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1

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Central Oklahoma Aquifer in central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export files The data sets in this report include digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Central Oklahoma aquifer in central Oklahoma. This area encompasses all or part of Cleveland, Lincoln, Logan, Oklahoma, Payne, and Pottawatomie Counties. The Central Oklahoma aquifer includes the alluvial and terrace deposits along major streams, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations, and the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups. The Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits consist of unconsolidated clay, silt, sand, and gravel. The Permian-age Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations consist of sandstone with interbedded siltstone and mudstone. The Permian-age Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups consist of sandstone, shale, and thin limestone. The Central Oklahoma aquifer underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma where the aquifer is used extensively for municipal, industrial, commercial, and domestic water supplies. Most of the usable ground water within the aquifer is from the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations. Substantial quantities of usable ground water also are present in the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups, and in alluvial and terrace deposits associated with the major streams. The aquifer boundaries, hydraulic conductivity and recharge values, and ground-water level elevation contours are from previously published reports.

Runkle, D. L.; Christenson, S. C.; Rea, Alan

1997-01-01

2

Three-Dimensional Geologic Model of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, South-Central Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer of south-central Oklahoma encompasses more than 850 square kilometers and is the principal water resource for south-central Oklahoma. Rock units comprising the aquifer are characterized by limestone, dolomite, and sandstones a...

C. D. Blome J. O. Puckette J. R. Faith M. P. Pantea N. Osborn S. Christenson S. Pack T. Halihan

2010-01-01

3

Ground-water quality assessment of the central Oklahoma Aquifer, Oklahoma; project description  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In April 1986, the U.S. Geological Survey began a pilot program to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. The program, known as the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program, is designed to acquire and interpret information about a variety of water-quality issues. The Central Oklahoma aquifer project is one of three ground-water pilot projects that have been started. The NAWQA program also incudes four surface-water pilot projects. The Central Oklahoma aquifer project, as part of the pilot NAWQA program, will develop and test methods for performing assessments of ground-water quality. The objectives of the Central Oklahoma aquifer assessment are: (1) To investigate regional ground-water quality throughout the aquifer in the manner consistent with the other pilot ground-water projects, emphasizing the occurrence and distribution of potentially toxic substances in ground water, including trace elements, organic compounds, and radioactive constituents; (2) to describe relations between ground-water quality, land use, hydrogeology, and other pertinent factors; and (3) to provide a general description of the location, nature, and possible causes of selected prevalent water-quality problems within the study unit; and (4) to describe the potential for water-quality degradation of ground-water zones within the study unit. The Central Oklahoma aquifer, which includes in descending order the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation, the Chase Group, the Council Grove Group, the Admire Group, and overlying alluvium and terrace deposits, underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma and is used extensively for municipal, industrial, commercial, and domestic water supplies. The aquifer was selected for study by the NAWQA program because it is a major source for water supplies in central Oklahoma and because it has several known or suspected water-quality problems. Known problems include concentrations of arsenic, chromium, selenium, and gross-alpha activity that exceed drinking-water standards. Suspected problems include possible contamination of the aquifer by oil-field brines and drilling fluids, pesticides, industrial chemicals, septic-tank effluent, fertilizers, and leakage from sewage systems and underground tanks used for storage of hydrocarbons. There are four major components of the Central Oklahoma aquifer project. The first component is the collection and analysis of existing information, including chemical, hydrologic, and land-use data. The second component is the geohydrologic and geochemical investigations of the aquifer flow system. The third component is the sampling for a wide variety of inorganic, organic, and radioactive constituents as part a regional survey that will produce a consistent set of data among all ground-water pilot projects. These data can be used to: (1) Define regional ground-water quality within the Central Oklahoma aquifer, and (2) compare water quality in the Central Oklahoma aquifer to the water quality in the other ground-water study units of the NAWQA program. The fourth component is topical studies that will address, in more detail, some of the major water-quality issues pertaining to the aquifer.

Christenson, S. C.; Parkhurst, D. L.

1987-01-01

4

Airborne and Ground Electrical Surveys for Subsurface Mapping of the Arbuckle Aquifer, Central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Airborne and ground electrical surveys have been conducted to map the subsurface hydrogeologic character of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south central Oklahoma. An understanding of the geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics is necessary to evaluate groundwater flow through the highly faulted, structurally complex, carbonate aquifer. Results from this research will further understanding of the aquifer and will assist in managing

D. Smith; B. D. Smith; C. D. Blome; N. Osborn

2008-01-01

5

Ground-water-quality assessment of the central Oklahoma aquifer, Oklahoma - Analysis of available water-quality data through 1987  

Microsoft Academic Search

The water quality of the Central Oklahoma aquifer was assessed using the information available through 1987. The following conclusions were drawn from the available data and the contingency-table statistics. The word common is used to describe situations where approximately 10% or more of the data exceeded a water quality standard: (1) groundwater concentrations of nitrate and selenium commonly exceed the

D. L. Parkhurst; S. C. Christenson; J. L. Schlottmann

1989-01-01

6

Vertical Gradients in Water Chemistry in the Central High Plains Aquifer, Southwestern Kansas and Oklahoma Panhandle, 1999.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to describe vertical gradients in water chemistry in the central High Plains aquifer in southwestern Kansas and the Oklahoma Panhandle. In 1998-99, 18 monitoring wells at nine sites in southwestern Kansas and the Oklahoma Pan...

P. B. McMahon

2001-01-01

7

Ground-Water-Quality Assessment of the Central Oklahoma Aquifer, Oklahoma: Analysis of Available Water-Quality Data through 1987. National Water-Quality Assessment. (Chapter B).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the paper is to report on the assessment of the water quality of the Central Oklahoma aquifer using the information available through 1987. The scope of the work included compiling data from Federal, State, and local agencies; evaluating th...

D. L. Parkhurst S. C. Christenson J. L. Schlottmann

1994-01-01

8

Ground-Water Quality in the Central High Plains Aquifer, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, 1999.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to describe the ground-water quality of the central High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Water samples collected during April- August 1999 from 74 randomly distributed domestic wa...

M. F. Becker B. W. Bruce L. M. Pope W. J. Andrews

2002-01-01

9

Geochemical Investigation of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, South-Central Oklahoma, 2004-06  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A geochemical reconnaissance investigation of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma was initiated in 2004 to characterize the ground-water quality at an aquifer scale, to describe the chemical evolution of ground water as it flows from recharge areas to discharge in wells and springs, and to determine the residence time of ground water in the aquifer. Thirty-six water samples were collected from 32 wells and springs distributed across the aquifer for chemical analysis of major ions, trace elements, isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, dissolved gases, and age-dating tracers. In general, the waters from wells and springs in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer are chemically suitable for all regulated uses, such as public supplies. Dissolved solids concentrations are low, with a median of 347 milligrams per liter (mg/L). Two domestic wells produced water with nitrate concentrations that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's nitrate maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 mg/L. Samples from two wells in the confined part of the aquifer exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) for chloride of 250 mg/L and the SMCL of 500 mg/L for dissolved solids. Water samples from these two wells are not representative of water samples from the other wells and springs completed in the unconfined part of the aquifer. No other water samples from the Arbuckle-Simpson geochemical reconnaissance exceeded MCLs or SMCLs, although not every chemical constituent for which the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has established a MCL or SMCL was analyzed as part of the Arbuckle-Simpson geochemical investigation. The major ion chemistry of 34 of the 36 samples indicates the water is a calcium bicarbonate or calcium magnesium bicarbonate water type. Calcium bicarbonate water type is found in the western part of the aquifer, which is predominantly limestone. Calcium magnesium bicarbonate water is found in the eastern part of the aquifer, which is predominantly a dolomite. The major ion chemistry for these 34 samples is consistent with a set of water-rock interactions. Rainfall infiltrates the soil zone, where the host rock, limestone or dolomite, dissolves as a result of uptake of carbon dioxide gas. Some continued dissolution of dolomite and precipitation of calcite occur as the water flows through the saturated zone. The major ion chemistry of the two samples from wells completed in the confined part of the aquifer indicates the water is a sodium chloride type. Geochemical inverse modeling determined that mixing of calcite-saturated recharge water with brine and dissolving calcite, dolomite, and gypsum accounts for the water composition of these two samples. One of the two samples, collected at Vendome Well in Chickasaw National Recreation Area, had a mixing fraction of brine of about 1 percent. The brine component of the sample at Vendome Well is likely to account for the relatively large concentrations of many of the trace elements (potassium, fluoride, bromide, iodide, ammonia, arsenic, boron, lithium, selenium, and strontium) measured in the water sample. Carbon-14, helium-3/tritium, and chlorofluorocarbons were used to calculate ground-water ages, recharge temperatures, and mixtures of ground water in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. Thirty four of 36 water samples recharged the aquifer after 1950, indicating that water is moving quickly from recharge areas to discharge at streams and springs. Two exceptions to this classification were noted in samples 6 and 15 (Vendome Well). Ground-water ages determined for these two samples by using carbon-14 are 34,000 years (site 6) and 10,500 years (site 15). Concentrations of dissolved argon, neon, and xenon in water samples were used to determine the temperature of the water when it recharged the aquifer. The mean annual air temperature at Ada, Oklahoma, is 16 degrees Celsius (C) and the median temperature of the 30 reconnaissance water samples was 18.1 C. The av

Christenson, Scott; Hunt, Andrew G.; Parkhurst, David L.

2009-01-01

10

Airborne and Ground Electrical Surveys for Subsurface Mapping of the Arbuckle Aquifer, Central Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Airborne and ground electrical surveys have been conducted to map the subsurface hydrogeologic character of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south central Oklahoma. An understanding of the geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics is necessary to evaluate groundwater flow through the highly faulted, structurally complex, carbonate aquifer. Results from this research will further understanding of the aquifer and will assist in managing the water resources of the region. The major issues include water quality, the allocation of water rights, and the potential impacts of pumping on springs and stream. Four areas in the Hunton anticline area, with distinctly different geology, were flown with a frequency domain helicopter electromagnetic system (HEM) in March, 2007. Ground electrical studies include dc resistivity imaging and natural field audiomagnetotelluric (AMT), and magnetotelluric (MT) surveys. The HEM resistivity and total field magnetic survey was flown in four blocks, A through D, mostly with a line spacing of 400 m. Block A extends from the Chickasaw National Recreational Area (CHIC) to Mill Creek on the west side of the anticline. The surface geology of this block is mostly dolomitic limestone of the Arbuckle Group that is in fault contact with younger Paleozoic clastic rocks. The flight line spacing was 800 meters in the western half of the block and 400 meters in the eastern part. Airborne magnetic data indicate that the Sulphur fault bends south to merge with the Mill Creek fault which substantiates an earlier hypothesis first made from interpretation of gravity data. Block B, located on the north side of the anticline consists of mostly of Arbuckle and Simpson Group rocks. Block C, covering most of the Clarita horst on the east side of the anticline, consists of the Upper Ordovician to the Lower Pennsylvanian shales. Block D, which was flown to include a deep test well site at Spears ranch, consisted of eight lines spaced at 400 meters. The HEM data are being used to more precisely locate faults, refine the lithostratigraphic units, and to map the depth and extent of shallow epikarst. The MT and AMT data revealed deep structural contacts and a transition between fresh and highly mineralized ground water between springs in the CHIC. The dc resistivity survey has greatly helped in mapping major faults both within dolomitic limestone and clastic units. Ground resistivity surveys also suggest that, in places, the faults within limestone are zones of lower resistivity and map low resistivity surficial epikarst a several meters thick. Ground penetrometer data also has been used to define the depth extent of epikarst in selected areas and the data correlate well with the dc resistivity and HEM resistivity depth sections.

Smith, D.; Smith, B. D.; Blome, C. D.; Osborn, N.

2008-12-01

11

Vertical gradients in water chemistry in the central High Plains aquifer, southwestern Kansas and Oklahoma panhandle, 1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The central High Plains aquifer is the primary source of water for domestic, industrial, and irrigation uses in parts of Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Water-level declines of more than 100 feet in some areas of the aquifer have increased the demand for water deeper in the aquifer. The maximum saturated thickness of the aquifer ranged from 500 to 600 feet in 1999. As the demand for deeper water increases, it becomes increasingly important for resource managers to understand how the quality of water in the aquifer changes with depth. In 1998?99, 18 monitoring wells at nine sites in southwestern Kansas and the Oklahoma Panhandle were completed at various depths in the central High Plains aquifer, and one monitoring well was completed in sediments of Permian age underlying the aquifer. Water samples were collected once from each well in 1999 to measure vertical gradients in water chemistry in the aquifer. Tritium concentrations measured in ground water indicate that water samples collected in the upper 30 feet of the aquifer were generally recharged within the last 50 years, whereas all of the water samples collected at depths more than 30 feet below the water table were recharged more than 50 years ago. Dissolved oxygen was present throughout the aquifer, with concentrations ranging from 1.7 to 8.4 mg/L. Water in the central High Plains aquifer was predominantly a calcium-bicarbonate type that exhibited little variability in concentrations of dissolved solids with depth (290 to 642 mg/L). Exceptions occurred in some areas where there had been upward movement of mineralized water from underlying sediments of Permian age and areas where there had been downward movement of mineralized Arkansas River water to the aquifer. Calcium-sulfate and sodium-chloride waters dominated and concentrations of dissolved solids were elevated (862 to 4,030 mg/L) near the base of the aquifer in the areas of upward leakage. Dissolution of gypsum or anhydrite and halite in sediments of Permian age by ground water was the likely source of calcium, sulfate, sodium, and chloride in those waters. Calcium-sodium-sulfate waters dominated, and concentrations of dissolved solids were as large as 4,916 mg/L near the water table in the area of downward leakage. Dissolution of minerals in sedimentary deposits of marine origin in upstream areas of the Arkansas River drainage were the likely sources of calcium, sodium, and sulfate in those waters. Nitrate was detected throughout the aquifer and the background concentration was estimated to be 2.45 mg/L as N. The largest nitrate concentrations (8.28, 22, and 54.4 mg/L as N) occurred in recently recharged water collected adjacent to irrigated fields. Three pesticides (atrazine, metolachlor, simazine) and five pesticide degradation products (alachlor ethanesulfonic acid, alachlor oxanilic acid, deethylatrazine, metolachlor ethanesulfonic acid, metolachlor oxanilic acid) were detected in recently recharged water from six water-table wells. Five of the six wells were adjacent to irrigated fields. These data indicate that concentrations of nitrate and pesticides increased over time in some areas of the aquifer as a result of agricultural activities. Results from this study indicate that vertical gradients in water chemistry existed in the central High Plains aquifer. The chemical gradients resulted from chemical inputs to the aquifer from underlying sediments of Permian age, from the Arkansas River, and from agricultural activities. In areas where those chemical inputs occurred, water quality in the aquifer was impaired and may not have been suitable for some intended uses.

McMahon, Peter B.

2001-01-01

12

Frame Disputes in a Natural Resource Controversy: The Case of the Arbuckle Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines citizen responses to the proposed sale of water from the Arbuckle Simpson Aquifer in Oklahoma. Landowners claimed individual property rights as the primary justification for the sale of the water, while a citizens group opposing the sale of water based its arguments on the future viability of the resource and the cultural significance of the aquifer for

Thomas E. Shriver; Charles Peaden

2009-01-01

13

Discrete and Continuous Gravity Studies of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, South-Central Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of a high-resolution gravity study using traditional and novel observational methods focused on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer (ASA), a major ground-water system in Oklahoma that is experiencing demand from distant regions. We have partnered with the National Park Service to conduct gravity surveys of prominent faults near the Chickasaw National Recreation Area. These structures, created during late Paleozoic orogenies, may serve as conduits for ground-water flow to the springs and wells that are important natural resources of this park. Gravity data were collected in two modes: traditional observations at discrete stations and a new approach utilizing continuous data from a marine gravity meter deployed on a moving land vehicle. With the discrete data, we clearly define the extensions of the major Sulphur, South Sulphur, and Mill Creek fault zones beneath younger, unfaulted rocks that form the surface geology of the park. Gravity anomalies range from 1 mGal to 15 mGal and arise from the juxtaposition of Paleozoic carbonate and clastic rocks across the faults. With the continuous gravity data, we increase the number of gravity observations by two or more orders of magnitude, although the precision of the continuous gravity varies with the quality of the navigation (Eotvos correction) and the measurement of vertical motion of the vehicle. To explore the limits of this continuous gravity technique, we performed numerous tests operating the vehicle at different speeds and using multiple GPS sensors that range in capability from recreational to survey quality. These tests demonstrate the tradeoff between the along-track data resolution and the precision of the gravity anomaly.

Scheirer, D.; Hosford Scheirer, A.; Herr, R.

2005-12-01

14

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the alluvial and terrace deposits along the North Canadian River from Oklahoma City to Eufaula Lake in east-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export and nonproprietary format files This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the alluvial and terrace deposits along the North Canadian River from Oklahoma City to Eufaula Lake in east-central Oklahoma. Ground water in 710 square miles of Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits along the North Canadian River is an important source of water for irrigation, industrial, municipal, stock, and domestic supplies. The aquifer, composed of alluvial and terrace deposits, consists of sand, silt, clay, and gravel. The aquifer is underlain and in hydraulic connection with the upper zone of the Permian-age Garber-Wellington aquifer and the Pennsylvanian-age Ada-Vamoosa aquifer. Most of the lines in the four digital data sets were digitized from a published ground-water modeling report but portions of the aquifer boundary data set was extracted from published digital geologic data sets. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

Adams, G. P.; Runkle, Donna; Rea, Alan; Becker, C. J.

1997-01-01

15

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the alluvial and terrace deposits along the North Canadian River from Canton Lake to Lake Overholser in Central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export and nonproprietary format files This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the alluvial and terrace deposits along the alluvial and terrace deposits along the North Canadian River from Canton Lake to Lake Overholser in central Oklahoma. Ground water in approximately 400 square miles of Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace aquifer is an important source of water for irrigation, industrial, municipal, stock, and domestic supplies. The aquifer consists of clay, silt, sand, and gravel. Sand-sized sediments dominate the poorly sorted, fine to coarse, unconsolidated quartz grains in the aquifer. The hydraulically connected alluvial and terrace deposits unconformably overlie Permian-age formations. The aquifer is overlain by a layer of wind-blown sand in parts of the area. Most of the lines in the aquifer boundary, hydraulic conductivity, and recharge data sets were extracted from published digital surficial geology data sets based on a scale of 1:250,000. The ground-water elevation contours and some of the lines for the aquifer boundary, hydraulic conductivity, and recharge data sets were digitized from a ground-water modeling report about the aquifer published at a scale of 1:250,000. The hydraulic conductivity values and recharge rates also are from the ground-water modeling report. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

Adams, G. P.; Rea, Alan; Runkle, D. L.

1997-01-01

16

Hydrogeologic Investigation of the Ogallala Aquifer in Roger Mills and Beckham Counties, Western Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Ogallala aquifer underlies portions of 10 counties in western Oklahoma. Regionally, it is part of the High Plains aquifer that underlies 174,000 square miles in eight states in the central United States. The study area for this investigation, defined ...

M. Belden N. I. Osborn

2002-01-01

17

A Multilayer Aquifer Model of the Ogallala Formation in Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The effects of layering on an aquifer were studied to obtain a better definition of the properties of the Ogallala Formation in the panhandle of Oklahoma. Two sand models simulated the conditions found in this area. Laboratory analyses of sand samples fro...

J. T. Chowning

1973-01-01

18

Water supplies of East Central and Southeastern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

To plan effectively for future growth in East Central and Southeastern Oklahoma, sound information on public water systems is imperative. This report evaluates the 229 public water systems in 24 counties in East Central and Southeastern Oklahoma. Areas included are: the Central Oklahoma Economic Development District, the Kiamichi Economic Development District of Oklahoma, and the Southern Oklahoma Development Authority. Quantity,

J. W. Ferrell; J. B. Perry; W. F. Harris

1984-01-01

19

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export and nonproprietary format files The data sets in this report include digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma. The Enid isolated terrace aquifer covers approximately 82 square miles and supplies water for irrigation, domestic, municipal, and industrial use for the City of Enid and western Garfield County. The Quaternary-age Enid isolated terrace aquifer is composed of terrace deposits that consist of discontinuous layers of clay, sandy clay, sand, and gravel. The aquifer is unconfined and is bounded by the underlying Permian-age Hennessey Group on the east and the Cedar Hills Sandstone Formation of the Permian-age El Reno Group on the west. The Cedar Hills Sandstone Formation fills a channel beneath the thickest section of the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in the midwestern part of the aquifer. All of the data sets were digitized and created from information and maps in a ground-water modeling thesis and report of the Enid isolated terrace aquifer. The maps digitized were published at a scale of 1:62,500. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

Becker, C. J. Runkle, D. L.; Rea, Alan

1997-01-01

20

A climatic guide for North Central Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This guide provides some climatological data pertaining to central and north central Oklahoma. The information was derived from standard reference material to reflect what general surface meteorological characteristics exist in that region. It is intended to assist those individuals involved in the implementation of the first ARM site in that locale. A similar guide already exists for the region involved in Kansas entitled, ``One Regional ARM Guide for Climatic Evaluation``. The Oklahoma Kansas area was selected as the first site from the process reported in the ``Identification, Recommendation and Justification of Potential Locales for ARM Sites``.

Brown, R.M.

1991-06-01

21

A climatic guide for North Central Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This guide provides some climatological data pertaining to central and north central Oklahoma. The information was derived from standard reference material to reflect what general surface meteorological characteristics exist in that region. It is intended to assist those individuals involved in the implementation of the first ARM site in that locale. A similar guide already exists for the region involved in Kansas entitled, One Regional ARM Guide for Climatic Evaluation''. The Oklahoma Kansas area was selected as the first site from the process reported in the Identification, Recommendation and Justification of Potential Locales for ARM Sites''.

Brown, R.M.

1991-06-01

22

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Elk City Aquifer in western Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export and nonproprietary format files This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Elk City aquifer in western Oklahoma. The aquifer covers an area of approximately 193,000 acres and supplies ground water for irrigation, domestic, and industrial purposes in Beckham, Custer, Roger Mills, and Washita Counties along the divide between the Washita and Red River basins. The Elk City aquifer consists of the Elk City Sandstone and overlying terrace deposits, made up of clay, silt, sand and gravel, and dune sands in the eastern part and sand and gravel of the Ogallala Formation (or High Plains aquifer) in the western part of the aquifer. The Elk City aquifer is unconfined and composed of very friable sandstone, lightly cemented with clay, calcite, gypsum, or iron oxide. Most of the grains are fine-sized quartz but the grain size ranges from clay to cobble in the aquifer. The Doxey Shale underlies the Elk City aquifer and acts as a confining unit, restricting the downward movement of ground water. All of the data sets were digitized and created from information and maps in a ground-water modeling thesis and report of the Elk City aquifer. The maps digitized were published at a scale of 1:63,360. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

Becker, C. J.; Runkle, D. L.; Rea, Alan

1997-01-01

23

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the High Plains Aquifer in western Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export files This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the High Plains aquifer in western Oklahoma. This area encompasses the panhandle counties of Cimarron, Texas, and Beaver, and the western counties of Harper, Ellis, Woodward, Dewey, and Roger Mills. The High Plains aquifer underlies approximately 7,000 square miles of Oklahoma and is used extensively for irrigation. The High Plains aquifer is a water-table aquifer and consists predominately of the Tertiary-age Ogallala Formation and overlying Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits. In some areas the aquifer is absent and the underlying Triassic, Jurassic, or Cretaceous-age rocks are exposed at the surface. These rocks are hydraulically connected with the aquifer in some areas. The High Plains aquifer is composed of interbedded sand, siltstone, clay, gravel, thin limestones, and caliche. The proportion of various lithological materials changes rapidly from place to place, but poorly sorted sand and gravel predominate. The rocks are poorly to moderately well cemented by calcium carbonate. The aquifer boundaries, hydraulic conductivity, and recharge data sets were created by extracting geologic contact lines from published digital surficial geology maps based on a scale of 1:125,000 for the panhandle counties and 1:250,000 for the western counties. The water-level elevation contours and some boundary lines were digitized from maps in a published water-level elevation map for 1980 based on a scale of 1:250,000. The hydraulic conductivity and recharge values in this report were used as input to the ground-water flow model on the High Plains aquifer. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

Becker, C. J.; Runkle, D. L.; Rea, Alan

1997-01-01

24

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Rush Springs Aquifer in western Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Rush Spring aquifer in western Oklahoma. This area encompasses all or part of Blaine, Caddo, Canadian, Comanche, Custer, Dewey, Grady, Stephens, and Washita Counties. These digital data sets were developed by Mark F. Becker to use as input into a computer model that simulated ground-water flow in the Rush Springs aquifer (Mark F. Becker, U.S. Geological Survey, written commun., 1997). For the purposes of modeling the ground-water flow in the Rush Springs aquifer, Mark F. Becker (written commun., 1997) defined the Rush Springs aquifer to include the Rush Springs Formation, alluvial and terrace deposits along major streams, and parts of the Marlow Formations, particularly in the eastern part of the aquifer boundary area. The Permian-age Rush Springs Formation consists of highly cross-bedded sandstone with some interbedded dolomite and gypsum. The Rush Springs Formation is overlain by Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits that consist of unconsolidated clay, silt, sand, and gravel. The Rush Springs Formation is underlain by the Permian-age Marlow Formation that consists of interbedded sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, gypsum-anhydrite, and dolomite beds (Mark F. Becker, written commun., 1997). The parts of the Marlow Formation that have high permeability and porosity are where the Marlow Formation is included as part of the Rush Springs aquifer. The Rush Springs aquifer underlies about 2,400 square miles of western Oklahoma and is an important source of water for irrigation, livestock, industrial, municipal, and domestic use. Irrigation wells are reported to have well yields greater than 1,000 gallons per minute (Mark F. Becker, written commun., 1997). Mark F. Becker created some of the aquifer boundaries, hydraulic conductivity, and recharge data sets by digitizing parts of previously published surficial geology maps. The hydraulic conductivity and recharge values are the input data to the ground-water flow model (Mark F. Becker, written commun., 1997). The water-level elevation data set was prepared at a scale of 1:250,000 by Mark F. Becker (written commun., 1997) from water levels measured in wells prior to the year 1950. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

Runkle, D. L.; Becker, M. F.; Rea, Alan

1997-01-01

25

Analysis of Regional Aquifers in the Central Midwest of the United States in Kansas, Nebraska, and Parts of Arkansas, Colorado Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. Summary. Regional Aquifer-System Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The major purpose of the CMRASA study is to describe the water resources in the regional aquifers that occur in rocks of Cambrian through Cretaceous age. Other purposes of the study are to evaluate potential uses of the water considering quantity, current...

D. G. Jorgensen J. O. Helgesen D. C. Signor R. B. Leonard J. L. Imes S. C. Christenson

1996-01-01

26

40 CFR 81.124 - North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region...Regions § 81.124 North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality...

2012-07-01

27

Microgravity monitoring of recharge in a karst aquifer in southwestern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Natural and artificial recharge of a shallow karst aquifer in Harmon County, Oklahoma, is being studied by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and the US Bureau of Reclamation. The aquifer, the Permian Blaine Formation, consists of interbedded gypsum, shale, and dolomite. It is the only significant fresh water aquifer developed in evaporite rocks in the USA. The Blaine Formation forms major cave systems locally and generally consists of an intricate network of caves, cavities, sinks, and dissolution-collapse structures affecting the five gypsum bed subunits. At the recharge-demonstration sites, the Blaine is roughly 200 feet thick. At each site, observations wells cluster about a central recharge well which injects rainfall runoff at the depth of maximum void space (approximately 100 to 200 feet) determining from drilling. Annual variation in water level is up to 50 feet. Local storms can cause a rise of several tens of feet in a few days and a gradual decrease over several weeks. This may lead to a regional increase in water table elevation near the recharge well ( mounding'), and localized filling of voids in the gypsum. Both of these effects are expected to cause changes in the local gravity field following a heavy rainfall. For example, the filling of a 5 meter radius cylindrical void at a depth of 25 meters would produce a 46 microgal anomaly, easily detectable by a microgravity meter after instrumental and tidal drift corrections are made. To look for these changes, microgravity profiles will be conducted across the recharge zones. If correlation of gravity with measured water levels and recharge volume is demonstrated, microgravity surveys may prove useful in siting recharge wells from surface measurements alone.

Young, R.A.; Ahern, J.L. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). School of Geology and Geophysics)

1993-02-01

28

Digital map of hydraulic conductivity for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital data set consists of hydraulic conductivity contours and polygons for the High Plains aquifer in the central United States. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 45 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to almost 104 degrees west longitude. The area covers 174,000 square miles and is present in Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Kansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, and South Dakota.

Cederstrand, J. R.; Becker, M. F.

1998-01-01

29

Effects of municipal ground-water withdrawals on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma consists of a thick sequence of folded and faulted carbonate and clastic rocks of Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician age. Fractures and karst features locally increase the aquifer's capacity to transmit and store ground water. The aquifer is a principal source of water for municipal and rural users. A hydrologic study was conducted to evaluate the effects of municipal ground-water withdrawal from the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer on local ground-water levels and discharge from nearby springs and streams in south-central Pontotoc County. A municipal well was pumped for 63 hours at an average rate of 1,170 gallons per minute. A maximum observed drawdown of 0.3 feet was recorded half a mile from the pumping well. Drawdown was observed as far as 1.2 miles from the pumping well. No measurable response was observed at any of the surface-water-discharge measurement sites; however, recharge from precipitation may have masked any decreases in discharge caused by the pumping. Simultaneous pumping of two municipal wells for 241 hours at average rates of 1,170 and 2,730 gallons per minute resulted in a maximum observed drawdown of 1.3 feet recorded at an average distance of 0.80 miles from the pumping wells. The most distant drawdown observed was at an average distance 1.1 miles from the pumped wells. Less that 2 days after pumping stopped, increases in springflow were recorded at two springs; it is unknown whether these discharge responses reflect the effects of recharge from precipitation, or the combined effects of precipitation and the cessation of ground-water withdrawal. The effects of the stress tests on the hydrologic system were offset by recharge from concurrent precipitation. The maximum observed drawdown represents about 6 percent of the median natural water-level fluctuation during the study period. The effect of drawdown could become critical during extended periods of low precipitation, if water levels are already near the bottom of domestic wells in the area. However, a comparison of maximum observed drawdown (1.3 ft) with the minimum saturated thickness of fresh ground water (1,500 ft) suggests that municipal pumping had little effect on the amount of ground water stored in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the study area. This evaluation is based on the limited pumping rates and times of the stress tests.

Savoca, M. E.; Bergman, D. L.

1994-01-01

30

Geophysical Investigation of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, Oklahoma, to Determine the Influence of Subsurface Structure on Groundwater Flow  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate an area of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in southern Oklahoma by employing near-surface geophysical surveying. This predominantly carbonate aquifer encompasses the Simpson, Arbuckle, and Timbered Hills Groups, which range in age from Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician. The aquifer serves as a principle water source for the surrounding area and feeds several major springs and creeks, including Pennington Creek,

E. Lewallen; K. Ramachandran; B. Tapp

2007-01-01

31

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Tillman terrace and alluvial aquifer in southwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export and nonproprietary format files This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Tillman terrace and alluvial aquifer in southwestern Oklahoma. The Tillman terrace aquifer encompasses the unconsolidated terrace deposits and alluvium associated with the North Fork of the Red River and the Red River in the western half of Tillman County. These sediments consist of discontinuous layers of clay, sandy clay, sand, and gravel. The aquifer extends over an area of 285 square miles and is used for irrigation and domestic purposes. Granite and the Hennessey Formation outcrop in northern parts of the aquifer where alluvial deposits are absent. These outcrops were included as part of the aquifer in a thesis that modeled the ground-water flow in the aquifer. Most of the aquifer boundaries and some of the lines in the hydraulic conductivity and recharge data sets were extracted from a published digital surficial geology data set based on a scale of 1:250,000. Most of the lines in the hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and 1969 water-level elevation contour data sets, and one line in the aquifer boundary data set were digitized from a paper map published at a scale of 1:249,695 in a thesis in which the ground-water flow in the aquifer was modeled. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

Becker, C. J.; Runkle, D. L.; Rea, Alan

1997-01-01

32

Hydrogeologic data for the Blaine aquifer and associated units in southwestern Oklahoma and northwestern Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is a compilation of hydrogeologic data collected for an areal ground-water investigation of the Blaine aquifer and associated units in southwestern Oklahoma and northwestern Texas. The study area includes parts of Greer, Harmon, and Jackson counties in Oklahoma and parts of Childress, Collingsworth, Hall, Hardeman, and Wilbarger counties in Texas. The Blaine aquifer consists of cavernous gypsum and dolomite beds. Water from the Blaine aquifer supports a local agriculture based mainly on irrigated cotton and wheat. The purpose of the study was to determine the availability, quantity, and quality of ground water from the Blaine aquifer and associated units. This report provides a reference for some of the data that was used as input into a computer ground-water flow model that simulates ground-water flow in the Blaine aquifer. The data in this report consists of: (1) Monthly or periodic water-level measurements in 134 wells; (2) daily mean water-level measurements for 11 wells equipped with water-level recorders; (3) daily total precipitation measurements from five precipitation gages; (4) low-flow stream-discharge measurements for 89 stream sites; (5) miscellaneous stream-discharge measurements at seven stream sites; (6) chemical analyses of surface water from 78 stream sites during low-flow periods; (7) chemical analyses of ground water from 41 wells; and (8) chemical analyses of runoff water collected at five sites.

Runkle, D. L.; Bergman, D. L.; Fabian, R. S.

1997-01-01

33

Reproductive Cycle of the Red Shiner, Notropis lutrensis, in Central Texas and South Central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The breeding season of red shiner extended from April to September in south central Oklahoma and central Texas in both 1976 and 1977. Ovarian regression occurred in midsummer of 1977; this coincided with hot, dry weather. In Oklahoma, but not in Texas, ovarian regression was followed by recrudescence during a brief period of rainfall. The midseason regression did not occur

Russel T. Farringer III; Anthony A. Echelle; Steven F. Lehtinen

1979-01-01

34

Aquifer characteristics, water availability, and water quality of the Quaternary aquifer, Osage County, northeastern Oklahoma, 2001-2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Additional sources of water are needed on the Osage Reservation for future growth and development. The Quaternary aquifer along the Arkansas River in the Osage Reservation may represent a substantial water resource, but limited amounts of hydrogeologic data were available for the aquifer. The study area is about 116 square miles of the Quaternary aquifer in the Arkansas River valley and the nearby upland areas along the Osage Reservation. The study area included the Arkansas River reach downstream from Kaw Lake near Ponca City, Oklahoma to upstream from Keystone Lake near Cleveland, Oklahoma. Electrical conductivity logs were produced for 103 test holes. Water levels were determined for 49 test holes, and 105 water samples were collected for water-quality field analyses at 46 test holes. Water-quality data included field measurements of specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and nitrate (nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen). Sediment cores were extracted from 20 of the 103 test holes. The Quaternary aquifer consists of alluvial and terrace deposits of sand, silt, clay, and gravel. The measured thickness of the alluvium ranged from 13.7 to 49.8 feet. The measured thickness of the terrace sediments ranged from 7 to 93.8 feet. The saturated thickness of all sediments ranged from 0 to 38.2 feet with a median of 24.8 feet. The weighted-mean grain size for cores from the alluvium ranged from 3.69 to 0.64 f, (0.08- 0.64 millimeter), and ranged from 4.02 to 2.01 f (0.06-0.25 millimeter) for the cores from terrace deposits. The mean of the weighted-mean grain sizes for cores from the alluvium was 1.67 f (0.31 millimeter), and the terrace deposits was 2.73 f (0.15 millimeter). The hydraulic conductivity calculated from grain size of the alluvium ranged from 2.9 to 6,000 feet per day and of the terrace deposits ranged from 2.9 to 430 feet per day. The calculated transmissivity of the alluvium ranged from 2,000 to 26,000 feet squared per day with a median of 5,100 feet squared per day. Water in storage in the alluvium was estimated to be approximately 200,000 acre-feet. The amount of water annually recharging the aquifer was estimated to be approximately 4,800 acre-feet. Specific conductance for all water samples ranged from 161 to 6,650 microsiemens per centimeter. Median specific conductance for the alluvium was 683 microsiemens per centimeter and for the terrace deposits was 263 microsiemens per centimeter. Dissolved-solids concentrations, estimated from specific conductance, for water samples from the aquifer ranged from 88 to 3,658 milligrams per liter. Estimated median dissolved- solids concentration for the alluvium was 376 milligrams per liter and for the terrace deposits was 145 milligrams per liter. More than half of the samples from the Quaternary aquifer were estimated to contain less than 500 milligrams per liter dissolved solids. Field-screened nitrate concentrations for the sampling in December 2001-August 2002 ranged from 0 to 15 milligrams per liter. The field-screened nitrate concentrations for the second sampling in September 2002 were less than corresponding laboratory reported values.

Mashburn, Shana L.; Cope, Caleb C.; Abbott, Marvin M.

2003-01-01

35

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2013-07-01

36

Fish and Habitat Heterogeneity in Four Streams in the Central Oklahoma\\/Texas Plains Ecoregion  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined fish assemblages and habitat characteristics in four streams within the Oklahoma portion of the Central Oklahoma\\/Texas Plains Ecoregion. Our objective was to evaluate the heterogeneity of habitat and fish assemblages within a single ecoregion. We were also interested in whether observed patterns in habitat and fish assemblages were related. We measured habitat characteristics and sampled fish at four

Conrad S. Toepfer; Lance R. Williams; A. David Martinez; William L. Fisher

1998-01-01

37

Magnetic, Electromagnetic, and Bathymetric Survey of the Lake of the Arbuckles, South-Central Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In August 2009, we conducted a week-long geophysical and sonar survey of the Lake of the Arbuckles, within Chickasaw National Recreation Area in south-central Oklahoma. In this region, Pennsylvanian-aged orogenic deformation and sedimentation created the conditions that now govern the groundwater recharge, storage, and flow in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer, one of the most important bedrock aquifers in Oklahoma. The Lake of the Arbuckles reservoir, filled about 40 years ago, occupies an area where two major faults disrupt the geologic units that constitute the aquifer. The Reagan fault and the Mill Creek fault are hypothesized to intersect beneath the lake, based on available geologic exposures and inferences from gravity, magnetic, and helicopter electromagnetic (EM) observations in areas surrounding the lake. To understand the obscured geometry of these faults, we developed a pontoon-raft to carry a broad-band (15 kHz - 135 kHz) EM bird and a cesium-vapor magnetic sensor across the lake. We towed the raft 15 m behind a small boat to minimize EM and magnetic interference from the vessel, and we collected data on 200-m-spaced transects across much of the lake. The Reagan fault has a large electrical conductivity contrast and magnetic signature due to its juxtaposition at shallow depth of magnetic Proterozoic basement rocks with Paleozoic carbonate and clastic rocks. Initial results will show how the lake survey magnetic transects help to define the location of this fault beneath the lake. In addition, we collected dual-frequency sonar data to map the present-day bathymetry of the lake, and we collected vertical, water-column profiles of sound velocity, conductivity, temperature, pH, redox potential, and dissolved oxygen. The water-column profiles allow correction of the sonar travel-times to depth and estimation of the EM response of the lake water, which will be essential in later inversion modeling of the EM data. In addition, comparisons of the present-day bathymetry with pre-reservoir topographic contours and with sedimentation range line transects surveyed prior to the filling of the reservoir will yield estimates of sedimentation rates and patterns of the lake.

Scheirer, D. S.; Smith, D. V.; Coffee, R.; Cason, J.

2009-12-01

38

40 CFR 81.124 - North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.124 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.124 North...

2013-07-01

39

Gravity investigations of the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geological configuration of the Arbuckle Uplift in the vicinity of Chickasaw National Recreation Area in south-central Oklahoma plays a governing role in the distribution of fresh and mineral springs within the park and in the existence of artesian wells in and around the park. A confining layer of well-cemented conglomerate lies immediately below the surface of the recreation area, and groundwater migrates from an area of meteoric recharge where rocks of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer crop out as close as two kilometers to the east of the park. Prominent, Pennsylvanian-aged faults are exposed in the aquifer outcrop, and two of the fault traces project beneath the conglomerate cover toward two groups of springs within the northern section of the park. We conducted gravity fieldwork and analysis to investigate the subsurface extensions of these major faults beneath Chickasaw National Recreation Area. By defining gravity signatures of the faults where they are exposed, we infer that the Sulphur and Mill Creek Faults bend to the south-west where they are buried. The South Sulphur Fault may project westward linearly if it juxtaposes rocks that have a density contrast opposite that of that fault's density configuration in the Sulphur Syncline area. The Sulphur Syncline, whose eastern extent is exposed in the outcrop area of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, does not appear to extend beneath Chickasaw National Recreation Area nor the adjacent City of Sulphur. The South Sulphur Fault dips steeply northward, and its normal sense of offset suggests that the Sulphur Syncline is part of a graben. The Mill Creek Fault dips vertically, and the Reagan Fault dips southward, consistent with its being mapped as a thrust fault. The Sulphur and Mill Creek Synclines may have formed as pull-apart basins in a left-lateral, left-stepping strike-slip environment. The character of the gravity field of Chickasaw National Recreation Area is different from the lineated gravity field in the area of Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer outcrop. This change in character is not due to the presence of the overlying conglomerate layer, which is quite thin (<100 m) in the area of the park with the springs. The presence of relatively high-density Precambrian basement rocks in a broader region suggests that significant gravity anomalies may arise from variations in basement topography. Understanding of the geological configuration of Chickasaw National Recreation Area can be improved by expanding the study area and by investigating complementary geophysical and borehole constraints of the subsurface.

Scheirer, Daniel S.; Scheirer, Allegra Hosford

2006-01-01

40

An Integrated Approach to Determine Ground-water Surface Water Flux in a Contaminated Aquifer-Wetland System at the Norman Landfill Research Site, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

An area of research in progress at the Norman Landfill Research Site in Oklahoma involves a small wetland that overlies a landfill leachate plume. The wetland-aquifer system actively exchanges contaminants and nutrients. These chemicals move from the wetland to the aquifer and vice versa depending on the ground- water\\/surface-water exchange rate and flow direction. The ground-water\\/surface-water flow has to be

I. Mendoza-Sanchez; M. Phanikumar; J. T. McGuire; J. Masoner; I. Cozzarelli

2008-01-01

41

Distribution and variability of nitrogen and phosphorus in the alluvial, High Plains, Rush Springs, and Blaine aquifers in western Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Aquifers are the primary source of water for drinking and agricultural purposes in western Oklahoma. Health concerns about consuming nitrogen and an increased reliance on ground water for drinking necessitate a better understanding of the cause and effect of contamination from nutrients. The purpose of this project was to compile nutrients data from the National Water Information System data base for the alluvial aquifers west of longitude 98 degrees W. and from three bedrock aquifers, High Plains, Rush Springs, and Blaine, and provide this information in a report for future projects and for the facilitation of nutrient source management. The scope of the work consisted of (1) compiling ground-water quality data concerning nitrogen and phosphorus ions, (2) constructing boxplots illustrating data variability, (3) maps for each aquifer showing locations of wells when nitrogen and phosphorus ions were measured in ground water and where concentrations of nitrate and nitrite, reported as nitrogen, exceed the maximum contaminant level, and (4) calculating summary statistics. Nutrient data were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey data base called the National Water Information System. Data were restricted to ground-water samples, but no restrictions were placed on well and water use or date and time of sampling. Compiled nutrient data consist of dissolved and total concentrations of the common nitrogen and phosphorus ions measured in ground water. For nitrogen these ions include nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, and nitrite plus nitrate. All concentrations are reported in milligrams per liter as nitrogen. Phosphorus in ground water is measured as the orthophosphate ion, and is reported in milligrams per liter as phosphorus. Nutrient variability is illustrated by a standard boxplot. The data are presented by aquifer or hydrologic subregion for alluvial aquifers, with one boxplot constructed for each nutrient compound if more than four analyses are present. Maps for each aquifer show where nitrogen and phosphorus have been measured in ground water and where the concentrations of nitrate and nitrite exceed the maximum contaminant level. A statistical summary for each aquifer and subregion show if censored data were present, number of samples in each data set, largest minimum reporting level for each nutrient compound, percentiles used to construct boxplots, and minimum and maximum values. Also given are the number of wells sampled in each aquifer and the number of wells exceeding the maximum contaminant level.

Becker, C. J.

1994-01-01

42

Hydrogeologic subdivision of the Wolfcamp series and Pennsylvanian system of eastern Texas Panhandle, north-central Texas, and southwestern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvanian-Wolfcamp section in the Palo Duro Basin includes brine aquifers that are considered to be the most important ground-water flow paths in the deep-basin system. This report is the fifth in a series providing summary documentation of studies that subdivide the section into hydrogeologic units based on their judged relative capacities for transmitting water. This report extends the hydrogeologic study area to the eastern Texas Panhandle, north-central Texas, and southwestern Oklahoma. It includes 37 counties in Texas and Oklahoma. Underground patterns of rock distribution are delineated from a hydrologic perspective and at a level of detail appropriate for numerical modeling of regional ground-water flow. Hydrogeologic units are defined and characterized so that appropriate porosity and permeability values can be assigned to each unit during construction of the numerical models (not part of this study), and so that modelers can combine units where necessary. In this study, hydrogeologic units have been defined as mappable, physically continuous rock bodies that function in bulk as water-transmitting or water-retarding units relative to adjacent rocks. Interpretations are made primarily from geophysical logs. Hydrologic characteristics are assessed on the basis of properties typically associated with certain lithologies (e.g., sandstones are more pervious than shales) and on the basis of gross variations in effective porosity (particularly in carbonate sequences). 44 refs., 32 figs., 1 tab.

Kayal, R.R.; Kistner, D.J.; Kranes, R.; Verock, F.P.

1987-03-01

43

Hydrology of the Arbuckle Mountain area, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water in the aquifer is confined in some parts of the area, while in other parts it is unconfined. The average saturated thickness of the aquifer is about 3,500 feet in the outcrop area. Water levels measured in wells fluctuated from 8 to 53 feet each year, primarily in response to recharge from rainfall. Recharge to the aquifer is estimated at about 4.7 inches per year. The average storage coefficient of the aquifer is estimated at 0.008, and the average transmissivity is estimated at 15,000 feet squared per day. Based on an average saturated thickness of about 3,500 feet and a storage coefficient of 0.008, the volume of ground water contained in the 500-square-mile outcrop area is about 9 million acre-feet. An undetermined amount of fresh water probably exists in the aquifer around the periphery of the aquifer outcrop. Base flow of streams that drain the aquifer accounts for about 60 percent of the total annual runoff from the outcrop area and is maintained by numerous springs. The close hydraulic connection between streams in the outcrop area and the aquifer is shown by a close correlation between base flow in Blue River and the fluctuation of ground-water levels in five wells in the Blue River basin. This correlation also exists between the discharge by Byrds Mill Spring and the fluctuation in water level in a nearby observation well; increase and decrease in spring discharge correspond to rise and fall of the water level in the well. The chemical quality of water from the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer is suitable for most industrial and municipal uses. The water is hard and of the bicarbonate type; the average hardness is about 340 milligrams per liter, and the average dissolved-solids concentration is about 360 milligrams per liter. Because springs issue from the aquifer and discharge to streams in the area, the quality of water from springs and base flow in streams is similar to that of ground water. The average dissolved-solids concentration of stream water is slightly less than that of water from wells and springs. (available as photostat copy only)

Fairchild, R. W.; Hanson R. L.; Davis R. E.

1982-01-01

44

Digital map of water levels in 1980 for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains digital data and accompanying documentation for contours for 1980 water-level elevations for the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was created by digitizing the 1980 water-level elevation contours from a 1:1,000,000-scale base map created by the U.S. Geological Survey High Plains Regional Aquifer Systems-Analysis (RASA) project (Gutentag, E.D., Heimes, F.J., Krothe, N.C., Luckey, R.R., and Weeks, J.B., 1984, Geohydrology of the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1400-B, 63 p.) The data are not intended for use at scales larger than 1:1,000,000.

Cederstrand, Joel R.; Becker, Mark F.

1999-01-01

45

Contamination of wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer by abandoned zinc and lead mines, Ottawa County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Roubidoux aquifer in Ottawa County Oklahoma is used extensively as a source of water for public supplies, commerce, industry, and rural water districts. Water in the Roubidoux aquifer in eastern Ottawa County has relatively low dissolved-solids concentrations (less than 200 mg/L) with calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate as the major ions. The Boone Formation is stratigraphically above the Roubidoux aquifer and is the host rock for zinc and lead sulfide ores, with the richest deposits located in the vicinity of the City of Picher. Mining in what became known as the Picher mining district began in the early 1900's and continued until about 1970. The water in the abandoned zinc and lead mines contains high concentrations of calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, sulfate, fluoride, cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, and zinc. Water from the abandoned mines is a potential source of contamination to the Roubidoux aquifer and to wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer. Water samples were collected from wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer in the Picher mining district and from wells outside the mining district to determine if 10 public supply wells in the mining district are contaminated. The chemical analyses indicate that at least 7 of the 10 public supply wells in the Picher mining district are contaminated by mine water. Application of the Mann-Whitney test indicated that the concentrations of some chemical constituents that are indicators of mine-water contamination are different in water samples from wells in the mining area as compared to wells outside the mining area. Application of the Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed that the concentrations of some chemical constituents that are indicators of mine-water contamination were higher in current (1992-93) data than in historic (1981-83) data, except for pH, which was lower in current than in historic data. pH and sulfate, alkalinity, bicarbonate, magnesium, iron, and tritium concentrations consistently indicate that the Cardin, Commerce 1, Commerce 3, Picher 2, Picher 3, Picher 4, and Quapaw 2 wells are contaminated.

Christenson, Scott C.

1995-01-01

46

A SURVEY OF THE FISHES OF THE MUDDY BOGGY RIVER IN SOUTH CENTRAL OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of the fishes of the Muddy Boggy River in south central Oklahoma produced 90 species representing 21 families. Eleven additional species have been reported by others, for a total of 101 species known to occur in Muddy Boggy River. Thirty-four species are new records for the Muddy Boggy River drainage. A description of the Muddy Boggy River System,

Jimmie Pigg

47

Equivalent dose distribution analysis of Holocene eolian and fluvial quartz sands from Central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Holocene quartz sands were collected from fluvial terrace deposits and eolian dune deposits adjacent to the North Canadian and Cimarron Rivers and their tributaries in Central Oklahoma. Single aliquot regenerative dose optically stimulated luminescence techniques were employed to generate equivalent dose (ED) distribution histograms for each sample. We hypothesize that the ED distributions are convolutions of the distribution arising from

Kenneth Lepper; Niels Agersnap Larsen; Stephen W. S McKeever

2000-01-01

48

Depositional model and diagenetic history of Frisco Formation (Lower Devonian) in central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Lower Devonian Frisco Limestone is a prolific reservoir within the Hunton Group. The giant Fitts and West Edmond fields produce from the Frisco, as do other small fields in the eastern Anadarko basin, central Oklahoma, and western Arkoma basin. A crinoidal-mudmound complex is the inferred depositional model, based on geometry and lithotypes. Mound growth was probably initiated on paleostructural

Patrick L. Medlock

1987-01-01

49

A Systematic Approach to Process Evaluation in the Central Oklahoma Turning Point (COTP) Partnership  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Formation is an important stage of partnership development. Purpose: To describe the systematic approach to process evaluation of a Turning Point initiative in central Oklahoma during the formation stage. The nine-month collaborative effort aimed to develop an action plan to promote health. Methods: A sound planning framework was used in the

Tolma, Eleni L.; Cheney, Marshall K.; Chrislip, David D.; Blankenship, Derek; Troup, Pam; Hann, Neil

2011-01-01

50

Groundwater Availability of the Central Valley Aquifer, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

California's Central Valley covers about 20,000 square miles and is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. More than 250 different crops are grown in the Central Valley with an estimated value of $17 billion per year. This irrigated agriculture relies heavily on surface-water diversions and groundwater pumpage. Approximately one-sixth of the Nation's irrigated land is in the Central Valley, and about one-fifth of the Nation's groundwater demand is supplied from its aquifers. The Central Valley also is rapidly becoming an important area for California's expanding urban population. Since 1980, the population of the Central Valley has nearly doubled from 2 million to 3.8 million people. The Census Bureau projects that the Central Valley's population will increase to 6 million people by 2020. This surge in population has increased the competition for water resources within the Central Valley and statewide, which likely will be exacerbated by anticipated reductions in deliveries of Colorado River water to southern California. In response to this competition for water, a number of water-related issues have gained prominence: conservation of agricultural land, conjunctive use, artificial recharge, hydrologic implications of land-use change, and effects of climate variability. To provide information to stakeholders addressing these issues, the USGS Groundwater Resources Program made a detailed assessment of groundwater availability of the Central Valley aquifer system, that includes: (1) the present status of groundwater resources; (2) how these resources have changed over time; and (3) tools to assess system responses to stresses from future human uses and climate variability and change. This effort builds on previous investigations, such as the USGS Central Valley Regional Aquifer System and Analysis (CV-RASA) project and several other groundwater studies in the Valley completed by Federal, State and local agencies at differing scales. The principal product of this new assessment is a tool referred to as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM) that accounts for integrated, variable water supply and demand, and simulates surface-water and groundwater-flow across the entire Central Valley system. The development of the CVHM comprised four major elements: (1) a comprehensive Geographic Information System (GIS) to compile, analyze and visualize data; (2) a texture model to characterize the aquifer system;(3) estimates of water-budget components by numerically modeling the hydrologic system with the Farm Process (FMP); and (4) simulations to assess and quantify hydrologic conditions.

Faunt, Claudia C. (editor)

2009-01-01

51

Analysis and modeling of spatial correlation structure in small-scale rainfall in Central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spatial correlation structure in small-scale rainfall is analyzed based on a dense cluster of raingauges in Central Oklahoma. This cluster, called the EVAC PicoNet, consists of 53 gauges installed in 25 measurement stations covering an area of about 3km by 3km. Two raingauges are placed in 24 stations and five in the central station. Three aspects of the estimated spatial

Grzegorz J. Ciach; Witold F. Krajewski

2006-01-01

52

Plan of study for the High Plains regional aquifer-system analysis in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ogallala Formation and associated Tertiary and Quarternary deposits from the principal aquifers supporting irrigation in the High Plains of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The volume of water in storage within the aquifers is declining in most of the High Plains because water is being withdrawn in excess of the rate of replenishment. The U.S. Geological Survey has initiated a 5-year study of the High Plains aquifer system to develop the geohydrologic data base and computer models of the ground-water flow system needed to evaluate the response of the aquifer system to ground-water management alternatives. This report describes the objectives, plan, and organization of the study and outlines the work to be accomplished in each State in the study area. (Woodard-USGS)

Weeks, John B.

1978-01-01

53

Identifying aquifer type in fractured rock aquifers using harmonic analysis.  

PubMed

Determining aquifer type, unconfined, semi-confined, or confined, by drilling or performing pumping tests has inherent problems (i.e., cost and complex field issues) while sometimes yielding inconclusive results. An improved method to cost-effectively determine aquifer type would be beneficial for hydraulic mapping of complex aquifer systems like fractured rock aquifers. Earth tides are known to influence water levels in wells penetrating confined aquifers or unconfined thick, low-porosity aquifers. Water-level fluctuations in wells tapping confined and unconfined aquifers are also influenced by changes in barometric pressure. Harmonic analyses of water-level fluctuations of a thick (~1000 m) carbonate aquifer located in south-central Oklahoma (Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer) were utilized in nine wells to identify aquifer type by evaluating the influence of earth tides and barometric-pressure variations using signal identification. On the basis of the results, portions of the aquifer responded hydraulically as each type of aquifer even though there was no significant variation in lithostratigraphy. The aquifer type was depth dependent with confined conditions becoming more prevalent with depth. The results demonstrate that harmonic analysis is an accurate and low-cost method to determine aquifer type. PMID:22463080

Rahi, Khayyun A; Halihan, Todd

2012-03-28

54

Diagenetic controls on primary and secondary porosity in valley-fill marine sandstones - Misener Formation, north-central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Devonian Misener formation in north-central Oklahoma consists of a series of discontinuous sandstone and shale bodies deposited in erosional topographic lows on the post-Hunton unconformity surface of north-central Oklahoma. Paleontological, mineralogical, and sedimentological evidence supports a marine valley-fill depositional setting including both channel and nonchannel facies. Abrupt changes in sandstone thickness and reservoir properties are characteristic of Misener sandstones.

D. Prezbindowski; R. D. Fritz; B. M. Francis

1989-01-01

55

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the alluvial and terrace deposits along the Cimarron River from Freedom to Guthrie in northwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export and nonproprietary format files This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries, maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the alluvial and terrace deposits along the Cimarron River from Freedom to Guthrie in northwestern Oklahoma. Ground water in 1,305 square miles of Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits along the the Cimarron River from Freedom to Guthrie is an important source of water for irrigation, industrial, municipal, stock, and domestic supplies. Alluvial and terrace deposits are composed of interfingering lenses of clay, sandy clay, and cross-bedded poorly sorted sand and gravel. The aquifer is composed of hydraulically connected alluvial and terrace deposits that unconformably overlie the Permian-age Formations. The aquifer boundaries are from a ground-water modeling report on the alluvial and terrace aquifer along the Cimarron River from Freedom to Guthrie in northwestern Oklahoma and published digital surficial geology data sets. The aquifer boundary data set was created from digital geologic data sets from maps published at a scale of 1:250,000. The hydraulic conductivity values, recharge rates, and ground-water level elevation contours are from the ground-water modeling report. Water-level elevation contours were digitized from a map at a scale of 1:250,000. The maps were published at a scale of 1:900,000. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

Adams, G. P.; Runkle, Donna; Rea, Alan; Cederstrand, J. R.

1997-01-01

56

Thickness variation of Simpson group in south-central Oklahoma and its tectonic significance  

SciTech Connect

The Middle Ordovician Simpson Group in the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen is composed of interbedded sandstone, limestone, and shale. Several pulses of subsidence controlled the deposition of these sediments. Simpson Group thickness variations, based on an isopach map and corresponding regional cross sections, define the presence of two distinct depositional basins flanked on their northern sides by a stable cratonic shelf. The anomalous thickness of Simpson sediments within these basins is related to syndepositional subsidence along zones of weakness initiated during the rifting stage of aulacogen development. The larger basin covers the western part of south-central Oklahoma. The northern flank of this basin illustrates a zone of rapid thickening of sediments. The updip portion of the northern flank is the northernmost limit of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. The depocenter of the larger basin is positioned in the Ardmore basin. Paleostress studies using calcite twin lamellae along the southeastern portion of the Sulfur fault within the smaller basin reveal an east-west compression followed by north-south compression. Surface folds formed by the east-west compression are highly faulted and overturned, whereas the folds formed by the north-south compression are open, slightly asymmetric, with rounded hinges and limbs. Similar east-west-trending structures in the subsurface could be a favorable target for hydrocarbon exploration. In general, these basins are genetically related but are separated by a large Precambrian basement block (Tishomingo Granite).

Islam, Q.T.; Crump, J. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (USA))

1989-08-01

57

Groundwater modeling of the Calera Aquifer region in Central Mexico  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The Calera Aquifer is the main source of water for irrigated agriculture, industrial, and drinking water purposes in the Calera Aquifer Region (CAR) in the state of Zacatecas, Mexico. Irrigated agriculture accounts for 80% of the total groundwater extracted from the Calera Aquifer. In recent years, ...

58

Geomorphic effects of rural-to-urban land use conversion on three streams in the Central Redbed Plains of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research evaluates the impact of rural-to-urban land use conversion on channel morphology and riparian vegetation for three streams in the Central Redbed Plains geomorphic province (central Great Plains ecoregion) of Oklahoma. The Deep Fork Creek watershed is largely urbanized; the Skeleton Creek watershed is largely rural; and the Stillwater Creek watershed is experiencing a rapid transition from rural to

Ranbir S. Kang; Richard A. Marston

2006-01-01

59

Behavior of North-Central Texas Paleozoic Aquifers: Geological Controls vs. Surface Water Control  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Paleozoic formations and small associated aquifers (Paleozoic aquifers) of North-Central Texas could become a target as Barnett Shale gas play development progresses westward. Paleozoic aquifers lie west of the productive Trinity aquifer, but well yields from Paleozoic aquifers are much lower. Although many recharge features such as streams and lakes exist in the region, lower salinity groundwater (<5,000 ppm) in Paleozoic aquifers is found mostly in outcrop areas, and salinity increases rapidly downdip. The limited availability of fresh water in Paleozoic aquifers could be attributed to the low permeability of the geological formations, whose regional trends show transition westward to muddier facies downdip. On the other hand, high water flux through geological formations by surface water driven circulation could generate active shallow systems having limited interaction with downdip confined sections. Whether such active shallow systems exist in the Paleozoic aquifers is unknown but important in understanding the behavior of Paleozoic aquifers. With the ultimate goal of quantifying Paleozoic aquifer capacity and yield, the study addresses the following related questions: (1) Are there active shallow systems associated with Paleozoic aquifers? (2) How does the groundwater interact with surface water in this environment? and (3) Does groundwater production in this system capture appreciable surface water? Hydraulic properties of geological formations, groundwater flow, and surface water fluxes (precipitation, recharge, evapotranspiration, streamflow, etc.) are analyzed to evaluate the main processes driving the regional hydrology. Hydrology of the Trinity and Paleozoic aquifers is compared to explain the difference in behavior between the two neighboring aquifers. Expected findings include a quantification of groundwater availability of Paleozoic aquifers and an understanding of how surface water influences groundwater availability. The study will (1) quantify groundwater and surface water fluxes, (2) enhance our understanding of groundwater surface water interaction in the footprint of the Paleozoic aquifers, and (3) provide a basis for evaluating groundwater production potential.

Huang, Y.; Wolaver, B. D.; Nicot, J.; Mercier, J.; Hingst, M.; Breton, C.

2011-12-01

60

Calibrated models as management tools for stream-aquifer systems: the case of central Kansas, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

We address the problem of declining streamflows in interconnected stream-aquifer systems and explore possible management options to address the problem for two areas of central Kansas: the Arkansas River valley from Kinsley to Great Bend and the lower Rattlesnake Creek Quivira National Wildlife Refuge area. The approach we followed implements, calibrates, and partially validates for the study areas a stream-aquifer

Marios Sophocleous; Samuel P. Perkins

1993-01-01

61

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Canadian County, Cleveland County, Grady County, Lincoln County, Logan County, Kingfisher County, McClain County, Oklahoma County, Pottawatomie...

2010-07-01

62

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Canadian County, Cleveland County, Grady County, Lincoln County, Logan County, Kingfisher County, McClain County, Oklahoma County, Pottawatomie...

2009-07-01

63

Geohydrology and simulation of steady-state flow conditions in regional aquifer systems in Cretaceous and older rocks underlying Kansas, Nebraska, and parts of Arkansas, Colorado, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Three regional aquifers systems are the basis for describing the geohydrology of bedrock aquifers in the central United States. The Great Plains aquifer system, composed of Lower Cretaceous sandstone, generally contains brackish water (1,000 to 10,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids); the Western Interior Plains aquifer system of lower Paleozoic rocks contains saline water and is laterally adjacent to the freshwater-bearing Ozark Plateaus aquifer system composed of rocks of the same age.

Signor, D. C.; Helgesen, J. O.; Jorgensen, D. G.; Leonard, R. B.

1997-01-01

64

Hydrogeological framework of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, west-central Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards-Trinity aquifer system underlies about 42,000 square miles of west-central Texas, where mostly gently dipping Lower Cretaceous strata comprise three regional aquifers and two regional confining units. The aquifers are the Edwards Aquifer of the Balcones fault zone, the Trinity Aquifer of the Balcones fault zone and Hill County, and the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer of the Edwards Plateau and Trans-Pecos. The Navarro-Del Rio confining unit confines the downdip part of the Edwards Aquifer, and the Hammett confining unit confines the updip, basal part of the Trinity Aquifer and a small southeastern fringe of the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer. Transmissivity averages less than 10,000 feet squared per day throughout more than 90 percent of the study area as the result of widespread cementation and secondary mineral growth. However, in fractured and leached rocks in the Balcones fault zone, transmissivity averages about 750,000 feet squared per day in the Edwards aquifer, which occupies less than 10 percent of the area.

Barker, Rene A.; Ardis, Ann F.

1996-01-01

65

Hydrogeology and water-quality characteristics of the Lower Floridan aquifer in east-central Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The hydrogeology and water-quality characteristics of the Lower Floridan aquifer and the relation of the Lower Floridan aquifer to the framework of the Floridan aquifer system were evaluated during a 6-year (1995-2001) study. The study area, a 7,500 square-mile area of east-central Florida, is underlain by three principal hydrogeologic units: the surficial aquifer system, the intermediate confining unit, and the Floridan aquifer system. The Floridan aquifer system, a carbonate-rock aquifer system composed of the Upper Floridan aquifer, a middle semiconfining unit, a middle confining unit, and the Lower Floridan aquifer, is the major source of water supply to east-central Florida. The Upper Floridan aquifer provides much of the water required to meet the current (2002) demand; however, the Lower Floridan aquifer is being used increasingly as a source of freshwater, particularly for municipal needs. For this reason, a better understanding of the aquifer is needed. The Lower Floridan aquifer is present throughout east-central Florida. The aquifer is composed of alternating beds of limestone and dolomite, and is characterized by abundant fractured dolomite zones and solution cavities. The altitude of the top of the Lower Floridan aquifer ranges from less than 600 feet below sea level in the northern part of the study area to more than 1,600 feet below sea level in the southwestern part. Thickness of the unit ranges from about 910 to 1,180 feet. The top of the Lower Floridan aquifer generally is marked by an increase in formation resistivity and by an increase in the occurrence of fractures and solution cavities within the carbonates. Also, a noticeable increase in borehole flow often marks the top of the unit. The bottom of the Lower Floridan aquifer is based on the first occurrence of evaporites. Ground-water in the Lower Floridan aquifer generally moves in a southwest-to-northeast direction across the study area. In September 1998, the altitude of the potentiometric surface of the Lower Floridan aquifer ranged from about 16 to 113 feet above sea level, and altitudes in May 1999 were about 2 to 7 feet lower than those measured in September 1998. The potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer system is constantly fluctuating, mainly in response to seasonal variations in rainfall and ground-water withdrawals. Seasonal fluctuations in the Lower Floridan aquifer typically range from about 2 to 10 feet. Water samples from 50 Lower Floridan aquifer wells were collected during this study. Most samples were analyzed in the field for temperature, pH, and specific conductance, and in the laboratory for major cations and anions. Specific conductance ranged from 147 to 6,710 microsiemens per centimeter. Chloride concentrations ranged from 3.0 to 2,188 milligrams per liter; sulfate concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 750 milli-grams per liter; and hardness ranged from 69 to 940 milligrams per liter. Water was least mineralized in the recharge areas of the Lower Floridan aquifer in the western part of the study area. The most mineralized water in the Lower Floridan aquifer occurred along parts of the Wekiva and St. Johns Rivers and in much of the eastern and southern parts of the study area. The altitude of the base of freshwater in the Floridan aquifer system (where chloride concentrations are equal to 250 milligrams per liter) is variable throughout the study area. The estimated position of the 250 milligram per liter isochlor surface is less than 200 feet below sea level in much of the eastern part of the study area, including the areas along the St. Johns River in Lake, Seminole, and Volusia Counties and near the Wekiva River in western Seminole County. The altitude of the 250 milligram per liter isochlor exceeds 3,000 feet below sea level in the extreme southwestern part of the study area.

O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Spechler, Rick M.; McGurk, Brian E.

2002-01-01

66

Ecological Assessment of Several Central Oklahoma Streams Through Evaluation of Fish Communities and Habitat in a Drought Year  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assessment of stream ecological health by monitoring chemical water quality alone fails to include important physical habitat and biological integrity parameters that may be critical to a valid assessment of human impact. As part of a larger monitoring effort, we performed rapid ecological assessments, including both habitat and biological community evaluations, for 10 streams in three central Oklahoma counties during

Angie M. Spence; Melissa L. Smith; Robert W. Nairn

1999-01-01

67

Longitudinal Distribution of Fishes from a Fall Sample of Island Bayou, a South-Central Oklahoma Stream  

Microsoft Academic Search

We collected a 1997 fall sample of Island Bayou to determine the longitudinal distribution of fishes in this south-central Oklahoma stream. Seine sampling of five sites produced 3,908 individuals representing 19 species. Sunfishes (Lepomis spp.) and mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) dominated upstream sites while downstream sites were dominated by minnows (Cyprinella spp. and Pimephales vigilax). We collected a similar number of

M. Jason Hood; Roger P. Lemmons

1998-01-01

68

Condition and Diet Quality of White-tailed Deer in Response to Vegetation Management in Central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the effects of woody vegetation management using herbicide and fire on condition and diet quality of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in the cross timbers of central Oklahoma. Condition of deer was assessed seasonally (1987-1989) on an area containing a mosaic of habitat types created by various brush removal treatments and on a control area not exposed to any

Roderick B. Soper; Robert L. Lochmiller; David M. Leslie

1993-01-01

69

PERFORMANCE AND PERSISTENCE OF JAPANESE COOL-SEASON GRASS FORAGES IN THE CENTRAL GREAT PLAINS OF OKLAHOMA, USA  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In this study, the performance of nine Japanese cool-season grass cultivars representing five species were evaluated in central Oklahoma, USA. Forage production, persistence data and climatological data were obtained to identify the performance of Japanese cool-season grass forages and their possib...

70

Primary and secondary porosity development in valley fill, marine sandstone reservoirs - Misener Formation, north-central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Devonian Misener formation in north-central Oklahoma consists of a series of discontinuous sand and shale bodies deposited in erosional topographic lows on the post-Hunton unconformity surface. Paleontological, mineralogical, and sedimentological evidence supports a marine depositional setting. Rapid changes in sandstone thickness and reservoir properties are characteristic of Misener sands. These sands were episodically deposited, fine upward, and commonly interfinger

D. R. Prezbindowski; B. M. Francis; R. D. Fritz

1989-01-01

71

Comprehensive Hosing Market Analysis: Oklahoma City, Oklahome As of October 1, 2009.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Housing Market Area (HMA) is coterminous with the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area and comprises Canadian, Cleveland, Grady, Lincoln, Logan, McClain, and Oklahoma Counties in central Oklahoma. The HMA includes the st...

2009-01-01

72

Diagenetic controls on primary and secondary porosity in valley-fill marine sandstones - Misener Formation, north-central Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian Misener formation in north-central Oklahoma consists of a series of discontinuous sandstone and shale bodies deposited in erosional topographic lows on the post-Hunton unconformity surface of north-central Oklahoma. Paleontological, mineralogical, and sedimentological evidence supports a marine valley-fill depositional setting including both channel and nonchannel facies. Abrupt changes in sandstone thickness and reservoir properties are characteristic of Misener sandstones. These sandstones were episodically deposited, fine upward and commonly interfinger with an equivalent shale facies. The basal contacts of the Misener sandstone bodies are erosional with the inclusion of shale, phosphate, and sandstone clasts in a medium-grained, dolomitic quartzarenite sandstone. A combination of primary and secondary porosity makes Misener sandstone reservoirs prolific hydrocarbon producers.

Prezbindowski, D.; Fritz, R.D.; Francis, B.M.

1989-03-01

73

Depositional model and diagenetic history of Frisco Formation (Lower Devonian) in central Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Lower Devonian Frisco Limestone is a prolific reservoir within the Hunton Group. The giant Fitts and West Edmond fields produce from the Frisco, as do other small fields in the eastern Anadarko basin, central Oklahoma, and western Arkoma basin. A crinoidal-mudmound complex is the inferred depositional model, based on geometry and lithotypes. Mound growth was probably initiated on paleostructural highs. Facies in the mud-mound complex include mound-core, flank/intermound, and mound-crest. The mound-core facies, consisting of poorly sorted wackestones and mudstones, formed as thickets of crinoid-baffled lime mud. The flank/intermound facies, which is moderately sorted packstones, formed in areas of low crinoid population, allowing current activity to winnow much of the lime mud to form carbonate sand. The mound-crest facies, which is predominantly grainstones with some packstones, was deposited as a sand sheet as the mound reached active wave base. Unlike the dolomitized reservoirs of other Hunton formations, the Frisco is a limestone reservoir that underwent an intricate, multiphase, diagenetic history. Although secondary porosity developed during subaerial exposure. Depositional facies exhibited considerable control on porosity distribution. Solution-enhanced primary porosity and secondary vuggy porosity are the most significant types.

Medlock, P.L.

1987-08-01

74

Groundwater-Flow Model of the Ozark Plateaus Aquifer System, Northwestern Arkansas, Southeastern Kansas, Southwestern Missouri, and Northeastern Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To assess the effect that increased water use is having on the long-term availability of groundwater within the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system, a groundwater-flow model was developed using MODFLOW 2000 for a model area covering 7,340 square miles for parts...

D. S. Yeatts J. A. Gillip J. B. Czarnecki P. M. Jones

2009-01-01

75

Cenomanian-Turonian aquifer of central Israel, its development and possible use as a storage reservoir  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Cenomanian-Turonian formations constitute a highly permeable dolomite and limestone aquifer in central Israel. The aquifer is on the west limb of an anticlinorium that trends north-northeast. In places it may be as much as 800 meters thick, but in the report area, largely the foothills of the Judean-Ephraim Mountains where the water development is most intensive, its thickness is generally considerably less. In some places the aquifer occurs at or near the land surface, or it is covered by sandy and gravelly coastal-plain deposits. However, in a large part of the area, it is overlain by as much as 400 meters of relatively impermeable strata, and it is probably underlain by less permeable Lower Cretaceous strata. In general the aquifer water is under artesian pressure. The porosity of the aquifer is characterized mainly by solution channels and cavities produced by jointing and faulting. In addition to the generally high permeability of the aquifer, some regions, which probably coincide with ancient drainage patterns and (or) fault zones, have exceptionally high permeabilities. The source of most of the water in the aquifer is believed to be rain that falls on the foothills area. The westward movement of ground water from the mountainous outcrop areas appears to be impeded by a zone of low permeability which is related to structural and stratigraphic conditions along the western side of the mountains. Gradients of the piezometric surface are small, and the net direction of water movement is westward and northwestward under natural conditions. Locally, however, the flow pattern may be in other directions owing to spatial variations in permeability in the aquifer, the location of natural discharge outlets, and the relation of the aquifer to adjacent geologic formations. There probably is also a large vertical component of flow. Pumping has modified the flow pattern by producing several irregularly shaped shallow depressions in the piezometric surface although, to date, no unwatering of the aquifer has occurred. In the central part of the area, pumping has induced some infiltration from overlying coastal-plain formations. Injecting and storing surplus water seasonally in the aquifer should be feasible at almost any place. However, the movement and recovery of the injected water probably could be controlled most easily if the water were injected where depressions have been formed in the piezometric surface.

Schneider, Robert

1964-01-01

76

Climatology of aerosol optical depth in North-Central Oklahoma: 1992-2008  

SciTech Connect

Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been measured at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most of the data presented are from the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer, a narrow-band, interference-filter Sun radiometer with five aerosol bands in the visible and near infrared; however, AOD measurements have been made simultaneously and routinely at the site by as many as three different types of instruments, including two pointing Sun radiometers. Scatterplots indicate high correlations and small biases consistent with earlier comparisons. The early part of this 16 year record had a disturbed stratosphere with residual Mt. Pinatubo aerosols, followed by the cleanest stratosphere in decades. As such, the last 13 years of the record reflect changes that have occurred predominantly in the troposphere. The field calibration technique is briefly described and compared to Langley calibrations from Mauna Loa Observatory. A modified cloud-screening technique is introduced that increases the number of daily averaged AODs retrieved annually to about 250 days compared with 175 days when a more conservative method was employed in earlier studies. AODs are calculated when the air mass is less than six; that is, when the Sun's elevation is greater than 9.25{sup o}. The more inclusive cloud screen and the use of most of the daylight hours yield a data set that can be used to more faithfully represent the true aerosol climate for this site. The diurnal aerosol cycle is examined month-by-month to assess the effects of an aerosol climatology on the basis of infrequent sampling such as that from satellites.

Michalsky, J.; Schwartz, S.; Denn, F.; Flynn, C.; Hodges, G.; Kiedron, P.; Koontz, A.; Schlemmer, J., and Schwartz, S. E

2010-04-01

77

Artificial recharge to the Floridan aquifer system, Orlando Area, Central Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Approximately 400 drainage wells exist in Orange County, central Florida. The rate of recharge through drainage wells is limited by the rate of surface flow to the wells; the hydraulic properties of weirs, overflow pipes, and well casings; or the water level above the top of the casing. The rate commonly is not limited by the hydraulic properties of the very transmissive aquifer system.

German, E. R.; Bradner, L. A.

1989-01-01

78

Potentiometric Surface of the Upper Floridan Aquifer, West-Central Florida, September 2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by the middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida generally contain highly mineralized water. The water-bearing units containing fresh water are herein referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is the principal source of water in the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is used for major public supply, domestic use, irrigation, and brackish water desalination in coastal communities (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2000). This map report shows the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer measured in September 2007. The potentiometric surface is an imaginary surface connecting points of equal altitude to which water will rise in tightly-cased wells that tap a confined aquifer system (Lohman, 1979). This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the wet season, when ground-water levels usually are at an annual high and withdrawals for agricultural use typically are low. The cumulative average rainfall of 39.50 inches for west-central Florida (from October 2006 through September 2007) was 13.42 inches below the historical cumulative average of 52.92 inches (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2007). Historical cumulative averages are calculated from regional rainfall summary reports (1915 to most recent complete calendar year) and are updated monthly by the Southwest Florida Water Management District. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District, is part of a semi-annual series of Upper Floridan aquifer potentiometric-surface map reports for west-central Florida. Potentiometric-surface maps have been prepared for January 1964, May 1969, May 1971, May 1973, May 1974, and for each May and September since 1975. Water-level data are collected in May and September each year to show the approximate annual low and high water-level conditions, respectively. Most of the water-level data for this map were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during the period September 17-21, 2007. Supplemental water-level data were collected by other agencies and companies. A corresponding potentiometric-surface map was prepared for areas east and north of the Southwest Florida Water Management District boundary by the U.S. Geological Survey office in Orlando, Florida (Kinnaman and Dixon, 2008). Most water-level measurements were made during a 5-day period; therefore, measurements do not represent a 'snapshot' of conditions at a specific time, nor do they necessarily coincide with the seasonal high water-level condition.

Ortiz, A. G.

2008-01-01

79

Potentiometric Surface of the Upper Floridan Aquifer, West-Central Florida, May 2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by the middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida generally contain highly mineralized water. The water-bearing units containing fresh water are herein referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is the principal source of water in the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is used for major public supply, domestic use, irrigation, and brackish water desalination in coastal communities (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2000). This map report shows the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer measured in May 2007. The potentiometric surface is an imaginary surface connecting points of equal altitude to which water will rise in tightly-cased wells that tap a confined aquifer system (Lohman, 1979). This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the dry season, when ground-water levels usually are at an annual low and withdrawals for agricultural use typically are high. The cumulative average rainfall of 41.21 inches for west-central Florida (from June 2006 through May 2007) was 11.63 inches below the historical cumulative average of 52.84 inches (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2007). Historical cumulative averages are calculated from regional rainfall summary reports (1915 to most recent complete calendar year) and are updated monthly by the Southwest Florida Water Management District. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District, is part of a semi-annual series of Upper Floridan aquifer potentiometric-surface map reports for west-central Florida. Potentiometric-surface maps have been prepared for January 1964, May 1969, May 1971, May 1973, May 1974, and for each May and September since 1975. Water-level data are collected in May and September each year to show the approximate annual low and high water-level conditions, respectively. Most of the water-level data for this map were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during the period May 21-25, 2007. Supplemental water-level data were collected by other agencies and companies. A corresponding potentiometric-surface map was prepared for areas east and north of the Southwest Florida Water Management District boundary by the U.S. Geological Survey office in Orlando, Florida (Kinnaman and Dixon, 2007). Most water-level measurements were made during a 5-day period; therefore, measurements do not represent a 'snapshot' of conditions at a specific time, nor do they necessarily coincide with the seasonal low water-level condition.

Ortiz, A. G.

2008-01-01

80

Potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer, west-central Florida, May 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by the middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida generally contain highly mineralized water. The water-bearing units containing freshwater are herein referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is a highly productive aquifer and supplies more than 10 times the amount of water pumped from either the surficial aquifer system or the intermediate aquifer system in most of the study area (Duerr and others, 1988). This map report shows the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer measured in May 2005. The potentiometric surface is an imaginary surface connecting points of equal altitude to which water will rise in a tightly cased well that taps a confined aquifer system (Lohman, 1979). This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the dry season, when ground-water levels usually are at an annual low and withdrawals for agricultural use typically are high. The cumulative average rainfall of 67.27 inches for west-central Florida (from June 2004 through May 2005) was 14.20 inches above the historical cumulative average of 53.07 inches (Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD), 2005). The above average precipitation is attributed to the active hurrican season for Florida in 2004. Historical cumulative averages are calculated from regional rainfall summary reports (1915 to the most recent completed calendar year) and are updated monthly by the SWFWMD. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the SWFWMD, is part of a semiannual series of Upper Floridan aquifer potentiometric-surface map reports for west-central Florida. Potentiometric-surface maps have been prepared for January 1964, May 1969, May 1971, May 1973, May 1974, and for each May and September since 1975. Water-level data are collected in May and September each year to show the approximate annual low and high water-level conditions, respectively. Most of the water-level data for this map were collected by the USGS during May 23-27, 2005. Supplemental water-level data were collected by other agencies and companies. A corresponding potentiometric-surface map was prepared for areas east and north of the SWFWMD boundary by the USGS office in Altamonte Springs, Florida (Kinnaman, 2006). Most water-level measurements were made during a 5-day period; therefore, measurements do not represent a 'snapshot' of conditions at a specific time, nor do they necessarily coincide with the seasonal low water-level condition. Water levels in about 19 percent of the wells measured in May 2005 were lower than the May 2004 water levels (Blanchard and others, 2004). Data from 409 wells indicate that the May 2005 water levels ranged from about 5 feet below to about 18 feet above the May 2004 water levels (fig. 1). The largest water-level declines occurred in southwestern Hernando County, northeastern Hillsborough County, and parts of Hillsborough, Sumter, and Sarasota Counties. The largest water-level rises occurred in southeastern Hillsborough County, eastern Manatee County, and western Hardee County (fig. 1). Water levels in about 95 percent of the wells measured in May 2005 were lower than the September 2004 water levels (Blanchard and Seidenfeld, 2005). Data from 405 wells indicate that the May 2005 water levels ranged from about 22 feet below to 14 feet above the September 2004 water levels. The largest water-level decline was in east-central Manatee County and the largest water-level rise was in central Sarasota County.

Ortiz, A. G.; Blanchard, R. A.

2006-01-01

81

Succession in grasslands: Thirty-two years of change in a central Oklahoma tallgrass prairie  

Microsoft Academic Search

Old field succession in Oklahoma has been reported to involve four stages of development: pioncer weeds, annual grass, bunch grass, and mature prairie. This sequence has been the basis for a number of analyses of grassland structure and function, but has never been documented on a single site. We used multivariate techniques to study succession on three permanent plots with

S. L. Collins; D. E. Adams

1983-01-01

82

Distribution of soil bulk density and organic matter along an elevation gradient in central Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The distribution of total soil carbon (TSC) within Oklahoma paddocks may affect sampling requirements to accurately monitor carbon (C) sequestration. This study examined how TSC was distributed in 3-1.6 ha paddocks [under different forms of long-term (1978-2004) management] situated across a common ...

83

Preliminary Assessment of Sand Dune Stability Along a Bioclimatic Gradient, North Central and Northwestern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandhills of eolian origin and currently active dunes in Oklahoma are located mainly on the northern side of the main rivers. Their longitudinal distribution spans a gradient of annual precipitation ranging from 914 mm in the east to 403 mm in the west. Vegetation types along this gradient include cross-timbers woodlands in the east and sand-sage and short grasses in

Carlos Cordova; Jess Porter; Kenneth Lepper; Regina Kalchgruber; Gregory Scott

2005-01-01

84

The Diurnal Wind Variation in the Lowest 1500 ft in Central Oklahoma: June 1966-May 1967.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

One year of wind data from a television tower in northern Oklahoma City has been analyzed on a diurnal basis. The annual mean speeds below the third level at 296 ft are lowest at night and highest during the day, and conversely the speeds up to the sevent...

K. C. Crawford H. R. Hudson

1972-01-01

85

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Interstate Unclassifiable/Attainment McCurtain County AQCR 184 Central Oklahoma Intrastate...Intrastate Unclassifiable/Attainment McCurtain County AQCR 184 Central Oklahoma Intrastate...022Shreveport-Texarkana-Tyler Intrastate: McCurtain County...

2009-07-01

86

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Interstate Unclassifiable/Attainment McCurtain County AQCR 184 Central Oklahoma Intrastate...Intrastate Unclassifiable/Attainment McCurtain County AQCR 184 Central Oklahoma Intrastate...022Shreveport-Texarkana-Tyler Intrastate: McCurtain County...

2010-07-01

87

Base of Principal Aquifer for the Elkhorn-Loup Model Area, North-Central Nebraska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In Nebraska, the water managers in the Natural Resources Districts and the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources are concerned with the effect of ground-water withdrawal on the availability of surface water and the long-term effects of ground-water withdrawal on ground- and surface-water resources. In north-central Nebraska, in the Elkhorn and Loup River Basins, ground water is used for irrigation, domestic supply, and public supply; surface water is used in this area for irrigation, recreation, and hydropower production. In recognition of these sometimes competing ground- and surface-water uses in the Elkhorn and Loup River Basins, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Lewis and Clark Natural Resources District, the Lower Elkhorn Natural Resources District, the Lower Loup Natural Resources District, the Lower Niobrara Natural Resources District, the Lower Platte North Natural Resources District, the Middle Niobrara Natural Resources District, the Upper Elkhorn Natural Resources District, and the Upper Loup Natural Resources District agreed to cooperatively study water resources in the Elkhorn and Loup River Basins. The goals of the overall study were to construct and calibrate a regional ground-water flow model of the area and to use that flow model as a tool to assess current and future effects of ground-water irrigation on stream base flow and to help develop long-term water-resource management strategies for this area, hereafter referred to as the Elkhorn-Loup model area. The Elkhorn-Loup model area covers approximately 30,800 square miles, and extends from the Niobrara River in the north to the Platte River in the south. The western boundary of the Elkhorn-Loup model area coincides with the western boundary of the Middle Niobrara, Twin Platte, and Upper Loup Natural Resources Districts; the eastern boundary coincides with the approximate location of the western extent of glacial till in eastern Nebraska. The principal aquifer in most of the Elkhorn-Loup model area is the High Plains aquifer; the principal aquifer in the remaining part of the Elkhorn-Loup model area is an unnamed alluvial aquifer. The upper surface of the geologic units that directly underlie the aquifer is called the 'base of aquifer' in this report. The geologic unit that forms the base of aquifer in the Elkhorn-Loup model area varies by location. The Tertiary-age Brule Formation generally is the base of aquifer in the west; the Cretaceous-age Pierre Shale generally is the base of aquifer in the east. The purpose of this report is to update the altitude and configuration of the base of the principal aquifer in the Elkhorn-Loup model area and a 2-mile buffer area around the Elkhorn-Loup model area, using base-of-aquifer data from test holes, registered water wells, and oil and gas wells within the Elkhorn-Loup model area and a 20-mile buffer area around the Elkhorn-Loup model area that have become available since the publication of earlier maps of the base of aquifer for this area. The base-of-aquifer map is important for the Elkhorn-Loup ground-water flow model because it defines the model's lower boundary. The accuracy of the Elkhorn-Loup ground-water flow model and the accuracy of the model's predictions about the effects of ground-water irrigation on stream base flow are directly related to the accuracy of the model's lower boundary.

McGuire, V. L.; Peterson, S. M.

2008-01-01

88

Screening and evaluation of a saline aquifer for CO 2 storage: Central Bohemian Basin, Czech Republic  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work is a preliminary screening and evaluation of one of the most promising geological structures for CO2 storage in the Czech Republic, namely the deep saline aquifers of the Central Bohemian PermianCarboniferous Basin. Archived and new mineralogical, petrophysical, lithological, geochemical, sequence-stratigraphic, thermal history, core analyses, hydrogeological testing, and seismic data for both the reservoir formation and seal rocks were

D. G. Hatzignatiou; F. Riis; R. Berenblyum; V. Hladik; R. Lojka; J. Francu

89

Preliminary projections of the effects of chloride-control structures on the Quaternary aquifer at Great Salt Plains, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

About 1,200 tons of chloride per day are added to the salt load of the Salt Fork of the Arkansas River at Great Salt Plains Lake from natural sources. The source of this chloride is brine discharge from the rocks of Permian age in the vicinity of the lake. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has planned a chloride-control project. The Corps requested that the U.S. Geological Survey use a digital model to project the effects of the chloride-control plan on ground water. Ground-water flow and ground-water transport models were calibrated to represent the Quaternary aquifer that is the near-surface part of the flow system. The models were used to project the effects of planned chloride-control structures. Based on model results, ground-water levels are projected to rise as much as 19 feet. However, these water-level rises will occur only in areas near three reservoirs. Changes in ground-water level caused by the project will be small throughout most of the area. Chloride concentration of ground water is projected to increase by more than 90,000 milligrams per liter at one location. However, significant increases in chloride concentration during the 50-year period simulated are projected to be limited to areas where the ground water already contains excessive chloride concentrations.

Reed, J. E.

1982-01-01

90

THREE-DIMENSIONAL LIGHTNING MAPPING OF THE CENTRAL OKLAHOMA SUPERCELL ON 26 MAY 2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three-dimensional lightning mapping observations from the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OK-LMA) were used to analyze charge structure of a splitting su- percell on 26 May 2004 during the Thunderstorm Elec- trification and Lightning Experiment (TELEX). The OK- LMA was used to evaluate cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes reported by the National Lightning Detection Network's (NLDN). Each NLDN flash between 2300 UTC and

Elise V. Johnson; Edward R. Mansell

91

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the alluvial and terrace deposits along the Beaver-North Canadian River from the panhandle to Canton Lake in northwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export and nonproprietary format files This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the alluvial and terrace deposits along the alluvial and terrace deposits along the Beaver-North Canadian River from the panhandle to Canton Lake in northwestern Oklahoma. Ground water in 830 square miles of the Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace aquifer is an important source of water for irrigation, industrial, municipal, stock, and domestic supplies. The aquifer consists of poorly sorted, fine to coarse, unconsolidated quartz sand with minor amounts of clay, silt, and basal gravel. The hydraulically connected alluvial and terrace deposits unconformably overlie the Tertiary-age Ogallala Formation and Permian-age formations. Most of the lines in the aquifer boundary and recharge data sets and some of the lines in the hydraulic conductivity data set were extracted from a published digital surficial geology data set based on a scale of 1:250,000. The ground-water elevation contours and some of the lines for the aquifer boundary, hydraulic conductivity, and recharge data sets were digitized from a ground-water modeling report about the aquifer published at a scale of 1:250,000. The hydraulic conductivity values and recharge rates also are from the ground-water modeling report. The data sets are provided in both nonproprietary and ARC/INFO export file formats. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

Adams, G. P.; Runkle, D. L.; Rea, Alan

1997-01-01

92

Potential for downward leakage to the Floridan Aquifer, Green Swamp area, central Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A qualitative evaluation of the potential for downward leakage from the surficial sand aquifer to the underlying Floridan aquifer was made for the Green Swamp area (about 870 sq mi) in central Florida. Downward leakage, or recharge, is limited under natural conditions owing to the nearness to land surface of the potentiometric surface of both the sand aquifer and the underlying Floridan aquifer. Continuous cores of the unconsolidated section were obtained at 74 sites in the study area and were evaluated for downward leakage potential based on grain-size distribution. Sand percentage was estimated for each interval or bed from microscopic examination of the core samples. The four maps prepared from this data show sand thickness, clay thickness, relative vertical hydraulic conductivity of the confining beds and the relative potential for downward leakage. About 20 percent (178 sq mi) of the area classified has a relatively good potential for downward leakage; almost 50 percent of the area has a relatively poor potential. (Woodard-USGS)

Grubb, H. F.

1977-01-01

93

Regional Groundwater Flow in Quaternary Aquifers in the Kanto Plain, central Japan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Kanto Plain located in the Pacific side of central Japan is the largest groundwater basin in Japan. Tokyo metropolitan district is situated in this plain, and approximately 30 % of the whole population of Japan lives here. Urbanization and various human activities have affected groundwater environment in each part of the plain; e.g. land subsidence, decline of piezometric head and pollution. It is necessary to make clear the present groundwater environment and the process of environmental changes to maintain and manage groundwater environment. In this study, groundwater samples were taken in Quaternary aquifers (shallower than GL-400m) and analyzed major dissolved ions and delta-18O, D to clarify the present regional groundwater flow system. Also, long term data of piezometric head in various aquifers observed by the local administrations were collected. From the three dimensional distribution of groundwater quality and delta-18O, D, groundwater with relatively high Cl- concentration (up to about 200mg/l) and low isotopic ratios was found in the aquifer that was situated between 200m and 400m depth of the central part. This groundwater area was distributed in the direction of northwest-southeast, and boundary of it was clear. Considering the hydrogeological setting and isotopic ratios of precipitation, the groundwater was considered to have been supplied to this area by regional groundwater flow. On the other hand, the southwestern boundary was well corresponded to the location of Ayasegawa fault system that deformed Quaternary sediments approximately 100m at the depth GL-200m. In addition, piezometric head in each aquifer differed bordering on the fault. These differences strongly suggested the fault system divides the regional groundwater flow system, that is, the fault system acts as barrier to groundwater flow from southwestern part to central part of the plain. Also, this barrier was fully functioning in the period when the groundwater was pumped in large quantities.

Hayashi, T.; Miyakoshi, A.; Yasuhara, M.; Sakura, Y.

2006-12-01

94

Basin-scale geohydrologic drought flow features of riparian aquifers in the southern Great Plains  

Microsoft Academic Search

Low-streamflow hydrographs from 22 subbasins in the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) Washita River Experimental Watershed complex in central Oklahoma were subjected to recession slope analysis; this method, after that of Brutsaert and Nieber [1977], was derived from a Dupuit-Boussinesq formulation for the groundwater outflows from the adjoining phreatic aquifers. The long-time aquifer response characteristics were generally found

Wilfried Brutsaert; James P. Lopez

1998-01-01

95

Water-level changes in the high plains aquifer underlying parts of South Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas; predevelopment through nonirrigation season 1987-88  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The changes in water levels in the High Plains aquifer from the nonirrigation season 1986-87 through the nonirrigation season 1987-88 and from the nonirrigation season 1979-80 through the nonirrigation season 1987-88 are presented in maps for the entire High Plains aquifer area. Water level changes are caused by interacting changes in precipitation, land use, and annual pumpage. Water levels declined from conditions prior to development until 1980 through parts of the High Plains of Nebraska, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. From 1980 through 1987 water level changes were mixed, with declines of more than 10 ft in the highly developed areas of Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas and relatively stable to rising water tables throughout the remaining aquifer area. The net change was a rise of 0.8 ft. The 1981-87 period was generally wetter than normal and pumping for irrigated agriculture was therefore reduced. Water level changes were mixed during 1987. Declines continued in some highly developed areas, but water levels generally rose throughout most of the aquifer. The average area-weighted change was a rise of 0.28 ft. This rise was due to the generally greater than normal precipitation, decreased acreage under irrigation, and decreased pumpage for those areas irrigated. At the end of the growing season, the drought in the Midwest in 1988 affected only limited areas of the High Plains. The effects of the drought on water levels can not be assessed until the water-level measurements for the nonirrigation season of 1988-89 are compiled. (USGS)

Kastner, W. M.; Schild, D. E.; Spahr, D. S.

1989-01-01

96

High Plains Aquifer Hydrologic Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The High Plains Aquifer encompasses 174,000 square miles in eight states and provides the primary source of potable water to the region. The hydrologic cycle exhibits great diversity across this geological basin, with significant expanses experiencing sustained declines in groundwater elevation (e.g., portions of the southern and central basins in Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas) while other areas are experiencing rises (e.g., portions of the northern basin in central Nebraska). The proposed High Plains Aquifer Hydrologic Observatory would promote significant scientific advancement in hydrology related to: (1) Recharge and evapotranspiration, (2) Surface water-groundwater exchange in dynamic riparian corridors, (3) Ecological role of vegetation in the hydrologic cycle, (4) Human systems and the hydrologic cycle, (5) Multi-scale monitoring, modeling & analysis, (6) Climate change studies, and (7) Utilization of remote sensing technology

Steward, D. R.

2004-12-01

97

Gravity constraints on lithosphere flexure and the structure of the late Paleozoic Ouachita orogen in Arkansas and Oklahoma, south central North America  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spectral analysis of Bouguer gravity anomalies in western central Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma indicates that the thickness of the crust in the Ouachita fold and thrust belt increases from 38 km in the western Ouachitas to 44 km in the eastern Ouachitas. The change in crustal thickness occurs near the western end of the Broken Bow uplift and coincides with

Dennis L. Harry; Kevin L. Mickus

1998-01-01

98

Data for ground-water test hole near Butte City, Central Valley aquifer project, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides preliminary data for the third of seven test holes drilled as part of the Central Valley Aquifer Project which is part of the National Regional Aquifer Systems Analysis Program. The test hole was drilled in the SW 1/4 NE 1/4 sec. 32, T. 19 N., R. 1 W., Glenn County, California, about one-half mile south of the town of Butte City. Drilled to a depth of 1,432 feet below land surface, the hole is cased to a depth of 82 feet and equipped with three piezometer tubes to depths of 592 feet, 968 feet, and 1,330 feet. A 5-foot well screen is at the bottom of each piezometer. Each screened interval has a cement plug above and below it to isolate it from other parts of the aquifer , and the well bore is filled between the plugs with sediment. Nine cores and 49 sidewall cores were recovered. Laboratory tests were made for mineralogy, hydraulic conductivity, porosity , consolidation, grain-size distribution, Atterberg limits, X-ray diffraction, and chemical quality of water. Geophysical and thermal gradient logs were made. The hole is sampled periodically for chemical analysis and measured for water level in the three tapped zones. This report presents methods used to obtain field samples, laboratory procedures, and the data obtained. (USGS)

French, James J.; Page, R. W.; Bertoldi, G. L.

1983-01-01

99

Data for ground-water test hole near Nicolaus, Central Valley aquifer project, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Preliminary data are provided for the third of seven test holes drilled as a part of the Central Valley Aquifer Project which is part of the National Regional Aquifer Systems Analysis Program. The test hole was drilled in the SW 1/4 NE 1/4 sec. 2, T.12N., R.3E., Sutter County, California, about 1 1/2 miles northwest of the town of Nicolaus. Drilled to a depth of 1,150 feet below land surface, the hole is cased to a depth of 100 feet and equipped with three piezometer tubes to depths of 311, 711, and 1,071 feet. A 5-foot well screen is set in sand at the bottom of each piezometer. Each screened interval has a cement plug above and below it to isolate it from other parts of the aquifer, and the well bore is filled between the plugs with sediment. Thirty-one cores and 34 sidewall cores were recovered. Laboratory tests were made for minerology, consolidation, grain-size distribution, Atterberg limits, X-ray diffraction, thermal conductivity, and chemical analysis of water. Geophysical and thermal gradient logs were made. The hole is sampled periodically for chemical analysis of the three tapped zones and measured for water level. This report presents methods used to obtain field samples, laboratory procedures, and the data obtained. (USGS)

French, James J.; Page, R. W.; Bertoldi, Gilbert L.

1983-01-01

100

Geochemical and Sr isotopic variations in groundwaters of the Edwards aquifer, central Texas  

SciTech Connect

The regionally-extensive Edwards aquifer of central Texas lies on the northwestern edge of the Gulf of Mexico Basin. The aquifer system is composed primarily of lower Cretaceous marine limestones and dolostones with minor evaporitic and siliciclastic confining units of the Edwards Group and associated formations. The eastern and southern boundaries of the freshwater aquifer are defined by an abrupt change in groundwater salinity that is known as the badwater line. Variation in the isotopic composition and concentration of Sr in the mineral phases and waters in this aquifer system provide means to examine groundwater evolution processes. Models of simultaneous variations in Sr isotopes and major and trace ions are used to constrain processes of groundwater-rock interaction and groundwater mixing. Geochemical variations were examined in Edwards carbonate host rocks and groundwaters in Williamson and Bell Counties. Groundwaters were sampled along and across the badwater line, and range in salinity from 320--2,630 mg/l total dissolved solids. Major ion distributions in the water samples demonstrate a hydrochemical facies transition from Ca-HCO[sub 3] freshwaters to Na-Cl-SO[sub 4]-HCO[sub 3] badwaters. Both water types show a wide range of [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr values: Ca-HCO[sub 3] waters range from values of 0.7078--0.7093, and Na-Cl-SO[sub 4]-HCO[sub 3] waters range from values of 0.7087--0.7097. The Sr isotope compositions for both water groups are significantly greater than their host marine carbonates ([approximately]0.7075). The high Sr isotopic compositions indicate an extraformational source of Sr in both hydrochemical facies. Fluid mixing processes involving a freshwater and at least two badwater endmembers are required to account for variations in elemental and isotopic compositions in the groundwaters. Mineral-solution reactions may operate during and/or subsequent to mixing to produce the compositional variability observed in some intermediate waters.

Oetting, G.C.; Banner, J.L.; Sharp, J.M. Jr. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1992-01-01

101

Strontium isotope geochemistry of groundwater in the central part of the Dakota (Great Plains) aquifer, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Dakota aquifer of the central and eastern Great Plains of the United States is an important source of water for municipal supplies, irrigation and industrial use. Although the regional flow system can be characterized generally as east to northeasterly from the Rocky Mountains towards the Missouri River, locally the flow systems are hydrologically complex. This study uses Sr isotopic data from groundwater and leached aquifer samples to document the complex subsystems within the Dakota aquifer in Nebraska and Kansas. The interaction of groundwater with the geologic material through which it flows has created spatial patterns in the isotopic measurements that are related to: long-term water-rock interaction, during which varying degrees of isotopic equilibrium between water and rock has been achieved; and the alteration of NaCl fluids by water-rock interaction. Specifically, Sr isotopic data distinguish brines from Kansas and western Nebraska from those in eastern Nebraska: the former are interpreted to reflect interaction with Permian rocks, whereas the latter record interaction with Pennsylvanian rocks. The Sr isotopic composition of groundwater from other parts of Nebraska and Kansas are a function of the dynamic interaction between groundwater and unlithified sediments (e.g., glacial till and loess), followed by interaction with oxidized and unoxidized sediments within the Dakota Formation. This study illustrates the power of combining Sr chemistry with more conventional geochemical data to obtain a more complete understanding of groundwater flow systems within regional aquifer systems where extensive monitoring networks do not exist. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Gosselin, D. C.; Harvey, F. E.; Frost, C.; Stotler, R.; Macfarlane, P. A.

2004-01-01

102

Arsenic and fluoride in a loess aquifer in the central area of Argentina  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this study is to analyze the geochemical conditions associated with the presence of arsenic (As) and fluoride (F) in the phreatic aquifer of Coronel Moldes, in the central sector of the Argentine Chacopampean plain. The studied aquifer is composed of silty sand sediments of aeolian origin, typically loess-like sediments. The geochemical composition of water varies from sodium bicarbonate to sodium sulfate-chloride water. As contents range from low concentrations, below detection level, to 250 ?g/l. High values of F (up to 12 mg/l) were recorded. A high As-F correlation was found ( R 2 = 0.84). The pH varied from 7.31 to 8.85 and the nitrates reached concentrations up to 200 mg/l, indicating an oxidant environment. The highest values of As and F agreed with sodium bicarbonate waters as well as with the highest values of pH recorded. There was a high correlation between As and F- as well as between As and the Na/Ca ratio. The composition and texture of loess, low permeability and hydraulic gradients together with the geochemical features of sodium bicarbonate waters are proper conditions for the mobilization of As and F in groundwater in the central area of Argentina.

Gomez, M. L.; Blarasin, M. T.; Martnez, D. E.

2009-03-01

103

Hydrologic maps of Ogallala Aquifer, west-central Kansas, 1979-81  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mathematical technique, called kriging, was programmed for a computer to interpolate hydrologic data based on a network of measured values in west-central Kansas. The computer program generated estimated values at the center of each 1-mile section in the Western Kansas Groundwater Management District No. 1 and facilitated contouring of selected hydrologic data that are needed in the effective management of ground water for irrigation. The kriging technique produced various maps that illustrated hydrologic conditions in the Ogallala aquifer, the principal source of water in west-central Kansas. Maps of the aquifer, which use a 3-year average, included the 1979-81 water-table altitudes, which ranged from about 2,580 to 3,720 feet; the 1979-81 saturated thicknesses, which ranged from about 0 to 250 feet; and the percentage changes in saturated thickness from 1950 to 1979-81, which ranged from about a 40-percent increase to a 100-percent decrease. A map showing errors of estimate also was provided as a measure of reliability for the 1979-81 water-table altitudes. Errors of estimate ranged from 2 to 24 feet. (USGS)

Spinazola, Joseph M.

1982-01-01

104

Impact of groundwater withdrawals on the interaction of multi-layered aquifers in the Viterbo geothermal area (central Italy)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The impact of groundwater withdrawals on the interaction between multi-layered aquifers with different water qualities in the Viterbo geothermal area (central Italy) was studied. In this area, deep thermal waters are used to supply thermal spas and public pools. A shallow overlying aquifer carries cold and fresh water, used for irrigation and the local drinking-water supply. Starting with a conceptual hydrogeological model, two simplified numerical models were implemented: a steady-state flow model of the entire groundwater system, and a steady-state flow and heat transport model of a representative area, which included complex interactions between the aquifers. The impact of increased withdrawals associated with potential future development of the thermal aquifer must be considered in terms of the water temperature of the existing thermal sources. However, withdrawals from the shallow aquifer might also influence the discharge of thermal sources and quality of the water withdrawn from the shallow wells. The exploitation of the two aquifers is dependent on the hydraulic conductivity and thickness of the intervening aquitard, which maintains the delicate hydrogeological equilibrium. Effective methods to control this equilibrium include monitoring the vertical gradient between the two aquifers and the residual discharge of natural thermal springs.

Baiocchi, Antonella; Lotti, Francesca; Piscopo, Vincenzo

2013-09-01

105

Recharge response to interannual and multidecadal climate variability and implications for groundwater resources of the Central Valley aquifer, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Climate variability on interannual to multidecadal temporal scales has substantial implications for management and sustainability of water resources, yet are poorly understood throughout much of the United States. Climate forcings on these timescales partially control precipitation distribution, temperature fluctuations, drought occurrence and severity, streamflow, and recharge. Reliable predictions of future climate and subsequent adaptation of groundwater management strategies in vulnerable aquifers, such as the Central Valley aquifer located in central California of the United States, requires improved understanding of climate variability on interannual to multidecadal timescales and the associated responses in recharge rates. Groundwater withdrawals from the Central Valley aquifer are the second largest of all aquifers in the United States and are used to support one of the largest agricultural economies. However, the effects of the El Nio Southern Oscillation (ENSO) (2 to 6 year cycle), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) (10 to 25 year cycle), and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) (50 to 80 year cycle) on recharge rates and groundwater levels in the Central Valley aquifer previously have not been quantified. In this study, singular spectrum analysis (SSA) was used to identify the principal components of groundwater level time series from selected wells in Central Valley aquifer that contribute to the greatest amount of variance in the record. In each of the time series analyzed, the PDO was the most significant contributor to groundwater level fluctuations. Wavelet analysis was also used to examine the nonstationary phase relation of multiple time series to identify significance and duration of each forcing. A consistent phase relation of multiple signals suggests possible coherence between climate forcings and groundwater levels, and also indicates the effect of the PDO on groundwater levels. These findings support the conclusion that interannual to multidecadal climate variability, especially PDO, contributes to fluctuations in available groundwater in the Central Valley, and is therefore a necessary component of future water resource management. Findings from the Central Valley aquifer are presented within the context of the effects of climate variability on multiple aquifers across the United States, and support the use of spatiotemporal variations in recharge rates due to climate variability within adaptation strategies for groundwater sustainability.

Kuss, A. M.; Gurdak, J. J.

2010-12-01

106

Hydrogeologic framework of the Wood River Valley aquifer system, south-central Idaho  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Wood River Valley contains most of the population of Blaine County and the cities of Sun Valley, Ketchum, Hailey, and Bellevue. This mountain valley is underlain by the alluvial Wood River Valley aquifer system, which consists primarily of a single unconfined aquifer that underlies the entire valley, an underlying confined aquifer that is present only in the southernmost valley, and the confining unit that separates them. The entire population of the area depends on groundwater for domestic supply, either from domestic or municipal-supply wells, and rapid population growth since the 1970s has caused concern about the long-term sustainability of the groundwater resource. As part of an ongoing U.S. Geological Survey effort to characterize the groundwater resources of the Wood River Valley, this report describes the hydrogeologic framework of the Wood River Valley aquifer system. Although most of the Wood River Valley aquifer system is composed of Quaternary-age sediments and basalts of the Wood River Valley and its tributaries, older igneous, sedimentary, or metamorphic rocks that underlie these Quaternary deposits also are used for water supply. It is unclear to what extent these rocks are hydraulically connected to the main part of Wood River Valley aquifer system and thus whether they constitute separate aquifers. Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in and near the study area that produce water to wells and springs are the Phi Kappa and Trail Creek Formations (Ordovician and Silurian), the Milligen Formation (Devonian), and the Sun Valley Group including the Wood River Formation (Pennsylvanian-Permian) and the Dollarhide Formation (Permian). These sedimentary rocks are intruded by granitic rocks of the Late Cretaceous Idaho batholith. Eocene Challis Volcanic Group rocks overlie all of the older rocks (except where removed by erosion). Miocene Idavada Volcanics are found in the southern part of the study area. Most of these rocks have been folded, faulted, and metamorphosed to some degree, thus rock types and their relationships vary over distance. Quaternary-age sediment and basalt compose the primary source of groundwater in the Wood River Valley aquifer system. These Quaternary deposits can be divided into three units: a coarse-grained sand and gravel unit, a fine-grained silt and clay unit, and a single basalt unit. The fine- and coarse-grained units were primarily deposited as alluvium derived from glaciation in the surrounding mountains and upper reaches of tributary canyons. The basalt unit is found in the southeastern Bellevue fan area and is composed of two flows of different ages. Most of the groundwater produced from the Wood River Valley aquifer system is from the coarse-grained deposits. The altitude of the pre-Quaternary bedrock surface in the Wood River Valley was compiled from about 1,000 well-driller reports for boreholes drilled to bedrock and about 70 Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) ambient-noise measurements. The bedrock surface generally mimics the land surface by decreasing down tributary canyons and the main valley from north to south; it ranges from more than 6,700 feet in Baker Creek to less than 4,600 feet in the central Bellevue fan. Most of the south-central portion of the Bellevue fan is underlain by an apparent topographically closed area on the bedrock surface that appears to drain to the southwest towards Stanton Crossing. Quaternary sediment thickness ranges from less than a foot on main and tributary valley margins to about 350 feet in the central Bellevue fan. Hydraulic conductivity for 81 wells in the study area was estimated from well-performance tests reported on well-driller reports. Estimated hydraulic conductivity for 79 wells completed in alluvium ranges from 1,900 feet per day (ft/d) along Warm Springs Creek to less than 1 ft/d in upper Croy Canyon. A well completed in bedrock had an estimated hydraulic conductivity value of 10 ft/d, one well completed in basalt had a value of 50 ft/d, and three wells completed in the confined system had values ranging from 32 to 52 ft/

Bartolino, James R.; Adkins, Candice B.

2012-01-01

107

Data for ground-water test hole near Zamora, Central Valley Aquifer Project, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Preliminary data are presented for the first of seven test holes drilled as a part of the Central Valley Aquifer Project which is part of the National Regional Aquifer Systems Analysis Program. The test hole was drilled in the SW 1/4 SE 1/4 sec. 34, T. 12 N. , R. 1 E., Yolo County, California, about 3 miles northeast of the town of Zamora. Drilled to a depth of 2,500 feet below land surface, the hole is cased to a depth of 190 feet and equipped with three piezometer tubes to depths of 947, 1,401, and 2,125 feet. A 5-foot well screen is at the bottom of each piezometer. Eighteen cores and 68 sidewall cores were recovered. Laboratory tests were made for mineralogy, hydraulic conductivity, porosity , consolidation, grain-size distribution, Atterberg limits, X-ray diffraction, diatom identification, thermal conductivity, and chemical analysis of water. Geophysical and thermal gradient logs were made. The hole is sampled periodically for chemical analysis and measured for water level in the three tapped zones. This report presents methods used to obtain field samples, laboratory procedures, and the data obtained. (USGS)

French, J. J.; Page, R. W.; Bertoldi, G. L.

1982-01-01

108

Controls on the spatial and temporal variability of vadose dripwater geochemistry: Edwards aquifer, central Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A 4-yr study of spatial and temporal variability in the geochemistry of vadose groundwaters from caves within the Edwards aquifer region of central Texas offers new insights into controls on vadose groundwater evolution, the relationship between vadose and phreatic groundwaters, and the fundamental influence of soil composition on groundwater geochemistry. Variations in Sr isotopes and trace elements (Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios) of dripwaters and soils from different caves, as well as phreatic groundwaters, provide the potential to distinguish between local variability and regional processes controlling fluid geochemistry, and a framework for understanding the links between climatic and hydrologic processes. The Sr isotope compositions of vadose cave dripwaters (mean 87Sr/ 86Sr = 0.7087) and phreatic groundwaters (mean 87Sr/ 86Sr = 0.7079) generally fall between values for host carbonates (mean 87Sr/ 86Sr = 0.7076) and exchangeable Sr in overlying soils (mean 87Sr/ 86Sr = 0.7088). Dripwaters have lower Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios, and higher 87Sr/ 86Sr values than phreatic groundwaters. Dripwater 87Sr/ 86Sr values also inversely correlate with both Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios. Mass-balance modeling combined with these geochemical relationships suggest that variations in fluid compositions are predominantly controlled by groundwater residence times, and water-rock interaction with overlying soils and host aquifer carbonate rocks. Consistent differences in dripwater geochemistry (i.e., 87Sr/ 86Sr, Mg/Ca, and Sr/Ca) between individual caves are similar to compositional differences in soils above the caves. While these differences appear to exert significant control on local fluid evolution, geochemical and isotopic variations suggest that the controlling processes are regionally extensive. Temporal variations in 87Sr/ 86Sr values and Mg/Ca ratios of dripwaters from some sites over the 4-yr interval correspond with changes in both aquifer and climatic parameters. These results have important implications for the interpretation of trace element and isotopic variations in speleothems as paleoclimate records, as well as the understanding of controls on water chemistry for both present-day and ancient carbonate aquifers.

Musgrove, MaryLynn; Banner, Jay L.

2004-03-01

109

Primary and secondary porosity development in valley fill, marine sandstone reservoirs - Misener Formation, north-central Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian Misener formation in north-central Oklahoma consists of a series of discontinuous sand and shale bodies deposited in erosional topographic lows on the post-Hunton unconformity surface. Paleontological, mineralogical, and sedimentological evidence supports a marine depositional setting. Rapid changes in sandstone thickness and reservoir properties are characteristic of Misener sands. These sands were episodically deposited, fine upward, and commonly interfinger with an equivalent shale facies. The basal contact of the Misener sandstone bodies is erosional with the inclusion of shale, phosphate, and sandstone clasts in a medium-grained, dolomitic quartzarenite sandstone. Reservoir porosity is best developed in the poorer sorted, medium-grained, dolomitic quartzarenites of the channel facies. A mixed mineralogy sandstone is critical to the preservation of primary porosity and the development of secondary porosity. Well-sorted, fine-grained quartzarenite sandstones (nonchannel) have been extensively quartz cemented. Early dolomitization in the mixed mineralogy sandstones prevented quartz cementation and preserved primary porosity. Sandstones containing preserved primary porosity served as pathways for the movement of subsurface fluids. These fluids generated secondary porosity by the selective dissolution of glauconite, phosphate, and lithic grains. Significant post-hydrocarbon diagenesis in the form of bitumen precipitation, dedolomitization, and calcite cementation has occurred in the water zone of several Misener sandstone reservoirs. The occurrence of these diagenetic products in the oil column suggests post entrapment tilting of some reservoirs.

Prezbindowski, D.R.; Francis, B.M.; Fritz, R.D. (International Petrology Research, Tulsa, OK (USA))

1989-08-01

110

Dissolved solids and sodium in water from the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 1978, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated a 5-year study of the High Plains regional aquifer to provide: (1) Hydrologic information needed to evaluate the effects of continued ground-water development; and (2) computer models to predict aquifer response to changes in ground-water development. The plan of study for the High Plains Regional Aquifer-System Analysis was described by Weeks (1978). A description of the High Plains aquifer and a map of the 1978 water table were presented by Gutentag and Weeks (1980). Maps of the bedrock geology, altitude of aquifer base, and saturated thickness of the High Plains aquifer were published by Weeks and Gutentag (1981). Water-level and saturated-thickness changes, from predevelopment to 1980, were mapped by Luckey, Gutentag, and Weeks (1981). This report describes the areal distribution of dissolved solids and sodium in the water of the High Plains aquifer. Data used in this study were provided by the U.S. Geological Survey and State agencies in each of the eight States in the High Plains. Their contribution is an integral part of this investigation.

Krothe, Noel C.; Oliver, Joseph W.; Weeks, John B.

1982-01-01

111

Modeling groundwater levels on the Calera Aquifer Region in Central Mexico using ModFLow.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A conceptual model for the Calera Aquifer has been created to represent the aquifer system beneath the Calera Aquifer Region (CAR) in the State of Zacatecas, Mexico. The CAR area was uniformly partitioned into a 500 X 500 m grid generating a high resolution model that represented the natural boundar...

112

Water and sediment yield response to multi-year precipitation variations in a central Oklahoma watershed  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Persistent, multi-year departures of annual precipitation from long term mean have been observed in various parts of the United States. The Dust Bowl years in the central plains and the recent drought in the West are examples of such persistent departures. Departures in annual precipitation that las...

113

Water Quality in the High Plains Aquifer, Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming, 1999-2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains the major findings of a 1999-2004 assessment of water quality in the High Plains aquifer. It is one of a series of reports by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program that present major findings for principal and other aquifers and major river basins across the Nation. In these reports, water quality is discussed in terms of local, regional, State, and national issues. Conditions in the aquifer system are compared to conditions found elsewhere and to selected national benchmarks, such as those for drinking-water quality. This report is intended for individuals working with water-resource issues in Federal, State, or local agencies, universities, public interest groups, or the private sector. The information will be useful in addressing a number of current issues, such as drinking-water quality, the effects of agricultural practices on water quality, source-water protection, and monitoring and sampling strategies. This report is also for individuals who wish to know more about the quality of ground water in areas near where they live and how that water quality compares to the quality of water in other areas across the region and the Nation. The water-quality conditions in the High Plains aquifer summarized in this report are discussed in greater detail in other reports that can be accessed in Appendix 1 of http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/1749/. Detailed technical information, data and analyses, collection and analytical methodology, models, graphs, and maps that support the findings presented in this report in addition to reports in this series from other basins can be accessed from the national NAWQA Web site (http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa). This report accompanies the detailed and technical report of water-quality conditions in the High Plains aquifer 'Water-quality assessment of the High Plains aquifer, 1999-2004' (http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/1749/)

Gurdak, Jason J.; McMahon, Peter B.; Dennehy, Kevin; Qi, Sharon L.

2009-01-01

114

Reconnaissance of water quality in the High Plains Aquifer beneath agricultural lands, south-central Kansas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The High Plains of western Kansas was one of 14 areas selected for preliminary groundwater quality reconnaissance by the U.S. Geological Survey 's Toxic Waste--Groundwater Contamination Program. The specific objective was to evaluate the effects of land used for agriculture (irrigated cropland and non-irrigated rangeland) on the water in the High Plains aquifer. Conceptual inferences, based on the information available, would lead one to expect groundwater beneath irrigated cropland to contain larger concentrations of sodium, sulfate, chloride, nitrite plus nitrate, and some water soluble pesticides than water beneath non-irrigated land (range-land) The central part of the Great Bend Prairie, an area of about 1,800 sq mi overlying the High Plains aquifer in south-central Kansas, was selected for the study of agricultural land use because it has sand soils, a shallow water table, relatively large annual precipitation, and includes large areas that are exclusively irrigated cropland or non-irrigated rangeland. As determined by a two-tailed Wilcoxon rank-sum test, concentrations of sodium and alkalinity were significantly larger at the 95% confidence level for water samples from beneath irrigated cropland than from beneath rangeland. No statistically significant difference in concentrations of sulfate, chloride, nitrite plus nitrate, and ammonia, was detected. Concentrations of 2,4-D found in water samples from beneath the rangeland were larger at the 99% confidence level as compared to concentrations of 2,4-D in samples from beneath irrigated cropland. Larger concentrations of sodium and alkalinity were found in water beneath irrigated cropland, and the largest concentration of the pesticide atrazine (triazines were found in three samples) was found in water from the only irrigation well sampled. The sodium and atrazine concentrations found in water from the irrigation well support the premise that water-level drawdown develops under irrigated fields. This diverts the natural groundwater flow patterns, so that pumpage may cause recycling and subsequent concentration of leachates from the land surface. (Author 's abstract)

Stullken, L. E.; Stamer, J. K.; Carr, J. E.

1987-01-01

115

Petrology of lower and middle Eocene carbonate rocks, Floridan aquifer, central Florida  

SciTech Connect

Study of cores from a US Geological Survey test well near Polk City, Florida, indicates that the Avon Park-Lake City (Claibornian) and Oldsmar (Sabinian) Limestones, which comprise most of the Floridan aquifer in central Florida, can be divided into six microfacies: foraminiferal mudstone, foraminiferal wackestone-packstone, foraminiferal grainstone, nodular anhydrite, laminated dolomicrite, and replacement dolomite. Dolomite containing variable amounts of nodular anhydrite forms more than 90% of the Avon Park-Lake city interval, whereas thte Oldsmar is chiefly limestone. Several episodes of dolomite formation are recognized. Laminated dolomicrite formed syngenetically in a supratidal-sabhka environment. Crystalline dolomite with nodular anhydrite formed early by replacement of limestone through reflux of dense, magnesium-rich brines. Replacement dolomite not associated with evaporites and containing limpid crystals probably formed later by a mixed-water process in the subsurface environment. Late diagenetic processes affecting crystalline dolomites include hydration of anhydrite to gypsum, partial dissolution of gypsum, minor alteration of gypsum to calcite, and dissolution of calcian dolomite cores in stoichiometric crystals. Crystalline dolomite and grainstone are the only rock types that have high enough porosities and permeabilities to provide significant yields of water. Medium and finely crystalline dolomites show best values of porosity and permeability because they have high percentages of intercrystal and moldic pores that are well connected. Filling of pores by anhydrite or gypsum can significantly reduce porosity and permeability.

Thayer, P.A.; Miller, J.A.

1984-09-01

116

Experimental studies in stream-aquifer interaction along the Arkansas River in Central Kansas --- Field testing and analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sophocleous, M., Townsend, M.A., Vogler, L.D., McClain, T.J., Marks, E.T. and Coble, G.R., 1988. Experimental studies in stream-aquifer interaction along the Arkansas River in Central Kansas -- Field testing and analysis. J. Hydrol., 98: 249-273. During the last several years, streamflows of a number of Kansas streams have been reduced as a result of groundwater declines. In order to better

MARIOS SOPHOCLEOUS; M. A. TOWNSEND; L. D. VOGLER; T. J. McCLAIN; E. T. MARKS; G. R. COBLE

1988-01-01

117

Assessing aquifer susceptibility to and severity of atrazine contamination at a field site in south-central Wisconsin, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

A field study from October 1989 through July 1992, conducted on a 4.1-km2 area in south-central Wisconsin, USA, examined the distributions of atrazine and its chlorinated metabolites in groundwater\\u000a and related those distributions to the groundwater flow system. MODFLOW and PATH3D were used to assess bedrock-aquifer susceptibility\\u000a to contamination. Estimated travel time from water table to bedrock surface ranges from

Jonathan Levy; Gordon Chesters; Daniel P. Gustafson; Harry W. Read

1998-01-01

118

An assessment of the potential and impacts of winter water banking in the Sokh aquifer, Central Asia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dynamics of artificial recharge of winter surface flows coupled with increased summer groundwater use for irrigation in\\u000a the Sokh aquifer (Central Asia) have been investigated. Water release patterns from the giant Toktogul reservoir have changed,\\u000a as priority is now given to hydropower generation in winter in Kyrgyzstan. Winter flows have increased and summer releases\\u000a have declined, but the Syr

Inna Gracheva; Akmal Karimov; Hugh Turral; F. Miryusupov

2009-01-01

119

Bacterial production of methane and its influence on ground-water chemistry in east-central Texas aquifers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geochemical and isotopic data for methane and ground water indicate that gaseous hydrocarbons in Eocene aquifers in east-central Texas form by bacterial processes. The δ¹³C values of methane from live wells in the clay-rich Yegua and Cook Mountain Formations range from -71{per thousand} to -62{per thousand}. Methane from ten wells in the cleaner sands of the Sparta Queen City Formations

Ethan L. Grossman; B. Keith Coffman; Steven J. Fritz; Hideki Wada

1989-01-01

120

Bacterial production of methane and its influence on ground-water chemistry in east-central Texas aquifers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geochemical and isotopic data for methane and ground water indicate that gaseous hydrocarbons in Eocene aquifers in east-central Texas form by bacterial processes. The delta13C values of methane from five wells in the clay-rich Yegua and Cook Mountain Formations range from -710\\/00 to -620\\/00. Methane from ten wells in the cleaner sands of the Sparta and Queen City Formations have

Ethan L. Grossman; B. Keith Coffman; Steven J. Fritz; Hideki Wada

1989-01-01

121

COORDINATED IN-SITU AND REMOTE SENSING PRECIPITATION MEASUREMENTS AT THE KESSLER FARM FIELD LABORATORY IN CENTRAL OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding the microphysics of precipitation and the atmosphere in which it forms and evolves is important for scientists to accurately estimate rainfall rates and improve parameterizations in models that predict the weather. Therefore, the University of Oklahoma in col- laboration with NOAAs National Severe Storms Labo- ratory is building up a suite of instrumentation to mea- sure the properties of

Phillip B. Chilson; Guifu Zhang; Terry Schuur; Laura M. Kanofsky; Michihiro S. Teshiba; Qing Cao; Grzegorz Ciach

122

Synthesis of the Hydrogeologic Framework of the Floridan Aquifer System and Delineation of a Major Avon Park Permeable Zone in Central and Southern Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The carbonate Floridan aquifer system of central and southern Florida (south of a latitude of about 29 degrees north) is an invaluable resource with a complex framework that has previously been mapped and managed primarily in a subregional context accordi...

E. Richardson R. S. Reese

2007-01-01

123

Aquifer tests at the Jackpile-Paguate uranium mine, Pueblo of Laguna, west-central New Mexico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The transmissivity of the Jackpile sandstone bed in the Brushy Basin Shale Member of the Morrison Formation, west-central New Mexico, was determined to be 24 sq ft/day at well M2 and 47 sq ft/day at well M3 from constant-discharge aquifer tests conducted at the Jackpile-Paguate Uranium Mine. The storage coefficient of the Jackpile sandstone bed was estimated to be 0.00018 at well M2 and 0.00029 at well M3 from the same tests. An aquifer test conducted at well M21 indicated the transmissivity of the Jackpile sandstone bed was 2.0 sq ft/day and the storage coefficient was 0.00002. The transmissivity of an unnamed sandstone bed in the Brushy Basin Shale Member of the Morrison Formation was estimated from ' slug-test ' results to be about 20 sq ft/day. Water levels in this sandstone probably did not change due to pumping from the overlying Jackpile sandstone bed for 88 hours at an average discharge of 15.3 gallons/min. A constant discharge aquifer test at well M4C indicated that the transmissivity of the alluvium at this location was about 430 sq ft/day. Water levels in the underlying Jackpile sandstone bed began declining within 15 minutes after withdrawals of groundwater from the alluvial aquifer began. (USGS)

Risser, D. W.; Davis, P. A.; Baldwin, J. A.; McaAda, D. P.

1984-01-01

124

Modeling CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoirs to Evaluate Regional CO2 Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Paleozoic-age Ozark Plateau Aquifer System (OPAS) in southern Kansas consists of a thick (>450 m) and deeply buried (>1 km) succession of Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle Group strata (dolomite) overlain by Lower Ordovician to Lower Carboniferous-age carbonate, chert, and shale. The Arbuckle Group is a thick widespread saline aquifer in southern Kansas. A 500 meter core of the OPAS interval and immediate overlying Pennsylvanian shale caprock were cored in early 2011 in the BEREXCO Wellington KGS #1-32 well in Wellington Field, a nearly depleted oil field in Sumner County, in south-central Kansas. An exhaustive set of modern logs were run in the KGS #1-32 well including chemical, microresistivity imaging, dipole sonic, nuclear magnetic resonance, and standard porosity and resistivity wireline logs. In addition, routine and special core analyses provide vital means to calibrate these logs. Core also provide vital chemical analyses and rock samples to run flow experiments, including in situ conditions, to establish reaction kinetics of rock and connate brines with CO2. Core and logs also provide the means to calibrate a 26 km2 multicomponent 3D seismic survey that was acquired in Wellington Field in 2010. Studies of four oil fields, also part of this project, are underway in southwestern Kansas to provide additional calibration points for the western part of the regional study that covers 65,000 km2 where CO2 sequestration capacity will be measured. Several hundred deep wells have been identified to serve as type wells in the regional study area. Well logs and sample descriptions are being digitized, correlated, and mapped to define distribution of aquifers, oil reservoirs, and caprocks. Drill stem test data have been analyzed for deep wells to establish that the Arbuckle is an open aquifer connected to surface exposures 100s of km to east in central Missouri. Over 500 km2 of 3D seismic have been donated by industrial partners to aid in understanding fault and fracture systems. Regional gravity and magnetics data have been analyzed to infer the potential presence of faults using the tilt angle processing of this information to aid in defining discontinuities and estimates of the depth of the anomalies. Results are being uploaded and integrated as part of an interactive web-based project mapper to permit comparison and interrogation of the data. Integrated views based on this comprehensive examination of the northern shelfward extension of the Anadarko Basin is providing new perspectives and insights into basin development and associated structures. Deep-seated basement faults are extensively developed, expressed in the Phanerozoic strata as drape or faults or no evidence for movement. Selection of CO2 sequestration sites will consider aquifer distribution, caprock integrity, and, once established, the extent of fracture and faults to evaluate risk for potential leakage of CO2. The project is funded by DOE/NETL under grant DE-FE0002056 and cost-sharing partners.

Watney, W. L.; Rush, J.

2011-12-01

125

Simulated effects of ground-water development on potentiometric surface of the Floridan Aquifer, west-central Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A digital model of two-dimensional ground-water flow was used to predict changes in the potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer, 1976 to 2000, in a 5,938-square-mile area of west-central Florida. In 1975, ground water withdrawn from the Floridan aquifer for irrigation, phosphate mines, other industries, and municipal supplies averaged about 649 million gallons per day. Rates are projected to increase to about 840 million gallons per day by 2000. The model was calibrated under steady-state and transient conditions. Input parameters included transmissivity and storage coefficient of the Floridan aquifer; thickness, vertical hydraulic conductivity, and storage coefficient of the upper confining bed; altitudes of the water table and potentiometric surface; and ground-water withdrawals. Simulation of May 1976 to May 2000, using projected combined pumping rates for municipal supplies, irrigation, and industry (including existing and proposed phosphate mines), resulted in a rise in the potentiometric surface of about 10 feet in Polk County, and a decline of about 35 feet in parts of Manatee and Hardee Counties. The lowest predicted potentiometric level was about 30 feet below sea level. Predicted declines for November 1976 to October 2000 were generally 5 to 10 feet less than those for May 1976 to May 2000. (USGS)

Wilson, W. E.; Gerhart, J. M.

1982-01-01

126

An assessment of the potential and impacts of winter water banking in the Sokh aquifer, Central Asia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamics of artificial recharge of winter surface flows coupled with increased summer groundwater use for irrigation in the Sokh aquifer (Central Asia) have been investigated. Water release patterns from the giant Toktogul reservoir have changed, as priority is now given to hydropower generation in winter in Kyrgyzstan. Winter flows have increased and summer releases have declined, but the Syr Darya River cannot pass these larger winter flows and the excess is diverted to a natural depression, creating a 40 109m3 lake. A water balance study of all 18 aquifers feeding the Fergana Valley indicated the feasibility of winter groundwater recharge in storage created by summer abstraction. This modeling study examines the dynamics of the process in one aquifer over a 5-year period, with four scenarios: the current situation; increased groundwater abstraction of around 625 million (M) m3/year; groundwater abstraction with an artificial recharge of 144 Mm3/year, equivalent to the volume available in low flow years in the Sokh River; and with a larger artificial recharge of 268 Mm3/year, corresponding to high flow availability. Summer surface irrigation diversions can be reduced by up to 350 Mm3 and water table levels can be lowered.

Gracheva, Inna; Karimov, Akmal; Turral, Hugh; Miryusupov, F.

2009-09-01

127

Geohydrology of the Oklahoma Panhandle, Beaver, Cimarron, and Texas Counties.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Ogallala aquifer is the principal source of ground water in the Oklahoma Panhandle. Based on an estimated average storage coefficient of 0.1, the quantity of water stored in the Ogallala aquifer was computed at approximately 50 million acre-feet (6.17...

D. L. Hart G. L. Hoffman R. L. Goemaat

1976-01-01

128

Hydrologic connections of a stream aquifer-vegetation zone in south-central Platte River valley, Nebraska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field investigation and numerical modeling approaches were used to examine the hydrologic relations between the Platte River and the adjacent alluvial aquifer and riparian zone in south-central Nebraska. Field methods include direct-push techniques for coring and electric logging in the river channel, permeameter tests for estimating the hydraulic conductivity of the streambed, and monitoring of groundwater levels responding to changes in stream stages and to groundwater evapotranspiration. The channel sediments consist mostly of coarse sand and gravels at the study site with large values of horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity. Groundwater in the riparian zone responded nearly simultaneously to the changes in stream stages, and diurnal fluctuations of the water table are correlated with fluctuations of stream stage in summer. All these indicate a well-connected river-aquifer-vegetation hydrologic system. Numerical models, based on the Galerkin finite element method, were developed to construct detailed flow nets for examining the changes in the patterns of groundwater flow dynamics resulting from the use of groundwater and stream water by riparian vegetation. Simulation results suggest that a number of hydrologic factors, such as the thickness of the aquifer and vertical anisotropy of aquifer hydraulic conductivity, also affect the flow patterns. Vertical flow is a major component, more significant than the horizontal flow below the river and the vegetation zone in the growing season. Groundwater evapotranspiration can bring deeper groundwater to the water table by hydraulic lift. This function of riparian vegetation could cause a complicated situation in an investigation of groundwater quality in riparian zones.

Chen, Xunhong

2007-02-01

129

Characterization of fractures in limestones - northern segment of Edwards aquifer and Balcones fault zone, central Texas  

SciTech Connect

Fracture distributions, orientations, and densities in Comanche Peak, Edwards, and Georgetown limestones (Edwards aquifer strata) were determined in conjunction with geologic mapping near the San Gabriel River from Lake Georgetown to Weir, Texas, to increase the understanding of the geology of the Balcones fault zone and to provide data useful in identification of potential recharge areas and assessment of local ground-water flow.

Collins, E.W.

1987-09-01

130

Hydrogeologic subdivision of the Wolfcamp series and Pennsylvanian system of eastern Texas Panhandle, north-central Texas, and southwestern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Pennsylvanian-Wolfcamp section in the Palo Duro Basin includes brine aquifers that are considered to be the most important ground-water flow paths in the deep-basin system. This report is the fifth in a series providing summary documentation of studies that subdivide the section into hydrogeologic units based on their judged relative capacities for transmitting water. This report extends the hydrogeologic

R. R. Kayal; D. J. Kistner; R. Kranes; F. P. Verock

1987-01-01

131

MICROBIAL ECOLOGY OF A SHALLOW UNCONFINED GROUND WATER AQUIFER POLLUTED BY MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LEACHATE  

EPA Science Inventory

The microflora of a shallow anoxic aquifer underlying a municipal landfill In Oklahoma was characterized by direct light microscopy, most probable number of determinations of sulfate reducers and methanogens, and measurements of methanogenesis in aquifer samples containing either...

132

Aerosol Optical and Chemical Properties Within and Without Clouds During an Airborne Field Campaign in Central Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The optical properties of aerosol particles are one of the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles' lifetime in the atmosphere. Here we present preliminary results showing aerosol optical and chemical properties obtained during the CHAPS field campaign within cloud drops and outside of clouds. The Cumulis Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS), sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program (ASP), took place in the vicinity of Oklahoma City in June, 2007. The intention of the study was to investigate the influence of clouds on aerosols and of aerosol on clouds. Duplicate sets of in-situ aerosol optical instruments were deployed on the ASP G-1 aircraft during the CHAPS campaign. One set of instruments was downstream of an isokinetic inlet designed to sample the ambient aerosol, the other set was downstream of a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) designed to sample and dry cloud droplets so that the cloud drop nuclei could be studied. Each instrument set comprised a 3-wavelength particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) and integrating nephelometer to provide spectral aerosol absorption, scattering and back-scattering and a particle counter to obtain aerosol number concentration. In addition, a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS) was able to sample on either inlet to provide information about the non-refractory chemical composition of the aerosol and cloud drop residuals. The data presented here will describe both how aerosol optical properties change upstream and downstream of a mid-size conurbation (Oklahoma City) and how ambient aerosol optical properties differ from those of the cloud drop nuclei. These changes in aerosol optical properties will be placed in the context of differences in chemical composition derived from the ToF-AMS.

Andrews, E.; Lee, Y.; Alexander, M. L.; Hubbe, J. M.; Ogren, J. A.

2007-12-01

133

Hydrochemistry of the Mahomet Bedrock Valley Aquifer, East-Central Illinois: indicators of recharge and ground-water flow  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A conceptual model of the ground-water flow and recharge to the Mahomet Bedrock Valley Aquifer (MVA), east-central Illinois, was developed using major ion chemistry and isotope geochemistry. The MVA is a 'basal' fill in the east-west trending buried bedrock valley composed of clean, permeable sand and gravel to thicknesses of up to 61 m. It is covered by a thick sequence of glacial till containing thinner bodies of interbedded sand and gravel. Ground water from the MVA was found to be characterized by clearly defined geochemical regions with three distinct ground-water types. A fourth ground-water type was found at the confluence of the MVA and the Mackinaw Bedrock Valley Aquifer (MAK) to the west. Ground water in the Onarga Valley, a northeastern tributary of the MVA, is of two types, a mixed cation-SO42- type and a mixed cation-HCO3- type. The ground water is enriched in Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, and SO42- which appears to be the result of an upward hydraulic gradient and interaction of deeper ground water with oxidized pyritic coals and shale. We suggest that recharge to the Onarga Valley and overlying aquifers is 100% from bedrock (leakage) and lateral flow from the MVA to the south. The central MVA (south of the Onarga Valley) is composed of relatively dilute ground water of a mixed cation-HCO3- type, with low total dissolved solids, and very low concentrations of Cl- and SO42-. Stratigraphic relationships of overlying aquifers and ground-water chemistry of these and the MVA suggest recharge to this region of the MVA (predominantly in Champaign County) is relatively rapid and primarily from the surface. Midway along the westerly flow path of the MVA (western MVA), ground water is a mixed cation-HCO3- type with relatively high Cl-, where Cl- increases abruptly by one to ??? two orders of magnitude. Data suggest that the increase in Cl- is the result of leakage of saline ground water from bedrock into the MVA. Mass-balance calculations indicate that approximately 9.5% of recharge in this area is from bedrock. Concentrations of Na+, HCO3-, As, and TDS also increase in the western MVA. Ground water in the MAK is of a Ca2+-HCO3- type. Mass-balance calculations, using Cl- as a natural, conservative tracer, indicate that approximately 17% of the ground water flowing from the confluence area is derived from the MVA.

Panno, S. V.; Hackley, K. C.; Cartwright, K.; Liu, C. L.

1994-01-01

134

Quaternary stratigraphy, sediment characteristics and geochemistry of arsenic-contaminated alluvial aquifers in the Ganges-Brahmaputra floodplain in central Bangladesh  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study focuses on the Quaternary stratigraphy, sediment composition, mineralogy, and geochemistry of arsenic (As)-contaminated alluvial aquifers in the Ganges-Brahmaputra floodplain in the central Bangladesh. Arsenic concentrations in 85 tubewells in Manikganj area, 70 km northwest of Dhaka City, range from 0.25 g/L to 191 g/L with a mean concentration of 33 g/L. Groundwater is mainly Ca-HCO3 type with high concentrations of dissolved As, Fe, and Mn, but low level of SO4. The uppermost aquifer occurs between 10 m and 80 m below the surface that has a mean arsenic concentration of 35 g/L. Deeper aquifer (> 100 m depth) has a mean arsenic concentration of 18 g/L. Sediments in the upper aquifer are mostly gray to dark-gray, whereas sediments in the deep aquifer are mostly yellowing-gray to brown. Quartz, feldspar, mica, hornblende, garnet, kyanite, tourmaline, magnetite, ilmenite are the major minerals in sediments from both aquifers. Biotite and potassium feldspar are dominant in shallow aquifer, although plagioclase feldspar and garnet are abundant in deep aquifer sediments. Sediment composition suggests a mixed provenance with sediment supplies from both orogenic belts and cratons. High arsenic concentrations in sediments are found within the upper 50 m in drilled core samples. Statistical analysis shows that As, Fe, Mn, Ca, and P are strongly correlated in sediments. Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Bi also show strong correlations with arsenic in the Manikganj sediment cores. Authigenic goethite concretions, possibly formed by bacteria, are found in the shallow sediments, which contain arsenic of a concentration as high as 8.8 mg/kg. High arsenic concentrations in aquifers are associated with fine-grained sediments that were derived mostly from the recycled orogens and relatively rapidly deposited mainly by meandering channels during the Early to Middle Holocene rising sea-level conditions.

Shamsudduha, M.; Uddin, A.; Saunders, J. A.; Lee, M.-K.

2008-07-01

135

Quaternary stratigraphy, sediment characteristics and geochemistry of arsenic-contaminated alluvial aquifers in the Ganges-Brahmaputra floodplain in central Bangladesh.  

PubMed

This study focuses on the Quaternary stratigraphy, sediment composition, mineralogy, and geochemistry of arsenic (As)-contaminated alluvial aquifers in the Ganges-Brahmaputra floodplain in the central Bangladesh. Arsenic concentrations in 85 tubewells in Manikganj area, 70 km northwest of Dhaka City, range from 0.25 microg/L to 191 microg/L with a mean concentration of 33 microg/L. Groundwater is mainly Ca-HCO(3) type with high concentrations of dissolved As, Fe, and Mn, but low level of SO(4). The uppermost aquifer occurs between 10 m and 80 m below the surface that has a mean arsenic concentration of 35 microg/L. Deeper aquifer (>100 m depth) has a mean arsenic concentration of 18 microg/L. Sediments in the upper aquifer are mostly gray to dark-gray, whereas sediments in the deep aquifer are mostly yellowing-gray to brown. Quartz, feldspar, mica, hornblende, garnet, kyanite, tourmaline, magnetite, ilmenite are the major minerals in sediments from both aquifers. Biotite and potassium feldspar are dominant in shallow aquifer, although plagioclase feldspar and garnet are abundant in deep aquifer sediments. Sediment composition suggests a mixed provenance with sediment supplies from both orogenic belts and cratons. High arsenic concentrations in sediments are found within the upper 50 m in drilled core samples. Statistical analysis shows that As, Fe, Mn, Ca, and P are strongly correlated in sediments. Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Bi also show strong correlations with arsenic in the Manikganj sediment cores. Authigenic goethite concretions, possibly formed by bacteria, are found in the shallow sediments, which contain arsenic of a concentration as high as 8.8 mg/kg. High arsenic concentrations in aquifers are associated with fine-grained sediments that were derived mostly from the recycled orogens and relatively rapidly deposited mainly by meandering channels during the Early to Middle Holocene rising sea-level conditions. PMID:18502538

Shamsudduha, M; Uddin, A; Saunders, J A; Lee, M-K

2008-04-10

136

Investigations in organic vegetable production in Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A demonstration plot to provide technology transfer on best management practices in organic production was established in a cooperative effort between scientists of the South Central Agricultural Research Laboratory and Oklahoma State University Wes Watkins Agricultural Research and Extension Center...

137

Hydrochemical and multivariate statistical interpretations of spatial controls of nitrate concentrations in a shallow alluvial aquifer around oxbow lakes (Osong area, central Korea)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydrochemical and multivariate statistical interpretations of 16 physicochemical parameters of 45 groundwater samples from a riverside alluvial aquifer underneath an agricultural area in Osong, central Korea, were performed in this study to understand the spatial controls of nitrate concentrations in terms of biogeochemical processes occurring near oxbow lakes within a fluvial plain. Nitrate concentrations in groundwater showed a large variability

Kyoung-Ho Kim; Seong-Taek Yun; Byoung-Young Choi; Gi-Tak Chae; Yongsung Joo; Kangjoo Kim; Hyoung-Soo Kim

2009-01-01

138

Analyses of Water-Level Differentials and Variations in Recharge between the Surficial and Upper Floridan Aquifers in East-Central and Northeast Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Continuous (daily) water-level data collected at 29 monitoring-well cluster sites were analyzed to document variations in recharge between the surficial (SAS) and Floridan (FAS) aquifer systems in east-central and northeast Florida. According to Darcys la...

L. C. Murray

2007-01-01

139

Using InSar To Determine Aquifer System Response In North Central Nevada Related To Mine Dewatering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Removal of groundwater to allow development of mineral deposits is a common practice in areas where the ore body is below the water table. In some instances, land subsidence and related earth fissuring can result from such dewatering. Large groundwater withdrawals on the order of 50,000 acre-ft/yr have occurred at one mine since the early 1990's in north-central Nevada to support mining. Ground fissuring believed associated with aquifer compaction has been observed in the Pumpernickel Valley-Kelly Creek Basin of East Central Nevada. The observations were coincident with periods of groundwater withdrawal for mine dewatering. Dewatering operations within the Pumpernickel Valley-Kelly Creek Basin has been from the fractured bedrock and not in the overlying alluvium. The observed basin subsidence may provide new insights into both the hydrologic connections, and also into the deformation behavior of fractured rocks. Subsidence in fractured rock aquifers has not been reported. Several techniques have been used to study and predict land subsidence, but our focus is to use one of the recently developed space-platform-based techniques know as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSar). The InSar processing was done using descending data acquired from European Space Agency Satellites ERS-1 and -2 on track 213 and frame 2781. Data acquired from ERS-1 and -2 covered the period between 1992 and 2000 during which time local dewatering pumping began and recorded subsequently reached a maximum of 57,000 acre-ft/year. A total of 146 interferometric pairs were derived from the data with perpendicular baselines for each pair less than 200 meters. Both the wrapped and unwrapped results were viewed and necessary corrections made. Selected unwrapped results were stacked together producing an 8 year time series showing total amount and spatial extent of subsidence. The final results gave a maximum of 36 cm displacement of the land surface during the groundwater extraction period between 1992 and 2000. The center of the subsidence bowl has been found to be close to the Humboldt River and to the north of the center of groundwater extraction for dewatering. Additional analysis of the observed subsidence, groundwater pumping history, hydrostratigraphy and aquifer systems response are in progress.

Baffoe-Twum, E.; Bell, J. W.; Tyler, S. W.; Fischer, J. R.

2006-12-01

140

Spatial hydrochemical and isotopic variations within the alluvial aquifer of the Allier River (Massif Central, France)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydrodynamic, hydrochemical (major ions, traces, pharmaceuticals and pesticides), isotopic (oxygen, hydrogen and carbon stable isotopes) and biological investigations were conducted every two weeks, since December 2010, to assess groundwater quality in the unconfined shallow alluvial aquifer of the Allier River (main tributary of the Loire River). The aquifer is mainly composed of unconsolidated alluvial deposits produced by the erosion of local crystalline rocks, the aquifer overlies impervious Oligocene marls; the surrounding hills are constituted with Quaternary deposits (early and old alluvial deposits on both sides of river), Oligocene limestones, marls and sandstones and Miocene volcano-sedimentary formations (Peperites). The study area is located in the east of the city of Clermont-Ferrand (France) where groundwater resources are used mainly for water supplies and then play an important socio-economic role as it is the major source of drinking water for about 100 000 inhabitants. This study aims at determining the factors and processes controlling shallow groundwater quality and groundwater origin by using the hydrochemical and hydrodynamical data collected on 87 water samples (71 boreholes, 13 piezometers and 4 surface waters) during a first field campaign carried out from the 9th to the 14th of December 2010. The Cournon Meteoric Water Line was determined according to 30 weekly rainfall samples. The results of this study show that spatial variations of physico-chemical parameters do exist in the study area, and the groundwater chemical composition is characterized by different water types with the predominance of the Ca-HCO3 type. Ionic concentration increases in boreholes far from the Allier River due to the increase of residence time or by a mixing with groundwater coming from the hills. The 2H and 18O signature of groundwater and surface water indicate that most of the boreholes close to the river are recharged by the Allier River, while boreholes far from the river exhibit isotopic contents close to the values of sampled springs of the hills, recharged by local precipitation. Nevertheless, some boreholes do not follow this simple scheme of functioning and present values attesting of a secondary process related to evaporation and/or mixing with deep groundwater from geothermal origin.

Mohammed, N.; Celle-Jeanton, H.; Huneau, F.; Le Coustumer, P.; Lavastre, V.; Bertrand, G.

2012-04-01

141

Assessment of nonpoint-source contamination of the High Plains Aquifer in south-central Kansas, 1987  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water quality was assessed in a 5,000-square-mile area of the High Plains aquifer in south-central Kansas that is susceptible to nonpoint-source contamination from agricultural and petroleum-production activities. Of particular interest was the presence of agricultural chemicals and petroleum-derived hydrocarbons that might have been associated with brines that formerly were disposed into unlined ponds. Random sampling of ground water was done within a framework of discrete land-use areas (irrigated cropland, petroleum-production land containing former brine-disposal ponds, and undeveloped rangeland) of 3-10 square miles. Although true baseline water-quality conditions probably are rare, in this region they are represented most closely by ground water in areas of undeveloped rangeland. The sampling design enabled statistical hypothesis testing, using nonparametric procedures, of the effects of land use, unsaturated-zone lithology, and type of well sampled. Results indicate that regional ground-water quality has been affected by prevailing land-use activities, as shown by increased concentrations of several inorganic constituents. Ground water beneath irrigated cropland was characterized by significantly larger concentrations of hardness, alkalinity, calcium, magnesium, potassium, fluofide, and nitrite plus nitrate than was water beneath undeveloped rangeland. Few nondegraded pesticides were detected in the aquifer, probably because of degradation and sorption. Atrazine was the most common, but only in small concentrations. round water beneath petroleum-production land was characterized by significantly larger concentrations of hardness, alkalinity, dissolved solids, sodium, and chloride than was water beneath undeveloped rangeland. Nonpoint-source contamination by oil-derived hydrocarbons was not discernible. The occurrences of trace organic compounds were similar between petroleum-production land and undeveloped rangeland, which indicates a natural origin for these compounds. The unsaturated zone in the study area is lithologically heterogeneous and contains substantial amounts of clay that inhibit the downward movement of water and solutes. Within the aquifer, the rate of lateral regional flow and solute transport is slow enough so that the ground-water quality reflects overlying land use in discrete areas of several square miles, but it is still sufficiently rapid so that the type of well sampled is not important in regional characterizations of water quality beneath irrigated cropland; the seasonal pumping of irrigation wells does not appear to divert regional flow enough to cause substantial local anomalies of more mineralized ground water.

Helgesen, John O.; Stullken, Lloyd E.; Rutledge, A. T.

1994-01-01

142

Effects of three highway-runoff detention methods on water quality of the surficial aquifer system in central Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water quality of the surficial aquifer system in central Florida was evaluated at one exfiltration pipe, two ponds (detention and retention), and two swales in central Florida, representing three runoff-detention methods, to detect any effect from infiltrating highway runoff. Concentrations of major ions, metals, and nutrients in groundwater and bottom sediments were measured from 1984 through 1986. At each study area, constituent concentrations in groundwater near the structure were compared to concentrations in groundwater from an upgradient control site. Groundwater quality data were also pooled by detention method and statistically compared to detect any significant differences between methods. Significantly greater mean phosphorus concentrations in groundwater near the exfiltration pipe than those in the control well was the only evidence of increasing constituent concentrations in groundwater near structures. The quality of water was more variable, and had greater constituent concentrations in the unsaturated zone than in the saturated zone near the exfiltration pipe. Values of water quality variables measured in groundwater at all study areas generally were within State drinking water standards. The main exception was dissolved iron, which commonly exceeded 300 micrograms/L at one swale and the detention pond. Results of the study indicate that natural processes occurring in soils attenuate inorganic constituent concentrations prior to reaching the receiving groundwater. However, organic compounds detected in bottom sediments at the retention pond indicate a potential problem that may eventually affect the quality of the receiving groundwater. (USGS)

Schiffer, D. M.

1989-01-01

143

Changes in flow in the upper North Canadian river basin of western Oklahoma, pre-development to 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water levels have declined in the southern part of the High Plains aquifer of the central USA since the mid-1960s in response to extensive irrigation development. The North Canadian River originates in western Oklahoma, and most of the basin is underlain by the High Plains aquifer. Average river flow in the headwaters near Guymon, Oklahoma, has decreased from about 0.9 m3/s before 1970 to near zero at present. Canton Lake, on the North Canadian River near Seiling, about 250 km downstream from Guymon, is a source of water supply for Oklahoma City. Precipitation data and streamflow data for gages upstream from Canton Lake were divided into an "early" period ending in 1971 and a "recent" period that begins in 1978. The early period represents conditions before ground-water levels had declined appreciably in the High Plains aquifer, and the recent period reflects the current condition, including the effects of storage reservoirs. Tests for trend and comparisons of flows between the early and recent periods show that the total annual volume of flow and the magnitudes of instantaneous annual peak discharges measured at most locations in the North Canadian River basin have decreased. Precipitation records for the area, however, show no corresponding changes. The decreases in average annual flow, expressed as a percentage of the average flows for the early period, ranged from 91 percent near Guymon to 37 percent near Canton Lake. A major contributing factor in the decreased flows appears to be the large declines in water levels in the High Plains aquifer.

Wahl, K. L.

2001-01-01

144

Arsenic content in drinking-water supplies of an important volcanic aquifer in central Italy  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we have investigated arsenic occurrence and distribution in ground waters of a large volcanic area in the central part of Italy. Samples were collected from 100 springs and wells currently supplying drinking water to the province of Viterbo. A complete chemical and physicochemical characterization of the samples was carried out. The concentration of the target element was

Laura Achene; Emanuele Ferretti; Luca Lucentini; Paola Pettine; Enrico Veschetti; Massimo Ottaviani

2010-01-01

145

Geohydrologic characteristics and simulated response to pumping stresses in the Sparta aquifer in East-Central Arkansas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A finite difference digital model of the Sparta aquifer system in Arkansas was developed to aid in assessing the geohydrologic characteristics of the aquifer as well as the impact of withdrawals on water-level declines in the aquifer. The model consists of two layers. The Cockfield aquifer, represented by layer 1, was modeled as a constant head surface. The Sparta aquifer is represented by layer 2. The base of the Sparta aquifer was modeled as a no-flow boundary. The model boundaries to the north, south, and east in Mississippi were represented by specified heads, while boundaries to the west in Louisiana were represented as no flow. The model period of 1989 to 1985 was divided into 25 stress periods. Appropriate aquifer withdrawals were assigned to each stress period. Calibrated hydraulic conductivities of the Sparta aquifer, ranged from 1 to 35 ft/day. Calibrated hydraulic vertical conductivities of the Cook Mountain confining unit ranged from 0.0003 to 0.000009 ft/day. The calibrated storage coefficient of the aquifer was 0.0001. More than 80% of the recharge to the aquifer came from vertical leakage and from direct recharge on the outcrop. Greater than 90 % of outflow from the aquifer was from pumpage or leakage to rivers. Theoretical pumping schemes to the year 2005 indicated that virtually no change to the potentiometric surface occurred when 1985 pumping rates were extended to 2005. Doubling of pumpage over the entire study area resulted in additional water-level declines of up to 130 ft. (USGS)

Fitzpatrick, Daniel J.; Kilpatrick, John M.; McWreath, Harry

1990-01-01

146

The role of perched aquifers in hydrological connectivity and biogeochemical processes in vernal pool landscapes, Central Valley, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relatively little is known about the role of perched aquifers in hydrological, biogeochemical, and biological processes of vernal pool landscapes. The objectives of this study are to introduce a perched aquifer concept for vernal pool formation and maintenance and to examine the resulting hydrological and biogeochemical phenomena in a representative catchment with three vernal pools connected to one another and

Mark Cable Rains; Graham E. Fogg; Thomas Harter; Randy A. Dahlgren; Robert J. Williamson

2006-01-01

147

Comparison of aquifer characteristics of Paleozoic Permosilesian and Mesozoic Buntsandstein clastic rocks in the Thuringian Basin, Central Germany  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Thuringian Basin in Central Germany is a structural trough with Buntsandstein and Zechstein outcropping at the margins and Keuper sedimentary fill in the center. Major aquifer units are Permosilesian, Lower and Middle Buntsandstein and Keuper clastics. In this study we compare aquifer characteristics of the Permosilesian and Buntsandstein sediments. Petrophysical, facial/textural, compositional/diagenetic and chemical properties were studied in order to investigate fluid flow properties in the present and past. The analyzed Buntsandstein sediments occur in present depths between approx. 400-900 m. Paleoburial depths were in the order of 2800 m. The succession is dominated by sandstones and mudstones. Deposition took place in lacustrine to fluvial (Lower Buntsandstein) and fluvial to eolian settings (Middle Buntsandstein). In order to compare sediments of almost identical origin, only the fluvial-alluvial sandstones were considered in this contribution. The sandstones are poorly to well sorted arkoses to subarkoses consisting of quartz, major amounts of feldspar and only negligible amounts of lithoclasts (volcanic, sedimentary rocks). Diagenetic features are early ferrous clay coatings, authigenic quartz overgrowth, feldspar alteration (including leaching, illitisation), blocky sulfate and carbonate cementation and late cement dissolution, formation of illite (early tangential illites, radial illite rims, late meshwork illites) and locally kaolinite. The analyzed Permosilesian sediments occur in present depths of about 1500-2500 m. They comprise conglomerates, sandstones and mudstones of fluvial-alluvial origin. Sandstones are moderately sorted sublitharenites and litharenites consisting of quartz, minor amounts of feldspar and a significant content of metamorphic and subordinately volcanic rock fragments. Major diagenetic features are early ferrous clay coatings and matrix, some authigenic quartz cement, feldspar and lithoclast alteration (including leaching, illitisation), minor blocky carbonate cements and intense illite formation (tangential illites, meshwork illites). Bulk geochemical analyzes (methods: ICP-MS/OES, XRF) reveal no significant differences in major element contents. However, compared to Buntsandstein sandstones the Permosilesian sediments are enriched in all transition metals caused by higher amounts of volcanic and metamorphic lithoclasts, and clay matrix respectively. Comparison of petrophysical characteristics reveals low porosity and permeabilities in the Permosilesian sediments (? = up to 10 %, K = 0,01 - 1 mD), and higher ones in the Buntsandstein samples (? = up to 24 %, K =0,01 - >100 mD). These differences are attributed to (1) facial differences (texture, matrix content), (2) compositional differences (alteration and dissolution of detrital grains), (3) differences in the diagenetic history (e.g. fabric stabilization by early blocky cements, cement dissolution, intense clay mineral formation in primary and secondary pore space), and (4) differences in burial depth (degree of mechanical compaction). We intent to characterize described influences on aquifer properties and the resulting fluid flow properties in order to understand fluid migration in sedimentary basins in the present and past.

Aehnelt, M.; Hilse, U.; Beyer, D.; Kunkel, C.; Deicke, Ch.; Voigt, Th.; Pudlo, D.; Gaupp, R.

2012-04-01

148

Effects of agricultural and residential land use on ground-water quality, Anoka Sand Plain Aquifer, east-central Minnesota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water quality in the 1,700 square-mile Anoka Sand Plain aquifer in east-central Minnesota is influenced by irrigated and nonirrigated agriculture, and by residential land use. Concen- trations of sulfate, chloride, nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, and pesticides in ground water are related to human activities, but nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen concentrations are affected more than are concentrations of other chemical constituents. Of the water samples collected from 100 wells during this study, samples from 30 wells had a concen- tration of nitrate plus nitrate nitrogen greater than 10 mg/L (milligrams per liter), the limit recommended for drinking water by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. Analysis of 360 samples indicated that the median concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen for undeveloped, nonirrigated cultivated, irrigated, and residential lands were 0.22, 2.0, 5.3, and 4.2 mg/L, respectively. Differences in nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen con- centrations with depth below the water table were statistically significant. Median concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen in ground-water samples less than 10 feet, 10 to 20 feet, and more than 20 feet below the water table were 5.1, 2.7, and less than 0.1 mg/L, respectively. Seasonal fluctuations in nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen concentrations at many wells were as great or greater than long-term change; however, the springtime median concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen increased steadily from 1984 through 1987, from 4.8 to 5.5 mg/L. Triazine herbicides were detected in 11 of the 18 samples analyzed for pesticides. Concentrations of atrazine were less than the 3 ug/L maximum contaminant level set for atrazine by the Minnesota Department of Health and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Anderson, H. W., Jr.

1993-01-01

149

Depositional setting and thin-section petrology of Misener Formation (Devonian) in northeast Nash and nearby fields, north-central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Devonian-age Misener formation is a mixed quartzose-carbonate sequence that is widely but discontinuously distributed in northern Oklahoma. Eleven conventional cores representing five different Misener oil fields in Grant and Garfield Counties were examined to determine the depositional setting and petrology of the formation. The Misener ranges in thickness to approximately 60 ft and is everywhere overlain by the Woodford

B. M. Francis; C. F. Mansfield

1987-01-01

150

Experimental studies in stream-aquifer interaction along the Arkansas River in Central Kansas - Field testing and analysis  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the last several years, streamflows of a number of Kansas streams have been reduced as a result of groundwater declines. In order to better understand and quantify stream-aquifer interrelationships, an eight-day comprehensive stream-aquifer pumping test, followed by recovery monitoring, was conducted along the Arkansas River near Great Bend, Kansas. In addition to water level monitoring in numerous observation wells, streamflow data, streambed hydraulic gradients, neutron probe-based water content of dewatered sediments, water chemistry and other data were collected. The alluvial aquifer is shown to be highly transmissive (T = 1803 m2d-1) with the pumping stress (9538 m3d-1) having a radius of influence larger than 1.77 km, impacting both the aquifer levels and the streamflow in the nearby Arkansas River. Drawdown and recharge boundary effects were observed in all observation wells, including those on the opposite side of the river. The alluvial aquifer did not exhibit a water table behavior and responded as a leaky confined aquifer. A semiconfining clay layer less than 3 m thick and an additional recharge source from a nearby stream-alluvial system were the probable causes of the observed phenomena. Actual streamflow depletion is shown to be appreciably less than the computed depletion based on analytical solutions. ?? 1988.

Sophocleous, M.; Townsend, M. A.; Vogler, L. D.; McClain, T. J.; Marks, E. T.; Coble, G. R.

1988-01-01

151

Demonstration optimization analyses of pumping from selected Arapahoe aquifer municipal wells in the west-central Denver Basin, Colorado, 20102109  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Declining water levels caused by withdrawals of water from wells in the west-central part of the Denver Basin bedrock-aquifer system have raised concerns with respect to the ability of the aquifer system to sustain production. The Arapahoe aquifer in particular is heavily used in this area. Two optimization analyses were conducted to demonstrate approaches that could be used to evaluate possible future pumping scenarios intended to prolong the productivity of the aquifer and to delay excessive loss of saturated thickness. These analyses were designed as demonstrations only, and were not intended as a comprehensive optimization study. Optimization analyses were based on a groundwater-flow model of the Denver Basin developed as part of a recently published U.S. Geological Survey groundwater-availability study. For each analysis an optimization problem was set up to maximize total withdrawal rate, subject to withdrawal-rate and hydraulic-head constraints, for 119 selected municipal water-supply wells located in 96 model cells. The optimization analyses were based on 50- and 100-year simulations of groundwater withdrawals. The optimized total withdrawal rate for all selected wells for a 50-year simulation time was about 58.8 cubic feet per second. For an analysis in which the simulation time and head-constraint time were extended to 100 years, the optimized total withdrawal rate for all selected wells was about 53.0 cubic feet per second, demonstrating that a reduction in withdrawal rate of about 10 percent may extend the time before the hydraulic-head constraints are violated by 50 years, provided that pumping rates are optimally distributed. Analysis of simulation results showed that initially, the pumping produces water primarily by release of water from storage in the Arapahoe aquifer. However, because confining layers between the Denver and Arapahoe aquifers are thin, in less than 5 years, most of the water removed by managed-flows pumping likely would be supplied by depleting overlying hydrogeologic units, substantially increasing the rate of decline of hydraulic heads in parts of the overlying Denver aquifer.

Banta, Edward R.; Paschke, Suzanne S.

2012-01-01

152

Lower-Division Offerings in the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area: Studies and Recommendations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report provides information on associate degree and certificate offerings at four two-year institutions in the Oklahoma and Tulsa City metropolitan areas and articulation between baccalaureate degree programs at the University of Central Oklahoma and four metropolitan area two-year institutions. Part I classifies Oklahoma City area

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

153

Urban flood analysis in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Flood insurance study information from the Federal Emergency Management Agency is utilized to estimate future flood hazard in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Techniques are described for estimating future urban runoff estimates. A method of developing stream cross section rating curves is explained. Future runoff estimates are used in conjuction with the rating curves to develop an estimate of 50- and 100- year flood profiles that would result from future urban development.

Tortorelli, Robert L.; Huntzinger, T. L.; Bergman, D. L.; Patneaude, A. L.

1983-01-01

154

CENSUS AND STATISTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SOIL AND WATER QUALITY AT ABANDONED AND OTHER CENTRALIZED AND COMMERCIAL DRILLING-FLUID DISPOSAL SITES IN LOUISIANA, NEW MEXICO, OKLAHOMA, AND TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

Commercial and centralized drilling-fluid disposal (CCDD) sites receive a portion of spent drilling fluids for disposal from oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) operations. Many older and some abandoned sites may have operated under less stringent regulations than are currently enforced. This study provides a census, compilation, and summary of information on active, inactive, and abandoned CCDD sites in Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, intended as a basis for supporting State-funded assessment and remediation of abandoned sites. Closure of abandoned CCDD sites is within the jurisdiction of State regulatory agencies. Sources of data used in this study on abandoned CCDD sites mainly are permit files at State regulatory agencies. Active and inactive sites were included because data on abandoned sites are sparse. Onsite reserve pits at individual wells for disposal of spent drilling fluid are not part of this study. Of 287 CCDD sites in the four States for which we compiled data, 34 had been abandoned whereas 54 were active and 199 were inactive as of January 2002. Most were disposal-pit facilities; five percent were land treatment facilities. A typical disposal-pit facility has fewer than 3 disposal pits or cells, which have a median size of approximately 2 acres each. Data from well-documented sites may be used to predict some conditions at abandoned sites; older abandoned sites might have outlier concentrations for some metal and organic constituents. Groundwater at a significant number of sites had an average chloride concentration that exceeded nonactionable secondary drinking water standard of 250 mg/L, or a total dissolved solids content of >10,000 mg/L, the limiting definition for underground sources of drinking water source, or both. Background data were lacking, however, so we did not determine whether these concentrations in groundwater reflected site operations. Site remediation has not been found necessary to date for most abandoned CCDD sites; site assessments and remedial feasibility studies are ongoing in each State. Remediation alternatives addressed physical hazards and potential for groundwater transport of dissolved salt and petroleum hydrocarbons that might be leached from wastes. Remediation options included excavation of wastes and contaminated adjacent soils followed by removal to permitted disposal facilities or land farming if sufficient on-site area were available.

Alan R. Dutton; H. Seay Nance

2003-06-01

155

Chronicles of Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Developed through a partnership between the Oklahoma Historical Society and the Oklahoma State University Library Electronic Publishing Center, this site makes 20 volumes of the Chronicles of Oklahoma available for researchers and the general public. Originally published by the Oklahoma State Historical Society, the available volumes range in date from 1921 to 1942. Users may search the volumes indices provided online, or search by keyword. The volumes contain a number of compelling articles on Oklahoma history, such as "Oklahoma as a Part of the Spanish Dominion, 1763-1803" and "My Experience with the Cheyenne Indians." The table of contents for each volume is a helpful way to browse through the different volumes. Along with the volumes currently available online, more volumes will be added in the future, time and money permitting.

156

Effects of recharge from drainage wells on quality of water in the Floridan Aquifer in the Orlando area, central Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Approximately 400 drainage wells in the Orlando area inject, by gravity, large quantities of stormwater runoff that may or may not be suitable for most purposes without treatment into the same freshwater zones of the Floridan aquifer tapped for public supply. The wells are used mostly to control lake levels and dispose of urban storm runoff. Recharge from drainage wells compensates for heavy withdrawals from the Floridan aquifer and helps maintain aquifer pressures that retard upward saltwater encroachment. Sixty-five supply wells and 21 drainage wells within a 16-mile radius of Orlando were sampled from September 1977 to June 1979. Most constituent concentrations were slightly higher in water from drainage wells than in water from supply wells. The most notable differences were in bacteria colony count and total nitrogen concentrations. With the exception of bacteria, water from drainage wells would generally meet the maximum contaminant levels established by the National Interim Primary and Proposed Secondary Drinking Water Regulations. (USGS)

Schiner, G. R.; German, E. R.

1983-01-01

157

Application of the resistivity/gravity joint inversion technique for Nubian sandstone aquifer assessment on the area located at the central part of Sinai, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Eleven deep vertical electrical soundings of AB/2 spacing ranging from 5 to 3000 m were carried out to investigate the upper part of the Nubian groundwater aquifer at the central part of Sinai, Egypt. These soundings have been jointly inverted using the SA algorithm with 160 gravity stations measured in the study area, assuming that density and resistivity contrast are represented by coincident interfaces. One hundred and sixty magnetic stations were executed at the same locations as gravity measurements to estimate the depth of basement rocks. The results of the joint interpretation indicated that the depth of the groundwater aquifer ranges from 500 to 800 m with resistivity values ranging from 6 to 562 ? m, suggesting that the fresh water is of good quality towards the northern part of the area. The top of the basement, which is mainly defined by gravity and magnetic data, lies at a depth ranging from 830 to 2788 m. The results also show that the aquifer configuration is controlled by different regional faults in the NNW-SSE direction.

Sultan, S. A.; Monteiro Santos, F. A.; Abd Alla, M. A.; Mekhemer, H. M.

2010-03-01

158

Regional ground-water-flow models of surficial sand and gravel aquifers along the Mississippi River between Brainerd and St. Cloud, central Minnesota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report documents regional ground-waterflow models constructed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) to satisfy the requirements of their Source Water Protection Plan (SWPP). Steady-state single-layer ground-water-flow models were constructed with the computer program MODFLOW to simulate flow in surficial sand and gravel aquifers along the Mississippi River between Brainerd and St. Cloud in central Minnesota. The hydrogeologic data that were used to construct the models were compiled from available sources. Calibrated values of horizontal hydraulic conductivity and areal recharge for the aquifer in a northern model area were 70 m/d and 3.0x10-4 m/d, respectively. This model was sensitive to net areal recharge, vertical hydraulic conductivity of perennial streambed sediments, and horizontal hydraulic conductivity. The major source of net inflow to the model was from edge boundary cells. The major source of net outflow was ground-water discharge to perennial and ephemeral streams. Calibrated values of horizontal hydraulic conductivity and areal recharge for the aquifer in a southern model area were 70 m/d and 6.0x10-4 m/d, respectively. This model was sensitive mostly to horizontal hydraulic conductivity. Net areal recharge and ground-water discharge to perennial streams were the major sources of net inflow and outflow, respectively.

Ruhl, J. F.; Cowdery, T. K.

2004-01-01

159

Oklahoma Tribes: A History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Oklahoma is a microcosm of American Indian country. Water rights, tribal government impotence, jurisdiction, tribal membership, treaty rights, taxation, sovereignty, racism, and poor housing, education, and health are all vital issues facing the Indian tribes of Oklahoma. In order to understand the complexity of these issues, a review of the

Gover, Kevin

1977-01-01

160

Oklahoma Tribes: A History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma is a microcosm of American Indian country. Water rights, tribal government impotence, jurisdiction, tribal membership, treaty rights, taxation, sovereignty, racism, and poor housing, education, and health are all vital issues facing the Indian tribes of Oklahoma. In order to understand the complexity of these issues, a review of the

Gover, Kevin

1977-01-01

161

Oklahoma Historical Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Oklahoma Historical Society is "to preserve and perpetuate the history of Oklahoma and its people by collecting, interpreting and disseminating knowledge of Oklahoma and the Southwest." The Society maintains over 20 museums and historic sites, and they are also responsible for maintaining this website. On the homepage, visitors can learn about the sites they maintain, including the Pawnee Bill Ranch and the Pioneer Woman Museum. In the "Publications" area, visitors can read back issues of "The Chronicles of Oklahoma" dating from 1921 to 1962, and they can also find the "Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture". The Society's "Found in Collections" blog is a great way to learn about their current archival work, and visitors can read about textile preservation techniques and the Civil War. Also, the site includes podcasts created to profile various aspects of the state's history. Finally, visitors can sign up to receive email updates on new additions, programs, and exhibits.

162

Experimental Evidence for Microbially Mediated Carbonate Dissolution from the Saline Water Zone of the Edwards Aquifer, Central Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microbially induced carbonate dissolution was evaluated from sulfidic wells in the Edwards Aquifer, Texas. Filamentous biomass covers rock surfaces, with Gammaproteobacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria dominating the attached community, but novel Alphaproteobacteria dominating the planktonic community. Despite fluids being saturated with respect to calcite, experimental calcite from in situ microcosms had significantly greater mass loss when colonized. Moreover, neoformed gypsum crystals were

Annette Summers Engel; Kelli Willson Randall

2011-01-01

163

Ground-Water Budgets for the Wood River Valley Aquifer System, South-Central Idaho, 1995-2004.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the development of ground-water budgets for the Wood River Valley aquifer system for the 10-year period 1995-2004, as well as for a wet year (1995), and a dry year (2001) within that period. The report also includes discussions of th...

J. R. Bartolino

2009-01-01

164

Field trip guide to selected outcrops, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Arbuckle Mountains, named for Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle, are located in south-central Oklahoma. The formations that comprise the Arbuckle Mountains have been extensively studied for hydrocarbon source rock and reservoir rock characteristics t...

1991-01-01

165

Subsurface geology of the Seminole area. [Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study area includes N. Seminole County and portions of Pottawatomie and Okfuskee counties, which are in the Greater Seminole District of central Oklahoma and in the NW. part of the Arkoma Basin. The subsurface stratigraphy, structure, and conditions of oil accumulation of Desmoinesian and older rocks in the Seminole Area are discussed. Subsurface structure maps, isopach maps, and cross

Cutolo-Lozano

1969-01-01

166

Linking economic and integrated hydrologic models to investigate the effects of reduced surface water deliveries on the aquifers of Californias Central Valley  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Predicted global mean temperature increases will change the rates and timing of mountain-front discharges and thus the availability of surface water supplies for agricultural and urban water consumers. Californias water supply and distribution system collects runoff from the Sierra Nevada Mountain range in the northeastern and eastern part of the state, and routes this to agricultural and urban consumers in the central, western and southern parts of the state. The surface water collection and distribution system relies heavily on the storage of winter precipitation as snow in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, with moderately-sized reservoirs collecting and releasing melt-water through the spring and summer months. Higher elevations of the Sierra Nevada have already experienced a 0.60C rise and 10% reduction in snowpack, and continued warming may reduce snowpack volume by 25% by 2050, with further reductions likely as lower-elevation precipitation increasingly falls as rain. Snowpack reductions, environmental restrictions and recurring droughts may significantly constrain surface water supplies. Agricultural water users have historically increased groundwater pumping to replace surface water during droughts, and groundwater levels have recovered in subsequent years of higher precipitation (and recharge) and surface water flows. Central Valley aquifers could be significantly impacted if reduced snowpack leads to sustained increases in groundwater pumping. These impacts are being studied using the California Central Valley Groundwater-Surface Water Simulation Model (C2VSIM) and the Central Valley Production Model (CVPM). Multiple CVPM runs were conducted to simulate crop acreage changes in response to surface water reductions and groundwater depth increases, and were then converted to logit function parameters. C2VSIM was used to simulate three future levels of drought (corresponding to 30%, 50% and 70% reductions in precipitation) for periods of 10, 20, 30 and 60 years, each preceded by a 10-yr spin-up and a 30-yr recovery period. Simulations were conducted with fixed agricultural demands and incorporating dynamic changes in crop mix using the logit function parameters derived from CVPM. Simulation results with fixed agricultural demands suggest that an extended drought would have moderate impacts on aquifer heads in the northern Sacramento River Basin, locally severe impacts in the central San Joaquin River Basin, and regionally severe impacts in the southern Tulare Basin. Simulation results incorporating dynamic crop changes suggest acreage reductions and changes in crop mix may significantly reduce impacts on the aquifers.

Brush, C. F.; Dale, L. L.; Miller, N. L.; Dogrul, E. C.; Kadir, T.; Vicuna, S. D.; Chung, F. I.

2009-12-01

167

Evaluation of groundwater storage monitoring with the GRACE satellite: Case study of the High Plains aquifer, central United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water scarcity is a critical issue in semiarid regions; however, regional groundwater monitoring is extremely limited. This study evaluates the ability of the GRACE satellites to monitor groundwater storage in the semiarid High Plains aquifer, United States (450,000 km2 area), which is subjected to intense irrigation. GRACE-derived terrestrial water storage (TWS) is highly correlated with the sum of soil moisture

Gil Strassberg; Bridget R. Scanlon; Don Chambers

2009-01-01

168

Boundary of the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This vector data set delineates the approximate boundary of the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer (ERWVFA). This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. The boundary of the ERWVFA was developed by combining information from two data sources. The first data source was a 1:250,000-scale geologic map of the Leadville quadrangle developed by Day and others (1999). The location of Quaternary sediments was used as a first approximation of the ERWVFA. The boundary of the ERWVFA was further refined by overlaying the geologic map with Digital Raster Graphic (DRG) scanned images of 1:24,000 topographic maps (U.S. Geological Survey, 2001). Where appropriate, the boundary of the ERWVFA was remapped to correspond with the edge of the valley-fill aquifer marked by an abrupt change in topography at the edge of the valley floor throughout the Eagle River watershed. The boundary of the ERWVFA more closely resembles a hydrogeomorphic region presented by Rupert (2003, p. 8) because it is based upon general geographic extents of geologic materials and not on an actual aquifer location as would be determined through a rigorous hydrogeologic investigation.

Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

2009-01-01

169

Oklahoma Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Oklahoma Geological Survey is a state agency dedicated to geological research and public service. This site contains information on earthquakes, geographic names, general Oklahoma geology, and the mountains and water resources of the state. There are educational materials available to order, many of which are free. Geologic maps indicate rock types and ages, as well as the geologic provinces of the state. Links are provided for more resources.

170

Solute chemistry and arsenic fate in aquifers between the Himalayan foothills and Indian craton (including central Gangetic plain): Influence of geology and geomorphology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Information on groundwater chemistry in the central Ganges basin can provide insights into recharge, provenance, and fate of solutes in arsenic (As)-affected areas upstream of the more intensively studied Bengal basin. The geological and geomorphological units of the region are much more discernible than the Bengal basin aquifers. Moreover, the region is less affected by groundwater abstraction, which complicates interpretation of As distributions in the Bengal basin. The study area extends from the northern edge of the Indian craton outcrops to the foothills of the Himalayas. Geologic units in the area can be broadly classified as pre-Cenozoic metamorphics and volcanics (PC), older alluvial deposits of the Ganges and its tributaries (OA), younger or active alluvial deposits of the Ganges and its tributaries in the basin (YA), and sediments of the Himalayan foothills (piedmont, PD). Stable-isotopic analyses indicate groundwater in these units has been recharged by meteoric or surface water that has generally undergone some evaporation. The hydrochemical facies is generally a Ca-HCO3 type. While most of the solutes in the YA groundwater are derived from carbonate dissolution, many of the PD, PC and OA groundwater samples are influenced by silicate weathering, suggesting that leaching of metamorphics and volcanics acts as a major source of solutes. Redox conditions are highly spatially variable (oxic to methanic, dominated by metal reduction), with no systematic depth variation within sampled aquifers. More than 75% of YA and PD groundwater samples have As ? 0.01 mg/L, but As was detected in only one OA sample and no PC samples. Arsenic is probably mobilized by reductive dissolution of Fe-Mn (oxyhydr)oxides in the alluvium, with possibility of competitive anionic mobilization. Hence, relative to the Bengal basin, in addition to lower groundwater abstraction influence, groundwater chemistry in the study area reflects a greater variety of differences in the geological and geomorphological settings of the aquifers.

Mukherjee, Abhijit; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Fryar, Alan E.; Saha, Dipankar; Ghosh, Ashok; Chowdhuri, Sunil; Mishra, Ranjan

2012-08-01

171

HOW DO THE STRUCTURES OF THE LATE PALEOZOIC OUACHITA THRUST BELT RELATE TO THE STRUCTURES OF THE SOUTHERN OKLAHOMA AULACOGEN  

Microsoft Academic Search

The thin-skinned structures of the late Paleozoic Ouachita thrust belt intersect the basement structures of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen beneath the Mesozoic strata of the Gulf Coastal Plain in southeastern Oklahoma. The Ouachita thrust belt forms a large northwest-directed salient which extends primarily in the subsurface from central Mississippi northwestward to Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma, and from there, southwestward toward

Steven John Jusczuk

2002-01-01

172

Oklahoma DOE EPSCoR Trainees. Final Report for the Period September 30, 1991 to March 31, 1996  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results of the State of Oklahoma DOE EPSCOR Traineeship program. The program was carried out at the three major research universities in the state: the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University, and the University of Tulsa. Each of the three universities selected a central thrust area for the DOE EPSCOR traineeships that was in keeping with

Knox

2000-01-01

173

Chemical and isotopic composition and potential for contamination of water in the upper Floridan Aquifer, west-central Florida, 1986-89  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Major ions, unstable field constitutents, and the environmental isotopes tritium, deuterium, and oxygen-18 were measured in water from 112 wells that are open to the uppermost producing zones of the upper Floridan Aquifer. Tritium analyses indicate that the unconfined aquifer in northern areas contains relatively young water that has entered the aquifer since 1953, whereas the confined aquifer in southern areas contains older water. The potential for contamination of the upper Floridan Aquifer generally is greatest in those areas where the aquifer is unconfined and recharge has been shown to be high.

Swancar, Amy; Hutchinson, C. B.

1995-01-01

174

Effects of land use on water quality of the Fountain Creek alluvial aquifer, east-central Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-quality data were collected from the Fountain Creek alluvial aquifer in 1988 and 1989 as part of the Toxic-Waste Ground-Water Contamination Program. These data indicate that dissolved solids, most major ions, fluoride, ammonium, boron, lithium, selenium, and strontium were more concentrated in the agricultural land-use area than in the upgradient urban land-use area. Nitrate and phosphate had significantly larger concentrations, and volatile organic compounds had significantly greater detection frequencies in the urban land-use area.

Chafin, Daniel T.

1996-01-01

175

Estimated 2008 groundwater potentiometric surface and predevelopment to 2008 water-level change in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque area, central New Mexico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The water-supply requirements of the Albuquerque metropolitan area of central New Mexico have historically been met almost exclusively by groundwater withdrawal from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. Previous studies have indicated that the large quantity of groundwater withdrawal relative to recharge has resulted in water-level declines in the aquifer system throughout the metropolitan area. Analysis of the magnitude and pattern of water-level change can help improve understanding of how the groundwater system responds to withdrawals and variations in the management of the water supply and can support water-management agencies' efforts to minimize future water-level declines and improve sustainability. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority, presents the estimated groundwater potentiometric surface during winter (from December to March) of the 2008 water year and the estimated changes in water levels between predevelopment and water year 2008 for the production zone of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque and surrounding metropolitan and military areas. Hydrographs from selected wells are included to provide details of historical water-level changes. In general, water-level measurements used for this report were measured in small-diameter observation wells screened over short intervals and were considered to best represent the potentiometric head in the production zone-the interval of the aquifer, about 300 feet below land surface to 1,100 feet or more below land surface, in which production wells generally are screened. Water-level measurements were collected by various local and Federal agencies. The 2008 water year potentiometric surface map was created in a geographic information system, and the change in water-level elevation from predevelopment to water year 2008 was calculated. The 2008 water-level contours indicate that the general direction of groundwater flow is from the Rio Grande towards clusters of production wells in the east, north, and west. Water-level changes from predevelopment to 2008 are variable across the area. Hydrographs from piezometers on the east side of the river generally indicate a trend of decline in the annual highest water level through most of the period of record. Hydrographs from piezometers in the valley near the river and on the west side of the river indicate spatial variability in water-level trends.

Falk, Sarah E.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Anderholm, Scott K.

2011-01-01

176

Multiple Radar Comparison and Analysis of the 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Supercell  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract This paper will examine the structure and evolution of the 8 May 2003 Central Oklahoma tornadic ,supercell using two ,different radars: the KTLX WSR-88D and the Central Oklahoma TDWR. Measurements of the vertical vorticity and ,convergence ,of each of three scales of rotation (mesocyclone, tornado cyclone signature [TCS], and tornadic vortex signature [TVS]) were made by ,subjectively choosing ,maximum

Michael E. Charles

2003-01-01

177

Ground-Water Budgets for the Wood River Valley Aquifer System, South-Central Idaho, 1995-2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Wood River Valley contains most of the population of Blaine County and the cities of Sun Valley, Ketchum, Haley, and Bellevue. This mountain valley is underlain by the alluvial Wood River Valley aquifer system which consists of a single unconfined aquifer that underlies the entire valley, an underlying confined aquifer that is present only in the southernmost valley, and the confining unit that separates them. The entire population of the area depends on ground water for domestic supply, either from domestic or municipal-supply wells, and rapid population growth since the 1970s has caused concern about the long-term sustainability of the ground-water resource. To help address these concerns this report describes a ground-water budget developed for the Wood River Valley aquifer system for three selected time periods: average conditions for the 10-year period 1995-2004, and the single years of 1995 and 2001. The 10-year period 1995-2004 represents a range of conditions in the recent past for which measured data exist. Water years 1995 and 2001 represent the wettest and driest years, respectively, within the 10-year period based on precipitation at the Ketchum Ranger Station. Recharge or inflow to the Wood River Valley aquifer system occurs through seven main sources (from largest to smallest): infiltration from tributary canyons, streamflow loss from the Big Wood River, areal recharge from precipitation and applied irrigation water, seepage from canals and recharge pits, leakage from municipal pipes, percolation from septic systems, and subsurface inflow beneath the Big Wood River in the northern end of the valley. Total estimated mean annual inflow or recharge to the aquifer system for 1995-2004 is 270,000 acre-ft/yr (370 ft3/s). Total recharge for the wet year 1995 and the dry year 2001 is estimated to be 270,000 acre-ft/yr (370 ft3/s) and 220,000 acre-ft/yr (300 ft3/s), respectively. Discharge or outflow from the Wood River Valley aquifer system occurs through five main sources (from largest to smallest): Silver Creek streamflow gain, ground-water pumpage, Big Wood River streamflow gain, direct evapotranspiration from riparian vegetation, and subsurface outflow (treated separately). Total estimated mean 1995-2004 annual outflow or discharge from the aquifer system is 250,000 acre-ft/yr (350 ft3/s). Estimated total discharge is 240,000 acre-ft/yr (330 ft3/s) for both the wet year 1995 and the dry year 2001. The budget residual is the difference between estimated ground-water inflow and outflow and encompasses subsurface outflow, ground-water storage change, and budget error. For 1995-2004, mean annual inflow exceeded outflow by 20,000 acre-ft/yr (28 ft3/s); for the wet year 1995, mean annual inflow exceeded outflow by 30,000 acre-ft/yr (41 ft3/s); for the dry year 2001, mean annual outflow exceeded inflow by 20,000 acre-ft/yr (28 ft3/s). These values represent 8, 13, and 8 percent, respectively, of total outflows for the same periods. It is difficult to differentiate the relative contributions of the three residual components, although the estimated fluctuations between the wet and dry year budgets likely are primarily caused by changes in ground-water storage. The individual components in the wet and dry year ground-water budgets responded in a consistent manner to changes in precipitation and temperature. Although the ground-water budgets for the three periods indicated that ground-water storage is replenished in wet years, statistical analyses by Skinner and others (2007) suggest that such replenishment is not complete and over the long term more water is removed from storage than is replaced. In other words, despite restoration of water to ground-water storage in wet years, changes have occurred in either recharge and (or) discharge to cause ground-water storage to decline over time. Such changes may include, but are not limited to: lining or abandoning canals and ditches, conversion of surface-water irriga

Bartolino, James R.

2009-01-01

178

Estimated Withdrawals from Stream-Valley Aquifers and Refined Estimated Withdrawals from Selected Aquifers in the United States, 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey National Water Use Information Program compiles estimates of fresh ground-water withdrawals in the United States on a 5-year interval. In the year-2000 compilation, withdrawals were reported from principal aquifers and aquifer systems including two general aquifers - Alluvial and Other aquifers. Withdrawals from a widespread aquifer group - stream-valley aquifers - were not specifically identified in the year-2000 compilation, but they are important sources of ground water. Stream-valley aquifers are alluvial aquifers located in the valley of major streams and rivers. Stream-valley aquifers are long but narrow aquifers that are in direct hydraulic connection with associated streams and limited in extent compared to most principal aquifers. Based in large part on information published in U.S. Geological Survey reports, preliminary analysis of withdrawal data and hydrogeologic and surface-water information indicated areas in the United States where possible stream-valley aquifers were located. Further assessment focused on 24 states and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. Withdrawals reported from Alluvial aquifers in 16 states and withdrawals reported from Other aquifers in 6 states and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico were investigated. Two additional States - Arkansas and New Jersey - were investigated because withdrawals reported from other principal aquifers in these two States may be from stream-valley aquifers. Withdrawals from stream-valley aquifers were identified in 20 States and were about 1,560 Mgal/d (million gallons per day), a rate comparable to withdrawals from the 10 most productive principal aquifers in the United States. Of the 1,560 Mgal/d of withdrawals attributed to stream-valley aquifers, 1,240 Mgal/d were disaggregated from Alluvial aquifers, 150 Mgal/d from glacial sand and gravel aquifers, 116 Mgal/d from Other aquifers, 28.1 Mgal/d from Pennsylvanian aquifers, and 24.9 Mgal/d from the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer. Five States, including Colorado (552 Mgal/d), Kansas (384 Mgal/d), Oklahoma (126 Mgal/d), Kentucky (102 Mgal/d), and Ohio (100 Mgal/d), accounted for 81 percent of estimated stream-valley aquifer withdrawals identified in this report. Of the total withdrawals from stream-valley aquifers, about 63 percent (984 Mgal/d) were used for irrigation, 26 percent (400 Mgal/d) for public-supply, and 11 percent (177 Mgal/d) for self-supplied industrial uses. The largest estimated water withdrawals were from stream-valley aquifers associated with the South Platte (404 Mgal/d), Arkansas (395 Mgal/d), and Ohio (221 Mgal/d) Rivers.

Sargent, B. Pierre; Maupin, Molly A.; Hinkle, Stephen R.

2008-01-01

179

DWARF BUFO AMERICANUS AMERICANUS FROM CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The American toad, Bv,!o americanus americanv,s (Holbrook), i8 an eastern form, ranging from southeastern Canada southward along the coast to eastern Texas, and westward through the prairie states to eastern Kansas and central Oklahoma. It is the common toad in New England, New York, Wisconsin, and Missouri and is the commonest species of B.fo in eastern Oklahoma, especially in the

ARTHUR N. BRAGG

180

Centimeter-scale characterization of biogeochemical gradients at a wetlandaquifer interface using capillary electrophoresis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Steep biogeochemical gradients were measured at mixing interfaces in a wetlandaquifer system impacted by landfill leachate in Norman, Oklahoma. The system lies within a reworked alluvial plain and is characterized by layered low hydraulic conductivity wetland sediments interbedded with sandy aquifer material. Using cm-scale passive diffusion samplers, peepers, water samples were collected in a depth profile to span interfaces between

Susan Bez-Cazull; Jennifer T. McGuire; Isabelle M. Cozzarelli; Anne Raymond; Lisa Welsh

2007-01-01

181

Microbial ecology of a shallow unconfined ground water aquifer polluted by municipal landfill leachate  

Microsoft Academic Search

The microflora of a shallow anoxic aquifer underlying a municipal landfill in Oklahoma was characterized by direct light microscopy, most probable number determinations of sulfate reducers and methanogens, and measurements of methanogenesis in aquifer samples containing either endogenous or exogenous electron donors and various sulfate concentrations. Acridine orange direct counts of bacteria did not vary significantly with time or between

Ralph E. Beeman; Joseph M. Suflita

1987-01-01

182

MAINE AQUIFERS  

EPA Science Inventory

AQFRS24 contains polygons of significant aquifers in Maine (glacial deposits that are a significant ground water resource) mapped at a scale 1:24,000. This statewide coverage was derived from aquifer boundaries delineated and digitized by the Maine Geological Survey from data com...

183

Buried aquifers in the Brooten-Belgrade and Lake Emily areas, west-central Minnesota--Factors related to developing water for irrigation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Irrigation has given a substantial boost to the economy in the Brooten-Belgrade and Lake Emily areas of Minnesota. The surficial outwash aquifer is capable of yielding sufficient quantities of water for irrigation over half of its area; the remaining part may be supplied by deep aquifers. Buried glacial outwash and Cretaceous sand aquifers, as thick as 50 feet occur to depths of 300 feet. In places, the buried aquifers are sufficiently thick and permeable to yield large quantities of water to wells. The buried aquifers are probably narrow, elongate, truncated bodies enclosed by clay till. The Precambrian surface, ranging from 190 to 350 feet below the land surface, is the lower limit of the buried aquifers. Water in the buried-drift aquifers is a very hard calcium magnesium bicarbonate type, suitable for irrigation needs. Water in Cretaceous aquifers, although untested, is expected to be higher in dissolved solids. Potenial water problems include slow rate of recharge to buried aquifers, and head loss caused by screening of the surficial and buried aquifers in the same well, and by allowing well to flow unabated. Another potential problem is possible pollution of the buried aquifers through the boreholes of multiaquifer wells. (Woodard-USGS)

Wolf, R. J.

1976-01-01

184

Depositional setting and thin-section petrology of Misener Formation (Devonian) in northeast Nash and nearby fields, north-central Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian-age Misener formation is a mixed quartzose-carbonate sequence that is widely but discontinuously distributed in northern Oklahoma. Eleven conventional cores representing five different Misener oil fields in Grant and Garfield Counties were examined to determine the depositional setting and petrology of the formation. The Misener ranges in thickness to approximately 60 ft and is everywhere overlain by the Woodford Shale. The Misener-Woodford sequence unconformably overlies the Hunton Group (Silurian-Devonian), Sylvan Shale (Ordovician). Core descriptions show the Misener to be a clean sand containing scattered disrupted clay laminae, shale clasts, and pyrite nodules. The contacts between the overlying Woodford Shale and the underlying Hunton and pre-Hunton strata are sharp and slightly undulose. Thin-section petrology indicates the Misener contains fine to medium-grained, rounded to subangular, quartz-rich sandstone with little or no dolomite and, in places, grades into a dolomite-rich sandstone with floating quartz grains. Quartz overgrowths are abundant and calcite cement is less common. Other components comprising the Misener strata include phosphatic shale clasts, phosphatic fossil fragments, glauconite, and chert. Porosity ranges from 0 to 14% and much of it appears to have been diagenetically induced.

Francis, B.M.; Mansfield, C.F.

1987-08-01

185

Oklahoma Climate Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Produced by the Oklahoma Climatological Survey, the Oklahoma Climate Data Web site offers information on various weather topics for the state that include normals and extremes, a rainfall update, monthly summaries, climate event summaries, and a weather timeline. The data is presented in tables, charts, illustrations, or Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) files (e.g., the timeline that goes back to 1900). A very interesting collection of facts, this site is a great example of a public agency offering quality information of their work to the public.

1996-01-01

186

Oklahoma Biological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Associated with the state of Oklahoma and the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Oklahoma, this Web site provides a wealth of information on the flora, fauna, and ecological communities found throughout the state. The site offers a variety of databases and literature collections on a variety of subjects including rare species, woody plants, breeding birds, and much more. The site is easy to navigate, and most searches can be executed simply. Some general information on biodiversity and tips on information sources for the non-specialist make this site valuable to a broader audience.

1969-12-31

187

Naming aquifers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Names are the symbols used in logic to designate items and to serve as addresses and structures to which information is related. However, in geohydrology, no widely accepted system for naming aquifers exists, and confusion has resulted. The confusion occurs in part because the few available guidelines are not widely known, and practicing geohydrologists may not be aware of or fully knowledgeable about those guidelines. In general, the inexactness and inaccuracy in naming aquifers probably occurs because of inexact or inaccurate definitions of an aquifer.

Jorgensen, Donald G.; Rosenshein, Joseph S.

188

Appraisal of the interconnection between the St Johns River and the surficial aquifer, east-central Duval County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The proposed deepening of the navigation channel in the St. Johns River to about 46-48 feet below sea level (45 feet below mean low water) may breach up to 11 feet of limestone unit of the lower part of the surficial aquifer along a 25-mile channel. The limestone supplies water to numerous domestic wells along the river in the Jacksonville area. Recent channel improvements to about 39 feet below sea level have already breached the limestone at many locations. Where breaching has not yet occurred, less than 1 to 6 feet of undifferentiated sediments overlie the limestone. These sediments, consisting predominantly of sand, are generally too permeable to form an effective confining layer. Chloride concentrations determined from water in wells tapping the limestone unit range from 8 to 6,600 milligrams per liter. However, chloride concentrations in water from wells located more than 500 feet from the river, were generally less than 30 milligrams per liter. The proposed dredging operation is not expected to alter significantly the present hydrologic system. The current position of the interface most likely represents conditions that will be present after future channel improvements. (USGS)

Spechler, R. M.; Stone, R. B.

1982-01-01

189

Oklahoma Forest Industries, 1978.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oklahoma supplied 73 million cu ft of roundwood to forest industries in 1978, an increase of 13 percent since 1972, and 35 percent since 1975 (fig. 1). Pine made up four-fifths of the total. Sawlogs and pulpwood were the major products, accounting for 81 ...

J. G. Jones V. A. Rudis

1978-01-01

190

Biota of Oklahoma Springs: Natural Biological Monitoring of Ground Water Quality.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A survey of the fishes and invertebrates of 49 Oklahoma springs, including locations in all major aquifers, was carried out in 1981 and 1982, with each spring sampled in both years. The objective of the research was to determine if faunal similarity was s...

W. J. Matthews J. J. Hoover W. B. Milstead

1983-01-01

191

Testing the sensitivity of pumpage to increases in surficial aquifer system heads in the Cypress Creek well-field area, West-Central Florida : an optimization technique  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Tampa Bay depends on ground water for most of the water supply. Numerous wetlands and lakes in Pasco County have been impacted by the high demand for ground water. Central Pasco County, particularly the area within the Cypress Creek well field, has been greatly affected. Probable causes for the decline in surface-water levels are well-field pumpage and a decade-long drought. Efforts are underway to increase surface-water levels by developing alternative sources of water supply, thus reducing the quantity of well-field pumpage. Numerical ground-water flow simulations coupled with an optimization routine were used in a series of simulations to test the sensitivity of optimal pumpage to desired increases in surficial aquifer system heads in the Cypress Creek well field. The ground-water system was simulated using the central northern Tampa Bay ground-water flow model. Pumping solutions for 1987 equilibrium conditions and for a transient 6-month timeframe were determined for five test cases, each reflecting a range of desired target recovery heads at different head control sites in the surficial aquifer system. Results are presented in the form of curves relating average head recovery to total optimal pumpage. Pumping solutions are sensitive to the location of head control sites formulated in the optimization problem and as expected, total optimal pumpage decreased when desired target head increased. The distribution of optimal pumpage for individual production wells also was significantly affected by the location of head control sites. A pumping advantage was gained for test-case formulations where hydraulic heads were maximized in cells near the production wells, in cells within the steady-state pumping center cone of depression, and in cells within the area of the well field where confining-unit leakance is the highest. More water was pumped and the ratio of head recovery per unit decrease in optimal pumpage was more than double for test cases where hydraulic heads are maximized in cells located at or near the production wells. Additionally, the ratio of head recovery per unit decrease in pumpage was about three times more for the area where confining-unit leakance is the highest than for other leakance zone areas of the well field. For many head control sites, optimal heads corresponding to optimal pumpage deviated from the desired target recovery heads. Overall, pumping solutions were constrained by the limiting recovery values, initial head conditions, and by upper boundary conditions of the ground-water flow model.

Yobbi, Dann K.

2002-01-01

192

Report on the Economic Impact of American Indians in the State of Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report assesses the economic impact created by the presence of American Indians in Oklahoma. In 1980, American Indians in Oklahoma numbered 169,459, or 5.6% of the state's population. Most Indians lived in central and eastern counties. Compared to the general population, Indians were younger, less educated, and had higher unemployment and

Green, Margaret Abudu; And Others

193

77 FR 26598 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00059  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disaster Declaration 13069 and 13070] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00059 AGENCY: U...declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes...Counties: Woodward. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma: Dewey, Ellis, Harper, Major,...

2012-05-04

194

Oklahoma DOE EPSCoR Trainees.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the results of the State of Oklahoma DOE EPSCOR Traineeship program. The program was carried out at the three major research universities in the state: the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University, and the University of Tulsa...

R. C. Knox

2000-01-01

195

76 FR 24555 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00045  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...24555-24556] [FR Doc No: 2011-10490... 12536 and 12537] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00045...disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1970-DR...Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma: Bryan, Choctaw...Disaster Assistance. [FR Doc. 2011-10490...

2011-05-02

196

Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The 46th state, Oklahoma, presents its unusual history with the online version of The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. The Encyclopedia was prepared by over 500 "university-based scholars and independent historians and scholars," and was a joint effort by The Oklahoma Historical Society and Oklahoma State University Library Electronic Publishing Center. Visitors can click on the "Table of Contents" link near the bottom of the homepage to "Browse Entries Alphabetically", "Browse Entries Chronologically", or "Browse Entries by Subject". Browsing via chronology introduces visitors to Oklahoma starting with the "Precontact Era", through the "Westward Expansion" and on to "Twentieth Century to Present". Subject categories include "African Americans", "Farming", "Military", and "Petroleum". When searching, visitors will be taken to the Electronic Publishing Center Search Page, so they will need to choose the specific collection, Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, from the drop down box, to confine the search to the Encyclopedia.

197

Reconnaissance of the hydrology, water quality, and sources of bacterial and nutrient contamination in the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system and Cave Springs Branch of Honey Creek, Delaware County, Oklahoma, March 1999-March 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A reconnaissance investigation of hydrology and water quality was conducted to evaluate possible sources of bacteria and nutrient contamination in the Cave Springs Branch basin and the underlying karstic Ozark Plateau aquifer system. Objectives were to: (1) determine the directions of ground-water flow in the basin and determine whether Cave Springs Branch interacts with ground water, (2) compare water quality in Cave Springs Branch with water quality in nearby wells to determine whether the stream is contaminating nearby wells, and (3) determine sources of fecal coliform bacteria and nitrate contamination in Cave Springs Branch and ground water. Potential sources of bacteria and nitrate in the area include cultivated agriculture, cow and horse on pasture, poultry production, households, and wildlife. Presence of fecal coliform and fecal streptococcal bacteria directly indicate fecal contamination and the potential for the presence of other pathogenic organisms in a water supply. Nitrate in drinking water poses health risks and may indicate the presence of additional contaminants. Fecal coliform bacteria colony counts were least in wells, intermediate in the poultry-processing plant wastewater outfall and Honey Creek above the confluence with Cave Springs Branch, and greatest in Cave Springs Branch. Bacteria strains and resistance to antibiotics by some bacteria indicate that livestock may have been sources of some bacteria in the water samples. Multiple antibiotic resistances were not present in the isolates from the water samples, indicating that the bacteria may not be from human or poultry sources. Ribotyping indicates that Escherichia coli bacteria in water samples from the basin were from bird, cow, horse, dog, deer, and human sources. The presence of multiple ribotypes from each type of animal source except bird indicates that most of the bacteria are from multiple populations of source animals. Identifiable sources of bacteria in Cave Springs Branch at the state line were dominantly cow and horse with one ribotype from bird. Escherichia coli was detected in only one well sample. Bacterial ribotypes in water from that upgradient well indicated human and dog feces as sources for bacteria, and that on site wastewater treatment may not always be adequate in these highly permeable soils. Greater concentrations of nitrate in Cave Springs Branch and O'Brien Spring relative to the poultry-processing plant wastewater outfall may be due, in part, to conversion of ammonia from poultry processing plant wastewater. The poultry-processing plant wastewater outfall sample collected in March 2000 contained greater concentrations of ammonia and total organic nitrogen plus ammonia than the spring, stream, and well samples collected during August 1999. Cave Springs Branch and Honey Creek contributed approximately equal loads of nitrogen to Honey Creek below the confluence and the greatest loads of nitrogen were introduced to Cave Springs Branch by the poultry processing plant wastewater outfall and O'Brien Spring. Nitrate concentrations in upgradient well samples ranged from 0.38 to 4.60 milligrams per liter, indicating that there are sources of ground-water nitrogen other than Cave Springs Branch, such as animal waste, fertilizer, or human waste. Nitrogen compounds in water from wells downgradient of Cave Springs Branch may be from Cave Springs Branch, fertilizers, animal waste, or human waste.

Schlottmann, Jamie L.; Tanner, Ralph S.; Samadpour, Mansour

2000-01-01

198

Oklahoma Healthy Homes Initiative  

PubMed Central

Compelling scientific evidence suggests that a strong association exists between housing-related hazards and the health and safety of their residents. Health, safety, and environmental hazards (such as asthma and allergy triggers), unintentional injury hazards, lead-based paint hazards, and poor indoor air quality are interrelated with substandard housing conditions. This article describes a Healthy Homes initiative to address these hazards in a coordinated fashion in the home, rather than taking a categorical approach, even in the presence of multiple hazards. It also provides an overview of Oklahoma's Healthy Homes initiative and its pilot project, the Tulsa Safe and Healthy Housing Project, which is currently administered in Tulsa in collaboration with Children First, Oklahoma's Nurse-Family Partnership program. This pilot project seeks to open new areas of research that can lead to a greater understanding of environmental health issues related to substandard housing in the United States, which will eventually make homes safer and healthier.

Khan, Fahad

2011-01-01

199

USGS Water Resources of Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS): Water Resources of Oklahoma contains hydrologic data; information on current state water-resource projects; USGS maps and aerial photo images; USGS publications and presentations; technical resources; and information on the general climate and water quality monitoring programs. There is also a form for making water data requests; a drought watch for Oklahoma; analysis of daily and monthly water conditions for Oklahoma; and a Water Science for Schools site.

200

THREATENED FISHES OF OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of museum coUecdoos aod recent inteDSive c:ollectiq throqbout Oklahoma have revealed a Dumber of fish species to be threateD.ed by mao, aetiYities. AD lUUlOCated list of the 34 forms c:oosidered threatened in the ._ is presented. Five species are believed to be rare and endaqered. Hopefallyz dariJicaeion of the scatus of these 34 forms will aid in their

Henry W. Robison; George A. Moore; Rudolph J. Miller

201

Census and Statistical Characterization of Soil and Water Quality at Abandoned and Other Centralized and Commercial Drilling-Fluid Disposal Sites in Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Commercial and centralized drilling-fluid disposal (CCDD) sites receive a portion of spent drilling fluids for disposal from oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) operations. Many older and some abandoned sites may have operated under less stringen...

A. R. Dutton H. S. Nance

2003-01-01

202

Aquifer-characteristics and water-chemistry data from wells on or near Navajo tribal lands in the Zuni River basin and Whitewater Arroyo drainage, west-central New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three stratigraphic units - the alluvium, the Gallup Sandstone, and the Dakota Sandstone, have favorable water bearing characteristics and are present throughout most of the Navajo tribal lands in the Zuni River basin and Whitewater Arroyo drainage, west-central New Mexico. Reported well yields are less than 10 to 500 gal\\/min for the alluvium aquifer; 4 to 260 gal\\/min for the

1990-01-01

203

78 FR 31998 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00071  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties (Physical Damage and Economic Injury Loans): Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie. Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma:...

2013-05-28

204

75 FR 47650 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00042  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Oklahoma. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma: Canadian, Cleveland, Kingfisher, Lincoln, Logan, Pottawatomie. The Interest Rates are: [[Page...

2010-08-06

205

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF STATE DATA RELATED TO ABANDONED CENTRALIZED AND COMMERCIAL DRILLING-FLUID DISPOSAL SITES IN LOUISIANA, NEW MEXICO, OKLAHOMA, AND TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

This 2003 Spring Semi-Annual Report contains a summary of the Final Technical Report being prepared for the Soil Remediation Requirements at Commercial and Centralized Drilling-Fluid Disposal (CCDD) Sites project funded by the United States Department of Energy under DOE Award No. DE-AC26-99BC15225. The summary describes (1) the objectives of the investigation, (2) a rationale and methodology of the investigation, (3) sources of data, assessment of data quality, and data availability, (4) examples of well documented centralized and commercial drilling-fluid disposal (CCDD) sites and other sites where drilling fluid was disposed of, and (5) examples of abandoned sites and measures undertaken for their assessment and remediation. The report also includes most of the figures, tables, and appendices that will be included in the final report.

H. Seay Nance

2003-03-01

206

Hydrogeology, water quality, and water-resources development potential of the upper Floridan Aquifer in the Valdosta area, south-central Georgia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water quality in the Upper Floridan aquifer in the Valdosta, Georgia area is adversely affected by direct recharge from the Withlacoochee River. Water enters the aquifer along a short reach of the river where sinkholes have formed in the stream bed. The water receives little filtration as it recharges the Upper Floridan aquifer through these sinkholes. Naturally occurring organic material in the river provides a readily available source of energy for the growth of microbiota in the aquifer. Microbiological processes and chemical reactions in the aquifer produce methane and hydrogen sulfide as the water from the river mixes with ground water and moves downgradient in the aquifer. Humic substances associated with the organic material in the ground water in this area can form trihalomethanes when the water is chlorinated for public supply. To assess areas most suitable for ground-water supply development, areal distributions of total organic carbon, total sulfide, and methane in the Upper Floridan aquifer were mapped and used to evaluate areas affected by recharge from the Withlacoochee River. Areas where concentrations of total organic carbon, total sulfide, and methane were less than or equal to 2.0 milligrams per liter, 0.5 milligrams per liter, and 100 micrograms per liter, respectively, were considered to be relatively unaffected by recharge from the river and to have the greatest potential for water- resources development.

McConnell, J. B.; Hacke, C. M.

1993-01-01

207

Karst in Permian evaporite rocks of western Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Bedded evaporites (gypsum and salt) of Permian age have been dissolved naturally by ground water to form a major evaporite-karst region in western Oklahoma. The Blaine Formation and associated evaporites comprise 100--800 ft of strata that dip gently into broad, structural basins. Outcropping gypsum, dolomite, and red-bed shales of the Blaine display typical karstic features, such as sinkholes, caves, disappearing streams, and springs. Large caves are developed in gypsum beds 10--30 ft thick at several places, and a major gypsum/dolomite karst aquifer provides irrigation water to a large region in southwestern Oklahoma, where salt layers above and below the Blaine Formation have been partly dissolved at depths of 30--800 ft below the land surface. Salt dissolution causes development of brine-filled cavities, into which overlying strata collapse, and the brine eventually is emitted at the land surface in large salt plains.

Johnson, K.S. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States))

1993-02-01

208

Oklahoma Pediatric Injury Control Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the Oklahoma Pediatric Injury Control Project was to increase the functional capacity of the Maternal and Child Health Service of the Oklahoma State Department of Health to address the problem of pediatric injuries. The objectives of the pr...

M. L. Brown

1994-01-01

209

Backtalk: Adult Services in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes projects of Oklahoma libraries designed to combat the problem of illiteracy among adults and explains Oklahoma Image, a humanities effort aimed at attracting out-of-school adults to public libraries by focusing on the state's multicultural heritage. Column also reports adult service news from other states. (JD)|

Giblon, Della L.; Henke, Esther Mae

1980-01-01

210

Artesian pressures and water quality in Paleozoic aquifers in the Ten Sleep area of the Bighorn Basin, north-central Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The major Paleozoic artesian aquifers, the aquifers most favorable for continued development, in the Ten Sleep area of the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming are the Tensleep Sandstone, the Madison Limestone and Bighorn Dolomite (Madison-Bighorn aquifer), and the Flathead Sandstone. The minor aquifers include the Goose Egg and Park City Formations (considered in the Ten Sleep area to be the lateral equivalent of the Phosphoria Formation) and the Amsden Formation. Most wells completed in the major and minor aquifers flow at the land surface. Wellhead pressures generally are less than 50 pounds per square inch for the Tensleep Sandstone, 150-250 pounds per square inch for the Madison-Bighorn aquifer, and more than 400 pounds per square inch for the Flathead Sandstone. Flowing wells completed in the Madison-Bighorn aquifer and the Flathead Sandstone yield more than 1,000 gallons per minute. The initial test of one well completed in the Madison-Bighorn aquifer indicated a flow rate of 14,000 gallons per minute. Transmissivities range from 500 to 1,900 feet squared per day for the Madison-Bighorn aquifer and from about 90 to 325 feet squared per day for the Tensleep and Flathead Sandstones. Significant secondary permeability from fracturing in the Paleozoic aquifers allows local upward interformational movement of water, and this affects the altitude of the potentiometric surfaces of the Tensleep Sandstone and the Madison-Bighorn aquifer. Water moves upward from the Tensleep and other formations, through the Goose Egg Formation, to discharge at the land surface as springs. Much of the spring flow is diverted for irrigation or is used for rearing fish. Decreases from original well pressures were not apparent in wells completed in the Tensleep Sandstone or in the Madison-Bighorn aquifer in the study area except for a few wells in or near the town of Ten Sleep. Most wells completed in the Flathead Sandstone, which also are open to the Madison-Bighorn aquifer, show a decrease of pressure from the time of completion to 1978. The decrease of pressure is partly the result of water moving from the Flathead Sandstone into the Madison-Bighorn aquifer, which has a lower potentiometric surface than does the Flathead Sandstone, even during the time the wells are not in operation. Pressure in some small-capacity wells completed in the Goose Egg Formation also has decreased near Ten Sleep. Most of the wells, particularly the irrigation wells, show a progressive decrease in pressure during the irrigation season but recover during periods of nonuse. Measurements of the pressure were made principally in 1953, 1962, 1970, and 1975-78. Well water from the Paleozoic aquifers generally contains minimal concentrations of dissolved solids and individual constituents but excessive hardness. Dissolved-solids concentrations of water are less than 300 milligrams per liter in the Tensleep Sandstone and the Madison-Bighorn aquifer, less than 200 milligrams per liter in the Flathead Sandstone, and as much as 450 milligrams per liter in the Goose Egg Formation. Bicarbonate is the major constituent, followed by calcium and magnesium. Relatively large concentrations of sulfate, as much as 490 milligrams per liter, were found, mainly in water from the Goose Egg Formation. The water has low sodium (alkali) and medium salinity; therefore, the water is satisfactory for irrigation and most other uses, if excessive hardness is not a detrimental factor. Wellhead temperatures range from 11 ? to 27.5 ? Celsius (51 ? to 81.5 ? Fahrenheit) within a range in depth of approximately 250 to 4,000 feet. This gives a geothermal gradient of about 0.44 ? Celsius per 100 feet (0.79 ? Fahrenheit per 100 feet).

Cooley, Maurice E.

1986-01-01

211

Groundwater Quality, Age, and Probability of Contamination, Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Eagle River watershed is located near the destination resort town of Vail, Colorado. The area has a fastgrowing permanent population, and the resort industry is rapidly expanding. A large percentage of the land undergoing development to support that growth overlies the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer (ERWVFA), which likely has a high predisposition to groundwater contamination. As development continues, local organizations need tools to evaluate potential land-development effects on ground- and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. To help develop these tools, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority, conducted a study in 2006-2007 of the groundwater quality, age, and probability of contamination in the ERWVFA, north-central Colorado. Ground- and surface-water quality samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water, tritium, dissolved gases, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) determined with very low-level laboratory methods. The major-ion data indicate that groundwaters in the ERWVFA can be classified into two major groups: groundwater that was recharged by infiltration of surface water, and groundwater that had less immediate recharge from surface water and had elevated sulfate concentrations. Sulfate concentrations exceeded the USEPA National Secondary Drinking Water Regulations (250 milligrams per liter) in many wells near Eagle, Gypsum, and Dotsero. The predominant source of sulfate to groundwater in the Eagle River watershed is the Eagle Valley Evaporite, which is a gypsum deposit of Pennsylvanian age located predominantly in the western one-half of Eagle County.

Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

2009-01-01

212

Fluorine in the rocks and sediments of volcanic areas in central Italy: total content, enrichment and leaching processes and a hypothesis on the vulnerability of the related aquifers.  

PubMed

Rock, sediment and water samples from areas characterised by hydrothermal alterations in the Sabatini and Vico Volcanic Districts, near Rome and the large city of Viterbo, respectively, were collected and analysed to determine the total fluorine (F) content and to understand the F geochemical background level in the volcanic districts of central Italy. Leaching and alteration processes controlling the high concentration of F in water were also investigated. Fluorine concentrations were directly determined (potentiometrically) by an F selective electrode in water samples, while the procedure for rock samples included preliminary F dissolution through alkaline fusion. F concentrations higher than 800 mg kg(-1) were commonly found in the analysed rocks and sediments; the concentration depended on the lithology and on the distance from the alteration areas. A specific successive sampling campaign was conducted in three areas where the F content in sediments was particularly high; in the same areas, measurements of CO(2) flux were also performed to investigate the possible deep origin of F. To verify the relationships among the high F contents in rocks and sediments, the leaching processes involved and the presence of F in the aquifer, we also collected water samples in the western sector of the Sabatini Volcanic District, where hydrothermal manifestations and mineral springs are common. The data were processed using a GIS system in which the F distribution was combined with morphological and geological observations. The main results of our study are that (1) F concentrations are higher in volcanic and recently formed travertine (especially in hydrothermally altered sediments) than in sedimentary rocks and decrease with distance from hydrothermal alteration areas, (2) F is more easily leached from hydrothermally altered rocks and from travertine and (3) sediments enriched with F may indicate the presence of deep regional fractures that represent direct pathways of hydrothermal fluids from the crust to the surface. PMID:21968879

De Rita, Donatella; Cremisini, Carlo; Cinnirella, Alessandro; Spaziani, Fabio

2011-10-04

213

78 FR 32007 - Environmental Impact Statement for Tulsa-Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for Tulsa--Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln, Creek...Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) Rail Division intend to prepare an EIS pursuant...for the State of Oklahoma High-Speed Rail Initiative: Tulsa--Oklahoma City...

2013-05-28

214

Diurnal cycle of the Oklahoma City urban heat island  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between the dates of 28 June and 31 July 2003, the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field project was conducted in Oklahoma City and was the largest urban dispersion experiment ever in North America. Because the focus of JU2003 was on atmospheric processes within the urban environment, an extremely dense network of instrumentation was deployed in and around the central business

Jeffrey B. Basara; Peter K. Hall; Amanda J. Schroeder; Bradley G. Illston; Kodi L. Nemunaitis

2008-01-01

215

Psychological response to the Oklahoma City bombing.  

PubMed

The bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Office Building in Oklahoma City was the most devastating terrorist activity that has occurred in America. Prevention of revictimization of persons seriously affected by the bombing was central to the planned response to this tragedy. Coordination and collaboration among local, state, and national agencies promoted effective clinical services provision, research facilitation, and prevention of revictimization. Information gathered from this cooperative effort will contribute to the effort to minimize the potential for such tragedies in the future as well as help to develop prevention and intervention strategies to reduce the effects when the next such disaster occurs. PMID:8682905

Krug, R S; Nixon, S J; Vincent, R

1996-01-01

216

Stream-Aquifer Relations and Yield of Stratified-Drift Aquifers in the Nashua River Basin, Massachusetts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes aquifer yields and stream-aquifer relations of six aquifers in the eastern and central parts of the Nashua River basin that have been identified as the major potential sources of ground-water supply in the Nashua River basin (Brackley...

V. de Lima

1991-01-01

217

Certified organic farming research and demonstration project by Oklahoma State University and USDA's Agricultural Research Service at Lane, Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In 2003, Oklahoma State University and USDA, Agricultural Research Service, South Central Agricultural Research Laboratory received organic certification for 8 acres at the Lane Agricultural Center, Lane, OK. The certified organic land was used to develop a cooperative project with a diversity of a...

218

Morphological and cultural comparison of microorganisms in surface soil and subsurface sediments at a pristine study site in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surface-soil and subsurface microfloras at the site of a shallow aquifer in Oklahoma were examined and compared with respect to (1) total and viable cell numbers, (2) colony and cell types that grew on various plating media, (3) cell morphologies seen in flotation films stripped from sample particles, and (4) cellular ultrastructure. Appreciable numbers of microbial cells were present in

T. L. Bone; D. L. Balkwill

1988-01-01

219

Ground water available in the Davenport area, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This memorandum describes the ground-water resources in the vicinity of Davenport, Lincoln County, Oklahoma. It is based on a one-day trip to Davenport made by the writer on February 11, 1948, to obtain information in addition to that in the ground-water files in Norman on the availability of ground water for public supply or other uses in the Davenport area. Davenport is a town of about 1,000 in east-central Lincoln County, Oklahoma, on U.S. Highway 66, about half way between Oklahoma City and Tulsa. It is in an area of undulating to gently rolling topography underlain by rocks of Pennsylvanian age. The area is drained into Deep Fork of the Canadian River, by Dry Creek and its tributary, Chuckaho Creek. (available in photostat copy only)

Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

220

Artesian pressures and water quality in Paleozoic aquifers in the Ten Sleep area of the Bighorn Basin, north-central Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Major Paleozoic artesian aquifers in the southeastern Bighorn Basin of Wyoming area, in descending order, the Tensleep Sandstone; the Madison Limestone and Bighorn Dolomite, which together form the Madison-Bighorn aquifer; and the Flathead Sandstone. Operating yields commonly are more than 1,000 gallons per minute from flowing wells completed in the Madison-Bighorn aquifer. The initial test of one well indicated a flow of 14,000 gallons per minute. Wellhead pressures range from less than 50 to more than 400 pounds per square inch. Transmissivities are 500-1,900 feet squared per day for the Madison-Bighorn aquifer and 90-325 feet squared per day for the Tensleep and Flathead Sandstones. Despite extensive development for irrigation there have been few decreases in pressure. Some decreases in pressure have occurred in wells completed in the Flathead Sandstone. Fractures along linear structural features result in significant secondary permeability and allow upward interformational movement of water that affects the altitude of the potentiometric surfaces in the Tensleep Sandstone and Madison-Bighorn aquifer. Upward-moving water from the Tensleep and other formations discharges at the land surface as springs along or near these lineations. Water from the aquifers generally contains minimal concentrations of dissolved solids and individual constituents but has excessive hardness. The water is satisfactory for irrigation and other purposes when hardness is not a detrimental factor. Wellhead temperatures range from 11 degrees to 27.5 degrees C, giving a geothermal gradient of about 0.44 degrees C per 100 feet. (USGS)

Cooley, M. E.

1985-01-01

221

Hydrologic and chemical interaction of the Arkansas River and the Equus Beds aquifer between Hutchinson and Wichita, south-central Kansas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Large chloride concentrations in Arkansas River water may degrade water quality in the adjacent Equus beds aquifer. A ground-water flow-model program (MODFLOW) was used to simulate hydrologic interaction of the Arkansas River and the Equus beds aquifer. A particle-tracking program (MODPATH) was used to simulate the movement of chloride from the river through the aquifer. Model-simulation results indicate that declining water levels in the Equus beds aquifer have caused net base-flow gains in the Arkansas and Little Arkansas Rivers to decrease from about 21 and 67 ft3/s (cubic feet per second), respectively, in 1940 to about -52 and 27 ft3/s, respectively, by the end of 1989. In hypothetical simulations (1990-2019) where only pumpage varied, net base-flow loss from the Arkansas River ranged from about 59 to 117 ft3/s for no increase in pumpage and a 3-percent per year increase in pumpage since 1989, respectively. Estimated chloride discharge from the Arkansas River Iassuming a chloride concentration of 630 milligrams per liter) to the aquifer increased from about 21 ton/d (tons per day) in 1940 to about 100 ton/d by the end of 1989 and was estimated to range from about 110 to 200 ton/d by 2019, depending on pumpage and climate conditions. Particle-tracking simulations show that the distribution of particles representing chloride from the Arkansas River expanded from relatively narrow bands near the river to a wider distribution within the aquifer, and may have reached the edge of the Wichita well field by 1963.

Myers, N. C.; Hargadine, G. D.; Gillespie, Joe B.

1996-01-01

222

Assessing Groundwater Storage Changes in Edwards-Trinity Aquifer, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Existing water supplies in Texas are projected to decline by about 18 percent by 2060, a trend caused primarily by increases in water demand and depletion of aquifers. The Edwards-Trinity regional aquifer system, a 200,000-km2 carbonate and clastic rock aquifer extending from southeastern Oklahoma to western Texas, provides water to all or parts of 38 counties in Texas. The extensive use of the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer has already resulted in relatively large artesian pressure declines near population centers. Although numerous studies have been conducted on the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, significant uncertainty remains about the spatiotemporal replenishment characteristics of the aquifer. The U.S.-German Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission provides a unique opportunity to infer terrestrial water storage (TWS) variations on a regional basis. Previous studies have demonstrated the viability of using GRACE-derived TWS anomalies to conduct water budget analysis at both regional and continental scales. The purposes of our study are to (a) assess the potential of using GRACE, North America Land Assimilation System data, and in situ measurements to infer groundwater storage variations in the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system and (b) utilize remotely sensed data for informed groundwater resources management. Our preliminary results indicate that GRACE-derived TWS anomalies correlate well with results obtained through other means and, thus, the GRACE data could be a valuable tool for further calibrating a regional groundwater availability model developed for the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system.

Sun, A. Y.; Green, R. T.; Rodell, M.; Michaels, T. I.

2009-12-01

223

Estimating Groundwater Concentrations from Mass Releases to the Aquifer at Integrated Disposal Facility and Tank Farm Locations Within the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes groundwater-related numerical calculations that will support groundwater flow and transport analyses associated with the scheduled 2005 performance assessment of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site. The report also provides potential supporting information to other ongoing Hanford Site risk analyses associated with the closure of single-shell tank farms and related actions. The IDF 2005 performance assessment analysis is using well intercept factors (WIFs), as outlined in the 2001 performance assessment of the IDF. The flow and transport analyses applied to these calculations use both a site-wide regional-scale model and a local-scale model of the area near the IDF. The regional-scale model is used to evaluate flow conditions, groundwater transport, and impacts from the IDF in the central part of the Hanford Site, at the core zone boundary around the 200 East and 200 West Areas, and along the Columbia River. The local-scale model is used to evaluate impacts from transport of contaminants to a hypothetical well 100 m downgradient from the IDF boundaries. Analyses similar to the regional-scale analysis of IDF releases are also provided at individual tank farm areas as additional information. To gain insight on how the WIF approach compares with other approaches for estimating groundwater concentrations from mass releases to the unconfined aquifer, groundwater concentrations were estimated with the WIF approach for two hypothetical release scenarios and compared with similar results using a calculational approach (the convolution approach). One release scenario evaluated with both approaches (WIF and convolution) involved a long-term source release from immobilized low-activity waste glass containing 25,550 Ci of technetium-99 near the IDF; another involved a hypothetical shorter-term release of {approx}0.7 Ci of technetium over 600 years from the S-SX tank farm area. In addition, direct simulation results for both release scenarios were provided to compare with the results of the WIF and convolution approaches.

Bergeron, Marcel P.; Freeman, Eugene J.

2005-06-09

224

Promoting School Readiness in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The results of the research, conducted on Oklahoma's universal Pre-kindergarten (Pre-k) program, on children of Tulsa Public Schools (TPS), the largest school district in the state to increase the school readiness are presented.

Gormley, William T., Jr.; Gayer, Ted

2005-01-01

225

Analyses of Water-Level Differentials and Variations in Recharge between the Surficial and Upper Floridan Aquifers in East-Central and Northeast Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Continuous (daily) water-level data collected at 29 monitoring-well cluster sites were analyzed to document variations in recharge between the surficial (SAS) and Floridan (FAS) aquifer systems in east-central and northeast Florida. According to Darcy's law, changes in the water-level differentials (differentials) between these systems are proportional to changes in the vertical flux of water between them. Variations in FAS recharge rates are of interest to water-resource managers because changes in these rates affect sensitive water resources subject to minimum flow and water-level restrictions, such as the amount of water discharged from springs and changes in lake and wetland water levels. Mean daily differentials between 2000-2004 ranged from less than 1 foot at a site in east-central Florida to more than 114 feet at a site in northeast Florida. Sites with greater mean differentials exhibited lower percentage-based ranges in fluctuations than did sites with lower mean differentials. When averaged for all sites, differentials (and thus Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA) recharge rates) decreased by about 18 percent per site between 2000-2004. This pattern can be associated with reductions in ground-water withdrawals from the UFA that occurred after 2000 as the peninsula emerged from a 3-year drought. Monthly differentials exhibited a well-defined seasonal pattern in which UFA recharge rates were greatest during the dry spring months (8 percent above the 5-year daily mean in May) and least during the wetter summer/early fall months (4 percent below the 5-year daily mean in October). In contrast, differentials exceeded the 5-year daily mean in all but 2 months of 2000, indicative of relatively high ground-water withdrawals throughout the year. On average, the UFA received about 6 percent more recharge at the project sites in 2000 than between 2000-2004. No statistically significant correlations were detected between monthly differentials and precipitation at 27 of the 29 sites between 2000-2004. For longer periods of record, double-mass plots of differentials and precipitation indicate the UFA recharge rate increased by about 34 percent at a site in west Orange County between the periods of 1974-1983 and 1983-2004. Given the absence of a trend in rainfall, the increase can likely be attributed to ground-water development. At a site in south Lake County, double-mass plots indicate that dredging of the Palatlakaha River and other nearby drainage improvements may have reduced recharge rates to the UFA by about 30 percent from the period between 1960-1965 to 1965-1970. Water-level differentials were positively correlated with land-surface altitude. The correlation was particularly strong for the 11 sites located in physiographically-defined ridge areas (coefficient of determination (R2) = 0.89). Weaker yet statistically significant negative correlations were detected between differentials and the model-calibrated leakance and thickness of the intermediate confining unit (ICU). Recharge to the UFA decreased by about 14 percent at the Charlotte Street monitoring-well site in Seminole County between 2000-2004. The decrease can be attributed to a reduction in nearby pumpage, from 57 to 49 million gallons per day over the 5-year period, with a subsequent recovery in UFA water levels that exceeded those in the SAS. Differentials at Charlotte were influenced by system memory of both precipitation and pumpage. While not statistically correlated with monthly precipitation, monthly differentials were well correlated with the 9-month moving average of precipitation. Similarly, differentials were best correlated with the 2-month moving average of pumpage. The polynomial function that quantifies the correlation between differentials and the 2-month moving average of pumpage indicates that, in terms of UFA recharge rates, the system was closer to a steady-state condition in 2000 when pumpage rates were high, than from 2001-2004 when p

Murray, Louis C., Jr

2007-01-01

226

Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HETA 2001-0496-2866, Oklahoma City Community College, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request for a health hazard evaluation from employees at the Oklahoma City Community College Bookstore on August 13, 2001. Employees were concerned that the temporary location of...

2001-01-01

227

Healthcare Inspection: Review of a Patient with Pulmonary Embolism Oklahoma City VA Medical Center Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The VA Office of Inspector General (OIG) Office of Healthcare Inspections reviewed allegations of misdiagnosis by providers at the Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, (facility) in Oklahoma City, OK. The purpose of the inspection was to determine if the alle...

2011-01-01

228

Geochemical Effects of Induced Stream-Water and Artificial Recharge on the Equus Beds Aquifer, South-Central Kansas, 1995-2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Artificial recharge of the Equus Beds aquifer is part of a strategy implemented by the city of Wichita, Kansas, to preserve future water supply and address declining water levels in the aquifer of as much as 30 feet caused by withdrawals for water supply and irrigation since the 1940s. Water-level declines represent a diminished water supply and also may accelerate migration of saltwater from the Burrton oil field to the northwest and the Arkansas River to the southwest into the freshwater of the Equus Beds aquifer. Artificial recharge, as a part of the Equus Beds Ground-Water Recharge Project, involves capturing flows larger than base flow from the Little Arkansas River and recharging the water to the Equus Beds aquifer by means of infiltration or injection. The geochemical effects on the Equus Beds aquifer of induced stream-water and artificial recharge at the Halstead and Sedgwick sites were determined through collection and analysis of hydrologic and water-quality data and the application of statistical, mixing, flow and solute-transport, and geochemical model simulations. Chloride and atrazine concentrations in the Little Arkansas River and arsenic concentrations in ground water at the Halstead recharge site frequently exceeded regulatory criteria. During 30 percent of the time from 1999 through 2004, continuous estimated chloride concentrations in the Little Arkansas River at Highway 50 near Halstead exceeded the Secondary Drinking-Water Regulation of 250 milligrams per liter established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Chloride concentrations in shallow monitoring wells located adjacent to the stream exceeded the drinking-water criterion five times from 1995 through 2004. Atrazine concentrations in water sampled from the Little Arkansas River had large variability and were at or near the drinking-water Maximum Contaminant Level of 3.0 micrograms per liter as an annual average established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Atrazine concentrations were much smaller than the drinking-water criterion and were detected at much smaller concentrations in shallow monitoring wells and diversion well water located adjacent to the stream probably because of sorption on aquifer sediment. Before and after artificial recharge, large, naturally occurring arsenic concentrations in the recharge water for the Halstead diversion well and recharge site exceeded the Maximum Contaminant Level of 10 micrograms per liter established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Arsenic and iron concentrations decreased when water was recharged through recharge basins or a trench; however, chemical precipitation and potential biofouling eventually may decrease the artificial recharge efficiency through basins and trenches. At the Sedgwick site, chloride concentrations infrequently exceeded regulatory criteria. Large concentrations of atrazine were treated to decrease concentrations to less than regulatory criteria. Recharge of treated stream water through recharge basins avoids potentially large concentrations of arsenic and iron that exist at the Halstead diversion site. Results from a simple mixing model using chloride as a tracer indicated that the water chemistry in shallow monitoring well located adjacent to the Little Arkansas River was 80 percent of stream water, demonstrating effective recharge of the alluvial aquifer by the stream. Results also indicated that about 25 percent of the water chemistry of the diversion well water was from the shallow part of the aquifer. Additionally, diverting water through a diversion well located adjacent to the stream removed about 75 percent of the atrazine, probably through sorption to aquifer sediment, and decreased the need for additional water treatment to remove atrazine. A flow and solute-transport model was developed using water-level and chloride concentration data to simulate and better evaluate the quantity of stream-water flow to the p

Schmidt, Heather C. Ross; Ziegler, Andrew C.; Parkhurst, David L.

2007-01-01

229

Changes in Water Levels and Storage in the High Plains Aquifer, Predevelopment to 2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The High Plains aquifer underlies 111.6 million acres (174,000 square miles) in parts of eight States - Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The area overlying the High Plains aquifer is one of the primary agricultural regions in the Nation. Water-level declines began in parts of the High Plains aquifer soon after the beginning of substantial irrigation with ground water in the aquifer area. By 1980, water levels in the High Plains aquifer in parts of Texas, Oklahoma, and southwestern Kansas had declined more than 100 feet (Luckey and others, 1981). In response to these water-level declines, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with numerous Federal, State, and local water-resources agencies, began monitoring more than 7,000 wells in 1988 to assess annual water-level changes in the aquifer. This fact sheet summarizes changes in water levels and drainable water in storage in the High Plains aquifer from predevelopment (before about 1950) to 2007 and serves as a companion product to a USGS report that presents more detailed and technical information about water-level and storage changes in the High Plains aquifer during this period (McGuire, 2009).

McGuire, V. L.

2009-01-01

230

Biological assessment of environmental flows for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Large-scale patterns in fish assemblage structure and functional groups are influenced by alterations in streamflow regime. In this study, we defined an objective threshold for alteration for Oklahoma streams using a combination of the expected range of 27 flow indices and a discriminant analysis to predict flow regime group. We found that fish functional groups in reference flow conditions had species that were more intolerant to flow alterations and preferences for stream habitat and faster flowing water. In contrast, altered sites had more tolerant species that preferred lentic habitat and slower water velocity. Ordination graphs of the presence and functional groups of species revealed an underlying geographical pattern roughly conforming to ecoregions, although there was separation between reference and altered sites within the larger geographical framework. Additionally, we found that reservoir construction and operation significantly altered fish assemblages in two different systems, Bird Creek in central Oklahoma and the Kiamichi River in southeastern Oklahoma. The Bird Creek flow regime shifted from a historically intermittent stream to one with stable perennial flows, and changes in fish assemblage structure covaried with changes in all five components of the flow regime. In contrast, the Kiamichi River flow regime did not change significantly for most flow components despite shifts in fish assemblage structure; however, most of the species associated with shifts in assemblage structure in the Kiamichi River system were characteristic of lentic environments and were likely related more to proximity of reservoirs in the drainage system than changes in flow. The spatial patterns in fish assemblage response to flow alteration, combined with different temporal responses of hydrology and fish assemblage structure at sites downstream of reservoirs, indicate that interactions between flow regime and aquatic biota vary depending on ecological setting. This supports the notion that regional variation in natural flow regimes could affect the development of flow recommendations.

Fisher, William L.; Seilheimer, Titus S.; Taylor, Jason M.

2012-01-01

231

Hydrogeology of the Scioto River Valley near Piketon, South-Central Ohio a quantitative study of ground-water yield and induced infiltration in a glacial outwash aquifer  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A systematic study was made of one of Ohio's principal aquifers, a sand and gravel outwash in the Scioto River Valley, to determine the feasibility of developing a ground-water supply of 20 million gallons per day at a site near Piketon. The first part of the study was spent in determining the thickness and physical properties of the sand and gravel aquifer and in drilling test wells to determine the best site for the supply wells. The second part of the investigation was an aquifer infiltration test to determine the hydraulic properties of the aquifer and the conditions of stream recharge. A well 83 feet deep was drilled on the flood plain and was pumped for 9 days at the rate of 1,000 gallons per minute. Tile effect on the hydrologic system during and after the pumping was determined by measuring the water levels in an array of deep and shallow observation wells and in 8 drive-point wells installed in the bed of the river. Seldom have more comprehensive data been collected showing the effects of pumping on a natural, unconfined, hydrologic system. From these data were calculated the coefficient of transmissibility (215,000 gallons per day per foot) and the rate of streambed infiltration (0.235 million gallons per day per acre per foot). The aquifer was tested near the end of a long drought; so the ground-water levels and the river stage were very nearly following a level trend. Because the ground-water levels were essentially unaffected by extraneous influences, the test data are probably as precise and uncomplicated as is practical to obtain in the field. These data proved to be valid for use as design criteria for the location, spacing, and construction of four supply wells. The third part of the investigation was the testing and quantitative evaluation of the four supply wells before they were put into service. The wells were found to perform about as predicted, indicating that the hydraulic properties of the aquifer, as determined by standard methods, are fairly representative.

Norris, Stanley Eugene; Fidler, Richard E.

1969-01-01

232

76 FR 34799 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00050  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties (Physical Damage and Economic Injury...Kingfisher, Logan, Mcclain, Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma...Oklahoma, Ottawa, Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Stephens. Arkansas: Benton....

2011-06-14

233

Water-level changes, 1980 TO 1997, and saturated thickness, 1996-97, in the High Plains Aquifer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Geological Service provides this report detailing water level changes in the High Plains aquifer. Underlying one of the major agricultural regions in the world, the High Plains Aquifer includes parts of eight States -- Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The report describes "(1) water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer from 1980 to 1997 and from 1996 to 1997, (2) the precipitation pattern in the High Plains region during 1996, and (3) estimated saturated thickness of the High Plains aquifer in 1996-97."

234

Use of geographical information system and water quality index to assess groundwater quality in El Khairat deep aquifer (Enfidha, Central East Tunisia)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Groundwater is the most important natural resource used for drinking by many people around the world, especially in rural\\u000a areas. In Tunisia, since the quantity and the quality of water available for different uses is variable from one place to\\u000a another, groundwater quality in El Khairat deep aquifer was evaluated for its suitability for drinking purposes. To this end,\\u000a an

Mouna Ketata; Moncef Gueddari; Rachida Bouhlila

235

Oklahoma's Federally-Recognized Indian Tribes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document compiles lesson plans, classroom activities, and facts from previous Oklahoma state publications about Oklahoma's American Indian peoples. "Oklahoma's Indian People: Images of Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow" contains brief presentations and related class activities and writing assignments about the histories of approximately 29

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City. Indian Education Section.

236

76 FR 23522 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...OK-033-FOR; Docket ID: OSM-2011-0001] Oklahoma Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of...receipt of a proposed amendment to the Oklahoma regulatory program under the Surface...Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA or the Act). Oklahoma proposes revisions to its program...

2011-04-27

237

Gender, Crime and Incarceration in Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Why is Oklahoma ranked No. 1 in the rate of incarcerating its female population. Senate Bill No. 810 of the 2003 Legislature created the Special Task Force for Women Incarcerated in Oklahoma to answer that question. The Oklahoma Criminal Justice Resource ...

D. Simpson M. Boling N. Warren L. Byrum

2004-01-01

238

Changes in water levels and storage in the High Plains Aquifer, predevelopment to 2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The High Plains aquifer underlies 111.8 million acres (175,000 square miles) in parts of eight States - Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The area overlying the High Plains aquifer is one of the primary agricultural regions in the Nation. Water-level declines began in parts of the High Plains aquifer soon after the onset of substantial irrigation with groundwater from the aquifer (about 1950 and termed "predevelopment" in this fact sheet). By 1980, water levels in the High Plains aquifer in parts of Texas, Oklahoma, and southwestern Kansas had declined more than 100 feet (ft) (Luckey and others, 1981). In 1987, in response to declining water levels, Congress directed the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with numerous Federal, State, and local water-resources entities, to assess and track water-level changes in the aquifer. This fact sheet summarizes changes in water levels and drainable water in storage in the High Plains aquifer from predevelopment to 2009. Drainable water in storage is the fraction of water in the aquifer that will drain by gravity and can be withdrawn by wells. The remaining water in the aquifer is held to the aquifer material by capillary forces and generally cannot be withdrawn by wells. Drainable water in storage is termed "water in storage" in this report. A companion USGS report presents more detailed and technical information about water-level and storage changes in the High Plains aquifer during this period (McGuire, 2011).

McGuire, V.L.

2011-01-01

239

Researching the Oklahoma City bombing.  

PubMed

The authors present a literature retrieval strategy for investigators who plan to conduct research on the Oklahoma City bombing. To facilitate a comprehensive review of the scholarly research on disasters, mass emergencies, and terrorism, a multidatabase search strategy is strongly encouraged. Secondly, a wealth of current information and data on the bombing are available on "popular" and "news" files. PMID:8643773

Piotrowski, C; Perdue, B

1995-12-01

240

Oklahoma Commercial Fishing Development Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contract commercial fisheries were established in two small recreational and industrial impoundments in Oklahoma to remove over abundant commercial species and evaluate the use of the experimental whip-set trammel net and the 1.2 meter trap net by commerc...

D. L. Combs

1977-01-01

241

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school

Ingraham, Sandy

242

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of children in Oklahoma. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school

Ingraham, Sandy

243

Clayton Lake, Jackfork Creek, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proposed Clayton damsite is located at mile 2.8 on Jackfork Creek in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, about 6 miles northwest of Clayton. The project consists of construction of a flood control, water supply, recreation, and fish and wildlife lake located...

1971-01-01

244

Seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha Uplift in Oklahoma. Part V. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Nemaha Ridge is composed of a number of crustal blocks typically 3 to 5 miles (5 to 8 km) wide and 5 to 20 miles (8 to 32 km) long. Structure-contour maps prepared of the top of the Viola Formation (Ordovician), the base of the Pennsylvanian, and the top of the Oswego Formation (Middle Pennsylvanian) reveal a complex fault pattern associated with the Nemaha Uplift. This fault pattern is dominated by several discontinuous uplifts, such as the Oklahoma City, Lovell, Garber, and Crescent Uplifts. A detailed study of the Oklahoma City Uplift suggests that a number of the Nemaha-related faults were developed in pre-Mississippian time. Many of these faults exhibit both increasing and decreasing displacements from early to late Paleozoic time. However, the displacement for most of the Oklahoma City faults took place between the end of Oswego time and the end of Hunton time. A lineament map was prepared for north-central Oklahoma. A detailed gravity map was prepared for the Kingfisher and Medford maxima. A total-intensity aeromagnetic map for the Enid and Oklahoma City 1/sup 0/ by 2/sup 0/ Quadrangles was prepared. A regional seismograph network was established to supplement existing seismological capability. A local earthquake-location program, named HYPERCUBE, was developed. From 1897 through 1976, Oklahoma has had approximately 128 known earthquakes. After the network became operational in late 1977, 255 additional earthquakes were detected in Oklahoma (through 1981). A study of earthquake distribution and intensity values in Oklahoma led to the development of a seismic-source map for Oklahoma and parts of the adjacent states. Six seismic-source zones were identified. For each zone except one, a magnitude-frequency relationship was determined.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr.

1983-02-01

245

Analysis of aquifer mineralization by paleodrainage channels  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mineralization of groundwater resources is a problem in south-central Kansas, due to the penetration of saline water from Permian bedrock formations into the overlying alluvial aquifer. One of the mechanisms involved in the mineralization involves small bedrock features of high permeability located in places occupied by streams and rivers in past geological eras. These geological features are termed 'paleodrainage channels'. The permeability of the overlying aquifer can be significantly smaller than that of the channel fill material. The comparatively fast migration of saline water through these channels of high permeability is associated with the transfer of minerals into the overlying freshwater aquifer. This study applies a set of boundary layer approaches to quantify the process of mineral transfer from the channels into the aquifer. The methods used in the present study provide quick estimation and evaluation of the dilution of the channel flow, as well as mineral concentration profile changes in the mineralized zone created in the overlying aquifer. More generally, the method can also be useful for the analysis and evaluation of various types of groundwater contamination in heterogeneous aquifers. The application of the method is exemplified by a complete set of calculations characterizing the possible mineralization process at a specific channel in south central Kansas. Sensitivity analyses are performed and provide information about the importance of the various parameters that affect the mineralization process. Some possible scenarios for the aquifer mineralization phenomena are described and evaluated. It is shown that the channel mineralization may create either several stream tubes of the aquifer with high mineral concentration, or many stream tubes mineralized to a lesser extent. Characteristics of these two patterns of aquifer mineralization are quantified and discussed. ?? 2003 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R. W.

2003-01-01

246

Drinking-water quality and variations in water levels in the fractured crystalline-rock aquifer, west-central Jefferson County, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In parts of Jefferson County, CO, water for domestic use from the fractured crystalline-rock aquifer contained excessive concentrations of major ions, coliform bacteria, trace elements, or radiochemicals. Based on results of analyses from 26 wells, water from 21 of the wells contained excessive concentrations of one or more constituents. Drinking water standards were exceeded for fluoride in water from 2 wells, nitrate plus nitrite in 2 wells, dissolved solids in 1 well, iron in 6 wells, manganese in 8 wells, zinc in 2 wells, coliform bacteria in 4 wells, gross alpha radiation in 11 wells and possibly 4 more, and gross beta radiation possibly in 1 well. Local variations in concentrations of 15 chemical constituents, specific conductance, and water temperature were statistically significant. Specific conductance increased significantly during 1973-75 only in the vicinity of Indian Hills. Annual range in depths to water in 11 observation wells varied from 1 to 15 feet. The shallowest water levels were recorded in late winter, usually in February. The deepest water levels occurred during summer or fall, depending on the well and the year. Three-year trends in water level changes in 6 of the 11 wells indicated decreasing water storage in the aquifer. (USGS).

Hall, Dennis C.; Johnson, Carl J.

1979-01-01

247

Co-seismic and post-seismic hydrogeological response of the Gran Sasso carbonate aquifer to the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake (central Italy)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mw=6.3 April 6 2009 L'Aquila earthquake mainshock produced self-evident co-seismic and post-seismic changes in the hydrogeological setting of the Gran Sasso carbonate fractured aquifer (Adinolfi Falcone et alii, 2008; Barbieri et alii, 2005) in which the seismogenic Paganica Fault, which is responsible for the mainshock, is located (Anzidei et alii, 2009; Atzori et alii, 2009; Chiarabba et alii, 2009; Walters et alii, 2009): i) the sudden co-seismic disappearance of some springs localized exactly along the surface trace of the Paganica Fault; ii) co-seismic and post-seismic increases in the discharge of the Gran Sasso highway tunnel drainages (+20%) and of other springs (+10%) and iii) a progressive increase of the water table (+1m) at the boundary of the aquifer. Taking into account previous data collected since the '90s, and spot and aftershock monitoring data on spring discharge, spring turbidity, water table levels and rainfall events, a preliminary conceptual model of the earthquake's consequences on the Gran Sasso aquifer is proposed, excluding the contribution of seasonal recharge. Co-seismic effects registered immediately after the shock (i.e. disappearance of local springs and discharge peaks), are caused by pore pressure increase related to deformation. Post-seismic effects, observed in the months following the mainshock (i.e. discharges remaining higher than in the inter-seismic period and a progressive increase of the groundwater level), suggest a permanent change in groundwater hydrodynamics. Additional groundwater flowing towards aquifer boundaries and springs reflects a possible increase in hydraulic conductivity, which can be related to fracture clearing and/or dilatancy (Montgomery and Manga, 2003). To validate the proposed conceptual model we analyse pore pressure changes and the Darcy flow pattern immediately after L'Aquila earthquake for a layered poroelastic medium, using a Green's functions approach (Wang and Kumpel, 2003), and compare results with observations of co-seismic spring discharge changes. As regards the post-seismic phase, several springs in the Gran Sasso region exhibit long-lasting flow increase, but pore pressure changes can sustain flow changes for few days only. We treat the Gran Sasso acquifer as a homogenous/heterogeneous one-dimensional/annular-sectored aquifer and compare the observed changes and model predictions computed for a permanent or transient increase in permeability. References Adinolfi Falcone, R. et alii, 2008: Journal of Hydrology, v. 357, p. 368- 388. Anzidei, M. et alii, 2009: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 36, L17307, doi:10.1029/2009GL039145. Atzori, S. et alii, 2009: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 36, L15305, doi:10.1029/2009GL039293. Barbieri, M. et alii, 2005: Applied Geochemistry, v. 20, p. 2063-2081. Chiarabba, C. et alii, 2009: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 6, 18308, oi:10.1029/2009GL039627. Montgomery, D.R., and Manga, M., 2003: Science, v. 300, p. 2047-2049. Walters, R.J. et alii, 2009: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 36, L17312, doi:10.1029/2009GL039337. Wang, R., and H.-J. Kumpel, 2003: Geophysics, v. 68, p. 705-717.

Amoruso, Antonella; Crescentini, Luca; Petitta, Marco; Rusi, Sergio; Tallini, Marco

2010-05-01

248

MORPHOLOGICAL AND CULTURAL COMPARISON OF MICROORGANISMS IN SURFACE SOIL AND SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS AT A PRISTINE STUDY SITE IN OKLAHOMA (JOURNAL VERSION)  

EPA Science Inventory

Surface-soil and subsurface microfloras at the site of a shallow aquifer in Oklahoma were examined and compared with respect to (1) total and viable cell numbers, (2) colony and cell types that grew on various plating media, (3) cell morphologies seen in flotation films stripped ...

249

Borehole geophysical, fluid, and hydraulic properties within and near the freshwater/saline-water transition zone, San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, south-central Texas, 2010-11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The freshwater zone of the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer is used by residents of San Antonio and numerous other rapidly growing communities in south-central Texas as their primary water supply source. This freshwater zone is bounded to the south and southeast by a saline-water zone with an intermediate zone transitioning from freshwater to saline water (transition zone). As demands on this water supply increase, there is concern that the transition zone could potentially move, resulting in more saline water in current freshwater supply wells. Since 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey, San Antonio Water System, and other Federal and State agencies have conducted studies to better understand the transition zone.

Thomas, Jonathan V.; Stanton, Gregory P.

2013-01-01

250

Diurnal cycle of the Oklahoma City urban heat island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Between the dates of 28 June and 31 July 2003, the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field project was conducted in Oklahoma City and was the largest urban dispersion experiment ever in North America. Because the focus of JU2003 was on atmospheric processes within the urban environment, an extremely dense network of instrumentation was deployed in and around the central business district (CBD) both prior to and during the field experiment. Among the variables collected were high-resolution observations of air temperature from various instrument sources. Additional observations of air temperature were also collected at Oklahoma Mesonet stations in the rural areas surrounding Oklahoma City. Using an index value, the diurnal cycle of the urban heat island (UHI) for Oklahoma City, with respect to the surrounding rural terrain, was quantified. The results revealed a consistent mean nocturnal UHI greater than 1.5C at both 2 and 9 m. However, observations at 2 m during JU2003 revealed a significant urban "cool" island during the convective portion of the day. The mean variability of temperature within the urban core of Oklahoma City increased significantly after sunrise, increased to a maximum near solar noon, and decreased following sunset. These results were inconsistent with the rural observations wherein the variability among sites was maximized during the nocturnal period. Finally, the vertical temperature gradient between 2 and 9 m demonstrated a clear and strong diurnal trend at the rural locations, whereas observations from the urban environment were nearly isothermal and consistent with near-neutral conditions throughout JU2003.

Basara, Jeffrey B.; Hall, Peter K.; Schroeder, Amanda J.; Illston, Bradley G.; Nemunaitis, Kodi L.

2008-10-01

251

Geohydrology of alluvium and terrace deposits of the Cimarron River from freedom to Guthrie, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground water in 1,305 square miles of Quaternary alluvium and terrace deposits along the Cimarron River from Freedom to Guthrie, Oklahoma, is used for irrigation, municipal, stock, and domestic supplies. As much as 120 feet of clay, silt, sand, and gravel form an unconfined aquifer with an average saturated thickness of 28 feet. The 1985-86 water in storage, assuming a specific yield of 0.20, was 4.47 million acre-feet. The aquifer is bounded laterally and underlain by relatively impermeable Permian geologic units. Regional ground-water flow is generally southeast to southwest toward the Cimarron River, except where the flow direction is affected by perennial tributaries. Estimated average recharge to the aquifer is 207 cubic feet per second. Estimated average discharge from the aquifer by seepage and evapotranspiration is 173 cubic feet per second. Estimated 1985 discharge by withdrawals from wells was 24.43 cubic feet per second. Most water in the terrace deposits varied from a calcium bicarbonate to mixed bicarbonate type, with median dissolved-solids concentration of 538 milligrams per liter. Cimarron River water is a sodium chloride type with up to 16,600 milligrams per liter dissolved solids. A finite-difference ground-water flow model was developed and calibrated to test the conceptual model of the aquifer under steady-state conditions. The model was calibrated to match 1985-86 aquifer heads and discharge to the Cimarron River between Waynoka and Dover.

Adams, G. P.; Bergman, D. L.

1996-01-01

252

Water Budget Analysis of the Norman Landfill site, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The hydrology at the Norman Landfill site in Oklahoma is quite complex. This site involves a wetland that controls the groundwater-surface water interaction. This presentation reports a simulation study for better understanding of local water balance at the landfill site using MODFLOW-2000. Inputs to the model are based on local climate, soil, geology, vegetation and seasonal hydrological dynamics of the system to determine the groundwater-surface water interaction, water balance components in various hydrologic reservoirs, and the complexity and seasonality of local/regional hydrological processes. Our model involved a transient two- dimensional hydrogeological simulation of the multi-layered aquifer. The approach was found to be efficient in identifying the dominant hydrological processes at the site including evapotranspiration, recharge, and regional groundwater flow and groundwater-surface water interaction. Model results indicate that the water balance components reflect the episodic pattern of growing and non-growing seasons.

Farid-marandi, S.; Mohanty, B. P.

2011-12-01

253

Transmissivity estimation for highly heterogeneous aquifers: comparison of three methods applied to the Edwards Aquifer, Texas, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Obtaining reliable hydrological input parameters is a key challenge in groundwater modeling. Although many quantitative characterization techniques exist, experience applying these techniques to highly heterogeneous real-world aquifers is limited. Three geostatistical characterization techniques are applied to the Edwards Aquifer, a limestone aquifer in south-central Texas, USA, for the purposes of quantifying the performance in an 88,000-cell groundwater model. The first

Scott L. Painter; Allan D. Woodbury; Yefang Jiang

2007-01-01

254

Transmissivity estimation for highly heterogeneous aquifers: comparison of three methods applied to the Edwards Aquifer, Texas, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Obtaining reliable hydrological input parameters is a key challenge in groundwater modeling. Although many quantitative characterization\\u000a techniques exist, experience applying these techniques to highly heterogeneous real-world aquifers is limited. Three geostatistical\\u000a characterization techniques are applied to the Edwards Aquifer, a limestone aquifer in south-central Texas, USA, for the purposes\\u000a of quantifying the performance in an 88,000-cell groundwater model. The first

Scott L. Painter; Allan D. Woodbury; Yefang Jiang

2007-01-01

255

75 FR 32821 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00038  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disaster Declaration 12194 and 12195] Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00038 AGENCY...of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA--1917--DR), dated 05...disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma, dated 05/24/2010 is hereby...

2010-06-09

256

Granite Monument Plaza Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Granite Monument Plaza - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

257

75 FR 5015 - Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, OK  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...RM-11589] Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, OK AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission...the licensee of KWTV-DT, channel 9, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Griffin requests the substitution of channel...

2010-02-01

258

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...following elements submitted to EPA in Oklahoma's program application for final...Underground Storage Tank Program, Oklahoma Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, Room 238, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (1) State...

2009-07-01

259

Typical Raised Planter Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Typical Raised Planter - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

260

Site Plans (1936 and 2001) Oklahoma City Civic Center, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Site Plans (1936 and 2001) - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

261

Municipal Building Planting Plan Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Municipal Building Planting Plan - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

262

Site Plans (2008 As Built) Oklahoma City Civic Center, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Site Plans (2008 As Built) - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

263

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...following elements submitted to EPA in Oklahoma's program application for final...Underground Storage Tank Program, Oklahoma Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, Room 238, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (1) State...

2010-07-01

264

West Lawn Site and Planting Plans Oklahoma City Civic ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

West Lawn Site and Planting Plans - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

265

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...following elements submitted to EPA in Oklahoma's program application for final...Underground Storage Tank Program, Oklahoma Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, Room 238, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (1) State...

2012-07-01

266

Jimson weed abuse in an Oklahoma teen.  

PubMed

Jimson weed, a plant often abused by teenagers and young adults, grows wild throughout Oklahoma. It is best known for its hallucinogenic properties; however intoxication can lead to anticholinergic manifestations that are potentially dangerous. Over the past six years, sixty-three individuals in Oklahoma have been hospitalized for jimson weed intoxication, including this Oklahoma teen. Importance lies in proper identification, understanding, and management in persons presenting with jimson weed poisoning. PMID:20131730

Honey, Brooke L; Hagemann, Tracy M; Lobb, Kelley M; McGoodwin, Lee

2009-12-01

267

What Works in Oklahoma Schools: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment of Oklahoma Schools. Phase II State Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Phase II provides a more detailed examination of classroom variables important to achievement in Oklahoma schools. Where Phase I addressed all nine of the Oklahoma essential elements using survey data, Phase II focuses on what occurs in Oklahoma classrooms primarily using data from principal interviews, classroom observations (on-site), and video

Marzano Research Laboratory, 2010

2010-01-01

268

The Active Bacterial Community in a Pristine Confined Aquifer  

EPA Science Inventory

This study of the active bacteria residing in a pristine confined aquifer provides unexpected insights into the ecology of iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the subsurface. At 18 wells in east-central Illinois, we trapped the microbes that attached to aquifer sedimen...

269

Site Characterization For Injection Of Compressed Air Into An Aquifer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Compressed air energy storage (CAES) can level rates of electricity generation at central plants. Air compressed during low demand may be stored in deep water-bearing permeable rock formations (aquifers). During peak demand the compressed air is reheated and expanded through turbines. An aquifer reservoir uses a closed anticline with impervious caprock overlying a permeable sandstone or limestone. The confined reservoir

Robert Allen; John Trapp; Thomas Jensen

1981-01-01

270

TIME DOMAIN ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION SURVEY OF THE DEEP SANDSTONE AQUIFER IN THE LAKE WINNEBAGO WISCONSIN AREA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Cambrian and Ordovician sandstone aquifer of eastern Wisconsin is a major source of water for municipalities and industry in eastern Wisconsin. A portion of east- central Wisconsin is facing significant water supply problems in response to decades of over pumping the aquifer. Declining water levels and deteriorating water quality have created concerns over the long-term viability of the aquifer.

Ted L. Powell; Robert Taylor

271

Aquifers for energy storage  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Minnesota Geological Survey, according to its director M. Walton, is considering the Franconia\\/Ironton\\/Galesville aquifer, which lies approx. 210 m under the Minneapolis\\/St. Paul area, as a possible storage area for thermal energy. Such a storage system would involve two wells drilled into the aquifer. One well would be used to pump cold water out of the aquifer to a

Walton

1980-01-01

272

40 CFR 81.424 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oklahoma. 81.424 Section 81.424 Protection of Environment...Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.424 Oklahoma. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing...

2012-07-01

273

The Oklahoma Territorial Election System: 1890 - 1905  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oklahoma's first Territorial election, administered under the 1890 Organic Act, was typical of the early Nineteenth Century. By today's standards it was primitive. By, the end of the Territorial period in 1907, Oklahoma had a modern election system. The shape this election system took was a product of Territorial political struggles.

R. Darcy

2002-01-01

274

76 FR 59766 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00056  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Oklahoma County Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/30/2011 through 09/01/2011. Effective Date: 09/21/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-09-27

275

Recent (2008-10) water quality in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer and its contributing zone, central Texas, with emphasis on factors affecting nutrients and bacteria  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Barton Springs zone, which comprises the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer and the watersheds to the west that contribute to its recharge, is in south-central Texas, an area with rapid growth in population and increasing amounts of land area affected by development. During November 2008-March 2010, an investigation of factors affecting the fate and transport of nutrients and bacteria in the Barton Springs zone was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The primary objectives of the study were to characterize occurrence of nutrients and bacteria in the Barton Springs zone under a range of flow conditions; to improve understanding of the interaction between surface-water quality and groundwater quality; and to evaluate how factors such as streamflow variability and dilution affect the fate and transport of nutrients and bacteria in the Barton Springs zone. The USGS collected and analyzed water samples from five streams (Barton, Williamson, Slaughter, Bear, and Onion Creeks), two groundwater wells (Marbridge and Buda), and the main orifice of Barton Springs in Austin, Texas. During the period of the study, during which the hydrologic conditions transitioned from exceptional drought to wetter than normal, water samples were collected routinely (every 3 to 4 weeks) from the streams, wells, and spring and, in response to storms, from the streams and spring. All samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, the bacterium Escherichia coli, and suspended sediment. During the dry period, the geochemistry of groundwater at the two wells and at Barton Springs was dominated by flow from the aquifer matrix and was relatively similar and unchanging at the three sites. At the onset of the wet period, when the streams began to flow, the geochemistry of groundwater samples from the Marbridge well and Barton Springs changed rapidly, and concentrations of most major ions and nutrients and densities of Escherichia coli became more similar to those of samples from the streams relative to concentrations and densities during the dry period. Geochemical modeling indicated that the proportion of Barton Springs discharge composed of stream recharge increased from about 0-8 percent during the dry period to about 80 percent during the wet period. The transition from exceptional drought to wetter-than-normal conditions resulted in a number of marked changes that highlight factors affecting the fate and transport of nutrients and bacteria and the strong influence of stream recharge on water quality in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer and had a pronounced effect on the fate of nitrogen species. Organic nitrogen loaded to and stored in soils during the dry period was nitrified to nitrate when the soils were rewetted, resulting in elevated concentrations of nitrate plus nitrite in streams as these constituents were progressively leached during continued wet weather. Estimated mean monthly loads of organic nitrogen and nitrate plus nitrite in stream recharge and Barton Springs discharge, which were relatively low and constant during the dry period, increased during the wet period. Loads of organic nitrogen, on average, were about six times greater in stream recharge than in Barton Springs discharge, indicating that organic nitrogen likely was being converted to nitrate within the aquifer. Loads of total nitrogen (organic nitrogen plus ammonia and nitrate plus nitrite) in stream recharge (162 kilograms per day) and in Barton Springs discharge (157 kilograms per day) for the period of the investigation were not significantly different. Dilution was not an important factor affecting concentrations of nitrate plus nitrite in the streams or in Barton Springs during the period of this investigation: Concentrations of nitrate plus nitrite did not decrease in streams with increasing stream discharge, and nitrate plus nitrite concentrations measured at Barton

Mahler, Barbara J.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Sample, Thomas L.; Wong, Corinne I.

2011-01-01

276

Field trip guide to selected outcrops, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Arbuckle Mountains, named for Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle, are located in south-central Oklahoma. The formations that comprise the Arbuckle Mountains have been extensively studied for hydrocarbon source rock and reservoir rock characteristics that can be applied to the subsurface in the adjacent Anadarko and Ardmore basins. Numerous reports and guidebooks have been written concerning the Arbuckle Mountains. A few important general publications are provided in the list of selected references. The purpose of this handout is to provide general information on the geology of the Arbuckle Mountains and specific information on the four field trip stops, adapted from the literature. The four stops were at: (1) Sooner Rock and Sand Quarry; (2) Woodford Shale; (3) Hunton Anticline and Hunton Quarry; and (4) Tar Sands of Sulfur Area. As part of this report, two papers are included for more detail: Paleomagnetic dating of basinal fluid migration, base-metal mineralization, and hydrocarbon maturation in the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma and Laminated black shale-bedded chert cyclicity in the Woodford Formation, southern Oklahoma.

NONE

1991-11-17

277

Arkansas turbidite studies may aid Oklahoma Jackfork exploration  

SciTech Connect

During the past 2 years, more than a dozen successful Pennsylvanian Jackfork gas wells have been drilled in eastern Oklahoma, and the play seems ready for expansion if drilling and completion costs can be contained. To date, wells are thought to produce from fractures in highly quartz-cemented, brittle sandstones. However, there is potential for stratigraphic accumulations of gas. It is generally agreed that Jackfork Group rocks were deposited mainly as turbidites in the deepwater Ouachita basin. A recent suggestion that significant amounts of Jackfork Group rocks are discontinuous and less predictable sandy debris flows has received considerable critical review in the recent literature and at the 1996 American Association of Petroleum Geologists convention. A shallower water origin has also been suggested for some outcrops in eastern Oklahoma. With this in mind, the authors provide a summary of their observations, measurements, and interpretations of upper Jackfork outcrops in southwest-central Arkansas as a guide for interpreting the subsurface Jackfork in eastern Oklahoma.

Slatt, R.M.; Al-Siyabi, H.; Williams, E.T. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Stone, C.G. [Arkansas Geological Commission, Little Rock, AR (United States); Weimer, P. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Davis, R.J. [Schlumberger Wireline and Testing, Jakarta (Indonesia); Jordan, D.W. [ARCO Venezuela Inc., Caracas (Venezuela)

1997-08-18

278

Aquatic Vegetation Restoration in Arcadia Lake, Oklahoma: A Case Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Arcadia Lake is located within the metropolitan area of Oklahoma City and Edmund, in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, about 2.4 km (1.5 miles) southwest of Arcadia, Oklahoma (Figure 1). Construction of the earth-filled dam was authorized by the Flood Control Ac...

G. O. Dick R. M. Smart E. R. Gilliland

2004-01-01

279

The Relationship between Fish Assemblages and Environmental Gradients in an Oklahoma Prairie Stream  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined fish community structure and habitat correlates at 10 stations on Lagoon Creek, a fifth-order tributary of the Cimarron River in east-central Oklahoma, during spring, summer, and fall 1995. Lagoon Creek is contained within the Sandstone Hills physiographic region, a transition zone between the Redbeds Plains and the Ozark Plateau. We collected 33 species, several of which are upland

Lance R. Williams; Conrad S. Toepfer; A. David. Martinez

1996-01-01

280

Monthly Runoff Predictions Based on Rainfall Forecasts in a Small Watershed in Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

It remains an open question whether seasonal probabilistic forecasts of precipitation can be translated into useful streamflow forecasts. The utility of streamflow forecasts was examined for a small watershed in central Oklahoma. Streamflow response to precipitation forecasts was simulated using t...

281

Horizontal structure of the electric field in the stratiform region of an Oklahoma mesoscale convective system  

Microsoft Academic Search

This analysis combines vertical electric field components Ez observed by two research aircraft flying horizontally at two levels, with vertical soundings of thermodynamic parameters and Ez made by five balloons, to produce a quasi-three-dimensional view of the space charge distribution in the trailing stratiform cloud region behind a mesoscale convective system (MCS) that developed in central Oklahoma late in the

Qixu Mo; Andrew G. Detwiler; John Hallett; Robert Black

2003-01-01

282

Percentage of Probability of Nonpoint-Source Nitrate Contamination of Recently Recharged Ground Water in the High Plains Aquifer  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This raster data set represents the percentage of probability of nonpoint-source nitrate contamination (greater than the proposed background concentration of 4 milligrams per liter (mg/L) as N) of recently (defined as less than 50 years) recharged ground water in the High Plains aquifer of the United States. The High Plains aquifer covers approximately 175,000 square miles in eight States; Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. Elevated nitrate concentrations above the background concentration have been detected in recently recharged (less than 50 years) ground water in the High Plains aquifer. This data set is derived from empirical models developed using multivariate logistic regression to evaluate the vulnerability of the High Plains aquifer to nitrate contamination from nonpoint sources. This data set was generated in a geographic information system from these models and represents the spatial extent of vulnerability of nitrate contamination greater than 4 mg/L across the aquifer.

Qi, Sharon L.; Gurdak, Jason J.

2006-01-01

283

Current (2004-07) Conditions and Changes in Ground-Water Levels from Predevelopment to 2007, Southern High Plains Aquifer, East-Central New Mexico-Curry County, Portales, and Causey Lingo Underground Water Basins  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Southern High Plains aquifer is the principal aquifer in Curry and Roosevelt Counties, N. Mex., and primary source of water in southeastern New Mexico. Successful water-supply planning for New Mexico's Southern High Plains requires knowledge of the current aquifer conditions and a context to estimate future trends given current aquifer-management policy. This report provides a summary of the current (2007) water-level status of the Southern High Plains aquifer in New Mexico, including a basis for estimating future trends by comparison with historical conditions. This report includes estimates of the extent of ground-water level declines in the Curry County, Portales, and Causey-Lingo Ground-water Management Area parts of the High Plains Aquifer in eastern New Mexico since predevelopment. Maps representing 2007 water levels, water-level declines, aquifer saturated thickness, and depth to water accompanied by hydrographs from representative wells for the Southern High Plains aquifer in the Curry County, Portales, and Causey Lingo Underground Water Basins were prepared in cooperation with the New Mexico Office of the State Engineer. The results of this mapping show the water level declined as much as 175 feet in the study area at rates as high as 1.76 feet per year.

Tillery, Anne

2008-01-01

284

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Clinton Quadrangle, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Uranium resources of the Clinton Quadrangle, west-central Oklahoma, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using available surface and subsurface geologic information. Uranium occurrences reported in previously published literature were located, sampled, and described in detail. Areas of anomalous radioactivity, which were interpreted from aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance surveys, were also investigated. Five areas of uranium favorability were delineated within the quadrangle. Delineation was based on both surface and subsurface data. Two of these areas include coastal-plain facies of the Upper Permian Doxey Shale. Two other areas include the marginal basin facies of the Cloud Chief and Rush Springs Formations (Late Permian). The fifth area, in the southern part of the quadrangle, is characterized by arkosic alluvial-fan and fluvial facies of Late Pennsylvanian and Early Permian age. Geologic units considered to be unfavorable include all pre-Upper Pennsylvanian rocks, most Permian rocks, the Pliocene Ogallala Formation, Pleistocene sediments, and parts of the Upper Pennsylvanian-Lower Permian rocks.

Bloch, S.; Johnson, K.S.; Eutsler, R.L.; Myers, J.J.

1982-09-01

285

Monitoring temperature conditions in recently drilled nonproductive industry boreholes in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Temperature conditions were monitored in seven industry petroleum-test wells (called holes-of-opportunity in this report) that were drilled in central and eastern Oklahoma. Five of these wells provided useful temperature information, and two wells were used to determine the length of time needed for the borehole-fluid temperature to achieve thermal equilibrium with the formation rocks. Four wells were used to verify the validity of a geothermal-gradient map of Oklahoma. Temperature surveys in two wells indicated a gradient lower than the predicted gradients on the geothermal-gradient map. When deep temperature data, between 5000 and 13,000 feet, are adjusted for mud-circulation effects, the adjusted gradients approximate the gradients on the geothermal-gradient map. The temperature-confirmation program appears to substantiate the geographic distribution of the high- and low-thermal-gradient regimes in Oklahoma. 13 refs., 18 figs., 7 tabs.

Harrison, W.E.; Luza, K.V.

1985-06-01

286

Continued support of the The Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma''  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research program is to continue developing, editing, maintaining, utilizing and making publicly available the Oil and Gas Well History file portion of the Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma. This grant funds that ongoing development work as a continuation of earlier grant numbers DE-FG19-88BC14233 and DE-FG22-89BC14483. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, working with Geological Information Systems at the University of Oklahoma Sarkeys Energy Center, has undertaken to construct this information system in response to the need for a computerized, centrally located library containing accurate, detailed information on the state's natural resources. Particular emphasis during this phase of NRIS development is being placed on computerizing information related to the energy needs of the nation, specifically oil and gas.

Mankin, C.J. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)); Rizzuti, T.P. (Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States))

1992-01-01

287

Tracers detect aquifer contamination  

SciTech Connect

The EPA`s National Laboratory (NRMRL) at Ada, OK, along with the University of Florida and the University of Texas, have developed a tracer procedure to detect the amount of contamination in aquifer formations. The tracer procedure has been successfully applied in a highly controlled field experiment in a contaminated cobbly, sandy gravel aquifer at Hill Air Force Base in Layton, UT. The tracer procedure should substantially improve the ability to remediate aquifers and is an improvement over the traditional reliance upon water samples from monitoring wells and core samples.

Enfield, C.

1995-07-01

288

The Oklahoma bombing. Lessons learned.  

PubMed

The Oklahoma City bombing experience in April of 1995 provided a unique opportunity to test the effectiveness of an existing disaster plan. The critical care nurses at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital learned valuable lessons about managing intense activity, equipment and supplies, staffing resources, and visitor issues. The degree to which the bombing affected the emotional state of personnel was unanticipated, and leaders learned that critical stress management interventions should be included in every emergency preparedness plan. Additionally, recommendations include using runners for communication; assigning specific roles (supplies, staffing, triage); keeping additional staff in reserve for shift relief; ensuring ample hospital staff members are available to coordinate visitors and media; and setting up record systems to preserve continuity. The unique lessons learned as a result of this terrorist attack can be used by other critical care nurses to understand and refine disaster plans. PMID:9214891

Anteau, C M; Williams, L A

1997-06-01

289

PDC bits find applications in Oklahoma drilling  

SciTech Connect

Drilling in Oklahoma is difficult by any standards. Polycrystalline diamond cutter (PDC) bits, with proven success drilling soft, homogenous formations common in the North Sea and U.S. Gulf Coast regions, have found some significant ''spot'' applications in Oklahoma. Applications qualified by bit design and application development over the past two (2) years include slim hole drilling in the deep Anadarko Basin, deviation control in Southern Oklahoma, drilling on mud motors, drilling in oil base mud, drilling cement, sidetracking, coring and some rotary drilling in larger hole sizes. PDC bits are formation sensitive, and care must be taken in selecting where to run them in Oklahoma. Most of the successful runs have been in water base mud drilling hard shales and soft, unconsolidated sands and lime, although bit life is often extended in oil-base muds.

Offenbacher, L.A.; McDermaid, J.D.; Patterson, C.R.

1983-02-01

290

75 FR 45679 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00043  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1926-DR), dated 07/26/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident...

2010-08-03

291

Standards for Accreditation of Oklahoma Schools, 2002.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oklahoma schools have the responsibility of meeting the educational needs of all students, providing equitable educational opportunities, and fostering lifelong learning as they prepare to participate in a democratic society. In order to establish priorit...

S. Garrett

2002-01-01

292

76 FR 77578 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00057  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 12/07/2011. Incident: Earthquakes. Incident Period: 11/05/2011 and continuing. Effective Date: 12/07/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-12-13

293

77 FR 61651 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00067  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of OKLAHOMA dated 10/01/2012. Incident: Multiple Wildfires. Incident Period: 07/30/2012 Through 08/12/2012. Effective Date: 10/01/2012. Physical Loan...

2012-10-10

294

76 FR 31670 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00048  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1970-DR), dated 05/06/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Straight-line Winds. Incident Period: 04/14/2011. Effective Date: 05/06/2011. Physical Loan...

2011-06-01

295

75 FR 30871 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00038  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1917-DR), dated 05/24/2010. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, and straight-line winds. Incident Period: 05/10/2010 through 05/13/2010. Effective Date:...

2010-06-02

296

75 FR 35103 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00040  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1917-DR), dated 06/11/2010. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, and straight-line winds. Incident Period: 05/10/2010 through 05/13/2010. Effective Date:...

2010-06-21

297

78 FR 23622 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00070  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 4109-DR), dated 04/08/2013. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and Snowstorm. Incident Period: 02/24/2013 through 02/26/2013. Effective Date: 04/08/2013....

2013-04-19

298

76 FR 30224 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00047  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-- 1985--DR), dated 05/13/2011. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and Snowstorm. Incident Period: 01/31/2011 through 02/05/2011. Effective Date: 05/13/2011....

2011-05-24

299

75 FR 10330 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00034  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1876-DR), dated 02/25/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm. Incident Period: 12/24/2009 through 12/25/2009. DATES: Effective Date: 02/25/2010. Physical...

2010-03-05

300

75 FR 11949 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00035  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1883-DR), dated 03/05/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm. Incident Period: 01/28/2010 through 01/30/2010. Effective Date: 03/05/2010. Physical Loan...

2010-03-12

301

76 FR 38263 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00052  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Notices] [Pages 38263-38264] [FR Doc No: 2011-16242...Disaster Declaration 12647 and 12648] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00052 AGENCY: U...Administrator for Disaster Assistance. [FR Doc. 2011-16242 Filed...

2011-06-29

302

Archeological Testing in Atoka County, Southeastern Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Proposed Impoundment 20 of the Lower Clear Boggy Creek Watershed Project is a single purpose floodwater retarding structure on Birch Creek in Atoka County, Oklahoma. Three archeological sites in the direct impact zone of the maximum flood pool were tested...

D. T. Hughes

1977-01-01

303

78 FR 42147 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00073  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Atoka, Canadian, Cleveland, Coal, Hughes, Latimer...McClain, Nowata, Okfuskee, Oklahoma, Okmulgee, Pittsburg, Pottawatomie, Pushmataha, Seminole. The Interest Rates...

2013-07-15

304

CRITICAL WATER RELATED CURRICULUM NEEDS AS PERCEIVED BY AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE TEACHERS IN PROGRAMS LOCATED WITHIN THE BOUNDARIES OF THE OGALLALA AQUIFER  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is part of a larger project pertaining to water related curriculum in agricultural science programs located in areas that are dependent upon the Ogallala Aquifer. Portions of South Dakota, Nebraska, Wyoming, Kansas, Colorado, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Texas were included in the study. This study sought to determine critical needs in curriculum and professional development related to teaching

Danielle Cox; David E. Lawver; Matt Baker; David Doerfert

2004-01-01

305

Aquifer-characteristics data for West Virginia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Specific-capacity, storage-coefficient, and specific-yield data for wells in West Virginia were compiled to provide a data set from which transmissivity could be estimated. This data can be used for analytical and mathematical groundwater flow modeling. Analysis of available storage-coefficient and (or) specific-yield data indicates the Ohio River alluvial aquifer has a median specific yield of 0.20, which is characteristic of an unconfined aquifer. The Kanawha River alluvial aquifer has a median specific yield of 0.003, which is characteristic of a semi-confined aquifer. The median storage coefficient of fractured-bedrock aquifers is only 0.007, which is characteristic of confined aquifers. The highest median transmissivity of a specific aquifer in West Virginia occurs in Ohio River alluvium (4,800 ft2/d); the second highest occurs in Kanawha River alluvium (1,600 ft2/d). The lowest median transmissivity (23 ft2/d) is for the McKenzie-Rose Hill-Tuscarora aquifer. Rocks of Cambrian age within the Waynesboro-Tomstown-Harpers-Weverton-Loudon aquifer had a low median transmissivity of only 67 ft2/d. Other aquifers with low transmissivities include the Hampshire Formation, Brallier-Harrell Formations, Mahantango Formations, Oriskany Sandstone, and the Conococheague Formation with median transmissivities of 74, 72, 92, 82, and 92 ft2/d, respectively. All other aquifers within the State had intermediate values of transmissivity (130-920 ft2/d). The highest median transmissivities among bedrock aquifers were those for aquifers within the Pennsylvanian age Pocahontas Formation (1,200 ft2/d) and Pottsville Group (1,300 ft2/d), and the Mississippian age Mauch Chunk Group (1,300 ft2/d). These rocks crop out primarily in the southern part of the State and to a lesser extent within the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province in West Virginia's Eastern Panhandle. The highest mean annual ground-water recharge rates within West Virginia (24.6 in.) occur within a band that extends through the central part of the State within the eastern part of the Kanawha River Basin. This area of relatively high relief has peaks higher than 4,000 ft and precipitation greater than 50 in./yr. The band of high recharge rates extends northward towards Pennsylvania and includes the Monongahela River Basin, which has a mean annual recharge of 21.4 inches. To the west of this central band lies a region of lower relief with much lower mean annual precipitation rates. Mean annual recharge for the Tug Fork, Twelvepole Creek, and Guyandotte River Basins is only 12.6 inches. For the western part of the Kanawha River Basin, mean recharge is 11.9 inches. The lowest mean annual recharge rates (8.4 in.) within the State occur in the Little Kanawha River Basin and the tributary streams in the region that discharge directly to the Ohio River. West Virginia's Eastern Panhandle is an area characterized by long linear northeast to southwest trending ridges and valleys. The mean annual ground-water recharge rate for this region, which is drained almost entirely by the Potomac River and its tributaries, is 9.4 inches. This area, which is located within a rain shadow resulting from orographic lifting in the higher altitude area to the west, receives less precipitation (approximately 30 in.) than the region to the west.

Kozar, Mark D.; Mathes, Melvin V.

2001-01-01

306

Epidemiology of homicide-suicide events: Oklahoma, 1994-2001.  

PubMed

In Oklahoma, all nonnatural deaths must be reported to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (ME), whose trained investigators report cause of death using a centralized, statewide, standardized reporting system. The purpose of this study was to determine temporal trends of Oklahoma homicide-suicide events and characterize the epidemiology of these events. By reviewing all ME reports of homicides and suicides from 1994 through 2001, we identified 73 homicide-suicide events resulting in 73 suicides and 89 homicides. Suicidal perpetrators of homicide-suicide events were most often white men aged >or=30 years who killed a current or ex-spouse or intimate partner. Homicide victims tended to be younger women the same race as their killer. Firearms were the predominant method of death in both homicides and suicides, with handguns used most frequently. Divorce/estrangement was the main contributing factor to these events, and the most common relationship type was possessive. The existence of a statewide, centralized, and computerized ME system and the ability to access the detailed information in the ME narratives were critical to identifying homicide-suicide events and obtaining the type of detailed information necessary to fully investigate these events. PMID:16121077

Comstock, R Dawn; Mallonee, Sue; Kruger, Elizabeth; Rayno, Kim; Vance, April; Jordan, Fred

2005-09-01

307

Implementation of a 3-D groundwater flow model in a semi-arid region using MODFLOW and GIS tools: The Zramdine-Bni Hassen Miocene aquifer system (east-central Tunisia)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, an integrated methodology was developed to investigate hydrological processes in Zramdine-Bni Hassen Miocene aquifer and to validate the groundwater proprieties deduced from the geological, geophysical, hydrodynamic and hydrochemical studies done in the region, using the coupling of groundwater flow model MODFLOW 2000 code with Geographic Information System tools. A 3-D groundwater flow model was developed for this aquifer using a large amount of available geological and hydrological data.The groundwater flow model was calibrated and validated with datasets during the 1980-2007 period. The results show that the ZBH aquifer exhibits the highest sensibility to changes of water infiltration and hydraulic conductivity. The model simulation shows a good degree of understand to the aquifer hydrogeology. The model can be regarded as a useful tool for analyzing the hydrological processes for complex groundwater that have similar geological and hydrogeological conditions and will help to propose a management rescue plan for the studied aquifer, especially for aquifer characterization in arid and semi arid regions.

Lachaal, Fethi; Mlayah, Ammar; Bdir, Mourad; Tarhouni, Jamila; Leduc, Christian

2012-11-01

308

Rare Earth Element Concentrations, Speciation, and Fractionation along Groundwater Flow Paths: The Carrizo Sand (Texas) and Upper Floridan Aquifers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Groundwater samples were collected in two different types of aquifers (i.e., Carrizo sand aquifer, Texas and Upper Floridan\\u000a carbonate aquifer, west-central Florida) to study the concentration, speciation, and fractionation of rare earth elements\\u000a (REE) along the groundwater flow path in each system. Major solutes and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were also measured\\u000a in these groundwaters. In the Carrizo aquifer, groundwaters

Jianwu Tang; Karen H. Johannesson

309

Sulfate and chloride concentrations in Texas aquifers.  

PubMed

Median sulfate and chloride concentrations in groundwater were calculated for 244 Texas counties from measurements at 8236 water wells. The data were mapped and analyzed with a geographic information system (GIS). Concentration clusters for both solutes were highest in north-central, west, and south Texas. Thirty-four counties had median sulfate levels above the secondary standard of 250 mg/L, and 31 counties registered median chloride concentrations above 250 mg/L. County median concentrations ranged from < 1.5 to 1,953 mg/L for sulfate, and from 6 to 1,275 mg/L for chloride. Various factors contribute to high sulfate and chloride levels in Texas aquifers, including mineral constitutents of aquifers, seepage of saline water from nearby formations, coastal saltwater intrusion, irrigation return flow, and oil/gas production. Ten counties in central and northeast Texas lack data and warrant additional monitoring. PMID:11345739

Hudak, P F

2000-08-01

310

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...responsibility for enforcing its underground storage tank program...may be obtained from the Underground Storage Tank Program, Oklahoma...Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, Room 238, Oklahoma City...reference as part of the underground storage tank program...

2013-07-01

311

The Nubian Aquifer in Southwest Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, and topographic and groundwater data are used to understand heterogeneities of the\\u000a Nubian Aquifer between 2024.5N and 2532E in southwest Egypt. New fluvial and structural interpretations emphasize that\\u000a the desert landscape was produced by fluvial action, including newly mapped alluvial fans. In central locations, braided channels\\u000a are spatially aligned with a NE structural trend, suggesting

C. A. Robinson; A. Werwer; F. El-Baz; M. El-Shazly; T. Fritch; T. Kusky

2007-01-01

312

Regional impacts of coal mining in eastern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study identifies the impacts of an expansion in Oklahoma coal mining, specifically in promoting economic growth in a rural and economically depressed region. Also, the study examined factors preventing Oklahoma coal-fired electric power plants from using Oklahoma coal and conditions that may induce them to use Oklahoma coal. The economic impacts of three coal production scenarios (5.0, 6.25, and

Martinez-Salazar

1985-01-01

313

76 FR 42723 - Land Acquisitions; Osage Nation of Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Affairs Land Acquisitions; Osage Nation of Oklahoma AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior...into trust for the Osage Nation of Oklahoma on July 8, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...land into trust for the Osage Nation of Oklahoma under the authority of the Indian...

2011-07-19

314

76 FR 9040 - Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-3316-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations...declaration of an emergency for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-3316-EM), dated February...emergency conditions in the State of Oklahoma resulting from a severe winter...

2011-02-16

315

Muriel Wright: Telling the Story of Oklahoma Indian Nations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Wright family, descended from the patriarch Allen Wright, who arrived in the new Choctaw Nation after surviving the "Trail of Tears," played an important role in Oklahoma politics and society. Following removal to Oklahoma, Allen went on to become Principal Chief of the Choctaw Nation and gave the name, Oklahoma, to the southwest territory.

Cesar, Dana; Smith, Joan K.; Noley, Grayson

2004-01-01

316

Social and Economic Consequences of Indian Gaming in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The balancing framework of Indian gaming as it operates in Oklahoma constrains Oklahoma Indian nations from operating facilities according to the dictates of the marketplace on a large-scale Class III basis. Indian gaming actually brings substantial net economic benefits to the state, contrary to claims that Oklahoma Indian gaming benefits come

Grant, Kenneth W., II; Spilde, Katherine A.; Taylor, Jonathan B.

2004-01-01

317

76 FR 42723 - Land Acquisitions; Osage Nation of Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Acquisitions; Osage Nation of Oklahoma AGENCY: Bureau of Indian...known as ``OMDE Ponca City,'' into trust for the Osage Nation of Oklahoma on July 8, 2011. FOR FURTHER...trust for the Osage Nation of Oklahoma under the authority of...

2011-07-19

318

East Lawn Site and Planting Plan with Section Oklahoma ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

East Lawn Site and Planting Plan with Section - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

319

Total Lightning Characteristics in Mesoscale Convective Systems in Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The distribution of total and cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning was surveyed in relation to GOES infrared satellite imagery and base-scan radar reflectivity data for 30 mesoscale convective systems occurring in central Oklahoma. Lightning flash data were obtained from the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array and the United States National Lightning Detection Network. Flash activity was compared with trends in the growth of the satellite-inferred cloud shield and the evolution of radar reflectivity. CG flashes accounted for 21% of all flashes studied. Of those flashes, 13% were positive polarity flashes. Most flashes were concentrated in or near regions of high radar reflectivity in agreement with past work. The distribution of total flashes generally was similar to that of ground flashes, except that the ground flash percentage increased during decay. Significant increases in flash rate were associated with an increasing -52C cloud shield area. Flash activity peaked approximately 90 minutes prior to the maximum extent of the -52C cloud shield. Trends in flash activity agreed better with trends in cloud shield evolution for colder cloud top temperatures, such as -66C. Acknowledgements: This project was supported by NASA EPSCoR grant #NNX07AV48A.

Makowski, J. A.; Macgorman, D. R.

2010-12-01

320

Conodont biostratigraphy of lower Ordovician rocks, Arbuckle Group, southern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Arbuckle Group of southern Oklahoma displays the only complete exposure of the shallow-water carbonates that characterize the Lower Ordovician of interior North America. Trilobites have been described from some parts of this sequence and sporadic occurrences of other invertebrates are known, but much of the sequence is sparingly fossiliferous. As a consequence, these magnificent exposures have not contributed notably to continuing efforts toward development of a comprehensive biostratigraphic scheme for the Lower Ordovician of the North American platform. Samples collected at 25-ft intervals through the Arbuckle Group along and adjacent to Interstate Highway 35 on the south flank of the Arbuckle anticline near Ardmore, Oklahoma, produced conodonts in abundances ranging from a few tens to over a thousand elements per kilogram and displaying good to excellent preservation with low CAI. These conodonts document a biostratigraphic continuum that provides a standard for correlation of Lower Ordovician rocks in the subsurface of central US and of the many localized and incomplete outcrops of generally equivalent strata in the Ozark and Upper Mississippi Valley regions. The stratigraphic continuity of the collections makes the I-35 section an ideal standard reference section for graphic correlation of Lower Ordovician rocks containing conodonts of the Mid-Continent Province.

Dresbach, R.I.; Ethington, R.L. (Univ. of Missouri, Columbia (USA))

1989-08-01

321

Aquifer stability investigations  

SciTech Connect

The study of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in porous rock reservoirs is carried out within the Reservoir Stability Studies Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of the study is to establish criteria for long-term stability of aquifer CAES reservoirs. These criteria are intended to be guidelines and check lists that utilities and architect-engineering firms may use to evaluate reservoir stability at candidate CAES sites. These criteria will be quantitative where possible, qualitative where necessary, and will provide a focal point for CAES relevant geotechnical knowledge, whether developed within this study or available from petroleum, mining or other geotechnical practices using rock materials. The Reservoir Stability Studies Program had four major activities: a state-of-the-art survey to establish preliminary stability criteria and identify areas requiring research and development; numerical modeling; laboratory testing to provide data for use in numerical models and to investigate fundamental rock mechanics, thermal, fluid, and geochemical response of aquifer materials; and field studies to verify the feasibility of air injection and recovery under CAES conditions in an aquifer, to validate and refine the stability criteria, and to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of the numerical and experimental methodologies developed in previous work. Three phases of study, including preliminary criteria formulation, numerical model development, and experimental assessment of CAES reservoir materials have been completed. Present activity consists of construction and operation of the aquifer field test, and associated numerical and experimental work in support of that activity. Work is presently planned to be complete by 1983 at the end of the field test. At that time the final stability criteria for aquifers will be issued. Attached here also are preliminary criteria for aquifers.

Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.

1981-09-01

322

Minerals yearbook, 1992: Oklahoma. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The value of Oklahoma nonfuel mineral production was nearly $252.6 million in 1992, a decrease of $22.9 million from that reported to the U.S. Bureau of Mines by State mineral producers in 1991. The value of the top three commodities produced, crushed stone, portland cement, and construction sand and gravel, exceeded $168.8 million and comprised almost 67% of the State's total nonfuel mineral value. Although rebounding from the recessionary period, the growth curve for several minerals produced in the State was minimal, and for several others it moved downward. Oklahoma ranked 35th nationally in total nonfuel mineral value. The State ranked 26th nationally in the production of industrial minerals, contributing about 1.38% of the $20.7 billion revenues received. Oklahoma ranked first in the Nation in crude gypsum production, second in the production of tripoli, and was the only domestic source of iodine.

Zelten, J.E.; Arndt, R.H.

1994-03-01

323

Estimating transmissivity in the Edwards Aquifer using upscaling, geostatistics, and Bayesian updating  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Edwards Aquifer, a highly heterogeneous karst aquifer located in south central Texas, is the sole source of drinking water for more than one million people. Hydraulic conductivity (K) measurements in the Edwards Aquifer are sparse, highly variable (log-K variance of 6.4), and are mostly from single-well drawdown tests that are appropriate for the spatial scale of a few meters.

S. L. Painter; Y. Jiang; A. D. Woodbury

2002-01-01

324

A Legal Analysis of Litigation against Oklahoma Educators and School Districts under the Oklahoma Governmental Tort Claims Act  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This dissertation analyzed public court decisions in cases against Oklahoma school districts and their employees involving sovereign immunity claims filed under Oklahoma's Governmental Tort Claims Act. The questions addressed were: (1) How have the Oklahoma courts interpreted the Governmental Tort Claims Act, (Okla. Stat. tit. 51 Section 151 et

Lacefield, Kevin Lee

2010-01-01

325

Comparison of ground?based 3?dimensional lightning mapping observations with satellite?based LIS observations in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

dimensional lightning mapping observations obtained in central Oklahoma by the New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) have been compared with optical observations of the discharges from space obtained by NASA's Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS). Excellent spa- tial and temporal correlations were obtained between the two sets of observations. All lightning discharges seen by LISwere mappedby theLMA. Most of thedetectedoptical

Ronald J. Thomas; Paul R. Krehbiel; William Rison; Timothy Hamlin; Dennis J. Boccippio; Steven J. Goodman; Hugh J. Christian

2000-01-01

326

Inquiry and Aquifers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents inquiry-oriented activities that acquaint students with groundwater sources, movement of water through aquifers, and contamination of groundwater by pollution. In one activity, students use well log data from web-based resources to explore groundwater systems. Provides sample well log data for those not having access to local information.

Leuenberger, Ted; Shepardson, Daniel; Harbor, Jon; Bell, Cheryl; Meyer, Jason; Klagges, Hope; Burgess, Willie

2001-01-01

327

Ogallala Aquifer Mapping Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A computerized data file has been established which can be used efficiently by the contour-plotting program SURFACE II to produce maps of the Ogallala aquifer in 17 counties of the Texas Panhandle. The data collected have been evaluated and compiled into ...

1984-01-01

328

Health Manpower in Oklahoma. Chiropractic: A Statistical Investigation of Practice Patterns and Service Characteristics in Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The characteristics of the chirpractic physician (D.C.) in Oklahoma are described statistically. A questionnaire was mailed to all 262 active, full-time chiropractic physicians; 163 (62 percent) returned the questionnaires. The questionnaire contained que...

W. W. Edmundson

1976-01-01

329

Market Feasibility Study of the Northeast, Park Plaza and Park Estates Shopping Centers, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report documents research findings related to three shoppings centers in northeast Oklahoma City. The three shopping centers targeted were Northeast Shopping Center, Park Plaza and Park Estates. An analysis of these centers has been divided into sever...

1978-01-01

330

Report for Consultation on the Metropolitan Oklahoma City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Oklahoma).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report is intended to provide the basic background information to provide a basis for the adoption of regional air quality standards and the implementation of those standards. It proposes boundaries for the Oklahoma City Intrastate Air Quality Control...

1970-01-01

331

Seasonal distribution of pathogenic free-living amebae in Oklahoma waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pathogenic free-living amebae cause serious human disease, including infection of the eye and the central nervous system. The purpose of this study was to sample aquatic environments in the Tulsa, Oklahoma, area year-round for the presence of these disease-causing amebae. A total of 34 pathogenic isolates were obtained from 2,016 processed water and swab samples. Pathogenicity was determined by the

David T. John; Marsha J. Howard

1995-01-01

332

Seismogram offers insight into Oklahoma City bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, generated seismic waves that were recorded on two permanent seismographs about 7 and 26 km away from the bombing. The seismogram recorded at 26 km shows two low-frequency wave trains, discrete sets of oscillatory signals, that begin about 10 s apart. Public release

Thomas L. Holzer; Joe B. Fletcher; Gary S. Fuis; Trond Ryberg; Thomas M. Brocher; Christopher M. Dietel

1996-01-01

333

Oklahoma city: The storying of a disaster  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bombing in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995 was a massive assault on the meaning?making of survivors and community members. Utilizing a social constructionist perspective, this article explores the evolution of the community's social narrative as it shifted in the immediate wake of the blast to a new framework for understanding the event three months later. It is speculated

James E. Levine

1996-01-01

334

Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators Journal 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators 2009 Journal includes the following four peer reviewed articles: (1) The Changing Role of Grandparents (Fred D. Hammond, III, Terry E. Spigner, Charolette Myles-Nixon, and Pauline Holloway); (2) Pedagogical Agent Instructional Design Challenges (Jon Martens); (3) Differences in Relatedness across

Green, Malinda Hendricks, Ed.

2009-01-01

335

Oklahoma Handbook: Child Nutrition Programs. Revised Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nutrition concepts, school food service guidelines, and related materials (such as nutrition charts, menu planning worksheets, and student survey forms) are provided in this nutrition handbook. Prepared by the Oklahoma State Department of Education's School Lunch Section, the handbook consists of nine sections that are organized in outline format.

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

336

Confirmation of Aedes taeniorhynchus in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

A single female collected in 1971 confirms the presence of Aedes taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) in Oklahoma. This species was also collected from inland localities in Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas. During the 1971 Venezuelan equine encephalitis epizootic in Texas a U. S. Army sponsored surveillance program resulted in the collection, identification and processing of 501,992 mosquitoes comprising 51 species from Arkansas, Louisiana,

Bruce A. Harrison; John F. Reinertl; Edward S. Saugstad; Joseph E. Farlow

337

Migrant Education Handbook, 1975 [State of Oklahoma].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The national goal of migrant education is "to establish programs and projects which are designed to meet the special educational needs of migratory children of migratory agricultural workers or migratory fishermen and to coordinate these programs and projects with similar programs in other states". In Oklahoma, the major objectives for migrant

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

338

JOM Rip-Off in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A report by the Department of the Interior on the misuse of Johnson-O'Malley funds in Oklahoma is reprinted in its entirety. The questionable costs total over $400 thousand, and the report recommends that the Bureau of Indian Affairs seek compensation and adjustment for the misspent funds. (KM)

Education Journal of the Institute for the Development of Indian Law, 1973

1973-01-01

339

Field Evaluation of Drainable Bases in Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) Research and Development Division (R&D) installed field data acquisition systems in 1992 on five test pavement sections with a view to evaluate the performance of the drainable base and edge drain systems i...

M. Rahman M. Zaman T. Curtis

1996-01-01

340

ASPECTS OF COWBIRD PARASITISM IN SOUTHERN OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

SPECTS of the parasitic breedin, u habits of the Brown-headed Cowbird (IMoZothrus ater) have been documented extensively by Friedmann (1929)) Laskey (1950)) Berger (1951)) Norris (1947), and others. It was the purpose of this study to investigate some of the major aspects of such parasitism in the breeding avifauna of southern Oklahoma. Particular em- phasis was placed on observation of

JOHN A. WIENS

341

77 FR 53247 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00063  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4078-DR), dated 08/22/2012. Incident: Freedom Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 through 08/14/2012. Effective Date: 08/22/2012. Physical Loan Application...

2012-08-31

342

77 FR 61652 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00066  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of OKLAHOMA dated 10/01/2012. Incident: Luther Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 Through 08/10/2012. Effective Date: 10/01/2012. Physical Loan Application...

2012-10-10

343

76 FR 60959 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00055  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Pawnee County Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/07/2011 through 08/14/2011. Effective Date: 09/21/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-09-30

344

75 FR 42173 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00041  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 07/13/2010. Incident: Tornadoes, Severe Storms, Straight Line Winds and Flooding. Incident Period: 06/13/2010 through 06/15/2010. DATES:...

2010-07-20

345

Iranians in Oklahoma: Learning the Hard Way.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The general frustration among Iranian students at Southwestern College and other colleges in Oklahoma City were revealed last February in an angry confrontation at the College. Political tensions, racial prejudice of Americans, language barriers, and problems of cultural adjustment are some causes of their frustration. (JMD)

Honey, Charles

1978-01-01

346

Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for

Mary N. Hill Kutz

1998-01-01

347

State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

2009-01-01

348

State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Oklahoma. The state uses a State Aid Formula to determine the appropriation of funds to various districts. Along with the aid formula, the state collects revenue from the following sources: compensatory programs, special education, vocational programs, transportation

Slosburg, Tucker

2010-01-01

349

Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-01

350

Characterization of mixing and dilution in heterogeneous aquifers by means of local temporal moments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breakthrough curves of a conservative tracer in a heterogeneous two- dimensional aquifer are analyzed by means of their temporal moments. The average velocity and the longitudinal macrodispersion coefficient of the equivalent one- dimensional aquifer obtained through cross-sectional averaging of concentration can be defined from the first and second central moments of a breakthrough curve integrated over the outflow boundary of

Olaf A. Cirpka; Peter K. Kitanidis

2000-01-01

351

Potential for Siting New Water Wells and Restoring Existing Wells in Arsenic-Impacted Aquifers  

EPA Science Inventory

Studies have indicated that arsenic concentrations greater than the new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) concentration of 10 micrograms per liter (ug/L) occur in numerous aquifers around the United States. One such aquifer is the Central ...

352

Modelling the response of an alluvial aquifer to anthropogenic and recharge stresses in the United States Southern Great Plains  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper uses Visual MODFLOW to simulate potential impacts of anthropogenic pumping and recharge variability on an alluvial aquifer in semi-arid northwestern Oklahoma. Groundwater withdrawal from the aquifer is projected to increase by more than 50% (relative to 1990) by the year 2050. In contrast, climate projections indicate declining regional precipitation over the next several decades, creating a potential problem of demand and supply. The following scenarios were simulated: (1) projected groundwater withdrawal, (2) a severe drought, (3) a prolonged wet period, and (4) a human adjustment scenario, which assumes future improvements in water conservation measures. Results indicate that the combined impacts of anthropogenic pumping and droughts would create drawdown of greater than 12 m in the aquifer. Spatially, however, areas of severe drawdown will be localized around large-capacity well clusters. The worst impacts of both pumping and droughts will be on stream-aquifer interaction. For example, the projected aquifer pumpage would lead to a total streamflow loss of 40%, creating losing stream system regionally. Similarly, a severe drought would lead to a total streamflow loss of >80%. A post-audit of the model was also carried out to evaluate model performance. By simulating various stress scenarios on the alluvial aquifer, this study provides important information for evaluating management options for alluvial aquifers.

Zume, Joseph T.; Tarhule, Aondover A.

2011-08-01

353

Geopressured aquifer simulator  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ten natural gas companies have funded the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) development of a laboratory facility for fluid and core analyses at temperatures and pressures characteristic of geopressured aquifers. The facility has been designed and constructed to measure the following parameters at pressures up to 20,000 psi and temperatures to 450°F: solubility of methane in brines from actual geopressured

A. P. Byrnes; E. M. Rockar; P. L. Randolph; S. M. Kelkar

1979-01-01

354

Aquifers In Nirgal Vallis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The topographic information provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter has been used in combination with the Mars Observer Camera imagery to estimate the topo- graphic position of sapping pits and gully heads on the rim of Nirgal Vallis. Hence Nirgal Vallis is understood to be formed by groundwater sapping (1, 2, 3, 4) an aquifer is proposed as water supply. Gullies in the northern rim of Nirgal Vallis as discovered in Mars Observer Camera (MOC) images (5, 6) proof the existence of such an aquifer. Further evidence for sapping in Nirgal Vallis is demonstrated by short hanging tribu- taries with amphitheater-like heads. The basis of these sapping pits defines the con- tact of aquifer to aquiclude during the valley formation. The gully heads are much deeper under the local surface and the correlation of their topographic position with the valley depth indicate the subsidence of the groundwater level following the ver- tical erosion of the valley. This implies the existence of different groundwater tables over time confined by impermeable layers, whereas the gully head level is the most recent groundwater table which still may be erosional active under the conditions of increasing water pressure and ice barrier failure (5). The occurrence of more than one tilted sapping level at different topographic positions which are time-correlated with the erosional notching of the valley, either indicates different aquifers with litholog- ical aquicludes or a climate controlled subsidence of the permafrost layer acting as confining layer. References: (1) Baker et al., 1992, In: Mars, Univ. of Arizona Press. (2) Carr, 1995, JGR 100, 7479. (3) Malin and Carr, 1999, Icarus, 397, 589. (4) Jaumann and Reiss, 2002, LPSC. (5) Malin and Edgett, 2000, Science, 288, 2330. (6) Malin and Edgett, 2001, JGR 106, 23429.

Reiss, D.; Jaumann, R.

355

Facies distributions, recharge-discharge relations, and aquifer sensitivity in a glacial aquifer system, northeastern Indiana  

SciTech Connect

The Huntertown aquifer system underlies about 650 km[sup 2] in the interlobate region of northeastern Indiana and corresponds to a sequence of Saginaw Lobe deposits sandwiched between two Erie Lobe till sheets. The northern part of the system typically consists of a 3 to 10 m thick basal outwash apron composed chiefly of sand and capped by a discontinuous sheet of sandy till. Several small to medium-sized (5 to 30km[sup 2]) ice-contact fans are superposed on this sequence and result in thick (15 to 30 m), transmissive sections of sand and gravel. To the southeast, these sediments grade into finer-grained fan-delta and slackwater facies associated with ancestral Lake Erie. Facies distributions, and thus aquifer connectivity, are related to topographic characteristics of the underlying till sheet, which controlled Saginaw Lobe meltwater drainage. The aquifer system is variably confined by a younger sequence of clayey tills and lacustrine mud. The degree of confinement is related to terrain characteristics, with the thickest till (15 to 25 m) being associated with ridged and moraines in the southern and central parts of the system. These features are characteristic of a regional discharge area and suggest a relatively longer residence time. Sensitivity of aquifers in this part of the system may thus be correspondingly less. The distribution of geochemical facies is much less predictable, however, and may be affected by several independent variables.

Fleming, A.H. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington, IN (United States)); Yarling, M. (Indiana Dept. of Environmental Management, Indianapolis, IN (United States))

1994-04-01

356

Hydrologic data for the alluvium and terrace deposits of the Cimarron River from Freedom to Guthrie, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground water in the Quaternary alluvium and terrace deposits associated with the Cimarron River in northwestern Oklahoma is used extensively for irrigation, municipal, stock, and domestic supplies. The data in this report were collected as part of an investigation to provide State water managers with the quantitative knowledge necessary to manage the ground-water resource effectively. The investigation was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oklahoma Geological Survey. The information presented in this report include data collected in the field from 1985 through 1989, and unpublished data compiled from files of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Data include well and test-bole records, consisting of ground-water levels, depth of wells, principal aquifer, and primary use of water. Water levels include continuous, daily, monthly, and periodic measure- ments for selected wells. Concentrations of common chemical constituents, selected trace elements, organic analyses, and tritium analyses of water samples from wells completed in the Cimarron River alluvium and terrace deposits and Permian geologic units are reported. Winter and summer base-flow discharge measurements of the Cimarron River and its Tributaries are presented together with water-quality data from the measuring sites. Continuous water-level and precipitation-gage data are presented graphically. Locations of data- collection sites are shown on plates.

Adams, Gregory P.; Bergman, D. L.; Pruitt, D. J.; May, J. E.; Kurklin, J. K.

1994-01-01

357

Geohydrology of a Deep-Aquifer System Monitoring-Well Site at Marina, Monterey County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the Salinas Valley, located in the central coastal area of California, extensive agriculture and subsequent urbanization has resulted in extensive ground-water development and seawater intrusion within the upper-aquifer system. As a result, local water...

R. T. Hanson R. S. Everett M. W. Newhouse S. M. Crawford M. I. Pimentel

2002-01-01

358

78 FR 16036 - Service Level Environmental Impact Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor, South Texas to Oklahoma...improved high- speed intercity passenger rail service along an 850-mile corridor...Level EIS, the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study (Study) also includes...

2013-03-13

359

75 FR 19667 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00036 Declaration of Economic Injury  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12115] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00036 Declaration...EIDL) declaration for the State of Oklahoma, dated 04/09/2010. Incident...Jefferson, Stephens. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma Beckham, Caddo, Carter, Cotton,...

2010-04-15

360

30 CFR 936.15 - Approval of Oklahoma regulatory program amendments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Oklahoma regulatory program amendments. 936.15...SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OKLAHOMA § 936.15 Approval of Oklahoma regulatory program amendments. The...

2010-07-01

361

30 CFR 936.25 - Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments...SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OKLAHOMA § 936.25 Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan...

2010-07-01

362

40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...26 2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization...APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Oklahoma § 272.1851 Oklahoma State-administered program: Final...

2009-07-01

363

30 CFR 936.15 - Approval of Oklahoma regulatory program amendments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Approval of Oklahoma regulatory program amendments. 936.15...SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OKLAHOMA § 936.15 Approval of Oklahoma regulatory program amendments. The...

2009-07-01

364

30 CFR 936.25 - Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments...SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OKLAHOMA § 936.25 Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan...

2009-07-01

365

77 FR 5710 - Federal Implementation Plans for Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin either significantly...Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin that required...Columbia Circuit (EME Homer City Generation, L.P. v. EPA...Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin. Because...

2012-02-06

366

75 FR 9895 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Monday through Friday, at the following offices: Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, Water Quality Division, 707 N. Robinson, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73101-1677; and the EPA Region 6, Drinking...

2010-03-04

367

40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Statutes and Regulations. (1) The Oklahoma statutes and regulations cited...You may obtain copies of the Oklahoma regulations that are incorporated...of State, P.O. Box 53390, Oklahoma City, OK 73152-3390; Phone...

2010-07-01

368

30 CFR 936.20 - Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... The Secretary approved the Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation...plan are available at: (a) Oklahoma Conservation Commission, 2800 N. Lincoln Blvd., Suite 160, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (b) Office...

2009-07-01

369

30 CFR 936.20 - Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... The Secretary approved the Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation...plan are available at: (a) Oklahoma Conservation Commission, 2800 N. Lincoln Blvd., Suite 160, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (b) Office...

2010-07-01

370

77 FR 21154 - BNSF Railway Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Oklahoma County, OK  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Railway Company--Abandonment Exemption--in Oklahoma County, OK BNSF Railway Company (BNSF) has filed...between milepost 541.69 and milepost 542.91 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla. (the Line).\\1\\ The Line...

2012-04-09

371

75 FR 65524 - United Auto Workers Local 1999, Oklahoma City, OK; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...TA-W-71,863] United Auto Workers Local 1999, Oklahoma City, OK; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding...former workers of United Auto Workers Local 1999, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (the subject firm). The determination was...

2010-10-25

372

40 CFR 147.2102 - Aquifer exemptions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2102 Section 147...PROGRAMS South Dakota § 147.2102 Aquifer exemptions. (a) This section identifies any aquifers or their portions exempted in...

2012-07-01

373

Isolation of avian influenza viruses in central Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Aquatic birds are the natural hosts for influenza virus. It is established that avian influenza viruses provide the gene pool for the generation of new strains of human influenza virus, which can cause pandemic infections. The recent outbreak of an avian influenza virus (H5N1) in Hong Kong not only produced high mortality in chickens, but also resulted in six human fatalities. This outbreak indicates that avian influenza virus can be pathogenic for humans. We surveyed local waterfowl habitats by taking water and fecal samples for virus isolation and identification. We isolated avian influenza viruses from ponds and small lakes in Bartlesville, Lawton, Stillwater, and Tulsa. The density of birds in these sites is small. However, our virus isolation rate is comparable to that found in higher density habitats. The risk of human infection remains to be determined. We encourage primary care physicians to submit samples for virus surveillance. PMID:10616258

Lai, A C; McPhillips, A M

1999-12-01

374

Largest Dinosaur Ever Discovered Found in Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Originally discovered in a remote corner of Oklahoma in 1994, the fossil of what may have been the largest creature to ever walk the earth has been excavated by a research team from the University of Oklahoma. Dubbed Sauroposeidon proteles, or "thunder lizard," the dinosaur was almost 100 feet long, with a 39 foot neck and weighing over 50 tons, so big that it would have created minor seismic activity just by walking, according to scientists. The new find is about 110 million years old and consists of neck vertebrae, some almost five feet in length, together with neck ribs nearly twelve feet long. The find is also significant because it may shed light on the last of the North American sauropods, who died out about 100 million years ago. A paper on this new find is scheduled to appear in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. The sites listed provide information and background material about this momentous discovery.

De Nie, Michael W.

375

In Oklahoma, Building More Prisons Has Solved No Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1973, Oklahoma State Penitentiary exploded in the costliest prison riot in American history. In the wake of that riot, Oklahoma adopted a Master Plan which called for lowering populations in the overcrowded prisons, primarily by reducing the state's incarceration rate-then as now twice the national averageand partly by new prison construction. Since 1975, Oklahoma has built 2,000 new spaces

Maygene Giari

1979-01-01

376

Aquifer interactions with a polluted mountain river of Nicaragua  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interactions between a stream and nearby shallow aquifers were investigated in a mountain basin being polluted by mercury released during mining in central Nicaragua. Hourly data series of water levels and temperatures were analysed using cross-correlation. Resistivity imaging was used to map the subsurface and to complement the hydrological data interpretation. The results show the complex hydrogeological conditions that

Jose Alfredo Mendoza; Peter Ulriksen; Francisco Picado; Torleif Dahlin

2008-01-01

377

Hydrogeology, ground-water movement, and subsurface storage in the Floridan aquifer system in southern Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Floridan aquifer system of southern Florida is composed chiefly of carbonate rocks that range in age from early Miocene to Paleocene. The top of the aquifer system in southern Florida generally is at depths ranging from 500 to 1,000 feet, and the average thickness is about 3,000 feet. It is divided into three general hydrogeologic units: (1) the Upper Floridan aquifer, (2) the middle confining unit, and (3) the Lower Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer contains brackish ground water, and the Lower Floridan aquifer contains salty ground water that compares chemically to modern seawater. Zones of high permeability are present in the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers. A thick, cavernous dolostone in the Lower Floridan aquifer, called the Boulder Zone, is one of the most permeable carbonate units in the world (transmissivity of about 2.5 x 107 feet squared per day). Ground-water movement in the Upper Floridan aquifer is generally southward from the area of highest head in central Florida, eastward to the Straits of Florida, and westward to the Gulf of Mexico. Distributions of natural isotopes of carbon and uranium generally confirm hydraulic gradients in the Lower Floridan aquifer. Groundwater movement in the Lower Floridan aquifer is inland from the Straits of Florida. The concentration gradients of the carbon and uranium isotopes indicate that the source of cold saltwater in the Lower Floridan aquifer is seawater that has entered through the karat features on the submarine Miami Terrace near Fort Lauderdale. The relative ages of the saltwater suggest that the rate of inland movement is related in part to rising sea level during the Holocene transgression. Isotope, temperature, and salinity anomalies in waters from the Upper Floridan aquifer of southern Florida suggest upwelling of saltwater from the Lower Floridan aquifer. The results of the study support the hypothesis of circulating relatively modern seawater and cast doubt on the theory that the saltwater in the Floridan aquifer system probably is connate or unflushed seawater from high stands of sea level. The principal use of the Floridan aquifer system in southern Florida is for subsurface storage of liquid waste. The Boulder Zone of the Lower Floridan aquifer is extensively used as a receptacle for injected treated municipal wastewater, oil field brine, and, to a lesser extent, industrial wastewater. Pilot studies indicate a potential for cyclic storage of freshwater in the Upper Floridan aquifer in southern Florida.

Meyer, Frederick W.

1989-01-01

378

Developing Methods For Linking Surficial Aquifers With Localized Rainfall Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water level hydrographs of the surficial aquifer can be evaluated to identify both the cause and consequence of water supply development. Rainfall, as a source of direct recharge and as a source of delayed or compounded recharge, is often the largest influence on surficial aquifer water level responses. It is clear that proximity of the rain gauge to the observation well is a factor in the degree of correlation, but in central Florida, USA, rainfall patterns change seasonally, with latitude, and with distance from the coast . Thus, for a location in central Florida, correlation of rain events with observed hydrograph responses depends on both distance and direction from an observation well to a rain gauge. In this study, we examine the use of extreme value analysis as a method of selecting the best rainfall data set for describing a given surficial aquifer monitor well. A surficial aquifer monitor well with a substantial suite of data is compared to a series of rainfall data sets from gauges ranging from meters to tens of kilometers in distance from the monitor well. The gauges vary in a wide range of directions from the monitor well in an attempt to identify both a method for rainfall gauge selection to be associated with the monitor well. Each rainfall gauge is described by a correlation coefficient with respect to the surficial aquifer water level data.

Lafrenz, W. B.; van Gaalen, J. F.

2008-12-01

379

Hydrogeology and water quality of the Tug Hill glacial aquifer in northern New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Tug Hill aquifer, in northern New York, is a 47-mile-long, 0.25-to-3.5-mile-wide, crescent-shaped Pleistocene sand and\\/or gravel deposit. The northern and central parts of the aquifer are under water-table conditions; the southern part has both water-table and discontinuous confined conditions. Groundwater and streams in the northern and central parts flow westward; those in the southern part flow from the edges

T. S. Miller; D. A. Sherwood; M. M. Krebs

1989-01-01

380

Oklahoma's Ouachita area beginning to stir  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on exploration of Ouachita rocks of southeastern Oklahoma. Wells are completed or planned in the Potato Hills, Moyers, and Atoka areas of the Ouachita Province. Deep and shallow drilling will start soon in a 9 sq mile area in the Potato Hills area of southern Latimer County. The shallow drilling program will consist of eight wells to about 6,000 ft to assess potential in Ordovician Big Fork, Womble, and Mississippian-Devonian Arkansas Novaculite.

Petzet, G.A.

1991-02-18

381

Passive electrical measurements from three Oklahoma tornados  

Microsoft Academic Search

Passive electrical measurement of three tornados in the Oklahoma area have been made and are being reported upon. The measurements made include point discharge current, 18.5-kc\\/s sferics, along with 10-, 50-, 100-, and 175-kc\\/s, and 30-Mc\\/s sferics. The preceding measurements of tornados are compared with a typical local thunderstorm. In this comparison, it is shown that the electrical discharges within

P. A. Silberg

1965-01-01

382

LEMANEA FUSCINA BORG (RHODOPHYTA) IN OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Field work was supported by NIH Grant 5506RR08003. I express my gratitude for their assistance to Dr. James J. White and Dr. Harold Robinson of the Smithsonian Institution. REFERENCES 1. C. E. TAFT, Proc. Okla. Acad. Sci. 20: 49-54, (1940). 2. W. C. VINYARD, The Algae of Oklahoma, Ph.D. Dissertation, Michigan State University, 1958. 3. L. H. FLINT, Am.

R. John Taylor

1977-01-01

383

76 FR 33394 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00051  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-- 1988--DR), dated 05/27/2011. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/21/2011 through 04/28/2011. Effective Date: 05/27/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 07/26/2011. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline Date:...

2011-06-08

384

RAPTOR REHABILITATION AT THE OKLAHOMA CITY ZOO  

Microsoft Academic Search

A program of raptor rehabilitation has been conducted at the Oklahoma City Zoo in an effort to conserve wildlife, to assist the publid, and to gain knowledge about the care and treatment of injured birds. From October 1973 through December 1974 Red-tailed Hawks and Great Horned Owls constituted 45.3 percent of all birds donated. Donations from the public comprised 89.0

John C. Snelling

1975-01-01

385

Hydrologic Drought of Water Year 2006 Compared with Four Major Drought Periods of the 20th Century in Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water Year 2006 (October 1, 2005, to September 30, 2006) was a year of extreme hydrologic drought and the driest year in the recent 2002-2006 drought in Oklahoma. The severity of this recent drought can be evaluated by comparing it with four previous major hydrologic droughts, water years 1929-41, 1952-56, 1961-72, and 1976-81. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, completed an investigation to summarize the Water Year 2006 hydrologic drought and compare it to the four previous major hydrologic droughts in the 20th century. The period of water years 1925-2006 was selected as the period of record because before 1925 few continuous record streamflow-gaging sites existed and gaps existed where no streamflow-gaging sites were operated. Statewide annual precipitation in Water Year 2006 was second driest and statewide annual runoff in Water Year 2006 was sixth driest in the 82 years of record. Annual area-averaged precipitation totals by the nine National Weather Service Climate Divisions from Water Year 2006 are compared to those during four previous major hydrologic droughts to show how rainfall deficits in Oklahoma varied by region. Only two of the nine climate divisions, Climate Division 1 Panhandle and Climate Division 4 West Central, had minor rainfall deficits, while the rest of the climate divisions had severe rainfall deficits in Water Year 2006 ranging from only 65 to 73 percent of normal annual precipitation. Regional streamflow patterns for Water Year 2006 indicate that Oklahoma was part of the regionwide below-normal streamflow conditions for Arkansas-White-Red River Basin, the sixth driest since 1930. The percentage of long-term stations in Oklahoma (with at least 30 years of record) having below-normal streamflow reached 80 to 85 percent for some days in August and November 2006. Twelve long-term streamflow-gaging sites with periods of record ranging from 62 to 78 years were selected to show how streamflow deficits varied by region. The hydrologic drought worsened going from north to south in Oklahoma, ranging from 45 percent in the north, to just 14 percent in east-central Oklahoma, and 20 percent of normal annual streamflow in the southwest. The low streamflows resulted in only 86.3 percent of the statewide conservation storage available at the end of the water year in major reservoirs, and 7 to 47 percent of hydroelectric power generation at sites in Oklahoma in Calendar Year 2005.

Tortorelli, Robert L.

2008-01-01

386

Hydrologic drought of water year 2011 compared to four major drought periods of the 20th century in Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water year 2011 (October 1, 2010, through September 30, 2011) was a year of hydrologic drought (based on streamflow) in Oklahoma and the second-driest year to date (based on precipitation) since 1925. Drought conditions worsened substantially in the summer, with the highest monthly average temperature record for all States being broken by Oklahoma in July (89.1 degrees Fahrenheit), June being the second hottest and August being the hottest on record for those months for the State since 1895. Drought conditions continued into the fall, with all of the State continuing to be in severe to exceptional drought through the end of September. In addition to effects on streamflow and reservoirs, the 2011 drought increased damage from wildfires, led to declarations of states of emergency, water-use restrictions, and outdoor burning bans; caused at least $2 billion of losses in the agricultural sector and higher prices for food and other agricultural products; caused losses of tourism and wildlife; reduced hydropower generation; and lowered groundwater levels in State aquifers. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, conducted an investigation to compare the severity of the 2011 drought with four previous major hydrologic drought periods during the 20th century water years 192941, 195256, 196172, and 197681. The period of water years 19252011 was selected as the period of record because few continuous record streamflow-gaging stations existed before 1925, and gaps in time existed where no streamflow-gaging stations were operated before 1925. In water year 2011, statewide annual precipitation was the 2d lowest, statewide annual streamflow was 16th lowest, and statewide annual runoff was 42d lowest of those 87 years of record. Annual area-averaged precipitation totals by the nine National Weather Service climate divisions from water year 2011 were compared to those during four previous major hydrologic drought periods to show how precipitation deficits in Oklahoma varied by region. The nine climate divisions in Oklahoma had precipitation in water year 2011 ranging from 43 to 76 percent of normal annual precipitation, with the Northeast Climate Division having the closest to normal precipitation and the Southwest Climate Division having the greatest percentage of annual deficit. Based on precipitation amounts, water year 2011 ranked as the second driest of the 19252011 period, being exceeded only in one year of the 1952 to 1956 drought period. Regional streamflow patterns for water year 2011 indicate that streamflow in the Arkansas-White-Red water resources region, which includes all of Oklahoma, was relatively large, being only the 26th lowest since 1930, primarily because of normal or above-normal streamflow in the northern part of the region. Twelve long-term streamflow-gaging stations with periods of record ranging from 67 to 83 years were selected to show how streamflow deficits varied by region in Oklahoma. Statewide, streamflow in water year 2011 was greater than streamflows measured in years during the drought periods of 192941, 195256, 196172, and 197681. The hydrologic drought worsened going from the northeast toward the southwest in Oklahoma, ranging from 140 percent (above normal streamflow) in the northeast, to 13 percent of normal streamflow in southwestern Oklahoma. The relatively low streamflow in 2011 resulted in 83.3 percent of the statewide conservation storage being available at the end of the water year in major reservoirs, similar to conservation storage in the preceding severe drought year of 2006. The ranking of streamflow as the 16th smallest for the 19252011 period, despite precipitation being ranked the 2d smallest, may have been caused, in part, by the relatively large streamflow in northeastern Oklahoma during water year 2011.

Shivers, Molly J.; Andrews, William J.

2013-01-01

387

77 FR 43586 - Southern Star Central Gas Pipeline, Inc.; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Commission [Docket No. CP12-479-000] Southern Star Central Gas Pipeline, Inc.; Notice of Intent...involving abandonment of facilities by Southern Star Central Gas Pipeline, Inc. (Southern Star) in Logan and Oklahoma Counties,...

2012-07-25

388

77 FR 29275 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs'', Oklahoma's authorized...

2012-05-17

389

75 FR 36609 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs'', Oklahoma's authorized...

2010-06-28

390

77 FR 46994 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs'', Oklahoma's authorized...

2012-08-07

391

Oklahoma Aerospace Intellectual Capital/Educational Recommendations: An Inquiry of Oklahoma Aerospace Executives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this qualitative study was to conduct detailed personal interviews with aerospace industry executives/managers from both the private and military sectors from across Oklahoma to determine their perceptions of intellectual capital needs of the industry. Interviews with industry executives regarding

Nelson, Erin M.

2010-01-01

392

Oklahoma Aerospace Intellectual Capital/Educational Recommendations: An Inquiry of Oklahoma Aerospace Executives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this qualitative study was to conduct detailed personal interviews with aerospace industry executives/managers from both the private and military sectors from across Oklahoma to determine their perceptions of intellectual capital needs of the industry. Interviews with industry executives regarding

Nelson, Erin M.

2010-01-01

393

Survey of Fishes in the Oklahoma Panhandle and Harper County, Northwestern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of the fishes of the Panhandle and Harper County in Northwestern Oklahoma produced 33 species representing 12 families. Sixteen additional species have been reported by others or have been stocked in lakes, for a total of 48 known species. Only seven were new records for the region. A description of the Cimarron and North Canadian River Systems, a

Jimmie Pigg

394

Forensic Seismology and the 1995 Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on April 19, 1995, was recorded on 2 permanent seismographs, 7 and 26 km away. The more distant seismograph recorded 2 low-frequency wave trains separated by about 10 s. Militia groups speculated that the 2 wave trains were caused by separate explosions and hinted at a

T. L. Holzer

2002-01-01

395

Guide to Oklahoma Colleges and Universities, 2000-2001 Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This guide contains information about Oklahoma's public colleges and universities, private colleges, and proprietary institutions that submitted material. Each institution prepared and submitted its own institutional page. The guide opens with general information about higher education in Oklahoma and presents some academic and financial

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

396

Twenty-Third Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, which is authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This 1970

Laney, L. J.

397

Twentieth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This 1967 annual

Laney, L. J.

398

Twenty-Fifth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Indian Education Program in Oklahoma is financed and operated under the provision of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Oklahoma Department of Education and is supervised by the State Department of Education as authorized by the Johnson O'Malley Act (JOM) of 1936. The narrative section of this 1972 annual report

James, Overton

399

Nineteenth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This 1966 annual

Laney, L. J.

400

Twenty-First Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, which is authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This

Laney, L. J.

401

Twenty-Third Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, which is authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This

Laney, L. J.

402

Twentieth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This 1967 annual

Laney, L. J.

403

The Oklahoma PN/ADN Articulation Project Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In response to a critical nursing shortage in the state of Oklahoma, the Oklahoma Practical Nursing (PN)/Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Articulation Project Coordinating Committee was formed in spring 1990 to develop a proposal for program articulation. A curriculum matrix was designed and adopted for use by five regional subcommittees which

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

404

Policies and Procedures Manual for Special Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The guide, a support document to the Oklahoma State Plan for Special Education, presents a policies and procedures manual for special education in Oklahoma in accordance with the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (P.L. 94-142). The manual is intended to establish the minimum standards for special education program approval, to establish

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

405

Ground-water in the Beggs area, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This memorandum discusses the geology of the Beggs area in Okmulgee County, Oklahoma, as it is related to the availability of ground water. Geological reports and unpublished data from the files of the Oklahoma Geological Survey, together with local information furnished by R.W. Steinman, Beggs Water Superintendent, are the basis for the statements that follow. (available as photostat copy only)

Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

406

Biology and epidemiology of peanut soilborne pathogens in Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Pressure from soil borne diseases limits yields and increases production costs to Oklahoma peanut growers. Sclerotinia blight, caused by the fungus Sclerotinia minor, and southern blight, caused by the fungus Sclerotium rolfsii, are the most economically damaging peanut diseases in Oklahoma. The c...

407

Heat flow and heat production in the Arkoma Basin and Oklahoma Platform, southeastern Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Subsurface temperature and thermal gradients along a north-south cross section through the Arkoma Basin and the Oklahoma Platform in southeastern Oklahoma were estimated from 345 bottom hole temperatures from 199 oil and gas wells. The average geothermal gradient in the southern part of the basin near the Ouachita Front is 20C/km, exceeds 30C/km in the middle part of the basin, and is 24C/km on the Oklahoma Platform to the north. Drill cuttings obtained from 11 oil and gas wells were used for 843 thermal conductivity measurements. Thermal conductivity data, corrected to in situ conditions, were used to estimate heat flow. Estimated heat flow (20%) in the deep part of the Arkoma Basin near the Ouachita Front is 35-40 mW/m2 and increases systematically northward to 60-65 mW/m2 on the Oklahoma Platform. Average heat production, estimated from gamma ray logs, is 2.3 0.2 ?W/m3 for basement rocks underlying the Arkoma Basin and 2.8 0.1 ?W/m3 for basement rocks in the Oklahoma Platform area. Numerical models show that heat refraction from the less conductive sedimentary rocks (1.6 W/mK) of the Arkoma Basin to the more conductive crystalline rocks (3.0 W/mK at 25C) of the Oklahoma Platform and the Ouachita Mountains accounts for about 5-10 mW/m2 of the observed 20-30 mW/m2 decrease in heat flow from north to south. Changes in crustal heat production related to compositional changes and crustal thinning account for another 5-15 mW/m2 of the observed heat flow change. If the remaining 0-20 mW/m2 difference in heat flow is attributed to heat transport by topographically driven groundwater flow, the average basin-scale permeability of the Arkoma Basin and the Oklahoma Platform can be no greater than 10-15 m2. Results of this study are not generally supportive of theories which invoke topographically driven regional groundwater flow from the Arkoma Basin in Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian time (290 Ma) to explain the genesis of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, paleothermal anomalies, and regional diagenesis in the North American midcontinent.

Lee, Youngmin; Deming, David; Chen, Kevin F.

1996-11-01

408

Changes in Water Levels and Storage in the High Plains Aquifer, Predevelopment to 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The High Plains aquifer underlies 111.4 million acres (174,000 square miles) in parts of eight States-Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The area overlying the High Plains aquifer is one of the major agricultural regions in the world. Water-level declines began in parts of the High Plains aquifer soon after the beginning of extensive ground-water irrigation. By 1980, water levels in the High Plains aquifer in parts of Texas, Oklahoma, and southwestern Kansas had declined more than 100 feet (Luckey and others, 1981). In response to these water-level declines, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with numerous Federal, State, and local water-resources agencies, began monitoring more than 7,000 wells in 1988 to assess annual water-level change in the aquifer. A report by the USGS, 'Water-Level Changes in the High Plains Aquifer, Predevelopment to 2005 and 2003 to 2005' (McGuire, 2007), shows the areas of substantial water-level changes in the aquifer from the time prior to substantial ground-water irrigation development (predevelopment or about 1950) to 2005 (fig. 1). In parts of the area, farmers began using ground water for irrigation extensively in the 1930s and 1940s. Estimated irrigated acreage in the area overlying the High Plains aquifer increased rapidly from 1940 to 1980 and changed slightly from 1980 to 2002: 1949-2.1 million acres, 1980-13.7 million acres, 1997-13.9 million acres, 2002-12.7 million acres. Irrigated acres in 2002 were 12 percent of the aquifer area, not including the areas with little or no saturated thickness (McGuire, 2007). Ground-water withdrawals for irrigation and other uses are compiled and reported by the USGS and agencies in each State about every 5 years. Ground-water withdrawals from the High Plains aquifer for irrigation increased from 4 to 19 million acre-feet from 1949 to 1974. Ground-water withdrawals for irrigation in 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995 were from 4 to 18 percent less than withdrawals for irrigation in 1974. Ground-water withdrawals from the aquifer for irrigation in 2000 were 21 million acre-feet (McGuire, 2007). Water-level changes in the aquifer result from an imbalance between discharge and recharge. Discharge is primarily ground-water withdrawals for irrigation. Discharge also includes evapotranspiration, where the water table is near the land surface, and seepage to streams and springs, where the water table intersects with the land surface. Recharge is primarily from precipitation. Other sources of recharge are irrigation return flow and seepage from streams, canals, and reservoirs. Water-level declines may result in increased costs for ground-water withdrawals because of increased pumping lift and decreased well yields (Taylor and Alley, 2001). Water-level declines also can affect ground-water availability, surface-water flow, and near-stream (riparian) habitat areas (Alley and others, 1999).

McGuire, V. L.

2007-01-01

409

Radium geochemistry of ground waters in paleozoic carbonate aquifers, Midcontinent, U. S. A.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to elucidate the processes controlling the distribution and behavior of the longer-lived radium (Ra) isotopes in continuous Paleozoic carbonate aquifers of parts of Missouri, Kansas, and Oklahoma. Activities of ({sup 228}Ra) and ({sup 226}Ra) were analyzed in fresh and saline ground waters, brines, and rocks. The fluids have a wide salinity range (200-250,000 mg l{sup -1} total dissolved solids). The ({sup 226}Ra) activity ranges from 0.66-7660 dpm kg{sup -1} and correlates with salinity and other alkaline earth element (Ca, Sr, and Ba) concentrations. The range of ({sup 228}Ra:{sup 226}Ra) ratios in the fluids (0.06-1.48) is similar to that in the aquifer rocks (0.21-1.53). The relatively low mean fluid ({sup 228}Ra:{sup 226}Ra) ratio (0.30) reflects the low Th:U ratio of the predominant carbonate aquifer rock. Radium occurs mostly ({>=}77%) as Ra{sup 2+} species in the fluids. Salinity-dependent sorption-desorption processes (with log K values from 10{sup 0}-10{sup 4} and negatively correlated with salinity), involving Th-enriched surface coatings on aquifer flow channels, can explain the rapid solid-fluid transfer of Ra isotopes in the system and the correlation of Ra with salinity.

Sturchio, N. C.; Banner, J. L.; Binz, C. M.; Heraty, L. J.; Musgrove, M.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Texas; Loras Coll.

2001-01-01

410

Chemical analyses of surface waters in Oklahoma, September - December 1944  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A preliminary survey of the industrial quality of surface waters in Oklahoma was started in August, 1944, by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oklahoma Resources and Planning Board, with the Oklahoma A. & M. College, Engineering Experiment Station and Department of Chemistry. From September to December, 1944, three hundred and fifteen samples were obtained at eighty-four points where gages are maintained for measurement of discharge. Daily samples were collected at six stations, namely: Illinois River near Gore, Oklahoma Cimarron River near Oilton, Oklahoma Canadian River near Whitefield, Oklahoma Washita River near Durwood, Oklahoma Red River near Gainesville, Texas Red River at Denison Dam, Texas Sport samples were collected at the remainder of the stations. The analyses of the spot samples were made largely in a laboratory provided by the Oklahoma A. & M. College, under the supervision of Dr. O.M. Smith, Head, Department of Chemistry; Dr. S.R. Wood, Associate Professor of Chemistry; and W.W. Hastings, U.S. Geological Survey. The daily samples were analyzed in the water resources laboratory of the Geological Survey at Austin, Texas. These data have been summarized in a report to the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, March 1, 1945. The streams of Oklahoma are classified into two major drainage basins: the Arkansas River and the Red River and their tributaries. The attached analyses are arranged in geographical order for their respective drainage basins, with records listed in downstream order for stations on the main stem first, followed by the analyses for the tributaries. When available, the mean daily discharge is given for the analyses. (available as photostat copy only)

Geological Survey (U.S.)

1945-01-01

411

Potentiometric surface of the Wilcox-Carrizo Aquifer; Bienville, Red River, and northern Natchitoches, and southern Webster parishes, Louisiana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The potentiometric surface of the Wilcox-Carrizo aquifer in central northwestern Louisiana is shown by contours using data collected from 1960 to 1980. The aquifer is not affected by regional water-level declines as no large pumping centers have been developed. Seasonal water-level fluctuations in wells are generally less than 10 feet annually. (USGS)

Ryals, G. N.

1981-01-01

412

Transmissivity estimation for highly heterogeneous aquifers: comparison of three methods applied to the Edwards Aquifer, Texas, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Obtaining reliable hydrological input parameters is a key challenge in groundwater modeling. Although many quantitative characterization techniques exist, experience applying these techniques to highly heterogeneous real-world aquifers is limited. Three geostatistical characterization techniques are applied to the Edwards Aquifer, a limestone aquifer in south-central Texas, USA, for the purposes of quantifying the performance in an 88,000-cell groundwater model. The first method is a simple kriging of existing hydraulic conductivity data developed primarily from single-well tests. The second method involves numerical upscaling to the grid-block scale, followed by cokriging the grid-block conductivity. In the third method, the results of the second method are used to establish the prior distribution for a Bayesian updating calculation. Results of kriging alone are biased towards low values and fail to reproduce hydraulic heads or spring flows. The upscaling/cokriging approach removes most of the systematic bias. The Bayesian update reduced the mean residual by more than a factor of 10, to 6 m, approximately 2.5% of the total head variation in the aquifer. This agreement demonstrates the utility of automatic calibration techniques based on formal statistical approaches and lends further support for using the Bayesian updating approach for highly heterogeneous aquifers.

Painter, Scott L.; Woodbury, Allan D.; Jiang, Yefang

2007-03-01

413

Methane production from geopressured aquifers  

SciTech Connect

Several assessments of geopressured aquifers have been performed during the past several years. This study examines an earlier publication in light of data available from recent research and geopressured aquifer well tests. What has been learned about geopressured aquifers in terms of reservoir parameters is incorporated to narrow the ranges of uncertainty in conducting parametric studies to predict production of natural gas. Economic sensitivity of the reservoir parameters is studied in terms of a reassessment of the capital investment and operating costs in constant (1980) dollars required for a complete geopressured aquifer production system. Test data from the U.S. DOE geopressured/geothermal well, Pleasant Bayou Well 2, are used in the analysis. 35 refs.

Doherty, M.G.; Randolph, P.L.; Rogers, L.A.; Poonawala, N.A.

1982-07-01

414

SOLE SOURCE AQUIFER BOUNDARY DATA  

EPA Science Inventory

There are 7 polygons representing 6 individual sole source aquifer boundaries and one streamflow source area in California, Arizona, and Nevada. Various efforts were combined to create the final product, which represents the Federal Register boundary description. Sole source aqu...

415

Microbial diversity and impact on carbonate geochemistry across a changing geochemical gradient in a karst aquifer.  

PubMed

Although microbes are known to influence karst (carbonate) aquifer ecosystem-level processes, comparatively little information is available regarding the diversity of microbial activities that could influence water quality and geological modification. To assess microbial diversity in the context of aquifer geochemistry, we coupled 16S rRNA Sanger sequencing and 454 tag pyrosequencing to in situ microcosm experiments from wells that cross the transition from fresh to saline and sulfidic water in the Edwards Aquifer of central Texas, one of the largest karst aquifers in the United States. The distribution of microbial groups across the transition zone correlated with dissolved oxygen and sulfide concentration, and significant variations in community composition were explained by local carbonate geochemistry, specifically calcium concentration and alkalinity. The waters were supersaturated with respect to prevalent aquifer minerals, calcite and dolomite, but in situ microcosm experiments containing these minerals revealed significant mass loss from dissolution when colonized by microbes. Despite differences in cell density on the experimental surfaces, carbonate loss was greater from freshwater wells than saline, sulfidic wells. However, as cell density increased, which was correlated to and controlled by local geochemistry, dissolution rates decreased. Surface colonization by metabolically active cells promotes dissolution by creating local disequilibria between bulk aquifer fluids and mineral surfaces, but this also controls rates of karst aquifer modification. These results expand our understanding of microbial diversity in karst aquifers and emphasize the importance of evaluating active microbial processes that could affect carbonate weathering in the subsurface. PMID:23151637

Gray, Cassie J; Engel, Annette S

2012-11-15

416

Recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer hydrologically associated with Barton springs in the Austin area, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards aquifer extends in a narrow belt from Bell County in the northeast to Kinney County in the southwest (index map) and provides water for at least nine counties in south-central Texas. Hydrologic boundaries divide the Edwards aquifer in the Austin area for which Barton Springs is the major discharge point. This part of the Edwards aquifer provides the municipal, industrial, domestic, and agricultural water supplies for about 30,000 people in the Austin area (southern Travis and northern Hays counties). Discharge from Barton Springs sustains streamflow at the mouth of Barton Creek and flows into Town Lake. Much of the land use within the outcrop area of the Edwards aquifer near Austin is rapidly changing from natural woodland and grassland to commercial and residential developments. Because urban development can result in a substantial degradation of the quality of water that recharges the aquifer, the extent of the recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer was delineated to provide information to the City of Austin for their use in formulating a plan for protecting and managing groundwater quality. The purpose of this report is to define and delineate the areal extent of the recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer in southern Travis and northern Hays Counties. The areal boundary of the recharge zone was determined by: (1) geologic mapping of the aquifer area; (2) interpretation of aerial photographs; (3) field verification of existing geologic maps; and (4) streamflow-loss studies. (Lantz-PTT)

Slagle, Diana L.; Ardis, Ann F.; Slade, Raymond M., Jr.

1986-01-01

417

Upper Basalt-Confined Aquifer System in the Southern Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The 1990 DOE Tiger Team Finding GW/CF-202 found that the hydrogeologic regime at the Hanford Site was inadequately characterized. This finding also identified the need for completing a study of the confined aquifer in the central and southern portions of the Hanford Site. The southern portion of the site is of particular interest because hydraulic-head patterns in the upper basalt-confined aquifer system indicate that groundwater from the Hanford central plateau area, where contaminants have been found in the aquifer, flows southeast toward the southern site boundary. This results in a potential for offsite migration of contaminants through the upper basalt-confined aquifer system. Based on the review presented in this report, available hydrogeologic characterization information for the upper basalt-confined aquifer system in this area is considered adequate to close the action item. Recently drilled offsite wells have provided additional information on the structure of the aquifer system in and near the southern part of the Hanford Site. Information on hydraulic properties, hydrochemistry, hydraulic heads and flow directions for the upper basalt-confined aquifer system has been re-examined and compiled in recent reports including Spane and Raymond (1993), Spane and Vermeul ( 1994), and Spane and Webber (1995).

Thorne, P.

1999-01-04

418

Survey of groundwater isotopic composition (?2H and ?18O) from the southwestern Edwards Aquifer and regionally associated aquifers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aquifers are an important source of water for growing human populations, while they also support numerous critical ecosystem functions, including supplying water to springs and rivers necessary for terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and the sometimes endangered species that are part of them. As human populations increase and the climate changes, demands on aquifer resources will continue to increase. To support these growing populations, urban areas in particular seek to develop additional water resources with, in some cases, not well-understood impacts on interconnected aquifers as well as the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems that depend on spring-fed surface water. In addition, large-scale changes to terrestrial systems (e.g., removal of woody vegetation) can be motivated by a desire to enhance aquifer recharge, but an understanding of the effect of those efforts on the regional water cycle is hampered, in part, by a lack of detailed understanding of the interactions of various features below ground. It is critical therefore to understand the relationships between waters found in different formations, as well as among surface and ground waters to improve our understanding of the consequences of increasing human demands and the impacts of climate change. We have conducted a survey of wells in south central Texas that access major and minor aquifers, including the karst-type Edwards (BFZ) aquifer and several regional minor aquifers. The primary objective of this survey was to establish baseline information from which to develop further targeted research using event-based sampling and a range of additional data on precipitation, geology, and other spatially explicit information. We sampled multiple wells in an area west of San Antonio, TX that access the primary major and minor aquifers in the region. The isotopic compositions of water taken from these wells at various locations and depths were similar, suggesting that these aquifers experience significant mixing, and are not strongly isolated from each other. Our results are consistent with recent reports based on elemental composition of waters sampled from wells also in the region. Future work will expand to include connections with surface waters and address precipitation event-based dynamics.

West, J. B.; Shallock, J. R.; Cooper, R.

2009-12-01

419

Characterization of mixing and dilution in heterogeneous aquifers by means of local temporal moments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breakthrough curves of a conservative tracer in a heterogeneous two-dimensional aquifer are analyzed by means of their temporal moments. The average velocity and the longitudinal macrodispersion coefficient of the equivalent one-dimensional aquifer obtained through cross-sectional averaging of concentration can be defined from the first and second central moments of a breakthrough curve integrated over the outflow boundary of the domain.

Olaf A. Cirpka; Peter K. Kitanidis

2000-01-01

420

Continued support of the ``The Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma``. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research program is to continue developing, editing, maintaining, utilizing and making publicly available the Oil and Gas Well History file portion of the Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma. This grant funds that ongoing development work as a continuation of earlier grant numbers DE-FG19-88BC14233 and DE-FG22-89BC14483. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, working with Geological Information Systems at the University of Oklahoma Sarkeys Energy Center, has undertaken to construct this information system in response to the need for a computerized, centrally located library containing accurate, detailed information on the state`s natural resources. Particular emphasis during this phase of NRIS development is being placed on computerizing information related to the energy needs of the nation, specifically oil and gas.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Rizzuti, T.P. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1992-11-01

421

Characterising aquifer treatment for pathogens in managed aquifer recharge.  

PubMed

In this study the value of subsurface treatment of urban stormwater during Aquifer Storage Transfer Recovery (ASTR) is characterised using quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) methodology. The ASTR project utilizes a multi-barrier treatment train to treat urban stormwater but to date the role of the aquifer has not been quantified. In this study it was estimated that the aquifer barrier provided 1.4, 2.6, >6.0 log(10) removals for rotavirus, Cryptosporidium and Campylobacter respectively based on pathogen diffusion chamber results. The aquifer treatment barrier was found to vary in importance vis--vis the pre-treatment via a constructed wetland and potential post-treatment options of UV-disinfection and chlorination for the reference pathogens. The risk assessment demonstrated that the human health risk associated with potable reuse of stormwater can be mitigated (disability adjusted life years, DALYs <1 10(-6)) if the aquifer is integrated with suitable post treatment options into a treatment train to attenuate pathogens and protect human health. PMID:21045325

Page, D; Dillon, P; Toze, S; Sidhu, J P S

2010-01-01

422

Numerical-Simulation and Conjunctive-Management Models of the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt Stream-Aquifer System, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Numerical-simulation and optimization techniques were used to evaluate alternatives for the conjunctive management of ground- and surface-water resources of the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt stream-aquifer system in central Rhode Island. Ground-water ...

P. M. Barlow D. C. Dickerman

2001-01-01

423

Continued support of ``The Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma``. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research program is to continue developing, editing, maintaining, utilizing and making publicly available the Oil and Gas Well History file portion of the Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, working with Geological Information Systems at the University of Oklahoma Sarkeys Energy Center, has undertaken to construct this information system in response to the need for a computerized, centrally located library containing accurate, detailed information on the state`s natural resources. Particular emphasis during this phase of NRIS development is being placed on computerizing information related to the energy needs of the nation, specifically oil and gas. The NRIS Well History file contains historical and recent completion records for oil and gas wells reported to the Oklahoma Corporation Commission on Form 1002-A. At the start of this quarter, the Well History file contained 355,873 records, providing geographical coverage for most of Oklahoma (all but Osage County). Data elements on this file include API well number, lease name and well number, location information, elevations, dates of significant activities for the well and formation items (e.g., formation names, completion and test data, depths and perforations). In addition to the standard Well History file processing, special projects are undertaken to add supplemental data to the file from well logs, scout tickets, and core and sample documentation.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Rizzuti, T.P. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1994-06-01

424

Continued support of ``The Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma``. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research program is to continue developing, editing, maintaining, utilizing and making publicly available the Oil and Gas Well History file portion of the Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, working with Geological Information Systems at the University of Oklahoma Sarkeys Energy Center, has undertaken to construct this information system in response to the need for a computerized, centrally located library containing accurate, detailed information on the state`s natural resources. Particular emphasis during this phase of NRIS development is being placed on computerizing information related to the energy needs of the nation, specifically oil and gas. The NRIS Well History file contains historical and recent completion records for oil and gas wells reported to the Oklahoma Corporation Commission on Form 1002-A. At the start of this quarter, the Well History file contained 283,751 records, providing geographical coverage for most of Oklahoma (all but the northeast part of the State). Data elements on this file include API well number, lease name and well number, location information, elevations, dates of significant activities for the well and formation items (e.g., formation names, completion and test data, depths and perforations). In addition to the standard Well History file processing, special projects are undertaken to add supplemental data to the file from well logs, scout tickets, and core and sample documentation.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Rizzuti, T.P. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1993-06-01

425

Continued support of the natural resources information system (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research program is to continue developing, editing, maintaining, utilizing and making publicly available the Oil and Gas Well History file portion of the Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, working with Geological Information Systems at the University of Oklahoma Sarkeys Energy Center, has undertaken to construct this information system in response to the need for a computerized, centrally located library containing accurate, detailed information on the state`s natural resources. The NRIS Well History file contains historical and recent completion records for oil and gas wells reported to the Oklahoma Corporation Commission on Form 1002-A. At the start of this quarter, the Well History file contained 361,101 records, providing geographical coverage for most of Oklahoma (all but Osage County). Data elements on this file include API well number, lease name and well number, location information, elevations, dates of significant activities for the well and formation items (e.g., formation names, completion and test data, depths and perforations). In addition to the standard Well History file processing, special projects are undertaken to add supplemental data to the file from well logs, scout tickets, and core and sample documentation.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Rizzuti, T.P. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1994-09-01

426

Continued support of ``The Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma``. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research program is to continue developing, editing, maintaining, utilizing and making publicly available the Oil and Gas Well History file portion of the Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, working with Geological Information Systems at the University of Oklahoma Sarkeys Energy Center, has undertaken to construct this information system in response to the need for a computerized, centrally located library containing accurate, detailed information on the state`s natural resources. Particular emphasis during this phase of NRIS development is being placed on computerizing information related to the energy needs of the nation, specifically oil and gas. The NRIS Well History file contains historical and recent completion records for oil and gas wells reported to the Oklahoma Corporation Commission on Form 1002-A. At the start of this quarter, the Well History file contained 310,890 records, providing geographical coverage for most of Oklahoma (all buc the northeast part of the State). Data elements on this file include API well number, lease name and well number, location information, elevations, dates of significant activities for the well and formation items (e.g., formation names, completion and test data, depths and perforations). In addition to the standard Well History file processing, special projects are undertaken to add supplemental data to the file from well logs, scout tickets, and core and sample documentation.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Rizzuti, T.P. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1993-09-01

427

Continued support of ``The Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the state of Oklahoma``. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research program is to continue developing, editing, maintaining, utilizing and making publicly available the Oil and Gas Well History file portion of the Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, working with Geological Information Systems at the University of Oklahoma Sarkeys Energy Center, has undertaken to construct this information system in response to the need for a computerized, centrally located library containing accurate, detailed information on the state`s natural resources. Particular emphasis during this phase of NRIS development is being placed on computerizing information related to the energy needs of the nation, specifically oil and gas. The NRIS Well History file contains historical and recent completion records for oil and gas wells reported to the Oklahoma Corporation Commission on Form 1002-A. At the start of this quarter, the Well History file contained 321,771 records, providing geographical coverage for most of Oklahoma (all but the northeast part of the State). Data elements on this file include API well number, lease name and well number, location information, elevations, dates of significant activities for the well and formation items (e.g., formation names, completion and test data, depths and perforations). In addition to the standard Well History file processing, special projects are undertaken to add supplemental data to the file from well logs, scout tickets, and core and sample documentation.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Rizzuti, T.P. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1993-12-01

428

Seismogram offers insight into Oklahoma City bombing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, generated seismic waves that were recorded on two permanent seismographs about 7 and 26 km away from the bombing. The seismogram recorded at 26 km shows two low-frequency wave trains, discrete sets of oscillatory signals, that begin about 10 s apart. Public release of this record prompted speculation that each wave train was caused by a different energy source. On May 23, 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey monitored the demolition of the bomb-ravaged F