at least a factor of two due to spatially heterogeneous farming practices. These results highlight the need for widespread, in-situ spatial and temporal sampling of agricultural regions to further characterize these heterogeneous emissions. Future analyses will inform emission inventories and regional air quality modeling efforts.

Miller, D. J.; Sun, K.; Tao, L.; Zondlo, M. A.

2013-12-01

346

Statistical evaluation of the effects of irrigation on chemical quality of ground water and base flow in three river valleys in north-central Kansas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The chemical quality of groundwater and base flow in three alluvial valleys in Kansas has been changed as a result of 10 or more years of irrigation. Sulfate concentrations in groundwater in the Prairie Dog Creek valley statistically larger during 1981-82 than before irrigation began. Concentrations of calcium, bicarbonate, sulfate, and dissolved solids in groundwater in the Republican River valley and calcium, sodium plus potassium, sulfate, chloride, and dissolved solids in groundwater in the Smoky Hill River valley were significantly larger during 1981-82 than before irrigation began. No significant long-term changes in nitrate concentrations in groundwater were detected in any of the three valleys. Irrigation generally has not caused contamination of groundwater in the alluvium with organic pesticides for which National Primary drinking-water standards have been established. The pesticide 2, 4-D was detected, however, at concentrations of less than 2 micrograms per liter in water from several wells and surface-water sampling sites. (USGS)

Spruill, T.B.

1985-01-01

347

Differential effects of natural polyphenols on neuronal survival in primary cultured central neurons against glutamate- and glucose deprivation-induced neuronal death.  

PubMed

Neuronal injury in the central nervous system following ischemic insult is believed to result from glutamate toxicity and glucose deprivation. In this study, polyphenols isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, including baicalin, baicalein, and wogonin, were investigated for their neuroprotective effects against glutamate/NMDA (Glu/NMDA) stimulation and glucose deprivation in primary cultured rat brain neurons. Cell death was accessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay for necrosis, and mitochondrial activity was accessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction activity assay. It was found that both baicalin and baicalein decreased LDH release of the cultured neurons after 24 h treatment, whereas wogonin profoundly increased LDH release after 2 h treatment and resulted in neuronal death after 24 h. Glu/NMDA treatment profoundly increased LDH release and moderately decreased MTT reduction activity in an NMDA receptor-dependent manner. Both baicalin and baicalein significantly reduced Glu/NMDA-increased LDH release, in which baicalein is much more potent than baicalin. Glu/NMDA-increased intracellular calcium was also significantly attenuated by baicalin and baicalein. Baicalin and baicalein did not affect glutamate receptor binding activity, but baicalein did moderately decrease Glu/NMDA-induced nitric oxide (NO) production. In the glucose deprivation (GD) study, baicalein but not baicalin showed significant protective effects on the GD-increased LDH release, without affecting the GD-induced NO production, in cultured rat brain neurons. These results suggest that baicalein is the most effective compound among three polyphenols tested in preventing neurotoxicity induced by both glutamate and GD, whereas baicalin was only effective in preventing glutamate toxicity. Wogonin might have a neurotoxic effect on the brain. PMID:12965234

Lee, Hsin-Hsueh; Yang, Ling-Ling; Wang, Ching-Cheung; Hu, Ssu-Yao; Chang, Shwu-Fen; Lee, Yi-Hsuan

2003-10-01

348

California's restless giant: the Long Valley Caldera  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Scientists have monitored geologic unrest in the Long Valley, California, area since 1980. In that year, following a swarm of strong earthquakes, they discovered that the central part of the Long Valley Caldera had begun actively rising. Unrest in the area persists today. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) continues to provide the public and civil authorities with current information on the volcanic hazard at Long Valley and is prepared to give timely warnings of any impending eruption.

Hill, David P.; Bailey, Roy A.; Hendley, James W., II; Stauffer, Peter H.; Marcaida, Mae

2014-01-01

349

The Politics of Place: Official, Intermediate and Community Discourses in Depopulated Rural Areas of Central Spain. The Case of the Riaza River Valley (Segovia, Spain)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides theoretical and methodological arguments to study the politics of space in small marginal and depopulated areas of Spain. The case for research is the Riaza river valley in the province of Segovia. Usually the analysis of rural space (and the geographical space in general) provides opposing presentations: vertical, between…

Paniagua, Angel

2009-01-01

350

Silicon Valley  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

It is no exaggeration to say that the innovations of the Silicon Valley have shaped our world. This excellent episode from the PBS series, American Experience, provides insight into how the magic happened, starting in 1957 when eight brilliant physicists quit their day jobs at the Shockley Semiconductor Company â and invented the microchip. Visitors will want to start with the Introduction, a first-rate synopsis of the early days of Silicon Valley. Next, click the Preview link for a teaser of the full-length film. A number of links feature clips from the documentary, and a full-length transcript may be downloaded free of cost. Also, offer your comments on the history of Silicon Valley in the Share Your Story section, and peruse the Timeline and the Photo Gallery.

351

Understanding Natural and Human-induced Impacts on the Hydrology of Central Rift Valley Lakes in Ethiopia Using Hydrologic Modeling and Remote Sensing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the past decades lake level fluctuations have been observed in the Central Rift Valley (CRV) lakes of Ethiopia, specifically Lake Abiyata, which is receding at an alarming rate. The cause is largely unknown and thus this research identifies and quantifies the causes and effects of climate variability and human-induced factors on the CRV lakes in Ethiopia using ground data, remote sensing, and hydrologic modeling. The CRV is a closed basin with an area of 10,185 sq. km. and contains three major surficially interconnected lakes: Lake Abiyata, Lake Langano and Lake Ziway. Remote sensing data (e.g. LANDSAT and TRMM) and ground data (e.g. river discharge, lake levels) was analyzed to understand the impact of climate variability on the lakes. Image processing such as radiometric correction and Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) was performed to calculate the surface area of the lakes and understand the temporal variation. The semi-distributed physically based hydrologic model, Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), was employed to estimate the total surface runoff to the lakes. SWAT was simulated from 1980 to 2010 and monthly preliminary calibration was performed from 1985 to 2000 using two river gauging stations. The preliminary R2 and Nash-Sutcliffe simulation efficiency values are 0.65 and 0.60, and 0.61 and 0.60. The output from SWAT, total runoff, along with precipitation and evaporation is used to calculate the water budget of each lake. Changes in the total volume of lake water were converted to changes in water heights using the geometry data of lakes (e.g. bathymetry data). The modeled lake level time series, which does not take into account the abstraction rates, are compared with the remote sensing and ground observed data. Surface area mapping from satellite imagery shows that the surface Area of L. Ziway and L. Langano remained unchanged throughout the period 1985 - 2010, whereas the surface area of L. Abiyata is decreasing from approximately 180 sq. km. in 1985 to 164 sq. km. in 2000 and to 95 sq. km. in 2005. The Lake level simulation result for L. Ziway showed that the mean, maximum and minimum water level elevations are 1636.2m, 1637.4m and 1635.3m and the observed values are 1636.1m, 1637.5m and 1635.7m respectively. Similarly, the simulated and observed mean, maximum and minimum lake level elevation values for L. Abiyata are 1579.4m, 1582.0m and 1578.7m, and 1578.1m, 1581.0m and 1576.5m respectively. Though the level of L. Ziway was consistent throughout the model period, there were temporal drops in water level which are attributed to climatic variability. However, for L. Abiyata, model simulated water level elevation are 1-2m above the observed which is equivalent to lake storage of 200-300 MCM. Precipitation form TRMM and gauge data on the area is consistent throughout the period of simulation. Therefore, the decrease in water level elevation is largely due to human impact, where there is pumping activity from L. Abiyata and its affluent stream for agricultural and industrial purposes in the area.

Seyoum, W. M.; Milewski, A.

2013-12-01

352

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit and 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits 9, an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action. Quarterly post-closure inspections are performed at the CASs that were closed in place at UC-I, UC-3, and UC-4. During calendar year 2005, site inspections were performed on March 15, June 16, September 22, and December 7. The inspections conducted at the UC-1 CMP documented that the site was in good condition and continued to show integrity of the cover unit. No new cracks or fractures were observed until the December inspection. A crack on the west portion of the cover showed evidence of lateral expansion; however, it is not at an actionable level. The crack will be sealed by filling with bentonite during the first quarter of 2006 and monitored during subsequent inspections. The cover vegetation was healthy and well established. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations. The inspections at UC-3 indicated that the sites are in excellent condition. All monuments and signs showed no displacement, damage, or removal. A small erosion gully from spring rain runoff was observed during the June inspection, but it did not grow to an actionable level during 2005. No other issues or concerns were identified. Inspections performed at UC-4 Mud Pit C cover revealed that erosion rills were formed during March and September exposing the geosynthetic clay liner. Both erosion rills were repaired within 90 days of reporting. Sparse vegetation is present on the cover. The overall condition of the monuments, fence, and gate are in good condition. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other four UC-4 locations. Subsidence surveys were conducted at UC-1 CMP and UC-4 Mud Pit C in March and September of 2005. The results of the subsidence surveys indicate that the covers are performing as expected, and no unusual subsidence was observed. The June vegetation survey of the UC-1 CMP cover and adjacent areas indicated that the revegetation has been very successful. The vegetation should continue to be monitored to document any changes in the plant community and identify conditions that could potentially require remedial action in order to maintain a viable vegetative cover on the site. Vegetation surveys should be conducted only as required. Precipitation during 2005 was above average, with an annual rainfall total of 21.79 centimeters (8.58 inches). Soil moisture content data show that the UC-1 CMP cover is performing as designed, with evapotranspiration effectively removing water from the cover. It is recommended to continue quarterly site inspections and the collection of soil moisture data for the UC-1 CMP cove

NONE

2006-04-01

353

Geomorphic analysis of late Quaternary faulting on Hilton Creek, Round Valley and Coyote warp faults, east-central Sierra Nevada, California, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geomorphic analysis of fault scarps and faulted surficial deposits allows for interpretation of late-Quaternary faulting on the Hilton Creek and Round Valley faults, two major range-front faults in the Sierra Nevada frontal fault system, as well as three faults on the north flank of the Coyote warp, a structure that separates the Round Valley fault from range-front faults to the south. Repeated movement on the two frontal faults during the last 15,000-25,000 years is evident from fault scarps on Tioga (oxygen isotope stage 2) surfaces. The scarp data indicate that vertical slip on the Round Valley fault may have been generally consistent along strike during this time period, and may have been characterized by 1.6-1.8 m of slip per faulting event. If so, 4 events may have occurred in either the last 7900-15,000 years or the last 13,000-15,000 years, 5-7 events may have occurred in the last 15,000-20,000 years, and 7-9 events may have occurred in the last 20,000-25,000 years, which suggests possible repeat times for faulting of 2000 to 4000 years for the Round Valley fault. Bevels in scarp slopes and displacement of probable Holocene-age surfaces support Holocene movement on the fault. On the Hilton Creek fault, scarps indicate that vertical slip increases northward along strike, reaching a maximum on the north side of McGee N Creek. Based on the size of scarps, individual displacements at McGee N Creek must have been either larger or more frequent than individual displacements on the Round Valley fault. The size of single-event displacements at McGee N Creek is unconstrained. However, if they have been on the order of 3-4 m per event, a size well within limits associated with normal faulting, then 7-9 faulting events could have occurred during the last 20,000-25,000 years, as proposed for the Round Valley fault, leaving open the possibility raised by other workers that the two faults may fail together. Holocene movement on the Hilton Creek fault is supported by morphology of the fault scarps and data from a trench at McGee N Creek that suggest a major surface-faulting event has occurred there within the last 3800 cal yr B.P. Estimating displacement on Tahoe (oxygen isotope stages 4-6) and pre-Tahoe (probably oxygen isotope stage 6) moraines from crest-height relations reveals that slip rates have been higher — perhaps twice as high — on the Hilton Creek fault at McGee N Creek than on the Round Valley fault throughout the late Quaternary. In contrast to the range-front faults, Coyote warp faults in the study area show no signs of Holocene movement. The lack of scarps on Tioga moraines, and the degraded morphology of scarps on adjacent Tahoe and pre-Tahoe moraines indicate that these faults have not ruptured in at least the last 15,000-25,000 years.

Berry, Margaret E.

1997-09-01

354

Mechanically and optically controlled graphene valley filter  

SciTech Connect

We theoretically investigate the valley-dependent electronic transport through a graphene monolayer modulated simultaneously by a uniform uniaxial strain and linearly polarized light. Within the Floquet formalism, we calculate the transmission probabilities and conductances of the two valleys. It is found that valley polarization can appear only if the two modulations coexist. Under a proper stretching of the sample, the ratio of the light intensity and the light frequency squared is important. If this quantity is small, the electron transport is mainly contributed by the valley-symmetric central band and the conductance is valley unpolarized; but when this quantity is large, the valley-asymmetric sidebands also take part in the transport and the valley polarization of the conductance appears. Furthermore, the degree of the polarization can be tuned by the strain strength, light intensity, and light frequency. It is proposed that the detection of the valley polarization can be realized utilizing the valley beam splitting. Thus, a graphene monolayer can be used as a mechanically and optically controlled valley filter.

Qi, Fenghua; Jin, Guojun, E-mail: gjin@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2014-05-07

355

Cot Deaths.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses the tragedy of crib deaths, giving particular attention to causes, prevention, and medical research on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Gives anecdotal accounts of coping strategies used by parents and families of SIDS infants. (DT)

Tyrrell, Shelagh

1985-01-01

356

Soil relative dating of moraine and outwash-terrace sequences in the northern part of the upper Arkansas Valley, Central Colorado, U.S.A.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Profile development indices for soils developed in moraines and outwash near Twin Lakes and in outwash near Leadville support the correlation of moraines with subdued morphology and two high outwash terraces with the Bull Lake glaciation (ca. 130-160 ka) and the correlation of hummocky moraines and two low outwash terraces with the Pinedale glaciation (ca. 14-47 ka). Elsewhere in the northern part of the upper Arkansas Valley, glacial sequences are correlated by mapping outwash terraces near the mouths of major tributaries of the Arkansas River. Near Twin Lakes, indices for soils on low, outer lateral moraines suggest that the older Pinedale glaciers extended beyond the margin of high, younger Pinedale lateral moraines with hummocky topography. A few subdued moraines near Twin Lakes and Leadville probably record one or more glaciations significantly older than the Bull Lake. The downvalley extent of Pinedale glaciers in the Mosquito Range on the east side of the Arkansas Valley is uncertain: most likely, Pinedale glaciers were almost as extensive as Bull Lake glaciers but built no prominent terminal moraines at their maximum positions.

Nelson, A.R.; Shroba, R.R.

1998-01-01

357

Identification of central Kenyan Rift Valley Fever virus vector habitats with Landsat TM and evaluation of their flooding status with airborne imaging radar  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne virus that affects livestock and humans in Africa. Landsat TM data are shown to be effective in identifying dambos, intermittently flooded areas that are potential mosquite breeding sites, in an area north of Nairobi, Kenya. Positive results were obtained from a limited test of flood detection in dambos with airborne high resolution L, C, and X band multipolarization SAR imagery. L and C bands were effective in detecting flooded dambos, but LHH was by far the best channel for discrimination between flooded and nonflooded sites in both sedge and short-grass environments. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a combined passive and active remote sensing program for monitoring the location and condition of RVF vector habitats, thus making future control of the disease more promising.

Pope, K. O.; Sheffner, E. J.; Linthicum, K. J.; Bailey, C. L.; Logan, T. M.; Kasischke, E. S.; Birney, K.; Njogu, A. R.; Roberts, C. R.

1992-01-01

358

Do ages of authigenic K-feldspar date the formation of Mississippi valley-type Pb-Zn deposits, central and southeastern United States?: Pb isotopic evidence  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Pb concentrations and isotopic compositions have been determined for authigenic overgrowths and detrital cores of K-feldspar from Cambrian sedimentary rocks in Texas, Tennessee, and Pennsylvania (group 1) and southeastern Missouri (group 2). Overgrowths and cores were separated by abrasion and analyzed separately. The disparity in Pb isotopic ratios of group 1 overgrowths and Pb in nearby Mississippi Valley-type deposits implies that the regional authigenic K-feldspar event was not synchronous with ore deposition in the southeastern United States. In contrast, Pb isotopic ratios from group 2 authigenic K-feldspar are similar to ratios in ores of southeastern Missouri, suggesting a genetic relation in late Paleozoic time. -from Authors

Aleinikoff, J.N.; Walter, M.; Kunk, M.J.; Hearn, P.P., Jr.

1993-01-01

359

Predictions of long-term behavior of a large-volume pilot test for CO2 geological storage in a saline formation in the Central Valley, California  

SciTech Connect

The long-term behavior of a CO{sub 2} plume injected into a deep saline formation is investigated, focusing on mechanisms that lead to plume stabilization. Key measures are plume migration distance and the time evolution of CO{sub 2} phase-partitioning, which are examined by developing a numerical model of the subsurface at a proposed power plant with CO{sub 2} capture in the San Joaquin Valley, California, where a large-volume pilot test of CO{sub 2} injection will be conducted. The numerical model simulates a four-year CO{sub 2} injection period and the subsequent evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume until it stabilizes. Sensitivity studies are carried out to investigate the effect of poorly constrained model parameters permeability, permeability anisotropy, and residual gas saturation.

Doughty, Christine; Myer, Larry R.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-11-01

360

Reemergence of Rift Valley Fever, Mauritania, 2010  

PubMed Central

A Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreak in humans and animals occurred in Mauritania in 2010. Thirty cases of RVF in humans and 3 deaths were identified. RVFV isolates were recovered from humans, camels, sheep, goats, and Culex antennatus mosquitoes. Phylogenetic analysis of isolates indicated a virus origin from western Africa. PMID:24447381

Faye, Ousmane; Ba, Hampathé; Ba, Yamar; Freire, Caio C.M.; Faye, Oumar; Ndiaye, Oumar; Elgady, Isselmou O.; Zanotto, Paolo M.A.; Diallo, Mawlouth

2014-01-01

361

Death Runthrough  

E-print Network

Broadcast Transcript: At a certain age, we all begin to feel our mortality. Here in South Korea, they're doing something about it. Test runs for death. Well, they're not really practicing dying. They're practicing with death's accessories. That is...

Hacker, Randi

2011-11-16

362

REACH SPECIFIC CHANNEL STABILIZATION BASED ON COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION OF VALLEY FILL HISTORY, ALLUVIAL ARCHITECTURE AND GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY IN A MOUNTAIN STREAM IN THE CENTRAL GREAT BASIN, NEVADA  

EPA Science Inventory

Kingston meadow, located in the Toiyabe Range, is one of many wet meadow complexes threatened by rapid channel incision in the mountain ranges of the central Great Basin. Channel incision can lower the baselevel for groundwater discharge and de-water meadow complexes resulting in...

363

Sociology of Death and Dying  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

According to Professor Michael C. Kearl, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at Trinity University, death is "the central dynamism underlying the life, vitality, and structure of the social order. . .[and] reveals the most central social processes and cultural values." To explain and explore the social and cultural implications of death, Kearl created this extensive guide to sociological thanatology. The guide consists of a series of hypertextual essays divided into nine major sections, including Death and the Social Order, Bids for Symbolic Immortality and Longevity, and How We Die. Throughout the site, numerous links to relevant thanatological resources are provided.

364

Simulation of the effects of management alternatives on the stream-aquifer system, South Fork Solomon River Valley between Webster Reservoir and Waconda Lake, north-central Kansas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

With extensive irrigation use of both surface water and groundwater in the South Fork Solomon River valley shortages of these water supplies have been created. A two-dimensional digital model of transient groundwater flow was applied to investigate the potential effects on the stream aquifer system of seven management alternatives. These alternatives included proposals to conserve surface water supplies by lining the Osborne Irrigation Canal with clay, replacing the lateral canals with pipe, removing phreatophytes, decreasing surface water use by 75%, 50%, or 25% and replacing it with groundwater sources, and continuing 1978 groundwater use and 1970-78 average surface water use until the end of the 20th century. Results were assessed by comparison of drawdowns of hydraulic head in the alluvial aquifer and base flow for each simulation. As listed in order of the smallest to the greatest potential effects on the system relative to drawdown and base flow the alternatives are: (1) removal of one-half of the phreatophytes; (2) continuation of 1978 groundwater withdrawals and average 1970-78 surface water supply; (3) replacement of the lateral canals with pipe; (4) lining the Osborne Irrigation Canal with clay; (5) decrease of surface water use by 25% and replacement of it with groundwater; (6) decrease of surface water use by 50% and replacement of it with groundwater; and (7) decrease of surface water use by 75% and replacement of it with groundwater. The removal of one-half of the phreatophytes would result in a decrease in average drawdown in the alluvial aquifer to about 1.74 ft and an increase in base flow of the Solomon River to about 12.3 cu ft/sec. The decrease of surface water supply by 75 % and a corresponding increase in groundwater withdrawal would result in an increase in drawdown in the aquifer to about 2.5 ft and a decrease in base flow to about 6.8 cu ft/sec. (Lantz-PTT)

Burnett, R.D.; Reed, T.B.

1985-01-01

365

Incised-valley-fill succession affected by rapid tectonic uplifts: An example from the uppermost Pleistocene to Holocene of the Isumi River lowland, central Boso Peninsula, Japan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The burial history of the Isumi River lowland was reconstructed based on a facies analysis of borehole and geoslicer samples, undisturbed sediment samples collected by 4.0-m-long, 0.35-m-wide, and 0.01- to 0.05-m-deep wedge-shaped steel case, together with an analysis of molluscan shell assemblages for environmental assessment and 14C age measurements. The borehole successions constitute a part of a depositional sequence in a fluvial- and wave-dominated incised valley. The facies succession and age data suggest that the lower part of the succession (before 7.0 calendar kilo years before present (cal. ky BP)) has, in a broad scale, an aggradational to retrogradational stacking pattern, although a short period of sediment progradation occurred during 9.0-8.5 cal. ky BP. The upper part (7.0 cal. ky BP-present) is a prograding succession of beach-shoreface and bayhead delta sediments deposited in an enclosed bay environment (ca. 3.5 cal. ky BP). The facies changes from an open to an enclosed marine environment resulted from barrier formation. Age measurements indicate that the Choja and Izumi terrace surfaces formed some time after 6.5 cal. ky BP and around 3.5 cal. ky BP, respectively. The temporary progradation during 9.0-8.5 cal. ky BP was probably associated with several meters of tectonic uplift, which resulted in an increase in the sediment supply owing to intensified fluvial and marine erosion. After a tectonic uplift at about 6.4 ky BP, a wide strand plain started to form along the bay shore as a result of sediment transport from both north and south of the bay by longshore currents. However, a barrier developed about 3.5 cal. ky BP, after the Izumi Surface was uplifted. Subsequently, this uplift transported sediments probably bypassed the southern part of the lowland and accumulated near the mouth of the bay to form this barrier, as is indicated by the poor strand plain development after this time. Strand-plain progradation might have been prevented by strong wave influences from the Pacific Ocean and longshore currents, resulting from both the recession of the sea cliffs south and north of the lowland and from the uplift, which shifted the shoreline seaward and changed the shoreline environment from an enclosed bay into a more open marine environment.

Sakai, Tetsuya; Fujiwara, Osamu; Kamataki, Takanobu

2006-03-01

366

Buried Quaternary Valleys In NW Europe - Aquifers and Drilling Hazards  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Buried Quaternary valleys are extremely widespread in the formerly glaciated, low- land areas of NW Europe (Huuse &Lykke-Andersen 2000, Fig. 4). The valleys may be several hundred metres deep, some kilometres across and few to several tens of kilometres long. Most of the deep valleys have irregular length profiles with sills and basins, unlike standard subaerial river systems. We interpret these as overdeepened valleys, formed mainly by subglacial meltwater erosion. Buried valleys located on- shore often provide sheltered reservoirs of clean groundwater, and much attention is presently focused on locating onshore valleys and quantifying their potential as groundwater aquifers. In nearshore areas, buried valleys may be a risk factor by pro- viding pathways of salt-water intrusion of onshore groundwater aquifers. Far offshore, buried valleys are located in the shallow subsurface above the prolific oil and gas fields of the central North Sea. Here, the valleys pose a risk for drilling operations by hosting shallow gas and potentially unstable sediments. The central North Sea is now largely covered by 3D seismic data, which often image the buried valleys in a level of de- tail much greater than that available onshore. Hence offshore valleys imaged by 3D seismic data may be used as analogues for groundwater reservoirs onshore NW Eu- rope. Here, we present examples of buried valleys from onshore, nearshore and far offshore locations, to illustrate how genetically and morphologically identical valleys may benefit or hamper the exploitation of subsurface accummulations of groundwater and hydrocarbons. Huuse, M. &Lykke-Andersen, H. 2000. Buried Quaternary valleys in the eastern Dan- ish North Sea: morphology and origin. Quaternary Science Reviews 19, 1233-1253.

Huuse, M.; Lykke-Andersen, H.; Piotrowski, J.

367

Valley Networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

[figure removed for brevity, see original site]

Released 30 July 2003

Valley networks are a relatively common feature in the southern highlands of Mars. This THEMIS visible image contains several of these small channels. Some appear clustered near the smaller crater at the top of the image. There is still some debate over the origin of these enigmatic martian landforms. Were they caused by overland flow after precipitation, underground sapping, or a combination of both?

Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -40.6, Longitude 165.2 East (194.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

Note: this THEMIS visual image has not be