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Sample records for central sleep apnea

  1. Central sleep apnea

    MedlinePlus

    ... central sleep apnea. A condition called Cheyne-Stokes respiration can mimic central sleep apnea. This involves breathing ... Complications may result from the underlying disease causing the central sleep apnea.

  2. Central sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Thalhofer, S; Dorow, P

    1997-01-01

    A central apnea is a disorder characterized by apneic events during sleep with no associated ventilatory effort. Central sleep apnea syndrome is characterized by repeated apneas during sleep resulting from loss of respiratory effort. Although the etiology of central apnea remains obscure in most cases, current investigations into breathing control system during sleep and association with certain diseases have pointed out possible mechanisms. Ventilation during sleep is highly dependent on the nonbehavioral control system. As a result, any diseases affecting this control system could influence the breathing patterns while the patient is asleep. As our results show, most patients with central sleep apnea and without congestive heart failure had quantifiable abnormalities like diminished carbon dioxide response curves. Neurological diseases affecting the brainstem are able to produce breathing pattern disorders in sleep. Well-known neurological diseases such as arteriosclerosis in the elderly, infarctions, tumors, hemorrhage, accidents with damage of this region, encephalitis, poliomyelitis or other infectious diseases may cause central apnea during sleep, even if in wakefulness no abnormalities of breathing patterns are present. Apneas cause hypoxemia, hypercapnia and increased sympathicotonia. This may result in development of pulmonary artery hypertension or systemic hypertension. Published results demonstrate that medical treatment is ineffective in these patients. Implantation of a diaphragm pacing device is an invasive measure, the efficacy of the diaphragm pacing has not been proven by long-term trials, however. Mechanical ventilation was shown to be the most efficient treatment. A therapeutic procedure using a timed n-BiPAP device is able to normalize blood gases during sleep. The n-BiPAP prevented the development of severe pulmonary artery hypertension during sleep. PMID:9044468

  3. Central Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Touchard, Arturo; Somers, Virend K.; Olson, Lyle J.; Caples, Sean M.

    2009-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (HF), an exceedingly common and costly disease, is frequently seen in association with central sleep apnea (CSA), which often manifests as a periodic breathing rhythm referred to as Cheyne-Stokes respiration. CSA has historically been considered to be a marker of heart disease, since improvement in cardiac status is often associated with the attenuation of CSA. However, this mirroring of HF and CSA may suggest bidirectional importance to their relationship. In fact, observational data suggest that CSA, associated with repetitive oxyhemoglobin desaturations and surges in sympathetic neural activity, may be of pathophysiologic significance in HF outcomes. In light of the disappointing results from the first large trial assessing therapy with continuous positive airway pressure in patients with CSA and HF, further large-scale interventional trials will be needed to assess the role, if any, of CSA treatment on the outcomes of patients with HF. This review will discuss epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic considerations of CSA in the setting of HF. PMID:18574295

  4. Sodium oxybate-induced central sleep apneas.

    PubMed

    Frase, Lukas; Schupp, Jonas; Sorichter, Stephan; Randelshofer, Wolfgang; Riemann, Dieter; Nissen, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    Sodium oxybate (?-hydroxybutyric acid, GHB) is a neurotransmitter in the human brain which exerts sedative effects and is used therapeutically in the treatment of narcolepsy. Current safety recommendations have been formulated for the use of GHB in patients with preexisting breathing disorders. We report the case of a 39-year-old female with narcolepsy and cataplexy revealing the de novo emergence of central sleep apneas in a Cheyne-Stokes pattern under constant treatment with GHB. After discontinuation of GHB, polysomnographic re-evaluation demonstrated the disappearance of central sleep apneas. To our knowledge, this is the first report of de novo central sleep apneas induced by GHB in a patient without pre-existing sleep-disordered breathing, suggesting that there is a need for further investigation and potentially an extension of the safety guidelines to patients without a pre-existing breathing disorder. PMID:23834969

  5. Severe Central Sleep Apnea in Vici Syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Kersh, Karim; Jungbluth, Heinz; Gringras, Paul; Senthilvel, Egambaram

    2015-11-01

    Vici syndrome is a rare congenital multisystem disorder due to recessive mutations in the key autophagy regulator EPG5. Vici syndrome is characterized by agenesis of the corpus callosum, hypopigmentation, immunodeficiency, cataracts, and cardiomyopathy, with variable additional multisystem involvement. Here we report on a 5-year-old girl who presented with global developmental delay, seizures, callosal agenesis, cataracts, sensorineural hearing loss, hypopigmentation, and immunodeficiency with a low CD4 count and recurrent infections. EPG5 sequencing (prompted by suggestive clinical features) revealed a homozygous missense mutation, c.1007A>G (p.Gln336Arg). The patient was referred to our center for evaluation of nocturnal apnea. Overnight polysomnography showed severe central sleep apnea (CSA) with an overall apnea-hypopnea index of 100.5 events per hour of sleep (central apnea index of 97.5, mixed apnea index of 2, and obstructive hypopnea index of 1). The patient responded to bilevel positive airway pressure therapy with a backup rate with normalization of the apnea-hypopnea index and maintenance of oxygen saturation >90%. Despite successful control of the severe CSA, the patient was eventually started on nocturnal oxygen therapy due to excessive upper airway secretions and the high risk of possible aspiration with positive airway pressure therapy. This is the first report of EPG5-related Vici syndrome associated with CSA. We discuss the polysomnographic findings in our patient in the context of a brief literature review of the reported sleep abnormalities in Vici syndrome. PMID:26482670

  6. Behavioral Hyperventilation and Central Sleep Apnea in Two Children

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Thomas P.; Tam-Williams, Jade; Schmandt, Margaret; Patel, Anand C.; Cleveland, Claudia; Coste, Ferdinand; Kemp, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral hyperventilation is a rarely recognized cause of central sleep apnea (CSA) among children. We report two pediatric patients who presented with prolonged central sleep apnea secondary to behavioral hyperventilation. One patient also had a prolonged corrected QT (QTC) interval resulting from hyperventilation. Citation: Johnston TP, Tam-Williams J, Schmandt M, Patel AC, Cleveland C, Coste F, Kemp JS. Behavioral hyperventilation and central sleep apnea in two children. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(4):487–489. PMID:26106657

  7. Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea is a common disorder that causes your breathing to stop or get very shallow. Breathing ... an hour. The most common type is obstructive sleep apnea. It causes your airway to collapse or ...

  8. Alternative approaches to treatment of Central Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Divergent approaches to treatment of hypocapnic central sleep apnea syndromes reflect the difficulties in taming a hyperactive respiratory chemoreflex. As both sleep fragmentation and a narrow CO2 reserve or increased loop gain drive the disease, sedatives (to induce longer periods of stable non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and reduce the destabilizing effects of arousals in NREM sleep) and CO2-based stabilization approaches are logical. Adaptive ventilation reduces mean hyperventilation yet can induce ventilator-patient dyssynchrony, while enhanced expiratory rebreathing space (EERS, dead space during positive pressure therapy) and CO2 manipulation directly stabilize respiratory control by moving CO2 above the apnea threshold. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition can provide further adjunctive benefits. Provent and Winx may be less likely to trigger central apneas or periodic breathing in those with a narrow CO2 reserve. An oral appliance can meaningfully reduce positive pressure requirements and thus enable treatment of complex apnea. Novel pharmacological approaches may target mediators of carotid body glomus cell excitation, such as the balance between gas neurotransmitters. In complex apnea patients, single mode therapy is not always successful, and multi-modality therapy might need to be considered. Phenotyping of sleep apnea beyond conventional scoring approaches is the key to optimal management. PMID:24772053

  9. Central and Peripheral factors contributing to Obstructive Sleep Apneas

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Garcia, Alfredo J.; Anderson, Tatiana M.; Koschnitzky, Jenna E.; Peng, Ying-Jie; Kumar, Ganesh; Prabhakar, Nanduri

    2013-01-01

    Apnea, the cessation of breathing, is a common physiological and pathophysiological phenomenon with many basic scientific and clinical implications. Among the different forms of apnea, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is clinically the most prominent manifestation. OSA is characterized by repetitive airway occlusions that are typically associated with peripheral airway obstructions. However, it would be a gross oversimplification to conclude that OSA is caused by peripheral obstructions. OSA is the result of a dynamic interplay between chemo- and mechanosensory reflexes, neuromodulation, behavioral state and the differential activation of the central respiratory network and its motor outputs. This interplay has numerous neuronal and cardiovascular consequences that are initially adaptive but in the long-term become major contributors to the morbidity and mortality associated with OSA. However, not only OSA, but all forms of apnea have multiple, and partly overlapping mechanisms. In all cases the underlying mechanisms are neither “exclusively peripheral” nor “exclusively central” in origin. While the emphasis has long been on the role of peripheral reflex pathways in the case of OSA, and central mechanisms in the case of central apneas, we are learning that such a separation is inconsistent with the integration of these mechanisms in all cases of apneas. This review discusses the complex interplay of peripheral and central nervous components that characterizes the cessation of breathing. PMID:23770311

  10. Tetraplegia is a risk factor for central sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Bascom, Amy T.; Chowdhuri, Susmita; Badr, M. Safwan

    2013-01-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is highly prevalent in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI); the exact mechanism(s) or the predictors of disease are unknown. We hypothesized that patients with cervical SCI (C-SCI) are more susceptible to central apnea than patients with thoracic SCI (T-SCI) or able-bodied controls. Sixteen patients with chronic SCI, level T6 or above (8 C-SCI, 8 T-SCI; age 42.5 ± 15.5 years; body mass index 25.9 ± 4.9 kg/m2) and 16 matched controls were studied. The hypocapnic apneic threshold and CO2 reserve were determined using noninvasive ventilation. For participants with spontaneous central apnea, CO2 was administered until central apnea was abolished, and CO2 reserve was measured as the difference in end-tidal CO2 (PetCO2) before and after. Steady-state plant gain (PG) was calculated from PetCO2 and VE ratio during stable sleep. Controller gain (CG) was defined as the ratio of change in VE between control and hypopnea or apnea to the ΔPetCO2. Central SDB was more common in C-SCI than T-SCI (63% vs. 13%, respectively; P < 0.05). Mean CO2 reserve for all participants was narrower in C-SCI than in T-SCI or control group (−0.4 ± 2.9 vs.−2.9 ± 3.3 vs. −3.0 ± 1.2 l·min−1·mmHg−1, respectively; P < 0.05). PG was higher in C-SCI than in T-SCI or control groups (10.5 ± 2.4 vs. 5.9 ± 2.4 vs. 6.3 ± 1.6 mmHg·l−1·min−1, respectively; P < 0.05) and CG was not significantly different. The CO2 reserve was an independent predictor of apnea-hypopnea index. In conclusion, C-SCI had higher rates of central SDB, indicating that tetraplegia is a risk factor for central sleep apnea. Sleep-related hypoventilation may play a significant role in the mechanism of SDB in higher SCI levels. PMID:24114704

  11. Tetraplegia is a risk factor for central sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Sankari, Abdulghani; Bascom, Amy T; Chowdhuri, Susmita; Badr, M Safwan

    2014-02-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is highly prevalent in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI); the exact mechanism(s) or the predictors of disease are unknown. We hypothesized that patients with cervical SCI (C-SCI) are more susceptible to central apnea than patients with thoracic SCI (T-SCI) or able-bodied controls. Sixteen patients with chronic SCI, level T6 or above (8 C-SCI, 8 T-SCI; age 42.5 ± 15.5 years; body mass index 25.9 ± 4.9 kg/m(2)) and 16 matched controls were studied. The hypocapnic apneic threshold and CO2 reserve were determined using noninvasive ventilation. For participants with spontaneous central apnea, CO2 was administered until central apnea was abolished, and CO2 reserve was measured as the difference in end-tidal CO2 (PetCO2) before and after. Steady-state plant gain (PG) was calculated from PetCO2 and VE ratio during stable sleep. Controller gain (CG) was defined as the ratio of change in VE between control and hypopnea or apnea to the ΔPetCO2. Central SDB was more common in C-SCI than T-SCI (63% vs. 13%, respectively; P < 0.05). Mean CO2 reserve for all participants was narrower in C-SCI than in T-SCI or control group (-0.4 ± 2.9 vs.-2.9 ± 3.3 vs. -3.0 ± 1.2 l·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), respectively; P < 0.05). PG was higher in C-SCI than in T-SCI or control groups (10.5 ± 2.4 vs. 5.9 ± 2.4 vs. 6.3 ± 1.6 mmHg·l(-1)·min(-1), respectively; P < 0.05) and CG was not significantly different. The CO2 reserve was an independent predictor of apnea-hypopnea index. In conclusion, C-SCI had higher rates of central SDB, indicating that tetraplegia is a risk factor for central sleep apnea. Sleep-related hypoventilation may play a significant role in the mechanism of SDB in higher SCI levels. PMID:24114704

  12. Radiation necrosis causing failure of automatic ventilation during sleep with central sleep apnea

    SciTech Connect

    Udwadia, Z.F.; Athale, S.; Misra, V.P.; Wadia, N.H.

    1987-09-01

    A patient operated upon for a midline cerebellar hemangioblastoma developed failure of automatic respiration during sleep, together with central sleep apnea syndrome, approximately two years after receiving radiation therapy to the brain. Clinical and CT scan findings were compatible with a diagnosis of radiation necrosis as the cause of his abnormal respiratory control.

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  14. Pediatric sleep apnea

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... During sleep, all of the muscles in the body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep ...

  15. Snoring and Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Snoring and Sleep Apnea Snoring and Sleep Apnea Patient Health Information ... newsroom@entnet.org . Insight into sleeping disorders and sleep apnea Forty-five percent of normal adults snore ...

  16. Sleep Apnea Information Page

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Sleep Apnea Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Sleep Apnea? Sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder ...

  17. Relationship between central sleep apnea and Cheyne-Stokes Respiration.

    PubMed

    Flinta, Irena; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) in patients with heart failure (HF) occurs frequently and shows a serious influence on prognosis in this population. The key elements in the pathophysiology of CSA are respiratory instability with chronic hyperventilation, changes of arterial carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2) and elongated circulation time. The main manifestation of CSA in patients with HF is Cheyne-Stokes Respiration (CSR). The initial treatment is the optimization of HF therapy. However, many other options of the therapeutic management have been studied, particularly those based on positive airway pressure methods. In patients with heart failure we often can observe the overlap of CSA and CSR; we will discuss the differences between these forms of breathing disorders during sleep. We will also discuss when CSA and CSR occur independently of each other and the importance of CSR occurring during the daytime in context of CSA during the nighttime. PMID:26961739

  18. Sleep Apnea Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... sleep apnea runs in families. Studies have linked sleep apnea to high blood pressure, heart attack, and stroke. Up to 50 percent of people with sleep apnea also suffer from high blood pressure. People ...

  19. Sleep Apnea Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Sleep Apnea Detection Page Content Article Body Sleep apnea is a ... Down syndrome , cerebral palsy , or craniofacial (skull and face) abnormalities , are at higher risk for sleep apnea. ...

  20. [Effect of n-BiPAP therapy on the hemodynamics in patients with central sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Thalhofer, S; Dorow, P

    1995-03-01

    We report of five patients, suffering from central sleep-apnea. All patients had a global respiratory failure during day-time and developed severe pulmonary artery hypertension during sleep. Therapy with n-BiPAP leeds to an improvement of blood gases and a decrease of pulmonary artery hypertension during sleep. PMID:7617605

  1. What Is Sleep Apnea?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Sleep Apnea? Español Sleep apnea (AP-ne-ah) is ... many people. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Sleep Apnea Research: The HeartBeat Study 06/07/2012 ...

  2. Adaptive Servoventilation for Treatment of Opioid-Associated Central Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Javaheri, Shahrokh; Harris, Nicholas; Howard, Joseph; Chung, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Opioids have become part of contemporary treatment in the management of chronic pain. Although severe daytime ventilatory depression is uncommon, chronic use of opioids could be associated with severe central and obstructive sleep apnea. Objectives: To determine the acute efficacy, and prolonged use of adaptive servoventilation (ASV) to treat central sleep apnea in patients on chronic opioids. Methods: Twenty patients on opioid therapy referred for evaluation of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) were found to have central sleep apnea (CSA). The first 16 patients underwent continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) titration, which showed persistent CSA. With the notion that CSA will be eliminated with continued use of CPAP, 4 weeks later, 9 of the 16 patients underwent a second CPAP titration which proved equally ineffective. Therefore, therapy with CPAP was abandoned. All patients underwent ASV titration. Main Results: Diagnostic polysomnography showed an average apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 61/h and a central-apnea index (CAI) of 32/h. On CPAP 1, AHI was 34/h and CAI was 20/h. Respective indices on CPAP 2 were AHI 33/h and CAI 19/h. During titration with ASV, CAI was 0/h and the average HI was 11/h on final pressures. With a reduction in AHI, oxyhemoglobin saturation nadir increased from 83% to 90%, and arousal index decreased from 29/h of sleep to 12/h on final ASV pressures. Seventeen patients were followed for a minimum of 9 months and up to 6 years. The mean long-term adherence was 5.1 ± 2.5 hours. Conclusions: Chronic use of opioids could be associated with severe CSA which remains resistant to CPAP therapy. ASV device is effective in the treatment of CSA and over the long run, most patients remain compliant with the device. Randomized long-term studies are necessary to determine if treatment of sleep apnea with ASV improves quality of life and the known mortality associated with opioids. Citation: Javaheri S, Harris N, Howard J, Chung E. Adaptive servoventilation for treatment of opioid-associated central sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(6):637-643. PMID:24932143

  3. Sleep apnea and stroke.

    PubMed

    Culebras, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence has established that sleep apnea is a risk factor for stroke. Patients with stroke have a high prevalence of sleep apnea that may have preceded or developed as a result of the stroke. Well-established concurrent stroke risk factors for stroke like hypertension and atrial fibrillation respond favorably to the successful treatment of sleep apnea. The gold standard diagnosis of sleep apnea is obtained in the sleep laboratory, but unattended polysomnography is gaining acceptance. Positive airway pressure (PAP) (continuous positive airway pressure [CPAP] or bilevel positive airway pressure [BiPAP]) applications are the gold-standard treatment of sleep apnea. Suggestive evidence indicates that stroke occurrence or recurrence may be reduced with treatment of sleep apnea. PMID:25407131

  4. Recognizing pediatric sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Miriam; Owens, Judith

    2014-08-16

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common condition in childhood and has a significant impact on health, learning, academic performance, and quality of life. The purpose of this article is to review the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, clinical presentation, diagnostic procedures, and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:25036250

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ejaz, Shakir M.; Bhatia, Subhash; Hurwitz, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder associated with several medical conditions, increased risk of motor vehicle accidents, and overall healthcare expenditure. There is higher prevalence of depression in people with obstructive sleep apnea in both clinical and community samples. Many symptoms of depression and obstructive sleep apnea overlap causing under-diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in depressed patients. Sleep problems, including obstructive sleep apnea, are rarely assessed on a regular basis in patients with depressive disorders, but they may be responsible for antidepressant treatment failure. The mechanism of the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and depression is complex and remains unclear. Though some studies suggest a mutual relationship, the relationship remains unclear. Several possible pathophysiological mechanisms could explain how obstructive sleep apnea can cause or worsen depression. Increased knowledge of the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and depression might significantly improve diagnostic accuracy as well as treatment outcomes for both obstructive sleep apnea and depression. PMID:21922066

  6. A review of preventing central sleep apnea by inspired CO2.

    PubMed

    Mulchrone, A; Shokoueinejad, M; Webster, J

    2016-05-01

    Although almost completely unknown half a century ago, sleep disorders are gaining recognition as major issues to public health due to their growing prevalence and dire societal consequences. Despite being linked to several infamous catastrophic events such as Chernobyl, it is estimated that 90% of sufferers fail to get diagnosed and receive treatment, and a significant portion of the ones that do are often non-compliant due to the side effects of current treatments. This article presents a review of the current standard treatment for central sleep apnea, and investigates the advantages and possible consequences of using inspired carbon dioxide (CO2) as an alternative treatment option. PMID:27093535

  7. Pulse rate analysis in case of central sleep apnea: a new algorithm for cardiac rate estimation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quang-Vinh; Le Page, Ronan; Goujon, Jean-Marc; Guyader, Patrick; Billon, Michel

    2009-01-01

    This paper first describes the AM-FM demodulation of an arterial pressure signal. Although it is known to be efficient on signals modulated by breathing, we demonstrate that in case of lack of respiratory modulation (real or simulated central sleep apnea), the AM-FM algorithm doesn't perform well in heart rate extraction. We introduce then a new algorithm based on Singular Spectrum Analysis eigenvalues which performs better cardiac frequency estimation in this context. Respiratory estimation is possible but is beyond the scope of this paper. The error for cardiac frequency estimation is around 0.2 BPM (Beats Per Minute) versus 5.5 BPM for the AM-FM demodulation. Further experimentations will be performed (with this time both cardiac and respiratory assessments) and will deal with real sleep apnea cases. PMID:19965048

  8. Sleep Apnea (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a result, sleep apnea can hurt school performance. Teachers and others may think a child has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or learning difficulties. Diagnosis If your child snores regularly, is ...

  9. Adaptive Servo-Ventilation for Central Sleep Apnea in Systolic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Cowie, Martin R.; Woehrle, Holger; Wegscheider, Karl; Angermann, Christiane; d’Ortho, Marie-Pia; Erdmann, Erland; Levy, Patrick; Simonds, Anita K.; Somers, Virend K.; Zannad, Faiez; Teschler, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Central sleep apnea is associated with poor prognosis and death in patients with heart failure. Adaptive servo-ventilation is a therapy that uses a noninvasive ventilator to treat central sleep apnea by delivering servo-controlled inspiratory pressure support on top of expiratory positive airway pressure. We investigated the effects of adaptive servo-ventilation in patients who had heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and predominantly central sleep apnea. METHODS We randomly assigned 1325 patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction of 45% or less, an apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) of 15 or more events (occurrences of apnea or hypopnea) per hour, and a predominance of central events to receive guideline-based medical treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation or guideline-based medical treatment alone (control). The primary end point in the time-to-event analysis was the first event of death from any cause, lifesaving cardiovascular intervention (cardiac transplantation, implantation of a ventricular assist device, resuscitation after sudden cardiac arrest, or appropriate lifesaving shock), or unplanned hospitalization for worsening heart failure. RESULTS In the adaptive servo-ventilation group, the mean AHI at 12 months was 6.6 events per hour. The incidence of the primary end point did not differ significantly between the adaptive servo-ventilation group and the control group (54.1% and 50.8%, respectively; hazard ratio, 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97 to 1.31; P = 0.10). All-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality were significantly higher in the adaptive servo-ventilation group than in the control group (hazard ratio for death from any cause, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.55; P = 0.01; and hazard ratio for cardiovascular death, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.65; P = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS Adaptive servo-ventilation had no significant effect on the primary end point in patients who had heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and predominantly central sleep apnea, but all-cause and cardiovascular mortality were both increased with this therapy. PMID:26323938

  10. Testosterone Deficiency and Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Burschtin, Omar; Wang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common condition among middle-aged men and is often associated with reduced testosterone (T) levels. OSA can contribute to fatigue and sexual dysfunction in men. There is suggestion that T supplementation alters ventilatory responses, possibly through effects on central chemoreceptors. Traditionally, it has been recommended that T replacement therapy (TRT) be avoided in the presence of untreated severe sleep apnea. With OSA treatment, however, TRT may not only improve hypogonadism, but may also alleviate erectile/sexual dysfunction. PMID:27132581

  11. Mechanisms and Clinical Consequences of Untreated Central Sleep Apnea in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Khayat, Rami; Ponikowski, Piotr; Augostini, Ralph; Stellbrink, Christoph; Mianulli, Marcus; Abraham, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is a highly prevalent, though often unrecognized, comorbidity in patients with heart failure (HF). Data from HF population studies suggest that it may present in 30% to 50% of HF patients. CSA is recognized as an important contributor to the progression of HF and to HF-related morbidity and mortality. Over the past 2 decades, an expanding body of research has begun to shed light on the pathophysiologic mechanisms of CSA. Armed with this growing knowledge base, the sleep, respiratory, and cardiovascular research communities have been working to identify ways to treat CSA in HF with the ultimate goal of improving patient quality of life and clinical outcomes. In this paper, we examine the current state of knowledge about the mechanisms of CSA in HF and review emerging therapies for this disorder. PMID:25572513

  12. Mechanisms and clinical consequences of untreated central sleep apnea in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Khayat, Rami; Ponikowski, Piotr; Augostini, Ralph; Stellbrink, Christoph; Mianulli, Marcus; Abraham, William T

    2015-01-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is a highly prevalent, though often unrecognized, comorbidity in patients with heart failure (HF). Data from HF population studies suggest that it may present in 30% to 50% of HF patients. CSA is recognized as an important contributor to the progression of HF and to HF-related morbidity and mortality. Over the past 2 decades, an expanding body of research has begun to shed light on the pathophysiologic mechanisms of CSA. Armed with this growing knowledge base, the sleep, respiratory, and cardiovascular research communities have been working to identify ways to treat CSA in HF with the ultimate goal of improving patient quality of life and clinical outcomes. In this paper, we examine the current state of knowledge about the mechanisms of CSA in HF and review emerging therapies for this disorder. PMID:25572513

  13. Contemporary Insights and Novel Treatment Approaches to Central Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Grayburn, Ryan L.; Kaka, Yaquta; Wilson Tang, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion Statement Central sleep apnea (CSA) is a common and under-diagnosed condition commonly associated with Cheyne-Stokes respiration. It is particularly prevalent in the heart failure population affecting up to 40% of all patients with heart failure. The pathophysiology associated with CSA is based on the underlying effects of hypoventilation and hyperventilation, with neurologic dysregulation of respiratory control as the primary defect. However, therapeutic options are limited due to the prevailing perception that CSA is a consequence, rather than cause of morbidity and mortality. At present, the main focus remains treating the underlying problem (ie intensifying heart failure therapeutics, decongestion), while additional suggestions of using acetazolamide, progesterone, nocturnal oxygen, and theophylline have not been validated with contemporary clinical trials. Positive pressure ventilation is currently the primary recommendation for all patients with sleep-disordered breathing (CSA included), and in some patients may effectively reduce the apnea-hypopnea index. However, significant research is ongoing to determine how to treat this complex patient population. PMID:24874028

  14. Severe Central Sleep Apnea Associated With Chronic Baclofen Therapy: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Pierre-Yves; Joyeux-Faure, Marie; Gentina, Thibaut; Launois, Sandrine H; d'Ortho, Marie Pia; Pépin, Jean-Louis; Gagnadoux, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid-B agonist with muscle-relaxant properties, is widely used in patients with severe spasticity. In animals, baclofen has been shown to decrease respiratory drive. In humans, however, use of baclofen at the standard dose did not significantly impair sleep-disordered breathing in a susceptible population of snorers. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the role of baclofen for the treatment of alcohol dependence. We describe severe central sleep apnea (CSA) in four patients with none of the conditions commonly associated with CSA who were receiving chronic baclofen therapy for alcohol withdrawal. In one patient, baclofen withdrawal was associated with a complete resolution of CSA. Three patients were treated by adaptive servo-ventilation while continuing their treatment with baclofen. Given the increasing number of patients receiving baclofen for alcohol withdrawal treatment, physicians should be aware that these patients might be affected by severe CSA. Future studies are required to determine the mechanisms, prevalence, and treatment modalities of sleep-disordered breathing associated with baclofen usage. PMID:27157226

  15. Pathophysiology of Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Veasey, Sigrid C.; Morgan, Barbara J.; O'Donnell, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep-induced apnea and disordered breathing refers to intermittent, cyclical cessations or reductions of airflow, with or without obstructions of the upper airway (OSA). In the presence of an anatomically compromised, collapsible airway, the sleep-induced loss of compensatory tonic input to the upper airway dilator muscle motor neurons leads to collapse of the pharyngeal airway. In turn, the ability of the sleeping subject to compensate for this airway obstruction will determine the degree of cycling of these events. Several of the classic neurotransmitters and a growing list of neuromodulators have now been identified that contribute to neurochemical regulation of pharyngeal motor neuron activity and airway patency. Limited progress has been made in developing pharmacotherapies with acceptable specificity for the treatment of sleep-induced airway obstruction. We review three types of major long-term sequelae to severe OSA that have been assessed in humans through use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment and in animal models via long-term intermittent hypoxemia (IH): 1) cardiovascular. The evidence is strongest to support daytime systemic hypertension as a consequence of severe OSA, with less conclusive effects on pulmonary hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease, and cardiac arrhythmias. The underlying mechanisms mediating hypertension include enhanced chemoreceptor sensitivity causing excessive daytime sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity, combined with overproduction of superoxide ion and inflammatory effects on resistance vessels. 2) Insulin sensitivity and homeostasis of glucose regulation are negatively impacted by both intermittent hypoxemia and sleep disruption, but whether these influences of OSA are sufficient, independent of obesity, to contribute significantly to the “metabolic syndrome” remains unsettled. 3) Neurocognitive effects include daytime sleepiness and impaired memory and concentration. These effects reflect hypoxic-induced “neural injury.” We discuss future research into understanding the pathophysiology of sleep apnea as a basis for uncovering newer forms of treatment of both the ventilatory disorder and its multiple sequelae. PMID:20086074

  16. [Sleep apnea and cardiovascular risk].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, H; Koehler, U; Hasper, E; Ewig, S; Lüderitz, B

    1995-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is the most important form of sleep-related breathing disorders due to its high prevalence and its potential for developing cardiovascular diseases. The increased morbidity of these patients is explained by the coincidence with cardiovascular diseases, and the increased mortality of untreated patients is due to cardiovascular complications, which depend on the degree of the breathing disorder. Heavy snoring, as a partial obstruction of the upper airways, and OSAS are independent risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Causal associations exist between acute hemodynamic changes, pressure and volume load, changes in the humoral and the central nervous system, and blood gas alterations during the obstructive apnea and the long-term condition due to OSAS. Obstructive apnea can be divided into an early phase, a late phase, and a phase of the postapneic hyperventilation with respect to hemodynamic changes, blood gas alterations, and the autonomic nervous system. The most striking changes in these parameters are seen at the end of apnea and in the first resumption of breathing, with an increase in systemic and pulmonary blood pressure, decrease in stroke volume, and a distinct change in heart rate. Manifestation of systemic hypertension even in the awake state is promoted by changes in the volume system, with activation of neurohumoral changes and by a resetting of baro- and chemoreceptors. Similar mechanisms are discussed in the development of pulmonary hypertension. In this circumstance the role of hypoxemia as a causal factor for pulmonary hypertension or as a consequence due to structural changes of the pulmonary vessels is controversial. OSAS is frequent in patients with coronary heart disease and these patients must be classified as a particular risk group because of apnea-associated silent myocardial ischemia and electric instability of the myocardium. The occurrence of arrhythmia in patients with OSAS is closely related to the apnea and hyperventilation events and depends on the sympathovagal balance. Early diagnosis and suitable therapy of patients at risk not only abolishes the sleep-related breathing disorder but also improves long-term outcome. PMID:8571638

  17. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Age

    PubMed Central

    Ayalon, Liat; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Drummond, Sean P. A.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Healthy aging is associated with cognitive deficits similar to those found in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). As in OSA, older adults show compensatory cerebral activation during cognitive demands in the face of neurocognitive decline. Objectives: The current study examines whether the combination of increasing age and sleep apnea will lead to a stronger compensatory response than either factor alone, or overwhelm the brain's capacity to compensate. Methods: A total of 14 treatment-naive patients with sleep apnea (aged 25–59 yr) and 14 age-matched healthy control subjects were each divided into two age groups of young (<45 yr) and middle-aged (≥ 45 yr). All underwent a sleep study, followed the next morning by a functional magnetic resonance imaging session that included a sustained attention and a verbal encoding task. A priori contrast analyses compared middle-aged patients with OSA to young patients, young control subjects, and middle-aged control subjects. Measurements and Main Results: Middle-aged patients with OSA showed reduced performance for immediate word recall and slower reaction time during sustained attention compared with the other three groups (middle-aged control, young sleep apnea, and young control). For both tasks, decreased activation was detected for middle-aged sleep apnea relative to the other groups in task-related brain regions. Conclusions: These results suggest that the presence of both sleep apnea and increasing age overwhelmed the brain's capacity to respond to cognitive challenges with compensatory recruitment and to maintain performance. The findings that sleep apnea impairs performance and brain function at a younger age than what might ordinarily be expected underscore the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of sleep apnea. PMID:20395556

  18. Metabolic syndrome and sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kostoglou-Athanassiou, I; Athanassiou, P

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a disorder characterized by abdominal obesity, hypertension, increased triglycerides, decreased HDL cholesterol and increased blood glucose. Accumulating evidence strongly indicates that insulin resistance and an increased amount of abdominal fat are the pathogenic factors for the characteristics of metabolic syndrome. The metabolic syndrome is characterized by an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Studies indicate that sleep apnea may be a manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. It has also been suggested that the metabolic syndrome or "syndrome X" should also comprise obstructive sleep apnea and should then be called syndrome "Z". It appears that obstructive sleep apnea and the metabolic syndrome are characterized by the same pathophysiologic environment, which increases the risk for the development of cardiovascular disease. The increased amount of visceral fat and the accompanying insulin resistance seem to be the main characteristics responsible for the development of obstructive sleep apnea and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:18923660

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea in children.

    PubMed

    Chan, James; Edman, Jennifer C; Koltai, Peter J

    2004-03-01

    Obstructive sleep-disordered breathing is common in children. From 3 percent to 12 percent of children snore, while obstructive sleep apnea syndrome affects 1 percent to 10 percent of children. The majority of these children have mild symptoms, and many outgrow the condition. Consequences of untreated obstructive sleep apnea include failure to thrive, enuresis, attention-deficit disorder, behavior problems, poor academic performance, and cardiopulmonary disease. The most common etiology of obstructive sleep apnea is adenotonsillar hypertrophy. Clinical diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea is reliable; however, the gold standard evaluation is overnight polysomnography. Treatment includes the use of continuous positive airway pressure and weight loss in obese children. These alternatives are tolerated poorly in children and rarely are considered primary therapy. Adenotonsillectomy is curative in most patients. Children with craniofacial syndromes, neuromuscular diseases, medical comorbidities, or severe obstructive sleep apnea, and those younger than three years are at increased risk of developing postoperative complications and should be monitored overnight in the hospital. PMID:15023015

  20. Obstructive sleep apnea and other sleep-related syndromes.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Teresa; Attarian, Hrayr

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder characterized by repetitive episodes of breathing cessation due to complete or partial collapse of the upper airway therefore affecting ventilation. It is quite common, with a prevalence of about 2-4%, has a strong genetic component, and creates a proinflammatory state with elevated TNFα and other cytokines. If untreated, OSA can lead to significant neurological problems that include stroke, cognitive decline, depression, headaches, peripheral neuropathy, and nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). Treatment reverses some of these neurological problems. Treatment includes continuous positive airway pressure and its variants, oral appliances, weight loss, upper airway surgery, and rarely maxillofacial procedures. Other sleep breathing disorders such as hypoventilation, central sleep apnea, complex sleep apnea, and Cheyne-Stokes respiration are less common and are sometimes associated with neuromuscular disorders causing diaphragmatic paralysis, but can also be seen in opiate exposure and severe obesity. PMID:24365301

  1. Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea at Altitude.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Konrad E; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Ulrich, Silvia

    2015-06-01

    Bloch, Konrad E., Tsogyal D. Latshang, and Silvia Ulrich. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea at altitude. High Alt Med Biol 16:110-116, 2015.--Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in the general population, in particular in men and women of older age. In OSA patients sleeping near sea level, the apneas/hypopneas associated with intermittent hypoxemia are predominantly due to upper airway collapse. When OSA patients stay at altitudes above 1600 m, corresponding to that of many tourist destinations, hypobaric hypoxia promotes frequent central apneas in addition to obstructive events, resulting in combined intermittent and sustained hypoxia. This induces strong sympathetic activation with elevated heart rate, cardiac arrhythmia, and systemic hypertension. There are concerns that these changes expose susceptible OSA patients, in particular those with advanced age and co-morbidities, to an excessive risk of cardiovascular and other adverse events during a stay at altitude. Based on data from randomized trials, it seems advisable for OSA patients to use continuous positive airway pressure treatment with computer controlled mask pressure adjustment (autoCPAP) in combination with acetazolamide during an altitude sojourn. If CPAP therapy is not feasible, acetazolamide alone is better than no treatment at all, as it improves oxygenation and sleep apnea and prevents excessive blood pressure rises of OSA patients at altitude. PMID:25973669

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Drager, Luciano F.; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is independently associated with death from cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction and stroke. Myocardial infarction and stroke are complications of atherosclerosis; therefore, over the last decade investigators have tried to unravel relationships between OSA and atherosclerosis. OSA may accelerate atherosclerosis by exacerbating key atherogenic risk factors. For instance, OSA is a recognized secondary cause of hypertension and may contribute to insulin resistance, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. In addition, clinical data and experimental evidence in animal models suggest that OSA can have direct proatherogenic effects inducing systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, vascular smooth cell activation, increased adhesion molecule expression, monocyte/lymphocyte activation, increased lipid loading in macrophages, lipid peroxidation, and endothelial dysfunction. Several cross-sectional studies have shown consistently that OSA is independently associated with surrogate markers of premature atherosclerosis, most of them in the carotid bed. Moreover, OSA treatment with continuous positive airway pressure may attenuate carotid atherosclerosis, as has been shown in a randomized clinical trial. This review provides an update on the role of OSA in atherogenesis and highlights future perspectives in this important research area. PMID:21813534

  3. Comorbidities in Infants with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Qubty, William F.; Mrelashvili, Anna; Kotagal, Suresh; Lloyd, Robin M.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: The clinical characteristics of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in infants have been insufficiently characterized. Our aim was to describe identifiable comorbidities in infants with obstructive sleep apnea, which may assist in recognizing these patients earlier in their disease course and help improve management. Methods: This was a single-center, retrospective study involving infants 0-17 months of age with a diagnosis of OSA on the basis of clinical features and nocturnal polysomnography (PSG) at the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine between 2000 and 2011. Patients were excluded if they had central apnea accounting for greater than 50% of respiratory events. OSA severity was determined by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Results: One hundred thirty-nine patients were included. Based upon the AHI, they were subdivided into mild (AHI < 5; 30%), moderate (AHI 5-9; 30%), or severe (AHI > 10; 40%) categories. Comorbidities included gastroesophageal reflux in 95/139 (68%), periodic limb movements in sleep in 59/139 (42%), craniofacial abnormalities in 52/139 (37%), neuromuscular abnormalities in 47/139 (34%), prematurity in 41/139 (29%), genetic syndromes in 41/139 (29%), laryngomalacia/tracheomalacia in 38/139 (27%), and epilepsy in 23/139 (17%) of subjects. Severity of OSA correlated with prematurity, having a genetic syndrome, or neuromuscular abnormality. Multispecialty evaluation was needed for 119/139 (86%). Conclusion: Comorbidities in infants with OSA differ from those of older children. Based upon the comorbidities identified in our study population, it appears that appropriate management of infants with OSA requires a multidisciplinary approach involving genetics, gastroenterology, pulmonology, otolaryngology, neurology, and general pediatrics. Citation: Qubty WF, Mrelashvili A, Kotagal S, Lloyd RM. Comorbidities in infants with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(11):1213-1216. PMID:25325583

  4. Obstructive sleep apnea and asthma*

    PubMed Central

    Salles, Cristina; Terse-Ramos, Regina; Souza-Machado, Adelmir; Cruz, Álvaro A

    2013-01-01

    Symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing, especially obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), are common in asthma patients and have been associated with asthma severity. It is known that asthma symptoms tend to be more severe at night and that asthma-related deaths are most likely to occur during the night or early morning. Nocturnal symptoms occur in 60-74% of asthma patients and are markers of inadequate control of the disease. Various pathophysiological mechanisms are related to the worsening of asthma symptoms, OSAS being one of the most important factors. In patients with asthma, OSAS should be investigated whenever there is inadequate control of symptoms of nocturnal asthma despite the treatment recommended by guidelines having been administered. There is evidence in the literature that the use of continuous positive airway pressure contributes to asthma control in asthma patients with obstructive sleep apnea and uncontrolled asthma. PMID:24310634

  5. Sleep apnea syndrome after irradiation of the neck

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, J.P.; Whitlock, W.L.; Dietrich, R.A.; Shaw, T. )

    1989-12-01

    After irradiation of the neck for a squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar pillar and vocal cord, a 71-year-old man presented with a rapidly progressive sleep apnea syndrome. Previous reports describe the condition of patients with obstructive sleep apnea that developed after neck irradiation and secondary to supraglottic edema. Our patient had an obstructive component to his apnea similar to that described in previous cases, but, in addition, he had hypothyroidism. Myxedema is a well-described cause of both obstructive and central apnea. We believe both contributed to his condition. He was successfully treated by placement of a tracheostomy and by thyroid supplementation. In patients who present with sleep apnea after neck irradiation, especially with acute or severe symptoms, the differential diagnosis should include both a central cause from hypothyroidism as well as a peripheral obstructive cause from laryngeal edema.

  6. Sleep Apnea and Risk of Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Su, Vincent Yi-Fong; Chen, Yung-Tai; Lin, Wei-Chen; Wu, Li-An; Chang, Shi-Chuan; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Su, Wei-Juin; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lee, Yu-Chin; Chou, Kun-Ta

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Epidemiological studies have identified a trend in the development of depressive and anxiety disorders following a diagnosis of sleep apnea. The relationship between sleep apnea and subsequent panic disorder, however, remains unclear. METHODS Using a nationwide database, the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, patients with sleep apnea and age-, sex-, income-, and urbanization-matched control patients who did not have sleep apnea were enrolled between 2000 and 2010. Patients with a prior diagnosis of panic disorder before enrollment were excluded. The 2 cohorts were observed until December 31, 2010. The primary endpoint was occurrence of newly diagnosed panic disorder. RESULTS A total of 8,704 sleep apnea patients and 34,792 control patients were enrolled. Of the 43,496 patients, 263 (0.60%) suffered from panic disorder during a mean follow-up period of 3.92 years, including 117 (1.34%) from the sleep apnea cohort and 146 (0.42%) from the control group. The Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a predisposition of patients with sleep apnea to develop panic disorder (log-rank test, P <.001). After multivariate adjustment, the hazard ratio for subsequent panic disorder among the sleep apnea patients was 2.17 (95% confidence interval, 1.68–2.81; P <.001). CONCLUSIONS Sleep apnea appears to confer a higher risk for future development of panic disorder. PMID:26195676

  7. Wireless remote monitoring system for sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sechang; Kwon, Hyeokjun; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2011-04-01

    Sleep plays the important role of rejuvenating the body, especially the central nervous system. However, more than thirty million people suffer from sleep disorders and sleep deprivation. That can cause serious health consequences by increasing the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart attack and so on. Apart from the physical health risk, sleep disorders can lead to social problems when sleep disorders are not diagnosed and treated. Currently, sleep disorders are diagnosed through sleep study in a sleep laboratory overnight. This involves large expenses in addition to the inconvenience of overnight hospitalization and disruption of daily life activities. Although some systems provide home based diagnosis, most of systems record the sleep data in a memory card, the patient has to face the inconvenience of sending the memory card to a doctor for diagnosis. To solve the problem, we propose a wireless sensor system for sleep apnea, which enables remote monitoring while the patient is at home. The system has 5 channels to measure ECG, Nasal airflow, body position, abdominal/chest efforts and oxygen saturation. A wireless transmitter unit transmits signals with Zigbee and a receiver unit which has two RF modules, Zigbee and Wi-Fi, receives signals from the transmitter unit and retransmits signals to the remote monitoring system with Zigbee and Wi-Fi, respectively. By using both Zigbee and Wi-Fi, the wireless sensor system can achieve a low power consumption and wide range coverage. The system's features are presented, as well as continuous monitoring results of vital signals.

  8. Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Emilia; Roche, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by repetitive episodes of airflow cessation resulting in brief arousals and intermittent hypoxemia. Several studies have documented significant daytime cognitive and behavioral dysfunction that seems to extend beyond that associated with simple sleepiness and that persists in some patients after therapeutic intervention. A still unanswered question is whether cognitive symptoms in OSA are primarily a consequence of sleep fragmentation and hypoxemia, or whether they coexist independently from OSA. Moreover, very little is known about OSA effects on cognitive performances in the elderly in whom an increased prevalence of OSA is present. In this review we will consider recent reports in the association between sleep apnea and cognition, with specific interest in elderly subjects, in whom sleep disturbances and age-related cognitive decline naturally occur. This will allow us to elucidate the behavioral and cognitive functions in OSA patients and to gain insight into age differences in the cognitive impairment. Clinically, these outcomes will aid clinicians in the evaluation of diurnal consequences of OSA and the need to propose early treatment. PMID:22661967

  9. Chiari 1 Malformation Presenting as Central Sleep Apnea during Pregnancy: A Case Report, Treatment Considerations, and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    St. Louis, Erik K.; Jinnur, Praveen; McCarter, Stuart J.; Duwell, Ethan J.; Benarroch, Eduardo E.; Kantarci, Kejal; Pichelmann, Mark A.; Silber, Michael H.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Olson, Eric J.; Morgenthaler, Timothy I.; Somers, Virend K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Chiari malformation (CM) type-1 frequently causes obstructive or central sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in both adults and children, although SDB is relatively rare as a presenting manifestation in the absence of other neurological symptoms. The definitive treatment of symptomatic CM is surgical decompression. We report a case that is, to our knowledge, a novel manifestation of central sleep apnea (CSA) due to CM type-1 with severe exacerbation and initial clinical presentation during pregnancy. Methods: Case report from tertiary care comprehensive sleep medicine center with literature review of SDB manifestations associated with CM type-1. PubMed search was conducted between January 1982 and October 2013. Results: We report a 25-year-old woman with severe CSA initially presenting during her first pregnancy that eventually proved to be caused by CM type-1. The patient was successfully treated preoperatively by adaptive servoventilation (ASV), with effective resolution of SDB following surgical decompression, and without recurrence in a subsequent pregnancy. Our literature review found that 58% of CM patients with SDB had OSA alone, 28% had CSA alone, 8 (10%) had mixed OSA/CSA, and 6 (8%) had hypoventilation. Of CM patients presenting with SDB, 50% had OSA, 42% had CSA, 8% had mixed OSA/CSA, and 10.4% had hypoventilation. We speculate that CSA may develop in CM patients in whom brainstem compression results in excessive central chemoreflex sensitivity with consequent hypocapnic CSA. Conclusion: Chiari malformation type-1 may present with a diversity of SDB manifestations, and timely recognition and surgical referral are necessary to prevent further neurological deficits. ASV therapy can effectively manage CSA caused by CM type-1, which may initially present during pregnancy. PMID:25386156

  10. A novel therapeutic approach for central sleep apnea: Phrenic nerve stimulation by the remedē® System.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Susan; Costanzo, Maria Rosa

    2016-03-01

    Central sleep apnea is a devastating disease which occurs in approximately 40% of patients with heart failure as well as patients with a history of stroke, opioid use and neurological conditions. It is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure likely due to the recurrent episodes of hypoxia and nor-epinephrine release. There have historically been few therapeutic options; positive airway pressure therapies have been the most common treatment to date. However, the adoption of positive airway pressure therapies has been limited due to poor patient adherence and acceptance and recent evidence of increased cardiovascular mortality in low ejection fraction heart failure patients with CSA. The remedē® System, utilizing transvenous stimulation of the phrenic nerve, offers a novel physiologic approach to therapy that eliminates the need for positive airway pressure and patient adherence. Studies have shown that this therapy improves sleep, oxygenation, and quality of life and ongoing trials are expected to give additional randomized data to support the therapeutic benefit of the remedē® System. PMID:26964705

  11. Surgical management of obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome is a common disorder that has recently received much attention by the medical community due to its potentially serious physiological consequences. The clinical significance of OSA results from hypoxemia and sleep fragmentation caused by collapse of the airway, which leads to apnea or hypopnea during sleep. This paper reviews common surgical techniques used for clinical management of OSA patients, with emphasis on jaw advancement surgical procedures. PMID:16389337

  12. Effects of nocturnal oxygen therapy in patients with chronic heart failure and central sleep apnea: CHF-HOT study.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Yoko M; Ueshima, Kenji; Yasuno, Shinji; Sasayama, Shigetake

    2016-02-01

    It was previously reported that nocturnal home oxygen therapy (HOT) significantly improved not only sleep disordered breathing (SDB), but also quality of life (QOL) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in two trials. To strengthen the statistical reliability of the above efficacies of HOT and to assess the effects of 12-week nocturnal HOT on suppression of ventricular arrhythmias, we combined the two trials and undertook a post hoc analysis. Ninety-seven patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and central sleep apnea were assigned to receive HOT (45 patients) or not (52 patients). HOT resulted in greater reduction in the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (-11.4 ± 11.0 vs. -0.2 ± 7.6 events/h, p < 0.01), which is associated with greater improvement in the Specific Activity Scale (0.8 ± 1.2 vs. 0.0 ± 0.6, p < 0.01), New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class (p < 0.01), and LVEF (p = 0.06). Median number of premature ventricular contraction (PVC) at baseline was 17 beats per hour in both the HOT and the control groups. Overall improvements of PVCs were not different either in the HOT group or in the control. However, in 12 patients with NYHA >III and AHI >20 events/h, PVC was significantly improved by HOT with a marked reduction in AHI and a substantial increase in LVEF. In conclusion, among patients with CHF and CSA, HOT improves SDB, QOL, and cardiac function. The effectiveness of HOT for ventricular arrhythmias was not observed in the overall analysis, but only in a limited number of patients with severe CHF and SDB. To clarify the effects of HOT on ventricular arrhythmias in patients with CHF and SDB, a further study is needed. PMID:25348726

  13. Clinical manifestations of sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may manifest in a number of ways from subtle intrusion into daily life to profound sleepiness, snoring, witnessed apneas and other classic symptoms. Although there is increasing evidence suggesting OSA can adversely affect health in a variety of ways, this disorder remains underdiagnosed. The most well-escribed health consequences of OSA relate to the cardiovascular system. Hypertension and arrhythmias have a strong association with OSA, and evidence suggests that treatment of OSA in patients with refractory hypertension and in patients planning cardioversion for atrial fibrillation may be of particularly importance. Significant associations between heart failure and OSA as well as complex sleep apnea have also been well-described. Cerebrovascular insult, impaired neurocognition, and poorly controlled mood disorder are also associated with in OSA. Therapy for OSA may ameliorate atherosclerotic progression and improve outcomes post-cerebrovascular accident (CVA). OSA should be considered in patients complaining of poor concentration at work, actual or near-miss motor vehicle accidents, and patients with severe sleepiness as a component of their co-morbid mood disorders. The metabolic impact of OSA has also been studied, particularly in relation to glucose homeostasis. Also of interest is the potential impact OSA has on lipid metabolism. The adverse effect untreated OSA has on glucose tolerance and lipid levels has led to the suggestion that OSA is yet another constituent of the metabolic syndrome. Some of these metabolic derangements may be related to the adverse effects untreated OSA has on hepatic health. The cardiovascular, neurocognitive, and metabolic manifestations of OSA can have a significant impact on patient health and quality of life. In many instances, evidence exists that therapy not only improves outcomes in general, but also modifies the severity of co-morbid disease. To mitigate the long-term sequela of this disease, providers should be aware of the subtle manifestations of OSA and order appropriate testing as necessary. PMID:26543619

  14. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Growing Problem

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Kevin K.; McClary, Andrew C.; Amedee, Ronald G.

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is an underrecognized and underdiagnosed medical condition, with a myriad of negative consequences on patients' health and society as a whole. Symptoms include daytime sleepiness, loud snoring, and restless sleep. While the “gold standard” of diagnosis is by polysomnography, a detailed history and focused physical examination may help uncover previously undiagnosed cases. Undetected obstructive sleep apnea can lead to hypertension, heart disease, depression, and even death. Several modalities exist for treating obstructive sleep apnea, including continuous positive airway pressure, oral appliances, and several surgical procedures. However, conservative approaches, such as weight loss and alcohol and tobacco cessation, are also strongly encouraged in the patient with obstructive sleep apnea. With increased awareness, both the medical community and society as a whole can begin to address this disease and help relieve the negative sequelae that result from it. PMID:21603432

  15. Therapeutic options for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Baby, Benesa S; Aronow, Wilbert S; Chandy, Dipak

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common, chronic disorder characterized by the cessation or reduction in airflow due to periodic mechanical obstruction of the upper airway passage during sleep. Symptoms and signs of sleep apnea include daytime sleepiness, fatigue, poor concentration, snoring, resuscitative snorts, and related occupational accidents. Sleep apnea is classified into 3 types based on its severity and management varies accordingly. The first step in treatment is to identify correctible causes and educate patients on lifestyle modifications. Positive airway pressure is the preferred treatment modality and can be delivered via 3 different modes. Oral appliances are of 3 types and are generally indicated in mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea. Surgery is a final therapeutic option that focuses on the removal of excessive tissue from different sites of the pharyngeal airway. PMID:21642831

  16. Sleep Symptoms and Polysomnographic Patterns of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    TAVASOLI, Azita; JALILOLGHADR, Shabnam; LOTFI, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to investigate the sleep symptoms and polysomnographic patterns of obstructive sleep apnea in overweight and obese children. Materials & Methods Overweight or obese children aging 6-18 yr old referred during 2010 to Endocrinology Clinic of Ghods Hospital in Ghazvin, central Iran were enrolled in the study. Polysomnography was done for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea and the BEARS and Children’s Sleep Habits questionnaires were used to survey sleep behaviors. Results: We enrolled 30 children (14 males, 16 females). Twenty-one cases had body mass index (BMI) >95% and 9 had 85% sleep talking 10 (33.3%); bedtime resistance 9 (30%); nightmares 8 (26.6%); waking up problems 6 (20%); sleep walking 6 (20%); difficult breathing 4 (13.3%); bedwetting 3 (10%) and sleep onset delay 2 (6.06%). Severe, moderate and mild apnea – hypopnea Index (AHI) were seen in 12, 9 and 6 subjects, respectively. A significant Pearson correlation was found between the BMI values and sleep latency. Conclusion : Prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea is high among overweight and obese children. Physicians should be familiar with its manifestations and consider polysomnography as an invaluable diagnostic test. There was no relation between the degree of obesity and severity of obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:27057182

  17. Dental treatment of a patient with central sleep apnea and phobic anxiety under sedation: report of a case and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kılınç, Yeliz; Işık, Berrin

    2012-11-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) results from a reduction in lack of output from the central respiratory generator in the brainstem, manifesting as apneas and hypopneas without discernible efforts. CSA can lead to hypercarbia, arrhythmias, pulmonary hypertension, and heart failure. Indeed, the patient may develop a disturbed breathing during sedation procedures. We report a patient who was diagnosed with CSA and had been on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for 5 years. He was referred for multiple tooth extractions under sedation owing to severe gag reflex and phobic anxiety disorder. The treatment was completed uneventfully under N(2)O and sevoflurane inhalation accompanied by midazolam and ketamine induction. The role of sedative, analgesic, and anesthetic agents as a precipitating factor for CSA is of particular concern. The combined administration of midazolam, ketamine, sevoflurane, and N(2)O/O(2) is a useful and safe option for patients requiring sedation. PMID:23083486

  18. Increased Vagal Tone and Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tosaddak

    2016-01-01

    It has been observed that atrial overdrive pacing abolishes sleep apnea syndrome, but how it does so has not been explained. There is a possibility that it sends a retrograde inhibitory impulse to the vagal center in the brainstem, which in turn reduces the vagal tone, and thus prevents sleep apnea. Therefore, medical vagolytics such as atropine type of drugs should have the same effect. This is a case report of such an attempt. PMID:25933142

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Due To Extrathoracic Tracheomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Muzumdar, Hiren; Nandalike, K.; Bent, J.; Arens, Raanan

    2013-01-01

    We report obstructive sleep apnea in a 3-year-old boy with tracheomalacia secondary to tracheotomy that resolved after placement of a metallic stent in the region of tracheomalacia. The tracheal location of obstruction during sleep in this case contrasts with the usual location in the pharynx or, less often, the larynx. This case also demonstrates the utility of polysomnography in managing decannulation of tracheostomies. Citation: Muzumdar H; Nandalike K; Bent J; Arens R. Obstructive sleep apnea due to extrathoracic tracheomalacia. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(2):163–164. PMID:23372471

  20. Sleep Quality and Risk for Sleep Apnea in Incarcerated Women

    PubMed Central

    Harner, Holly M.; Budescu, Mia

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about characteristics of women's sleep during incarceration. Objectives The study objectives were to: describe incarcerated women's sleep quality; document incarcerated women's risk for sleep apnea; and identify other factors that contribute to poor sleep quality during incarceration. Methods This cross-sectional descriptive exploratory investigation was conducted in a maximum security women's prison in the United States. Incarcerated women's sleep quality and their risk for sleep apnea was assessed by using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Multivariable Apnea Prediction Score (MAPS), respectively. Results Four hundred thirty-eight incarcerated women participated in this investigation. Results indicate that 72% of the sample met the PSQI criteria for “poor sleepers.” Poor sleepers were significantly more likely to report sleep disturbances, and scored significantly higher on the risk for sleep apnea scale compared to women who did not meet the poor sleep threshold. Approximately 10% of the sample had a probability for sleep apnea higher than .50. Factors that contributed to poor sleep included: (a) “racing thoughts/worry/thinking about things”; (b) environmental noise and other factors; (c) physical health conditions/pain; (d) nightmares and flashbacks; and (e) not taking sleep medication. Discussion Most participants reported poor sleep quality during incarceration. Poor sleep might exacerbate existing health conditions and contribute to the development of new health problems for incarcerated women. Furthermore, poor sleep quality may reduce a woman's ability to fully participate in beneficial prison programming. This investigation provides a first look at how women sleep in prison and offers recommendations for future research. PMID:24785244

  1. Health promotion in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Camila de Castro; Blasca, Wanderléia Quinhoneiro; Berretin-Felix, Giédre

    2015-04-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), which is commonly underdiagnosed, has a high occurrence in the world population. Health education concerning sleep disorders and OSAS should be implemented. Objectives The objective was to identify studies related to preventive actions on sleep disorders, with emphasis on OSAS. Data Synthesis A literature review was conducted using Lilacs, Medline, PubMed, and Scopus by combining the following keywords: "Health Promotion," "Sleep Disorders," "Primary Prevention," "Health Education," and "Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndromes." Initially, 1,055 papers, from 1968 to 2013, were located, with the majority from the Scopus database. The inclusion criteria were applied, and four articles published between 2006 and 2012 were included in the present study. Conclusions The studies on preventive actions in sleep disorders, with emphasis on OSAS, involved the general population and professionals and students in the health field and led to increased knowledge on sleep disorders and more appropriate practices. PMID:25992174

  2. Sleep Apnea May Take Toll on Your Mood, Thinking Skills

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157515.html Sleep Apnea May Take Toll on Your Mood, Thinking ... 29, 2016 MONDAY, Feb. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep apnea may have an impact on brain function, ...

  3. Statins May Reduce Heart Risks Linked to Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Statins May Reduce Heart Risks Linked to Sleep Apnea: Study But it's too early to prescribe ... HealthDay News) -- A new discovery about the way sleep apnea may raise the risk of heart disease ...

  4. Sleep Apnea May Raise Heart Risks in People with Pacemakers

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158688.html Sleep Apnea May Raise Heart Risks in People With ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with heart pacemakers and sleep apnea are at much greater risk for a ...

  5. Too Often, CPAP Is Only Sleep Apnea Treatment Offered

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_156479.html Too Often, CPAP Is Only Sleep Apnea Treatment Offered Many patients can't tolerate ... News) -- More than half of those diagnosed with sleep apnea fail to stick with the standard treatment ...

  6. Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yi-Xian; Xiao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To get a comprehensive understanding about the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and asthma by reviewing the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestation and then summarizing the latest progress on diagnosis and treatment. Data Sources: Articles referred in this review were mainly collected from a comprehensive search of the PubMed published in English from 1990 to 2015 with the terms “OSA” and “asthma” as the main keywords. Highly regarded older publications were also included. Study Selection: Information about the features of the two diseases in common, the pathophysiologic association between them and their current treatments from the literature search were identified, retrieved, and summarized. Results: Both OSA and asthma are very prevalent conditions. The incidences of them have kept on rising in recent years. Asthma is often accompanied by snoring and apnea, and OSA often combines with asthma, as well. They have many predisposing and aggravating factors in common. Possible shared direct mechanistic links between them include mechanical effects, intermittent hypoxia, nerve reflex, inflammation, leptin, etc. Indirect mechanistic links include medication, nose diseases, smoking, obesity, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Since OSA presents many similar features with nocturnal asthma, some scholars termed them as a sole syndrome – “alternative overlap syndrome,” and proved that asthma symptoms in those patients could be improved through the treatment of continuous positive airway pressure. Conclusions: OSA and asthma are closely associated in pathogenesis, symptoms, and therapies. With the growing awareness of the relationship between them, we should raise our vigilance on the coexistence of OSA in those difficult-to-control asthmatic patients. Further studies are still needed to guide the clinical works. PMID:26481749

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea. Trends in therapy.

    PubMed

    Riley, R W; Powell, N B; Guilleminault, C; Clerk, A; Troell, R

    1995-02-01

    The National Commission on Sleep Disorders Research, in its report to Congress, concluded that the primary care community generally does not understand sleep disorders. Obstructive sleep apnea carries a risk of substantial morbidity and mortality. Excessive daytime sleepiness results from fragmented sleep and microarousals associated with apneic events. It causes poor work performance and increases the incidence of automobile accidents due to driving while drowsy. The commission estimates that the loss of productivity in the United States from excessive daytime sleepiness is more than $20 billion per year. Obstructive sleep apnea is strongly associated with hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea include male sex, obesity, older age, craniofacial anomalies, and familial risk. Treatment is based on documenting the disorder by polysomnography. Medical management of the syndrome includes weight loss and nasal continuous positive airway pressure. A network of follow-up and support is necessary to maintain compliance. Surgical treatment is reserved for those for whom nasal airway pressure treatment fails. A surgical protocol is presented that demonstrates efficacy equal to nasal airway pressure treatment. Primary care physicians should assume the responsibility of identifying patients at risk for obstructive sleep apnea and refer them appropriately. PMID:7725686

  8. Modeling sleep apnea severity using bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Gavrilovic, Bojan; Popovic, Milos R; Yadollahi, Azadeh

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder in adults characterized by repetitive collapse of the pharynx. OSA prevalence increases in fluid retaining patients such as those with heart or renal failure, and worsens with overnight fluid accumulation in the neck. The objective of this study was to develop a new method of measuring changes in intracellular water (ICW) in the neck, and investigate metrics that represent total neck impedance and their relationship to sleep apnea severity. In 18 non-obese men, neck fluid volume (NFV) was measured before and after sleep using bioelectrical impedance at 50 kHz. For each participant, resistance and reactance was extracted from the impedance measurements. A model was developed to estimate the cell membrane capacitance which could represent changes in intracellular fluid in the neck. OSA severity was assessed using polysomnography to estimate the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) as well as the obstructive AHI (OAHI). Our results showed a strong correlation between the changes in NFV from before to after sleep with the changes in cell membrane capacitance from before to after sleep, indicating an increase in ICW in the neck during sleep. Using linear stepwise regression we were also able to develop models to accurately predict AHI and OAHI using baseline anthropometric and bioimpedance measurements. These promising results demonstrate that non-invasive measurements of bioimpedance can be used to develop a novel biomarker to model sleep apnea severity, and assess patients at high risk of OSA. PMID:26737658

  9. White Matter Damage and Systemic Inflammation in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Lin, Hsin-Ching; Chen, Pei-Chin; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Lin, Wei-Ming; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Su, Yu-Jih; Friedman, Michael; Lin, Ching-Po; Lin, Wei-Che

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate white matter integrity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and to assess its relationship with systemic inflammation. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: One tertiary medical center research institute. Patients or Participants: Twenty patients with severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] > 30, 18 men and 2 women) and 14 healthy volunteers (AHI < 5, 11 men and 3 women). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Patients with severe OSA and healthy volunteers underwent polysomnography to determine the severity of sleep apnea, and DTI scanning to determine fiber integrity. Early or late phase changes in leukocyte apoptosis and its subsets were determined by flow cytometry. DTI-related indices (including fractional anisotropy [FA], axial diffusivity [AD], radial diffusivity [RD], and mean diffusivity [MD]) were derived from DTI. The FA maps were compared using voxel-based statistics to determine differences between the severe OSA and control groups. The differences in DTI indices, clinical severity, and leukocyte apoptosis were correlated after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and systolic blood pressure. Exploratory group-wise comparison between the two groups revealed that patients with OSA exhibited low FA accomplished by high RD in several brain locations, without any differences in AD and MD. The FA values were negatively correlated with clinical disease severity and leukocyte early apoptosis. Conclusions: Obstructive sleep apnea impairs white matter integrity in vulnerable regions, and this impairment is associated with increased disease severity. The possible interactions between systemic inflammation and central nervous system microstructural damage may represent variant hypoxic patterns and their consequent processes in obstructive sleep apnea. Citation: Chen HL, Lu CH, Lin HC, Chen PC, Chou KH, Lin WM, Tsai NW, Su YJ, Friedman M, Lin CP, Lin WC. White matter damage and systemic inflammation in obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2015;38(3):361–370. PMID:25325459

  10. How Is Sleep Apnea Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics CPAP High Blood Pressure Overweight and Obesity Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency Sleep Studies Send a link to ... For more information, go to the Health Topics Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency article.) If treatment and enough sleep ...

  11. Sleep apnea and the kidney: is sleep apnea a risk factor for chronic kidney disease?

    PubMed

    Hanly, Patrick J; Ahmed, Sofia B

    2014-10-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing, which presents challenges for both patients and health-care budgets. Although this phenomenon has been attributed to the growth in diabetes, hypertension, and obesity, sleep apnea and nocturnal hypoxemia may also contribute to the pathogenesis of CKD and its progression to kidney failure. Two pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for CKD are glomerular hyperfiltration and chronic intrarenal hypoxia, resulting in tubulointerstitial injury, the final common pathway to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Multiple descriptive studies have demonstrated an association between CKD and sleep apnea. Although sleep apnea is common in patients with CKD and associated with significant nocturnal hypoxemia, it is often relatively free of sleep-related symptoms, making it difficult to detect without objective nocturnal monitoring. Nevertheless, sleep apnea and nocturnal hypoxemia have been associated with loss of kidney function and kidney injury, suggesting that they contribute to the pathogenesis of continued deterioration in kidney function. There are several pathways through which sleep apnea may achieve this, including a direct effect of intrarenal hypoxia and activation of the systemic and renal renin-angiotensin system. Further research is required to better understand these relationships and determine whether specific interventions in patients with sleep apnea have an impact on clinical outcomes, such as reducing the prevalence of CKD and delaying its progression to ESKD. PMID:25288001

  12. Treatment of the Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wiggins, Robert V.; Schmidt-Nowara, Wolfgang W.

    1987-01-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a disorder of sleep and breathing that is being recognized with increasing frequency. The pathophysiologic consequences range from mild sleepiness to life-threatening cardiovascular and respiratory decompensation. The primary forms of treatment are directed at modifying the upper airway with either an operation or continuous positive airway pressure. Aside from tracheostomy, which is virtually always successful, other forms of treatment have met with varying results. Ancillary therapy, including oxygen, weight loss and drugs, is often helpful but seldom curative. Follow-up sleep studies are necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment. Selecting therapy for a patient with obstructive sleep apnea requires a comprehensive evaluation including polysomnography, special examinations of the upper airway and assessing the cardiopulmonary status. Therapy is based on the severity of disease and must be tailored to each patient. PMID:3321711

  13. Sleep Apnea in Adults (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... remains open, and air can pass from the nose and mouth to the lungs. In a person with sleep apnea, parts of the throat and mouth drop into the airway and block off the flow of air. This can cause loud snoring and ...

  14. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Role of an Otorhinolaryngologist.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jinesh Atulkumar; George, Ajay; Chauhan, Nirali; Francis, Stani

    2016-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a disorder resulting from collapse of the upper airway during sleep. Its etiology is multifactorial, resulting from the interdependence of structurally vulnerable upper airway anatomy interacting with physiologic mechanism of ventilator instability during sleep. The ENT causes for OSA are relatively simple conditions that can be treated by safe and simple medical and/or surgical procedures. To assess the prevalence of ENT disorders in patients presenting to the sleep clinic. Patients presented to sleep clinic were submitted to an assessment protocol including clinical history, otorhinolaryngology examination and a polysomnography. Total 69 patients were included and distributed into two groups according to AHI: patients with sleep disordered breathing only (simple snorer and/or AHI ≤ 5) and patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (AHI > 5). There was significant statistical difference for deviated nasal septum (p = 0.0004) and inferior turbinate hypertrophy (p = 0.03) in both groups. Most patients were in the class III and IV of Mallampati classification. Odds of having OSA increases more than 1.5 folds as the level of Mallampati classification increases by one class. ENT disorders were more common in the patients with OSA than in simple snorers and have impact on pathophysiology of OSA and its treatment modality. Hence, ENT examination in all patients with sleep disordered breathing will be helpful. PMID:27066415

  15. Sleep Apnea Cardiovascular Clinical Trials—Current Status and Steps Forward: The International Collaboration of Sleep Apnea Cardiovascular Trialists

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Craig, Sonya E.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Heeley, Emma; Redline, Susan; McEvoy, R. Doug; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Sleep apnea is a common chronic disease that is associated with coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure and mortality, although the ability of sleep apnea treatment to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has not been demonstrated. In contrast to patients seeking treatment in sleep disorders centers, as many as half of individuals with moderate to severe sleep apnea in the general population do not report excessive sleepiness; however, if treatment of sleep apnea were shown to reduce cardiovascular disease risk, this would provide a strong rationale for treatment of sleep apnea even in the absence of daytime sleepiness. This article summarizes the status of clinical trials evaluating the potential cardiovascular benefits of sleep apnea treatment and discusses the challenges of conducting such trials, and introduces the International Collaboration of Sleep Apnea Cardiovascular Trialists (INCOSACT), a clinical research collaboration formed to foster cardiovascular sleep research. Citation: Gottlieb DJ; Craig SE; Lorenzi-Filho G; Heeley E; Redline S; McEvoy RD; Durán-Cantolla J. Sleep apnea cardiovascular clinical trials— current status and steps forward: the International Collaboration of Sleep Apnea Cardiovascular Trialists. SLEEP 2013;36(7):975-980. PMID:23814333

  16. Health Promotion in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Camila de Castro; Blasca, Wanderléia Quinhoneiro; Berretin-Felix, Giédre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), which is commonly underdiagnosed, has a high occurrence in the world population. Health education concerning sleep disorders and OSAS should be implemented. Objectives The objective was to identify studies related to preventive actions on sleep disorders, with emphasis on OSAS. Data Synthesis A literature review was conducted using Lilacs, Medline, PubMed, and Scopus by combining the following keywords: “Health Promotion,” “Sleep Disorders,” “Primary Prevention,” “Health Education,” and “Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndromes.” Initially, 1,055 papers, from 1968 to 2013, were located, with the majority from the Scopus database. The inclusion criteria were applied, and four articles published between 2006 and 2012 were included in the present study. Conclusions The studies on preventive actions in sleep disorders, with emphasis on OSAS, involved the general population and professionals and students in the health field and led to increased knowledge on sleep disorders and more appropriate practices. PMID:25992174

  17. Effects of Exercise Training in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure and Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Linda M.; Drager, Luciano F.; Rodrigues, Ana C. T.; Rondon, Maria U. P. B.; Braga, Ana M. F. W.; Mathias, Wilson; Krieger, Eduardo M.; Barretto, Antonio C. P.; Middlekauff, Holly R.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Negrão, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: To test the effects of exercise training on sleep and neurovascular control in patients with systolic heart failure with and without sleep disordered breathing. Design: Prospective interventional study. Setting: Cardiac rehabilitation and exercise physiology unit and sleep laboratory. Patients: Twenty-five patients with heart failure, aged 42 to 70 years, and New York Heart Association Functional Class I-III were divided into 1 of 3 groups: obstructive sleep apnea (n = 8), central sleep apnea (n = 9) and no sleep apnea (n = 7). Interventions: Four months of no-training (control) followed by 4 months of an exercise training program (three 60-minute, supervised, exercise sessions per week). Measures and Results: Sleep (polysomnography), microneurography, forearm blood flow (plethysmography), peak VO2, and quality of life were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the control and trained periods. No significant changes occurred in the control period. Exercise training reduced muscle sympathetic nerve activity (P < 0.001) and increased forearm blood flow (P < 0.01), peak VO2(P < 0.01), and quality of life (P < 0.01) in all groups, independent of the presence of sleep apnea. Exercise training improved the apnea-hypopnea index, minimum O2 saturation, and amount stage 3-4 sleep (P < 0.05) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea but had no significant effects in patients with central sleep apnea. Conclusions. The beneficial effects of exercise training on neurovascular function, functional capacity, and quality of life in patients with systolic dysfunction and heart failure occurs independently of sleep disordered breathing. Exercise training lessens the severity of obstructive sleep apnea but does not affect central sleep apnea in patients with heart failure and sleep disordered breathing. Citation: Ueno LM; Drager LF; Rodrigues ACT; Rondon MUPB; Braga AMFW; Mathias W; Krieger EM; Barretto ACP; Middlekauff HR; Lorenzi-Filho G; Negrão CE. Effects of exercise training in patients with chronic heart failure and sleep apnea. SLEEP 2009;32(5):637-647. PMID:19480231

  18. Exacerbation of obstructive sleep apnea by oral indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Keith R; Fan, Jue-Lin; Peebles, Karen; Thomas, Kate; Lucas, Sam; Lucas, Rebecca; Dawson, Andrew; Swart, Marianne; Shepherd, Kelly; Ainslie, Phil

    2010-03-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are predisposed to instability in central ventilatory control during sleep. Increased instability, as reflected in an enhanced expired volume in per unit time loop gain, has been associated with a greater predisposition to upper airway collapse. Here, in an otherwise healthy patient with untreated mild OSA, we describe the further exacerbation of OSA after oral indomethacin administration. The subject was a control subject in part of a study to investigate the effects of altering cerebral blood flow (CBF) on ventilatory responses and sleep. He was administered either placebo or 100 mg of indomethacin orally with 20 mL of antacid 2.5 h before sleep on different days. He was studied overnight by polysomnography, arterial blood gases, and transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Administration of 100 mg of oral indomethacin prior to sleep resulted in an almost doubling of the apnea-hypopnea index (14 to 24/h), compared with placebo. This was due to an increase in apneas, rather than hypopneas. Following the indomethacin, changes in arterial blood gases were unremarkable, but both CBF as indexed using transcranial Doppler ultrasound and CBF reactivity to a steady-state change in CO(2) (CBF-CO(2)) reactivity were reduced, and the ventilatory response to CO(2) was elevated. CBF was also further reduced during nonrapid eye movement sleep following the indomethacin when compared with the control night. Indomethacin-induced reductions in CBF and CBF-CO(2) reactivity and related increases in ventilatory instability may lead to a greater predisposition to upper airway collapse and related apnea; these factors may partly explain the exacerbation of OSA. PMID:20202953

  19. Relationship Between Sleep Apnea and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Miguel Ángel; Campos-Rodríguez, Francisco; Almendros, Isaac; Farré, Ramón

    2015-09-01

    In the light of relationships reported between hypoxemia (tissue hypoxia) and cancer, Abrams et al. concluded in 2008 that sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) and its main consequence, intermittent hypoxia, could be related with increased susceptibility to cancer or poorer prognosis of a pre-existing tumor. This pathophysiological association was confirmed in animal studies. Two large independent historical cohort studies subsequently found that the degree of nocturnal hypoxia in patients with SAHS was associated with higher cancer incidence and mortality. This finding has been confirmed in almost all subsequent studies, although the retrospective nature of some requires that they be considered as hypothesis-generating only. The relationship between sleep apnea and cancer, and the pathophysiological mechanisms governing it, could be clarified in the near future in a currently on-going study in a large group of melanoma patients. PMID:25843225

  20. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children].

    PubMed

    Aubertin, G

    2013-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in school-aged children. Tonsillar and/or adenoids hypertrophy is the most common etiology of OSA in children. OSA has been associated with sleep quality disturbance (frequent arousals) and nocturnal gas-exchange abnormalities (hypoxemia and sometimes hypercapnia), complicated with a large array of negative health outcomes. The clinical symptoms are not able to distinguish primary snoring from OSA. Polysomnography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of sleep disordered breathing, but the demand is increasing for this highly technical sleep test. So, some other simpler diagnostic methods are available, as respiratory polygraphy, but need to be validated in children. Treatment of OSA in children must be based on a mutlidisciplinary approach with pediatricians, ENT surgeons and orthodontists. PMID:23870386

  1. The Relationship between High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea and General and Central Obesity: Findings from a Sample of Chilean College Students

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Clarita; Andrade, Asterio; Frye, Megan; Williams, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluates the prevalence and extent to which high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with general obesity and central obesity among college students in Punta Arenas, Chile. Risk for OSA was assessed using the Berlin Questionnaire and trained research nurses measured anthropometric indices. Overweight was defined as body mass index (BMI) of 25–29.9 kg/m2 and general obesity was defined as BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2. Central obesity was defined as waist circumference ≥90 centimeters (cm) for males and ≥80 cm for females. Multivariate logistic regression models were fit to obtain adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Prevalence of high risk for OSA, general obesity, and central obesity were 7.8%, 12.8%, and 42.7%, respectively. Students at high risk for OSA had greater odds of general obesity (OR 9.96; 95% CI: 4.42–22.45) and central obesity (OR 2.78; 95% CI 1.43–5.40). Findings support a strong positive association of high risk for OSA with obesity. PMID:24944841

  2. The Relationship between High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea and General and Central Obesity: Findings from a Sample of Chilean College Students.

    PubMed

    Wosu, Adaeze C; Vélez, Juan Carlos; Barbosa, Clarita; Andrade, Asterio; Frye, Megan; Chen, Xiaoli; Gelaye, Bizu; Williams, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluates the prevalence and extent to which high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with general obesity and central obesity among college students in Punta Arenas, Chile. Risk for OSA was assessed using the Berlin Questionnaire and trained research nurses measured anthropometric indices. Overweight was defined as body mass index (BMI) of 25-29.9 kg/m(2) and general obesity was defined as BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2). Central obesity was defined as waist circumference ≥90 centimeters (cm) for males and ≥80 cm for females. Multivariate logistic regression models were fit to obtain adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Prevalence of high risk for OSA, general obesity, and central obesity were 7.8%, 12.8%, and 42.7%, respectively. Students at high risk for OSA had greater odds of general obesity (OR 9.96; 95% CI: 4.42-22.45) and central obesity (OR 2.78; 95% CI 1.43-5.40). Findings support a strong positive association of high risk for OSA with obesity. PMID:24944841

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS). Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Azagra-Calero, Eva; Barrera-Mora, José M.; Llamas-Carreras, José M.; Solano-Reina, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome is characterized by repeated airway collapse during sleep. The li-terature describes multiple causes of the disease. The main cause is a reduction of the expansion forces of the pharyngeal dilator muscles, as in situations of genioglossal muscle dysfunction, and discoordination between the inspiratory activity of the muscle and respiratory effort, which play an important role in progression of the disease. Other described causes are soft tissue disorders, such as macroglossia or tonsillar hypertrophy, and skeletal structural alterations such as micrognathia and retrognathia. The syndrome is also more frequent in obese people, where the accumulation of fat in the neck region produces narrowing of the pharyngeal airway, thereby diminishing the passage of air. This review focuses on the pathogenesis, epidemiology, main features and diagnosis of the disease, and on its main forms of treatment. Key words:Sleep apnea, obstructive sleep apnea, sleep apnea syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. PMID:22549673

  4. 77 FR 25226 - Proposed Recommendations on Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... was published in the Federal Register on April 20, 2012 (77 FR 23794) announcing proposed regulatory... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Proposed Recommendations on Obstructive Sleep Apnea AGENCY... withdrawing its proposed regulatory guidance for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and request for comment...

  5. Surgery for pediatric sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Darrow, David H

    2007-08-01

    Sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD) in children are caused by a diverse group of anatomic and physiologic pathologies. These disorders share a common clinical presentation as stertor or sonorous breathing, occasionally accompanied by apneic events of variable duration. Successful management depends on accurate identification of the site of obstruction and the severity of obstruction. Intervention, both surgical and nonsurgical, is tailored to the disorder. In children with SRBD, such intervention may alter behavior and cognition, improve sleep and feeding, or even save a life. PMID:17606027

  6. Effectiveness of Three Sleep Apnea Management Alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Masa, Juan F.; Corral, Jaime; Sanchez de Cos, Julio; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Cabello, Marta; Hernández-Blasco, Luis; Monasterio, Carmen; Alonso, Alberto; Chiner, Eusebi; Aizpuru, Felipe; Vázquez-Polo, Francisco-José; Zamorano, Jose; Montserrat, Jose M.; Garcia-Ledesma, Estefania; Pereira, Ricardo; Cancelo, Laura; Martinez, Angeles; Sacristan, Lirios; Salord, Neus; Carrera, Miguel; Sancho-Chust, José N.; Negrín, Miguel A.; Embid, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Home respiratory polygraphy (HRP) may be a cost-effective alternative to polysomnography (PSG) for diagnosis and treatment election in patients with high clinical probability of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but there is conflicting evidence on its use for a wider spectrum of patients. Objectives: To determine the efficacy and cost of OSA management (diagnosis and therapeutic decision making) using (1) PSG for all patients (PSG arm); (2) HRP for all patients (HRP arm); and (3) HRP for a subsample of patients with high clinical probability of being treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and PSG for the remainder (elective HRP arm). Methods: Multicentric study of 366 patients with intermediate-high clinical probability of OSA, randomly subjected to HRP and PSG. We explored the diagnostic and therapeutic decision agreements between the PSG and both HRP arms for several HRP cutoff points and calculated costs for equal diagnostic and/or therapeutic decision efficacy. Results: For equal diagnostic and therapeutic decision efficacy, PSG arm costs were 18% higher than HRP arm costs and 20% higher than elective HRP arm costs. HRP arm costs tended to be lower than elective HRP arm costs, and both tended to be lower than PSG arm costs if patient costs were omitted. Conclusion: Home respiratory polygraphy is a less costly alternative than polysomnography for the diagnosis and therapeutic decision making for patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea. We found no advantage in cost terms, however, in using home respiratory polygraphy for all patients or home respiratory polygraphy for the most symptomatic patients and polysomnography for the rest. Citation: Masa JF; Corral J; Sanchez de Cos J; Duran-Cantolla J; Cabello M; Hernández-Blasco L; Monasterio C; Alonso A; Chiner E; Aizpuru F; Vázquez-Polo FJ; Zamorano J; Montserrat JM. Effectiveness of three sleep apnea management alternatives. SLEEP 2013;36(12):1799-1807. PMID:24293754

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Debaun, Michael R.; Strunk, Robert C.; Redline, Susan; Seicean, Sinziana; Craven, Daniel I.; Gavlak, Johanna C.D.; Wilkey, Olu; Inusa, Baba; Roberts, Irene; Goodpaster, R. Lucas; Malow, Beth; Rodeghier, Mark; Kirkham, Fenella J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the prevalence of and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA). METHODS: Cross-sectional baseline data were analyzed from the Sleep and Asthma Cohort Study, a multicenter prospective study designed to evaluate the contribution of sleep and breathing abnormalities to SCA-related morbidity in children ages 4 to 18 years, unselected for OSAS symptoms or asthma. Multivariable logistic regression assessed the relationships between OSAS status on the basis of overnight in-laboratory polysomnography and putative risk factors obtained from questionnaires and direct measurements. RESULTS: Participants included 243 children with a median age of 10 years; 50% were boys, 99% were of African heritage, and 95% were homozygous for βS hemoglobin. OSAS, defined by obstructive apnea hypopnea indices, was present in 100 (41%) or 25 (10%) children at cutpoints of ≥1 or ≥5, respectively. In univariate analyses, OSAS was associated with higher levels of habitual snoring, lower waking pulse oxygen saturation (Spo2), reduced lung function, less caretaker education, and non–preterm birth. Lower sleep-related Spo2 metrics were also associated with higher obstructive apnea hypopnea indices. In multivariable analyses, habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 remained risk factors for OSAS in children with SCA. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of OSAS in children with SCA is higher than in the general pediatric population. Habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 values, data easily obtained in routine care, were the strongest OSAS risk factors. Because OSAS is a treatable condition with adverse health outcomes, greater efforts are needed to screen, diagnose, and treat OSAS in this high-risk, vulnerable population. PMID:25022740

  8. Factors related to sleep apnea syndrome in sleep clinic patients.

    PubMed

    Dealberto, M J; Ferber, C; Garma, L; Lemoine, P; Alpérovitch, A

    1994-06-01

    We examined 129 patients recruited from two sleep clinics to study the sleep apnea syndrome (SAS), defined by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) > or = 10. Information was registered from a self-administered questionnaire, basal physical measurements, and polysomnography. In 68 subjects recorded for two consecutive nights, a high correlation was found between first- and second-night AHIs (r = 0.89). Habitual loud snoring and breathing arrests during sleep were associated with AHI > or = 10. A model including these two variables, sex, age, and body mass index was created in order to predict AHI > or = 10 and with which it was possible to successfully classify almost three of four patients. Among subjective sleep questionnaire items, only daytime sleepiness was related to drops of transcutaneous oxygen tension. These discrepancies in the observed relationship between sleep parameters and subjective sleep items reduce the questionnaire value in epidemiologic settings where it aimed to detect SAS, as defined solely by the AHI value. PMID:8205872

  9. The pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Pham, Luu V; Schwartz, Alan R

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a major source of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and represents an increasing burden on health care resources. Understanding underlying pathogenic mechanisms of OSA will ultimately allow for the development of rational therapeutic strategies. In this article, we review current concepts about the pathogenesis of OSA. Specifically, we consider the evidence that the upper airway plays a primary role in OSA pathogenesis and provide a framework for modelling its biomechanical properties and propensity to collapse during sleep. Anatomical and neuromuscular factors that modulate upper airway obstruction are also discussed. Finally, we consider models of periodic breathing, and elaborate generalizable mechanisms by which upper airway obstruction destabilizes respiratory patterns during sleep. In our model, upper airway obstruction triggers a mismatch between ventilatory supply and demand. In this model, trade-offs between maintaining sleep stability or ventilation can account for a full range of OSA disease severity and expression. Recurrent arousals and transient increases in airway patency may restore ventilation between periods of sleep, while alterations in neuromuscular and arousal responses to upper airway obstruction may improve sleep stability at still suboptimal levels of ventilation. PMID:26380762

  10. The pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a major source of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and represents an increasing burden on health care resources. Understanding underlying pathogenic mechanisms of OSA will ultimately allow for the development of rational therapeutic strategies. In this article, we review current concepts about the pathogenesis of OSA. Specifically, we consider the evidence that the upper airway plays a primary role in OSA pathogenesis and provide a framework for modelling its biomechanical properties and propensity to collapse during sleep. Anatomical and neuromuscular factors that modulate upper airway obstruction are also discussed. Finally, we consider models of periodic breathing, and elaborate generalizable mechanisms by which upper airway obstruction destabilizes respiratory patterns during sleep. In our model, upper airway obstruction triggers a mismatch between ventilatory supply and demand. In this model, trade-offs between maintaining sleep stability or ventilation can account for a full range of OSA disease severity and expression. Recurrent arousals and transient increases in airway patency may restore ventilation between periods of sleep, while alterations in neuromuscular and arousal responses to upper airway obstruction may improve sleep stability at still suboptimal levels of ventilation. PMID:26380762

  11. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Type 2 Diabetes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Karoline; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Aurora, Rashmi N.

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS In older adults, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and type 2 diabetes mellitus are prevalent medical conditions each with adverse clinical consequences. Over the last decade, there has been increased recognition that OSA is highly prevalent in people with type 2 diabetes and that metabolic conditions such as insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and type 2 diabetes are common in people with OSA. Intermittent hypoxemia and recurrent arousals in OSA trigger a repertoire of pathophysiological events including activation of the sympathetic nervous system, increase in oxidative stress, alterations in corticotropic function, and release of inflammatory adipo-cytokines. These pathophysiological alterations can alter normal glucose homeostasis and may increase the risk for type 2 diabetes. Conversely, there is also evidence that type 2 diabetes may alter OSA progression and promote the expression of central sleep apnea. Cheyne-Stokes or periodic breathing and central disordered breathing events during sleep are more common in people with type 2 diabetes. It has been suggested that diabetes-associated autonomic dysfunction could possibly result in instability of respiratory control via enhanced central chemoreceptor-mediated gain as well as cardiac impairments with prolonged circulatory time. While more research is needed to clarify the mechanisms underlying the bi-directional association between OSA and type 2 diabetes, the frequent co-existence of these two conditions should prompt all health care professionals to embrace clinical practices that include screening a patient presenting with one disorder for the other particularly in older adults. PMID:25453306

  12. Contemporary surgery for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Powell, Nelson B

    2009-09-01

    Surgical treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been available in some form for greater than three decades. Early management for airway obstruction during sleep relied on tracheotomy which although life saving was not well accepted by patients. In the early eighties two new forms of treatment for OSAS were developed. Surgically a technique described as a uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) was used to treat the retropalatal region for snoring and sleep apnea. Concurrently sleep medicine developed a nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device to manage nocturnal airway obstruction. Both of these measures were used to expand and stabilize the pharyngeal airway space during sleep. The goal for each technique was to limit or alleviate OSAS. Almost 30 yr later these two treatment modalities continue to be the mainstay of contemporary treatment. As expected, CPAP device technology improved over time along with durable goods. Surgery followed suit and additional techniques were developed to treat soft and bony structures of the entire upper airway (nose, palate and tongue base). This review will only focus on the contemporary surgical methods that have demonstrated relatively consistent positive clinical outcomes. Not all surgical and medical treatment modalities are successful or even partially successful for every patient. Advances in the treatment of OSAS are hindered by the fact that the primary etiology is still unknown. However, both medicine and surgery continue to improve diagnostic and treatment methods. Methods of diagnosis as well as treatment regimens should always include both medical and surgical collaborations so the health and quality of life of our patients can best be served. PMID:19784401

  13. The Relationship between Metformin and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Deborah; Rein, Lisa; Tarima, Sergey; Woodson, B. Tucker; Meurer, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to assess if metformin had any associations with the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in an adult type 2 diabetes population in the Midwest. Hypothesis Use of metformin is associated with decreased prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in a adult type 2 diabetes population. Methods A retrospective secondary database analysis was carried out with metformin use by patients with type 2 diabetes as the primary variable of interest and obstructive sleep apnea status as the primary outcome. A sample population of 9,853 type 2 diabetes patients with one year of follow-up was used. Other variables that were analyzed included age, gender, race, hypertension, Congestive Heart Failure, Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and Body Mass Index. A p-value of <0.01 was considered significant. Results Metformin usage was not significantly associated with obstructive sleep apnea prevalence (Odds Ratio: 1.17, Confidence Interval: 1.001.36, p = 0.049), but trended in the direction where metformin usage was associated with having obstructive sleep apnea. Lower HbA1c was found to be significantly associated with lower prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (p <0.001). The rest of the variables followed previously published associations. Conclusions Metformin therapy may improve sleep quality, but it may not be through methods that reduce the likelihood of developing obstructive sleep apnea. Future studies that can prove causation about this association should be considered. PMID:26900606

  14. Management of Hypertension in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Sofia F; Braz, Caio V; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Drager, Luciano F

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is considered to be a secondary form of hypertension and in clinical practice OSA is frequently associated with hypertension, even if proof of causality cannot be established. Growing evidence suggests that OSA is associated with worse blood pressure control, alterations in night-time blood pressure dipping, increased target organ damage, and arterial stiffness in patients with hypertension. This review summarizes the current evidence for managing hypertension in patients with OSA. Particular focus will be devoted to discuss the impact of lifestyle changes, preferences for anti-hypertensive treatment in patients with OSA, and the effects of OSA treatment with continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure. PMID:26482751

  15. Obstructive sleep apnea and vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Lanfranchi, Paola; Somers, Virend A

    2001-01-01

    There is emerging evidence linking obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to vascular disease, including hypertension. This relationship may be independent of co-morbidity, such as obesity. Even apparently healthy OSA patients have evidence of subtle functional vascular abnormalities that are known to occur in patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis. Untreated OSA may possibly contribute to the initiation and/or progression of pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in hypertension, heart failure, cardiac ischemia and stroke. This brief commentary will examine the evidence and mechanisms linking OSA to vascular disease. PMID:11737928

  16. Automated sleep scoring and sleep apnea detection in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraglia, David P.; Berryman, Matthew J.; Coussens, Scott W.; Pamula, Yvonne; Kennedy, Declan; Martin, A. James; Abbott, Derek

    2005-12-01

    This paper investigates the automated detection of a patient's breathing rate and heart rate from their skin conductivity as well as sleep stage scoring and breathing event detection from their EEG. The software developed for these tasks is tested on data sets obtained from the sleep disorders unit at the Adelaide Women's and Children's Hospital. The sleep scoring and breathing event detection tasks used neural networks to achieve signal classification. The Fourier transform and the Higuchi fractal dimension were used to extract features for input to the neural network. The filtered skin conductivity appeared visually to bear a similarity to the breathing and heart rate signal, but a more detailed evaluation showed the relation was not consistent. Sleep stage classification was achieved with and accuracy of around 65% with some stages being accurately scored and others poorly scored. The two breathing events hypopnea and apnea were scored with varying degrees of accuracy with the highest scores being around 75% and 30%.

  17. Non-contact screening system with two microwave radars in the diagnosis of sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Masayuki; Ueki, Katsuhiko; Kurita, Akira; Tojima, Hirokazu; Matsui, Takemi

    2013-01-01

    There are two key problems in applying Doppler radar to a diagnosis system for sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome. The first is noise associated with body movement and the second is the body position in bed and the change of the sleeping posture. We propose a new automatic gain control and a real-time radar-output channel selection method which is based on a spectrum shape analysis. There are three types of sleep apnea: central sleep apnea, obstructive sleep apnea and mixed sleep apnea. In this paper we paid attention to the obstructive sleep apnea and attempted to detect the disorder of corrugated shape compared with usual breathing or the paradoxical movement of the reversed phase with chest and abdominal radar signals. A prototype of the system was set up at a sleep disorder center in a hospital and field tests were carried out with eight subjects. Despite the subjects engaging in frequent body movements while sleeping, the system was quite effective in the diagnosis of sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (r=0.98). PMID:23920557

  18. The effect of adaptive servo ventilation (ASV) on objective and subjective outcomes in Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) with central sleep apnea (CSA) in heart failure (HF): A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyunju; Sawyer, Amy M

    2016-01-01

    To summarize the current evidence for adaptive servo ventilation (ASV) in Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) with central sleep apnea (CSA) in heart failure (HF) and advance a research agenda and clinical considerations for ASV-treated CSR-CSA in HF. CSR-CSA in HF is associated with higher overall mortality, worse outcomes and lower quality of life (QOL) than HF without CSR-CSA. Five databases were searched using key words (n = 234). Randomized controlled trials assessed objective sleep quality, cardiac, and self-reported outcomes in adults (≥18 years) with HF (n = 10). ASV has a beneficial effect on the reduction of central sleep apnea in adult patients with CSR-CSA in HF, but it is not be superior to CPAP, bilevel PPV, or supplemental oxygen in terms of sleep quality defined by polysomnography, cardiovascular outcomes, subjective daytime sleepiness, and quality of life. ASV is not recommended for CSR-CSA in HF. It is important to continue to refer HF patients for sleep evaluation to clearly discern OSA from CSR-CSA. Symptom management research, inclusive of objective and subjective outcomes, in CSR-CSA in HF adults is needed. PMID:26995256

  19. Hypoxia Inducible Factors and Hypertension: Lessons from Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nanduri, Jayasri; Peng, Ying-Jie; Yuan, Guoxiang; Kumar, Ganesh K.; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic hypertension is one of the most prevalent cardiovascular diseases. Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) with recurrent apnea is a major risk factor for developing essential hypertension. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a hallmark manifestation of recurrent apnea. Rodent models patterned after the O2 profiles seen with SDB patients showed that CIH is the major stimulus for causing systemic hypertension. This article reviews the physiological and molecular basis of CIH-induced hypertension. Physiological studies have identified that augmented carotid body chemosensory reflex and the resulting increase in sympathetic nerve activity is a major contributor to CIH-induced hypertension. Analysis of molecular mechanisms revealed that CIH activates hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 and suppresses HIF-2- mediated transcription. Dysregulation of HIF-1- and HIF-2- mediated transcription leads to imbalance of pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant enzyme gene expression resulting in increased reactive species (ROS) generation in the chemosensory reflex which is central for developing hypertension. PMID:25772710

  20. A Respiratory Movement Monitoring System Using Fiber-Grating Vision Sensor for Diagnosing Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Yasuhiro; Sato, Jun-Ya; Nakajima, Masato

    2005-01-01

    A non-restrictive and non-contact respiratory movement monitoring system that finds the boundary between chest and abdomen automatically and detects the vertical movement of each part of the body separately is proposed. The system uses a fiber-grating vision sensor technique and the boundary position detection is carried out by calculating the centers of gravity of upward moving and downward moving sampling points, respectively. In the experiment to evaluate the ability to detect the respiratory movement signals of each part and to discriminate between obstructive and central apneas, detected signals of the two parts and their total clearly showed the peculiarities of obstructive and central apnea. The cross talk between the two categories classified automatically according to several rules that reflect the peculiarities was ≤ 15%. This result is sufficient for discriminating central sleep apnea syndrome from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and indicates that the system is promising as screening equipment. Society of Japan

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea presenting as pseudopheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Marmouch, Hela; Arfa, Sondes; Graja, Sameh; Slim, Tensim; Khochtali, Ines

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old female with a history of poorly controlled resistant hypertension was admitted to our hospital with severe hypertension. She had a history of fatigue and intermittent episodes of palpitations. Laboratory evaluation was significant for elevated 24-h urinary catecholamine levels (3,5 times the upper normal levels). This case was presenting with a clinical and biochemical picture indistinguishable from that of pheochromocytoma. However, neither computed tomography nor meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine scintigraphy detected any catecholamine-producing tumor in or outside the adrenal glands. Our patient was screened with full polysomnography because of heavy snoring, daytime somnolence and obesity. It revealed severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. After three months of continuous positive airway pressure therapy, the patient experienced resolution of his presenting symptoms, improved blood pressure control and normalization of his urinary catecholamine levels. This case highlights sleep disordered breathing as a potentially reversible cause of pseudo-pheochromocytoma. PMID:27217898

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Mimics Attention Deficit Disorder.

    PubMed

    Blesch, Lauri; Breese McCoy, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Attention deficit and hyperactivity are known possible symptoms or correlates of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, these associations may be missed in children, because children often fail to report excessive daytime sleepiness, and attention deficit disorder (ADD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are common primary diagnoses in themselves. We report on a 17-year-old, slender, non-snoring male who presented to his pediatrician with a prolonged history of four complaints: inattention, fidgeting, frequent sinusitis, and somnolence. He was diagnosed with ADHD, while the somnolence, which often abated somewhat upon use of antibiotics for sinusitis, was attributed to the sinus infections. A later sleep study revealed OSA, and thorough additional testing proved that the original ADHD diagnosis was in error. All four conditions were allayed with proper use of a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine. PMID:23529886

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea presenting as pseudopheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Marmouch, Hela; Arfa, Sondes; Graja, Sameh; Slim, Tensim; Khochtali, Ines

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old female with a history of poorly controlled resistant hypertension was admitted to our hospital with severe hypertension. She had a history of fatigue and intermittent episodes of palpitations. Laboratory evaluation was significant for elevated 24-h urinary catecholamine levels (3,5 times the upper normal levels). This case was presenting with a clinical and biochemical picture indistinguishable from that of pheochromocytoma. However, neither computed tomography nor meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine scintigraphy detected any catecholamine-producing tumor in or outside the adrenal glands. Our patient was screened with full polysomnography because of heavy snoring, daytime somnolence and obesity. It revealed severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. After three months of continuous positive airway pressure therapy, the patient experienced resolution of his presenting symptoms, improved blood pressure control and normalization of his urinary catecholamine levels. This case highlights sleep disordered breathing as a potentially reversible cause of pseudo-pheochromocytoma. PMID:27217898

  4. Inflammation in Sleep Apnea: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, Dileep; Jun, Jonathan; Polotsky, Vsevolod

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). One theory to explain this relationship proposes that OSA can induce systemic inflammation, thereby inducing CVD. This theory is based on the premise that obesity is a pro-inflammatory state, and that physiological derangements during sleep in subjects with OSA further aggravate inflammation. In support of this theory, some clinical studies have shown elevated inflammatory biomarkers in OSA subjects, or improvement in these markers following treatment of OSA. However, the data are inconsistent and often confounded by the effects of comorbid obesity. Animal models of OSA have been developed, which involve exposure of rodents or cells to intermittent hypoxia, a hallmark feature of OSA. Several of these experiments demonstrate that intermittent hypoxia can stimulate inflammatory pathways and lead to cardiovascular or metabolic pathology. In this review, we review relationships between OSA and inflammation, with particular attention to studies published within the last year. PMID:25502450

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Health in Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Arnetz, Bengt B.; Templin, Thomas; Saudi, Waleed; Jamil, Hikmet

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether obstructive sleep apnea mediates the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and psychosomatic and somatic disorders and its implications for self-rated health (SRH) among Iraqi immigrants in the United States. Methods A random sample of immigrants who had left Iraq before the 1991 Gulf War (n = 145) or after (n = 205) and are residing in metropolitan Detroit responded to a structured interview covering questions on sociodemographics, premigration trauma, SRH, physician-diagnosed and -treated obstructive sleep apnea, somatic disorders, and psychosomatic disorders. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the relationship between premigration trauma scores and health, as well as to explore mediating pathways between PTSD, obstructive sleep apnea, and health. Results The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea among post-Gulf War immigrants (30.2%) was significantly higher than among pre-Gulf War immigrants (0.7%; p < .001). Premigration trauma scores were positively associated with depression and PTSD. Structural equation modeling supported a model in which obstructive sleep apnea mediated the relationship between PTSD and psychosomatic and somatic disorders. Premigration trauma also related directly to SRH. Conclusions Part of the PTSD-associated adverse health effects observed in Iraqi immigrants is mediated by obstructive sleep apnea. Because sleep apnea in the current study is based on medical history and current treatment, there is a need for future confirmatory polysomnographic studies. PMID:23023679

  6. Achondroplasia and obstructive sleep apnea: correction of apnea and abnormal sleep-entrained growth hormone release by tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, S J; Shprintzen, R J; Wu, R H; Thorpy, M J; Hahm, S Y; Marion, R; Sher, A E; Saenger, P

    1985-01-01

    Severe obstructive sleep apnea in a patient with achondroplasia syndrome was found to result in a definitive deficiency of overnight growth hormone secretion related to absence of slow-wave sleep. Resolution of the apnea by tracheostomy resulted in normalization of growth hormone release and normal growth rates postoperatively. Sleep-related growth hormone deficiency may contribute to the short stature so often seen in a variety of craniofacial syndromes. Furthermore, this short stature may be reversible. PMID:4041579

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Gonzaga, C; Bertolami, A; Bertolami, M; Amodeo, C; Calhoun, D

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent episodes of partial (hypopnea) or complete interruption (apnea) in breathing during sleep due to airway collapse in the pharyngeal region. OSA and its cardiovascular consequences have been widely explored in observational and prospective studies. Most evidence verifies the positive relationship between OSA and hypertension, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, stroke and heart failure. However, more studies are needed to better assess the impact of OSA, and possible benefit of treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and cardiovascular mortality. The leading pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the changes triggered by OSA, include intermittent hypoxemia and re-oxygenation, arousals and changes in intrathoracic pressure. Hypertension is strongly related with activation of the sympathetic nervous system, stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and impairment of endothelial function. The high prevalence of OSA in the general population, hypertensive patients and especially obese individuals and patients resistant to antihypertensive therapy, highlights the need for effective screening, diagnosis and treatment of OSA to decrease cardiovascular risk. PMID:25761667

  8. New therapies for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    White, David P

    2014-10-01

    A strong demand for new obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) therapies exists and several are emerging. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation is designed to activate upper airway muscles. The initial study from Inspire (Maple Grove, MN) suggests that the device will work well in a very selective group of OSA patients. However, it is likely to be quite expensive. The Winx device (ApniCure, Redwood City, CA) works by establishing a vacuum in the oral cavity, which pulls the uvula and soft palate forward and stabilizes the tongue position. The current device works in approximately 40% of patients and the early data suggest adherence may be quite good. The Provent device( Theravent, San Jose, CA) has been available for several years and is disposable. It is to be attached to the nares nightly and establishes substantial expiratory resistance. Multiple studies suggest that Provent can successfully treat OSA in about 35 to 50% of the patients. However, acceptance and adherence may be a problem. OSA phenotyping is not a therapy, but a way to determine exactly what causes airway collapse in each patient, which can vary substantially. This may allow for individualization of apnea therapy. New methods to prevent supine sleep and surgically implantable devices to treat OSA are also evolving. PMID:25353107

  9. [Obstructive sleep apnea-related cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Schulz, Richard; Grebe, Mathias; Eisele, Hans-Joachim; Mayer, Konstantin; Weissmann, Norbert; Seeger, Werner

    2006-04-15

    The clinical spectrum of obstructive sleep apnea-(OSA-)related cardiovascular disease (CVD) comprises systemic arterial hypertension (prevalence: 40-60%), pulmonary hypertension (20-30%), coronary artery disease (20-30%), congestive heart failure (5-10%), and stroke (5-10%). During sleep, heart rhythm disorders such as atrioventricular blocks, sinus arrests and atrial fibrillation can be induced by OSA. OSA-related CVD mainly affects those patients with an apnea-hypopnea index > 30/h and, if left untreated, is linked to increased mortality. Epidemiologic data have clearly shown that cardiovascular risk is increased in OSA independent of confounding factors such as obesity and concomitant metabolic disease. In recent years, the pathophysiology of OSA-related CVD has been further elucidated showing that apart from the well-known sympathetic activation, increased oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory changes seem to play major roles. Furthermore, studies using high resolution ultrasonography have demonstrated endothelial dysfunction and enhanced atherosclerosis in these patients. Finally, animal models of OSA have delineated that daytime arterial hypertension is the consequence of the OSA-associated chronic intermittent hypoxia. Therapy of OSA by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) ventilation exerts cardioprotective effects. It has been shown to rectify the vascular micromilieu, restore endothelium-dependent vasodilation, lower 24-h blood pressure, eliminate nocturnal heart rhythm disorders, and improve left ventricular function. Furthermore, long-term CPAP therapy leads to a reduction in important clinical endpoints such as the rates of myocardial infarction and stroke. PMID:16607489

  10. Facial morphology and obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Capistrano, Anderson; Cordeiro, Aldir; Capelozza, Leopoldino; Almeida, Veridiana Correia; Silva, Priscila Izabela de Castro e; Martinez, Sandra; de Almeida-Pedrin, Renata Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed at assessing the relationship between facial morphological patterns (I, II, III, Long Face and Short Face) as well as facial types (brachyfacial, mesofacial and dolichofacial) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients attending a center specialized in sleep disorders. Methods: Frontal, lateral and smile photographs of 252 patients (157 men and 95 women), randomly selected from a polysomnography clinic, with mean age of 40.62 years, were evaluated. In order to obtain diagnosis of facial morphology, the sample was sent to three professors of Orthodontics trained to classify patients' face according to five patterns, as follows: 1) Pattern I; 2) Pattern II; 3) Pattern III; 4) Long facial pattern; 5) Short facial pattern. Intraexaminer agreement was assessed by means of Kappa index. The professors ranked patients' facial type based on a facial index that considers the proportion between facial width and height. Results: The multiple linear regression model evinced that, when compared to Pattern I, Pattern II had the apnea and hypopnea index (AHI) worsened in 6.98 episodes. However, when Pattern II was compared to Pattern III patients, the index for the latter was 11.45 episodes lower. As for the facial type, brachyfacial patients had a mean AHI of 22.34, while dolichofacial patients had a significantly statistical lower index of 10.52. Conclusion: Patients' facial morphology influences OSA. Pattern II and brachyfacial patients had greater AHI, while Pattern III patients showed a lower index. PMID:26691971

  11. Worsening of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Associated with Catheter-Related Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jouvenot, Marie; Willoteaux, Serge; Meslier, Nicole; Gagnadoux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that fluid accumulation in the neck contributes to the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We describe a case of catheter-related superior v ena cava (SVC) thrombosis revealed by rapid onset of typical symptoms of OSA. A marked improvement in OSA severity was observed after central venous catheter removal, anticoagulant therapy, and SVC angioplasty Citation: Jouvenot M, Willoteaux S, Meslier N, Gagnadoux F. Worsening of obstructive sleep apnea associated with catheter-related superior vena cava syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(6):681–682. PMID:25766698

  12. [Indications in sleep-apnea syndrome. When and why is further assessment meaningful?].

    PubMed

    Bloch, K E; Russi, E W

    1997-03-11

    Forms of sleep apnea syndrome: Interrupted breathing and hypoventilation during sleep lead to sleep disorders and to cardiovascular sequelae. In the common obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) apneas are related to intermittent obstruction of the upper airways. In the rarer central sleep apnea syndrome certain cardiovascular or central nervous system disorders lead to disturbed regulation of respiration connected with periodic breathing. Signs indicating OSAS: Loud, cyclic snoring, interrupted by cessation of breathing during sleep observed by relatives and excessive daytime to diurnal sleepiness indicate OSAS. Furthermore alteration of personality, headache in the morning, non-refreshing sleep and nocturnal choking sensations may indicate OSAS. When is evaluation necessary? Patients with complaints possibly induced by OSAS should be further evaluated since nocturnal application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) by means of a nose mask and other treatment forms often lead to significant improvement of OSAS. In addition patients with untreated OSAS have an increased risk for car accidents and premature death as consequence of cardiovascular diseases. The type and extent of a supposed respiratory disorder is evaluated by means of a sleep study. PMID:9190646

  13. Respiratory sound recordings for detection of sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldemark, Karina E.; Agehed, Kenneth I.; Lindblad, Thomas

    1999-03-01

    Sleep apnea is characterized by frequent prolonged interruptions of breathing during sleep. This syndrome causes severe sleep disorders and is often responsible for development of other diseases such as heart problems, high blood pressure and daytime fatigue, etc. After diagnosis, sleep apnea is often successfully treated by applying positive air pressure (CPAP) to the mouth and nose. Although effective, the (CPAP) equipment takes up a lot of space and the connected mask causes a lot of inconvenience for the patients. This raised interest in developing new techniques for treatment of sleep apnea syndrome. Several studies indicated that electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve and muscle in the tongue may be a useful method for treating patients with severe sleep apnea. In order to be able to successfully prevent the occurrence of apnea it is necessary to have some technique for early and fast on-line detection or prediction of the apnea events. This paper suggests using measurements of respiratory airflow (mouth temperature). The signal processing for this task includes the use of a window short-FFT technique and uses an artificial back propagation neural net to model or predict the occurrence of apneas. The results show that early detection of respiratory interruption is possible and that the delay time for this is small.

  14. [Diagnostic criteria for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Beydon, N; Aubertin, G

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is 1-4 % in school-aged children. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy is the most common etiology of OSAS in children. Other causes are obesity; facial or skeletal malformations; and neuromuscular, respiratory, or metabolic diseases. OSAS has been associated with sleep quality disturbance (frequent arousals) and nocturnal gas exchange abnormalities (hypoxemia and sometimes hypercapnia), which can both result in negative health outcomes. The analysis of clinical symptoms and physical examination cannot always distinguish between children with primary snoring and children with OSAS. However, the association of at least one sign of nocturnal upper airway obstruction with other diurnal or nocturnal symptoms can be sufficient to establish OSAS diagnosis in a child more than 3 years of age with clear enlarged tonsils but who is otherwise healthy. In all other cases, polysomnography (the gold standard for the diagnosis of sleep-disordered breathing) must be performed either to declare the diagnosis when clinical assessment is not conclusive or when risk factors are present, or to follow up children with an associated health condition or initial severe OSAS. The equipment used to record sleep and the interpretation criteria are all pediatric-specific. Other methods, such as respiratory polygraphy, are simpler to implement, but further studies are warranted to validate the interpretation criteria of these methods in children. However, in centers with experienced personnel, polygraphy can be used in place of polysomnography. In all cases, the analysis of sleep traces must be manual and performed by personnel under the supervision of medical staff trained to interpret pediatric sleep studies. PMID:26968302

  15. Sleep Apnea and Nocturnal Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Populational Study

    PubMed Central

    Cintra, Fatima Dumas; Leite, Renata Pimentel; Storti, Luciana Julio; Bittencourt, Lia Azeredo; Poyares, Dalva; Castro, Laura de Siqueira; Tufik, Sergio; de Paola, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanisms associated with the cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea include abrupt changes in autonomic tone, which can trigger cardiac arrhythmias. The authors hypothesized that nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Objective To analyze the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and abnormal heart rhythm during sleep in a population sample. Methods Cross-sectional study with 1,101 volunteers, who form a representative sample of the city of So Paulo. The overnight polysomnography was performed using an EMBLA S7000 digital system during the regular sleep schedule of the individual. The electrocardiogram channel was extracted, duplicated, and then analyzed using a Holter (Cardio Smart) system. Results A total of 767 participants (461 men) with a mean age of 42.00 0.53 years, were included in the analysis. At least one type of nocturnal cardiac rhythm disturbance (atrial/ventricular arrhythmia or beat) was observed in 62.7% of the sample. The occurrence of nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias was more frequent with increased disease severity. Rhythm disturbance was observed in 53.3% of the sample without breathing sleep disorders, whereas 92.3% of patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea showed cardiac arrhythmia. Isolated atrial and ventricular ectopy was more frequent in patients with moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea when compared to controls (p < 0.001). After controlling for potential confounding factors, age, sex and apnea-hypopnea index were associated with nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia. Conclusion Nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and the prevalence increases with disease severity. Age, sex, and the Apnea-hypopnea index were predictors of arrhythmia in this sample. PMID:25252161

  16. Sleep Apnea and Nocturnal Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Populational Study.

    PubMed

    Cintra, Fatima Dumas; Leite, Renata Pimentel; Storti, Luciana Julio; Bittencourt, Lia Azeredo; Poyares, Dalva; Castro, Laura de Siqueira; Tufik, Sergio; Paola, Angelo de

    2014-11-01

    Background: The mechanisms associated with the cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea include abrupt changes in autonomic tone, which can trigger cardiac arrhythmias. The authors hypothesized that nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Objective: To analyze the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and abnormal heart rhythm during sleep in a population sample. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 1,101 volunteers, who form a representative sample of the city of São Paulo. The overnight polysomnography was performed using an EMBLA® S7000 digital system during the regular sleep schedule of the individual. The electrocardiogram channel was extracted, duplicated, and then analyzed using a Holter (Cardio Smart®) system. Results: A total of 767 participants (461 men) with a mean age of 42.00 ± 0.53 years, were included in the analysis. At least one type of nocturnal cardiac rhythm disturbance (atrial/ventricular arrhythmia or beat) was observed in 62.7% of the sample. The occurrence of nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias was more frequent with increased disease severity. Rhythm disturbance was observed in 53.3% of the sample without breathing sleep disorders, whereas 92.3% of patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea showed cardiac arrhythmia. Isolated atrial and ventricular ectopy was more frequent in patients with moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea when compared to controls (p < 0.001). After controlling for potential confounding factors, age, sex and apnea-hypopnea index were associated with nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia. Conclusion: Nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and the prevalence increases with disease severity. Age, sex, and the Apnea-hypopnea index were predictors of arrhythmia in this sample. PMID:25252161

  17. The Prevalence and Natural History of Complex Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Javaheri, Shahrokh; Smith, Jason; Chung, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Central sleep apnea (CSA) may occasionally occur in patients with obstructive sleep apnea during titration with a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device. Objectives: To determine the prevalence and the natural history of CPAP-emergent CSA. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 1286 patients with a diagnosis of OSA who underwent titration with a positive airway device during a 1-year period. Patients were seen in consultation and underwent full-night attended polysomnography followed by full-night attended CPAP titration. Four weeks after CPAP therapy, patients returned to the clinic for follow-up, and objective adherence to CPAP was recorded. In patients who had CSA on CPAP, a second full-night attended CPAP titration was recommended. Results: Eighty-four of the 1286 patients developed a central apnea index (CAI) of 5 or greater per hour while on CPAP. The incidence of CSA varied from 3% to 10% monthly, with an overall incidence of 6.5%. Forty--two of the 84 patients returned for a second CPAP titration. In 33 patients, CSA was eliminated. In each of the remaining 9 patients, the CAI remained at 5 or greater per hour, with an average of 13 per hour. These patients characteristically had the most severe OSA, and 5 had a CAI of 5 or more per hour at baseline. Two of the 9 patients were on opioids Conclusions: In this large retrospective study of 1286 patients with a diagnosis of OSA, 6.5% had CPAP-emergent or persistent CSA. However, CPAP-emergent CSA was generally transitory and was eliminated within 8 weeks after CPAP therapy. The prevalence of CPAP-persistent CSA was about 1.5%. Severity of OSA, a CAI of 5 or greater per hour, and use of opioids were potential risk factors. Citation: Javaheri S; Smith J; Chung E. The prevalence and natural history of complex sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(3):205-211. PMID:19960639

  18. Obstructive apnea during sleep is associated with peripheral vasoconstriction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imadojemu, Virginia A.; Gleeson, Kevin; Gray, Kristen S.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.; Leuenberger, Urs A.

    2002-01-01

    Obstructive apnea during sleep is associated with a substantial transient blood pressure elevation. The mechanism of this pressor response is unclear. In this study we measured muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (Psa), and mean limb blood velocity as an index of blood flow (MBV, Doppler) and calculated changes in limb vascular resistance during and after apneas during both wakefulness and sleep in patients with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Immediately postapnea during sleep Psa increased significantly compared with the earlier stages of apnea and this was preceded by a rise of MSNA (n = 5). In contrast to blood pressure, MBV remained unchanged. Because resistance = blood pressure/blood flow, limb vascular resistance increased by 29 +/- 8% from late apnea to postapnea (n = 7, p < 0.002). Voluntary breathhold maneuvers during room air exposure evoked similar responses (n = 10). Supplemental oxygen administered via nonrebreather face mask attenuated the MSNA and vasoconstrictor responses to obstructive (n = 2) and voluntary apneas (n = 10). Our data suggest that obstructive apneas in patients with the obstructive apnea syndrome are accompanied by transient limb vasoconstriction. This vasoconstrictor response appears to be, at least in part, mediated by the sympathetic nervous system and may be linked to hypoxia.

  19. Sleep apnea and cognitive function in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Krysten M; Alosco, Michael L; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Cohen, Ronald; Raz, Naftali; Sweet, Lawrence; Colbert, Lisa H; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2012-01-01

    Background. Prior research indicates that heart failure (HF) patients exhibit significant cognitive deficits on neuropsychological testing. Sleep apnea is associated with both HF and reduced cognitive function, but the combined impact of these conditions on cognitive function is unknown. Methods. In the current study, 172 older adults with a dual diagnosis of HF and sleep apnea or HF alone completed a battery of cognitive tests measuring attention, executive functioning, and memory. Results. Relative to patients with HF alone, persons with both HF and sleep apnea performed worse on measures of attention after adjusting for demographic and medical variables. Conclusions. The current findings suggest that HF patients with comorbid sleep apnea may be at greater risk for cognitive impairment relative to HF patient without such history. Further work is needed to clarify mechanisms for these findings and to determine whether the interactive effects on cognitive function lead to poorer patient outcomes. PMID:22745901

  20. CT demonstration of pharyngeal narrowing in adult obstructive sleep apnea

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlman, M.E.; Haponik, E.F.; Smith, P.L.; Allen, R.P.; Bleecker, E.R.; Goldman, S.M.

    1983-03-01

    Sleep apnea is a major cause of daytime hypersomnolence. Among the proposed etiologies, focal obstruction of the airways at the level of the pharynx has been suggested but not proven. Using computed tomography, the cross-sectional area of the airway can be readily assessed. Thirty-three adults with clinically proven sleep apnea and 12 normal adults underwent systematic computed tomography of the neck. Significant airway narrowing was demonstrated in all the patients with obstructive sleep apnea, whereas no such narrowing was seen in the controls. In 11, the narrowing was at a single level, whereas in 22 patients two or more levels were affected. This study has shown that a structurally abnormal airway may serve as an anatomic substrate for the development of sleep apnea. On the basis of this evidence, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty has been performed in two patients with relief of symptoms in one.

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Asad; Raymond, Neil T.; Begum, Safia; Dubb, Kiran; Mughal, Shanaz; Jose, Biju; Piya, Milan K.; Barnett, Anthony H.; Stevens, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is common and causes significant morbidity. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is also common in patients with type 2 diabetes. Because OSA is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress, we hypothesized that OSA is associated with peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes. Objectives: To assess the relationship between OSA and peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A cross-sectional study of adults with type 2 diabetes recruited randomly from the diabetes clinic of two UK hospitals. Measurements and Main Results: Peripheral neuropathy was diagnosed using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument. OSA (apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 5 events/h) was assessed using home-based, multichannel respiratory monitoring. Serum nitrotyrosine was measured by ELISA, lipid peroxide by spectrophotometer, and microvascular function by laser speckle contrast imaging. Two hundred thirty-four patients (mean [SD] age, 57 [12] yr) were analyzed. OSA prevalence was 65% (median apnea-hypopnea index, 7.2; range, 0–93), 40% of which were moderate to severe. Neuropathy prevalence was higher in patients with OSA than those without (60% vs. 27%, P < 0.001). After adjustment for possible confounders, OSA remained independently associated with diabetic neuropathy (odds ratio, 2.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.44–5.52; P = 0.0034). Nitrotyrosine and lipid peroxide levels (n = 102, 74 with OSA) were higher in OSA and correlated with hypoxemia severity. Cutaneous microvascular function (n = 71, 47 with OSA) was impaired in OSA. Conclusions: We describe a novel independent association between diabetic peripheral neuropathy and OSA. We identified increased nitrosative/oxidative stress and impaired microvascular regulation as potential mechanisms. Prospective and interventional studies are needed to assess the impact of OSA and its treatment on peripheral neuropathy development and progression in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:22723291

  2. Oral Appliances for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this review was to determine the clinical effectiveness of oral appliances compared to ‘no treatment’, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), or surgery for the management of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population OSA is characterized by repeated occurrences of upper airway collapse and obstruction during sleep. The condition leads to excessive daytime sleepiness, diminished quality of life, and increased risks of accidents, cardiovascular disease and death. In the general population, the prevalence of OSA is estimated to be 4% in men and 2% in women. Risk factors for OSA include obesity, male gender, increasing age, alcohol use, sedative use, and a family history of OSA. Description of Oral Appliances Oral appliances for OSA fall into two broad categories: mandibular advancement splints (MAS), also known as mandibular repositioning devices, and tongue repositioning or retaining devices. The aim of MAS devices is to advance the mandible forward slightly to enlarge the upper airway and prevent it from collapsing. Similarly, tongue repositioning devices suction the tongue forward to prevent it from falling back and obstructing the airway during sleep. The alternatives to oral appliances include continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) devices, surgery, drug therapy, positional devices, and lifestyle modification. CPAP is the gold standard of treatment, but despite its effectiveness, compliance rates for CPAP have declined because required systems are noisy and because wearing the mask can be uncomfortable, causing claustrophobia in some users. Evidence-Based Analysis Methods Research Questions Are oral appliances effective in improving sleep-disordered breathing in patients with OSA compared to alternative treatments? Are there safety concerns with oral appliances? What is the evidence regarding patient preference, quality of life, and compliance for oral appliances? If effective, are oral appliances cost effective? Literature Search A literature search was conducted up to February 2009. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with more than 20 adults with OSA were eligible for inclusion. The primary outcomes of interest were the Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI), measures of daytime sleepiness, patient preference, compliance, and adverse events. Summary of Findings Five systematic reviews and 16 RCTs that met the inclusion criteria were identified. The systematic reviews consistently concluded that CPAP was more effective than oral appliances at improving sleep disordered breathing, although there may be a niche area for the latter, especially among those with mild OSA as CPAP is difficult to tolerate by some users. Based on the results of the RCTs analyzed for this review, MAS devices are less effective than CPAP when AHI is used as the outcome of interest. MAS devices were shown to decrease AHI levels, but whether this reduction is clinically meaningful is uncertain. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) was not able to achieve statistical significance in comparisons of MAS versus CPAP and MAS versus placebo. Nonetheless, after treatment with either MAS or CPAP, patients seem to be able to achieve normal ESS levels. The ESS has substantial limitations including its subjective nature and low construct validity (i.e. it is unclear if the scale is an accurate measure of sleepiness). Adverse events among patients with MAS devices in the RCTs were common, but mostly mild and transient. Jaw discomfort was the most commonly reported adverse event. Based on the results of the RCTs, compliance does not seem to be better or worse with MAS or CPAP. Similarly, there is no clear patient preference for MAS or CPAP among the studies reporting preference and satisfaction. Keywords Obstructive sleep apnea, oral appliances, mandibular advancement splints, tongue repositioning devices PMID:23074535

  3. Epidemiological aspects of obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, John F.; Pengo, Martino F.; Drakatos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is probably the most common respiratory disorder, with recent data from the United States and Europe suggesting that between 14% and 49% of middle-aged men have clinically significant OSA. The intimate relationship between OSA and obesity means that its prevalence will only increase as the global obesity epidemic evolves. At an individual level, OSA leads to a significant decrease in quality of life (QOL) and functional capacity, alongside a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. Emerging data also suggest that the presence and severity of OSA and associated nocturnal hypoxemia are associated with an increased risk of diabetes and cancer. At a societal level, OSA not only leads to reduced economic productivity, but also constitutes a major treatable risk factor for hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD) and stroke. This article addresses OSA from an epidemiological perspective, from prevalence studies to economic aspects to co-morbidity. PMID:26101650

  4. Dental treatment for paediatric obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Ngiam, Joachim; Cistulli, Peter A

    2015-06-01

    Paediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common and its prevalence is expected to increase due to the rise in childhood obesity. Recent research has shown that many children, both syndromic and non-syndromic, who exhibit mouth breathing as a result of upper airway obstruction, may also exhibit dentofacial anomalies. Although adenotonsillectomy and continuous positive airway pressure have been classically proposed as the primary treatment modalities for paediatric OSA, there are significant limitations to both therapies. Therefore newer treatment modalities are needed. Current research has focused on emerging dental treatment options for paediatric OSA, such as rapid maxillary expansion, oral appliances and distraction osteogenesis. However, there are few randomized trials assessing the effectiveness of these novel dental therapies for paediatric OSA, and hence further research is required to advance the field. PMID:25600076

  5. Treatment Options for Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Cielo, Christopher M; Gungor, Anil

    2016-01-01

    There are a variety of therapies available for the treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In children with enlarged adenoids or tonsils, adenotonsillectomy (AT) is the preferred treatment, but other surgical options include partial tonsillectomy and lingual tonsillectomy. In specific populations, craniofacial or bariatric surgery may be indicated, and tracheostomy should be reserved for cases where there is no other therapeutic option. Positive airway pressure (PAP) is the most effective non-surgical therapy for OSAS as it can be successfully used in even cases of severe OSAS. Nasal steroids and leukotriene receptor antagonists may be used in the treatment of mild or moderate OSAS. Rapid maxillary expansion and dental appliances may be effective in select populations with dental problems. Other non-surgical therapies, such as positional therapy, supplemental oxygen, and weight loss have not been shown to be effective in most pediatric populations. PMID:26597557

  6. In the clinic. Obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Jay S; Patel, Sanjay R

    2014-11-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of Obstructive Sleep Apnea focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:25364899

  7. Sleep Apnea in Patients with Acromegaly. Frequency, Characterization and Positive Pressure Titration

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Gordillo, Daniel; Ortega-Gómez, María del Rocío; Galicia-Polo, Lourdes; Castorena-Maldonado, Armando; Vergara-López, Alma; Guillén-González, Miguel Ángel; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: to describe the frequency of sleep apnea in patients with acromegaly;to identify the proportion of candidates for treatment with positive airway pressure;to report our experience with the positive pressure titration process in acromegaly patients. Methods: A cross-sectional study that included the acromegaly cohort at the Centro Medico Nacional “20 de Noviembre” in Mexico City (n=44). A standard polysomnography (PSG) was carried out for each patient. A second PSG was done for purposes of CPAP titration. Results: A total of 35 patients were studied (80% of the cohort, 20 [57%] women). Polysomnography results showed that 34 subjects (97%, 95%CI 91-100%) had apnea hypopnea indexes (AHI) ≥ 5. No patient had central apnea. We identified 19 subjects with AHI ≥5 and Epworth ≥10, for a frequency of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome of 54% (95%CI 36-71%). A total of 31 patients (88%; 95%CI 77-99%) were deemed to be candidates for positive pressure treatment, but only 8 of them accepted CPAP. They required pressures that ranged from 10 to 18 cmH2O. Conclusions: Our results confirm a high prevalence of sleep apnea in patients with acromegaly, and provide evidence that the majority of those patients are candidates for treatment with positive pressure. Contrary to what has been reported, we identified no patients with central apnea. PMID:22754597

  8. Low-grade albuminuria in children with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Varlami, Vasiliki; Malakasioti, Georgia; Alexopoulos, Emmanouel I; Theologi, Vasiliki; Theophanous, Eleni; Liakos, Nikolaos; Daskalopoulou, Euphemia; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos; Kaditis, Athanasios G

    2013-06-01

    Small urinary protein loss (low-grade albuminuria or microalbuminuria) may reflect altered permeability of the glomerular filtration barrier. In the present study, it was hypothesized that children with obstructive sleep apnea have an increased risk of microalbuminuria compared with control subjects without sleep-disordered breathing. Albumin-to-creatinine ratio was measured in morning spot urine specimens collected from consecutive children with or without snoring who were referred for polysomnography. Three groups were studied: (i) control subjects (no snoring, apnea-hypopnea index < 1 episode h(-1) ; n = 31); (ii) mild obstructive sleep apnea (snoring, apnea-hypopnea index = 1-5 episodes h(-1) ; n = 71); and (iii) moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea (snoring, apnea-hypopnea index > 5 episodes∙h(-1) ; n = 27). Indications for polysomnography in control subjects included nightmares, somnambulism and morning headaches. An albumin-to-creatinine ratio > median value in the control group (1.85 mg of albumin per g of creatinine) was defined as elevated. Logistic regression analysis revealed that children with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea, but not those with mild obstructive sleep apnea, had increased risk of elevated albumin-to-creatinine ratio relative to controls (reference) after adjustment for age, gender and presence of obesity: odds ratio 3.8 (95% confidence interval 1.1-12.6); P = 0.04 and 1.5 (0.6-3.7); P > 0.05, respectively. Oxygen desaturation of hemoglobin and respiratory arousal indices were significant predictors of albumin-to-creatinine ratio (r = 0.31, P = 0.01; and r = 0.43, P < 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, children with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea are at significantly higher risk of increased low-grade excretion of albumin in the morning urine as compared with control subjects without obstructive sleep apnea. These findings may reflect altered permeability of the glomerular filtration barrier related to nocturnal hypoxemia and sympathetic activation which are induced by obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:23228180

  9. Classifying obstructive sleep apnea using smartphones.

    PubMed

    Al-Mardini, Mamoun; Aloul, Fadi; Sagahyroon, Assim; Al-Husseini, Luai

    2014-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious sleep disorder which is characterized by frequent obstruction of the upper airway, often resulting in oxygen desaturation. The serious negative impact of OSA on human health makes monitoring and diagnosing it a necessity. Currently, polysomnography is considered the gold standard for diagnosing OSA, which requires an expensive attended overnight stay at a hospital with considerable wiring between the human body and the system. In this paper, we implement a reliable, comfortable, inexpensive, and easily available portable device that allows users to apply the OSA test at home without the need for attended overnight tests. The design takes advantage of a smatrphone's built-in sensors, pervasiveness, computational capabilities, and user-friendly interface to screen OSA. We use three main sensors to extract physiological signals from patients which are (1) an oximeter to measure the oxygen level, (2) a microphone to record the respiratory effort, and (3) an accelerometer to detect the body's movement. Finally, we examine our system's ability to screen the disease as compared to the gold standard by testing it on 15 samples. The results showed that 100% of patients were correctly identified as having the disease, and 85.7% of patients were correctly identified as not having the disease. These preliminary results demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed system when compared to the gold standard and emphasize the important role of smartphones in healthcare. PMID:25038556

  10. [Depressive symptomatology and sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pochat, M D; Ferber, C; Lemoine, P

    1993-01-01

    The sleep apnea syndrome (SAS), which is defined by more than 5 apneas or hypopneas per hour of sleep (9), is quite a frequent affection which concerns 1.4 to 10% of general population (1.7). The major daytime complaints of the SAS are daytime sleepiness, memory and attention disorders, headaches and asthenia especially in the morning, and sexual impotence (9). The nocturnal manifestations are dominated by sonorous and generally long standing snoring, increased by dorsal decubitus and intake of alcohol, with repeated interruptions by respiratory arrests. These manifestations are always noted but rarely spontaneously reported. The sleep, non refreshing, is agitated and perturbed by numerous awakenings. The findings of the clinical examination are poor: obesity is found in 2/3 of the cases and arterial hypertension in 1/2 of the cases (20). Polygraphic recording during sleep only permits an absolute diagnosis. This frequent affection is a real problem of public health because of its numerous complications (3, 10, 12, 13, 18, 21). Symptoms of depression are often found when a patient with a SAS is examined and conversely, symptoms which evoke a SAS can be found in the clinical examination of depressed patients. We decided so to study the thymic and anxious status of 24 patients investigated for a SAS and submitted to a polygraphic recording during sleep. Four clinical parameters were studied: DSM III-R diagnosis criteria, Montgomery and Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS) and thymasthenia rating scale of Lecrubier, Payan and Puech. We also reported Total Sleep Time (TST = 6.5 +/- 1.5), Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI = 26.7 +/- 21.6), number (2.1 +/- 2.8/h) and duration (174.2 +/- 150.8 s/h) of hypoxic events. Results showed that among 24 patients, 8 were depressed according to DSM III-R diagnosis criteria and had MADRS > 25, 22 were anxious, 11 had a major anxiety (HARS > 15) and 15 presented thymasthenia (SET > 15). Significative correlations existed between anxiety and depression (r = 0.82; p < 0.0001), depression and thymasthenia (r = 0.77; p < 0.0001) and thymasthenia and anxiety (r = 0.75; p < 0.0001). Among the 8 depressed patients a correlation existed between AHI and depression (r = 0.72; p = 0.04), but no correlation was found between depression and hypoxic events. These results were comparable to those of Guilleminault (10), Reynolds (21), Kales (12), Bliwise (3), Klonoff (13) and Millman (18) who studied relations between SAS and depression. The evaluation of thymasthenia gave a more precise typology of the depressive state associated to SAS: the type of the mood disorder is more "blunted" and "anhedonic" than "sorrowful", particularly characterised by asthenia, lack of energy, reduction of interests (leisures, libido, work), loss of initiative, difficulties to organise tasks, fall of performances and reduction of pleasure usually felt in pleasant events (15). The physic symptomatology dominated the psychic one. The sleep disorganization, more than metabolic consequences of apneas, could be involved in this associated depressive state. Other neuropsychiatric troubles can be associated to the SAS. In fact, cognitive troubles (2, 8, 14, 16, 19, 22, 24) and personality disorders (12, 18) have been described. Our data confirm previous observations suggesting a frequent association between SAS, depression, fatigue and anxiety. Clinicians should consequently be aware that a depression with severe complaints of fatigue should deserve an investigation oriented towards SAS. Conversely, when a SAS is diagnosed, it is necessary to look for a possible depression in order to set up the most appropriate treatment. The frequency of SAS, like depression's one, increases with age. Prescription and consummation of sedative psychotropic drugs increase too with age. Since respiratory depressant effects of these drugs have been clearly demonstrated, it is important to evoke SAS when depressive and/or anxious states are diagnosed and not to aggravate it. An efficacious treatment of SAS can also cure the associated depressive state, but this one can persist. It is necessary, in this case, to select a non sedative antidepressant. PMID:12404778

  11. Crash Risk Soars When Truck Drivers Don't Treat Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk Soars When Truck Drivers Don't Treat Sleep Apnea: Study Consistent treatment with breathing device can ... March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Truck drivers with sleep apnea who don't regularly follow their treatment ...

  12. Sleep apnea in a child with the pickwickian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Simpser, M D; Strieder, D J; Wohl, M E; Rosenthal, A; Rockenmacher, S

    1977-09-01

    A 3-year-old girl with a history of excessive weight gain from birth presented with obesity, somnolence, and cyanosis, characteristic of the Pickwickian syndrome. Obesity was familial and exogenous without endocrine or neurologic anomaly. Respiratory center sensitivity to carbon dioxide was normal. Excessive somnolence was due to the obesity, which during sleep caused airway obstruction, apnea, and awakening, finally resulting in sleep deprivation. The sleep apneas and the daytime somnolence disappeared with weight reduction, showing that obesity alone had been responsible for the disorder. PMID:896358

  13. Sleep apnea syndrome: correction with surgical advancement of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Bear, S E; Priest, J H

    1980-07-01

    Mandibular retrognathism is occasionally associated with sleep apnea syndrome. Most cases of this disorder have, until now, been treated with permanent tracheotomies. One patient with this syndrome was treated with surgical advancement of the mandible with bilateral C osteotomies and iliac corticocancellous grafts. Complete reversal of the sleep apnea symptoms and return of the sleep EEG to normal resulted after surgery. Although further study needs to be done, mandibular advancement would appear to be a preferable alterantive to tracheotomy for such patients. PMID:6929910

  14. PHARYNGEAL MOTOR CONTROL AND THE PATHOGENESIS OF OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Amy S; White, David P

    2008-01-01

    The upper airway in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is thought to collapse during sleep at least in part, because of a sleep related reduction in upper airway dilator muscle activity. Therefore a comprehensive understanding of the neural regulation of these muscles is warranted. The dilator muscles can be classified in two broad categories; those that have respiratory related activity and those that fire constantly throughout the respiratory cycle. The motor control of these two groups likely differs with the former receiving input from respiratory neurons and negative pressure reflex circuits. The activity of both muscle groups is reduced shortly after sleep onset, indicating that both receive input from brainstem neurons involved in sleep regulation. In the apnea patient, this may lead to pharyngeal airway collapse. This review briefly describes the currently proposed sleep and respiratory neural pathways and how these circuits interact with the upper airway dilator muscle motorneurones, including recent evidence from animal studies. PMID:17869188

  15. Pathogenic Roles of the Carotid Body Inflammation in Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Breathing difficulties in sleep are a hallmark of sleep-disordered breathing commonly observed in patients with sleep disorders. The pathophysiology of sleep apnea is in part due to an augmented activity of the carotid body chemoreflex. Arterial chemoreceptors in the carotid body are sensitive to inflammatory cytokines and immunogenic molecules in the circulation, because cytokine receptors are expressed in the carotid body in experimental animals and human. Intriguingly, proinflammatory cytokines are also locally produced and released in the carotid body. Also, there are significant increases in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, cytokine receptors, and inflammatory mediators in the carotid body under hypoxic conditions, suggesting an inflammatory response of the carotid body. These upregulated cytokine signaling pathways could enhance the carotid chemoreceptor activity, leading to an overactivity of the chemoreflex adversely effecting breathing instability and autonomic imbalance. This review aims to summarize findings of the literature relevant to inflammation in the carotid body, with highlights on the pathophysiological impact in sleep apnea. It is concluded that local inflammation in the carotid body plays a pathogenic role in sleep apnea, which could potentially be a therapeutic target for the treatment of the pathophysiological consequence of sleep apnea. PMID:25276055

  16. Sleep Apnea Research in Animals. Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Swati; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Jun, Jonathan C

    2016-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder that describes recurrent collapse of the upper airway during sleep. Animal models have been pivotal to the understanding of OSA pathogenesis, consequences, and treatment. In this review, we highlight the history of OSA research in animals and include the discovery of animals with spontaneous OSA, the induction of OSA in animals, and the emulation of OSA using exposures to intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. PMID:26448201

  17. A Retrospective Case Series of Adaptive Servoventilation for Complex Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Stephen E.; Mosko, Sarah S.; Davis, James A.; Pierce, R. Ander; Godfrey-Pixton, Tamera V.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Central sleep apnea can be refractory to traditional positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy (CPAP or bilevel PAP), whether appearing first as a feature of baseline polysomnography or only later once PAP is applied in what is termed “complex sleep apnea” (CompSA). This retrospective study examined the efficacy of adaptive servoventilation (ASV) in 25 consecutive patients with PAP-refractory central sleep apnea, most exhibiting predominantly obstructive apnea during baseline polysomnography. Methods: Patient characteristics were: age = 59.8 ± 16.5 yr; BMI = 30.4 ± 6.1 kg/m2; apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) = 48.5 ± 30.2/h; and central apnea index (CAI) = 10.8 ± 16.0/h. Following unsuccessful PAP titrations, patients underwent ASV titration. Eighteen met established criteria for CompSA. Results: On traditional PAP, AHI did not improve significantly compared to baseline, whether based on the entire titration (38.5 ± 23.4/h, p = 0.10) or the final PAP pressure(s) (44.4 ± 25.9/h, p = 0.54); CAI tripled across the titration (27.4 ± 23.5/h, p = 0.001) and at the final pressure(s) (34.8 ± 24.2/h, p < 0.001). On ASV, AHI fell to 11.4 ± 8.2/h across the titration (p < 0.001) and decreased further to 3.6 ± 4.2/h at the optimal end expiratory pressure (p < 0.001). AHI was ≤ 5/h in 80% of patients and < 10/h in 92%. ASV virtually eliminated central apneas at optimal end expiratory pressure (0.7 ± 2.2/h, p < 0.001). Respiratory arousals showed parallel improvements on ASV but not PAP. Conclusions: ASV proved superior to traditional PAP in reducing the AHI, CAI, and respiratory arousals in a heterogeneous patient group with sleep disordered breathing in whom central apneas emerged or persisted on PAP. Citation: Brown SE; Mosko SS; Davis JA; Pierce RA; Godfrey-Pixton TV. A retrospective case series of adaptive servoventilation for complex sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2011;7(2):187-195. PMID:21509335

  18. Cognitive complaints in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Vaessen, Tim J A; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Sitskoorn, Margriet M

    2015-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with impairments in cognitive functioning. Although cognitive complaints are related to quality of life, work productivity and health care expenditures, most research and all reviews have focused exclusively on objective cognitive functioning so far. In this systematic review, we assessed the available literature on subjective measures of cognition in adult OSA patients. Concentration complaints were consistently found to be more severe in untreated OSA patients as compared to primary snorers and healthy controls. The same seems to be true for memory and executive function problems, but firm conclusions cannot be made as of yet, due to methodological limitations of the available studies. Cognitive complaints appear to be at least partially related to subjective sleepiness. Importantly, they are not necessarily a sign of objective cognitive impairment. Additional research is needed to explore the relation between cognitive complaints, sleepiness and mood problems using validated and norm-referenced questionnaires for cognitive complaints. In addition, the impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on cognitive complaints in OSA warrants further study. PMID:24846772

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea screening by NIRS imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashefi, Feraydune; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Liu, Hanli

    2007-02-01

    This study aimed at determining cerebral hemodynamic parameters in human subjects during breath holding using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Breath holding serves as a method of simulation OSA (Obstructive Sleep Apnea). Data was acquired non-invasively from 40 subjects, twenty OSA sufferers (10 females, 10 males, age 20-70 years), and twenty normal volunteers (10 females, 10 males, age 20-65 years). Measurements were conducted using a LED Imager (LEDI) during breath holding. In comparing OSA subjects with controls during breath holding, a consistent increase or even a decrease in oxy- ([O IIHb]), deoxy- ([HHb]), total hemoglobin ([tHb]) concentrations, and tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO II) in the regional brain tissue were observed. The LEDI probe consists of 4 sources and 10 detectors serving as 4 sets of 1 source and 4 detectors each. A three wavelength (730, 805, and 850 nm) LED was used and the wavelengths were switched sequentially. The distance between sources and the source-detector separation were 2.5 cm. Data acquisition consisted of three segments, baseline for one minute, followed by a period of breath holding, and then 2 minutes of recovery time. The duration of the breath holding was subject-dependent. Our investigation proves that NIR spectroscopy could be used as a tool for detecting cerebral hemodynamics and also serves as a method of screening patients with OSA.

  20. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children is a frequent disease for which optimal diagnostic methods are still being defined. Treatment of OSA in children should include providing space, improving craniofacial growth, resolving all symptoms, and preventing the development of the disease in the adult years. Adenotonsillectomy (T&A) has been the treatment of choice and thought to solve young patient's OSA problem, which is not the case for most adults. Recent reports showed success rates that vary from 27.2% to 82.9%. Children snoring regularly generally have a narrow maxilla compared to children who do not snore. The impairment of nasal breathing with increased nasal resistance has a well-documented negative impact on early childhood maxilla-mandibular development, making the upper airway smaller and might lead to adult OSA. Surgery in young children should be performed as early as possible to prevent the resulting morphologic changes and neurobehavioral, cardiovascular, endocrine, and metabolic complications. Close postoperative follow-up to monitor for residual disease is equally important. As the proportion of obese children has been increasing recently, parents should be informed about the weight gain after T&A. Multidisciplinary evaluation of the anatomic abnormalities in children with OSA leads to better overall treatment outcome. PMID:21189957

  1. Reliability and accuracy of sleep apnea scans in novel cardiac resynchronization therapy devices: an independent report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Fox, Henrik; Nölker, Georg; Gutleben, Klaus-Jürgen; Bitter, Thomas; Horstkotte, Dieter; Oldenburg, Olaf

    2014-03-01

    Pacemaker apnea scan algorithms are able to screen for sleep apnea. We investigated whether these systems were able to accurately detect sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in two patients from an outpatient clinic. The first patient suffered from ischemic heart failure and severe central sleep apnea (CSA) and underwent adaptive servoventilation therapy (ASV). The second patient suffered from dilated cardiomyopathy and moderate obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Pacemaker read-outs did not match polysomnography (PSG) recordings well and overestimated the apnea-hypopnea index. However, ASV therapy-induced SDB improvements were adequately recognized by the apnea scan of the Boston Scientific INVIVE® cardiac resynchronization therapy pacemaker. Detection of obstructive respiratory events using impedance-based technology may underestimate the number of events, as frustrane breathing efforts induce impedance changes without significant airflow. By contrast, in the second case, apnea scan overestimated the number of total events and of obstructive events, perhaps owing to a very sensitive but less specific hypopnea definition and detection within the diagnostic algorithm of the device. These two cases show that a pacemaker apnea scan is able to reflect SDB, but PSG precision is not met by far. The device scan revealed the decline of SDB through ASV therapy for CSA in one patient, but not for OSA in the second case. To achieve reliable monitoring of SDB, further technical developments and clinical studies are necessary. PMID:24519661

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea and the prevalence and incidence of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kendzerska, Tetyana; Leung, Richard S.; Hawker, Gillian; Tomlinson, George; Gershon, Andrea S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: A link between obstructive sleep apnea and cancer development or progression has been suggested, possibly through chronic hypoxemia, but supporting evidence is limited. We examined the association between the severity of obstructive sleep apnea and prevalent and incident cancer, controlling for known risk factors for cancer development. Methods: We included all adults referred with possible obstructive sleep apnea who underwent a first diagnostic sleep study at a single large academic hospital between 1994 and 2010. We linked patient data with data from Ontario health administrative databases from 1991 to 2013. Cancer diagnosis was derived from the Ontario Cancer Registry. We assessed the cross-sectional association between obstructive sleep apnea and prevalent cancer at the time of the sleep study (baseline) using logistic regression analysis. Cox regression models were used to investigate the association between obstructive sleep apnea and incident cancer among patients free of cancer at baseline. Results: Of 10 149 patients who underwent a sleep study, 520 (5.1%) had a cancer diagnosis at baseline. Over a median follow-up of 7.8 years, 627 (6.5%) of the 9629 patients who were free of cancer at baseline had incident cancer. In multivariable regression models, the severity of sleep apnea was not significantly associated with either prevalent or incident cancer after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index and smoking status at baseline (apnea–hypopnea index > 30 v. < 5: adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.71–1.30, for prevalent cancer, and adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.02, 95% CI 0.80–1.31, for incident cancer; sleep time spent with oxygen saturation < 90%, per 10-minute increase: adjusted OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00–1.03, for prevalent cancer, and adjusted HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.99–1.02, for incident cancer). Interpretation: In a large cohort, the severity of obstructive sleep apnea was not independently associated with either prevalent or incident cancer. Additional studies are needed to elucidate whether there is an independent association with specific types of cancer. PMID:25096668

  3. Brain Structure Network Analysis in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yun-gang; Wang, Defeng; Liu, Kai; Weng, Jian; Guan, Yuefeng; Chan, Kate C. C.; Chu, Winnie C. W.; Shi, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleeping disorder commonly affecting school-aged children and is characterized by repeated episodes of blockage of the upper airway during sleep. In this study, we performed a graph theoretical analysis on the brain morphometric correlation network in 25 OSA patients (OSA group; 5 female; mean age, 10.1 ± 1.8 years) and investigated the topological alterations in global and regional properties compared with 20 healthy control individuals (CON group; 6 females; mean age, 10.4 ± 1.8 years). A structural correlation network based on regional gray matter volume was constructed respectively for each group. Our results revealed a significantly decreased mean local efficiency in the OSA group over the density range of 0.32–0.44 (p < 0.05). Regionally, the OSAs showed a tendency of decreased betweenness centrality in the left angular gyrus, and a tendency of decreased degree in the right lingual and inferior frontal (orbital part) gyrus (p < 0.005, uncorrected). We also found that the network hubs in OSA and controls were distributed differently. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that characterizes the brain structure network in OSA patients and invests the alteration of topological properties of gray matter volume structural network. This study may help to provide new evidence for understanding the neuropathophysiology of OSA from a topological perspective. PMID:26413809

  4. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tahrani, Abd A.; Ali, Asad; Raymond, Neil T.; Begum, Safia; Dubb, Kiran; Altaf, Quratul-ain; Piya, Milan K.; Barnett, Anthony H.; Stevens, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common in type 2 diabetes and increases oxidative stress. Hence, OSA could promote the development and progression of DN. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a cohort study in adults with type 2 diabetes. Patients with known OSA or ESRD were excluded. DN was defined as the presence of albuminuria or an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. DN progression was based on eGFR measurements. OSA was defined as apnea hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5 events/h. Serum nitrotyrosine abundance (a marker of nitrosative stress) was measured by ELISA. RESULTS A total of 224 patients were included. OSA and DN prevalence was 64.3 and 40.2, respectively. DN prevalence was higher in patients with OSA (OSA+) compared with those without OSA (OSA−) (49.3% vs. 23.8%, P < 0.001). After adjustment, OSA (odds ratio 2.64 [95% CI 1.13–6.16], P = 0.02) remained independently associated with DN. After an average follow-up of 2.5 (0.7) years, eGFR decline was greater in OSA+ compared with OSA− patients (median −6.8% [interquartile range −16.1 to 2.2] vs. −1.6% [−7.7 to 5.3%], P = 0.002). After adjusting, both baseline OSA (B = −3.8, P = 0.044) and AHI (B = −4.6, P = 0.02) remained independent predictors of study-end eGFR. Baseline serum nitrotyrosine abundance (B = −0.24, P = 0.015) was an independent predictor of study-end eGFR after adjustment. CONCLUSIONS OSA is independently associated with DN in type 2 diabetes. eGFR declined faster in patients with OSA. Nitrosative stress may provide a pathogenetic link between OSA and DN. Interventional studies assessing the impact of OSA treatment on DN are needed. PMID:24062320

  5. Tongue Fat and its Relationship to Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Andrew M.; Keenan, Brendan T.; Jackson, Nicholas; Chan, Eugenia L.; Staley, Bethany; Poptani, Harish; Torigian, Drew A.; Pack, Allan I.; Schwab, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine whether tongue fat is increased in obese sleep apneics compared to obese subjects without sleep apnea. We hypothesized that excess fat is deposited in the tongue in obese patients with sleep apnea. Design: Case-control design. Setting: Academic medical center. Patients: We examined tongue fat in 31 obese controls (apnea-hypopnea index, 4.1 ± 2.7 events/h) and 90 obese apneics (apnea-hypopnea index, 43.2 ± 27.3 events/h). Analyses were repeated in a subsample of 18 gender-, race-, age-, and BMI-matched case-control pairs. Interventions: All subjects underwent a MRI with three-point Dixon magnetic resonance imaging. We used sophisticated volumetric reconstruction algorithms to study the size and distribution of upper airway fat deposits in the tongue and masseter muscles within apneics and obese controls. Measurements and Results: The data supported our a priori hypotheses that after adjustment for age, BMI, gender, and race, the tongue in apneics was significantly larger (P = 0.001) and had an increased amount of fat (P = 0.002) compared to controls. Similar results were seen in our matched sample. Our data also demonstrate that within the apneic and normal tongue, there are regional differences in fat distribution, with larger fat deposits at the base of the tongue. Conclusions: There is increased tongue volume and deposition of fat at the base of tongue in apneics compared to controls. Increased tongue fat may begin to explain the relationship between obesity and obstructive sleep apnea. Citation: Kim AM, Keenan BT, Jackson N, Chan EL, Staley B, Poptani H, Torigian DA, Pack AI, Schwab RJ. Tongue fat and its relationship to obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2014;37(10):1639-1648. PMID:25197815

  6. Mandibular Movements Identify Respiratory Effort in Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Martinot, Jean-Benoît; Senny, Fréderic; Denison, Stéphane; Cuthbert, Valérie; Gueulette, Emmanuelle; Guénard, Hervé; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea (OAH) diagnosis in children is based on the quantification of flow and respiratory effort (RE). Pulse transit time (PTT) is one validated tool to recognize RE. Pattern analysis of mandibular movements (MM) might be an alternative method to detect RE. We compared several patterns of MM to concomittant changes in PTT during OAH in children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy. Methods: Participants: 33 consecutive children with snoring and symptoms/signs of OAH. Measurements: MMs were measured during polysomnography with a magnetometer device (Brizzy Nomics, Liege, Belgium) placed on the chin and forehead. Patterns of MM were evaluated representing peak to peak fluctuations > 0.3 mm in mandibular excursion (MML), mandibular opening (MMO), and sharp MM (MMS), which closed the mouth on cortical arousal (CAr). Results: The median (95% CI) hourly rate of at least 1 MM (MML, or MMO, or MMS) was 18.1 (13.2–36.3) and strongly correlated with OAHI (p = 0.003) but not with central apnea-hypopnea index (CAHI; p = 0.292). The durations when the MM amplitude was > 0.4 mm and PTT > 15 ms were strongly correlated (p < 0.001). The mean (SD) of MM peak to peak amplitude was larger during OAH than CAH (0.9 ± 0.7 mm and 0.2 ± 0.3 mm; p < 0.001, respectively). MMS at the termination of OAH had larger amplitude compared to MMS with CAH (1.5 ± 0.9 mm and 0.5 ± 0.7 mm, respectively, p < 0.001). Conclusions: MM > 0.4 mm occurred frequently during periods of OAH and were frequently terminated by MMS corresponding to mouth closure on CAr. The MM findings strongly correlated with changes in PTT. MM analysis could be a simple and accurate promising tool for RE characterization and optimization of OAH diagnosis in children. Citation: Martinot JB, Senny F, Denison S, Cuthbert V, Gueulette E, Guénard H, Pépin JL. Mandibular movements identify respiratory effort in pediatric obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):567–574. PMID:25766710

  7. Sleep Perception in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Study Using Polysomnography and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyunwoo; Lim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Jun-Soon; Lee, Keon-Joo; Koo, Dae Lim

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Discrepancies between objectively measured sleep and subjective sleep perception in patients with insomnia have been reported. However, few studies have investigated sleep-state misperception in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We designed this study to 1) delineate the factors that could affect this discrepancy and 2) infer an underlying mechanism in patients with OSA. Methods We recruited patients who visited our sleep clinic for the evaluation of their snoring and/or observed OSA. Participants completed a structured questionnaire and underwent overnight polysomnography. On the following day, five sessions of the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) were applied. We divided the patients into two groups: normal sleep perception and abnormal perception. The abnormal-perception group included patients whose perceived total sleep time was less than 80% of that measured in polysomnography. Results Fifty OSA patients were enrolled from a university hospital sleep clinic. Excessive daytime sleepiness, periodic limb movement index (PLMI), and the presence of dreaming were positively associated with poor sleep perception. REM sleep near the sleep termination exerted important effects. Respiratory disturbance parameters were not related to sleep perception. There was a prolongation in the sleep latency in the first session of the MSLT and we suspected that a delayed sleep phase occurred in poor-sleep perceivers. Conclusions As an objectively good sleep does not match the subjective good-sleep perception in OSA, physicians should keep in mind that OSA patients who perceive that they have slept well does not mean that their OSA is less severe. PMID:27074296

  8. Lack of Regular Exercise, Depression, and Degree of Apnea are Predictors of Excessive Daytime Sleepiness in Patients with Sleep Apnea: Sex Differences

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Maria; Lin, Hung-Mo; Pejovic, Slobodanka; Sarrigiannidis, Alexios; Bixler, Edward O.; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Apnea, depression, and metabolic abnormalities are independent predictors of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) in patients with sleep apnea. Exercise is beneficial for apnea, depression, and metabolic abnormalities; however, its association with EDS is not known. Study Objectives: To evaluate the contribution of lack of regular exercise, depression, and apnea severity on daytime sleepiness in patients with sleep apnea. Participants and Design: One thousand one hundred six consecutive patients (741 men and 365 women) referred to the sleep disorders clinic for symptoms consistent with sleep apnea. Daytime sleepiness was assessed with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and activity was evaluated with a quantifiable Physical Activity Questionnaire. Results: Compared with women, men had a higher apnea hypopnea index (AHI) (40.4 ± 1.2 vs 31.0 ± 1.8), lower body mass index (BMI) (35.3 ± 0.3 kg/m2 vs 39.6 ± 0.5 kg/m2), and higher rate of regular exercise (39.1% vs 28.8%) (p < 0.05). Linear regression analysis of the total sample after adjusting for age, BMI, sex, central nervous system medication, and diabetes showed that logAHI, depression, and lack of regular exercise were significant predictors of sleepiness. Predictors of mild or moderate sleepiness for both sexes were depression and logAHI, whereas predictors of severe sleepiness for men were lack of regular exercise, depression, and minimum SaO2 and, for women, logAHI. Conclusions: In obese apneic patients, lack of regular exercise (only in men), depression, and degree of apnea are significant predictors of EDS. This association is modified by sex and degree of sleepiness. Assessment and management of depression and physical exercise should be part of a thorough evaluation of patients with sleep apnea. Citation: Basta M; Lin HM; Pejovic S; Sarrigiannidis A; Bixler EO; Vgontzas AN. Lack of regular exercise, depression, and degree of apnea are predictors of excessive daytime sleepiness in patients with sleep apnea: sex differences. J Clin Sleep Med 2008;4(1):19–25. PMID:18350958

  9. Atrial arrhythmogenesis in obstructive sleep apnea: Therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Linz, Dominik; Linz, Benedikt; Hohl, Mathias; Böhm, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of sleep disordered breathing like obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is 40-50%. OSA reduces success rate of catheter based and pharmacological antiarrhythmic treatment. Additionally, efficient treatment of OSA by continuous positive airway pressure ventilation (CPAP), the first line therapy of OSA, has been shown to improve catheter ablation success rates in AF-patients. A systematic literature search using several databases was performed to review the pathophysiology of obstructive apneas in OSA potentially leading to the development of a substrate for AF and to explain potential mechanisms involved in the clinically observed atrial antiarrhythmic effect of effective CPAP therapy. PMID:26186892

  10. Promoting safety of postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Veney, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    Orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea are at risk for postoperative complications related to administration of pain medications, anxiolytics, and antiemetics. They are more likely to experience respiratory and cardiac complications, be transferred to an intensive care unit, or have an increased length of stay in the hospital. This informational article is for nurses who care for postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The focus is on promoting patient safety through communication, vigilant postoperative sedation assessment, and nursing interventions that include appropriate patient positioning, patient education, and involving patients and their families in care. PMID:24247310

  11. Dead space mask eliminates central apnea at altitude.

    PubMed

    Patz, David S; Patz, Michael D; Hackett, Peter H

    2013-06-01

    Travelers to high altitude may have disturbed sleep due to periodic breathing with frequent central apneas. We tested whether a mask with added dead space could reduce the central apneas of altitude. 16 subjects were recruited, age 18-35, residing at 4600 ft (1400 m). They each slept one night with full polysomnographic monitoring, including end tidal CO2, in a normobaric hypoxia tent simulating 12,000 ft. (3658 m) altitude. Those who had a central apnea index (CAI) >20/h returned for a night in the tent for dead space titration, during which they slept with increasing amounts of dead space, aiming for a CAI <5/h or <10% of baseline. Then each subject slept another night with the titrated amount of dead space. Of the 16 subjects, 5 had a central apnea index >20/h mean 49.1, range 21.4-131.5/hr. In each of the 5, the dead space mask reduced the CAI by at least 88% to a mean of 3.1, range 0.9-7.1/h, (p=0.04). Hypopnea index was unchanged. Three subjects required 500 cc of dead space or less. One subject required 860 cc, and one required 2.1 L. Morning symptoms and arousal index were not significantly affected by the dead space mask. Dead space did not appear to increase the CO2 reserve. At 12,000 ft., central apneas can be effectively reduced with a dead space mask, but clinical utility will require further evaluation. PMID:23795738

  12. Sleep Apnea in Early Childhood Associated with Preterm Birth but Not Small for Gestational Age: A Population-Based Record Linkage Study

    PubMed Central

    Raynes-Greenow, Camille H.; Hadfield, Ruth M.; Cistulli, Peter A.; Bowen, Jenny; Allen, Hugh; Roberts, Christine L.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Investigate the relationship between gestational age and weight for gestational age and sleep apnea diagnosis in a cohort of children aged up to 6 years old. Design: A cohort study, using record linked population health data. Setting: New South Wales, Australia. Participants: 398,961 children, born between 2000 and 2004, aged 2.5 to 6 years. Measurements: The primary outcome was sleep apnea diagnosis in childhood, first diagnosed between 1 and 6 years of age. Children with sleep apnea were identified from hospital records with the ICD-10 code G47.3: sleep apnea, central or obstructive. Results: A total of 4,145 (1.0%) children with a first diagnosis of sleep apnea were identified. Mean age at first diagnosis was 44.2 months (SD 13.9). Adenoidectomy, tonsillectomy, or both were common among the children diagnosed with sleep apnea (85.6%). Children born preterm compared to term were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with sleep apnea (< 32 weeks versus term hazard ratio 2.74 [95% CI: 2.16, 3.49]) this remained even after adjustment for known confounding variables. Children born small for gestational age were not at increased risk of sleep apnea compared to children born appropriate for gestational age, hazard ratio 0.95 (95% CI 0.86-1.06). Conclusions: This is the largest study investigating preterm birth and sleep apnea diagnosis and suggests that diagnosis of sleep disordered breathing is more prevalent in children born preterm, but not those who are small for gestational age. Citation: Raynes-Greenow CH; Hadfield RM; Cistulli PA; Bowen J; Allen H; Roberts CL. Sleep apnea in early childhood associated with preterm birth but not small for gestational age: a population-based record linkage study. SLEEP 2012;35(11):1475-1480. PMID:23115396

  13. Single-Unit Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity Reflects Sleep Apnea Severity, Especially in Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hamaoka, Takuto; Murai, Hisayoshi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Usui, Soichiro; Okabe, Yoshitaka; Tokuhisa, Hideki; Kato, Takeshi; Furusho, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Yu; Nakatsumi, Yasuto; Takata, Shigeo; Takamura, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with augmented sympathetic nerve activity, as assessed by multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). However, it is still unclear whether single-unit MSNA is a better reflection of sleep apnea severity according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). One hundred and two OSAS patients underwent full polysomnography and single- and multi-unit MSNA measurements. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis were performed to determine which parameters correlated with OSAS severity, which was defined by the AHI. Single- and multi-unit MSNA were significantly and positively correlated with AHI severity. The AHI was also significantly correlated with multi-unit MSNA burst frequency (r = 0.437, p < 0.0001) and single-unit MSNA spike frequency (r = 0.632, p < 0.0001). Multivariable analysis revealed that SF was correlated most significantly with AHI (T = 7.27, p < 0.0001). The distributions of multiple single-unit spikes per one cardiac interval did not differ between patients with an AHI of <30 and those with and AHI of 30–55 events/h; however, the pattern of each multiple spike firing were significantly higher in patients with an AHI of >55. These results suggest that sympathetic nerve activity is associated with sleep apnea severity. In addition, single-unit MSNA is a more accurate reflection of sleep apnea severity with alternation of the firing pattern, especially in patients with very severe OSAS. PMID:26973534

  14. Neurocognitive impairment in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Lal, Chitra; Strange, Charlie; Bachman, David

    2012-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder with far-reaching health implications. One of the major consequences of OSAS is an impact on neurocognitive functioning. Several studies have shown that OSAS has an adverse effect on inductive and deductive reasoning, attention, vigilance, learning, and memory. Neurocognitive impairment can be measured objectively with tests such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised, the Psychomotor Vigilance Task, the Steer Clear Performance Test, and tests of repetitive finger tapping. In children, OSAS may cause attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in addition to behavioral problems and learning disabilities. Risk factors for cognitive impairment include increasing age, male sex, apolipoprotein E ε4 allele positivity, current cigarette smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, Down syndrome, hypothyroidism, significant alcohol consumption, stroke, and the use of psychoactive medications. At a cellular level, OSAS likely causes cognitive impairment through intermittent hypoxia, hormonal imbalance, and/or systemic inflammation, either independently or via the resultant endothelial dysfunction that occurs. Excessive daytime sleepiness should be measured and minimized in all studies of neurocognitive impairment. Recent studies have used functional and structural neuroimaging to delineate the brain areas affected in patients with OSAS with neurocognitive dysfunction. A common finding in several of these studies is decreased hippocampal volume. Other affected brain areas include the frontal and parietal lobes of the brain, which show focal reductions in gray matter. These changes can be reversed at least partially with the use of CPAP, which highlights the importance of early recognition and treatment of OSAS. The currently available data in this field are quite limited, and more research is needed. PMID:22670023

  15. Central sleep related breathing disorders - diagnostic and therapeutic features

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Heinrich F.

    2006-01-01

    Three classes of central SRBD are distinguished: 1. Central sleep apnea (CSA), 2. Cheyne-Stokes Respiration as a subgroup of CSA and 3. central hypoventilation syndromes. Reduced or completely absent central respiratory drive without upper airway obstruction is the common feature of central SRBD. Hypoventilation syndromes most often occur secondary in patients with neuromuscular, pulmonary or sceletal diseases or in patients with massive obesity. In patients with hypoventilation during sleep nocturnal and exertional dyspnea and headaches are frequently reported symptoms. Excessive daytime sleepiness is the key symptom in patients with central sleep apnea syndrome. Cheyne-Stokes Respiration is frequent in heart failure patients but in many cases does not cause symptoms specific for the breathing disorder. If there are symptoms or if ambulatory recording of breathing during sleep suggests a sleep related breathing disorder, polysomnography is then performed to definitively rule out or confirm the diagnosis and to initiate treatment, if needed. The indication for treatment in asymptomatic patients with central sleep apnea and Cheyne-Stokes Respiration may be difficult, as there are very little data concerning the long-term benefit in these patients. Symptomatic patients and those with severe central sleep apnea should be treated. Oxygen and CPAP may be effective in 20-30% of patients each. If these treatment options are ineffective, non-invasive pressure support ventilaiton can be used. In patients suffering from hypoventilation syndromes the treatment of choice is non-invasive pressure support ventilaiton combined with supplemental oxygen, if required. PMID:22073076

  16. Sleep Disruption in Patients with Sleep Apnea and End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Loewen, Andrea; Siemens, AnDrea; Hanly, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Sleep apnea (SA) is common in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and such patients are likely to suffer additional sleep disruption associated with restless legs syndrome (RLS) and periodic leg movements (PLM). Our objective was to evaluate sleep quality in ESRD patients who are newly diagnosed with SA and determine the additional contribution of PLM to sleep disruption. Methods: Two groups of patients with SA (apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) > 15) were compared, one with ESRD (n = 12) and the other with normal renal function (n = 18), using a sleep history questionnaire, sleep diary, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, polysomnography (1 night) and actigraphy (6 nights). Results: The prevalence of RLS was higher in ESRD patients (60% vs 6%, p < 0.001). ESRD patients had shorter total sleep time (TST) (264 78 vs 330 46 min, p = 0.01), lower sleep efficiency (68 20 % vs 81 11 %, p = 0.03), and more stage 1 NREM sleep (23 18 vs 8 5 % TST, p = 0.002). ESRD patients had a higher frequency of PLM (31 37 hr-1 vs 8.0 16 hr-1, p = 0.02) and PLM-related arousals (15 18 hr-1 vs 1 2 hr-1, p = 0.003). Actigraphy demonstrated a higher movement and fragmentation index in ESRD patients (23 10 % sleep time vs 17 6 % sleep time, p = 0.04). Conclusions: The co-existence of PLM is an additional source of sleep disruption in patients with ESRD and SA. Treatment of PLM, in addition to treatment of sleep apnea, may be required to improve sleep quality in this patient population. Citation: Loewen A; Siemens A; Hanly P. Sleep disruption in patients with sleep apnea and end-stage renal disease. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(4):324-329. PMID:19968009

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: natural history, diagnosis, and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Gharibeh, Tarek; Mehra, Reena

    2010-01-01

    Sleep apnea is an entity characterized by repetitive upper airway obstruction resulting in nocturnal hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. It is estimated that 2%–4% of the middle-aged population has sleep apnea with a predilection in men relative to women. Risk factors of sleep apnea include obesity, gender, age, menopause, familial factors, craniofacial abnormalities, and alcohol. Sleep apnea has been increasingly recognized as a major health burden associated with hypertension and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. Increased airway collapsibility and derangement in ventilatory control responses are the major pathological features of this disorder. Polysomnography (PSG) is the gold-standard method for diagnosis of sleep apnea and assessment of sleep apnea severity; however, portable sleep monitoring has a diagnostic role in the setting of high pretest probability sleep apnea in the absence of significant comorbidity. Positive pressure therapy is the mainstay therapy of sleep apnea. Other treatment modalities, such as upper airway surgery or oral appliances, may be used for the treatment of sleep apnea in select cases. In this review, we focus on describing the sleep apnea definition, risk factor profile, underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, associated adverse consequences, diagnostic modalities, and treatment strategies. PMID:23616712

  18. Apnea MedAssist: real-time sleep apnea monitor using single-lead ECG.

    PubMed

    Bsoul, Majdi; Minn, Hlaing; Tamil, Lakshman

    2011-05-01

    We have developed a low-cost, real-time sleep apnea monitoring system ''Apnea MedAssist" for recognizing obstructive sleep apnea episodes with a high degree of accuracy for both home and clinical care applications. The fully automated system uses patient's single channel nocturnal ECG to extract feature sets, and uses the support vector classifier (SVC) to detect apnea episodes. "Apnea MedAssist" is implemented on Android operating system (OS) based smartphones, uses either the general adult subject-independent SVC model or subject-dependent SVC model, and achieves a classification F-measure of 90% and a sensitivity of 96% for the subject-independent SVC. The real-time capability comes from the use of 1-min segments of ECG epochs for feature extraction and classification. The reduced complexity of "Apnea MedAssist" comes from efficient optimization of the ECG processing, and use of techniques to reduce SVC model complexity by reducing the dimension of feature set from ECG and ECG-derived respiration signals and by reducing the number of support vectors. PMID:20952340

  19. Classification algorithms for predicting sleepiness and sleep apnea severity

    PubMed Central

    Eiseman, Nathaniel A.; Westover, M. Brandon; Mietus, Joseph E.; Thomas, Robert J.; Bianchi, Matt T.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Identifying predictors of subjective sleepiness and severity of sleep apnea are important yet challenging goals in sleep medicine. Classification algorithms may provide insights, especially when large data sets are available. We analyzed polysomnography and clinical features available from the Sleep Heart Health Study. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the apnea–hypopnea index were the targets of three classifiers: k-nearest neighbor, naive Bayes and support vector machine algorithms. Classification was based on up to 26 features including demographics, polysomnogram, and electrocardiogram (spectrogram). Naive Bayes was best for predicting abnormal Epworth class (0–10 versus 11–24), although prediction was weak: polysomnogram features had 16.7% sensitivity and 88.8% specificity; spectrogram features had 5.3% sensitivity and 96.5% specificity. The support vector machine performed similarly to naive Bayes for predicting sleep apnea class (0–5 versus >5): 59.0% sensitivity and 74.5% specificity using clinical features and 43.4% sensitivity and 83.5% specificity using spectrographic features compared with the naive Bayes classifier, which had 57.5% sensitivity and 73.7% specificity (clinical), and 39.0% sensitivity and 82.7% specificity (spectrogram). Mutual information analysis confirmed the minimal dependency of the Epworth score on any feature, while the apnea–hypopnea index showed modest dependency on body mass index, arousal index, oxygenation and spectrogram features. Apnea classification was modestly accurate, using either clinical or spectrogram features, and showed lower sensitivity and higher specificity than common sleep apnea screening tools. Thus, clinical prediction of sleep apnea may be feasible with easily obtained demographic and electrocardiographic analysis, but the utility of the Epworth is questioned by its minimal relation to clinical, electrocardiographic, or polysomnographic features. PMID:21752133

  20. [Progress in research on obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Xie, Jing; Jiang, Mao; Huang, Juanjuan; Yang, Tianlun

    2016-02-28

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a complicated chronic disease caused by certain reasons, characterized by obstruction of the upper airway and apnea or hypopnea during sleep, which can be followed by anoxia, snoring and daytime sleepiness. Recent studies have shown that hypertension is closely connected to OSAS. OSAS can lead to hypertension by several possible mechanisms. The diagnosis of OSAS mainly depends on the medical history, sign, polysomnogram (PSG) result and the frequency of apnea and hypopnea. OSAS can be relieved by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), oral orthodontic treatment, medicine, change of lifestyles and others. This brief review focuses on the mechanism of hypertension due to OSAS and the diagnosis criteria and treatment of OSAS. PMID:26932221

  1. Immediate postarousal sleep dynamics: an important determinant of sleep stability in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Younes, Magdy; Hanly, Patrick J

    2016-04-01

    Arousability from sleep is increasingly recognized as an important determinant of the clinical spectrum of sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Patients with SDB display a wide range of arousability. The reason for these differences is not known. We hypothesized that differences in the speed with which sleep deepens following arousals/awakenings (postarousal sleep dynamics) is a major determinant of these differences in arousability in patients with SDB. We analyzed 40 preexisting clinical polysomnography records from patients with a range of SDB severity (apnea-hypopnea index 5-135/h). Sleep depth was determined every 3 s using the odds ratio product (ORP) method, a continuous index of sleep depth (0 = deep sleep, 2.5 = full wakefulness) that correlates strongly (r= 0.98) with arousability (Younes M, Ostrowski M, Soiferman M, Younes H, Younes M, Raneri J, and Hanly P.Sleep38: 641-654, 2015). Time course of ORP was determined from end of arousal until the next arousal. All arousals were analyzed (142 ± 65/polysomnogram). ORP increased from 0.58 ± 0.32 during sleep to 1.67 ± 0.35 during arousals. ORP immediately (first 9 s) following arousals/awakenings (ORP-9) ranged from 0.21(very deep sleep) to 1.71 (highly arousable state) in different patients. In patients with high ORP-9, sleep deepened slowly (over minutes) beyond 9 s but only if no arousals/awakenings recurred. ORP-9 correlated strongly with average non-rapid eye movement sleep depth (r= 0.87,P< 2E-13), the arousal/awakening index (r= 0.68,P< 5E-6), and with the apnea-hypopnea index (r= 0.60,P< 0.001). ORP-9 was consistent within each patient and did not change on continuous positive airway pressure despite marked improvement in sleep architecture. We conclude that postarousal sleep dynamics are highly variable among patients with sleep-disordered breathing and largely determine average sleep depth and continuity. PMID:26718786

  2. Degeneration in Arousal Neurons in Chronic Sleep Disruption Modeling Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Fenik, Polina; Zhan, Guanxia; Xin, Ryan; Veasey, Sigrid C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic sleep disruption (CSD) is a cardinal feature of sleep apnea that predicts impaired wakefulness. Despite effective treatment of apneas and sleep disruption, patients with sleep apnea may have persistent somnolence. Lasting wake disturbances in treated sleep apnea raise the possibility that CSD may induce sufficient degeneration in wake-activated neurons (WAN) to cause irreversible wake impairments. Implementing a stereological approach in a murine model of CSD, we found reduced neuronal counts in representative WAN groups, locus coeruleus (LC) and orexinergic neurons, reduced by 50 and 25%, respectively. Mice exposed to CSD showed shortened sleep latencies lasting at least 4 weeks into recovery from CSD. As CSD results in frequent activation of WAN, we hypothesized that CSD promotes mitochondrial metabolic stress in WAN. In support, CSD increased lipofuscin within select WAN. Further, examining the LC as a representative WAN nucleus, we observed increased mitochondrial protein acetylation and down-regulation of anti-oxidant enzyme and brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA. Remarkably, CSD markedly increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha within WAN, and not in adjacent neurons or glia. Thus, CSD, as observed in sleep apnea, results in a composite of lasting wake impairments, loss of select neurons, a pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidative mitochondrial stress response in WAN, consistent with a degenerative process with behavioral consequences. PMID:26074865

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in a Railroad Controller Worker.

    PubMed

    Raşcu, Agripina; Moise, Laura; Naghi, Eugenia; Handra, Claudia; Oţelea, Marina; Raşcu, Alexandra; Lăcătuşu, Lavinia

    2015-01-01

    Sleep Apnea Syndrome (SAS) constitutes a healthcare issue of major importance at international level with a prevalence of 5% in the active population. Consequentially to the induced co-morbidities, the mortality reaches as high as 39% at eight years time lapse from the initial diagnostic. Seldom undiagnosed, the severity spectrum of SAS, in the absence of therapy, only continues to amplify. Here below, we are presenting the case of a 49 years old patient, railroad controller worker, non-smoker and occasionally alcohol user, who was hospitalized in our Clinic for Occupational Medicine. During last year, the patient was accusing excessive daytime somnolence, breath arrests during sleep, intense snoring, morning headaches, morning oral dryness, pin point chest pain, nocturia (4-5 nocturnal urination), concentration difficulties and an overall reduced work capacity. The presumptive diagnostic of Obstructive Sleep Apnea is being considered based on the correlation between the clinical presentation and the Epworth, Stanford and Berlin questionnaire results. The key diagnostic element was the polygraph recording over an 8 hours sleep period. Positive Diagnosis: Obstructive Sleep Apnea severe form. Management and recommendations: (1) Behavioral therapy (weight loss) and (2) CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) therapy which was instituted immediately after the positive diagnosis was made. As a consequence, the respiratory symptoms, the frequent episodes of daytime snoozing and the concentration difficulties at work place diminished considerably. PMID:26076566

  4. The Influence of a Mandibular Advancement Plate on Polysomnography in Different Grades of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Pauli; Huuskonen, Usko; Oikarinen, Kyösti; Sándor, George K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a mandibular advancement device on different grades of obstructive sleep apnea using a relatively simple test for the apnea-hypopnea index to determine if a mandibular device will be effective. Material and Methods A total of 68 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) including, 31 with mild, 23 with moderate and 14 with severe OSAS were treated with a mandibular advancement device (MAD) and monitored with polysomnography. Results 25 of the 31 mild, 15 of the 23 moderate and 2 of the 14 severe OSAS patients were cured of their OSAS if a post treatment apnea-hypopnea index of less than 5 is regarded as cured. The odds ratios for success with MAD therapy are 3 for women over men, 14.9 for mild obstructive sleep apnea, 5.42 for moderate obstructive sleep apnea if severe obstructive sleep apnea is assigned an odds ratio of 1. Conclusions The use of the apnea-hypopnea index alone is useful in mild and moderate disease to predict the effectiveness of mandibular advancement device. Treatment with a mandibular advancement device is very effective in treating mild and moderate obstructive sleep apnea. Conservative treatment with a mandibular advancement device can be successful in less severe grades of sleep apnea and may be an alternative for non-surgical patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea intolerant of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure management. PMID:25937875

  5. Update on obstructive sleep apnea and its relation to COPD

    PubMed Central

    Mieczkowski, Brian; Ezzie, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common and preventable lung disease that affects millions of people in the United States. Sleep disorders including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are also common. It is not surprising that many people with COPD also suffer from OSA. This relationship, however, puts people at risk for more nocturnal desaturations and potential complications related to this, including pulmonary hypertension and heart rhythm disturbances. This update focuses on the physiology of sleep disturbances in COPD as well as the clinical implications of OSA in COPD. PMID:24748786

  6. Cluster headache with obstructive sleep apnea and periodic limb movements during sleep: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pelin, Zerrin; Bozluolcay, Melda

    2005-01-01

    We report the case of a man with episodic cluster headache who suffered from severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) as well as periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS). His attacks of headache occurred primarily during sleep being timely to REM sleep as 90 to 120 minutes interval. OSAs were more frequent and prolonged during REM sleep and oxygen saturation decreased to 81% during this sleep period. Periodic limb movements were also observed in our patient that were more frequent during the first half of the polysomnographic recordings. This case is one of the few reporting cases with CH who had both OSA and PLMS. PMID:15663620

  7. Application of dual mask for postoperative respiratory support in obstructive sleep apnea patient.

    PubMed

    Porhomayon, Jahan; Zadeii, Gino; Nader, Nader D; Bancroft, George R; Yarahamadi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    In some conditions continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or bilevel positive airway pressure (BIPAP) therapy alone fails to provide satisfactory oxygenation. In these situations oxygen (O2) is often being added to CPAP/BIPAP mask or hose. Central sleep apnea and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are often present along with other chronic conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), congestive heart failure, pulmonary fibrosis, neuromuscular disorders, chronic narcotic use, or central hypoventilation syndrome. Any of these conditions may lead to the need for supplemental O2 administration during the titration process. Maximization of comfort, by delivering O2 directly via a nasal cannula through the mask, will provide better oxygenation and ultimately treat the patient with lower CPAP/BIPAP pressure. PMID:23662212

  8. Fat, sleep, and Charles Dickens: literary and medical contributions to the understanding of sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Kryger, M H

    1985-12-01

    Although the relationship between breathing and sleep has only recently been "discovered" by the medical community, excellent literary descriptions of what we know to be the sleep apnea syndrome were made long ago. Although ancient Greek writings described probable sleep apnea, the most important literary contributions in this area are by Charles Dickens. His description of Joe the fat boy in the Pickwick Papers is an example of his brilliant skills of observation and description. It was not until about 140 years after Pickwick Papers was published that we understood what he was describing. PMID:3910333

  9. Sleep apnea risk among Mexican American and non-Hispanic white stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Skolarus, Lesli E.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Burgin, William; Brown, Devin L.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Sleep apnea is a modifiable independent stroke risk factor and is associated with poor stroke outcomes. Mexican Americans have a higher incidence of stroke than non-Hispanic whites. In a biethnic community, we sought to determine the frequency of screening, testing and treatment of sleep apnea among stroke survivors, and to compare self-perceived risk of sleep apnea with actual risk. Methods A survey was mailed to ischemic stroke survivors in the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project. The survey included the validated sleep apnea screening tool, the Berlin questionnaire, and queried the frequency of sleep apnea screening by symptoms, formal sleep testing, and treatment. Self-perceived risk and actual high risk of sleep apnea were compared using McNemar’s test. Results Of the 193 respondents (49% response rate), 54% were Mexican American. Forty-eight percent of respondents had a high risk of sleep apnea based on the Berlin questionnaire, while only 19% thought they were likely to have sleep apnea (p<0.01). There was no difference in proportion of respondents at high risk of sleep apnea between Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites (48% vs. 51%, p=0.73). Less than 20% of respondents had undergone sleep apnea screening, testing or treatment. Conclusions Stroke survivors perceive their risk of sleep apnea to be lower than their actual risk. Despite a significant proportion of both Mexican American and non-Hispanic white stroke survivors at high risk of sleep apnea, few undergo symptom screening, testing or treatment. Both stroke survivors and physicians may benefit from educational interventions. PMID:22156693

  10. Evaluation of Anthropometric and Metabolic Parameters in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Yaşar; Yilmaz, Süreyya; Güven, Mehmet; Kılınç, Faruk; Kara, Ali Veysel; Yilmaz, Zülfükar; Kırbaş, Gökhan; Tuzcu, Alpaslan Kemal; Yılmaz Aydın, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Sleep disorders have recently become a significant public health problem worldwide and have deleterious health consequences. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common type of sleep-related breathing disorders. We aimed to evaluate anthropometric measurements, glucose metabolism, and cortisol levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Materials and Methods. A total of 50 patients with a body mass index ≥30 and major OSA symptoms were included in this study. Anthropometric measurements of the patients were recorded and blood samples were drawn for laboratory analysis. A 24-hour urine sample was also collected from each subject for measurement of 24-hour cortisol excretion. Patients were divided equally into 2 groups according to polysomnography results: control group with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) <5 (n = 25) and OSA group with an AHI ≥5 (n = 25). Results. Neck and waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, late-night serum cortisol, morning serum cortisol after 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test, and 24-hour urinary cortisol levels were significantly higher in OSA patients compared to control subjects. Newly diagnosed DM was more frequent in patients with OSA than control subjects (32% versus 8%, p = 0.034). There was a significant positive correlation between AHI and neck circumference, glucose, and late-night serum cortisol. Conclusions. Our study indicates that increased waist and neck circumferences constitute a risk for OSA regardless of obesity status. In addition, OSA has adverse effects on endocrine function and glucose metabolism. PMID:26257957

  11. American Thoracic Society patient information series. Other therapies for sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    2015-01-15

    Treatment is needed for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) because untreated OSA can result in serious health problems. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is the most common treatment used for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). (see ATS Patient Series http://patients.thoracic.org/wp-content/uploads/ 2014/03/obstructive-sleep-apnea.pdf) For those who cannot use CPAP or want to try another option, there are other therapies that can work for people with OSA. PMID:25590163

  12. Sleep apnea. From the needles of Dionysius to continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Kryger, M H

    1983-12-01

    It is generally believed that the first description of the sleep apnea syndrome was made by Charles Dickens in the Pickwick Papers and that the first medical description was published in 1956. In fact, some of the features of the sleep apnea syndrome were described in antiquity and brief medical reports were published prior to the Pickwick Papers. This article traces the literary and medical contributions to our understanding of sleep apnea. PMID:6360064

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disorder in the population—a review on the epidemiology of sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) defined at an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5 was a mean of 22% (range, 9-37%) in men and 17% (range, 4-50%) in women in eleven published epidemiological studies published between 1993 and 2013. OSA with excessive daytime sleepiness occurred in 6% (range, 3-18%) of men and in 4% (range, 1-17%) of women. The prevalence increased with time and OSA was reported in 37% of men and in 50% of women in studies from 2008 and 2013 respectively. OSA is more prevalent in men than in women and increases with age and obesity. Smoking and alcohol consumption are also suggested as risk factors, but the results are conflicting. Excessive daytime sleepiness is suggested as the most important symptom of OSA, but only a fraction of subjects with AHI >5 report daytime sleepiness and one study did not find any relationship between daytime sleepiness and sleep apnea in women. Stroke and hypertension and coronary artery disease are associated with sleep apnea. Cross-sectional studies indicate an association between OSA and diabetes mellitus. Patients younger than 70 years run an increased risk of early death if they suffer from OSA. It is concluded that OSA is highly prevalent in the population. It is related to age and obesity. Only a part of subjects with OSA in the population have symptoms of daytime sleepiness. The prevalence of OSA has increased in epidemiological studies over time. Differences and the increase in prevalence of sleep apnea are probably due to different diagnostic equipment, definitions, study design and characteristics of included subjects including effects of the obesity epidemic. Cardiovascular disease, especially stroke is related to OSA, and subjects under the age of 70 run an increased risk of early death if they suffer from OSA. PMID:26380759

  14. The deterioration of driving performance over time in drivers with untreated sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    May, Jennifer F; Porter, Bryan E; Ware, J Catesby

    2016-04-01

    Sleep apnea increases risk of driving crashes when left untreated. This study examined the driving performance decrements of untreated, undiagnosed sleep apnea drivers compared with healthy controls in a monotonous highway driving simulator task. It was hypothesized that the sleep apnea group would perform worse during a driving simulator test compared with the control group. A significant group by time interaction occurred indicating that sleep apnea participants' performance degraded more quickly over the course of the drive. In contrast with previous studies, this sleep apnea group did not include sleep disorder center patients, but rather community volunteers whose screening indicated a significant apnea/hypopnea index of 15 or greater. There may be inherent differences between patients and nonpatients with sleep apnea, as patients may have a more significant impact on their quality of life, causing them to seek treatment. Still, the results are clear that although the sleep apnea group drove similarly to the control group at the start of the drive, they are sensitive to time on task effects. These results support the need to diagnose and treat sleep apnea. PMID:26851617

  15. Assessing severity of obstructive sleep apnea by fractal dimension sequence analysis of sleep EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Yang, X. C.; Luo, L.; Shao, J.; Zhang, C.; Ma, J.; Wang, G. F.; Liu, Y.; Peng, C.-K.; Fang, J.

    2009-10-01

    Different sleep stages are associated with distinct dynamical patterns in EEG signals. In this article, we explored the relationship between the sleep architecture and fractal dimension (FD) of sleep EEG. In particular, we applied the FD analysis to the sleep EEG of patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), which is characterized by recurrent oxyhemoglobin desaturation and arousals from sleep, a disease which received increasing public attention due to its significant potential impact on health. We showed that the variation of FD reflects the macrostructure of sleep. Furthermore, the fast fluctuation of FD, as measured by the zero-crossing rate of detrended FD (zDFD), is a useful indicator of sleep disturbance, and therefore, correlates with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and hourly number of blood oxygen saturation (SpO 2) decreases greater than 4%, as obstructive apnea/hypopnea disturbs sleep architecture. For practical purpose, a modified index combining zDFD of EEG and body mass index (BMI) may be useful for evaluating the severity of OSAHS symptoms.

  16. Quality of life in patients with obstructive sleep apnea: Relationship with daytime sleepiness, sleep quality, depression, and apnea severity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonhee; Lee, Sang-Ahm; Ryu, Han Uk; Chung, Yoo-Sam; Kim, Woo Sung

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relative contributions of daytime sleepiness, sleep quality, depression, and apnea severity to mental and physical quality of life (QoL) in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. This was a cross-sectional study. Participants were adults diagnosed with OSA. Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form 36 (SF-36), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Medical Outcomes Study-Sleep Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used. The factors predicting the physical and mental QoL were evaluated using multiple linear regression analysis. Seven hundred ninety three OSA patients participated in the study. The average age was 48.9 years (SD = 11.7 years). The mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 29.5 hour(-1) (SD = 20.6 hour(-1)). The SF-36 scores were 72.6 (SD = 18.5). The BDI, sleep quality, and age were related to both mental and physical QoL. However, ESS, minimal arterial oxygen saturation, gender, and body mass index were associated with the physical but not mental QoL. The BDI was the strongest predictor of both physical and mental QoL. AHI was related to neither physical nor mental QoL. The potential factors affecting QoL are different between physical and mental dimensions of QoL. Depressive mood was the strongest predictor of both the physical and mental QoL. PMID:26396158

  17. Role of Sensory Stimulation in Amelioration of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), characterized by recurrent upper airway (UA) collapse during sleep, is associated with significant morbidity and disorders. Polysomnogram is employed in the evaluation of OSA and apnea-hypopnea number per hour reflects severity. For normal breathing, it is essential that the collapsible UA is patent. However, obstruction of the UA is quite common in adults and infants. Normally, important reflex mechanisms defend against the UA collapse. The muscle activity of UA dilators, including the genioglossus, tensor palatini (TP), and pharyngeal constrictors, is due to the integrated mechanism of afferent sensory input → to motor function. Snoring is harsh breathing to prevent UA obstruction. Unfortunately, snoring vibrations, pharyngeal suction collapse, negative pressure, and hypoxia cause pathological perturbations including dysfunctional UA afferent sensory activity. The current paper posits that peripheral sensory stimulation paradigm, which has been shown to be efficacious in improving several neurological conditions, could be an important therapeutic strategy in OSA also. PMID:23470957

  18. Fatal Consequences: Obstructive Sleep Apnea in a Train Engineer.

    PubMed

    McKay, Mary Pat

    2015-11-01

    This special report describes the findings of the National Transportation Safety Board's investigation into the probable cause of the derailment of a Metro-North passenger train in the Bronx, New York on December 1, 2013, that resulted in 4 deaths and injuries to 59 additional persons. A key finding in the medical investigation was the engineer's post-accident diagnosis of severe, obstructive sleep apnea, and the probable cause of the accident was determined to be the result of the engineer having fallen asleep while operating the train. This accident highlights the importance of screening, evaluating, and ensuring adequate treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, particularly among patients working in positions where impairment of physical or cognitive function or sudden incapacitation may result in serious harm to the public. PMID:26553898

  19. Cardiovascular Complications of Sleep Apnea: Role of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ayas, Najib

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs in 2% of middle-aged women and 4% of middle-aged men with a higher prevalence among obese subjects. This condition is considered as an independent risk factor for cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. One of the major pathophysiological characteristics of OSA is intermittent hypoxia. Hypoxia can lead to oxidative stress and overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which can lead to endothelial dysfunction, a hallmark of atherosclerosis. Many animal models, such as the rodent model of intermittent hypoxia, mimic obstructive sleep apnea in human patients and allow more in-depth investigation of biological and cellular mechanisms of this condition. This review discusses the role of oxidative stress in cardiovascular disease resulting from OSA in humans and animal models. PMID:24734153

  20. Fatal Consequences: Obstructive Sleep Apnea in a Train Engineer

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    This special report describes the findings of the National Transportation Safety Board’s investigation into the probable cause of the derailment of a Metro-North passenger train in the Bronx, New York on December 1, 2013, that resulted in 4 deaths and injuries to 59 additional persons. A key finding in the medical investigation was the engineer’s post-accident diagnosis of severe, obstructive sleep apnea, and the probable cause of the accident was determined to be the result of the engineer having fallen asleep while operating the train. This accident highlights the importance of screening, evaluating, and ensuring adequate treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, particularly among patients working in positions where impairment of physical or cognitive function or sudden incapacitation may result in serious harm to the public. PMID:26553898

  1. [Orthodontic treatment in children suffering from obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Huet, A P; Paulus, C

    2015-09-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may affect children, especially those with dentofacial disharmonies. Dentofacial orthopedic (DFO) treatments carried out in those patients must take this condition into account and can, in selected cases, improve or even treat the OSAS. The goal of our work was to report our experience about DFO treatments of children affected by OSAS in the department of maxillofacial surgery of Femme-Mère-Enfant hospital of university hospitals of Lyon, France. PMID:26255231

  2. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a cause of cognitive disorders in the elderly?].

    PubMed

    Kinugawa, K; Nguyen-Michel, V H; Mariani, J

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a chronic disease characterized by repeated upper airway obstructions during sleep, resulting in fragmented sleep with arousals, nocturnal intermittent hypoxemia and diurnal dysfunctions. Despite its high prevalence in elderly, sleep apnea syndrome seems to be underestimated and difficult to be recognized because of the lack of clinical symptoms specificity in this population. Among the numerous consequences of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, cognitive impairment prevails on the attention, executive functions and memory. Neuroimaging studies in human and experimental models allowed to highlight neural correlates of these cognitive dysfunctions in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with cognitive impairment shares some features with Alzheimer's disease, involving genetic predisposition ApoE4, hippocampus and synaptic plasticity abnormalities. In this context, the question arises whether obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a possible etiological or aggravating factor of cognitive decline in elderly with mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease. Although there are conflicting results in studies evaluating therapeutic efficiency of continuous positive air pressure, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome seems nevertheless as a correctable factor, at least for its impact on some cognitive consequences. Looking for sleep apnea syndrome in elderly with cognitive decline should be considered in a global, diagnosis and therapeutic management. PMID:24630586

  3. Oral Appliance Therapy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePlus

    ... right provider? Many dentists with specialized training in dental sleep medicine and oral appliance therapy are also members of the American Academy ... dentist search feature on the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine Web ... oral appliance therapy. This project is a collaboration between the ...

  4. Relationship Between Snoring Intensity and Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Whun; Lee, Chul Hee; Rhee, Chae Seo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the intensity of snoring and severity of sleep apnea using Watch-PAT (peripheral arterial tone) 100. Methods A total of 404 patients (338 males and 66 females) who underwent home-based portable sleep study using Watch-PAT 100 for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) from January 2009 through December 2011 were included in this study. Subjects were divided into 4 groups; no OSA (PAT apnea hypopnea index [pAHI]<5/hour), mild OSA (5≤pAHI<15/hour), moderate OSA (15≤pAHI<30/hour), or severe OSA groups (pAHI≥30/hour). Mean snoring intensity and percent sleep time with snoring intensity greater than 40, 50, and 60 dB were measured by Watch-PAT 100. Correlations of these parameters with apnea hypopnea index (AHI), respiratory disturbance index (RDI), and oxygen desaturation index were assessed. Results The mean age and body mass index were 46.5±14.8 years and 24.7±3.4 kg/m2, respectively. Mean AHI and RDI were 16.5±15.3/hour and 20.8±14.3/hour, respectively. The mean snoring intensity in the no, mild, moderate, and severe OSA groups was 44.0±2.7, 45.4±6.0, 47.7±5.0, and 50.5±5.6 dB, respectively (P<0.001). There was a positive correlation between snoring intensity and pAHI or PAT RDI (pRDI) (r=0.391 and r=0.385, respectively, both P<0.001). There was also a positive correlation between percent sleep time with the snoring intensity greater than 50 dB and pAHI or pRDI (r=0.423 and r=0.411, respectively, both P<0.001). Conclusion This study revealed that the intensity of snoring increased with the severity of sleep apnea, which suggests that the loudness of snoring might be an indicator of the severity of OSA. PMID:26622957

  5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Children.

    PubMed

    Tsubomatsu, Chieko; Shintani, Tomoko; Abe, Ayumi; Yajima, Ryoto; Takahashi, Nozomi; Ito, Fumie; Takano, Kenichi; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is important for children pertaining to their physical and mental growth. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children has been shown to have different effects as compared to OSAS in adults, including deficits in cognition and neuropsychological functions, hyperactivity, ADHD, behavior problems, aggressive behavior, learning problems and nocturnal enuresis. Hypertrophy of the adenoids and tonsils is a major cause of OSAS in children; therefore, adenotonsillectomy may decrease the effects of OSAS pertaining to physical and mental growth. It is important to accurately diagnose and appropriately treat OSAS in children to prevent OSAS in their adulthood. PMID:27115764

  6. Asynchrony of lingual muscle recruitment during sleep in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Dotan, Yaniv; Pillar, Giora; Schwartz, Alan R; Oliven, Arie

    2015-06-15

    Pharyngeal collapsibility during sleep increases primarily due to decline in dilator muscle activity. However, genioglossus EMG is known to increase during apneas and hypopneas, usually without reversing upper airway obstruction or inspiratory flow limitation. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that intense activation of the genioglossus fails to prevent pharyngeal obstruction during sleep, and to evaluate if sleep-induced changes in tongue muscle coordination may be responsible for this phenomenon. We compared genioglossus and tongue retractors EMG activity in 13 obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients during wakefulness, while breathing through inspiratory resistors, to the activity observed at the end of apneas and hypopneas after 25 mg of brotizolam, before arousal, at equal esophageal pressure. During wakefulness, resistive breathing triggered increases in both genioglossus and retractor EMG. Activation of agonist tongue muscles differed considerably from that of the arm, as both genioglossus and retractors were activated similarly during all tongue movements. During sleep, flow limitation triggered increases in genioglossal EMG that could reach more than twofold the level observed while awake. In contrast, EMGs of the retractors reached less than half the wakefulness level. In sleeping OSA patients, genioglossal activity may increase during obstructed breathing to levels that exceed substantially those required to prevent pharyngeal collapse during wakefulness. In contrast, coactivation of retractors is deficient during sleep. These findings suggest that sleep-induced alteration in tongue muscle coordination may be responsible for the failure of high genioglossal EMG activity to alleviate flow limitation. PMID:25814639

  7. Risk of Sleep Apnea in Hospitalized Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shear, Talia C.; Balachandran, Jay S.; Mokhlesi, Babak; Spampinato, Lisa M.; Knutson, Kristen L.; Meltzer, David O.; Arora, Vineet M.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives: To assess the prevalence of undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among general medical inpatients and to investigate whether OSA risk is associated with in-hospital sleep quantity and quality. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: General medicine ward in academic medical center Participants: 424 hospitalized adult patients ≥ 50 years old without a sleep disorder diagnosis (mean age 65 years, 57% female, 72% African American). Main Measures: The Berlin questionnaire, a validated screen for determining risk of OSA, was administered to hospitalized medical patients. Sleep duration and efficiency were measured via wrist actigraphy. Self-reported sleep quality was evaluated using Karolinska Sleep Quality Index (KSQI). Key Results: Two of every 5 inpatients ≥ 50 years old (39.5%, n = 168) were found to be at high risk for OSA. Mean in-hospital sleep duration was ∼ 5 h and mean sleep efficiency was 70%. Using random effects linear regression models, we found that patients who screened at high risk for OSA obtained ∼ 40 min less sleep per night (-39.6 min [-66.5, -12.8], p = 0.004). These findings remained significant after controlling for African American race, sex, and age quartiles. In similar models, those patients who screened at high risk had ∼ 5.5% less sleep efficiency per night (-5.50 [-9.96, -1.05], p = 0.015). In multivariate analysis, patients at high risk for OSA also had lower self-reported sleep quality on KSQI (-0.101 [-0.164, -0.037], p = 0.002). Conclusion: Two of every 5 inpatients older than 50 years screened at high risk for OSA. Those screening at high risk have worse in-hospital sleep quantity and quality. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1067. Citation: Shear TC, Balachandran JS, Mokhlesi B, Spampinato LM, Knutson KL, Meltzer DO, Arora VM. Risk of sleep apnea in hospitalized older patients. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(10):1061-1066. PMID:25317085

  8. Simulated Obstructive Sleep Apnea Increases P-Wave Duration and P-Wave Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Wons, Annette M.; Rossi, Valentina; Bratton, Daniel J.; Schlatzer, Christian; Schwarz, Esther I.; Camen, Giovanni; Kohler, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Background A high P-wave duration and dispersion (Pd) have been reported to be a prognostic factor for the occurrence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF), a condition linked to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We tested the hypothesis of whether a short-term increase of P-wave duration and Pd can be induced by respiratory manoeuvres simulating OSA in healthy subjects and in patients with PAF. Methods 12-lead-electrocardiography (ECG) was recorded continuously in 24 healthy subjects and 33 patients with PAF, while simulating obstructive apnea (Mueller manoeuvre, MM), obstructive hypopnea (inspiration through a threshold load, ITH), central apnea (AP), and during normal breathing (BL) in randomized order. The P-wave duration and Pd was calculated by using dedicated software for ECG-analysis. Results P-wave duration and Pd significantly increased during MM and ITH compared to BL in all subjects (+13.1ms and +13.8ms during MM; +11.7ms and +12.9ms during ITH; p<0.001 for all comparisons). In MM, the increase was larger in healthy subjects when compared to patients with PAF (p<0.05). Conclusion Intrathoracic pressure swings through simulated obstructive sleep apnea increase P-wave duration and Pd in healthy subjects and in patients with PAF. Our findings imply that intrathoracic pressure swings prolong the intra-atrial and inter-atrial conduction time and therefore may represent an independent trigger factor for the development for PAF. PMID:27071039

  9. Sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome and type 2 diabetes. A reciprocal relationship?

    PubMed

    Martínez Cerón, Elisabet; Casitas Mateos, Raquel; García-Río, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) is independently associated with the development of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Moreover, despite significant methodological limitations, some studies report a high prevalence of SAHS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). A recent meta-analysis shows that moderate-severe SAHS is associated with an increased risk of DM2 (relative risk=1.63 [1.09 to 2.45]), compared to the absence of apneas and hypopneas. Common alterations in various pathogenic pathways add biological plausibility to this relationship. Intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, caused by successive apnea-hypopnea episodes, induce several intermediate disorders, such as activation of the sympathetic nervous system, oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, alterations in appetite-regulating hormones and activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which, in turn, favor the development of insulin resistance, its progression to glucose intolerance and, ultimately, to DM2. Concomitant SAHS seems to increase DM2 severity, since it worsens glycemic control and enhances the effects of atherosclerosis on the development of macrovascular complications. Furthermore, SAHS may be associated with the development of microvascular complications: retinopathy, nephropathy or diabetic neuropathy in particular. Data are still scant, but it seems that DM2 may also worsen SAHS progression, by increasing the collapsibility of the upper airway and the development of central apneas and hypopneas. PMID:25145320

  10. Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Buerger's Disease: a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kazemzadeh, Gholam Hosein; Bameshki, Ali Reza; Navvabi, Iman; Ahmadi Hoseini, Seyed Hosein; Taghavi Gilani, Mehryar

    2015-10-01

    In this study we evaluated the incidence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in patients with thromboangiitis obliterans for reduction of crisis. In 40 patients with Buerger's disease daily sleepiness and risk of Obstructive sleep apnea were evaluated using the Epworth sleeping scale (ESS) and the Stop-Bang score. An Apnea-link device was used for evaluation of chest motion, peripheral oxygenation, and nasal airflow during night-time sleep. The apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) and respiratory disurbance index were used for Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome diagnosis. All subjects were cigarette smokers and 80% were opium addicted. The prevalence of Obstructive sleep apnea (AHI>5) was 80%, but incidence of Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (AHI>5 + ESS≥10) was 5% (2/40). There was no association between duration or frequency of hospitalization and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (P=0.74 and 0.86, respectively). In addition, no correlation between ESS and Stop-Bang scores and AHI was observed (P=0.58 and 0.41, respectively). There was an inverse correlation between smoking rate and AHI (P=0.032, r = -0.48). We did not find an association between Buerger's disease and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Although the AHI was high (80%) and daily sleepiness was low. The negative correlation of smoking with AHI and on the other hand daily napping in addiction may be caused by the absence of a clear relationship between Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and Buerger's disease. PMID:26615374

  11. Prevalence of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Patients with Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Patt, Brian T.; Jarjoura, David; Lambert, Lynn; Roy, Sashwati; Gordillo, Gayle; Schlanger, Richard; Sen, Chandan K.; Khayat, Rami N.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Chronic non-healing wounds are a major human and economic burden. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is prevalent in patients with obesity, diabetes, aging, and cardiovascular disease, all of which are risk factors for chronic wounds. We hypothesized that OSA would have more prevalence in patients of a wound center than the general middle-aged population. Methods: Consecutive patients of the Ohio State University Comprehensive Wound Center (CWC) were surveyed with the Berlin and Epworth questionnaires. In the second stage of the protocol, 50 consecutive unselected CWC patients with lower extremity wounds underwent home sleep studies. Results: In 249 patients of the CWC who underwent the survey study, OSA had been previously diagnosed in only 22%. The prevalence of high-risk status based on questionnaires for OSA was 46% (95% CI 40%, 52%). In the 50 patients who underwent home sleep studies, and using an apnea hypopnea index of 15 events per hour, the prevalence of OSA was 57% (95% CI 42%, 71%). There was no difference between the Berlin questionnaire score and weight between patients with OSA and those without. Conclusions: The prevalence of OSA in patients with chronic wounds exceeds the estimated prevalence of OSA in the general middle aged population. This study identifies a previously unrecognized population with high risk for OSA. Commonly used questionnaires were not sufficiently sensitive for the detection of high risk status for OSA in this patient population. Citation: Patt BT; Jarjoura D; Lambert L; Roy S; Gordillo G; Schlanger R; Sen CK; Khayat RN. Prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with chronic wounds. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(6):541-544. PMID:21206743

  12. Reversibility of deficient sleep entrained growth hormone secretion in a boy with achondroplasia and obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, S J; Wu, R H; Thorpy, M J; Shprintzen, R J; Marion, R E; Saenger, P

    1987-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea may lead to disordered sleep architecture and impair the physiologic slow wave sleep related growth hormone release. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs with craniofacial syndromes and in children with airway narrowing, pharyngeal hypoplasia, tonsillar adenoidal hypertrophy, micrognathia and achondroplasia. To examine the relationship between disordered sleep and growth hormone release we studied a 9 year old male with achondroplasia, growth failure (3 cm/year) and obstructive sleep apnea. Polysomnography data and a 20 min sampling for sleep entrained growth hormone showed before therapeutic tracheostomy numerous apneic episodes, absent slow wave sleep and abnormal low growth hormone secretion during sleep. Normalized slow wave sleep entrained growth hormone secretion after tracheostomy led to a sustained increase in growth rate. Normal growth rate (greater than 5 cm/year) continues 2 years after tracheostomy. We conclude that obstructive sleep apnea may impair sleep related growth hormone release. Obstructive sleep apnea may be a useful model for other diseases in which growth failure and sleep disturbances are linked. PMID:3661058

  13. Sleep apnea syndrome in the morbidly obese as an indication for weight reduction surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Peiser, J; Lavie, P; Ovnat, A; Charuzi, I

    1984-01-01

    Fifteen morbidly obese patients with Sleep Apnea Syndrome (SAS) were studied during nocturnal sleep before and between 2 to 4 months after a weight reduction surgery. Six patients were also recorded between 4 to 8 months after surgery. Postoperative recordings revealed a dramatic reduction in the sleep apnea index and an improvement in sleep motility and daytime vigilance levels. A further decrease in apneas and sleep motility was seen in the late post-treatment recording. These results indicate that weight reduction surgery is an effective definitive treatment for obesity associated SAS. PMID:6691724

  14. Intention to Exercise in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Simon S.; Doyle, Geoffrey; Pascoe, Thomas; Douglas, James A; Jorgensen, Greg

    2007-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common and serious health issue that is strongly associated with excess weight. Exercise may be an effective mechanism for reducing the severity of OSA both in association with, and independent of, reduction in body weight. As such, increased exercise has been suggested as a potential intervention for OSA, particularly for patients with mild to moderate clinical severity. However, it is unknown how ready to engage in exercise patients with OSA are. Self-reported exercise intention was assessed in 206 consecutive patients attending a large tertiary sleep disorders service in Australia. Classification of the patients by Stage of Change, a construct of the Transtheoretical Model of behavior change, was supported by differences between the groups in level of habitual self-reported exercise. Cluster analysis identified 4 potential patient types, with differing profiles in perceived costs and benefits of exercise, and exercise-related self-efficacy. The validity of these patient clusters was also supported by differences between the groups in current self-reported exercise levels. The results may help to identify patients who are more likely to engage in increased exercise, and to identify barriers to exercise in patients less inclined to increase their exercise. Citation: Smith SS; Doyle G; Pascoe T et al. Intention to exercise in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2007;3(7):689694. PMID:18198801

  15. Insular Cortex Metabolite Changes in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Santosh K.; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M.; Woo, Mary A.; Yan-Go, Frisca L.; Harper, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: Adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) show significant autonomic and neuropsychologic deficits, which may derive from damage to insular regions that serve those functions. The aim was to assess glial and neuronal status from anterior insular metabolites in OSA versus controls, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (PMRS), and thus to provide insights for neuroprotection against tissue changes, and to reduce injury consequences. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University-based medical center. Participants: Thirty-six patients with OSA, 53 controls. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: We performed PMRS in bilateral anterior insulae using a 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner, calculated N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr), choline/creatine (Cho/Cr), myo-inositol/creatine (MI/Cr), and MI/NAA metabolite ratios, and examined daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale, ESS), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, PSQI), and neuropsychologic status (Beck Depression Inventory II [BDI-II] and Beck Anxiety Inventory [BAI]). Body mass index, BAI, BDI-II, PSQI, and ESS significantly differed between groups. NAA/ Cr ratios were significantly reduced bilaterally, and left-sided MI/Cr and MI/NAA ratios were increased in OSA over controls. Significant positive correlations emerged between left insular MI/Cr ratios and apnea-hypopnea index values, right insular Cho/Cr ratios and BDI-II and BAI scores, and negative correlations appeared between left insular NAA/Cr ratios and PSQI scores and between right-side MI/Cr ratios and baseline and nadir change in O2 saturation. Conclusions: Adults with obstructive sleep apnea showed bilaterally reduced N-acetylaspartate and left-side increased myo-inositol anterior insular metabolites, indicating neuronal damage and increased glial activation, respectively, which may contribute to abnormal autonomic and neuropsychologic functions in the condition. The activated glial status likely indicates increased inflammatory action that may induce more neuronal injury, and suggests separate approaches for glial and neuronal protection. Citation: Yadav SK, Kumar R, Macey PM, Woo MA, Yan-Go FL, Harper RM. Insular cortex metabolite changes in obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2014;37(5):951-958. PMID:24790274

  16. Effect of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on the Sleep Architecture in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Kappus, Matthew R.; Leszczyszyn, David J.; Moses, Leonard; Raman, Shekar; Heuman, Douglas M.; Bajaj, Jasmohan S.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep disturbances in cirrhosis are assumed to be due to hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The interaction between cirrhosis, prior HE, and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has not been evaluated. We aimed to evaluate the additional effect of cirrhosis with and without prior HE on the sleep architecture and perceived sleep disturbances of OSA patients. Methods: A case-control review of OSA patients who underwent polysomnography (PSG) in a liver-transplant center was performed. OSA patients with cirrhosis (with/without prior HE) were age-matched 1:1 with OSA patients without cirrhosis. Sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, sleep quality, and sleep architecture was compared between groups. Results: Forty-nine OSA cirrhotic patients (age 57.4 ± 8.3 years, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) 8.3 ± 5.4, 51% HCV, 20% prior HE) were age-matched 1:1 to OSA patients without cirrhosis. Apnea-hypopnea index, arousal index, sleep efficiency, daytime sleepiness, and effect of sleepiness on daily activities were similar between OSA patients with/ without cirrhosis. Sleep architecture, including %slow wave sleep (SWS), was also not different between the groups. MELD was positively correlated with time in early (N1) stage (r = 0.4, p = 0.03). All prior HE patients (n = 10) had a shift of the architecture towards early, non-restorative sleep (higher % [N2] stage [66 vs 52%, p = 0.005], lower % SWS [0 vs 29%, p = 0.02], lower REM latency [95 vs 151 minutes, p = 0.04]) compared to the rest. Alcoholic etiology was associated with higher latency to N1/N2 sleep, but no other effect on sleep architecture was seen. Conclusions: OSA can contribute to sleep disturbance in cirrhosis and should be considered in the differential of sleep disturbances in cirrhosis. Prior HE may synergize with OSA in worsening the sleep architecture. Citation: Kappus MR; Leszczyszyn DJ; Moses L; Raman S; Heuman DM; Bajaj JS. Effect of obstructive sleep apnea on the sleep architecture in cirrhosis. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(3):247-251. PMID:23494006

  17. The Association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Neurocognitive Performance—The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES)

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Stuart F.; Chan, Cynthia S.; Dement, William C.; Gevins, Alan; Goodwin, James L.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Green, Sylvan; Guilleminault, Christian; Hirshkowitz, Max; Hyde, Pamela R.; Kay, Gary G.; Leary, Eileen B.; Nichols, Deborah A.; Schweitzer, Paula K.; Simon, Richard D.; Walsh, James K.; Kushida, Clete A.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine associations between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and neurocognitive performance in a large cohort of adults. Study Design: Cross-sectional analyses of polysomnographic and neurocognitive data from 1204 adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES), assessed at baseline before randomization to either continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or sham CPAP. Measurements: Sleep and respiratory indices obtained by laboratory polysomnography and several measures of neurocognitive performance. Results: Weak correlations were found for both the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) and several indices of oxygen desaturation and neurocognitive performance in unadjusted analyses. After adjustment for level of education, ethnicity, and gender, there was no association between the AHI and neurocognitive performance. However, severity of oxygen desaturation was weakly associated with worse neurocognitive performance on some measures of intelligence, attention, and processing speed. Conclusions: The impact of OSA on neurocognitive performance is small for many individuals with this condition and is most related to the severity of hypoxemia. Citation: Quan SF; Chan CS; Dement WC; Gevins A; Goodwin JL; Gottlieb DJ; Green S; Guilleminault C; Hirshkowitz M; Hype PR; Kay GG; Leary EB; Nichols DA; Schweitzer PK; Simon RD; Walsh JK; Kushida CA. The association between obstructive sleep apnea and neurocognitive performance—the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES). SLEEP 2011;34(3):303-314. PMID:21358847

  18. Overweight explains the increased red blood cell aggregation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Sinnapah, Stéphane; Cadelis, Gilbert; Waltz, Xavier; Lamarre, Yann; Connes, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Sleep apnea patients and obese subjects are overexposed to cardiovascular diseases. These two health conditions may be associated with hemorheological alterations which could increase the cardiovascular risk. The present study investigated the hemorheological characteristics in patients with overweight and/or sleep apnea to identify the main predictor of red blood cell (RBC) abnormalities in sleep apnea patients. Ninety-seven patients were subjected to one night sleep polygraphy to determine their sleep apnea status. Body mass index (BMI) and the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) were determined for categorization of obesity and sleep apnea status. Blood was sampled for hematocrit, blood viscosity, RBC deformability, aggregation and disaggregation threshold measurements. BMI and AHI were positively associated and were both positively associated with RBC aggregation. Analyses of covariance and multiple regression analyses revealed that BMI was more predictive of RBC aggregation than AHI. No association of BMI classes and AHI classes with RBC deformability or blood viscosity was observed. This study shows that increased RBC aggregation in sleep apnea patients is caused by overweight. Therapies to improve blood rheology in sleep apnea patients, and therefore reduce the risk for cardiovascular disorders, should focus on weight-loss. PMID:23271197

  19. Effect of Oral Appliance for Snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Madhu; Srivastava, Govind Narayan; Pratap, Chandra Bhanu; Sharma, Vipul Kumar; Chaturvedi, Thakur Prasad

    2015-01-01

    To analyze therapeutic and clinical efficacy of mandibular advancement device (MAD) on snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Thirty patients with OSA were recruited on the basis ofpolysomnography with an Apnea and Hypopnea Index (AHI) greater than 5 but less than 30. Repeat polysomnography was performed in follow up with the appliance in place. MAD used in the study is Medical Dental Sleep Appliance (MDSA). It is a titratable appliance. With the appliance in position, the mandible was advanced to an extent that did not exceed 70% of maximum protrusion capacity; Vertical opening did not exceed on an average 3-4 mm beyond freeway space. Comparison of pre AHI scores (diagnostic PSG) with post AHI scores (PSG with OA in-situ) showed a decrease from Mean +/- SD 26.2367 +/- 6.53 to 13.7111 +/- 627. A highly significant (p < 0.001) improvement in AHI was observed. Pre and post ESS score showed a mean decrease from 14.2333 +/- 5.00 to 6.1481 +/- 2.46 MDSA is effective in reducing apnea hypopnea index scores and improving oxygen saturation level. PMID:26720958

  20. The potential benefits of treatment of sleep apnea in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Stephan; Schueller, Per O; Hennersdorf, Marcus G; Strauer, Bodo E

    2008-01-01

    At least half of patients with heart failure (HF) suffer from sleep apnea. Growing evidence suggests that there may be a strong pathophysiological link between chronic HF and sleep apnea due to nocturnal oxygen desaturation and sympathetic activation. It seems that sleep apnea contributes to systolic and diastolic HF, reduced left and right ventricular function, and arrhythmia (e.g. atrial fibrillation, bradycardia, or ventricular ectopy). Therefore, treatment of sleep apnea might alleviate cardiac symptoms and improve cardiac function. Nevertheless, the exact role of long-term treatment of sleep apnea in HF patients remains to be elucidated, as important clinical endpoints (e.g mortality) have been assessed in only a few studies. Heart Fail Monit 2008;5(4):106-11. PMID:18273493

  1. A Case of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Assessments of Fitness for Work

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder that can cause excessive daytime sleepiness and impairment of cognition. These symptoms may lead to the occurrence of occupational accidents in workers with obstructive sleep apnea. Case presentation A 36-year-old man who worked as a dimensional control surveyor caused a vehicle accident while he was driving at the work site. Although he experienced loss of consciousness at the time of the accident, he had no other symptoms. His brain computed tomography and laboratory test did not show any specific findings. Medical tests were conducted to evaluate his fitness for work. Decreased sleep latency was observed on the electroencephalography image, which is suggestive of a sleep disorder. He frequently experienced daytime sleepiness and his Epworth sleepiness score was 13. The polysomnography showed a markedly increased apnea-hypopnea index of 84.3, which led to a diagnosis of severe obstructive sleep apnea. The patient was advised to return to work only when his obstructive sleep apnea improved through proper treatment. Conclusion Proper screening for obstructive sleep apnea among workers is important for preventing workplace accidents caused by this disorder, but screening guidelines have not yet been established in Korea. An effort toward preparing practical guidelines for obstructive sleep apnea is needed. PMID:24822091

  2. Reduced innervation in the human pharynx in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    de Carlos, Félix; Cobo, Juan; Macías, Emilio; Feito, Jorge; González, Mónica; Cobo, Teresa; Fernández-Mondragón, María P; García-Suárez, Olivia; Vega, José A

    2015-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a disease characterized by repetitive breathing during sleep that lead to reduced oxygen saturation and sleep disturbance among other symptoms. Obstructive sleep apnea is caused by blockade of the upper respiratory airway, although the pathogenic mechanism underlying this occlusion remains unknown. In these studies we explored the hypothesis that alterations in the innervation, especially mechanosensory innervation, of the pharynx may contribute to obstructive sleep apnea. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the innervation of the human pharynx in normal individuals and in subjects clinically diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea. Using immunohistochemistry for axon and Schwann cells, as well as for two putative mechanoproteins (ASIC2 and TRPV4), we observed a significant reduction in the density of nerve fibers in the submucosa of patients with obstructive sleep apnea as well as morphological abnormalities in mechanosensory corpuscles. Importantly, while ASIC2 and TRPV4 expression was regularly found in the axons of mechanosensory corpuscles distributed throughout the muscular layer in the control subjects, it was absent in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. These findings support that neurological alterations are important contributors to the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:25663466

  3. Investigating relative respiratory effort signals during mixed sleep apnea using photoplethysmogram.

    PubMed

    Khandoker, A H; Karmakar, C K; Penzel, T; Glos, M; Palaniswami, M

    2013-10-01

    Sleep disordered breathing does show different types of events. These are obstructive apnea events, central apnea events and mixed sleep apnea (MSA) which have a central component with a pause in airflow without respiratory effort followed by an obstructive component with respiratory effort. The esophageal pressure (Pes) is the accurate method to assess respiratory effort. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether the features extracted from photo-plethysmogram (PPG) could relate with the changes in Pes during MSA. Therefore, Pes and PPG signals during 65 pre-scored MSA events and 10s preceding the events were collected from 8 patients. Pulse intervals (PPI), Pulse wave amplitudes (PWA) and wavelet decomposition (Wv) of PPG signals at level 8 (0.15-0.32Hz) were derived from PPG signals. Results show that significant correlations (r=0.63, p<0.01; r=0.42, p<0.05; r=0.8, p<0.01 for OSA part) were found between reductions in Pes and that in PPG based surrogate respiratory signals PPI, PWA and Wv. Results suggest that PPG based relative respiratory effort signal can be considered as an alternative to Pes as a means of measuring changes in inspiratory effort when scoring OSA and CSA parts of MSA events. PMID:23695488

  4. A failure of adaptive servo-ventilation to correct central apneas in Cheyne-Stokes breathing.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Harigopal; Dillard, Thomas A

    2012-02-15

    An 80-year-old man with severe central sleep apnea due to Cheyne-Stokes breathing (AHI 41.2) caused by severe cardiac failure underwent a trial of adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) by full face mask after failure of a fixed CPAP trial. Recommended procedure was closely followed and the ASV device activated normally during central apneas. Initial settings were EEP 5, PSmin 3, PSmax 15 on room air. The device did not capture the thorax or abdomen, as shown by lack of change in respiratory inductive plethysmography, despite expected mask pressure waveforms. Snoring was also detected during apneas with device activation. Desaturation continued, followed by arousals during hyperpnea. On the device, the patient clearly slept for 1-3 epochs during the central apneas only to awaken during hyperpnea. We hypothesize that the failure to capture may have resulted from "reverse" obstructive apnea, possibly due to glottic closure during ASV activation. We suggest that earlier manual adjustments to ASV in cases such as ours, prior to waiting for the recommended 20 to 40 min of sleep, may be appropriate in selected patients. We also consider additional interventions that may increase the likelihood of a successful trial. PMID:22334816

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Kidney Disease: A Potential Bidirectional Relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Abuyassin, Bisher; Sharma, Kumar; Ayas, Najib T.; Laher, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with high mortality rates and heavy economic and social burdens. Nearly 10% of the United States population suffer from CKD, with fatal outcomes increased by 16–40 times even before reaching end-stage renal disease. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is between 3% and 7% in the general population, and has increased dramatically during the last 2 decades along with increased rates of obesity. However, the prevalence of OSA is much greater in patients with CKD. In addition, aggressive dialysis improves OSA. The current literature suggests a bidirectional association between CKD and OSA through a number of potential pathological mechanisms, which increase the possibility of both diseases being possible risk factors for each other. CKD may lead to OSA through a variety of mechanisms, including alterations in chemoreflex responsiveness, pharyngeal narrowing due to fluid overload, and accumulation of uremic toxins. It is also being increasingly recognized that OSA can also accelerate loss of kidney function. Moreover, animals exposed to intermittent hypoxia suffer histopathological renal damage. Potential mechanisms of OSA-associated renal dysfunction include renal hypoxia, hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, and increased oxidative stress. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 845. Citation: Abuvassin B, Sharma K, Ayas NT, Laher I. Obstructive sleep apnea and kidney disease: a potential bidirectional relationship? J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(8):915–924. PMID:25845900

  6. Sleep Apnea and Fatty Liver Are Coupled Via Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Arısoy, Ahmet; Sertoğullarından, Bunyamin; Ekin, Selami; Özgökçe, Mesut; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Huyut, Mehmet Tahir; Ölmez, Şehmus; Turan, Mahfuz

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by intermittent hypoxia. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between OSA and fatty liver. Material/Methods We enrolled 176 subjects to this study who underwent polysomnography (PSG) for suspected OSA. The control group included 42 simple snoring subjects. PSG, biochemical tests, and ultrasonographic examination were performed all subjects. Results The simple snoring and mild, moderate, and severe OSA groups included 18/42 (42.86%), 33/52 (63.5%), 27/34 (79.4%), and 28/48 (79.2%) subjects with hepatosteatosis, respectively. There were significant differences in hepatosteatosis and hepatosteatosis grade between the simple snoring and the moderate and severe OSA groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that BMI and average desaturation were independently and significantly related to hepatic steatosis. Conclusions Our study shows that BMI and the average desaturation contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver in subjects with OSA. In this regard, sleep apnea may trigger metabolic mitochondrial energy associated processes thereby altering lipid metabolism and obesity as well. PMID:26993969

  7. Sleep Apnea and Fatty Liver Are Coupled Via Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Arısoy, Ahmet; Sertoğullarından, Bunyamin; Ekin, Selami; Özgökçe, Mesut; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Huyut, Mehmet Tahir; Ölmez, Şehmus; Turan, Mahfuz

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by intermittent hypoxia. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between OSA and fatty liver. MATERIAL AND METHODS We enrolled 176 subjects to this study who underwent polysomnography (PSG) for suspected OSA. The control group included 42 simple snoring subjects. PSG, biochemical tests, and ultrasonographic examination were performed all subjects. RESULTS The simple snoring and mild, moderate, and severe OSA groups included 18/42 (42.86%), 33/52 (63.5%), 27/34 (79.4%), and 28/48 (79.2%) subjects with hepatosteatosis, respectively. There were significant differences in hepatosteatosis and hepatosteatosis grade between the simple snoring and the moderate and severe OSA groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that BMI and average desaturation were independently and significantly related to hepatic steatosis. CONCLUSIONS Our study shows that BMI and the average desaturation contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver in subjects with OSA. In this regard, sleep apnea may trigger metabolic mitochondrial energy associated processes thereby altering lipid metabolism and obesity as well. PMID:26993969

  8. Relative validity of self-reported snoring as a symptom of sleep apnea in a sleep clinic population.

    PubMed

    Bliwise, D L; Nekich, J C; Dement, W C

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative validity of responses to three different questions about snoring as indicators for sleep apnea in a population referred to a sleep clinic. Secondary goals were to evaluate the meaning of a "don't know" response to these questions and to examine how the associations between snoring and sleep apnea are influenced by demographics. Results from 1,409 patients in a sleep clinic indicated that nearly all levels of estimated snoring frequency were associated with a greater likelihood of sleep apnea. In addition, a "don't know" response indicated a likelihood of sleep apnea. In the sample from this clinic, sensitivities approximating 90 percent were obtained in men, and specificities approximating 90 percent were obtained in women, but high diagnostic accuracy (high specificity in men; high sensitivity in women) could not be achieved with the three snoring questions used here. Generally, associations between snoring and sleep apnea were independent of age and sex. Single persons, persons living alone, and persons customarily sleeping alone of both sexes all showed associations between self-reported snoring and the presence of sleep apnea. PMID:1995215

  9. Probabilistic cardiac and respiratory based classification of sleep and apneic events in subjects with sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Willemen, T; Varon, C; Dorado, A Caicedo; Haex, B; Vander Sloten, J; Van Huffel, S

    2015-10-01

    Current clinical standards to assess sleep and its disorders lack either accuracy or user-friendliness. They are therefore difficult to use in cost-effective population-wide screening or long-term objective follow-up after diagnosis. In order to fill this gap, the use of cardiac and respiratory information was evaluated for discrimination between different sleep stages, and for detection of apneic breathing. Alternative probabilistic visual representations were also presented, referred to as the hypnocorrogram and apneacorrogram. Analysis was performed on the UCD sleep apnea database, available on Physionet. The presence of apneic events proved to have a significant impact on the performance of a cardiac and respiratory based algorithm for sleep stage classification. WAKE versus SLEEP discrimination resulted in a kappa value of κ = 0.0439, while REM versus NREM resulted in κ = 0.298 and light sleep (N1N2) versus deep sleep (N3) in κ = 0.339. The high proportion of hypopneic events led to poor detection of apneic breathing, resulting in a kappa value of κ = 0.272. While the probabilistic representations allow to put classifier output in perspective, further improvements would be necessary to make the classifier reliable for use on patients with sleep apnea. PMID:26290159

  10. Sleep estimation using BodyMedia's SenseWear™ armband in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Munir M.; BaHammam, Ahmed S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to evaluate the validity of the BodyMedia's SenseWear™ Armband (BSA) device in estimating total sleep time (TST) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). METHODS: Simultaneous overnight recordings of in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) and BSA were performed on (1) 107 OSA patients (mean age of 45.2 ± 14.3 years, mean apnea hypopnea index of 43 ± 35.7/hr and (2) 30 controls matched with OSA patients for age and body mass index. An agreement analysis between the PSG and BSA scoring results was performed using the Bland and Altman method. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in OSA patients between BSA and PSG with regard to TST, total wake time, and sleep efficiency. There was also no significant difference in the controls between BSA and PSG with regard to TST, total wake time, and sleep efficiency. Bland Altman plots showed strong agreement between TST, wake time, and sleep efficiency for both OSA and the controls. The intraclass correlation coefficients revealed perfect agreement between BSA and PSG in different levels of OSA severity and both genders. CONCLUSION: The current data suggest that BSA is a reliable method for determining sleep in patients with OSA when compared against the gold standard test (PSG). BSA can be a useful tool in determining sleep in patients with OSA and can be combined with portable sleep studies to determine TST. PMID:23440703

  11. Innovative treatments for adults with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Terri E; Calik, Michael W; Farabi, Sarah S; Fink, Anne M; Galang-Boquiren, Maria T; Kapella, Mary C; Prasad, Bharati; Carley, David W

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects one in five adult males and is associated with significant comorbidity, cognitive impairment, excessive daytime sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. For over 25 years, the primary treatment has been continuous positive airway pressure, which introduces a column of air that serves as a pneumatic splint for the upper airway, preventing the airway collapse that is the physiologic definition of this syndrome. However, issues with patient tolerance and unacceptable levels of treatment adherence motivated the exploration of other potential treatments. With greater understanding of the physiologic mechanisms associated with OSA, novel interventions have emerged in the last 5 years. The purpose of this article is to describe new treatments for OSA and associated complex sleep apnea. New approaches to complex sleep apnea have included adaptive servoventilation. There is increased literature on the contribution of behavioral interventions to improve adherence with continuous positive airway pressure that have proven quite effective. New non-surgical treatments include oral pressure devices, improved mandibular advancement devices, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, and newer approaches to positional therapy. Recent innovations in surgical interventions have included laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency ablation, palatal implants, and electrical stimulation of the upper airway muscles. No drugs have been approved to treat OSA, but potential drug therapies have centered on increasing ventilatory drive, altering the arousal threshold, modifying loop gain (a dimensionless value quantifying the stability of the ventilatory control system), or preventing airway collapse by affecting the surface tension. An emerging approach is the application of cannabinoids to increase upper airway tone. PMID:25429246

  12. Comorbidities Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: a Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, José Antonio; Ribeiro, Davi Knoll; Cavallini, Andre Freitas da Silva; Duarte, Caue; Freitas, Gabriel Santos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by partial or complete recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. OSA brings many adverse consequences, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiac and encephalic alterations, behavioral, among others, resulting in a significant source of public health care by generating a high financial and social impact. The importance of this assessment proves to be useful, because the incidence of patients with comorbidities associated with AOS has been increasing consistently and presents significant influence in natural disease history. Objective The objective of this study is to assess major comorbidities associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and prevalence in a group of patients diagnosed clinically and polysomnographically with OSA. Methods This is a retrospective study of 100 charts from patients previously diagnosed with OSA in our service between October 2010 and January 2013. Results We evaluated 100 patients with OSA (84 men and 16 women) with a mean age of 50.05 years (range 19–75 years). The prevalence of comorbidities were hypertension (39%), obesity (34%), depression (19%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (18%), diabetes mellitus (15%), hypercholesterolemia (10%), asthma (4%), and no comorbidities (33%). Comorbidities occurred in 56.2% patients diagnosed with mild OSA, 67.6% with moderate OSA, and 70% of patients with severe OSA. Conclusion According to the current literature data and the values obtained in our paper, we can correlate through expressive values obesity with OSA and their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) values. However, despite significant prevalence of OSA with other comorbidities, our study could not render expressive significance values able to justify their correlations. PMID:27096019

  13. Innovative treatments for adults with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Terri E; Calik, Michael W; Farabi, Sarah S; Fink, Anne M; Galang-Boquiren, Maria T; Kapella, Mary C; Prasad, Bharati; Carley, David W

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects one in five adult males and is associated with significant comorbidity, cognitive impairment, excessive daytime sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. For over 25 years, the primary treatment has been continuous positive airway pressure, which introduces a column of air that serves as a pneumatic splint for the upper airway, preventing the airway collapse that is the physiologic definition of this syndrome. However, issues with patient tolerance and unacceptable levels of treatment adherence motivated the exploration of other potential treatments. With greater understanding of the physiologic mechanisms associated with OSA, novel interventions have emerged in the last 5 years. The purpose of this article is to describe new treatments for OSA and associated complex sleep apnea. New approaches to complex sleep apnea have included adaptive servoventilation. There is increased literature on the contribution of behavioral interventions to improve adherence with continuous positive airway pressure that have proven quite effective. New non-surgical treatments include oral pressure devices, improved mandibular advancement devices, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, and newer approaches to positional therapy. Recent innovations in surgical interventions have included laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency ablation, palatal implants, and electrical stimulation of the upper airway muscles. No drugs have been approved to treat OSA, but potential drug therapies have centered on increasing ventilatory drive, altering the arousal threshold, modifying loop gain (a dimensionless value quantifying the stability of the ventilatory control system), or preventing airway collapse by affecting the surface tension. An emerging approach is the application of cannabinoids to increase upper airway tone. PMID:25429246

  14. Comorbidities Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: a Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Pinto, José Antonio; Ribeiro, Davi Knoll; Cavallini, Andre Freitas da Silva; Duarte, Caue; Freitas, Gabriel Santos

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by partial or complete recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. OSA brings many adverse consequences, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiac and encephalic alterations, behavioral, among others, resulting in a significant source of public health care by generating a high financial and social impact. The importance of this assessment proves to be useful, because the incidence of patients with comorbidities associated with AOS has been increasing consistently and presents significant influence in natural disease history. Objective The objective of this study is to assess major comorbidities associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and prevalence in a group of patients diagnosed clinically and polysomnographically with OSA. Methods This is a retrospective study of 100 charts from patients previously diagnosed with OSA in our service between October 2010 and January 2013. Results We evaluated 100 patients with OSA (84 men and 16 women) with a mean age of 50.05 years (range 19-75 years). The prevalence of comorbidities were hypertension (39%), obesity (34%), depression (19%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (18%), diabetes mellitus (15%), hypercholesterolemia (10%), asthma (4%), and no comorbidities (33%). Comorbidities occurred in 56.2% patients diagnosed with mild OSA, 67.6% with moderate OSA, and 70% of patients with severe OSA. Conclusion According to the current literature data and the values obtained in our paper, we can correlate through expressive values obesity with OSA and their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) values. However, despite significant prevalence of OSA with other comorbidities, our study could not render expressive significance values able to justify their correlations. PMID:27096019

  15. Cognition and biomarkers of oxidative stress in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Leticia Viana; de Bruin, Veralice Meireles Sales; D'Almeida, Vania; Pompéia, Sabine; Bueno, Orlando Francisco Amodeo; Tufik, Sérgio; Bittencourt, Lia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate neuropsychological performance and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and the relationships between these factors. METHODS: This was an observational, cross-sectional study of 14 patients (36.0±6.5 years old) with obstructive sleep apnea and 13 controls (37.3±6.9 years old). All of the participants were clinically evaluated and underwent full-night polysomnography as well as neuropsychological tests. Blood samples were used to assay superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione and homocysteine, as well as vitamins E, C, B11 and B12. RESULTS: The patients performed poorly relative to the controls on several neuropsychological tests, such as the attention test and tests of long-term memory and working memory/executive function. They also had lower levels of vitamin E (p<0.006), superoxide dismutase (p<0.001) and vitamin B11 (p<0.001), as well as higher concentrations of homocysteine (p<0.02). Serum concentrations of vitamin C, catalase, glutathione and vitamin B12 were unaltered. Vitamin E levels were related to performance in the backward digit span task (F = 15.9; p = 0.002) and this correlation remained after controlling for age and body mass index (F = 6.3, p = 0.01). A relationship between superoxide dismutase concentrations and executive non-perseveration errors in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (F = 7.9; p = 0.01) was also observed. CONCLUSIONS: Decreased levels of antioxidants and lower performance on the neuropsychological tasks were observed in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. This study suggests that an imbalance between antioxidants and pro-oxidants may contribute to neuropsychological alterations in this patient population. PMID:23778335

  16. A home sleep apnea screening device with time-domain signal processing and autonomous scoring capability.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiayi; Sánchez-Sinencio, Edgar

    2015-02-01

    Current solutions of sleep apnea diagnosis require the patient to undergo overnight studies at a specialized sleep laboratory. Due to such inconvenience and high cost, millions of sleep apnea patients remain undiagnosed and thus untreated. Based on a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) sensor and an effective apnea detection algorithm, we propose a low-cost single-channel apnea screening solution applicable in the comfort of patients' homes. A prototype device was designed and assembled including a MEMS sensor for measuring the patient's nasal air flows, and a time-domain signal processing IC for apnea detection and autonomous scoring. The IC chip was fabricated in standard 0.5- μm CMOS technology. The proposed device was tested for both respiratory rhythm detection and sleep apnea screening under clinical environment. Apnea-hypopnea indices (AHI) were scored to indicate severity of sleep apnea conditions. Test results suggest that the proposed device can be a valuable screening solution for the broader public with undiagnosed apnea conditions. PMID:25486649

  17. Overview of proteomics studies in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, Amélia; Torres, Vukosava Milic; Vaz, Fátima; Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Matthiesen, Rune; Pinto, Paula; Malhotra, Atul; Bárbara, Cristina; Penque, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an underdiagnosed common public health concern causing deleterious effects on metabolic and cardiovascular health. Although much has been learned regarding the pathophysiology and consequences of OSA in the past decades, the molecular mechanisms associated with such processes remain poorly defined. The advanced high-throughput proteomics-based technologies have become a fundamental approach for identifying novel disease mediators as potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets for many diseases, including OSA. Here, we briefly review OSA pathophysiology and the technological advances in proteomics and the first results of its application to address critical issues in the OSA field. PMID:25770042

  18. Overview of proteomics studies in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Amélia; Torres, Vukosava Milic; Vaz, Fátima; Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Matthiesen, Rune; Pinto, Paula; Malhotra, Atul; Bárbara, Cristina; Penque, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an underdiagnosed common public health concern causing deleterious effects on metabolic and cardiovascular health. Although much has been learned regarding the pathophysiology and consequences of OSA in the past decades, the molecular mechanisms associated with such processes remain poorly defined. The advanced high-throughput proteomics-based technologies have become a fundamental approach for identifying novel disease mediators as potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets for many diseases, including OSA. Here, we briefly review OSA pathophysiology and the technological advances in proteomics and the first results of its application to address critical issues in the OSA field. PMID:25770042

  19. Sleep apnea, reproductive hormones and quality of sexual life in severely obese men.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Ahmad O; Walker, James M; Gibson, Mark; Cloward, Tom V; Hunt, Steven C; Kolotkin, Ronette L; Adams, Ted D; Meikle, A Wayne

    2011-06-01

    The effect of sleep apnea on the reproductive function of obese men is not entirely elucidated. The objective of this study was to define the effect of sleep apnea on the reproductive hormones and sexual function in obese men. This study included 89 severely obese men with BMI ≥35 kg/m2 considering gastric bypass surgery. Anthropometrics (weight, and BMI), reproductive hormones, and sleep studies were measured. The sexual quality of life was assessed using the Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite questionnaire (IWQOL-Lite). The mean age of our patients was 46.9 ± 11.0 years, the mean BMI was 47.8 ± 8.7 kg/m2 and the mean weight was 337.7 ± 62.4 lb. After correction for age and BMI, means of free testosterone per severity group of sleep apnea were as follows: no or mild sleep apnea 74.4 ± 3.8 pg/ml, moderate sleep apnea 68.6 ± 4.2 pg/ml, and severe sleep apnea 60.2 ± 2.92 pg/ml, P = 0.014. All other parameters of sleep apnea including hypopnea index, percent time below a SpO2 of 90%, and percent time below a SpO2 of 80% were also negatively correlated with testosterone levels after correction for age and BMI. BMI and presence of coronary artery disease decreased the sexual quality of life. Sleep apnea was associated with reduced sexual quality of life. In summary, sleep apnea negatively affects testosterone levels independent of BMI. Severely obese men had decreased sexual quality of life. PMID:21273994

  20. The bidirectional interactions between psoriasis and obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Hirotsu, Camila; Nogueira, Heloisa; Albuquerque, Rachel G; Tomimori, Jane; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica L

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder which can impair general routine activities and has been closely related to poor quality of life. Pruritus and scratching are frequently observed, occurring mainly during sleep and precipitating nighttime arousals. Indeed, sleep quality has been shown to be negatively affected in psoriatic patients, in a close relationship with stress exposure and immune response. Although psoriasis is known to impair sleep, leading to insomnia, its association with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is controversial. Similarly, OSA is considered a multifactorial inflammatory disease, characterized by intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation and autonomic dysfunction, with important outcomes on the cardiovascular and metabolic systems. Importantly, immunological activities and pro-inflammatory cytokines play a prominent role in both OSA and psoriasis. Currently it is not clear whether OSA is a risk factor for psoriasis development or if psoriasis is a possible predictor of OSA. Thus, our main purpose is to provide an overview of this intriguing relationship and show the current link between psoriasis and OSA in a bidirectional relationship. PMID:26220730

  1. 21 CFR 872.5570 - Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. 872.5570 Section 872.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 872.5570 Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep... obstructive sleep apnea are devices that are worn during sleep to reduce the incidence of snoring and to...

  2. 21 CFR 872.5570 - Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. 872.5570 Section 872.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 872.5570 Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep... obstructive sleep apnea are devices that are worn during sleep to reduce the incidence of snoring and to...

  3. 21 CFR 872.5570 - Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. 872.5570 Section 872.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 872.5570 Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep... obstructive sleep apnea are devices that are worn during sleep to reduce the incidence of snoring and to...

  4. 21 CFR 872.5570 - Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. 872.5570 Section 872.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 872.5570 Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep... obstructive sleep apnea are devices that are worn during sleep to reduce the incidence of snoring and to...

  5. 21 CFR 872.5570 - Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. 872.5570 Section 872.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 872.5570 Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep... obstructive sleep apnea are devices that are worn during sleep to reduce the incidence of snoring and to...

  6. Feasibility of Portable Sleep Monitors to Detect Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) in a Vulnerable Urban Population

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Jillian; Lee, Euny; Nedelman, Michael; Aurora, R. Nisha; Krieger, Ana; Horowitz, Carol R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Portable sleep monitors may offer a convenient method to expand detection of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), yet few studies have evaluated this technology in vulnerable populations. We therefore aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of portable sleep monitors for detection of OSA in a prediabetic, urban minority population. Methods We recruited a convenience sample of participants at their 12-month follow-up for a community-partnered, peer-led lifestyle intervention aimed to prevent diabetes in prediabetic and overweight patients in this prospective mixed-methods pilot study. All participants wore portable sleep monitors overnight at home. We qualitatively explored perceptions about OSA and portable monitors in a subset of participants. Results We tested 72 people, predominantly non-White, female, Spanish speaking, uninsured, and of low income. Use of portable sleep monitors was feasible: 100% of the monitors were returned and all participants received results. We detected OSA in 49% (defined as an Apnea-Hypopnea Index [AHI] >5) and moderate-severe OSA in 14% (AHI >15) requiring treatment in 14%. In 21 qualitative interviews, participants supported increased use of portable sleep monitors in their community, were appropriately concerned that OSA could cause progression to diabetes, and thought weight loss could prevent or improve OSA. Conclusions Portable sleep monitors may represent a feasible method for detecting OSA in high-risk urban minority populations. PMID:25748767

  7. Heart rate responses to autonomic challenges in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Macey, Paul M; Kumar, Rajesh; Woo, Mary A; Yan-Go, Frisca L; Harper, Ronald M

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is accompanied by structural alterations and dysfunction in central autonomic regulatory regions, which may impair dynamic and static cardiovascular regulation, and contribute to other syndrome pathologies. Characterizing cardiovascular responses to autonomic challenges may provide insights into central nervous system impairments, including contributions by sex, since structural alterations are enhanced in OSA females over males. The objective was to assess heart rate responses in OSA versus healthy control subjects to autonomic challenges, and, separately, characterize female and male patterns. We studied 94 subjects, including 37 newly-diagnosed, untreated OSA patients (6 female, age mean ± std: 52.1 ± 8.1 years; 31 male aged 54.3 ± 8.4 years), and 57 healthy control subjects (20 female, 50.5 ± 8.1 years; 37 male, 45.6 ± 9.2 years). We measured instantaneous heart rate with pulse oximetry during cold pressor, hand grip, and Valsalva maneuver challenges. All challenges elicited significant heart rate differences between OSA and control groups during and after challenges (repeated measures ANOVA, p<0.05). In post-hoc analyses, OSA females showed greater impairments than OSA males, which included: for cold pressor, lower initial increase (OSA vs. control: 9.5 vs. 7.3 bpm in females, 7.6 vs. 3.7 bpm in males), OSA delay to initial peak (2.5 s females/0.9 s males), slower mid-challenge rate-of-increase (OSA vs. control: -0.11 vs. 0.09 bpm/s in females, 0.03 vs. 0.06 bpm/s in males); for hand grip, lower initial peak (OSA vs. control: 2.6 vs. 4.6 bpm in females, 5.3 vs. 6.0 bpm in males); for Valsalva maneuver, lower Valsalva ratio (OSA vs. control: 1.14 vs. 1.30 in females, 1.29 vs. 1.34 in males), and OSA delay during phase II (0.68 s females/1.31 s males). Heart rate responses showed lower amplitude, delayed onset, and slower rate changes in OSA patients over healthy controls, and impairments may be more pronounced in females. The dysfunctions may reflect central injury in the syndrome, and suggest autonomic deficiencies that may contribute to further tissue and functional pathologies. PMID:24194842

  8. Probabilistic sleep architecture models in patients with and without sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Matt T; Eiseman, Nathaniel A; Cash, Sydney S; Mietus, Joseph; Peng, Chung-Kang; Thomas, Robert J

    2012-06-01

    Sleep fragmentation of any cause is disruptive to the rejuvenating value of sleep. However, methods to quantify sleep architecture remain limited. We have previously shown that human sleep-wake stage distributions exhibit multi-exponential dynamics, which are fragmented by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), suggesting that Markov models may be a useful method to quantify architecture in health and disease. Sleep stage data were obtained from two subsets of the Sleep Heart Health Study database: control subjects with no medications, no OSA, no medical co-morbidities and no sleepiness (n = 374); and subjects with severe OSA (n = 338). Sleep architecture was simplified into three stages: wake after sleep onset (WASO); non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep; and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The connectivity and transition rates among eight 'generator' states of a first-order continuous-time Markov model were inferred from the observed ('phenotypic') distributions: three exponentials each of NREM sleep and WASO; and two exponentials of REM sleep. Ultradian REM cycling was accomplished by imposing time-variation to REM state entry rates. Fragmentation in subjects with severe OSA involved faster transition probabilities as well as additional state transition paths within the model. The Markov models exhibit two important features of human sleep architecture: multi-exponential stage dynamics (accounting for observed bout distributions); and probabilistic transitions (an inherent source of variability). In addition, the model quantifies the fragmentation associated with severe OSA. Markov sleep models may prove important for quantifying sleep disruption to provide objective metrics to correlate with endpoints ranging from sleepiness to cardiovascular morbidity. PMID:21955148

  9. Obstructive sleep apnea in children: a critical update

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hui-Leng; Gozal, David; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children is a highly prevalent disorder caused by a conglomeration of complex pathophysiological processes, leading to recurrent upper airway dysfunction during sleep. The clinical relevance of OSA resides in its association with significant morbidities that affect the cardiovascular, neurocognitive, and metabolic systems. The American Academy of Pediatrics recently reiterated its recommendations that children with symptoms and signs suggestive of OSA should be investigated with polysomnography (PSG), and treated accordingly. However, treatment decisions should not only be guided by PSG results, but should also integrate the magnitude of symptoms and the presence or absence of risk factors and signs of OSA morbidity. The first-line therapy in children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy is adenotonsillectomy, although there is increasing evidence that medical therapy, in the form of intranasal steroids or montelukast, may be considered in mild OSA. In this review, we delineate the major concepts regarding the pathophysiology of OSA, its morbidity, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24109201

  10. Reliability of SleepStrip as a screening test in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Dinç, Aykut Erdem; Yılmaz, Metin; Tutar, Hakan; Aydil, Utku; Kızıl, Yusuf; Damar, Murat; Kemaloğlu, Yusuf K

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common sleep disorder and related to multiple conditions that cause mortality in adults. In the present study, reliability of SleepStrip, a disposable screening device for detection of OSAS, is tested. In this prospective, nonrandomized double-blinded single cohort study at an academic health center, the performance of the SleepStrip in detecting respiratory events and establishing an SleepStrip score (Sscore) in domestic use were compared to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) obtained by the standard polysomnography (PSG) recordings in the sleep laboratory. Forty-one patients who have the PSG results participated the study and wore the SleepStrips at home. Test efficiency rate was 75% and there was a positive correlation between PSG-AHI scores and Sscores (r = 0.71, p < 0.001). However, diagnostic accuracy analysis showed that the correlation between Sscores and PSG-AHI scores were significant only at AHI > 30 levels. The SleepStrip has 100% specificity and positive predictive values, but it also has low negative predictive and sensitivity values. The SleepStrip is not a reliable screening test in differential diagnosis among simple snorers, mild, moderate and severe OSAS patients. However, high Sscores highly indicate the presence of moderate-severe OSAS. We can safely send these patients to split-night PSG and continuous, automatic, bi-level positive airway pressure (CPAP/BPAP/APAP) titration at the same night. The SleepStrip may increase the effective use of the sleep laboratories. PMID:24861563

  11. Significance of vaspin in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    PAN, ZHE; ZHUANG, XIANGHUA; LI, XIAOBO; HUANG, SHAOYI; ZHANG, LIANG; LOU, FUCHEN; CHEN, SHIHONG; NI, YIHONG

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a commonly-diagnosed chronic sleep disorder. It is considered to be an important independent risk factor in the development of insulin resistance (IR). Patients with OSAHS exhibit a variety of metabolic disorders, including obesity and metabolic syndrome. Visceral adipose tissue-derived serpin (vaspin) is an adipokine that is considered to be a link between obesity and IR. The present study aimed to evaluate the levels of plasma vaspin in patients with OSAHS and examine their potential correlation with sleep characteristics. A total of 20 healthy male subjects and 42 male patients with OSAHS were selected, and patients were divided into mild (n=22) and severe (n=20) OSAHS groups. The 20 patients in the severe OSAHS group received nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) treatment for 2 months. Venous blood samples were drawn from all patients in a fasting state prior to and subsequent to nCPAP treatment, which were used to measure the levels of biochemical indicators. The sleep parameters and serologic index changes were compared prior to and following treatment. The values of contractive pressure (SBP), neck circumference (NC), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), body mass index (BMI) and hip circumference (HC) in the two OSAHS groups were significantly increased compared with those in the control group. In addition, the levels of vaspin in OSAHS patients were markedly increased and vaspin was revealed to be positively associated with fasting blood sugar, fasting insulin, triglycerides, homeostasis model assessment-IR, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), NC, WC, BMI and WHR (P<0.05). After 2 months of nCPAP treatment, the SBP and AHI were significantly reduced. In conclusion, vaspin may have an important role in OSAHS patients with IR and treatment using nCPAP may improve the condition of OSAHS patients. PMID:26998001

  12. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Preoperative Screening and Postoperative Care.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Robert M; Pomerantz, Jonathan; Miller, Deborah E; Weiss-Coleman, Rebecca; Solomonides, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has reached epidemic proportions, and it is an often unrecognized cause of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Profound hypoxic injury from apnea during the postoperative period is often misdiagnosed as cardiac arrest due to other causes. Almost a quarter of patients entering a hospital for elective surgery have OSA, and >80% of these cases are undiagnosed at the time of surgery. The perioperative period puts patients at high risk of apneic episodes because of drug effects from sedatives, narcotics, and general anesthesia, as well as from the effects of postoperative rapid eye movement sleep changes and postoperative positioning in the hospital bed. For adults, preoperative screening using the STOP or STOP-Bang questionnaires can help to identify adult patients at increased risk of OSA. In the pediatric setting, a question about snoring should be part of every preoperative examination. For patients with known OSA, continuous positive airway pressure should be continued postoperatively. Continuous pulse oximetry monitoring with an alarm system can help to prevent apneic catastrophes caused by OSA in the postoperative period. PMID:26957384

  13. Coblation endoscopic lingual lightening (CELL) for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Li, Hsueh-Yu; Lee, Li-Ang; Kezirian, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of Coblation endoscopic lingual lightening (CELL) surgery for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This study was a retrospective case series in a tertiary referral sleep center. Twenty-five adults with moderate to severe OSA and determined to have retropalatal and tongue base obstruction based on Friedman tongue position III and fiberoptic endoscopy underwent CELL in combination with modified uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, known as relocation pharyngoplasty. CELL involves transoral resection of tongue base muscle tissue and lingual tonsil using Coblation under endoscopic guidance. The mean operation time for CELL was 42.6 ± 13.7 min. Total blood loss for CELL plus relocation pharyngoplasty was <50 ml in all patients. Mean postoperative pain score (sum of total pain scores/sum of total hospitalization day, visual analog scale, 0-10) was 2.6 ± 0.6. Postoperative bleeding and taste disturbance extending beyond 3 months occurred in one patient (4 %) individually. No patients reported tongue weakness or speech dysfunction. Epworth sleepiness scale improved from 9.6 ± 4.9 to 7.5 ± 4.3 (p = 0.023). Apnea-hypopnea index decreased from 45.7 ± 21.7 to 12.8 ± 8.2 events/hour (p < 0.001) 6 months after surgery. The overall response rate was 80 %. CELL is feasible, safe and effective in treating tongue base obstruction in OSA patients who underwent simultaneous relocation pharyngoplasty. PMID:25577994

  14. Ventricular dysfunction in children with obstructive sleep apnea: radionuclide assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, A.; Leiberman, A.; Margulis, G.; Sofer, S.

    1988-01-01

    Ventricular function was evaluated using radionuclide ventriculography in 27 children with oropharyngeal obstruction and clinical features of obstructive sleep apnea. Their mean age was 3.5 years (9 months to 7.5 years). Conventional clinical assessment did not detect cardiac involvement in 25 of 27 children; however, reduced right ventricular ejection fraction (less than 35%) was found in 10 (37%) patients (mean: 19.5 +/- 2.3% SE, range: 8-28%). In 18 patients wall motion abnormality was detected. In 11 children in whom radionuclide ventriculography was performed before and after adenotonsillectomy, right ventricular ejection fraction rose from 24.4 +/- 3.6% to 46.7 +/- 3.4% (P less than 0.005), and in all cases wall motion showed a definite improvement. In five children, left ventricular ejection fraction rose greater than 10% after removal of oropharyngeal obstruction. It is concluded that right ventricular function may be compromised in children with obstructive sleep apnea secondary to adenotonsillar hypertrophy, even before clinical signs of cardiac involvement are present.

  15. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: From Phenotype to Genetic Basis

    PubMed Central

    Casale, M; Pappacena, M; Rinaldi, V; Bressi, F; Baptista, P; Salvinelli, F

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome, characterized by snoring, periodic apnea, hypoxemia during sleep, and daytime hypersomnolence. It affects 4-5% of the general population. Racial studies and chromosomal mapping, familial studies and twin studies have provided evidence for the possible link between the OSAS and genetic factors and also most of the risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of OSAS are largely genetically determined. A percentage of 35-40% of its variance can be attributed to genetic factors. It is likely that genetic factors associated with craniofacial structure, body fat distribution and neural control of the upper airway muscles interact to produce the OSAS phenotype. Although the role of specific genes that influence the development of OSAS has not yet been identified, current researches, especially in animal model, suggest that several genetic systems may be important. In this chapter, we will first define the OSAS phenotype, the pathogenesis and the risk factors involved in the OSAS that may be inherited, then, we will review the current progress in the genetics of OSAS and suggest a few future perspectives in the development of therapeutic agents for this complex disease entity. PMID:19794884

  16. High altitude pulmonary edema, down syndrome, and obstructive sleep apneas.

    PubMed

    Richalet, Jean-Paul; Chenivesse, Cécile; Larmignat, Philippe; Meille, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    A 24-year-old adult with a Down syndrome was admitted in December 2006 at the Moutiers hospital in the French Alps for an acute inaugural episode of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) that occurred in the early morning of day 3 after his arrival to La Plagne (2000 m). This patient presented an interventricular septal defect operated on at the age of 7, a hypothyroidism controlled by 50 microg levothyrox, a state of obesity (BMI 37.8 kg/m(2)), and obstructive sleep apneas with a mean of 42 obstructive apneas or hypopneas per hour, treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). The patient refused to use his CPAP during his stay in La Plagne. At echocardiography, resting parameters were normal, with a left ventricular, ejection fraction of 60%, a normokinetic right ventricle, and an estimated systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) of 30 mmHg. At exercise, sPAP rose to 45 mmHg and the right ventricle was still normokinetic and not dilated. An exercise hypoxic tolerance test performed at 60 W and at the equivalent altitude of 3300 m revealed a severe drop in arterial oxygen saturation down to 60%, with an abnormal low ventilatory response to hypoxia, suggesting a defect in peripheral chemosensitivity to hypoxia. In conclusion, patients with Down syndrome, including adults with no cardiac dysfunction and regular physical activity, are at risk of HAPE even at moderate altitude when they suffer from obstructive sleep apneas associated with obesity and low chemoresponsiveness. This observation might be of importance since an increasing number of young adults with Down syndrome participate in recreational or sport activities, including skiing and mountaineering. PMID:18578649

  17. Probabilistic sleep architecture models in patients with and without sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Matt T.; Eiseman, Nathaniel A.; Cash, Sydney S.; Mietus, Joseph; Peng, Chung-Kang; Thomas, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Sleep fragmentation of any cause is disruptive to the rejuvenating value of sleep. However, methods to quantify sleep architecture remain limited. We have previously shown that human sleep–wake stage distributions exhibit multi-exponential dynamics, which are fragmented by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), suggesting that Markov models may be a useful method to quantify architecture in health and disease. Sleep stage data were obtained from two subsets of the Sleep Heart Health Study database: control subjects with no medications, no OSA, no medical co-morbidities and no sleepiness (n = 374); and subjects with severe OSA (n = 338). Sleep architecture was simplified into three stages: wake after sleep onset (WASO); non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep; and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The connectivity and transition rates among eight ‘generator’ states of a first-order continuous-time Markov model were inferred from the observed (‘phenotypic’) distributions: three exponentials each of NREM sleep and WASO; and two exponentials of REM sleep. Ultradian REM cycling was accomplished by imposing time-variation to REM state entry rates. Fragmentation in subjects with severe OSA involved faster transition probabilities as well as additional state transition paths within the model. The Markov models exhibit two important features of human sleep architecture: multi-exponential stage dynamics (accounting for observed bout distributions); and probabilistic transitions (an inherent source of variability). In addition, the model quantifies the fragmentation associated with severe OSA. Markov sleep models may prove important for quantifying sleep disruption to provide objective metrics to correlate with endpoints ranging from sleepiness to cardiovascular morbidity. PMID:21955148

  18. Perioperative sleep apnea: a real problem or did we invent a new disease?

    PubMed Central

    Zaremba, Sebastian; Mojica, James E.; Eikermann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Depending on the subpopulation, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can affect more than 75% of surgical patients. An increasing body of evidence supports the association between OSA  and perioperative complications, but some data indicate important perioperative outcomes do not differ between patients with and without OSA. In this review we will provide an overview of the pathophysiology of sleep apnea and the risk factors for perioperative complications related to sleep apnea. We also discuss a clinical algorithm for the identification and management of OSA patients facing surgery. PMID:27006758

  19. Systolic pressure response to voluntary apnea predicts sympathetic tone in obstructive sleep apnea as a clinically useful index.

    PubMed

    Jouett, Noah P; Hardisty, Janelle M; Mason, J Ryan; Niv, Dorene; Romano, James J; Watenpaugh, Donald E; Burk, John R; Smith, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation tested the hypotheses that systolic arterial pressure (SAP) responses to voluntary apnea (a) serve as a surrogate of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), (b) can distinguish Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) patients from control subjects and (c) can document autonomic effects of treatment. 9 OSA and 10 control subjects were recruited in a laboratory study; 44 OSA subjects and 78 control subjects were recruited in a clinical study; and 21 untreated OSA subjects and 14 well-treated OSA subjects were recruited into a treatment study. Each subject performed hypoxic and room air voluntary apneas in triplicate. Muscle SNA (MSNA) and continuous AP were measured during each apnea in the laboratory study, while systolic arterial pressure (SAP) responses were measured continuously and by standard auscultation in the clinical and treatment studies. OSA subjects exhibited increased mean arterial pressure (MAP), SAP and MSNA responses to hypoxic apnea (all P<0.01) and the SAP response highly correlated with the MSNA response (R(2)=0.72, P<0.001). Clinical assessment confirmed that OSA subjects exhibited markedly elevated SAP responses (P<0.01), while treated OSA subjects had a decreased SAP response to apnea (P<0.04) compared to poorly treated subjects. These data indicate that (a) OSA subjects exhibit increased pressor and MSNA responses to apnea, and that (b) voluntary apnea may be a clinically useful assessment tool of autonomic dysregulation and treatment efficacy in OSA. PMID:26774324

  20. Increased Prevalence of Sleep Apnea in Children with Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type 1a

    PubMed Central

    Landreth, Hannah; Malow, Beth A.; Shoemaker, Ashley H.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a) is a rare genetic disorder. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of sleep apnea in children with PHP1a. Methods Nineteen patients with PHP1a between 2 and 21 years old were enrolled prospectively using online advertisements. Parents completed a medical history and surveys to assess sleep behavior. Polysomnography records were obtained when available. In addition, 18 subjects were identified in a retrospective chart review of de-identified medical record with 2.3 million patient charts. Results Parents reported sleep disturbance (94%) and daytime somnolence (81%) in their child with PHP1a. In the retrospective chart review, 39% had a history of sleep apnea versus 8.8% of a similarly obese control group. In the combined analysis (n= 31), 52% had a history of snoring and 45% had a diagnosis of sleep apnea. Patients were obese with a mean BMI z-score of 2.20 ± 0.59. Patients with sleep apnea were significantly younger than those without a diagnosis (8.1 ± 5.4 vs. 12.8 ± 5.0 years, p= 0.02). Conclusions Children with PHP1a have a 4.4 fold greater relative risk of sleep apnea than similarly obese children. Screening for sleep apnea in this population may be warranted to prevent adverse health outcomes. PMID:25925491

  1. Prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in Asian adults: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disease, affecting approximately 2% of women and 4% of men residing in Western communities. No systematically reviewed data are available about the prevalence of this disease in Asia, the most heavily populated continent. Methods PubMed/Medline, Scopus and Google Scholar were searched for articles published from 1993 to May 2012 that reported the prevalence of OSA diagnosed via sleep monitoring and the prevalence of patients at risk for OSA as assessed by symptomatology and/or sleep questionnaires. We have also searched abstract database of major pulmonary and sleep scientific societies for relevant abstracts presented from 2010 to 2012. The following inclusion criteria were used: articles published in English, age ≥ 18 years, ≥ 100 participants in studies using sleep monitoring for the diagnosis of OSA, ≥ 300 participants in studies using questionnaires to detect patients at high risk for OSA. Exclusion criteria: duplicate publications, studies reporting the prevalence of central sleep apnea only, hospital based studies as well as studies assessing OSA prevalence among patients with resistant arterial hypertension, chronic kidney disease, heart failure and in patients with concomitant neurological disease. Results Twenty four articles were found to meet the inclusion criteria, covering 47,957 subjects (26,042 men and 21,915 women) and four relevant abstracts were noted. OSA prevalence ranged from 3.7% to 97.3%. Male gender, older age, a higher BMI and waist to hip ratio, greater neck circumference, arterial hypertension, smoking, snoring and daytime sleepiness were associated with OSA. Sample size, difference between the populations studied and the fact that some works included patients with a high pre-test probability of OSA explain the difference in prevalence rates. Conclusion This systematic review highlights the lack of data regarding the prevalence of OSA in Asians. Only a few studies provide an approximate estimate of the OSA burden in some Asian communities. PMID:23433391

  2. Pathophysiologic Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Disease in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zamarrón, Carlos; Valdés Cuadrado, Luis; Álvarez-Sala, Rodolfo

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a highly prevalent sleep disorder, characterized by repeated disruptions of breathing during sleep. This disease has many potential consequences including excessive daytime sleepiness, neurocognitive deterioration, endocrinologic and metabolic effects, and decreased quality of life. Patients with OSAS experience repetitive episodes of hypoxia and reoxygenation during transient cessation of breathing that provoke systemic effects. Furthermore, there may be increased levels of biomarkers linked to endocrine-metabolic and cardiovascular alterations. Epidemiological studies have identified OSAS as an independent comorbid factor in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, and physiopathological links may exist with onset and progression of heart failure. In addition, OSAS is associated with other disorders and comorbidities which worsen cardiovascular consequences, such as obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is an emerging public health problem that represents a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors. Both OSAS and metabolic syndrome may exert negative synergistic effects on the cardiovascular system through multiple mechanisms (e.g., hypoxemia, sleep disruption, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, and inflammatory activation). It has been found that CPAP therapy for OSAS provides an objective improvement in symptoms and cardiac function, decreases cardiovascular risk, improves insulin sensitivity, and normalises biomarkers. OSAS contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease independently and by interaction with comorbidities. The present review focuses on indirect and direct evidence regarding mechanisms implicated in cardiovascular disease among OSAS patients. PMID:23936649

  3. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zamarrón, Carlos; Valdés Cuadrado, Luis; Alvarez-Sala, Rodolfo

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a highly prevalent sleep disorder, characterized by repeated disruptions of breathing during sleep. This disease has many potential consequences including excessive daytime sleepiness, neurocognitive deterioration, endocrinologic and metabolic effects, and decreased quality of life. Patients with OSAS experience repetitive episodes of hypoxia and reoxygenation during transient cessation of breathing that provoke systemic effects. Furthermore, there may be increased levels of biomarkers linked to endocrine-metabolic and cardiovascular alterations. Epidemiological studies have identified OSAS as an independent comorbid factor in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, and physiopathological links may exist with onset and progression of heart failure. In addition, OSAS is associated with other disorders and comorbidities which worsen cardiovascular consequences, such as obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is an emerging public health problem that represents a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors. Both OSAS and metabolic syndrome may exert negative synergistic effects on the cardiovascular system through multiple mechanisms (e.g., hypoxemia, sleep disruption, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, and inflammatory activation). It has been found that CPAP therapy for OSAS provides an objective improvement in symptoms and cardiac function, decreases cardiovascular risk, improves insulin sensitivity, and normalises biomarkers. OSAS contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease independently and by interaction with comorbidities. The present review focuses on indirect and direct evidence regarding mechanisms implicated in cardiovascular disease among OSAS patients. PMID:23936649

  4. Diagnostic test evaluation of a nasal flow monitor for obstructive sleep apnea detection in sleep apnea research.

    PubMed

    Wong, Keith K H; Jankelson, David; Reid, Adrian; Unger, Gunnar; Dungan, George; Hedner, Jan A; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2008-02-01

    In this diagnostic test evaluation of a nasal flow monitoring device for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), 34 patients referred for polysomnography were studied at home for three consecutive nights with the monitor. The mean age of subjects (+/-SD) was 41.9+/-10.3 years, and their mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 31.5+/-27.2. The difference between the average AHI from three nights at home on the monitor and the polysomnogram (PSG) result was 1.8+/-17.1. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for PSG AHI > or = 10 was .96. With a threshold AHI of 18 on the flow monitor, sensitivity was .92, specificity .86, positive predictive value .96, and negative predictive value .75. For detecting severe OSA (AHI > or = 30), the AUC was .85. With knowledge of appropriate thresholds and the pretest risk of OSA, the flow monitor can be used to detect or exclude OSA for sleep-related research, as well as to identify severe cases needing priority for further evaluation. PMID:18411561

  5. Using the Pathophysiology of Obstructive Sleep Apnea to Teach Cardiopulmonary Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitzky, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder of upper airway obstruction during sleep. The effects of intermittent upper airway obstruction include alveolar hypoventilation, altered arterial blood gases and acid-base status, and stimulation of the arterial chemoreceptors, which leads to frequent arousals. These arousals disturb sleep

  6. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Psychiatric Disorders: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Madhulika A.; Simpson, Fiona C.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with psychiatric pathology. Psychiatric comorbidity in OSA may affect patient quality of life and adherence to CPAP. A focused evaluation of OSA in highly selected groups of primarily psychiatric patients may provide further insights into the factors contributing to comorbidity of OSA and psychopathology. The goal of this study is to examine the prevalence and treatment of OSA in psychiatric populations. Methods: A systematic review following the PRISMA guidelines was conducted to determine the prevalence of OSA in schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, mood disorders, and anxiety disorders, and to examine potential interventions. The PubMed, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched (last search April 26, 2014) using keywords based on the ICD-9-CM coding for OSA and the DSM-IV-TR diagnostic groups. Results: The search retrieved 48 records concerning studies of OSA in the selected disorders. The prevalence studies indicate that there may be an increased prevalence of OSA in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), despite considerable heterogeneity and a high risk of bias. There was insufficient evidence to support increased OSA in schizophrenia and psychotic disorders, bipolar and related disorders, and anxiety disorders other than PTSD. Studies of treatment of OSA indicate an improvement in both OSA and psychiatric symptoms. CPAP adherence was reduced in veterans with PTSD. Conclusions: OSA prevalence may be increased in MDD and PTSD. In individuals with OSA and psychiatric illness, treatment of both disorders should be considered for optimal treatment outcomes. Citation: Gupta MA, Simpson FC. Obstructive sleep apnea and psychiatric disorders: a systematic review. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(2):165–175. PMID:25406268

  7. Oral Appliance Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Kate; Vanderveken, Olivier M.; Tsuda, Hiroko; Marklund, Marie; Gagnadoux, Frederic; Kushida, Clete A.; Cistulli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Oral appliances (OA) have emerged as an alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) treatment. The most commonly used OA reduces upper airway collapse by advancing the mandible (OAm). There is a strong evidence base demonstrating OAm improve OSA in the majority of patients, including some with more severe disease. However OAm are not efficacious for all, with approximately one-third of patients experiencing no therapeutic benefit. OAm are generally well tolerated, although short-term adverse effects during acclimatization are common. Long-term dental changes do occur, but these are for the most part subclinical and do not preclude continued use. Patients often prefer OAm to gold-standard CPAP treatment. Head-to-head trials confirm CPAP is superior in reducing OSA parameters on polysomnography; however, this greater efficacy does not necessarily translate into better health outcomes in clinical practice. Comparable effectiveness of OAm and CPAP has been attributed to higher reported nightly use of OAm, suggesting that inferiority in reducing apneic events may be counteracted by greater treatment adherence. Recently, significant advances in commercially available OAm technologies have been made. Remotely controlled mandibular positioners have the potential to identify treatment responders and the level of therapeutic advancement required in single night titration polysomnography. Objective monitoring of OAm adherence using small embedded temperature sensing data loggers is now available and will enhance clinical practice and research. These technologies will further enhance efficacy and effectiveness of OAm treatment for OSA. Citation: Sutherland K; Vanderveken OM; Tsuda H; Marklund M; Gagnadoux F; Kushida CA; Cistulli PA; on behalf of the ORANGE-Registry. Oral appliance treatment for obstructive sleep apnea: an update. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(2):215-227. PMID:24533007

  8. Effects of renal sympathetic denervation on blood pressure, sleep apnea course, and glycemic control in patients with resistant hypertension and sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Adam; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Florczak, Elżbieta; Kądziela, Jacek; Śliwiński, Paweł; Bieleń, Przemysław; Michałowska, Ilona; Kabat, Marek; Warchoł, Ewa; Januszewicz, Magdalena; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Somers, Virend K; Sobotka, Paul A; Januszewicz, Andrzej

    2011-10-01

    Percutaneous renal sympathetic denervation by radiofrequency energy has been reported to reduce blood pressure (BP) by the reduction of renal sympathetic efferent and afferent signaling. We evaluated the effects of this procedure on BP and sleep apnea severity in patients with resistant hypertension and sleep apnea. We studied 10 patients with refractory hypertension and sleep apnea (7 men and 3 women; median age: 49.5 years) who underwent renal denervation and completed 3-month and 6-month follow-up evaluations, including polysomnography and selected blood chemistries, and BP measurements. Antihypertensive regimens were not changed during the 6 months of follow-up. Three and 6 months after the denervation, decreases in office systolic and diastolic BPs were observed (median: -34/-13 mm Hg for systolic and diastolic BPs at 6 months; both P<0.01). Significant decreases were also observed in plasma glucose concentration 2 hours after glucose administration (median: 7.0 versus 6.4 mmol/L; P=0.05) and in hemoglobin A1C level (median: 6.1% versus 5.6%; P<0.05) at 6 months, as well as a decrease in apnea-hypopnea index at 6 months after renal denervation (median: 16.3 versus 4.5 events per hour; P=0.059). In conclusion, catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation lowered BP in patients with refractory hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea, which was accompanied by improvement of sleep apnea severity. Interestingly, there are also accompanying improvements in glucose tolerance. Renal sympathetic denervation may conceivably be a potentially useful option for patients with comorbid refractory hypertension, glucose intolerance, and obstructive sleep apnea, although further studies are needed to confirm these proof-of-concept data. PMID:21844482

  9. Predictors of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Polysomnography after a Technically Inadequate or Normal Home Sleep Test

    PubMed Central

    Zeidler, Michelle R.; Santiago, Vicente; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Mitchell, Michael N.; Santiago, Silverio; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Home sleep testing (HST) is an accepted alternative to polysomnography (PSG) for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in high-risk populations. Clinical guidelines recommend PSG in cases where the HST is technically inadequate (TI) or fails to establish the diagnosis of OSA in patients with high pretest probability. This retrospective study evaluated predictors of OSA on PSG within patients who had a TI or normal HST. Methods: Electronic medical records were reviewed on 1,157 patients referred for HST at our sleep center. Two hundred thirty-eight patients had a TI or normal HST with subsequent PSG. Age, BMI, Epworth score, HST result, and PSG-based apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were abstracted. Results: Two hundred thirty-eight consecutive patients with either a normal HST (n = 127) or TI HST (n = 111) underwent subsequent PSG. Of 127 who had a normal HST, 76% had a normal PSG and 24% had OSA (23 mild, 6 moderate, 1 severe). Of 111 who had a TI HST, 29% had a normal PSG and 71% had OSA (43 mild, 19 moderate, 17 severe). Individuals younger than 50 years old with a normal HST were more likely to have a normal PSG. Older age predicted diagnosis of OSA on PSG among individuals with a TI HST. Conclusion: In this retrospective analysis of a clinical sample, when the HST is interpreted as normal in a younger patient population, the subsequent PSG is likewise normal in majority of the patients, although significant OSA is sometimes discovered. When a HST is read as TI, the majority of patients have OSA. Citation: Zeidler MR, Santiago V, Dzierzewski JM, Mitchell MN, Santiago S, Martin JL. Predictors of obstructive sleep apnea on polysomnography after a technically inadequate or normal home sleep test. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(11):1313–1318. PMID:26156951

  10. Tongue Volume Influences Lowest Oxygen Saturation but Not Apnea-Hypopnea Index in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sang Hyeon; Kim, Jinna; Min, Hyun Jin; Chung, Hyo Jin; Hong, Jae Min; Lee, Jeung-Gweon; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Cho, Hyung-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to identify correlations between sleep apnea severity and tongue volume or posterior airway space measured via three-dimensional reconstruction of volumetric computerized tomography (CT) images in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) for use in predicting OSA severity and in surgical treatment. We also assessed associations between tongue volume and Mallampati score. Methods Snoring/OSA male patients (n = 64) who underwent polysomnography, cephalometry, and CT scans were enrolled in this retrospective study. OSA was diagnosed when the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was greater than 5 (mild 5–14; moderate 15–29; severe>30). The patients were also categorized into the normal-mild group (n = 22) and the moderate-severe group (n = 42). Using volumetric CT images with the three-dimensional reconstruction technique, the volume of the tongue, posterior airway space volume, and intra-mandibular space were measured. The volumes, polysomnographic parameters, and physical examination findings were compared, and independent factors that are related to OSA were analysed. Results No associations between tongue volume or posterior airway space and the AHI were observed. However, multivariate linear analyses showed that tongue volume had significantly negative association with lowest O2 saturation (r = 0.365, p = 0.027). High BMI was related to an increase in tongue volume. Modified Mallampati scores showed borderline significant positive correlations with absolute tongue volume (r = 0.251, p = 0.046) and standardized tongue volume (absolute tongue volume / intramandibular area; r = 0.266, p = 0.034). Between the normal-mild and moderate-severe groups, absolute tongue volumes were not different, although the standardized tongue volume in the moderate-severe group was significantly higher. Conclusion Absolute tongue volume showed stronger associations with lowest O2 saturation during sleep than with the severity of AHI. We also found that high BMI was a relevant factor for an increase in absolute tongue volume and modified Mallampati grading was a useful physical examination to predict tongue size. PMID:26280546

  11. Prevalence of major obstructive sleep apnea syndrome symptoms in coal miners and healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Kart, Levent; Dutkun, Yal?n; Alt?n, Remzi; Ornek, Tacettin; K?ran, Sibel

    2010-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is associated with symptoms including habitual snoring, witness apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness. Also obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is related to some occupations which are needed attention for work accident. We aimed to determine the prevalence of snoring, witnessed apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness in coal workers and healthy adults in Zonguldak city center, and also evaluate the differences between these groups. This study consisted of 423 underground coal workers and 355 individuals living in centre of Zonguldak. Study and comparison group were chosen by nonstratified randomized sampling method. Data were collected by a questionnaire that included information regarding snoring, witnessed apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness. Mean age was 43.3 6.05 years in miners and 44.3 11.8 years in comparison group. In miners, snoring frequency was determined as 42.6%, witnessed apneas were 4.0%, and daytime sleepiness were 4.7%. In comparison group, these symptoms were 38.6%, 4.8% and 2.8% respectively. There were no statistical differences between coal workers and comparison group in these symptoms. Also snoring prevalence was higher in smoker miners. We found that major symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in coal workers are similar to general population in Zonguldak. Further studies that constucted higher populations and with polysomnography are needed to evaluate these findings. PMID:21038136

  12. Correlation of Lateral Cephalogram and Flexible Laryngoscopy with Sleep Study in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Anila; Faizal, Bini

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To study the correlation between lateral cephalogram, flexible laryngoscopy, and sleep study in patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Background. Screening tools should be devised for predicting OSA which could be performed on an outpatient basis. With this aim we studied the skeletal and soft tissue characteristics of proven OSA patients. Methods. A prospective study was performed in patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea by sleep study. They were evaluated clinically and subjected to lateral cephalometry and nasopharyngolaryngoscopy. The findings were matched to see if they corresponded to AHI of sleep study in severity. An attempt was made to see whether the data predicted the patients who would benefit from oral appliance or surgery as the definitive treatment in indicated cases. Results. A retropalatal collapse seen on endoscopy could be equated to the distance from mandibular plane to hyoid (MP-H) of lateral cephalometry and both corresponded to severity of AHI. At the retroglossal region, there was a significant correlation with MP-H, length of the soft palate, and AHI. Conclusion. There is significant correlation of lateral cephalogram and awake flexible nasopharyngolaryngoscopy with AHI in OSA. In unison they form an excellent screening tool for snorers. PMID:26689652

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic bone disease: Insights in to the relationship between bone and sleep

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Christine M.; Shea, Steven A.; Stone, Katie L.; Cauley, Jane A.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Redline, Susan; Karsenty, Gerard; Orwoll, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and low bone mass are two prevalent conditions, particularly among older adults, a section of the U.S. population that is expected to grow dramatically over the coming years. OSA, the most common form of sleep disordered breathing, has been linked to multiple cardiovascular, metabolic, hormonal and inflammatory derangements and may have adverse effects on bone. However, little is known about how OSA (including the associated hypoxia and sleep loss) affects bone metabolism. In order to gain insight into the relationship between sleep and bone, we review the growing information on OSA and metabolic bone disease and discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms by which OSA may affect bone metabolism/architecture. PMID:25639209

  14. Preliminary evaluation of Wearable Wellness System for Obstructive Sleep Apnea detection.

    PubMed

    Crupi, R; Faetti, T; Paradiso, R

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have proven how sleep deprivation has a negative impact on daily life, affecting people's psychophysical state. In this field, research is focusing on the improvement of unobtrusive sleep monitoring devices for promoting sleep hygiene and early detection of sleep disorders. This study aims to assess the use of a textile-based wearable system, with its associated apnea detection algorithm, in monitoring of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAs). The system has been compared through the simultaneous acquisition of physiological signals in parallel with polysomnograph in laboratory and home environments. Results show that such a wearable system could be successfully used for early detection of OSAs (Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome) and could stimulate people to a better self healthcare looking for a specialized medic examination and eventually undergoing to proper treatment avoiding the onset of OSAs co-morbidities. PMID:26737206

  15. Patient and Partner Experiences With Obstructive Sleep Apnea and CPAP Treatment: A Qualitative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Luyster, Faith S; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Aloia, Mark S; Martire, Lynn M; Buysse, Daniel J; Strollo, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have investigated factors associated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for sleep apnea from the patients' and their partners' perspective. This qualitative research study explored patients' and partners' experiences of CPAP and facilitators and barriers to CPAP use, and elicited suggestions for a first-time CPAP user program. Data from 27 participants were collected via four sleep apnea patient and four partner focus groups. Qualitative content analysis identified five themes: knowledge of sleep apnea, effects of sleep apnea, effects of CPAP, barriers and facilitators of CPAP, and ideas for a new user support program. Patients and partners emphasized the importance of partner involvement in the early CPAP treatment period. These data suggest consideration of a couple-oriented approach to improving CPAP adherence. PMID:25203283

  16. Influence of chronic barbiturate administration on sleep apnea after hypersomnia presentation: case study.

    PubMed Central

    Takhar, J; Bishop, J

    2000-01-01

    When sleepiness is excessive, undesirable, inappropriate or unexplained, it often indicates a clinical disorder that is generically termed hypersomnia. One of the leading causes of hypersomnia is sleep apnea. We present the case of a 44-year-old woman with a history of bipolar spectrum disorder and epilepsy who initially showed evidence of hypersomnia. The hypersomnia settled with changes to her medication, but the patient was subsequently found to have severe obstructive sleep apnea. The relation between the patient's medication and sleep apnea is discussed, and the possible respiratory-suppressant effects of chronic barbiturate treatment are considered. The role of other evoking factors within the context of this case and the mechanisms by which drug interactions and psychotropic treatment may worsen, obscure or perpetuate sleep apnea are also examined. PMID:11022396

  17. Importance of cephalographs in diagnosis of patients with sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Laxmi, Nimma Vijaya; Talla, Harshavardhan; Meesala, Deepika; Soujanya, Shakuntala; Naomi, Nithya; Poosa, Manasa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is considered to be a potentially life threatening disorder, which is characterized by repeated collapse of the upper airway during sleep with cessation of breathing. The cephalometric method despite being a static, two-dimensional evaluation of dynamic three-dimensional structures of the head and neck is useful in diagnosing patients with OSA, as they have shown that significant differences exist between asymptomatic controls and patients with OSA. Aims and Objectives: This study is designed to compare and validate the craniofacial morphology in patients with OSA using lateral cephalometry in both upright and supine position. Materials and Methods: Sixty subjects participated in the study of which 30 were patients with OSA diagnosed by questionnaire and 30 were healthy control group with age range of 25–45 years. Results: The study group demonstrated an increased ANB, mandibular plane angles (GoGn-SN), lower anterior facial height which are statistically significant with a significant P < 0.05. Significant decrease in posterior airway space, increased soft palate length, tongue length, and thickness suggesting reduced airway space in supine posture. Conclusion: Evaluation of craniofacial morphology in OSA patients using lateral cephalometry helps in recognizing the morphological changes induced by altered sleep pattern and for appropriate treatment planning. PMID:26604577

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea, immuno-inflammation, and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Claire; Dematteis, Maurice; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Baguet, Jean-Philippe; Lvy, Patrick

    2009-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a highly prevalent sleep disorder leading to cardiovascular and metabolic complications. OSA is also a multicomponent disorder, with intermittent hypoxia (IH) as the main trigger for the associated cardiovascular and metabolic alterations. Indeed, recurrent pharyngeal collapses during sleep lead to repetitive sequences of hypoxia-reoxygenation. This IH induces several consequences such as hemodynamic, hormonometabolic, oxidative, and immuno-inflammatory alterations that may interact and aggravate each other, resulting in artery changes, from adaptive to degenerative atherosclerotic remodeling. Atherosclerosis has been found in OSA patients free of other cardiovascular risk factors and is related to the severity of nocturnal hypoxia. Early stages of artery alteration, including functional and structural changes, have been evidenced in both OSA patients and rodents experimentally exposed to IH. Impaired vasoreactivity with endothelial dysfunction and/or increased vasoconstrictive responses due to sympathetic, endothelin, and renin-angiotensin systems have been reported and also contribute to vascular remodeling and inflammation. Oxidative stress, inflammation, and vascular remodeling can be directly triggered by IH, further aggravated by the OSA-associated hormonometabolic alterations, such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and adipokine imbalance. As shown in OSA patients and in the animal model, genetic susceptibility, comorbidities (obesity), and life habits (high fat diet) may aggravate atherosclerosis development or progression. The intimate molecular mechanisms are still largely unknown, and their understanding may contribute to delineate new targets for prevention strategies and/or development of new treatment of OSA-related atherosclerosis, especially in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:19404644

  19. Ambulatory management of patients with sleep apnea: is there a place for portable monitor testing?

    PubMed

    Sunwoo, Bernie; Kuna, Samuel T

    2010-06-01

    Portable monitor testing is being increasingly used as an alternative strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Portable monitors have become progressively sophisticated but lack standardization. Recent studies comparing clinical outcomes of ambulatory management pathways using portable monitor testing support their use in patients with a high pretest probability for obstructive sleep apnea. Whether ambulatory management is cost-effective and will improve patient access to diagnosis and treatment requires further investigation. PMID:20488288

  20. Vaspin and lipocalin-2 levels in severe obsructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Zorlu, Mehmet; Akkoyunlu, Muhammed Emin; Kilic, Elif; Karatoprak, Cumali; Cakirca, Mustafa; Yavuz, Erdinc; Ardic, Cuneyt; Camli, Ahmet Adil; Cikrikcioglu, Mehmetali; Kart, Levent

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaspin and lipocalin-2 are less-known recent members of adipocytokine family. There are ongoing studies investigating the role of vaspin ve lipocalin-2 in metabolic syndrome (MS). Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is independently associated with an increased prevalence of MS. We aimed to measure the levels of vaspin and lipocalin-2 which are secreted from adipocytes in patients with severe OSAS and examine the relationship between these two adipocytokines and OSAS. Methods The study consisted of two groups: severe OSAS patients with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of >30/h (OSAS group, 34 subjects) and age-matched healthy volunteers with a AHI <5/h (control group, 25 subjects) Serum levels of vaspin and lipocalin-2 in these two groups were compared. Results Serum levels of vaspin were significantly lower in OSAS group; patients with severe OSAS compared with control group; healthy volunteers (OSAS group: 0.690.5 vs. control group: 1.241.13; P=0.034). The difference between the two groups in terms of serum levels of lipocalin-2 has not reached statistical significance (OSAS group: 61.618.2 vs. control group: 68.520.1; P=0.17). Conclusions We found that serum vaspin levels were significantly lower in patients with severe OSAS compared with healthy controls. Lipocalin-2 levels were similar. The decrease in serum vaspin levels in severe OSAS patients may be important in diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. PMID:24976995

  1. Determinants of CPAP Adherence in Hispanics with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Abad, Montserrat; Chatila, Wissam; Lammi, Matthew R; Swift, Irene; D'Alonzo, Gilbert E; Krachman, Samuel L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We hypothesized that socioeconomic factors and a language barrier would impact adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) among Hispanics with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. Patients with OSA who were prescribed CPAP for at least 1 year and completed a questionnaire evaluating demographic data, socioeconomic status, and CPAP knowledge and adherence participated in the study. Results. Seventy-nine patients (26 males; 53 ± 11 yrs; body mass index (BMI) = 45 ± 9 kg/m(2)) with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) 33 ± 30 events/hr completed the study. Included were 25 Hispanics, 39 African Americans, and 15 Caucasians, with no difference in age, AHI, CPAP use, or BMI between the groups. While there was a difference in educational level (P = 0.006), income level (P < 0.001), and employment status (P = 0.03) between the groups, these did not influence CPAP adherence. Instead, overall improvement in quality of life and health status and perceived benefit from CPAP influenced adherence, both for the group as a whole (P = 0.03, P = 0.004, and P = 0.001, resp.), as well as in Hispanics (P = 0.02, P = 0.02, P = 0.03, resp.). Conclusion. In Hispanic patients with OSA, perceived benefit with therapy, rather than socioeconomic status or a language barrier, appears to be the most important factor in determining CPAP adherence. PMID:24649371

  2. Determinants of CPAP Adherence in Hispanics with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lammi, Matthew R.; Swift, Irene; D'Alonzo, Gilbert E.; Krachman, Samuel L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We hypothesized that socioeconomic factors and a language barrier would impact adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) among Hispanics with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. Patients with OSA who were prescribed CPAP for at least 1 year and completed a questionnaire evaluating demographic data, socioeconomic status, and CPAP knowledge and adherence participated in the study. Results. Seventy-nine patients (26 males; 53 ± 11 yrs; body mass index (BMI) = 45 ± 9 kg/m2) with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) 33 ± 30 events/hr completed the study. Included were 25 Hispanics, 39 African Americans, and 15 Caucasians, with no difference in age, AHI, CPAP use, or BMI between the groups. While there was a difference in educational level (P = 0.006), income level (P < 0.001), and employment status (P = 0.03) between the groups, these did not influence CPAP adherence. Instead, overall improvement in quality of life and health status and perceived benefit from CPAP influenced adherence, both for the group as a whole (P = 0.03, P = 0.004, and P = 0.001, resp.), as well as in Hispanics (P = 0.02, P = 0.02, P = 0.03, resp.). Conclusion. In Hispanic patients with OSA, perceived benefit with therapy, rather than socioeconomic status or a language barrier, appears to be the most important factor in determining CPAP adherence. PMID:24649371

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in North American Commercial Drivers

    PubMed Central

    KALES, Stefanos N.; STRAUBEL, Madeleine G.

    2013-01-01

    The most common medical cause of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Specifically, among an estimated 14 million US commercial drivers, 17–28% or 2.4 to 3.9 million are expected to have OSA. Based on existing epidemiologic evidence, most of these drivers are undiagnosed and not adequately treated. Untreated OSA increases the risk of vehicular crashes as documented in multiple independent studies and by meta-analysis. Therefore, identifying commercial drivers with OSA and having them effectively treated should decrease crash-related fatalities and injuries. Several strategies are available for screening and identifying drivers with OSA. The simplest and most effective objective strategies use body mass index (BMI) cutoffs for obesity. Functional screens are promising adjuncts to other objective tests. The most effective approach will likely be a combination of a good questionnaire; BMI measures; and a careful physician-obtained history complemented by a functional screen. PMID:24317450

  4. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical features of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Madani, Mansoor; Madani, Farideh

    2009-11-01

    The normal cycle of respiration includes a unique balancing force between many upper airway structures that control its dilation and closure. Alteration of this delicate equilibrium, possibly by an increased airflow resistance, can cause various degrees of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). OSA is now recognized as a major illness, an important cause of medical morbidity and mortality affecting millions of people worldwide, and a major predisposing factor for several systemic conditions, such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes, and even sexual dysfunction. Initial evaluation for possible OSA may be done by dental professionals who can provide guidance for its comprehensive evaluation and management. Because of the complexity of the disease, factors contributing to its development must be identified. Some factors caused by the patient's anatomic structures are slightly easier to rectify, whereas others may relate to the patient's age, sex, habits, or associated illnesses, including obesity. In this article, various epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical features of OSA are discussed. PMID:19944337

  5. Obstructive sleep apnea in North American commercial drivers.

    PubMed

    Kales, Stefanos N; Straubel, Madeleine G

    2014-01-01

    The most common medical cause of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Specifically, among an estimated 14 million US commercial drivers, 17-28% or 2.4 to 3.9 million are expected to have OSA. Based on existing epidemiologic evidence, most of these drivers are undiagnosed and not adequately treated. Untreated OSA increases the risk of vehicular crashes as documented in multiple independent studies and by meta-analysis. Therefore, identifying commercial drivers with OSA and having them effectively treated should decrease crash-related fatalities and injuries. Several strategies are available for screening and identifying drivers with OSA. The simplest and most effective objective strategies use body mass index (BMI) cutoffs for obesity. Functional screens are promising adjuncts to other objective tests. The most effective approach will likely be a combination of a good questionnaire; BMI measures; and a careful physician-obtained history complemented by a functional screen. PMID:24317450

  6. Implications of Renal Denervation Therapy in Patients with Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Jaén-Águila, Fernando; Vargas-Hitos, José Antonio; Mediavilla-García, Juan Diego

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome is a prevalent condition characterized by repeated episodes of obstruction of the upper airway, leading to intermittent hypoxemia and important endothelial and anatomical dysfunctions that cause cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. The finding of the relationship between OSA and hypertension, especially resistant hypertension (RHT), has increased the interest in therapeutic strategies that affect renal sympathetic activity in these patients. The observational studies published until now demonstrated that renal denervation therapy can reduce the severity of OSA syndrome. Renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) could be a future therapeutic possibility for conditions other than RHT, such as atrial fibrillation, heart failure, obesity, and OSA syndrome, where renal sympathetic system plays an important physiological role. The aim of this review was to elucidate the implications of renal sympathetic activity in OSA syndrome. PMID:26491559

  7. Implications of Renal Denervation Therapy in Patients with Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Jaén-Águila, Fernando; Vargas-Hitos, José Antonio; Mediavilla-García, Juan Diego

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome is a prevalent condition characterized by repeated episodes of obstruction of the upper airway, leading to intermittent hypoxemia and important endothelial and anatomical dysfunctions that cause cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. The finding of the relationship between OSA and hypertension, especially resistant hypertension (RHT), has increased the interest in therapeutic strategies that affect renal sympathetic activity in these patients. The observational studies published until now demonstrated that renal denervation therapy can reduce the severity of OSA syndrome. Renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) could be a future therapeutic possibility for conditions other than RHT, such as atrial fibrillation, heart failure, obesity, and OSA syndrome, where renal sympathetic system plays an important physiological role. The aim of this review was to elucidate the implications of renal sympathetic activity in OSA syndrome. PMID:26491559

  8. Bilevel positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Mansukhani, Meghna P; Kolla, Bhanu Prakash; Olson, Eric J; Ramar, Kannan; Morgenthaler, Timothy I

    2014-05-01

    For most patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA), continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an effective therapy. However, for a subset of individuals, CPAP is either not effective or is poorly tolerated. Bilevel positive airway pressure (BPAP) is potentially capable of treating OSA at a lower mean pressure than CPAP and can help augment ventilation via pressure support. This review summarizes the evidence for the use of BPAP in spontaneous mode in the initial treatment of patients with OSA and in those who are poorly compliant with CPAP therapy. It also examines evidence regarding use of BPAP in OSA with associated hypoventilation, such as in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or severe obesity. Finally, current clinical guidelines that help determine which patients would be candidates for a BPAP device and how to manually titrate BPAP to determine the optimal settings to be prescribed are also discussed. PMID:24666419

  9. [Implantable nerve stimulation for obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Afonso Delgado, Lidia; Micoulaud Franchi, Jean-Arthur; Monteyrol, Pierre-Jean; Philip, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a common disorder that has been identified as a contributor to cardiovascular disease making it a major public health problem. Continuous positive airway pressure is the standard treatment but compliance is suboptimal. Mandibular advancement devices and surgery have limited indications, inconstant efficiency and potential irreversible side effects. Stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve, that innervates the genioglossus, a protrusor muscle of the tongue, is now a new treatment option for moderate and severe cases of OSAHS. Two types of stimulation are currently available: stimulation synchronous with inspiration and continuous stimulation. The indication of each type of stimulation and long-term effects still need to be assessed but the implantable nerve stimulation is a promising treatment for patients without a therapy solution so far. PMID:26796478

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea and cancer: effects of intermittent hypoxia?

    PubMed

    Kukwa, Wojciech; Migacz, Ewa; Druc, Karolina; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta; Czarnecka, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder characterized by pauses in regular breathing. Apneic episodes lead to recurrent hypoxemia-reoxygenation cycles with concomitant cellular intermittent hypoxia. Studies suggest that intermittent hypoxia in OSA may influence tumorigenesis. This review presents recent articles on the potential role of OSA in cancer development. Relevant research has focused on: molecular pathways mediating the influence of intermittent hypoxia on tumor physiology, animal and epidemiological human studies linking OSA and cancer. Current data relating OSA to risk of neoplastic disease remain scarce, but recent studies reveal the potential for a strong relation. More work is, therefore, needed on the impact of OSA on many cancer-related aspects. Results may offer enlightenment for improved cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26562000

  11. Hypoglossal nerve conduction findings in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandren, Sindhu; Gruis, Kirsten L.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Concannon, Maryann; Wolfe, James; Albers, James W.; Brown, Devin L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Denervation of oropharyngeal muscles in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been suggested by needle EMG and muscle biopsy, but little is known about oropharyngeal nerve conduction abnormalities in OSA. We sought to compare hypoglossal nerve conduction studies in patients with and without OSA. Methods Unilateral hypoglossal nerve conduction studies were performed on 20 subjects with OSA and 20 age-matched controls using standard techniques. Results Median age was 48 in OSA subjects and 47 in controls. Hypoglossal compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes were significantly reduced (Wilcoxon Signed Rank test, p =0.01), but prolongation of latencies in OSA subjects did not reach significance in comparison to those in controls. Among a subgroup of subjects without polyneuropathy (15 pairs), reduced amplitudes in OSA subjects retained borderline significance (p=0.05). Discussion Hypoglossal nerve conduction abnormalities may distinguish patients with OSA from controls. These abnormalities could potentially contribute to, or arise from, OSA. PMID:20544939

  12. Effect of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leão, Sílvia; Conde, Bebiana; Fontes, Paulo; Calvo, Teresa; Afonso, Abel; Moreira, Ilídio

    2016-04-01

    The effect of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on clinical outcomes after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is incompletely defined. We sought to determine the prevalence of OSA in patients with ACS and evaluate prognostic impact of OSA and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in these patients. This was a prospective longitudinal cohort study of 73 patients admitted on cardiac intensive care unit for ACS. Cardiorespiratory sleep study and/or polysomnography were performed in all patients. CPAP was recommended if Apnea-Hypopnea Index ≥5. The main study outcome was a composite of death for any cause, myocardial infarction, and myocardial revascularization. OSA was diagnosed in 46 patients (63%). Age and cardiovascular risk factors were not significantly different between groups. OSA was classified as mild (m-OSA) in 14 patients (30%) and as moderate-to-severe (s-OSA) in 32 patients (70%). After a median follow-up of 75 months (interquartile range 71 to 79), patients with s-OSA had lower event-free survival rate. After adjustment for gender, patients with s-OSA showed a significantly higher incidence of the composite end point (hazard ratio 3.58, 95% CI 1.09 to 17.73, p = 0.035). Adherence to CPAP occurred in 19 patients (41%), but compliance to CPAP therapy did not reduce the risk of composite end point (hazard ratio 0.87, 95% CI 0.31 to 2.46, p = 0.798). In conclusion, OSA is an underdiagnosed disease with high prevalence in patients with ACS. It is urgent to establish screening protocols because those have high diagnostic yield and allow identifying a group of patients with manifestly unfavorable prognosis. PMID:26857162

  13. Sleep Architecture Following a Weight Loss Intervention in Overweight and Obese Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Type 2 Diabetes: Relationship to Apnea-Hypopnea Index

    PubMed Central

    Shechter, Ari; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Kuna, Samuel T.; Zammit, Gary; RoyChoudhury, Arindam; Newman, Anne B.; Millman, Richard P.; Reboussin, David M.; Wadden, Thomas A.; Jakicic, John M.; Pi-Sunyer, F. Xavier; Wing, Rena R.; Foster, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine if weight loss and/or changes in apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) improve sleep architecture in overweight/obese adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial including 264 overweight/obese adults with T2D and OSA. Participants were randomized to an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) or a diabetes and support education (DSE) control group. Measures included anthropometry, AHI, and sleep at baseline and year-1, year-2, and year-4 follow-ups. Results: Changes in sleep duration (total sleep time [TST]), continuity [wake after sleep onset (WASO)], and architecture stage 1, stage 2, slow wave sleep, and REM sleep) from baseline to year 1, 2, and 4 did not differ between ILI and DSE. Repeated-measure mixed-model analyses including data from baseline through year-4 for all participants demonstrated a significant positive association between AHI and stage 1 sleep (p < 0.001), and a significant negative association between AHI and stage 2 (p = 0.01) and REM sleep (p < 0.001), whereas changes in body weight had no relation to any sleep stages or TST. WASO had a significant positive association with change in body weight (p = 0.009). Conclusions: Compared to control, the ILI did not induce significant changes in sleep across the 4-year follow-up. In participants overall, reduced AHI in overweight/obese adults with T2D and OSA was associated with decreased stage 1, and increased stage 2 and REM sleep. These sleep architecture changes are more strongly related to reductions in AHI than body weight, whereas WASO may be more influenced by weight than AHI. Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00194259 Citation: Shechter A, St-Onge MP, Kuna ST, Zammit G, RoyChoudhury A, Newman AB, Millman RP, Reboussin DM, Wadden TA, Jakicic JM, Pi-Sunyer FX, Wing RR, Foster GD, Sleep AHEAD Research Group of the Look AHEAD Research Group. Sleep architecture following a weight loss intervention in overweight and obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes: relationship to apnea-hypopnea index. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(11):1205-1211. PMID:25325608

  14. Cumulative Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity and Short Sleep Duration with the Risk for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Priou, Pascaline; Le Vaillant, Marc; Meslier, Nicole; Paris, Audrey; Pigeanne, Thierry; Nguyen, Xuan-Lan; Alizon, Claire; Bizieux-Thaminy, Acya; Leclair-Visonneau, Laurene; Humeau, Marie-Pierre; Gagnadoux, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and short sleep duration are individually associated with an increased risk for hypertension (HTN). The aim of this multicenter cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis of a cumulative association of OSA severity and short sleep duration with the risk for prevalent HTN. Among 1,499 patients undergoing polysomnography for suspected OSA, 410 (27.3%) previously diagnosed as hypertensive and taking antihypertensive medication were considered as having HTN. Patients with total sleep time (TST) <6 h were considered to be short sleepers. Logistic regression procedures were performed to determine the independent association of HTN with OSA and sleep duration. Considering normal sleepers (TST ≥6 h) without OSA as the reference group, the odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence intervals) for having HTN was 2.51 (1.35–4.68) in normal sleepers with OSA and 4.37 (2.18–8.78) in short sleepers with OSA after adjustment for age, gender, obesity, diabetes, depression, current smoking, use of thyroid hormones, daytime sleepiness, poor sleep complaint, time in bed, sleep architecture and fragmentation, and study site. The risk for HTN appeared to present a cumulative association with OSA severity and short sleep duration (p<0.0001 for linear trend). The higher risk for HTN was observed in short sleepers with severe OSA (AHI ≥30) (OR, 4.29 [2.03–9.07]). In patients investigated for suspected OSA, sleep-disordered breathing severity and short sleep duration have a cumulative association with the risk for prevalent HTN. Further studies are required to determine whether interventions to optimize sleep may contribute to lower BP in patients with OSA. PMID:25531468

  15. Association between Asthma and Risk of Developing Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Teodorescu, Mihaela; Barnet, Jodi H.; Hagen, Erika W.; Palta, Mari; Young, Terry B.; Peppard, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is more common among patients with asthma; whether asthma is associated with the development of OSA is unknown. Objective To examine the prospective relationship of asthma with incident OSA. Design Population-based prospective epidemiology study (the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort). Setting Beginning in 1988, adult participants were recruited from a random sample of Wisconsin state employees to attend overnight polysomnography studies at 4-year intervals. Asthma and covariate information were assessed during polysomnography studies through March 2013. Participants Participants identified as free of OSA (apnea-hypopnea index<5 events/hr and not treated) by two baseline polysomnography studies and that had at least one additional polysomnography study were included. 547 participants (52% women; mean [SD] baseline age = 50 [8] years) provided 1105 4-year follow-up intervals. Exposure Questionnaire-assessed presence and duration of self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma. Main Outcome The associations of presence and duration of asthma with 4-year incidences of both OSA (apnea-hypopnea index ? 5 or positive airway pressure treatment) and OSA concomitant with habitual daytime sleepiness were estimated using repeated-measures Poisson regression, adjusting for confounders. Results Twenty-two out of 81 (27% [95% CI=17%37%]) participants with asthma experienced incident OSA over their first observed 4-year follow-up interval compared to 75 incident cases of OSA among 466 participants without asthma (16% [95% CI, 13%19%]). Using all 4-year intervals, participants with asthma experienced 45 incident OSA cases during 167 4-year intervals (27% [95% CI, 20%34%]) and participants without asthma experienced 160 incident OSA cases during 938 4-year intervals (17% [95% CI, 15%19%]); the corresponding adjusted relative risk was 1.39 (95% CI, 1.061.82), controlling for sex, age, baseline and change in body mass index, and other factors. Asthma was also associated with new-onset OSA with habitual sleepiness (relative risk: 2.72 [95% CI, 1.265.89], p=0.04). Asthma duration was related to both incident OSA (relative risk: 1.07 per 5-year increment in asthma duration [95% CI, 1.021.13], p=0.01) and incident OSA with habitual sleepiness (relative risk: 1.18 [95% CI, 1.071.31], p=0.02). Conclusions and Relevance Asthma was associated with increased risk of new-onset OSA. Studies investigating the value of periodic OSA evaluation in patients with asthma are warranted. PMID:25585327

  16. Association between obstructive sleep apnea severity and glucose control in patients with untreated versus treated diabetes.

    PubMed

    Priou, Pascaline; Le Vaillant, Marc; Meslier, Nicole; Chollet, Sylvaine; Pigeanne, Thierry; Masson, Philippe; Bizieux-Thaminy, Acya; Humeau, Marie-Pierre; Goupil, François; Ducluzeau, Pierre-Henri; Gagnadoux, Frédéric

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the association between obstructive sleep apnea severity and glucose control differs between patients with newly diagnosed and untreated type 2 diabetes, and patients with known and treated type 2 diabetes. This multicentre cross-sectional study included 762 patients investigated by sleep recording for suspected obstructive sleep apnea, 497 of whom were previously diagnosed and treated for type 2 diabetes (treated diabetic patients), while 265 had no medical history of diabetes but had fasting blood glucose ≥126 mg dL(-1) and/or glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c ) ≥6.5% consistent with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (untreated diabetic patients). Multivariate regression analyses were performed to evaluate the independent association between HbA1c and obstructive sleep apnea severity in treated and untreated patients with diabetes. In untreated diabetic patients, HbA1c was positively associated with apnea-hypopnea index (P = 0.0007) and 3% oxygen desaturation index (P = 0.0016) after adjustment for age, gender, body mass index, alcohol habits, metabolic dyslipidaemia, hypertension, statin use and study site. The adjusted mean value of HbA1c increased from 6.68% in the lowest quartile of the apnea-hypopnea index (<17) to 7.20% in the highest quartile of the apnea-hypopnea index (>61; P = 0.033 for linear trend). In treated patients with diabetes, HbA1c was associated with non-sleep variables, including age, metabolic dyslipidaemia and insulin use, but not with obstructive sleep apnea severity. Obstructive sleep apnea may adversely affect glucose control in patients with newly diagnosed and untreated type 2 diabetes, but may have a limited impact in patients with overt type 2 diabetes receiving anti-diabetic medications. PMID:25703309

  17. Sleep Apnea Prevalence in Acute Myocardial Infarction - the Sleep Apnea in Post Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients (SAPAMI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ludka, Ondrej; Stepanova, Radka; Vyskocilova, Martina; Galkova, Lujza; Mikolaskova, Monika; Belehrad, Milos; Kostalova, Jana; Mihalova, Zuzana; Drozdova, Adela; Hlasensky, Jiri; Gacik, Michal; Pudilova, Lucie; Mikusova, Tereza; Fischerova, Blanka; Sert-Kuniyoshi, Fatima; Kara, Tomas; Spinar, Jindrich; Somers, Virend K.

    2014-01-01

    Background While sleep apnea (SA) might be a modifiable cardiovascular risk factor, recent data suggest that SA is severely underdiagnosed in patients after acute myocardial infarction (MI). There is limited evidence about day-night variation of onset of MI on dependence of having SA. We therefore investigated the prevalence of SA and examined the day-night variation of onset of MI in acute MI patients. Methods We prospectively studied 782 consecutive patients admitted to the hospital with the diagnosis of acute MI. All subjects underwent sleep evaluations using a portable device after at least 48 hours post-admission. Using the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), groups were defined as patients without SA (<5 events/hour), mild SA (5–15 events/hour), moderate SA (15–30 events/hour), and severe SA (≥30 events/hour). Results Almost all patients (98%) underwent urgent coronary angiography and 91% of patients underwent primary PCI. Using a threshold of AHI ≥ 5 events/hour, SA was present in 65.7% of patients after acute MI. Mild SA was present in 32.6%, moderate in 20.4% and severe in 12.7%. The day-night variation in the onset of MI in all groups of SA patients was similar to that observed in non-SA patients. From 6AM–12PM, the frequency of MI was higher in both SA and non-SA patients, as compared to the interval from 12AM–6AM (all p<0.05). Conclusion There is a high prevalence of SA in patients presenting with acute MI. Peak time of MI onset in SA patients was between 6AM–noon, similar to that in the general population. Whether diagnosis and treatment of SA after MI will significantly improve outcomes in these patients remains to be determined. PMID:25064202

  18. Piezoelectric belts as a method for measuring chest and abdominal movement for obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Courtney M; Clemmons, Pamela

    2012-09-01

    Distinguishing obstructive sleep apnea from central apnea depends upon accurate measure of chest and abdominal movement. American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) polysomnography guidelines recommend the use of respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP) belts but not piezoelectrode (PE) belts for measuring chest and abdominal movements. To compare these two sensors, we measured the signal amplitude for 10 RIP belts and 10 PE belts stretched by mechanical distraction across six distances (2.5 to 15.0 centimeters) and replicated 10 times for each belt. Amplitudes were measured using the Stellate Harmonie (Stellate Systems, Inc., Natus Medical, Inc., San Carlos, California, USA) recording system. A Pearson Product Moment Correlation coefficient was calculated. All RIP belts performed well at all distraction lengths and demonstrated linear performance. Eight of 10 PE belts performed well through all measures whereas, two showed nonlinear increase in signal on stretch of greater than 12.5 centimeters. Signals from PE belts highly correlated with the distance of distraction (r = 0.96 to 0.99) and the RIP belts (r = 0.98 to 0.99). These results suggest that PE belts perform similarly to RIP belts at distraction distances up to 10.0 centimeters. Further testing on biological models is needed to determine if PE belts are a suitable alternative for RIP belts in polysomnography. PMID:23019764

  19. Abdominal fat and sleep apnea: the chicken or the egg?

    PubMed

    Pillar, Giora; Shehadeh, Naim

    2008-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome is a disorder characterized by repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction that occur during sleep. Associated features include loud snoring, fragmented sleep, repetitive hypoxemia/hypercapnia, daytime sleepiness, and cardiovascular complications. The prevalence of OSA is 2-3% and 4-5% in middle-aged women and men, respectively. The prevalence of OSA among obese patients exceeds 30%, reaching as high as 50-98% in the morbidly obese population. Obesity is probably the most important risk factor for the development of OSA. Some 60-90% of adults with OSA are overweight, and the relative risk of OSA in obesity (BMI >29 kg/m(2)) is >or=10. Numerous studies have shown the development or worsening of OSA with increasing weight, as opposed to substantial improvement with weight reduction. There are several mechanisms responsible for the increased risk of OSA with obesity. These include reduced pharyngeal lumen size due to fatty tissue within the airway or in its lateral walls, decreased upper airway muscle protective force due to fatty deposits in the muscle, and reduced upper airway size secondary to mass effect of the large abdomen on the chest wall and tracheal traction. These mechanisms emphasize the great importance of fat accumulated in the abdomen and neck regions compared with the peripheral one. It is the abdomen much more than the thighs that affect the upper airway size and function. Hence, obesity is associated with increased upper airway collapsibility (even in nonapneic subjects), with dramatic improvement after weight reduction. Conversely, OSA may itself predispose individuals to worsening obesity because of sleep deprivation, daytime somnolence, and disrupted metabolism. OSA is associated with increased sympathetic activation, sleep fragmentation, ineffective sleep, and insulin resistance, potentially leading to diabetes and aggravation of obesity. Furthermore, OSA may be associated with changes in leptin, ghrelin, and orexin levels; increased appetite and caloric intake; and again exacerbating obesity. Thus, it appears that obesity and OSA form a vicious cycle where each results in worsening of the other. PMID:18227501

  20. [Perioperative management of adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Rösslein, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep related breathing disorder with an increasing prevalence. Most surgical patients with OSA have not been diagnosed prior to surgery and are at an increased risk of developing perioperative complications. Preoperative identification of these patients is important in order to take appropriate measures concerning a safe perioperative management. While the level of scientific evidence for single measures is still low, several steps seem prudent: Preoperatively, sedating medications should only be applied with extreme caution. Anesthetic management should focus on regional anesthetic techniques and reduction of systemic opioids. In the case of general anesthesia, an increased risk of a patient presenting with a difficult airway should be appreciated. The extent and duration of postoperative continuous monitoring has to be determined on an individual basis. A preoperatively existing therapy with continuous positive airway pressure should be continued postoperatively as soon as possible. Patients with OSA may be managed on an outpatient basis if certain requirements are met. PMID:25850644

  1. Potential Role of Adult Stem Cells in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Almendros, Isaac; Carreras, Alba; Montserrat, Josep M.; Gozal, David; Navajas, Daniel; Farre, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    Adult stem cells are undifferentiated cells that can be mobilized from the bone marrow or other organs, home into injured tissues, and differentiate into different cell phenotypes to serve in a repairing capacity. Furthermore, these cells can respond to inflammation and oxidative stress by exhibiting immunomodulatory properties. The protective and reparative roles of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have primarily been examined and characterized in auto-immune and cardiovascular diseases. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a very prevalent disease (4–5% of adult population and 2–3% of children) characterized by an abnormal increase in upper airway collapsibility. Recurrent airway obstructions elicit arterial oxygen desaturations, increased inspiratory efforts, and sleep fragmentation, which have been associated with important long-term neurocognitive, metabolic, and cardiovascular consequences. Since inflammation, oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are key factors in the development of the morbid consequences of OSA, bone marrow-derived stem cells could be important modulators of the morbid phenotype by affording a protective role. This mini-review is focused on the recent data available on EPCs, VSELs, and MSCs in both animal models and patients with OSA. PMID:22807922

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea and dyslipidemia: evidence and underlying mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Adedayo, Ajibola Monsur; Olafiranye, Oladipupo; Smith, David; Hill, Alethea; Zizi, Ferdinand; Brown, Clinton; Jean-Louis, Girardin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Over the past half century, evidence has been accumulating on the emergence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the most prevalent sleep-disordered breathing, as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. A significant body of research has been focused on elucidating the complex interplay between OSA and cardiovascular risk factors, including dyslipidemia, obesity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus that portend increased morbidity and mortality in susceptible individuals. Conclusion Although a clear causal relationship of OSA and dyslipidemia is yet to be demonstrated, there is increasing evidence that chronic intermittent hypoxia, a major component of OSA, is independently associated and possibly the root cause of the dyslipidemia via the generation of stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase-1 and reactive oxygen species, peroxidation of lipids, and sympathetic system dysfunction. The aim of this review is to highlight the relationship between OSA and dyslipidemia in the development of atherosclerosis and present the pathophysiologic mechanisms linking its association to clinical disease. Issues relating to epidemiology, confounding factors, significant gaps in research and future directions are also discussed. PMID:22903801

  3. Neural Respiratory Drive and Arousal in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Si-Chang; He, Bai-Ting; Steier, Joerg; Moxham, John; Polkey, Michael I.; Luo, Yuan-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: It has been hypothesized that arousals after apnea and hypopnea events in patients with obstructive sleep apnea are triggered when neural respiratory drive exceeds a certain level, but this hypothesis is based on esophageal pressure data, which are dependent on flow and lung volume. We aimed to determine whether a fixed threshold of respiratory drive is responsible for arousal at the termination of apnea and hypopnea using a flow independent technique (esophageal diaphragm electromyography, EMGdi) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Setting: Sleep center of state Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease. Patients: Seventeen subjects (two women, mean age 53 ± 11 years) with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome were studied Methods: We recorded esophageal pressure and EMGdi simultaneously during overnight full polysomnography in all the subjects. Measurements and Results: A total of 709 hypopnea events and 986 apnea events were analyzed. There was wide variation in both esophageal pressure and EMGdi at the end of both apnea and hypopnea events within a subject and stage 2 sleep. The EMGdi at the end of events that terminated with arousal was similar to those which terminated without arousal for both hypopnea events (27.6% ± 13.9%max vs 29.9% ± 15.9%max, P = ns) and apnea events (22.9% ± 11.5%max vs 22.1% ± 12.6%max, P = ns). The Pes at the end of respiratory events terminated with arousal was also similar to those terminated without arousal. There was a small but significant difference in EMGdi at the end of respiratory events between hypopnea and apnea (25.3% ± 14.2%max vs 21.7% ± 13.2%max, P < 0.05]. Conclusions: Our data do not support the concept that there is threshold of neural respiratory drive that is responsible for arousal in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Citation: Xiao SC, He BT, Steier J, Moxham J, Polkey MI, Luo YM. Neural respiratory drive and arousal in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea. SLEEP 2015;38(6):941–949. PMID:25669181

  4. Sleep Position Trainer versus Tennis Ball Technique in Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eijsvogel, Michiel M.; Ubbink, Rinse; Dekker, Janita; Oppersma, Eline; de Jongh, Frans H.; van der Palen, Job; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein G.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: Positional therapy (PT) is an effective therapy in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (POSAS) when used, but the compliance of PT is low. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a new kind of PT is effective and can improve compliance. Methods: 29 patients were treated with the sleep position trainer (SPT), 26 patients with the tennis ball technique (TBT). At baseline and 1 month polysomnography, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Quebec Sleep Questionnaire (QSQ) were taken. Daily compliance was objectively measured in both groups. Results: Both therapies prevent supine sleep position to a median of 0% (min-max: SPT 0.0% to 67%, TBT 0.0% to 38.9%), resulting in a treatment success (AHI < 5) in 68.0% of the SPT and 42.9% of the TBT patients. The ESS at baseline was < 10 in both groups. Sleep quality parameters, such as wake after sleep onset (WASO; p = 0.001) and awakenings (p = 0.006), improved more in the SPT group. Total QSQ scores (0.4 ± 0.2, p = 0.03), the QSQ domains nocturnal symptoms (0.7 ± 0.2, p = 0.01), and social interactions (0.8 ± 0.3, p = 0.02) changed in favor of the SPT group. Effective compliance (≥ 4 h/night + ≥ 5 days/week) was 75.9% for the SPT and 42.3% for the TBT users (p = 0.01). Conclusion: In mild POSAS with normal EES the new SPT device and the standard TBT are equally effective in reducing respiratory indices. However, compared to the TBT, sleep quality, quality of life, and compliance improved significantly more in the SPT group. Citation: Eijsvogel MM, Ubbink R, Dekker J, Oppersma E, de Jongh FH, van der Palen J, Brusse-Keizer MG. Sleep position trainer versus tennis ball technique in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(2):139–147. PMID:25515276

  5. Ischemic stroke subtype and presence of sleep-disordered breathing: the BASIC Sleep Apnea Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Devin L.; Mowla, Ashkan; McDermott, Mollie; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Hegeman, Garnett; Smith, Melinda A.; Garcia, Nelda M.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2014-01-01

    Goal Little is known about the prevalence of sleep apnea (SA) across ischemic stroke subtypes. Given the important implications for SA screening, we tested the association between SA and ischemic stroke subtype in a population-based study. Methods Within the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi Project, ischemic stroke patients were offered SA screening with the ApneaLink Plus™ (n=355). A neurologist assigned TOAST subtype (with an additional category for nonlacunar infarctions of unknown etiology) using hospital records. Unadjusted and adjusted (demographics, BMI, NIHSS, diabetes, history of stroke/TIA) logistic and linear regression models were used to test the association between subtype and SA or apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Findings Median age was 65 and 55% were male; 59% were Mexican American. Median time from stroke onset to SA screen was 13 days (IQR: 6, 21). Overall, 215 (61%) had SA (AHI ≥ 10). Median AHI was 13 (IQR: 6, 27). Prevalence of SA by subtype was: cardioembolism, 66%; large artery atherosclerosis, 57%; small vessel occlusion, 68%; other determined, 50%; undetermined etiology, 58%; and nonlacunar stroke of unknown etiology, 63%. Ischemic stroke subtype was not associated with SA in unadjusted (p=0.72) or adjusted models (p=0.91) models. Ischemic stroke subtype was not associated with AHI in unadjusted (p=0.41) or adjusted models (p=0.62). Conclusion In this population-based stroke surveillance study, ischemic stroke subtype was not associated with the presence or severity of SA. Sleep apnea is likely to be present after ischemic stroke, and the subtype should not influence decisions about SA screening. PMID:25497720

  6. Selected surgical managements in snoring and obstructive sleep apnea patients

    PubMed Central

    Olszewska, Ewa; Rutkowska, Justyna; Czajkowska, Aneta; Rogowski, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The diagnostic process and the surgical procedures in patients with snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are crucial. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of surgical treatment in snoring and OSAS patients. Material/Methods A precise laryngological examination and screening polysomnography (Poly-Mesam) were performed in all patients with mild, moderate and severe OSAS before and 6 months after surgery. The patients completed questionnaires concerning their complaints. We included patients qualified to septoplasty, laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP), uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) and radiofrequency-induced thermotherapy of the tongue base (RITT). Outcome evaluation of surgery was performed on the basis of data received from follow-up laryngological examinations, selected parameters obtained from the Poly-Mesam test and follow-up questionnaires. Results In most cases we observed improvement, defined as decreasing some sleep parameters, such as a respiratory disturbance index (RDI), by more than 50%, decreasing the loudness of snoring, decreasing the number of hypopneas, and obtaining better blood saturation values. After UPPP we noticed changes in retropalatal space, soft palate dimensions and uvula-posterior pharyngeal wall distance. In the postoperative period we did not observe severe complications. In some cases we found short-lived palatal deficiency after UPPP. Patients after RITT experienced discomfort and throat pain lasting from 2 to 4 days. In 2 patients we observed swelling of the tongue base, which decreased after few days. Conclusions Surgery in OSAS contributes to normalization of some sleep parameters. The majority of patients experienced improvement after surgery. PMID:22207114

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is Associated with Increased Chemoreflex Sensitivity in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Trombetta, Ivani C.; Maki-Nunes, Cristiane; Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Alves, Maria-Janieire N. N.; Rondon, Maria Urbana P. B.; Cepeda, Felipe X.; Drager, Luciano F.; Braga, Ana Maria F. W.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Negrao, Carlos E.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is often observed in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS). In addition, the association of MetS and OSA substantially increases sympathetic nerve activity. However, the mechanisms involved in sympathetic hyperactivation in patients with MetS + OSA remain to be clarified. We tested the hypothesis that chemoreflex sensitivity is heightened in patients with MetS and OSA. Design: Prospective clinical study. Participants: Forty-six patients in whom MetS was newly diagnosed (ATP-III) were allocated into: (1) MetS + OSA (n = 24, 48 ± 1.8 yr); and (2) MetS – OSA (n = 22, 44 ± 1.7 yr). Eleven normal control subjects were also studied (C, 47 ± 2.3 yr). Measurements: OSA was defined as an apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 15 events/hr (polysomnography). Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was measured by microneurography technique. Peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity was assessed by inhalation of 10% oxygen and 90% nitrogen (carbon dioxide titrated), and central chemoreflex sensitivity by 7% carbon dioxide and 93% oxygen. Results: Physical characteristics and MetS measures were similar between MetS + OSA and MetS – OSA. MSNA was higher in MetS + OSA patients compared with MetS – OSA and C (33 ± 1.3 versus 28 ± 1.2 and 18 ± 2.2 bursts/min, P < 0.05). Isocapnic hypoxia caused a greater increase in MSNA in MetS + OSA than MetS – OSA and C (P = 0.03). MSNA in response to hyperoxic hypercapnia was greater in MetS + OSA compared with C (P = 0.005). Further analysis showed a significant association between baseline MSNA and peripheral (P < 0.01) and central (P < 0.01) chemoreflex sensitivity. Min ventilation in response to hyperoxic hypercapnia was greater in MetS + OSA compared with C (P = 0.001). Conclusion: OSA increases sympathetic peripheral and central chemoreflex response in patients with MetS, which seems to explain, at least in part, the increase in sympathetic nerve activity in these patients. In addition, OSA increases ventilatory central chemoreflex response in patients with MetS. Citation: Trombetta IC; Maki-Nunes C; Toschi-Dias E; Alves MJNN; Rondon MUPB; Cepeda FX; Drager LF; Braga AMFW; Lorenzi-Filho G; Negrao CE. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with increased chemoreflex sensitivity in patients with metabolic syndrome. SLEEP 2013;36(1):41-49. PMID:23288970

  8. Using the Pathophysiology of Obstructive Sleep Apnea to Teach Cardiopulmonary Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitzky, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder of upper airway obstruction during sleep. The effects of intermittent upper airway obstruction include alveolar hypoventilation, altered arterial blood gases and acid-base status, and stimulation of the arterial chemoreceptors, which leads to frequent arousals. These arousals disturb sleep…

  9. Reduced mammillary body volume in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Birrer, Bramley V X; Macey, Paul M; Woo, Mary A; Gupta, Rakesh K; Yan-Go, Frisca L; Harper, Ronald M

    2008-06-27

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients show compromised emotional and cognitive functions, including anterograde memory deficits. While some memory inadequacies in OSA may result from earlier-described structural deficits in the hippocampus, mammillary body injury also could contribute, since these structures receive projections from the hippocampus via the fornix, project heavily to the anterior thalamus, and have been implicated in other conditions with memory deficiencies, such as Korsakoff's syndrome. However, volume loss in mammillary bodies has not been reported in OSA, likely a consequence of logistic difficulties in size assessment. We evaluated mammillary body volumes in 43 OSA (mean age+/-S.D., 46.9+/-9.2 years; mean apnea-hypopnea-index+/-S.D., 31.2+/-19.9 events/h) and 66 control subjects (age, 47.3+/-8.9 years). Two high-resolution T1-weighted image volumes were collected on a 3.0 T magnetic resonance scanner, averaged to improve signal-to-noise, and reoriented (without warping) into a common space. Brain sections containing both mammillary bodies were oversampled, and the bodies were manually traced and volumes calculated. OSA patients showed significantly reduced left, right, and combined mammillary body volumes compared with control subjects, after partitioning for age, gender, and head size (multivariate linear model, p<0.05). Left-side mammillary bodies showed greater volume reduction than the right side. Diminished mammillary body volume in OSA patients may be associated with memory and spatial orientation deficits found in the syndrome. The mechanisms contributing to the volume loss are unclear, but may relate to hypoxic/ischemic processes, possibly assisted by nutritional deficiencies in the syndrome. PMID:18486338

  10. Effect of obstructive sleep apnea on mitral valve tenting.

    PubMed

    Pressman, Gregg S; Figueredo, Vincent M; Romero-Corral, Abel; Murali, Ganesan; Kotler, Morris N

    2012-04-01

    Obstructive apneas produce high negative intrathoracic pressure that imposes an afterload burden on the left ventricle. Such episodes might produce structural changes in the left ventricle over time. Doppler echocardiograms were obtained within 2 months of attended polysomnography. Patients were grouped according to apnea-hypopnea index (AHI): mild/no obstructive sleep apnea (OSA; AHI <15) and moderate/severe OSA (AHI ≥15). Mitral valve tenting height and area, left ventricular (LV) long and short axes, and LV end-diastolic volume were measured in addition to tissue Doppler parameters. Comparisons of measurements at baseline and follow-up between and within groups were obtained; correlations between absolute changes (Δ) in echocardiographic parameters were also performed. After a mean follow-up of 240 days mitral valve tenting height increased significantly (1.17 ± 0.12 to 1.28 ± 0.17 cm, p = 0.001) in moderate/severe OSA as did tenting area (2.30 ± 0.41 to 2.66 ± 0.60 cm(2), p = 0.0002); Δtenting height correlated with ΔLV end-diastolic volume (rho 0.43, p = 0.01) and Δtenting area (rho 0.35, p = 0.04). In patients with mild/no OSA there was no significant change in tenting height; there was a borderline significant increase in tenting area (2.20 ± 0.44 to 2.31 ± 0.43 cm(2), p = 0.05). Septal tissue Doppler early diastolic wave decreased (8.04 ± 2.49 to 7.10 ± 1.83 cm/s, p = 0.005) in subjects with moderate/severe OSA but not in in those with mild/no OSA. In conclusion, in patients with moderate/severe OSA, mitral valve tenting height and tenting area increase significantly over time. This appears to be related, at least in part, to changes in LV geometry. PMID:22264596

  11. Sleep disruption increases seizure susceptibility: Behavioral and EEG evaluation of an experimental model of sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Hrnčić, Dragan; Grubač, Željko; Rašić-Marković, Aleksandra; Šutulović, Nikola; Šušić, Veselinka; Bjekić-Macut, Jelica; Stanojlović, Olivera

    2016-03-01

    Sleep disruption accompanies sleep apnea as one of its major symptoms. Obstructive sleep apnea is particularly common in patients with refractory epilepsy, but causing factors underlying this are far from being resolved. Therefore, translational studies regarding this issue are important. Our aim was to investigate the effects of sleep disruption on seizure susceptibility of rats using experimental model of lindane-induced refractory seizures. Sleep disruption in male Wistar rats with implanted EEG electrodes was achieved by treadmill method (belt speed set on 0.02m/s for working and 0.00m/s for stop mode, respectively). Animals were assigned to experimental conditions lasting 6h: 1) sleep disruption (sleep interrupted, SI; 30s working and 90s stop mode every 2min; 180cycles in total); 2) activity control (AC, 10min working and 30min stop mode, 9cycles in total); 3) treadmill chamber control (TC, only stop mode). Afterwards, the animals were intraperitoneally treated with lindane (L, 4mg/kg, SI+L, AC+L and TC+L groups) or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO, SIc, ACc and TCc groups). Convulsive behavior was assessed by seizure incidence, latency time to first seizure, and its severity during 30min after drug administration. Number and duration of ictal periods were determined in recorded EEGs. Incidence and severity of lindane-induced seizures were significantly increased, latency time significantly decreased in animals undergoing sleep disruption (SI+L group) compared with the animals from TC+L. Seizure latency was also significantly decreased in SI+L compared to AC+L groups. Number of ictal periods were increased and duration of it presented tendency to increase in SI+L comparing to AC+L. No convulsive signs were observed in TCc, ACc and SIc groups, as well as no ictal periods in EEG. These results indicate sleep disruption facilitates induction of epileptic activity in rodent model of lindane-epilepsy enabling translational research of this phenomenon. PMID:26705666

  12. The Berlin questionnaire for sleep apnea in a sleep clinic population: relationship to polysomnographic measurement of respiratory disturbance.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Negar; Chung, Sharon A; Gibbs, Alison; Shapiro, Colin M

    2008-03-01

    The Berlin questionnaire (BQ) has been used to help identify patients at high risk of having sleep apnea in primary care and atrial fibrillation patients. The BQ may be a useful adjunct in sleep medicine and research, but it has never been validated in a sleep clinic population. The aim of the study is to determine the specificity and sensitivity of the BQ compared to the respiratory disturbance index (RDI) values obtained from two nights of polysomnographic recording in a sleep clinic population. This is a retrospective chart review study of 130 sleep clinic patients. Patients' demographics, BQ scores, RDI measurements, and sleep study parameters were extracted from the patients' chart. Of the 130 charts reviewed, the BQ identified 76 (58.5%) as being at high-risk of having sleep apnea, but overnight polysomnography found only 34 of the 130 patients (26.2%) had an RDI > 10. The BQ performed with 0.62 sensitivity and 0.43 specificity at the RDI > 10 level. Due to the low sensitivity and specificity as well as the large number of false negatives and positives, the Berlin questionnaire is not an appropriate instrument for identifying patients with sleep apnea in a sleep clinic population. PMID:17684781

  13. Fetal response to periodic sleep apnea: a new syndrome in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Joel-Cohen, S J; Schoenfeld, A

    1978-04-01

    Periodic sleep apnea, a chronic sleep deprivation state, in which marked changes in the arterial PO2 and PCO2 tensions have been recorded, is a relatively new syndrome not previously reported in pregnancy. It is characterized by episodes of apnea, prevalently obstructive, during sleep. The majority of patients with this syndrome have snored heavily for years, suggesting a causal relationship between snoring and periodic sleep apnea. The effects of prolonged snoring on alveolar ventilation and systemic pressure(s) suggest that this snoring has physiopathological implications on maternal cardio-respiratory reserve and indirectly upon the fetus, especially as there are recordable changes in fetal heart rate and also a change in the acid-base status of the fetus. The possibility that this syndrome may have an adverse effect upon the fetus is stressed. PMID:45501

  14. Nonrapid Eye Movement-Predominant Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Detection and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Motoo; Fujita, Yukio; Kumamoto, Makiko; Yoshikawa, Masanori; Ohnishi, Yoshinobu; Nakano, Hiroshi; Strohl, Kingman P.; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can be severe and present in higher numbers during rapid eye movement (REM) than nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep; however, OSA occurs in NREM sleep and can be predominant. In general, ventilation decreases an average 10% to 15% during transition from wakefulness to sleep, and there is variability in just how much ventilation decreases. As dynamic changes in ventilation contribute to irregular breathing and breathing during NREM sleep is mainly under chemical control, our hypothesis is that patients with a more pronounced reduction in ventilation during the transition from wakefulness to NREM sleep will have NREM- predominant rather than REM-predominant OSA. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 451 consecutive patients (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] > 5) undergoing diagnostic polysomnography was performed, and breath-to-breath analysis of the respiratory cycle duration, tidal volume, and estimated minute ventilation before and after sleep onset were examined. Values were calculated using respiratory inductance plethysmography. The correlation between the percent change in estimated minute ventilation during wake-sleep transitions and the percentage of apnea-hypopneas in NREM sleep (%AHI in NREM; defined as (AHI-NREM) / [(AHI-NREM) + (AHI-REM)] × 100) was the primary outcome. Results: The decrease in estimated minute ventilation during wake-sleep transitions was 15.0 ± 16.6% (mean ± standard deviation), due to a decrease in relative tidal volume. This decrease in estimated minute ventilation was significantly correlated with %AHI in NREM (r = −0.222, p < 0.01). Conclusions: A greater dynamic reduction in ventilation back and forth from wakefulness to sleep contributes to the NREM predominant OSA phenotype via induced ventilatory instability. Citation: Yamauchi M, Fujita Y, Kumamoto M, Yoshikawa M, Ohnishi Y, Nakano H, Strohl KP, Kimura H. Nonrapid eye movement-predominant obstructive sleep apnea: detection and mechanism. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(9):987–993. PMID:25845901

  15. Automatic detection of sleep apnea based on EEG detrended fluctuation analysis and support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Wu, Xiao-ming; Zeng, Wei-jie

    2015-12-01

    Sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) is prevalent in individuals and recently, there are many studies focus on using simple and efficient methods for SAS detection instead of polysomnography. However, not much work has been done on using nonlinear behavior of the electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. The purpose of this study is to find a novel and simpler method for detecting apnea patients and to quantify nonlinear characteristics of the sleep apnea. 30 min EEG scaling exponents that quantify power-law correlations were computed using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and compared between six SAS and six healthy subjects during sleep. The mean scaling exponents were calculated every 30 s and 360 control values and 360 apnea values were obtained. These values were compared between the two groups and support vector machine (SVM) was used to classify apnea patients. Significant difference was found between EEG scaling exponents of the two groups (p < 0.001). SVM was used and obtained high and consistent recognition rate: average classification accuracy reached 95.1% corresponding to the sensitivity 93.2% and specificity 98.6%. DFA of EEG is an efficient and practicable method and is helpful clinically in diagnosis of sleep apnea. PMID:25663167

  16. Association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chiner, Eusebi; Llombart, Mónica; Valls, Joan; Pastor, Esther; Sancho-Chust, José N.; Andreu, Ada Luz; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Barbé, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can predispose individuals to lower airway infections and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to upper airway microaspiration. This study evaluated the association between OSA and CAP. Methods We performed a case-control study that included 82 patients with CAP and 41 patients with other infections (control group). The controls were matched according to age, sex and body mass index (BMI). A respiratory polygraph (RP) was performed upon admission for patients in both groups. The severity of pneumonia was assessed according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). The associations between CAP and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), OSA, OSA severity and other sleep-related variables were evaluated using logistic regression models. The associations between OSA, OSA severity with CAP severity were evaluated with linear regression models and non-parametric tests. Findings No significant differences were found between CAP and control patients regarding anthropometric variables, toxic habits and risk factors for CAP. Patients with OSA, defined as individuals with an Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) ≥10, showed an increased risk of CAP (OR = 2·86, 95%CI 1·29–6·44, p = 0·01). Patients with severe OSA (AHI≥30) also had a higher risk of CAP (OR = 3·18, 95%CI 1·11–11·56, p = 0·047). In addition, OSA severity, defined according to the AHI quartile, was also significantly associated with CAP (p = 0·007). Furthermore, OSA was significantly associated with CAP severity (p = 0·0002), and OSA severity was also associated with CAP severity (p = 0·0006). Conclusions OSA and OSA severity are associated with CAP when compared to patients admitted to the hospital for non-respiratory infections. In addition, OSA and OSA severity are associated with CAP severity. These results support the potential role of OSA in the pathogenesis of CAP and could have clinical implications. This link between OSA and infection risk should be explored to investigate the relationships among gastroesophageal reflux, silent aspiration, laryngeal sensory dysfunction and CAP. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01071421 PMID:27050437

  17. Sleep-Related Painful Erections in a Patient With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abouda, Maher; Jomni, Taieb; Yangui, Ferdaws; Charfi, Mohamed Ridha; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Sleep-related painful erection (SRPE) is a rare sleep disorder characterized by recurrent, painful penile erections occurring when awakening from rapid eye movement sleep, while erections are painless during wakefulness. Almost 35 cases have been reported worldwide, and only two of them had an associated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We report a new case of a 61-year-old man suffering from SRPE associated with OSAS. The adequate treatment of respiratory events with continuous positive airway pressure did not alleviate the SRPE symptoms and excessive daytime sleepiness. The SRPE diagnosis was made by polysomnography coupled with video surveillance when the patient was referred to the sleep laboratory for residual excessive daytime sleepiness. The patient had 2-4 episodes of SRPE/night. Beta-blocker did not alleviate the SRPE, but a transient improvement was noted when the patient was treated with paroxetine. In contrast with the two previously published cases of SRPE plus OSAS, continuous positive airway treatment did not improve SRPE symptoms in our patient. PMID:26392186

  18. Independent Association between Sleep Fragmentation and Dyslipidemia in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yingjun; Yi, Hongliang; Zou, Jianyin; Meng, Lili; Tang, Xulan; Zhu, Huaming; Yu, Dongzhen; Zhou, Huiqun; Su, Kaiming; Guan, Jian; Yin, Shankai

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is independently associated with dyslipidemia. Previous studies have demonstrated that sleep fragmentation can impair lipid metabolism. The present study aimed to identify whether sleep fragmentation is independently associated with dyslipidemia, in a large-scale, clinic-based consecutive OSA sample. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 2,686 patients who underwent polysomnography (PSG) for suspicion of OSA from January 2008 to January 2013 at the sleep laboratory. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to evaluate the independent associations between the microarousal index (MAI) and lipid profiles adjusting for potential confounders, including metabolic syndrome components and nocturnal intermittent hypoxia. The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for various types of dyslipidemia according to MAI quartiles, as determined by logistic regression were also evaluated. MAI was found positively associated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) but not with total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c). Furthermore, the adjusted ORs (95% confidence interval) for hyper-LDL cholesterolemia increased across MAI quartiles, as follows: 1 (reference), 1.3 (1.1-1.7), 1.6 (1.2-2.0), and 1.6 (1.2-2.1) (p = 0.001, linear trend). Sleep fragmentation in OSA is independently associated with hyper-LDL cholesterolemia, which may predispose patients with OSA to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27184822

  19. Acute Exacerbation of Sleep Apnea by Hyperoxia Impairs Cognitive Flexibility in Brown-Norway Rats

    PubMed Central

    Topchiy, Irina; Amodeo, Dionisio A.; Ragozzino, Michael E.; Waxman, Jonathan; Radulovacki, Miodrag; Carley, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine whether learning deficits occur during acute exacerbation of spontaneous sleep related breathing disorder (SRBD) in rats with high (Brown Norway; BN) and low (Zucker Lean; ZL) apnea propensity. Design: Spatial acquisition (3 days) and reversal learning (3 days) in the Morris water maze (MWM) with polysomnography (12:00–08:00): (1) with acute SRBD exacerbation (by 20-h hyperoxia immediately preceding reversal learning) or (2) without SRBD exacerbation (room air throughout). Setting: Randomized, placebo-controlled, repeated-measures design. Participants: 14 BN rats; 16 ZL rats. Interventions: 20-h hyperoxia. Measurements and Results: Apneas were detected as cessation of respiration ≥ 2 sec. Swim latency in MWM, apnea indices (AI; apneas/hour of sleep) and percentages of recording time for nonrapid eye movement (NREM), rapid eye movement (REM), and total sleep were assessed. Baseline AI in BN rats was more than double that of ZL rats (22.46 ± 2.27 versus 10.7 ± 0.9, P = 0.005). Hyperoxia increased AI in both BN (34.3 ± 7.4 versus 22.46 ± 2.27) and ZL rats (15.4 ± 2.7 versus 10.7 ± 0.9) without changes in sleep stage percentages. Control (room air) BN and ZL rats exhibited equivalent acquisition and reversal learning. Acute exacerbation of AI by hyperoxia produced a reversal learning performance deficit in BN but not ZL rats. In addition, the percentage of REM sleep and REM apnea index in BN rats during hyperoxia negatively correlated with reversal learning performance. Conclusions: Acute exacerbation of sleep related breathing disorder by hyperoxia impairs reversal learning in a rat strain with high apnea propensity, but not a strain with a low apnea propensity. This suggests a non-linear threshold effect may contribute to the relationships between sleep apnea and cognitive dysfunctions, but strain-specific differences also may be important. Citation: Topchiy I, Amodeo DA, Ragozzino ME, Waxman J, Radulovacki M, Carley DW. Acute exacerbation of sleep apnea by hyperoxia impairs cognitive flexibility in brown-norway rats. SLEEP 2014;37(11):1851-1861. PMID:25364080

  20. Influence of obstructive sleep apnea on serum butyrylcholinesterase activity and ischemia-modified albumin levels

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu-Xue; Ma, Shao-Gang; Liu, Hong; Xu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of obstructive sleep apnea and continuous positive airway pressure treatment on serum butyrylcholinesterase activity and ischemia-modified albumin levels. METHODS: Thirty-two patients with obstructive sleep apnea and 30 age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled and underwent a diagnostic polysomnogram. The serum butyrylcholinesterase activity, ischemia-modified albumin levels, metabolic parameters, and polysomnography scores were detected and evaluated. Nine patients were studied before and after treatment with continuous positive airway pressure. RESULTS: The serum ischemia-modified albumin levels were significantly higher and the butyrylcholinesterase activity was significantly lower in patients with obstructive sleep apnea than in the controls (p<0.001). The continuous positive airway pressure treatment decreased the modified albumin levels and elevated the buthrylcholinesterase activity (p = 0.019 and p = 0.023, respectively). The modified albumin levels were positively correlated with the apnea-hypopnea index (r = 0.462, p = 0.008) at baseline. Elevated ischemia-modified albumin levels can be more accurate than butyrylcholinesterase activity at reflecting the presence of obstructive sleep apnea. Receiver operating characteristic curves revealed a significant difference between the areas under the curve 0.916 for ischemia-modified albumin and 0.777 for butyrylcholinesterase (z = 2.154, p = 0.031). CONCLUSION: The elevated ischemia-modified albumin level was significantly associated with obstructive sleep apnea and was more sensitive than butyrylcholinesterase activity in reflecting obstructive sleep apnea. The continuous positive airway pressure treatment helped to ameliorate the imbalance. PMID:23917661

  1. Is Technologist Review of Raw Data Necessary after Home Studies for Sleep Apnea?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Devin L.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Hegeman, Garnett; Smith, Melinda A.; Garcia, Nelda M.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: As the importance of portable monitors for detection of sleep apnea increases, efficient and cost-minimizing methods for data interpretation are needed. We sought to compare in stroke patients, for whom portable studies often have particular advantages, results from a cardiopulmonary monitoring device with and without manual edits by a polysomnographic technologist. Methods: Participants in an ongoing stroke surveillance study in Corpus Christi, Texas, underwent sleep apnea assessments with the ApneaLink Plus device within 45 days of stroke onset. Recordings were analyzed by the device's software unedited, and again after edits were made to the raw data by a registered polysomnographic technologist. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated, with the edited data as the reference standard. Sleep apnea was defined by 3 different apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) thresholds: ≥ 5, ≥ 10, and ≥ 15. Results: Among 327 subjects, 54% were male, 59% were Hispanic, and the median age was 65 years (interquartile range: 57, 77). The median AHI for the unedited data was 9 (4, 22), and for the edited data was 13 (6, 27) (p < 0.01). Specificity was above 98% for each AHI cutoff, while sensitivity was 81% to 82%. For each cutoff threshold, the edited data yielded a higher proportion of positive sleep apnea screens (p < 0.01) by approximately 10% in each group. Conclusions: For stroke patients assessed with a cardiopulmonary monitoring device, manual editing by a technologist appears likely to improve sensitivity, whereas specificity of unedited data is already excellent. Citation: Brown DL; Chervin RD; Hegeman G; Smith MA; Garcia NM; Morgenstern LB; Lisabeth LD. Is technologist review of raw data necessary after home studies for sleep apnea? J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(4):371-375. PMID:24733981

  2. Sleep Apnea, Sleep Disturbance, and Fasting Glucose Variability: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tatti, Patrizio; Strollo, Felice; Passali, Desiderio

    2013-01-01

    Background Disturbed sleep and nocturnal altered breathing are related to disturbances of glucose metabolism. The present uncontrolled observational study explores the role of these factors on the variability of fasting glycemia. Methods The number and duration of nocturnal awakenings and the fasting glycemia of 97 patients with type 2 diabetes treated with diet, metformin, or gliptins were recorded over seven consecutive days. During the same time period, the main respiratory indexesoxygen disturbance index, apnea/hypopnea index, and respiratory disturbance indexwere recorded for one night. Results The three respiratory indexes and the number of nocturnal awakenings are highly correlated with the coefficient of variation of the fasting blood glucose recorded over the 7-day period at p <.005 level. A multiple regression analysis showed that the variables in the model explained 86% of the variability. Results Respiratory/sleep disturbances appear to be modulators superimposed on blood glucose levels determined by other factors. PMID:23759408

  3. Is Mixed Apnea Associated with Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep a Reversible Compensatory Sign of Heart Failure?

    PubMed

    Korostovtseva, Lyudmila; Sazonova, Yulia; Zvartau, Nadezhda; Semenov, Andrey; Nepran, Viktoriya; Bochkarev, Mikhail; Nikolaev, German; Mitrofanova, Lyubov; Sviryaev, Yurii; Gordeev, Mikhail; Konradi, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sleep-disordered breathing is common in heart failure (HF), and prolonged circulation time and diminished pulmonary volume are considered the main possible causes of sleep apnea in these patients. However, the impact and interrelation between sleep apnea and HF development are unclear. We report the case of a patient with complete elimination of non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep-associated mixed apnea in HF after heart transplantation. CASE REPORT After unsuccessful 12-month conventional treatment with abrupt exacerbation of biventricular HF IV class (according to New York Heart Association Functional Classification), a 26-year-old man was admitted to the hospital. Based on a comprehensive examination including endomyocardial biopsy, dilated cardiomyopathy was diagnosed. Heart transplantation was considered the only possible treatment strategy. Polysomnography showed severe NREM sleep-associated mixed sleep apnea [apnea-hypopnea index 43/h, in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep 3.7/h, in NREM sleep 56.4/h, mean SatO2 93.9%], and periodic breathing. One-month post-transplantation polysomnography did not show sleep-disordered breathing (apnea-hypopnea index 1.0/h; in REM sleep - 2.8/h, in NREM sleep 0.5/h, mean SatO2 97.5%). The patient was discharged from the hospital in improved condition. CONCLUSIONS NREM sleep-associated mixed apnea occurring in severe systolic HF due to dilated cardiomyopathy might be reversible in case of successful HF treatment. We suggest that mixed sleep apnea strongly associated with NREM sleep occurs in HF, when the brain centers regulating ventilation are intact, and successful HF compensation might be highly effective regarding sleep-breathing disorders without non-invasive ventilation. This is important to know, especially with regard to the recently published data of potentially unfavorable effects of adaptive servoventilation in systolic HF, and the lack of other treatment options. PMID:26681187

  4. The Relationship of Daytime Hypoxemia and Nocturnal Hypoxia in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fanfulla, Francesco; Grassi, Mario; Taurino, Anna Eugenia; Lupo, Nadia D'Artavilla; Trentin, Rossella

    2008-01-01

    Question of the study: Prevalence and determinants of daytime hypoxemia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome are not well established. The aims of this study, conducted in a large series of OSA patients, were to estimate the prevalence of daytime hypoxemia, to assess the reciprocal effects between daytime PaO2 and nocturnal SpO2, and to investigate the direct and indirect role of sleep apnea severity in determining feedback gas exchange abnormalities. Materials and methods: In 456 patients a daytime hypoxemia-nocturnal hypoxia feedback structural equations model was designed. PaO2 adjusted for age (% of predicted), percent sleep time spent with SpO2 <90% (TST90), oxygen desaturation index and the apnea-hypopnea index, were determined as the measures of daytime hypoxemia, nocturnal hypoxia, and sleep apnea severity, respectively, after adjusting for the severity of obesity and lung volumes. Results: The TST90-PaO2 feed-back structural equations modeling showed that daytime PaO2 was inversely related (P<0.001) to nocturnal hypoxia (−4.0% of PaO2 per 1 SD of TST90). The severity of OSA (−1.0%) was an indirect determinant of daytime PaO2 via the TST90 pathway. In contrast, daytime PaO2 did not influence (P>0.05) the extent of nocturnal hypoxia. Conclusions: In OSA patients, the extent of nocturnal hypoxia seems to be both a direct determinant and a mediator of the indirect effect of sleep apnea on the development of daytime hypoxemia. Citation: Fanfulla F; Grassi M; Taurino AE; Lupo ND; Trentin R. The relationship of daytime hypoxemia and nocturnal hypoxia in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. SLEEP 2008;31(2):249–255. PMID:18274273

  5. Mini Tracheostomy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An Evidence Based Proposal.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Macario; Zaghi, Soroush; Chang, Edward T; Song, Sungjin A; Szelestey, Blake; Certal, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To search for articles evaluating the use of tracheostomies (either permanent stomas or tracheostomy tubes) in adult obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients and to evaluate the potential for the use of mini tracheostomies as treatment for OSA. Study Design. Systematic review. Methods. Nine databases were searched from inception through July 21, 2015. Results. The overall tracheostomy search yielded 516 articles, of which eighteen studies provided polysomnographic data. No study was identified (empty review) for the use of mini tracheostomies for treating OSA. The mini tracheostomy search yielded ninety-five articles which describe findings for either mini tracheostomy kits (inner cannula diameter of 4 mm) or the performance of mini tracheotomies. Six articles described the use of mini tracheostomies as a temporary procedure to relieve acute upper airway obstruction and none described the use for OSA. For tracheostomy stomal sites, suturing the skin directly to the tracheal rings with defatting can minimize stomal site collapse. The smallest tracheostomy stomal size that can successfully treat OSA has not been described. Conclusion. Mini tracheostomies as small as 4 mm have been successfully used in the short term to relieve upper airway obstruction. Given that polysomnography data are lacking, additional research is needed. PMID:26925105

  6. Regional cerebral blood flow alterations in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Santosh K.; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M.; Richardson, Heidi L.; Wang, Danny J.J.; Woo, Mary A.; Harper, Ronald M.

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a condition characterized by upper airway muscle atonia with continued diaphragmatic efforts, resulting in repeated airway obstructions, periods of intermittent hypoxia, large thoracic pressure changes, and substantial shifts in arterial pressure with breathing cessation and resumption. The hypoxic exposure and hemodynamic changes likely induce the structural and functional deficits found in multiple brain areas, as shown by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures. Altered cerebral blood flow (CBF) may contribute to these localized deficits; thus, we examined regional CBF, using arterial spin labeling procedures, in 11 OSA (age, 49.112.2 years; 7 male) and 16 control subjects (42.310.2 years; 6 male) with a 3.0-Tesla MRI scanner. CBF maps were calculated, normalized to a common space, and regional CBF values across the brain quantified. Lowered CBF values emerged near multiple bilateral brain sites in OSA, including the corticospinal tracts, superior cerebellar peduncles, and pontocerebellar fibers. Lateralized, decreased CBF appeared near the left inferior cerebellar peduncles, left tapetum, left dorsal fornix/stria terminalis, right medial lemniscus, right red nucleus, right midbrain, and midline pons. Regional CBF values in OSA are significantly reduced in major sensory and motor fiber systems and motor regulatory sites, especially in structures mediating motor coordination; those reductions are often lateralized. The asymmetric CBF declines in motor regulatory areas may contribute to loss of coordination between upper airway and diaphragmatic musculature, and lead to further damage in the syndrome. PMID:24076138

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Surgery: Quality Improvement Imperatives and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Julie L.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is more common in surgical candidates than in the general population and may increase susceptibility to perioperative complications that range from transient desaturation to catastrophic injuries. Understanding the potential impact of OSA on patients’ surgical risk profile is of particular interest to otolaryngologists, who routinely perform airway procedures—including surgical procedures for treatment of OSA. Whereas the effects of OSA on long-term health outcomes are well documented, the relationship between OSA and surgical risk is not collinear, and clear consensus on the nature of the association is lacking. Better guidelines for optimization of pain control, perioperative monitoring, and surgical decision making are potential areas for quality improvement efforts. Many interventions have been suggested to mitigate the risk of adverse events in surgical patients with OSA, but wide variations in clinical practice remain. We review the current literature, emphasizing recent progress in understanding the complex pathophysiologic interactions noted in OSA patients undergoing surgery and outlining potential strategies to decrease perioperative risks. PMID:25013745

  8. Mini Tracheostomy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An Evidence Based Proposal

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Macario; Zaghi, Soroush; Chang, Edward T.; Song, Sungjin A.; Szelestey, Blake; Certal, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To search for articles evaluating the use of tracheostomies (either permanent stomas or tracheostomy tubes) in adult obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients and to evaluate the potential for the use of mini tracheostomies as treatment for OSA. Study Design. Systematic review. Methods. Nine databases were searched from inception through July 21, 2015. Results. The overall tracheostomy search yielded 516 articles, of which eighteen studies provided polysomnographic data. No study was identified (empty review) for the use of mini tracheostomies for treating OSA. The mini tracheostomy search yielded ninety-five articles which describe findings for either mini tracheostomy kits (inner cannula diameter of 4 mm) or the performance of mini tracheotomies. Six articles described the use of mini tracheostomies as a temporary procedure to relieve acute upper airway obstruction and none described the use for OSA. For tracheostomy stomal sites, suturing the skin directly to the tracheal rings with defatting can minimize stomal site collapse. The smallest tracheostomy stomal size that can successfully treat OSA has not been described. Conclusion. Mini tracheostomies as small as 4 mm have been successfully used in the short term to relieve upper airway obstruction. Given that polysomnography data are lacking, additional research is needed. PMID:26925105

  9. Obstructive sleep apnea: management considerations in psychiatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Taryn; Zolezzi, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are often comorbid. However, there is limited information on the impact of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms, on how to manage psychiatric pharmacotherapy in patients presenting with OSA, or on the effectiveness and challenges of OSA treatments in patients with comorbid mental illness. As such, the objective of this article is to provide an overview of some epidemiological aspects of OSA and treatment considerations in the management of OSA in individuals with comorbid psychiatric disorders. Predefined keywords were used to search for relevant literature in electronic databases. Data show that OSA is particularly prevalent in patients with psychiatric disorders. The medical care that patients with these comorbidities require can be challenging, as some of the psychiatric medications used by these patients may exacerbate OSA symptoms. As such, continuous positive airway pressure continues to be the first-line treatment, even in patients with psychiatric comorbidity. However, more controlled studies are required, particularly to determine continuous positive airway pressure compliance in patients with mental illness, the impact of treating OSA on psychiatric symptoms, and the impact of the use of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms. PMID:26508864

  10. Disparities and genetic risk factors in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Katherine A; Patel, Sanjay R

    2016-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an increasingly prevalent condition. A growing body of literature supports substantial racial disparities in the prevalence, risk factors, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this disease. Craniofacial structure among Asians appears to confer an elevated risk of OSA despite lower rates of obesity. Among African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics, OSA prevalence is increased, likely due in part to obesity. The burden of symptoms, particularly excessive daytime sleepiness, is higher among African Americans, although Hispanics more often report snoring. Limited data suggest that African Americans may be more susceptible to hypertension in the setting of OSA. While differences in genetic risk factors may explain disparities in OSA burden, no definitive genetic differences have yet been identified. In addition to disparities in OSA development, disparities in OSA diagnosis and treatment have also been identified. Increased severity of disease at diagnosis among African Americans suggests a delay in diagnosis. Treatment outcomes are also suboptimal among African Americans. In children, tonsillectomy is less likely to cure OSA and more commonly associated with complications in this group. Among adults, adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is substantially lower in African Americans. The reasons for these disparities, particularly in outcomes, are not well understood and should be a research priority. PMID:26428843

  11. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Hypertension, and Their Additive Effects on Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Mario Francesco; Zito, Annapaola; Carratù, Pierluigi; Falcone, Vito Antonio; Bega, Elioda; Scicchitano, Pietro; Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Resta, Onofrio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims. It is widely accepted that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is independently associated with atherosclerosis. Similar to OSA, hypertension (HTN) is a condition associated with atherosclerosis. However, to date, the impact of the simultaneous presence of OSA and HTN on the risk of atherosclerosis has not been extensively studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the consequences of the coexistence of OSA and HTN on carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and on inflammatory markers of atherosclerosis (such as interleukin- [IL-] 6 and pentraxin- [PTX-] 3). Methods. The study design allowed us to define 4 groups: (1) controls (n = 30); (2) OSA patients without HTN (n = 30); (3) HTN patients without OSA (n = 30); (4) patients with OSA and HTN (n = 30). In the morning after portable monitoring (between 7 am and 8 am), blood samples were collected, and carotid IMT was measured. Results. Carotid IMT, IL-6, and PTX-3 in OSA normotensive patients and in non-OSA HTN subjects were significantly higher compared to control subjects; in addition, in OSA hypertensive patients they were significantly increased compared to OSA normotensive, non-OSA HTN, or control subjects. Conclusions. OSA and HTN have an additive role in the progression of carotid atherosclerosis and in blood levels of inflammatory markers for atherosclerosis, such as interleukin-6 and pentraxin-3. PMID:26697221

  12. Reactive Oxygen Species and the Brain in Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Shelley XL; Gozal, David

    2010-01-01

    Rodents exposed to intermittent hypoxia (IH), a model of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), manifest impaired learning and memory and somnolence. Increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative tissue damage, and apoptotic neuronal cell death are associated with the presence of IH-induced CNS dysfunction. Furthermore, treatment with antioxidants or overexpression of antioxidant enzymes is neuroprotective during IH. These findings mimic clinical cases of OSA and suggest that ROS may play a key causal role in OSA-induced neuropathology. Controlled production of ROS occurs in multiple subcellular compartments of normal cells and de-regulation of such processes may result in excessive ROS production. The mitochondrial electron transport chain, especially complexes I and III, and the NADPH oxidase in the cellular membrane are the two main sources of ROS in brain cells, although other systems, including xanthine oxidase, phospholipase A2, lipoxygenase, cyclooxygenase, and cytochrome P450, may all play a role. The initial evidence for NADPH oxidase and mitochondrial involvement in IH-induced ROS production and neuronal injury unquestionably warrants future research efforts. PMID:20833273

  13. Cognitive profile and brain morphological changes in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Torelli, Federico; Moscufo, Nicola; Garreffa, Girolamo; Placidi, Fabio; Romigi, Andrea; Zannino, Silvana; Bozzali, Marco; Fasano, Fabrizio; Giulietti, Giovanni; Djonlagic, Ina; Malhotra, Atul; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Guttmann, Charles RG

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is accompanied by neurocognitive impairment, likely mediated by injury to various brain regions. We evaluated brain morphological changes in patients with OSA and their relationship to neuropsychological and oximetric data. Sixteen patients affected by moderate-severe OSA (age: 55.86.7 years, 13 males) and fourteen control subjects (age: 57.65.1 years, 9 males) underwent 3.0 Tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing evaluating short and long-term memory, executive functions, language, attention, praxia and non-verbal learning. Volumetric segmentation of cortical and subcortical structures and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) were performed. Patients and controls differed significantly in Rey Auditory- Verbal Learning test (immediate and delayed recall), Stroop test and Digit span backward scores. Volumes of cortical gray matter (GM), right hippocampus, right and left caudate were smaller in patients compared to controls, with also brain parenchymal fraction (a normalized measure of cerebral atrophy) approaching statistical significance. Differences remained significant after controlling for comorbidities (hypertension, diabetes, smoking, hypercholesterolemia). VBM analysis showed regions of decreased GM volume in right and left hippocampus and within more lateral temporal areas in patients with OSA. Our findings indicate that the significant cognitive impairment seen in patients with moderate-severe OSA is associated with brain tissue damage in regions involved in several cognitive tasks. We conclude that OSA can increase brain susceptibility to the effects of aging and other clinical and pathological occurrences. PMID:20888921

  14. Gender-Specific Impacts of Apnea, Age, and BMI on Parasympathetic Nerve Dysfunction during Sleep in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Yuji; Ohki, Noboru; Satoya, Natsumi; Inoue, Fukumi; Maeda, Yoshiko; Sekiguchi, Haruki; Suzuki, Mayumi; Tsuji, Takao; Aoshiba, Kazutetsu; Nagai, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Background The gender-specific influences of various confounding factors, including apnea, age, BMI, and cigarette consumption, on the function of the parasympathetic nerve system (PNS) during sleep in OSA patients has never been investigated. Methods One hundred ninety-seven males and 63 females with OSA were subjected to full PSG examinations including assessment of R-R intervals (RRIs) during an overnight ECG. The PNS-derived modulatory effect on the RRIs and the variability of this effect were quantified during REM and NREM using instantaneous time-frequency analysis with complex demodulation. The spectral domain with the maximum instantaneous amplitude in the high-frequency band between 0.15 and 0.4 Hz was defined as the main HF peak and used as a surrogate marker of PNS discharge. Based on density-spectrum-array maps of the main HF peaks (HF-DSA map), shifts in the central frequency of the main HF peak over time were continuously observed. When the main HF peaks on the HF-DSA maps maintained the same central frequency for more than 20 sec or 5 min, the PNS functions were considered to be “stable” or “very stable”, respectively. Results Apneas enhanced PNS-derived cardiac-modulation during REM in males, but more importantly, they made PNS-function unstable during both REM and NREM in males and during NREM in females. Aging blunted the PNS-derived cardiac-modulation during both REM and NREM regardless of gender, but aging had no impact on the stability of PNS-function. BMI blunted PNS-eliciting cardiac-modulation during REM in males and during NREM in both males and females. BMI made the PNS unstable during REM in females. Neither height nor cigarette consumption influenced any PNS-related parameter. Conclusions The PNS-derived cardiac-modulation was generally inhibited by aging and obesity, in which the effect of obesity was gender-specific. The PNS instability at nighttime was mainly induced by apneas but by obesity particularly during REM in females. PMID:24667894

  15. Interrelationships between obesity, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and cardiovascular risk in obese adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Dorit; Chirinos, Julio A.; Levitt Katz, Lorraine E.; Mohler, Emile R.; Gallagher, Paul R.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Marcus, Carole L.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may be a cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor independently of obesity in adults. Pediatric studies have associated OSAS with endothelial dysfunction, but few studies have examined relationships between OSAS and macrovascular sequelae. Our objective was to examine OSASs independent contribution to macrovascular CVD risk measures in obese adolescents. Subjects/Methods This cross-sectional observational study was conducted at Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia Clinical Research and Academic Sleep Centers, and University of Pennsylvania Vascular Research Unit. 31 obese non-diabetic adolescents underwent anthropometric measurements, overnight polysomnography, fasting laboratory draw, and cardiovascular imaging. Cardiovascular outcome measures included maximal carotid intima-media thickness (cIMTmax), a measure of carotid structural changes, and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CFPWV), an aortic stiffness measure whose relationship vis--vis OSAS in children has not been previously examined. Carotid diameter and augmentation index (AIx, measuring central pressure augmentation from wave reflections) were assessed. Potential confounding variables examined included blood pressure, lipoproteins, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, insulin and glucose. Results The apnea hypopnea index, a primary OSAS measure, was not associated with cIMTmax, carotid diameter, CFPWV or AIx. BMI associated positively with cIMTmax (r=0.52, p=0.006) and CFPWV (r=0.45, p=0.01). Mean asleep end-tidal CO2 was negatively associated with carotid diameter (r=?0.63, p<0.0005). Insulin levels were negatively associated with AIx (r=?0.53, p=0.02). Conclusions OSAS did not predict carotid structural changes or arterial stiffness independently of BMI in obese adolescents. Higher insulin levels associated with lower central pressure wave augmentation. Finally, long-term hypercapnia may predispose to carotid narrowing. PMID:25913504

  16. Sleep-related changes in autonomic control in obstructive sleep apnea: a model-based perspective.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Michael C K; Blasi, Anna

    2013-09-15

    This paper reviews our current understanding of the long-term effects of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on cardiovascular autonomic function in humans, focusing directly on the knowledge derived from noninvasive measurements of heart rate, beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP), and respiration during wakefulness and sleep. While heart rate variability (HRV) as a means of autonomic assessment has become ubiquitous, there are serious limitations with the conventional time-domain and spectral methods of analysis. These shortcomings can be overcome with the application of a multivariate mathematical model that incorporates BP, respiration and other external factors as physiological sources of HRV. Using this approach, we have found that: (a) both respiratory-cardiac coupling and baroreflex dynamics are impaired in OSA; (b) continuous positive airway pressure therapy partially restores autonomic function; (c) baroreflex gain, which increases during sleep in normals, remains unchanged or decreases in OSA subjects; and (d) the autonomic changes that accompany transient arousal from NREM sleep in normals are largely absent in patients with OSA. PMID:23707878

  17. Evidence of neurodegeneration in obstructive sleep apnea: Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and cognitive dysfunction in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of dementia and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) increases with age. Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease of the elderly characterized by amyloid β (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The disease involves widespread synaptic loss in the neocortex and the hippocampus. Rodent and clinical studies suggest that OSA impairs the structural integrity of several brain regions, including the medial temporal lobe. Indeed, hypoxia, hypertension, hypoperfusion, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and oxidative stress noted in OSA patients also occur in AD patients. This Review highlights pathological commonality, showing that OSA upregulates Aβ, tau hyperphosphorylation, and synaptic dysfunction. Indeed, OSA and hypertension trigger hypoperfusion and hypometabolism of brain regions, including cortex and hippocampus. Several studies show that hypertension-driven brain damage and pathogenic mechanisms lead to an Aβ increase. The pathophysiological mechanism by which OSA enhances hypertension may be linked to sympathoexcitation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction. Strong pathophysiological similarities that exist between OSA and AD are underscored here. For example, the hippocampus is negatively impacted in both OSA and AD. OSA promotes hippocampal atrophy, which is associated with memory impairment. Cognitive impairment, even in the absence of manifest dementia, is an important independent predictor of mortality. However, several pathophysiological mechanisms in OSA are reversible with appropriate therapy. OSA, therefore, is a modifiable risk factor of cognitive dysfunction, and treating OSA prior to mild cognitive impairment may be an effective prevention strategy to reduce risk for cognitive decline and AD in middle-aged persons and the elderly. PMID:26301370

  18. Sleep apnea in rheumatoid arthritis patients with occipitocervical lesions: the prevalence and associated radiographic features

    PubMed Central

    Shoda, Naoki; Seichi, Atsushi; Takeshita, Katsushi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Ono, Takashi; Oka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Kozo

    2009-01-01

    Since sleep apnea is a risk factor for high mortality of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, this study examined the prevalence in RA patients with occipitocervical lesions, and the associated radiographic features. Twenty-nine RA patients requiring surgery for progressive myelopathy due to occipitocervical lesions (3 males, 26 females, average age 65 years) were preoperatively evaluated. Twenty-three (79%) had sleep apnea defined as apnea–hypopnea index >5 events per hour measured by a portable monitoring device, and all of them were classified as the obstructive type. Among gender, age, bone mass index (BMI), and radiographic parameters related to occipitocervical lesions: atlantodental interval (ADI), cervical angles (O/C1, C1/2, and C2/6), and cervical lengths (O–C2 and O–C6), the ADI and cervical lengths were shown to be significantly associated with the presence of sleep apnea by parametric statistical analysis. Since there were positive correlations between the ADI and cervical lengths by Pearson’s test, we performed a multivariate logistic regression analysis after adjustment for confounding factors and found that small ADI was the principle parameter associated with sleep apnea. We therefore conclude that the prevalence of sleep apnea is higher than that in a general RA population that was reported previously, and believe that occipitocervical lesions are an independent risk factor for this condition. Small ADI and short neck, secondary to the vertical translocation by RA, may cause obstructive sleep apnea, probably through mechanical or neurological collapse of the upper airway. PMID:19365641

  19. The Clinical Effect of Acupuncture in the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zheng-tao; Jiang, Wen-xiu; Huang, Jun-ming; Zhang, Jin-ming; Chen, An-min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study aims to determine the clinical efficacy of acupuncture therapy in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. Methods. A systematic literature search was conducted in five databases including PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Wanfang, and CNKI to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effect of acupuncture therapy for obstructive sleep apnea. Meta-analysis was conducted using the RevMan version 5.3 software. Results. Six RCTs involving 362 subjects were included in our study. Compared with control groups, manual acupuncture (MA) was more effective in the improvement of apnea/hypopnea index (AHI), apnea index, hypopnea index, and mean SaO2. Electroacupuncture (EA) was better in improving the AHI and apnea index when compared with control treatment, but no statistically significant differences in hypopnea index and mean SaO2 were found. In the comparison of MA and nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the results favored MA in the improvement of AHI; there was no statistical difference in the improvement in mean SaO2. No adverse events associated with acupuncture therapy were documented. Conclusion. Compared to control groups, both MA and EA were more effective in improving AHI and mean SaO2. In addition, MA could further improve apnea index and hypopnea index compared to control. PMID:27127530

  20. Prevalence of Treatment Choices for Snoring and Sleep Apnea in an Australian Population

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Nathaniel S.; Bartlett, Delwyn J; Matharu, Kabir S; Williams, Anthony; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence of treatment and diagnosis of snoring and sleep apnea in the population of New South Wales Australia. Methods: Postal survey of 10,000 people randomly selected from the electoral roll, half aged 18 to 24 and half aged 25 to 64, with telephone follow-up for some nonresponders. Weighted prevalences are reported. Results The overall response rate was 35.6% (18–24 n = 1421 and 25–64 n = 1879). One hundred and fifty-nine respondents reported seeking medical help for snoring or sleep apnea (6.3%, 95% confidence interval 5.46–7.12%), with 133 of these being aged 25 to 64. Fifty-one respondents reported subsequent treatment (2.0%; 95% CI 1.49–2.43), with some reporting more than 1 treatment. Continuous positive airway pressure was received in 17 cases, mandibular advancement splints in 9 cases, and upper airway or nasal surgery in 31 cases. Eighty-six reported receiving an overnight sleep study (polysomnography). Most surgical patients did not report having their sleep measured with a sleep study (22/31). Conclusions: The population of New South Wales has had the longest potential exposure to continuous positive airway pressure. However, few of those in even the middle-aged group reported ever being recommended continuous positive airway pressure treatment. It is more common to have a surgical intervention for snoring or sleep apnea. Surprisingly, most surgical patients do not report any associated sleep study to quantify their snoring or sleep apnea or measure the efficacy of surgery. Since a substantial proportion of patients who experience snoring and sleep apnea are not assessed via a sleep study, it is necessary to increase awareness of undergoing such clinical procedures. Citation: Marshall NS; Bartlett DJ; Matharu KS; Williams A; Grunstein RR. Prevalence of treatment choices for snoring and sleep apnea in an Australian population. J Clin Sleep Med 2007;3(7):695–699. PMID:18198802

  1. Congestive Heart Failure and Central Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Sands, Scott A; Owens, Robert L

    2016-03-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is among the most common causes of admission to hospitals in the United States, especially in those over age 65. Few data exist regarding the prevalence CHF of Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) owing to congestive heart failure in the intensive care unit (ICU). Nevertheless, CSR is expected to be highly prevalent among those with CHF. Treatment should focus on the underlying mechanisms by which CHF increases loop gain and promotes unstable breathing. Few data are available to determine prevalence of CSR in the ICU, or how CSR might affect clinical management and weaning from mechanical ventilation. PMID:26972039

  2. Length of Individual Apnea Events Is Increased by Supine Position and Modulated by Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Töyräs, Juha; Muraja-Murro, Anu; Kupari, Salla; Tiihonen, Pekka; Mervaala, Esa; Kulkas, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Positional obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common among OSA patients. In severe OSA, the obstruction events are longer in supine compared to nonsupine positions. Corresponding scientific information on mild and moderate OSA is lacking. We studied whether individual obstruction and desaturation event severity is increased in supine position in all OSA severity categories and whether the severity of individual events is linked to OSA severity categories. Polygraphic recordings of 2026 patients were retrospectively analyzed. The individual apnea, and hypopnea durations and desaturation event depth, duration, and area of 526 included patients were compared between supine and nonsupine positions in different OSA severity categories. Apnea events were 6.3%, 12.5%, and 11.1% longer (p < 0.001) in supine compared to nonsupine position in mild, moderate, and severe OSA categories, respectively. In moderate and severe OSA categories desaturation areas were 5.7% and 25.5% larger (p < 0.001) in supine position. In both positions the individual event severity was elevated along increasing OSA severity category (p < 0.05). Supine position elevates apnea duration in all and desaturation area in moderate and severe OSA severity categories. This might be more hazardous for supine OSA patients and therefore, estimation of clinical severity of OSA should incorporate also information about individual event characteristics besides AHI. PMID:27051535

  3. Rules for scoring respiratory events in sleep: update of the 2007 AASM Manual for the Scoring of Sleep and Associated Events. Deliberations of the Sleep Apnea Definitions Task Force of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

    PubMed

    Berry, Richard B; Budhiraja, Rohit; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Gozal, David; Iber, Conrad; Kapur, Vishesh K; Marcus, Carole L; Mehra, Reena; Parthasarathy, Sairam; Quan, Stuart F; Redline, Susan; Strohl, Kingman P; Davidson Ward, Sally L; Tangredi, Michelle M

    2012-10-15

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) Sleep Apnea Definitions Task Force reviewed the current rules for scoring respiratory events in the 2007 AASM Manual for the Scoring and Sleep and Associated Events to determine if revision was indicated. The goals of the task force were (1) to clarify and simplify the current scoring rules, (2) to review evidence for new monitoring technologies relevant to the scoring rules, and (3) to strive for greater concordance between adult and pediatric rules. The task force reviewed the evidence cited by the AASM systematic review of the reliability and validity of scoring respiratory events published in 2007 and relevant studies that have appeared in the literature since that publication. Given the limitations of the published evidence, a consensus process was used to formulate the majority of the task force recommendations concerning revisions.The task force made recommendations concerning recommended and alternative sensors for the detection of apnea and hypopnea to be used during diagnostic and positive airway pressure (PAP) titration polysomnography. An alternative sensor is used if the recommended sensor fails or the signal is inaccurate. The PAP device flow signal is the recommended sensor for the detection of apnea, hypopnea, and respiratory effort related arousals (RERAs) during PAP titration studies. Appropriate filter settings for recording (display) of the nasal pressure signal to facilitate visualization of inspiratory flattening are also specified. The respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) signals to be used as alternative sensors for apnea and hypopnea detection are specified. The task force reached consensus on use of the same sensors for adult and pediatric patients except for the following: (1) the end-tidal PCO(2) signal can be used as an alternative sensor for apnea detection in children only, and (2) polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) belts can be used to monitor respiratory effort (thoracoabdominal belts) and as an alternative sensor for detection of apnea and hypopnea (PVDFsum) only in adults.The task force recommends the following changes to the 2007 respiratory scoring rules. Apnea in adults is scored when there is a drop in the peak signal excursion by ≥ 90% of pre-event baseline using an oronasal thermal sensor (diagnostic study), PAP device flow (titration study), or an alternative apnea sensor, for ≥ 10 seconds. Hypopnea in adults is scored when the peak signal excursions drop by ≥ 30% of pre-event baseline using nasal pressure (diagnostic study), PAP device flow (titration study), or an alternative sensor, for ≥ 10 seconds in association with either ≥ 3% arterial oxygen desaturation or an arousal. Scoring a hypopnea as either obstructive or central is now listed as optional, and the recommended scoring rules are presented. In children an apnea is scored when peak signal excursions drop by ≥ 90% of pre-event baseline using an oronasal thermal sensor (diagnostic study), PAP device flow (titration study), or an alternative sensor; and the event meets duration and respiratory effort criteria for an obstructive, mixed, or central apnea. A central apnea is scored in children when the event meets criteria for an apnea, there is an absence of inspiratory effort throughout the event, and at least one of the following is met: (1) the event is ≥ 20 seconds in duration, (2) the event is associated with an arousal or ≥ 3% oxygen desaturation, (3) (infants under 1 year of age only) the event is associated with a decrease in heart rate to less than 50 beats per minute for at least 5 seconds or less than 60 beats per minute for 15 seconds. A hypopnea is scored in children when the peak signal excursions drop is ≥ 30% of pre-event baseline using nasal pressure (diagnostic study), PAP device flow (titration study), or an alternative sensor, for ≥ the duration of 2 breaths in association with either ≥ 3% oxygen desaturation or an arousal. In children and adults, surrogates of the arterial PCO(2) are the end-tidal PCO(2) or transcutaneous PCO(2) (diagnostic study) or transcutaneous PCO(2) (titration study). For adults, sleep hypoventilation is scored when the arterial PCO(2) (or surrogate) is > 55 mm Hg for ≥ 10 minutes or there is an increase in the arterial PCO(2) (or surrogate) ≥ 10 mm Hg (in comparison to an awake supine value) to a value exceeding 50 mm Hg for ≥ 10 minutes. For pediatric patients hypoventilation is scored when the arterial PCO(2) (or surrogate) is > 50 mm Hg for > 25% of total sleep time. In adults Cheyne-Stokes breathing is scored when both of the following are met: (1) there are episodes of ≥ 3 consecutive central apneas and/or central hypopneas separated by a crescendo and decrescendo change in breathing amplitude with a cycle length of at least 40 seconds (typically 45 to 90 seconds), and (2) there are five or more central apneas and/or central hypopneas per hour associated with the crescendo/decrescendo breathing pattern recorded over a minimum of 2 hours of monitoring. PMID:23066376

  4. [The clinical and polysomnographic characteristics of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in the children].

    PubMed

    Kalashnikova, T P; Anisimov, G V; Tervo, S O; Skurikhin, A V

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study peculiarities of the neurological, ororhinolaryngological status of the children presenting with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) as well as their clinical and polysomnographic (PSG) sleep characteristics. A total of 15 children at the age from 6 to 9 years with OSAS confirmed by the PSG study were included in the investigation. All the children suffered nasal obstruction of different etiology and non-specific neurological complaints of transient headache, emotional lability, impaired memory, enhanced fatigue, and poor attention; these conditions were responsible for school desadaptation. All the patients underwent dyssomnic events. The polysomnographic study revealed the disordered sleep structure manifested as the shortened drowsiness phase, lengthened latent period of the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and its reduced representation in the overall sleep cycle, enhanced duration of delta-sleep. The sleep alertness time also increased alongside with a rise in the number of activations on the sleep electroencephalograms by virtue of increased respiratory efforts. A characteristic feature of the children presenting with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome was vegetative disorder during sleep associated with a rise in the number of tachycardia episodes. The results of this study facilitate the understanding of certain pathogenetic aspects of neurological problems in the children suffering respiratory tract obstruction and OSAS and outline the problems awaiting further investigations. PMID:25377677

  5. The Dimension of Hyoid Bone Is Independently Associated with the Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sang Hyeon; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Lee, Jeung-Gweon; Cho, Hyung-Ju

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We hypothesized that the size of the hyoid bone itself may affect the severity of sleep apnea. The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between hyoid bone dimensions and the severity of sleep apnea using computerized tomography (CT) axial images. Methods We retrospectively measured the hyoid bone in axial images of neck CTs and correlated these measurements with results of polysomnography in a total of 106 male patients. The new hyoid bone parameters studied in this study were as follows: distance between bilateral lesser horns (LH-d), distance between bilateral greater horns (GH-d), distance from the most anterior end of the hyoid arch to GH-d (AP), distance from the greater to the lesser horn on right and left sides (GH-LH), and the anterior angle between bilateral extensive lines from the greater to the lesser horn (H-angle). Data was analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression, and Pearson correlation tests. Results We found a significant inverse correlation between the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and GH-d or AP. Neither the LH-d, GH-LH, nor H-angle were associated with the AHI. The patient group that met the criteria of both GH-d<45.4 and AP<33.4 demonstrated the most severe AHI. Conclusion The lateral width or antero-posterior length of hyoid bone was associated with AHI and predicted the severity of sleep apnea in male patients. This finding supports the role of expansion hyoidplasty for treatment of sleep apnea. Pre-operative consideration of these parameters may improve surgical outcomes in male patients with sleep apnea. PMID:24312562

  6. Effects of treatment by laser-assisted uvuloplasty on sleep energy expenditure in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Chi; Chang, Ke-Chang; Lee, Kud-Sheng

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of successful laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP) on sleep energy expenditure (EE) in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients. Fifteen healthy subjects (group I) and 25 patients with moderately severe or severe OSAS (group II) proven by overnight sleep study and who wanted LAUP were enrolled. During the night of the sleep studies, EE was measured with a metabolic cart (indirect calorimetry with canopy), including basal metabolic rate (BMR), mean sleep EE, lowest sleep EE, ratios of mean sleep EE/BMR, and lowest sleep EE/BMR. For the OSAS patients, a second sleep study with EE measurement was performed 3 months after LAUP. Based on this assessment of their sleep architecture, they were divided into 2 groups: responders (group IIa) and nonresponders (group IIb). The mean sleep EE, the ratio of mean sleep EE/BMR and lowest EE/BMR were significantly higher in group II than group I. After LAUP in group II, 6 patients were found to be responders (group IIa) and 19 patients were nonresponders (group IIb). Group IIa had decreased mean sleep EE, ratios of mean sleep EE/BMR, and lowest sleeping EE/BMR after LAUP than before LAUP compared with no significant changes in group IIb after LAUP. In conclusion, there is increased sleep EE in moderately severe OSAS patients when compared with normal controls. LAUP, when effective in reversing the sleep abnormalities, also normalizes the sleep EE. If it does not adequately treat the OSAS, however, the sleep EE remains abnormal. PMID:11979396

  7. Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleep Quality, Cognition, and Driving Performance in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S; Thacker, Leroy R; Leszczyszyn, David; Taylor, Samuel A; Heuman, Douglas M; Raman, Shekar; Sterling, Richard K; Siddiqui, Muhammad S; Stravitz, R Todd; Sanyal, Arun J; Puri, Puneet; Luketic, Velimir; Matherly, Scott; Fuchs, Michael; White, Melanie B; Noble, Nicole A; Unser, Ariel B; Wade, James B

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims: In patients with cirrhosis, sleep disturbances are assumed to result from hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The effects of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on cognition, sleep parameters, or driving in patients with cirrhosis are unclear. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional, prospective study of 118 subjects. Subjects were assigned to 1 of 4 groups: those with OSA and cirrhosis (without HE or ascites, n=34), those with only cirrhosis (n=30), those with only OSA only (n=29), and those without OSA or cirrhosis (controls, n=25). None of OSA patients were receiving continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Subjects underwent cognitive testing (paper–pencil tests for psychomotor speed and attention, as well as executive function tests), sleep assessment (daytime sleepiness and night-time sleep quality) and a monotonous driving simulation (worsening lane deviations over time indicate poor performance). We also tested patients with OSA, with cirrhosis (n=10) and without cirrhosis (n=7), before and after CPAP therapy. Results: Daytime sleepiness and sleep quality were worse in subjects in the OSA groups (with or without cirrhosis) than subjects with cirrhosis alone or controls. Of subjects with only OSA, 36% had impaired psychomotor speed and attention, compared to >60% of subjects in both cirrhosis groups. In contrast, executive function was uniformly worse in subjects with OSA, with or without cirrhosis, than groups without OSA. Simulator performance (lane deviations) worsened over time in both OSA groups. CPAP therapy significantly increased executive function and sleep quality, and reduced simulator lane deviations and sleepiness, in subjects with and without cirrhosis. After CPAP therapy, performance on the paper–pencil test performance improved significantly only in subjects with OSA without cirrhosis. Conclusion: OSA should be considered in evaluating sleep impairment in patients with cirrhosis. In patients with cirrhosis and OSA, psychomotor speed and attention issues are likely related to the cirrhosis, whereas executive function and simulator performance are affected by the OSA. CPAP therapy improves executive function and simulator performance in patients with OSA, regardless of cirrhosis. PMID:25158922

  8. Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in an Edentulous Lower Jaw Patient with a Mandibular Advancement Device

    PubMed Central

    Keyf, Filiz; iftci, Blent; F?rat Gven, Selma

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common sleep-related breathing disorder with periodic reduction or cessation of airflow during sleep. It is associated with loud snoring, disrupted sleep, and witnessed apneas. Treatment of OSA varies from simple measures such as oral appliances and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to surgical procedures like uvulopalatopharyngoplasty and tracheostomy. Oral appliances are a viable nonsurgical treatment alternative in patients with OSA, of which mandibular advancement devices are most common. Edentulism which contributes to the worsening of OSA reduces the number of available therapeutic strategies and is considered a contraindication to oral appliance therapy. This clinical report describes the treatment of a 63-year-old edentulous OSA patient for whom a mandibular advancement device was designed. PMID:24551463

  9. Sleep apnea termination decreases cerebral blood volume: a near-infrared spectroscopy case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, Jaakko; Noponen, Tommi; Salmi, Tapani; Toppila, Jussi; Meriläinen, Pekka

    2009-07-01

    Medical near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can be used to estimate cerebral haemodynamic changes non-invasively. Sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder where repetitive pauses in breathing decrease the quality of sleep and exposes the individual to various health problems. We have measured oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin concentration changes during apneic events in sleep from the forehead of one subject using NIRS and used principal component analysis to extract extracerebral and cortical haemodynamic changes from NIRS signals. Comparison of NIRS signals with EEG, bioimpedance, and pulse oximetry data suggests that termination of apnea leads to decreases in cerebral blood volume and flow that may be related to neurological arousal via neurovascular coupling.

  10. Management of obstructive sleep apnea in an edentulous lower jaw patient with a mandibular advancement device.

    PubMed

    Keyf, Filiz; Ciftci, Bülent; Fırat Güven, Selma

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common sleep-related breathing disorder with periodic reduction or cessation of airflow during sleep. It is associated with loud snoring, disrupted sleep, and witnessed apneas. Treatment of OSA varies from simple measures such as oral appliances and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to surgical procedures like uvulopalatopharyngoplasty and tracheostomy. Oral appliances are a viable nonsurgical treatment alternative in patients with OSA, of which mandibular advancement devices are most common. Edentulism which contributes to the worsening of OSA reduces the number of available therapeutic strategies and is considered a contraindication to oral appliance therapy. This clinical report describes the treatment of a 63-year-old edentulous OSA patient for whom a mandibular advancement device was designed. PMID:24551463

  11. The Face of Sleepiness: Improvement in Appearance after Treatment of Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Chervin, Ronald D.; Ruzicka, Deborah L.; Vahabzadeh, Arshia; Burns, Margaret C.; Burns, Joseph W.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Anecdote but no formal evidence suggests that facial appearance improves after hypersomnolent patients with obstructive sleep apnea are treated. We investigated whether masked volunteer raters can identify post- rather than pre-treatment images as looking more alert, and whether impressions are predicted by any objective changes on highly precise 3-dimensional digital photogrammetry. Methods: Participants included 20 adults with obstructive sleep apnea on polysomnography and excessive sleepiness on Epworth Sleepiness Scales. Photogrammetry was performed before and after ≥ 2 months of adherent use of positive airway pressure. Twenty-two raters then assessed pre- and post-treatment facial images, paired side-by-side in random order. Results: Subjects included 14 men and 6 women, with mean age 45 ± 11 (SD) years and mean baseline apnea/hypopnea index of 26 ± 21. The 22 raters twice as often identified post-treatment rather than pre-treatment images to look more alert (p = 0.0053), more youthful (p = 0.026), more attractive (p = 0.0068), and more likely to reflect the treated state (p = 0.015). Photogrammetry documented post-treatment decreases in forehead surface volume and decreased infraorbital and cheek redness, but no narrowing of the interpalpebral fissure. Decreased deep NREM sleep at baseline, and pre- to post-treatment decrements in facial redness showed promise as predictors of improved subjective ratings for alertness. Conclusions: Patients with obstructive sleep apnea are perceived to appear more alert, more youthful, and more attractive after adherent use of positive airway pressure. Objective changes in facial surface volume and color were identified. Post-treatment decrements in redness may inform subjective impressions of improved alertness. Citation: Chervin RD; Ruzicka DL; Vahabzadeh A; Burns MC; Burns JW; Buchman SR. The face of sleepiness: improvement in appearance after treatment of sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(9):845-852. PMID:23997695

  12. Snoring and risk for obstructive sleep apnea among nigerians with heart failure: Prevalence and clinical correlates

    PubMed Central

    Akintunde, Adeseye A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Heart failure is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing nations like Nigeria. Sleep apnea and snoring has recently been recognized to be a cardiovascular risk factor. Sleep apnea is yet to be well studied among Africans with heart failure. We aimed to determine the prevalence of snoring and high risk for obstructive sleep apnea among Nigerians with stable heart failure. Materials and Methods: We studied 103 subjects that included 62 patients with heart failure and 41 control subjects. Demographic parameters and clinical examination were performed on the participants. The Berlin score and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale were administered for each participant. Echocardiography was done on all participants. Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) 17.0. Results: Snoring was reported in 48.4% of subjects with heart failure compared to 22.0% of control subjects ( P < 0.005). High risk for obstructive sleep apnea using the Berlin score was documented in 51.6% of heart failure subjects compared to 7.31% of controls. Excessive daytime somnolence occurred more in heart failure patients (51.6% vs. 9.8%, P < 0.05). Snorers tended to be older and were more likely to be obese than nonsnorers. Systolic blood pressure and fasting blood sugar were significantly higher among heart failure subjects with snoring than those without snoring (131.9 ± 19.2 vs. 119.2 ± 15.7 and 6.0 ± 0.8 vs. 5.4 ± 2.7, P < 0.005). Conclusion: Heart failure seems to be associated with snoring and a high risk for obstructive sleep apnea among Africans with heart failure. Assessment for sleep disordered breathing should be incorporated into their routine clinical workup. PMID:23580920

  13. Prevalence and Correlates of Insomnia and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shahbaj; Gupta, Manan; Gupta, Ravi; Dhyani, Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Poor sleep quality, insomnia, and restless legs syndrome (RLS) and sleep apnea are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinical correlates of these problems are poorly understood. Aims: This study was to find out the prevalence and correlates of insomnia and subjects with ‘high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)’ in adults with chronic kidney disease. Materials and Methods: One hundred and four adults with CKD were included. Their demographic data, details regarding kidney disease and hemodialysis (HD) were recorded. Presence of insomnia and its severity was assessed. They were screened for sleep apnea using a validated questionnaire. Results: Average age was 54.17 (± 12.96) years. 89.4% had stage 5 nephropathy and 78.8% subjects were on regular HD. Males outnumbered females. Insomnia was reported by 35.5%. Among these, 50% had chronic insomnia. Insomnia subjects had higher prevalence of diabetes (P = 0.01) and depression (P < 0.001). Fifty-one percent subjects were at “high risk for sleep apnea”. They had higher prevalence of diabetes (P < 0.001), coronary disease (P = 0.02), insomnia (P = 0.008), and experienced daytime symptoms of insomnia (P < 0.001). However, in the logistic regression, only male gender (odds ratio, OR = 13.59) and daytime symptoms of insomnia (OR = 7.34) were found to be associated with “higher risk for sleep apnea”. Conclusion: Insomnia was prevalent in CKD. Nearly half of these patients are at high risk for sleep apnea and a third of them suffer from insomnia. Hence, these patients should be screened for sleep disorders. PMID:24404542

  14. Management of Sleep Apnea without High Pretest Probability or with Comorbidities by Three Nights of Portable Sleep Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Arnoldo; Embid, Cristina; Isetta, Valentina; Farre, Ramón; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Parra, Olga; Barbé, Ferran; Montserrat, Josep M.; Masa, Juan F.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) diagnosis using simplified methods such as portable sleep monitoring (PM) is only recommended in patients with a high pretest probability. The aim is to determine the diagnostic efficacy, consequent therapeutic decision-making, and costs of OSA diagnosis using polysomnography (PSG) versus three consecutive studies of PM in patients with mild to moderate suspicion of sleep apnea or with comorbidity that can mask OSA symptoms. Design and Setting: Randomized, blinded, crossover study of 3 nights of PM (3N-PM) versus PSG. The diagnostic efficacy was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Therapeutic decisions to assess concordance between the two different approaches were performed by sleep physicians and respiratory physicians (staff and residents) using agreement level and kappa coefficient. The costs of each diagnostic strategy were considered. Patients and Results: Fifty-six patients were selected. Epworth Sleepiness Scale was 10.1 (5.3) points. Bland-Altman plot for apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) showed good agreement. ROC curves showed the best area under the curve in patients with PSG AHI ≥ 5 [0.955 (confidence interval = 0.862–0.993)]. For a PSG AHI ≥ 5, a PM AHI of 5 would effectively exclude and confirm OSA diagnosis. For a PSG AHI ≥ 15, a PM AHI ≥ 22 would confirm and PM AHI < 7 would exclude OSA. The best agreement of therapeutic decisions was achieved by the sleep medicine specialists (81.8%). The best cost-diagnostic efficacy was obtained by the 3N-PM. Conclusions: Three consecutive nights of portable monitoring at home evaluated by a qualified sleep specialist is useful for the management of patients without high pretest probability of obstructive sleep apnea or with comorbidities. Clinical Trial Registration: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, registration number: NCT01820156 Citation: Guerrero A, Embid C, Isetta V, Farre R, Duran-Cantolla J, Parra O, Barbé F, Montserrat JM, Masa JF. Management of sleep apnea without high pretest probability or with comorbidities by three nights of portable sleep monitoring. SLEEP 2014;37(8):1363-1373. PMID:25083017

  15. Brainstem infarction and sleep-disordered breathing in the BASIC Sleep Apnea Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Devin L.; McDermott, Mollie; Mowla, Ashkan; De Lott, Lindsey; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Kerber, Kevin A.; Hegeman, Garnett; Smith, Melinda A.; Garcia, Nelda M.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Association between cerebral infarction site and post-stroke sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has important implications for SDB screening and the pathophysiology of post-stroke SDB. Within a large, population-based study, we assessed whether brainstem infarction location is associated with SDB presence and severity. Methods Cross-sectional study of ischemic stroke patients in the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project. Subjects underwent SDB screening (median 13 days after stroke) with a well-validated cardiopulmonary sleep apnea testing device (n=355). Acute infarction location was determined based on review of radiology reports and dichotomized into brainstem involvement or none. Logistic and linear regression models were used to test the associations between brainstem involvement and SDB or apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) in unadjusted and adjusted models. Results Thirty-eight (11%) had acute infarction involving the brainstem. Of those without brainstem infarction, 59% had significant SDB (AHI≥10); the median AHI was 13 (interquartile range (IQR) 6, 26). Of those with brainstem infarction, 84% had SDB; median AHI was 20 (IQR 11, 38). In unadjusted analysis, brainstem involvement was associated with over three times the odds of SDB (OR 3.71 (95% CI: 1.52, 9.13)). In a multivariable model, adjusted for demographics, BMI, hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, prior stroke/TIA, and stroke severity, results were similar (OR 3.76 (95% CI: 1.44, 9.81)). Brainstem infarction was also associated with AHI (continuous) in unadjusted (p=0.004) and adjusted models (p=0.004). Conclusions Data from this population-based stroke study show that acute infarction involving the brainstem is associated with both presence and severity of SDB. PMID:24916097

  16. Effects of stabilizing or increasing respiratory motor outputs on obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Teodorescu, Mihaela; Pegelow, David F.; Teodorescu, Mihai C.; Gong, Yuansheng; Fedie, Jessica E.; Dempsey, Jerome A.

    2013-01-01

    To determine how the obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patient's pathophysiological traits predict the success of the treatment aimed at stabilization or increase in respiratory motor outputs, we studied 26 newly diagnosed OSA patients [apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) 42 ± 5 events/h with 92% of apneas obstructive] who were treated with O2 supplementation, an isocapnic rebreathing system in which CO2 was added only during hyperpnea to prevent transient hypocapnia, and a continuous rebreathing system. We also measured each patient's controller gain below eupnea [change in minute volume/change in end-tidal Pco2 (ΔV̇e/ΔPetCO2)], CO2 reserve (eupnea-apnea threshold PetCO2), and plant gain (ΔPetCO2/ΔV̇e), as well as passive upper airway closing pressure (Pcrit). With isocapnic rebreathing, 14/26 reduced their AHI to 31 ± 6% of control (P < 0.01) (responder); 12/26 did not show significant change (nonresponder). The responders vs. nonresponders had a greater controller gain (6.5 ± 1.7 vs. 2.1 ± 0.2 l·min−1·mmHg−1, P < 0.01) and a smaller CO2 reserve (1.9 ± 0.3 vs. 4.3 ± 0.4 mmHg, P < 0.01) with no differences in Pcrit (−0.1 ± 1.2 vs. 0.2 ± 0.9 cmH2O, P > 0.05). Hypercapnic rebreathing (+4.2 ± 1 mmHg PetCO2) reduced AHI to 15 ± 4% of control (P < 0.001) in 17/21 subjects with a wide range of CO2 reserve. Hyperoxia (SaO2 ∼95–98%) reduced AHI to 36 ± 11% of control in 7/19 OSA patients tested. We concluded that stabilizing central respiratory motor output via prevention of transient hypocapnia prevents most OSA in selected patients with a high chemosensitivity and a collapsible upper airway, whereas increasing respiratory motor output via moderate hypercapnia eliminates OSA in most patients with a wider range of chemosensitivity and CO2 reserve. Reducing chemosensitivity via hyperoxia had a limited and unpredictable effect on OSA. PMID:23599393

  17. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and ischemic heart disease. Evidence of their relationship].

    PubMed

    González-Pliego, José Angel; Hernández-Gordillo, Daniel; Castañeda-Barragán, Edgar; García-Lamas, Leopoldo; Guzmán-Sánchez, César Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to analyse the relation between obstructive sleep apnea and coronary disease. We present epidemiological data on the respiratory disorder and its association with ischemic cardiopathy, as well as common cardiovascular risk factors, physiopathological interactions between both conditions, clinical evolution and impact of treatment on prognosis. PMID:25577551

  18. Oral Appliance for the Treatment of Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Edentulous Patient.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Bacchi, Ataís; de Castro, Gabriela Cassaro; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia Marisa

    2014-12-01

    Oral appliances have attracted interest for the treatment of mild and moderate obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the mandibular repositioning device (MRD) or a tongue-retainer device (TRD) is usually indicated to increase the upper air space. Describes a combination of MRD (with 60 % maximum mandibular protrusion) and TRD to treat severe OSA. Polysomnography (PSG) and two questionnaires: the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) evaluated the sleep pattern in two times (after and before the use of oral appliance). The initial PSG exam was compatible with diagnoses severe OSA and the Apnea-Hypopnea Index was 40.4, and 54 % oxygen saturation -spO(2). The ESS and PSQI scores were 11 and 6, respectively. After she began wearing the device she stopped snoring, her Apnea-Hypopnea Index decreased to 17.6, presented a sleep efficiency of 81.6 % and had a 77 % spO(2). The ESS and PSQI scores dropped to three. MRD in association with the tongue-retainer was effective in reducing the severity of the apnea for this edentulous patient. PMID:26199526

  19. Still Tired After Getting Your Zzz's? You Might Have Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePlus

    ... 40, smoking, having a family history of the disorder, and having a nasal obstruction due to a deviated septum, allergies or sinus problems. Sleep apnea can also affect children, with the most common cause being enlarged tonsils and adenoids. Losing weight ...

  20. [Experiences with therapy of pediatric sleep apnea syndrome and obstructive nasopharyngeal respiratory pattern with nasal BIPAP and CPAP therapy].

    PubMed

    Zwacka, G; Scholle, S

    1995-03-01

    Sleep-apnea in childhood shows a frequency similar to adults but it is caused by many other reasons. Therapeutic effects of nasal CPAP and BIPAP can replace surgical ENT-Therapy in large extent mainly in ages at 2-5 years. But also in older children is it possible to treat obstructive sleep apnea and hypoventilation neuromuscular diseases by BIPAP. Examples for treatment of children by BIPAP who are two years old were given. Other demonstrated cases cover children with stridor congenitus, obstructive sleep apnea, hypoventilation, adenoidal breathing disturbances with primary surgical treated tonsillar hyperplasia and one case of thoracal postobstructive malformation with therapeutic BIPAP options. PMID:7617601

  1. Sleep EEG Characteristics in Young and Elderly Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Jin; Kim, Jong Won; Lee, Yu-Jin G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective In the present study, it was hypothesized that the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) characteristics of young (<30 yrs) and elderly (>55 yrs) OSAS patients would differ. Methods We analyzed 76 sleep EEG recordings from OSAS patients (young group: n=40, mean age: 24.3±4.9 yrs; elderly group: n=36, mean age: 59.1±4.9 yrs), which were obtained during nocturnal polysomnography. The recordings were assessed via spectral analysis in the delta (0.5–4.5 Hz), theta (4.5–8 Hz), alpha (8–12 Hz), beta (12–32 Hz), slow sigma (11–13 Hz), and fast sigma (13–17 Hz) frequency bands. Results Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI) and sleep efficiency (%) did not differ significantly between the two groups (19.8±14.4 vs. 25.9±16.0, p=0.085; 84.4±12.6 vs. 80.9±11.0, p=0.198, respectively). After adjusting for gender, the slow/fast sigma ratio was not significantly correlated with AHI in the elderly group (r=-0.047, p=0.790) but AHI was inversely correlated with the slow/fast sigma ratio in the young group (r=-0.423, p=0.007). A multiple linear regression analysis revealed that a higher AHI was related with a lower slow/fast sigma ratio in the young group (β=-0.392, p=0.028) but not the elderly. Conclusion In the present study, sleep EEG activity differed between young and elderly OSAS patients. The slow/fast sigma ratio was associated with OSAS severity only in young patients, suggesting that young OSAS patients may have a distinctive brain plasticity compared with elderly patients. PMID:27081383

  2. Consensus and evidence-based Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea guidelines 2014 (first edition)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T.; Elavarasi, A.; Ragesh, R.; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D.; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A. G.; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M. S.; Kharbanda, O. P.; Kumar, Suresh; Mohapatra, P. R.; Mallick, B. N.; Mehta, Ravindra; Prasad, Rajendra; Sharma, S. C.; Sikka, Kapil; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shukla, Garima; Suri, J. C.; Vengamma, B.; Grover, Ashoo; Vijayan, V. K.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Gupta, Rasik

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences among the general public as well as the majority of primary care physicians across India is poor. This necessitated the development of the Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities or ≥15 such episodes without any sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents, and high-risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers, and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography is the “gold standard” for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances (OA) are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer OA to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioral measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy. PMID:26180408

  3. Consensus and evidence-based Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea guidelines 2014 (first edition).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surendra K; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T; Elavarasi, A; Ragesh, R; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A G; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M S; Kharbanda, O P; Kumar, Suresh; Mohapatra, P R; Mallick, B N; Mehta, Ravindra; Prasad, Rajendra; Sharma, S C; Sikka, Kapil; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shukla, Garima; Suri, J C; Vengamma, B; Grover, Ashoo; Vijayan, V K; Ramakrishnan, N; Gupta, Rasik

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences among the general public as well as the majority of primary care physicians across India is poor. This necessitated the development of the Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities or ≥15 such episodes without any sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents, and high-risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers, and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography is the "gold standard" for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances (OA) are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer OA to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioral measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy. PMID:26180408

  4. Associations of Allostatic Load with Sleep Apnea, Insomnia, Short Sleep Duration, and Other Sleep Disturbances: Findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2008

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoli; Redline, Susan; Shields, Alexandra E.; Williams, David R.; Williams, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine whether allostatic load (AL), a measure of cumulative physiologic dysregulation across biological systems, was associated with sleep apnea, insomnia, and other sleep disturbances. Methods Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2008 were used. AL was measured using nine biomarkers representing cardiovascular, inflammatory, and metabolic system functioning. A total of 7,726 US adults aged 18 years and older were included in this study. Results The prevalence of high AL (AL score ≥3) was the highest among African Americans (25.2%), followed by Hispanic Americans (21.0%), Whites (18.8%), and other racial/ethnic group (16.5%). After adjustment for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors and depression status, high AL was significantly associated with sleep apnea (odds ratio (OR)=1.49, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14-1.95), snoring (1.65, 95% CI: 1.41-1.93), snorting/stop breathing (OR=1.62, 95% CI: 1.25-2.10), prolonged sleep latency (OR=1.33, 95% CI: 1.13-1.56), short sleep duration (<6 hours) (OR=1.29, 95% CI: 1.04-1.61), and diagnosed sleep disorder (OR=1.85, 95% CI: 1.53-2.24). There was no clear evidence that observed associations varied by sociodemographic characteristics or depression status. Conclusions This study suggests significant associations of high AL with sleep apnea, sleep apnea symptoms, insomnia component, short sleep duration, and diagnosed sleep disorder among US adults. PMID:24985316

  5. Quality Measures for the Care of Pediatric Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kothare, Sanjeev V.; Rosen, Carol L.; Lloyd, Robin M.; Paruthi, Shalini; Thomas, Sherene M.; Troester, Matthew M.; Carden, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    The Board of Directors of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned a Task Force to develop quality measures as part of its strategic plan to promote high quality patient-centered care. Among many potential dimensions of quality, the AASM requested Workgroups to develop outcome and process measures to aid in evaluating the quality of care of five common sleep disorders: insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea in adults, obstructive sleep apnea in children, restless legs syndrome, and narcolepsy. This paper describes the rationale, background, general methods development, and considerations in implementation of these quality measures in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children. This document describes measurement methods for five desirable process measures: assessment of symptoms and risk factors of OSA, initiation of an evidence-based action plan, objective evaluation of high-risk children with OSA by obtaining a polysomnogram (PSG), reassessment of signs and symptoms of OSA within 12 months, and documentation of objective assessment of positive airway pressure adherence. When these five process measures are met, clinicians should be able to achieve the two defined outcomes: improve detection of childhood OSA and reduce signs and symptoms of OSA after initiation of a management plan. The AASM recommends the use of these measures as part of quality improvement programs that will enhance the ability to improve care for patients with childhood OSA. Citation: Kothare SV, Rosen CL, Lloyd RM, Paruthi S, Thomas SM, Troester MM, Carden KA. Quality measures for the care of pediatric patients with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):385–404. PMID:25700879

  6. Narcolepsy with obstructive sleep apnea in a 4-year-old Korean girl: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soonhak; Jang, Kyungmi; Hwang, Sukyung; Cho, Minhyun; Seo, Hyeeun

    2013-05-01

    A 4-yr-old girl has exhibited severe snoring, restless sleep and increasing daytime sleepiness over the last 3 months. The physical examination showed that she was not obese but had kissing tonsils. Polysomnography demonstrated increased apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 5.2, and multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT) showed shortened mean sleep latency and one sleep-onset REM period (SOREMP). She was diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and underwent tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. After the surgery, her sleep became much calmer, but she was still sleepy. Another sleep test showed normal AHI of 0.2, the mean sleep latency of 8 min, and two SOREMPs. Diagnosis of OSA to be effectively treated by surgery and narcolepsy without cataplexy was confirmed. Since young children exhibiting both OSA and narcolepsy can fail to be diagnosed with the latter, it's desirable to conduct MSLT when they have severe daytime sleepiness or fail to get better even with good treatment. PMID:23678276

  7. Sympathetic and Catecholaminergic Alterations in Sleep Apnea with Particular Emphasis on Children

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Fahed; Gozal, David; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is involved in the regulation of major organ functions in the human body, and disruption of sleep potentially can elicit organ dysfunction. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most prevalent sleep disorder of breathing in adults and children, and its manifestations reflect the interactions between intermittent hypoxia, intermittent hypercapnia, increased intra-thoracic pressure swings, and sleep fragmentation, as elicited by the episodic changes in upper airway resistance during sleep. The sympathetic nervous system is an important modulator of the cardiovascular, immune, endocrine and metabolic systems, and alterations in autonomic activity may lead to metabolic imbalance and organ dysfunction. Here we review how OSA and its constitutive components can lead to perturbation of the autonomic nervous system in general, and to altered regulation of catecholamines, both of which then playing an important role in some of the mechanisms underlying OSA-induced morbidities. PMID:22319509

  8. Is Mixed Apnea Associated with Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep a Reversible Compensatory Sign of Heart Failure?

    PubMed Central

    Korostovtseva, Lyudmila; Sazonova, Yulia; Zvartau, Nadezhda; Semenov, Andrew; Nepran, Viktoriya; Bochkarev, Mikhail; Nikolaev, German; Mitrofanova, Lyubov; Sviryaev, Yurii; Gordeev, Mikhail; Konradi, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 24 Final Diagnosis: Dilated cardiomyopathy Symptoms: Biventricular heart failure • sleep apnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Heart transplantation Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Sleep-disordered breathing is common in heart failure (HF), and prolonged circulation time and diminished pulmonary volume are considered the main possible causes of sleep apnea in these patients. However, the impact and interrelation between sleep apnea and HF development are unclear. We report the case of a patient with complete elimination of non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep-associated mixed apnea in HF after heart transplantation. Case Report: After unsuccessful 12-month conventional treatment with abrupt exacerbation of biventricular HF IV class (according to New York Heart Association Functional Classification), a 26-year-old man was admitted to the hospital. Based on a comprehensive examination including endomyocardial biopsy, dilated cardiomyopathy was diagnosed. Heart transplantation was considered the only possible treatment strategy. Polysomnography showed severe NREM sleep-associated mixed sleep apnea [apnea-hypopnea index 43/h, in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep 3.7/h, in NREM sleep 56.4/h, mean SatO2 93.9%], and periodic breathing. One-month post-transplantation polysomnography did not show sleep-disordered breathing (apnea-hypopnea index 1.0/h; in REM sleep − 2.8/h, in NREM sleep 0.5/h, mean SatO2 97.5%). The patient was discharged from the hospital in improved condition. Conclusions: NREM sleep-associated mixed apnea occurring in severe systolic HF due to dilated cardiomyopathy might be reversible in case of successful HF treatment. We suggest that mixed sleep apnea strongly associated with NREM sleep occurs in HF, when the brain centers regulating ventilation are intact, and successful HF compensation might be highly effective regarding sleep-breathing disorders without non-invasive ventilation. This is important to know, especially with regard to the recently published data of potentially unfavorable effects of adaptive servoventilation in systolic HF, and the lack of other treatment options. PMID:26681187

  9. Non-contact diagnostic system for sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome based on amplitude and phase analysis of thoracic and abdominal Doppler radars.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Masayuki; Tojima, Hirokazu; Matsui, Takemi

    2016-05-01

    Full-night polysomnography (PSG) has been recognized as the gold standard test for sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS). However, PSG examinees are physically restrained for the full night by many contact sensors and obtrusive connecting cables, inducing mental stress. We developed a non-contact SAHS diagnostic system that can detect apneic events without inducing stress in monitored individuals. Two Doppler radars were installed beneath the mattress to measure the vibrations of the chest and abdomen, respectively. Our system determines apnea and hypopnea events when the radar output amplitude decreases by <20 and 70 %, respectively, of the amplitude of a normal breath (without SAHS events). Additionally, we proposed a technique that detects paradoxical movements by focusing on phase differences between thoracic and abdominal movements, and were able to identify three types of sleep apnea: obstructive, central, and mixed. Respiratory disturbance indexes obtained showed a higher correlation (r = 94 %) with PSG than with pulse oximetry (r = 89 %). When predicting the severity of SAHS with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of >15/h or >30/h using PSG as a reference, the radar system achieved a sensitivity of 96 and 90 %, and a specificity of 100 and 79 % with an AHI of >15/h and >30/h, respectively. The proposed radar system can be used as an alternative to the current airflow sensor, and to chest and abdomen belts for apnea-hypopnea evaluation. PMID:26307200

  10. Bone Loss in Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chakhtoura, Marlene; Nasrallah, Mona; Chami, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related respiratory disorder. It is associated with many endocrinopathies including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypercortisolism, and glucose intolerance that may lead to bone loss with secondary osteoporosis. Methods: We report the case of a 41-year-old man who presented with bilateral 9th rib fractures and was found to have obstructive sleep apnea and osteoporosis. We also present a literature review on this topic. Results: OSA can lead to bone loss through various mechanisms. Some are shared with obesity, including hypogonadism, altered adrenergic tone, inflammation, oxidative stress, vitamin D deficiency and diabetes mellitus; others are specific to OSA, such as hypoxia and altered glucocorticoids regulation. Conclusion: There are no guidelines on screening for osteoporosis in OSA. Further research is needed to assess the incidence of bone loss and fractures in OSA. Citation: Chakhtoura M, Nasrallah M, Chami H. Bone loss in obesity and obstructive sleep apnea: a review of literature. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):575–580. PMID:25580607

  11. Noncontact screening system with two microwave radars for the diagnosis of sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Masayuki; Ueki, Katsuhiko; Tojima, Hirokazu; Matsui, Takemi

    2013-01-01

    There were two key problems in applying Doppler radar to a diagnosis system for sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome. The first is noise associated with body movements and the second is the body positions in bed and the changes of the sleeping posture. We focused on the changes of the amplitude of the radar output signal corresponding to the changes in the tidal volume, and proposed a method of detecting the change of the respiratory amplitude value without the influence of body position in bed. In addition, we challenged the detection of the apnea-hypopnea event confirmed by accompanied rise of heart rates. To increase the accuracy of heart rate measurement, we propose a new automatic gain control and a real-time radar-output channel selection method based on a spectrum shape analysis. A prototype of the system was set up at a sleep disorder center in a hospital and field tests were carried out with eight subjects. Despite the subjects engaging in frequent body movements while sleeping, the system was quite effective in the diagnosis of sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (the correlation coefficient r = 0.98). PMID:24110122

  12. Is Perioperative Fluid and Salt Balance a Contributing Factor in Postoperative Worsening of Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

    PubMed

    Lam, Thach; Singh, Mandeep; Yadollahi, Azadeh; Chung, Frances

    2016-05-01

    An understanding of the potential mechanisms underlying recurrent upper airway collapse may help anesthesiologists better manage patients in the postoperative period. There is convincing evidence in the sleep medicine literature to suggest that a positive fluid and salt balance can worsen upper airway collapse in patients with obstructive sleep apnea through the redistribution of fluid from the legs into the neck and upper airway while supine, in a process known as "rostral fluid shift." According to this theory, during the day the volume from a fluid bolus or from fluid overload states (i.e., heart failure and chronic kidney disease) accumulates in the legs due to gravity, and when a person lies supine at night, the fluid shifts rostrally to the neck, also owing to gravity. The fluid in the neck can increase the extraluminal pressure around the upper airways, causing the upper airways to narrow and predisposing to upper airway collapse. Similarly, surgical patients also incur large fluid and salt balance shifts, and when recovered supine, this may promote fluid redistribution to the neck and upper airways. In this commentary, we summarize the sleep medicine literature on the impact of fluid and salt balance on obstructive sleep apnea severity and discuss the potential anesthetic implications of excessive fluid and salt volume on worsening sleep apnea. PMID:27101494

  13. Fluoroscopic and computed tomographic features of the pharyngeal airway in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Suratt, P M; Dee, P; Atkinson, R L; Armstrong, P; Wilhoit, S C

    1983-04-01

    Because it has been suggested that patients with obstructive sleep apnea have a narrower pharyngeal airway than normal persons, we performed lateral fluoroscopy and computed tomographic (CT) scans of the pharynx in patients with this syndrome. Fluoroscopy in 6 sleeping patients showed that the obstruction always began during inspiration when the soft palate touched the tongue and posterior pharyngeal wall. The CT scans in 9 awake subjects demonstrated that the narrowest section of the airway in patients and in control subjects was the region posterior to the soft palate. The cross-sectional area of this region was significantly narrower in patients than it was in control subjects (p less than 0.001). Because a narrow airway would be more likely to collapse during inspiration than a normal one would (Bernoulli's Principle), we conclude that the narrow airways we observed in awake patients may be an important contributing factor in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:6838055

  14. Biology of peripheral blood cells in obstructive sleep apnea--the tip of the iceberg.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Lena; Dyugovskaya, Larissa; Polyakov, Andrey

    2008-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a highly prevalent breathing disorder in sleep, characterized by intermittent and recurrent pauses in respiration, has emerged as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Accumulated evidence implicates Leukocyte-endothelial cell activation and adhesion as critical components that induce inflammation and injury to the vasculature resulting in the development of cardiovascular complications. Similar cellular interactions were described in conditions of ischemia/reperfusion, and various components of the metabolic syndrome as hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. The hallmark of sleep apnea--the multiple cycles of hypoxia/reoxygenation--promote oxidative stress and inflammation. These facilitate increased interactions of blood cells with endothelial cells, resulting in endothelial cell injury and dysfunction. Such events can promote atherosclerosis and the development of cardiovascular morbidities in OSA. However, inter-individual differences in response to intermittent hypoxia and activation of anti-inflammatory cytokine profiles in T lymphocytes can serve as protective mechanisms. PMID:18946785

  15. [Prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in a group of obese workers].

    PubMed

    Nicosia, C; Vigna, L; Monsellato, S; Patrini, L; Consonni, D; Bertazzi, P A; Riboldi, L

    2012-01-01

    The Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is a quite diffused in workers disease, mainly in obese or overweight subjects. This syndrome can cause cardiovascular and cerebral complications and have negative effects on job performances. We evaluated 214 obese/overweight workers referred from different job areas. A diagnosis of OSAS was pre-existent in about 5% of the examined subjects, and clinical elements suggesting suspect of OSAS were present in about 15% of the sample. The risk of development Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome seems to be linear correlated with BMI, neck and waist circumference. We did not find any correlation between OSAS risk and job area. We strongly suggest that health surveillance should include the evaluation of the possible presence of sleep disorders to reduce the risks associated and the negative consequences on job performances. PMID:23405669

  16. Respiratory Sound Analysis for Flow Estimation During Wakefulness and Sleep, and its Applications for Sleep Apnea Detection and Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadollahi, Azadeh

    Tracheal respiratory sounds analysis has been investigated as a non--invasive method to estimate respiratory flow and upper airway obstruction. However, the flow--sound relationship is highly variable among subjects which makes it challenging to estimate flow in general applications. Therefore, a robust model for acoustical flow estimation in a large group of individuals did not exist before. On the other hand, a major application of acoustical flow estimation is to detect flow limitations in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) during sleep. However, previously the flow--sound relationship was only investigated during wakefulness among healthy individuals. Therefore, it was necessary to examine the flow--sound relationship during sleep in OSA patients. This thesis takes the above challenges and offers innovative solutions. First, a modified linear flow--sound model was proposed to estimate respiratory flow from tracheal sounds. To remove the individual based calibration process, the statistical correlation between the model parameters and anthropometric features of 93 healthy volunteers was investigated. The results show that gender, height and smoking are the most significant factors that affect the model parameters. Hence, a general acoustical flow estimation model was proposed for people with similar height and gender. Second, flow--sound relationship during sleep and wakefulness was studied among 13 OSA patients. The results show that during sleep and wakefulness, flow--sound relation- ship follows a power law, but with different parameters. Therefore, for acoustical flow estimation during sleep, the model parameters should be extracted from sleep data to have small errors. The results confirm reliability of the acoustical flow estimation for investigating flow variations during both sleep and wakefulness. Finally, a new method for sleep apnea detection and monitoring was developed, which only requires recording the tracheal sounds and the blood's oxygen saturation level (SaO2) data. It automatically classifies the sound segments into breath, snore and noise. A weighted average of features extracted from sound segments and SaO2 signal was used to detect apnea and hypopnea events. The performance of the proposed approach was evaluated on the data of 66 patients. The results show high correlation (0.96, p < 0.0001) between the outcomes of our system and those of the polysomnography. Also, sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method in differentiating simple snorers from OSA patients were found to be more than 91%. These results are superior or comparable with the existing commercialized sleep apnea portable monitors.

  17. Apnea-Induced Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Disruption Impairs Human Spatial Navigational Memory

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Akifumi; Mantua, Janna; Lim, Jason; Koushyk, Viachaslau; Leibert, David P.; Osorio, Ricardo S.; Rapoport, David M.; Ayappa, Indu

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal electrophysiology and behavioral evidence support a role for sleep in spatial navigational memory, but the role of particular sleep stages is less clear. Although rodent models suggest the importance of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in spatial navigational memory, a similar role for REM sleep has never been examined in humans. We recruited subjects with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who were well treated and adherent with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Restricting CPAP withdrawal to REM through real-time monitoring of the polysomnogram provides a novel way of addressing the role of REM sleep in spatial navigational memory with a physiologically relevant stimulus. Individuals spent two different nights in the laboratory, during which subjects performed timed trials before and after sleep on one of two unique 3D spatial mazes. One night of sleep was normally consolidated with use of therapeutic CPAP throughout, whereas on the other night, CPAP was reduced only in REM sleep, allowing REM OSA to recur. REM disruption via this method caused REM sleep reduction and significantly fragmented any remaining REM sleep without affecting total sleep time, sleep efficiency, or slow-wave sleep. We observed improvements in maze performance after a night of normal sleep that were significantly attenuated after a night of REM disruption without changes in psychomotor vigilance. Furthermore, the improvement in maze completion time significantly positively correlated with the mean REM run duration across both sleep conditions. In conclusion, we demonstrate a novel role for REM sleep in human memory formation and highlight a significant cognitive consequence of OSA. PMID:25355211

  18. Apnea-induced rapid eye movement sleep disruption impairs human spatial navigational memory.

    PubMed

    Varga, Andrew W; Kishi, Akifumi; Mantua, Janna; Lim, Jason; Koushyk, Viachaslau; Leibert, David P; Osorio, Ricardo S; Rapoport, David M; Ayappa, Indu

    2014-10-29

    Hippocampal electrophysiology and behavioral evidence support a role for sleep in spatial navigational memory, but the role of particular sleep stages is less clear. Although rodent models suggest the importance of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in spatial navigational memory, a similar role for REM sleep has never been examined in humans. We recruited subjects with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who were well treated and adherent with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Restricting CPAP withdrawal to REM through real-time monitoring of the polysomnogram provides a novel way of addressing the role of REM sleep in spatial navigational memory with a physiologically relevant stimulus. Individuals spent two different nights in the laboratory, during which subjects performed timed trials before and after sleep on one of two unique 3D spatial mazes. One night of sleep was normally consolidated with use of therapeutic CPAP throughout, whereas on the other night, CPAP was reduced only in REM sleep, allowing REM OSA to recur. REM disruption via this method caused REM sleep reduction and significantly fragmented any remaining REM sleep without affecting total sleep time, sleep efficiency, or slow-wave sleep. We observed improvements in maze performance after a night of normal sleep that were significantly attenuated after a night of REM disruption without changes in psychomotor vigilance. Furthermore, the improvement in maze completion time significantly positively correlated with the mean REM run duration across both sleep conditions. In conclusion, we demonstrate a novel role for REM sleep in human memory formation and highlight a significant cognitive consequence of OSA. PMID:25355211

  19. Complications of adenotonsillectomy for obstructive sleep apnea in school-aged children

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinopoulou, Sofia; Gallagher, Paul; Elden, Lisa; Garetz, Susan L.; Mitchell, Ron B.; Redline, Susan; Rosen, Carol L.; Katz, Eliot S.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Amin, Raouf; Arens, Raanan; Paruthi, Shalini; Marcus, Carole L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adenotonsillectomy is the treatment of choice for most children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, but can lead to complications. Current guidelines recommend that high-risk children be hospitalized after adenotonsillectomy, but it is unclear which otherwise-healthy children will develop post-operative complications. We hypothesized that polysomnographic parameters would predict post-operative complications in children who participated in the Childhood AdenoTonsillectomy (CHAT) study. Methods Children in the CHAT study aged 59 years with apnea hypopnea index 230/hr or obstructive apnea index 120/hr without comorbidities other than obesity/asthma underwent adenotonsillectomy. Associations between demographic variables and surgical complications were examined with Chi square and Fishers exact tests. Polysomnographic parameters between subjects with/without complications were compared using Mann-Whitney tests. Results Of the 221 children (median apnea hypopnea index 4.7/hr, range 1.227.7/hr; 31% obese), 16 (7%) children experienced complications. 3 (1.4%) children had respiratory complications including pulmonary edema, hypoxemia and bronchospasm. Thirteen (5.9%) had non-respiratory complications, including dehydration (4.5%), hemorrhage (2.3%) and fever (0.5%). There were no statistically significant associations between demographic parameters (gender, race, and obesity) or polysomnographic parameters (apnea hypopnea index, % total sleep time with SpO2<92%, SpO2 nadir, % sleep time with end-tidal CO2>50 Torr) and complications. Conclusions This study showed a low risk of post-adenotonsillectomy complications in school-aged healthy children with obstructive apnea although many children met published criteria for admission due to obesity, or polysomnographic severity. In this specific population, none of the polysomnographic or demographic parameters predicted post-operative complications. Further research could identify the patients at greatest risk of post-operative complications. PMID:25575425

  20. The Sleep Apnea cardioVascular Endpoints (SAVE) Trial: Rationale, Ethics, Design, and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Antic, Nick A.; Heeley, Emma; Anderson, Craig S.; Luo, Yuanming; Wang, Jiguang; Neal, Bruce; Grunstein, Ron; Barbe, Ferran; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Huang, Shaoguang; Redline, Susan; Zhong, Nanshan; McEvoy, R. Doug

    2015-01-01

    The Sleep Apnea cardioVascular Endpoints (SAVE) study is an ongoing investigator-initiated and conducted, international, multicenter, open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trial that was designed to determine whether treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) can reduce the risk of serious cardiovascular (CV) events in patients with established CV disease (clinical trial registration NCT00738179). The results of this study will have important implications for the provision of health care to patients with sleep apnea around the world. The SAVE study has brought together respiratory, sleep, CV and stroke clinicians-scientists in an interdisciplinary collaboration with industry and government sponsorship to conduct an ambitious clinical trial. Following its launch in Australia and China in late 2008, the recruitment network expanded across 89 sites that included New Zealand, India, Spain, USA, and Brazil for a total of 2,717 patients randomized by December 2013. These patients are being followed until December 2015 so that the average length of follow-up of the cohort will be over 4 y. This article describes the rationale for the SAVE study, considerations given to the design including how various cultural and ethical challenges were addressed, and progress in establishing and maintaining the recruitment network, patient follow-up, and adherence to CPAP and procedures. The assumptions underlying the original trial sample size calculation and why this was revised downward in 2012 are also discussed. Clinical Trials Registration Number: NCT00738179. Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry Number: ACTRN12608000409370. Citation: Antic NA, Heeley E, Anderson CS, Luo Y, Wang J, Neal B, Grunstein R, Barbe F, Lorenzi-Filho G, Huang S, Redline S, Zhong N, McEvoy RD. The sleep apnea cardiovascular endpoints (SAVE) trial: rationale, ethics, design, and progress. SLEEP 2015;38(8):1247–1257. PMID:25669180

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea, metabolic syndrome, and age: will geriatricians be caught asleep on the job?

    PubMed

    Cherniack, E Paul; Cherniack, Neil S

    2010-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is increasingly recognized in older persons as an important cause of morbidity and mortality, resulting in cardiovascular disease, cognitive dysfunction, and disturbed sleep. It has been cited as an independent risk factor for the metabolic syndrome (MS). The elevated levels of cytokines, such as interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which also increase with age, are a common feature of both OSA and MS. Intermittent hypoxia caused by the recurring episodes of apnea and near-apnea in OSA is a major cause of its systemic effects. Mathematical models of OSA show how obesity and anatomic changes in the upper airways, which may be age-related, interact with the networks responsible for the chemical and neural control of breathing to cause the recurrent intermittent hypoxia of sleep apnea. Treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure improves some aspects of the metabolic syndrome, reduces cardiovascular morbidity, and improves domains of cognitive function. OSA is more difficult to identify in the elderly because many of its symptoms can be caused by other disorders which are common in the elderly. Clinicians who encounter OSA may be advised to search for the presence of MS, and vice versa. PMID:20305362

  2. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea with mandibular advancement appliance over prostheses: A case report.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Thais Moura; Colen, Sâmia; Cunali, Paulo Afonso; Rossi, Rowdley; Dal-Fabbro, Cibele; Ferraz, Otávio; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with a mandibular advancement device (MAD) is recommended for mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), primary snoring and as a secondary option for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, because it has better adherence and acceptance. However, edentulous patients do not have supports to hold the MAD. This study aimed to present a possible to OSA treatment with MAD in over complete upper and partial lower dentures. The patient, a 38-year-old female with mild OSA, was treated with a MAD. The respiratory parameter, such as apnea-hypopnea index, arousal index and oxyhemoglobin saturation was improved after treatment. PMID:26483952

  3. The effect of antihypertensive agents on sleep apnea: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and hypertension are well-known cardiovascular risk factors. Their control could reduce the burden of heart disease across populations. Several drugs are used to control hypertension, but the only consistently effective treatment of OSA is continuous positive airway pressure. The identification of a drug capable of improving OSA and hypertension simultaneously would provide a novel approach in the treatment of both diseases. Methods/Design This is a randomized double-blind clinical trial, comparing the use of chlorthalidone with amiloride versus amlodipine as a first drug option in patients older than 40 years of age with stage I hypertension (140 to 159/90 to 99 mmHg) and moderate OSA (15 to 30 apneas/hour of sleep). The primary outcomes are the variation of the number of apneas per hour and blood pressure measured by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The secondary outcomes are adverse events, somnolence scale (Epworth), ventilatory parameters and C reactive protein levels. The follow-up will last 8 weeks. There will be 29 participants per group. The project has been approved by the ethics committee of our institution. Discussion The role of fluid retention in OSA has been known for several decades. The use of diuretics are well established in treating hypertension but have never been appropriately tested for sleep apnea. As well as testing the efficacy of these drugs, this study will help to understand the mechanisms that link hypertension and sleep apnea and their treatment. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01896661 PMID:24382030

  4. Agreement Between Stroke Patients and Family Members For Ascertaining Pre-Stroke Risk of Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Sarah L; Brown, Devin L; Chervin, Ronald D; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Smith, Melinda A; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2014-01-01

    Background Ascertaining self-reported information about pre-stroke obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) risk in the acute stroke period is challenging as many stroke patients have deficits that hinder communication. We examined agreement between stroke patients without communication limitations and family members (proxy) with respect to pre-stroke risk of OSA. Methods Patient-proxy pairs (n = 42) were interviewed independently as part of the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi Project from May 2010 - April 2011. The Berlin questionnaire was used to measure a high risk of OSA defined as the presence of at least two of the following conditions: 1) snoring behaviors/witnessed apneas, 2) daytime sleepiness, and 3) hypertension or obesity. Patient-proxy agreement was assessed using a kappa coefficient. Results Forty-three percent of patients self-identified as high risk for sleep apnea, and 45% of proxies identified patients as high risk. Patient-proxy agreement for high risk of pre-stroke OSA was fair (kappa = 0.28) with better agreement for spouses and children proxies (kappa = 0.38) than for other family members. Agreement was also fair for most individual questions. Conclusions Spouse and child proxy use of the Berlin questionnaire may be an option to assess a patient's pre-stroke likelihood of sleep apnea. Whereas prospective studies of incident stroke in patients with and without objectively confirmed sleep apnea would require formidable resources, the present results suggest that an alternative strategy may involve proxy use of the Berlin in a retrospective study design. PMID:24238964

  5. Hypoadiponectinemia is Related to Sympathetic Activation and Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jamie C.M.; Xu, Aimin; Tam, Sidney; Khong, Pek-lan; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Lam, David C.L.; Lai, Agnes Y.K.; Lam, Bing; Lam, Karen S.L.; Ip, Mary S.M.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Hypoadiponectinemia is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and diabetes mellitus. We hypothesize that adiponectin may be downregulated in sleep apnea through various mechanisms, contributing to cardiometabolic risks. This study investigated the relationship between serum adiponectin and sleep disordered breathing and its potential determinants. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects and setting: Adult men without prevailing medical comorbidity from the sleep clinic in a teaching hospital. Measurements & Results: One hundred thirty-four men underwent polysomnography, with mean age of 43.9 (9.8) years, and median apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 17.1 (5.7, 46.6). Overnight urine samples for catecholamines and blood samples for analyses of insulin, glucose and adiponectin levels from fasting subjects were taken. Insulin resistance was estimated by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to quantify the amount of abdominal visceral fat. Serum adiponectin level, adjusted for age, body mass index, and visceral fat volume, was significantly lower in subjects with severe obstructive sleep apnea (AHI ≥ 30) compared with those with an AHI of less than 30: 4.0 (3.1, 5.4) versus 5.4 (3.6, 7.9) μg/mL, P = 0.039. After we adjusted for adiposity, adiponectin levels remained negatively correlated with AHI (P = 0.037), arousal index (P = 0.022), HOMA-IR/fasting insulin (P < 0.001), and urinary norepinephrine and normetanephrine (P < 0.008). In a multiple stepwise regression model, the independent determinants of adiponectin after adjustment for adiposity were HOMA-IR (P < 0.001) and urinary norepinephrine and normetanephrine (P = 0.037). Conclusions: Adiponectin was suppressed in subjects with severe obstructive sleep apnea, independent of obesity. Adiponectin levels were determined by insulin resistance and sympathetic activation, factors that may be totally or partially attributed to sleep disordered breathing. Citation: Lam JCM; Xu A; Tam S; Khong PL; Yao TJ; Lam DCL; Lai AYK; Lam B; Lam KSL; Ip MSM. Hypoadiponectinemia is related to sympathetic activation and severity of obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2008;31(12):1721–1727. PMID:19090328

  6. A Robust Apnea Period Detection Method in Changing Sleep Posture by Average Mutual Information of Heartbeat and Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Yosuke; Watanabe, Kajiro; Kobayashi, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Tanaka

    Sleep disorders disturb the recovery from mental and physical fatigues, one of the functions of the sleep. The majority of those who with the disorders are suffering from Sleep Apnea Syndrome (SAS). Continuous Hypoxia during sleep due to SAS cause Circulatory Disturbances, such as hypertension and ischemic heart disease, and Malfunction of Autonomic Nervous System, and other severe complications, often times bringing the suffers to death. In order to prevent these from happening, it is important to detect the SAS in its early stage by monitoring the daily respirations during sleep, and to provide appropriate treatments at medical institutions. In this paper, the Pneumatic Method to detect the Apnea period during sleep is proposed. Pneumatic method can measure heartbeat and respiration signal. Respiration signal can be considered as noise against heartbeat signal, and the decrease in the respiration signal due to Apnea increases the Average Mutual Information of heartbeat. The result of scaling analysis of the average mutual information is defined as threshold to detect the apnea period. The root mean square error between the lengths of Apnea measured by Strain Gauge using for reference and those measured by using the proposed method was 3.1 seconds. And, error of the number of apnea times judged by doctor and proposal method in OSAS patients was 3.3 times.

  7. Modafinil in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome: a pilot study in 6 patients.

    PubMed

    Arnulf, I; Homeyer, P; Garma, L; Whitelaw, W A; Derenne, J P

    1997-01-01

    We studied the effects of modafinil, a vigilance-enhancing drug, on excessive daytime sleepiness, memory, night sleep and respiration in 6 patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) using a double-blind random cross-over design with 24-hour polysomnography, verbal memory test and a 5-week sleep-wake diary kept by the patients. There were two 2-week treatment periods in which either modafinil or placebo was used; they were separated by a 1-week wash-out period. Our results show that modafinil reduces daytime sleep duration, lengthens the duration of subjective daytime vigilance and improves long-term memory in patients with OSAHS without modifying night sleep and respiration events. PMID:9097352

  8. Manifestations of Insomnia in Sleep Apnea: Implications for Screening and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bailes, Sally; Rizzo, Dorrie; Baltzan, Marc; Grad, Roland; Pavilanis, Alan; Creti, Laura; Fichten, Catherine S; Libman, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the presence, type, and severity of insomnia complaints in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients and to assess the utility of the Sleep Symptom Checklist (SSC) for case identification in primary care. Participants were 88 OSA patients, 57 cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) patients, and 14 healthy controls (Ctrl). Each completed a sleep questionnaire as well as the SSC, which includes insomnia, daytime functioning, psychological, and sleep disorder subscales. Results showed that OSA patients could be grouped according to 3 insomnia patterns: no insomnia (OSA), n = 21; insomnia (OSA-I), n = 30, with a subjective complaint and disrupted sleep; and noncomplaining poor sleepers (OSA-I-NC), n = 37. Comparisons among the OSA, CBT-I, and Ctrl groups demonstrate distinct profiles on the SSC subscales, indicating its potential utility for both case identification and treatment planning. PMID:26437146

  9. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Ghaleh Bandi, Mir Farhad; Naserbakht, Morteza; Tabasi, Abdolreza; Marghaiezadeh, Azin; Riazee Esfahani, Mohammad; Golzarian, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sleep apnea is temporary cessation or absence of breathing during sleep. Significant increase in blood pressure is clinically seen in apneic episodes. The aim of this study was to examine sleep apnea syndrome as a risk factor for non- arthritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) in a case control study. Methods: Nineteen NAION patients (9 men and 10 women) and 31 age and sex matched control participants (18 men and 13 women) were evaluated for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Full night polysomnography was performed and proportion of OSAS was compared between the NAION patients and the control group. Other risk factors for NAION such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, ischemic heart disease and tobacco consumption were also evaluated. Chi square test and independent samples t-test were used for statistical analysis. Results: OF the 19 NAION patients, 18 (95%) had OSAS, and of the control group 13 (41.9%) had OSAS. The frequency of OSAS was significantly higher among NAION patients compared to the controls (p< 0.001). The Mean Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI) was 37.65/h SD= 37.61/h in NAION patients and it was 15.05/h SD= 11.97/h (p= 0.018) in controls. The frequency of diabetes and hypertension was significantly higher in the NAION patients than in controls. Conclusion: based on the results of this study, it seems that there is an association between NAION and OSAS. PMID:26913263

  10. Toward numerical simulations of fluid-structure interactions for investigation of obstructive sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Jung; Huang, Shao-Ching; White, Susan M.; Mallya, Sanjay M.; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2015-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a medical condition characterized by repetitive partial or complete occlusion of the airway during sleep. The soft tissues in the airway of OSA patients are prone to collapse under the low-pressure loads incurred during breathing. This paper describes efforts toward the development of a numerical tool for simulation of air-tissue interactions in the upper airway of patients with sleep apnea. A procedure by which patient-specific airway geometries are segmented and processed from dental cone-beam CT scans into signed distance fields is presented. A sharp-interface embedded boundary method based on the signed distance field is used on Cartesian grids for resolving the airflow in the airway geometries. For simulation of structure mechanics with large expected displacements, a cut-cell finite element method with nonlinear Green strains is used. The fluid and structure solvers are strongly coupled with a partitioned iterative algorithm. Preliminary results are shown for flow simulation inside the three-dimensional rigid upper airway of patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Two validation cases for the fluid-structure coupling problem are also presented.

  11. Toward numerical simulations of fluid-structure interactions for investigation of obstructive sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Jung; Huang, Shao-Ching; White, Susan M.; Mallya, Sanjay M.; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2016-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a medical condition characterized by repetitive partial or complete occlusion of the airway during sleep. The soft tissues in the airway of OSA patients are prone to collapse under the low-pressure loads incurred during breathing. This paper describes efforts toward the development of a numerical tool for simulation of air-tissue interactions in the upper airway of patients with sleep apnea. A procedure by which patient-specific airway geometries are segmented and processed from dental cone-beam CT scans into signed distance fields is presented. A sharp-interface embedded boundary method based on the signed distance field is used on Cartesian grids for resolving the airflow in the airway geometries. For simulation of structure mechanics with large expected displacements, a cut-cell finite element method with nonlinear Green strains is used. The fluid and structure solvers are strongly coupled with a partitioned iterative algorithm. Preliminary results are shown for flow simulation inside the three-dimensional rigid upper airway of patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Two validation cases for the fluid-structure coupling problem are also presented.

  12. Monocarboxylate Transporter 2 and Stroke Severity in a Rodent Model of Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Guo, Shang-Z; Bonen, Arend; Li, Richard C.; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Zhang, Shelley X.L.; Brittian, Kenneth R.; Gozal, David

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is not only more prevalent but is also associated with more severe adverse functional outcomes among patients with sleep apnea. Monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) are important regulators of cellular bioenergetics, have been implicated in brain susceptibility to acute severe hypoxia (ASH), and could underlie the unfavorable prognosis of cerebrovascular accidents in sleep apnea patients. Rodents were exposed to either intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep, a characteristic feature of sleep apnea, or to sustained hypoxia (SH), and expression of MCT1 and MCT2 was assessed. In addition, the functional recovery to MCAO in rats and hMCT2 transgenic mice and of hippocampal slices subjected to ASH was assessed, as well as the effects of MCT blocker and MCT2 antisense oligonucleotides and siRNAs. IH, but not SH, induced significant reductions in MCT2 expression over time at both the mRNA and protein levels, and in the functional recovery of hippocampal slices subjected to ASH. Similarly, MCAO-induced infarcts were significantly greater in IH-exposed rats and mice, and over-expression of hMCT2 in mice markedly attenuated the adverse effects of IH. Exogenous pyruvate treatment reduced infarct volumes in normoxic rats but not in IH-exposed rats. Administration of he MCT2 blocker 4CN, but not the MCT1 antagonist pCMBS, increased infarct size. Thus, prolonged exposures to IH mimicking sleep apnea are associated with increased CNS vulnerability to ischemia that is mediated, at least in part, by concomitant decreases in the expression and function of MCT2. Efforts to develop agonists of MCT2 should provide opportunities to ameliorate the overall outcome of stroke. PMID:21753001

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea in psychiatric outpatients. A clinic-based study.

    PubMed

    Nikolakaros, Georgios; Virtanen, Irina; Markkula, Juha; Vahlberg, Tero; Saaresranta, Tarja

    2015-10-01

    Psychiatric diseases and symptoms are common among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, only a few studies have examined OSA in psychiatric patients. At the outpatient clinic of the Uusikaupunki Psychiatric Hospital, Finland, we used a low referral threshold to a diagnostic sleep study. An ambulatory cardiorespiratory polygraphy was performed in 114 of 221 patients. 95 patients were referred by the psychiatric clinic and 19 were examined in other clinical settings. We reviewed the medical files and retrospectively assessed the prevalence of OSA and the effect of gender, age, obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, alcohol abuse, and symptoms suggesting OSA. 58 of the 221 patients (26.2%), 30 of 85 men (35.3%) and 28 of 136 women (20.6%), had OSA as determined by an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 5/h or more. 20 patients (12 men and 8 women) had moderate or severe OSA (AHI ≥ 15/h). 46 patients (including 11 patients with moderate or severe OSA) were identified in the psychiatric clinic. In univariate analysis, a high body mass index, male gender, hypertension, snoring, and a history of witnessed apneas during sleep were associated with the presence of OSA. In multivariate analysis, a history of witnessed apneas did not remain significant. Age, type 2 diabetes, alcohol abuse, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), and fatigue did not associate with the presence of OSA. Our findings suggest that in psychiatric outpatients OSA is common but underdiagnosed. Presentation is often atypical, since many patients with OSA do not report witnessed apneas or EDS. PMID:26343604

  14. Effects of the Mueller maneuver on functional mitral regurgitation and implications for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Pressman, Gregg S; Orban, Marek; Leinveber, Pavel; Parekh, Kunal; Singh, Manmeet; Kara, Tomas; Somers, Virend K

    2015-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is prevalent and adversely affects cardiovascular health. However, little is known of the acute effects of an obstructive apnea on cardiovascular physiology. We hypothesized that pre-existing functional mitral regurgitation (MR) would worsen during performance of a Mueller maneuver (MM) used to simulate an obstructive apnea; 15 subjects with an ejection fraction ≤35% and pre-existing functional MR were studied with Doppler echocardiography. The radius of the proximal flow convergence was used as a measure of mitral regurgitant flow. Measurements were made at baseline, during the MM, and post-MM. Areas of all 4 chambers were also measured at these time points, both in systole and diastole. Mean flow convergence radius for the group decreased significantly during the transition from the late-MM to post-MM (0.65 → 0.57 mm, p = 0.001), implying increased MR during the MM. In addition, in 3 subjects, duration of MR increased during the MM. Right atrial (RA) areas, both systolic and diastolic, increased during the maneuver, whereas RA fractional area change decreased, indicating reduced RA emptying. Left ventricular emptying decreased early in the maneuver, probably because of the increased afterload burden, and then recovered. In conclusion, high negative intrathoracic pressure produces changes that, repeated hundreds of times per night in patients with obstructive sleep apnea, have the potential to worsen heart failure and predispose affected subjects to atrial fibrillation. PMID:25846766

  15. Correlation between hippocampal sulcus width and severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akhan, Galip; Songu, Murat; Ayik, Sibel Oktem; Altay, Canan; Kalemci, Serdar

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) severity and the hippocampal sulcus width in a cohort of subjects with OSAS and controls. A total of 149 OSAS patients and 60 nonapneic controls were included in the study. Overnight polysomnograpy was performed in all patients. Hippocampal sulcus width of the patients was measured by a radiologist blinded to the diagnosis of the patients. Other variables noted for each patient were as follows: gender, age, body mass index, apnea hypopnea index, Epworth sleepiness scale, sleep efficacy, mean saturation, lowest O2 saturation, longest apnea duration, neck circumference, waist circumference, hip circumference. A total of 149 OSAS patients were divided into three groups: mild OSAS (n = 54), moderate OSAS (n = 40), severe OSAS (n = 55) groups. The control group consisted of patients with AHI <5 (n = 60). Hippocampal sulcus width was 1.6 ± 0.83 mm in the control group; while 1.9 ± 0.81 mm in mild OSAS, 2.1 ± 0.60 mm in moderate OSAS, and 2.9 ± 0.58 mm in severe OSAS groups (p < 0.001). Correlation analysis of variables revealed that apnea hypopnea index (rs = 0.483, p < 0.001) was positively correlated with hippocampal sulcus width. Our findings demonstrated that severity of OSAS might be associated with various pathologic mechanisms including increased hippocampal sulcus width. PMID:25502740

  16. Chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and the relationship between sleep disorder and pain level, quality of life, and disability

    PubMed Central

    Aytekin, Ebru; Demir, Saliha Eroglu; Komut, Ece Akyol; Okur, Sibel Caglar; Burnaz, Ozer; Caglar, Nil Sayiner; Demiryontar, Dilay Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and to assess the relationship between sleep disorder and pain, quality of life, and disability. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy-four patients were included in the study and classified as having mild, moderate, or severe obstructive sleep apnea. Chronic widespread pain, quality of life, and disability were evaluated. [Results] Forty-one patients (55.4%) had chronic widespread pain. Female patients had a higher incidence of chronic pain, and female patients with chronic pain had higher body mass indexes, pain levels, and disability scores than did male patients. Physical component scores of female patients with chronic pain were lower than those of male patients. No correlation was observed between the degree of sleep disorder and severity of pain, pain duration, disability, or quality of life in obstructive sleep apnea patients with pain. [Conclusion] This study showed a 55.4% prevalence of chronic widespread pain in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and a greater risk of chronic pain in female than in male patients. Female patients with obstructive sleep apnea and chronic pain have higher pain and disability levels and a lower quality of life. PMID:26504332

  17. High-Flow Nasal Cannula Therapy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Leon; Goldberg, Shmuel; Shitrit, Michal; Picard, Elie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Over the last decade, high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy has become an increasingly important and popular mode of noninvasive respiratory support. HFNC facilitates delivery of humidified and heated oxygen at a high flow rate and generates positive airway pressure. Methods: We present five cases of children with OSA without adenotonsillar hypertrophy who were treated with HFNC. Results: We demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in apnea-hypopnea index and nadir oxygen saturation in this small cohort. Conclusion: We present our successful experience of treating severe OSA with HFNC in the home setting. Further randomized controlled trials are needed to determine whether HFNC could be considered as an established alternative for CPAP in OSA in children Citation: Joseph L, Goldberg S, Shitrit M, Picard E. High-flow nasal cannula therapy for obstructive sleep apnea in children. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(9):1007–1010. PMID:26094930

  18. Dental devices; classification for intraoral devices for snoring and/or obstructive sleep apnea. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2002-11-12

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the intraoral devices for snoring and/or obstructive sleep apnea into class II (special controls). These devices are used to control or treat simple snoring and/or obstructive sleep apnea. This classification is based on the recommendations of the Dental Devices Panel (the Panel), and is being taken to establish sufficient regulatory controls that will provide reasonable assurance of the safety and effectiveness of these devices. This action is being taken under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (the 1976 amendments), the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (the SMDA), and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is publishing a notice of availability of the guidance document that will serve as the special control for this final rule. PMID:12428642

  19. [Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children: beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy].

    PubMed

    Esteller, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in the general childhood population is 1-2% and the most common cause is adenotonsillar hypertrophy. However, beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy, there are other highly prevalent causes of this syndrome in children. The causes are often multifactorial and include muscular hypotonia, dentofacial abnormalities, soft tissue hypertrophy of the airway, and neurological disorders). Collaboration between different specialties involved in the care of these children is essential, given the wide variability of conditions and how frequently different factors are involved in their genesis, as well as the different treatments to be applied. We carried out a wide literature review of other causes of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children, beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy. We organised the prevalence of this syndrome in each pathology and the reasons that cause it, as well as their interactions and management, in a consistent manner. PMID:25107357

  20. Data-Driven Multimodal Sleep Apnea Events Detection : Synchrosquezing Transform Processing and Riemannian Geometry Classification Approaches.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Tomasz M

    2016-07-01

    A novel multimodal and bio-inspired approach to biomedical signal processing and classification is presented in the paper. This approach allows for an automatic semantic labeling (interpretation) of sleep apnea events based the proposed data-driven biomedical signal processing and classification. The presented signal processing and classification methods have been already successfully applied to real-time unimodal brainwaves (EEG only) decoding in brain-computer interfaces developed by the author. In the current project the very encouraging results are obtained using multimodal biomedical (brainwaves and peripheral physiological) signals in a unified processing approach allowing for the automatic semantic data description. The results thus support a hypothesis of the data-driven and bio-inspired signal processing approach validity for medical data semantic interpretation based on the sleep apnea events machine-learning-related classification. PMID:27194241

  1. Processing and representation of meta-data for sleep apnea diagnosis with an artificial intelligence approach.

    PubMed

    Nettleton, D; Muiz, J

    2001-09-01

    In this article, we revise and try to resolve some of the problems inherent in questionnaire screening of sleep apnea cases and apnea diagnosis based on attributes which are relevant and reliable. We present a way of learning information about the relevance of the data, comparing this with the definition of the information by the medical expert. We generate a predictive data model using a data aggregation operator which takes relevance and reliability information about the data into account to produce a diagnosis for each case. We also introduce a grade of membership for each question response which allows the patient to indicate a level of confidence or doubt in their own judgement. The method is tested with data collected from patients in a Sleep Clinic using questionnaires specially designed for the study. Other artificial intelligence predictive modeling algorithms are also tested on the same data and their predictive accuracy compared to that of the aggregation operator. PMID:11518667

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: An important piece in the puzzle of cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Costa, Cátia; Santos, Beatriz; Severino, Davide; Cabanelas, Nuno; Peres, Marisa; Monteiro, Isabel; Leal, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is a clinical entity characterized by recurring episodes of apnea and/or hypopnea during sleep, due to a total or partial collapse, respectively, of the upper airway. This collapse originates a set of pathophysiological changes that determine the appearance of several cardiovascular complications. OSA contributes for the development of hypertension, heart failure, arrhythmias and coronary heart disease. Nowadays it is recognized to be an important public health problem, taking into account not just its repercussions but also its prevalence, since the main risk factor for the disease is obesity, a growing problem worldwide, both in developed and developing countries. The present review summarizes the current knowledge about OSA, as regards its definition, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, cardiovascular effects and treatment. PMID:25496654

  3. [Effect of CPAP and BIPAP on stroke volume in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Weber, U; Kellner, C; Burbach, R; Kirchheiner, T; Rühle, K H

    1995-03-01

    We studied the effect of CPAP and BIPAP on cardiac output (CO) in 23 male obstructive sleep apnea (OSAS) patients with cardiac history but without congestive heart failure (CHF) during wakefulness using the thermodilution method. CPAP was applied at 10 cm H2O and 15 cm H2O, BIPAP at 10/0 cm H2O and 15/10 cm H2O. CO only decreased significantly by 14.6 +/- 11.8% at 15 cm H2O CPAP and by 13.4 +/- 10.0% at 15/10 cm H2O BIPAP. CPAP and BIPAP did not differ in altering hemodynamics. So sleep apnea patients without CHF develop no severe decrease of CO during nasal positive pressure ventilation up to 15 cm 2O. PMID:7753770

  4. Effect of sleep stage on breathing in children with central hypoventilation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingtao; Colrain, Ian M; Panitch, Howard B; Tapia, Ignacio E; Schwartz, Michael S; Samuel, John; Pepe, Michelle; Bandla, Preetam; Bradford, Ruth; Mosse, Yael P; Maris, John M; Marcus, Carole L

    2008-07-01

    The early literature suggests that hypoventilation in infants with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CHS) is less severe during rapid eye movement (REM) than during non-REM (NREM) sleep. However, this supposition has not been rigorously tested, and subjects older than infancy have not been studied. Given the differences in anatomy, physiology, and REM sleep distribution between infants and older children, and the reduced number of limb movements during REM sleep, we hypothesized that older subjects with CHS would have more severe hypoventilation during REM than NREM sleep. Nine subjects with CHS, aged (mean +/- SD) 13 +/- 7 yr, were studied. Spontaneous ventilation was evaluated by briefly disconnecting the ventilator under controlled circumstances. Arousal was common, occurring in 46% of REM vs. 38% of NREM trials [not significant (NS)]. Central apnea occurred during 31% of REM and 54% of NREM trials (NS). Although minute ventilation declined precipitously during both REM and NREM trials, hypoventilation was less severe during REM (drop in minute ventilation of 65 +/- 23%) than NREM (drop of 87 +/- 16%, P = 0.036). Despite large changes in gas exchange during trials, there was no significant change in heart rate during either REM or NREM sleep. We conclude that older patients with CHS frequently have arousal and central apnea, in addition to hypoventilation, when breathing spontaneously during sleep. The hypoventilation in CHS is more severe during NREM than REM sleep. We speculate that this may be due to increased excitatory inputs to the respiratory system during REM sleep. PMID:18499780

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is Related to Impaired Cognitive and Functional Status after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Aaronson, Justine A.; van Bennekom, Coen A.M.; Hofman, Winni F.; van Bezeij, Tijs; van den Aardweg, Joost G.; Groet, Erny; Kylstra, Wytske A.; Schmand, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder in stroke patients and is associated with prolonged hospitalization, decreased functional outcome, and recurrent stroke. Research on the effect of OSA on cognitive functioning following stroke is scarce. The primary objective of this study was to compare stroke patients with and without OSA on cognitive and functional status upon admission to inpatient rehabilitation. Design: Case-control study. Setting and Patients: 147 stroke patients admitted to a neurorehabilitation unit. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: All patients underwent sleep examination for diagnosis of OSA. We assessed cognitive status by neuropsychological examination and functional status by two neurological scales and a measure of functional independence. Results: We included 80 stroke patients with OSA and 67 stroke patients without OSA. OSA patients were older and had a higher body mass index than patients without OSA. OSA patients performed worse on tests of attention, executive functioning, visuoperception, psychomotor ability, and intelligence than those without OSA. No differences were found for vigilance, memory, and language. OSA patients had a worse neurological status, lower functional independence scores, and a longer period of hospitalization in the neurorehabilitation unit than the patients without OSA. OSA status was not associated with stroke type or classification. Conclusions: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with a lower cognitive and functional status in patients admitted for stroke rehabilitation. This underlines the importance of OSA as a probable prognostic factor, and calls for well-designed randomized controlled trials to study its treatability. Citation: Aaronson JA, van Bennekom CA, Hofman WF, van Bezeij T, van den Aardweg JG, Groet E, Kylstra WA, Schmand B. Obstructive sleep apnea is related to impaired cognitive and functional status after stroke. SLEEP 2015;38(9):1431–1437. PMID:25669178

  6. Frequency of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Dental Patients with Tooth Wear

    PubMed Central

    Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Martínez-Null, Cristina; Aguirre, Jose Javier; Guinea, Elena Rubio; Anitua, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To estimate the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in dental patients with tooth wear, and to assess the role of dentists in the identification of patients at risk of OSAS. Methods: Dental patients with tooth wear and treated with occlusal splint were prospectively recruited to perform sleep study. The severity of tooth wear was established by the treating dentist before patient referral to sleep disorders unit. Sleep questionnaires, anthropometric measurements, and validated respiratory polygraphy were performed. Results: All patients with dental wear were offered a sleepiness analysis. Of 31 recruited patients, 30 (77% males) participated in this study. Patients' mean age was 58.5 ± 10.7 years (range: 35–90 years) and the body mass index was 27.9 ± 3.4 kg/m2. Tooth wear was mild in 13 patients, moderate in 8 and severe in 9. The mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 32.4 ± 24.9. AHI < 5 was reported in 2 patients, AHI of 5–29 in 17, and AHI ≥ 30 in 11. A statistically significant association was found between AHI severity and tooth wear severity (Spearman R = 0.505; p = 0.004). Conclusions: Tooth wear could be a tool to identify those patients at risk of having OSAS. This highlights the importance of dental professionals to identify and refer patients with OSAS. Citation: Durán-Cantolla J, Alkhraisat MH, Martínez-Null C, Aguirre JJ, Guinea ER, Anitua E. Frequency of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in dental patients with tooth wear. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(4):445–450. PMID:25665693

  7. High Priority Future Research Needs for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kamal; Moorthy, Denish; Chan, Jeffrey A.; Concannon, Thomas W.; Ratichek, Sara J.; Chung, Mei; Balk, Ethan M.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To identify and prioritize future research needs (FRN) topics for diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: Twenty-one panel members represented six stake-holder categories: patients and the public, providers; purchasers of health care, payers, policymakers, and principal investigators. Building on a recently completed comparative effectiveness review, stakeholders nominated and discussed potential FRN topics. Stakeholders then nominated their top priority FRN topics based on the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Effective Health Care Program Selection Criteria. From these nominations, the highest priority FRN topics were determined and were elaborated upon to include possible study designs to address the topics. Results: Thirty-seven topics were discussed and prioritized. The nine highest priority FRN topics included: cost-effectiveness of management strategies, defining age- and sex-specific criteria for OSA, evaluating routine preoperative screening for OSA, evaluating involvement of a sleep medicine specialist in diagnosis of OSA, evaluating clinical prediction rules, assessing the effect of treating sleep disordered breathing and long-term clinical outcomes, comparing treatments for patients who do not tolerate positive airway pressure, evaluating strategies to improve treatment compliance, and evaluating the association between sleep apnea severity and long-term clinical outcomes. Conclusions: While there are numerous specific research questions with low or insufficient strength of evidence for OSA management, OSA patients, their healthcare providers, and society at large would benefit from refocusing research efforts into the prioritized research questions and away from simple comparisons of short-term outcomes between specific interventions. Citation: Patel K; Moorthy D; Chan JA; Concannon TW. High priority future research needs for obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(4):395-402. PMID:23585757

  8. Effects of Gender on the Prevalence of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang-Ping; Tan, Adeline; Tai, Bee-Choo; Loo, Germaine; Tan, Huay-Cheem; Lee, Chi-Hang

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: Male predominance has been observed in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) studies conducted in the community and sleep clinics. Due to the different demographic and patient risk profiles of the studies involved, we investigated the effects of gender on OSA prevalence among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: We prospectively recruited a cohort of CAD patients for an overnight sleep study using a home testing portable diagnostic device. OSA was defined as apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 15. Results: One hundred sixty-two consecutive patients (male, n = 81; female, n = 81) were recruited, and most (60%) presented with acute coronary syndrome. The female patients were older (61 ± 10 versus 56 ± 10 years, p < 0.001), less likely to be smokers (8.6% versus 34.6%, p < 0.001), and more likely to have diabetes mellitus (70.4% versus 46.9%, p = 0.002) and chronic renal failure (17.3% versus 4.9%, p = 0.012) than the male patients. The sleep study's success rate was higher in female than male patients (88.9% versus 74.1%, p = 0.047). No significant differences were observed between them in the AHI, oxygen desaturation index, baseline SpO2, lowest SpO2, or total time SpO2 < 90%. The prevalence of OSA for the female and male patients was 40.3% and 35.0%, respectively (p = 0.323). Conclusion: Prevalence of OSA is high in CAD patients with no evidence of sex predilection. The lack of male predominance could be due to females being older and with more comorbidities. Citation: Zhao LP, Tan A, Tai BC, Loo G, Tan HC, Lee CH. Effects of gender on the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with coronary artery disease. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(12):1279-1284. PMID:25325576

  9. An evaluation of a novel mask in four patients with obstructive sleep apnea and overlap syndromes.

    PubMed

    Yarahmadi, Alireza; Nader, Nader D; Zadeii, Gino; Porhomayon, Jahan

    2013-01-01

    We present four cases of adults with obstructive sleep apnea in whom positive airway pressure therapy alone failed to provide adequate oxygenation. We have previously reported the use of dual mask for ventilatory support of a patient postoperatively (Porhomayon et al., 2013). Here, we report an evaluation of the dual mask in four patients with overlap syndromes. Application of dual mask provided adequate oxygenation with lower continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)/bilevel positive airway pressure (BIPAP) pressure levels. PMID:23970903

  10. Reliability of Telemedicine in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Coma-del-Corral, María Jesús; Alonso-Álvarez, María Luz; Allende, Marta; Cordero, José; Ordax, Estrella; Masa, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Advances in information technology and telecommunications have provided the option of making it easier to diagnose and treat obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) using telemedicine techniques. This study assessed the feasibility and reliability of respiratory polygraphy and prescription of treatment by pressure adjustment with auto-continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) systems, both being transmitted telematically to the Sleep Unit, with teleconsultation as a support method. Subjects and Methods: Forty patients were studied from a population 80 km from the Sleep Unit using respiratory polygraphy transmitted in real time. They were divided into two groups: one was seen by conventional consultation, and the other was seen using teleconsultation. We also estimated satisfaction with this system and its costs. Results: The mean patient age was 53±10.3 years, with a body mass index of 31±6.2 kg/m2 and an Epworth score of 12±5.3. In total, 35 patients were diagnosed with OSAS, with an Apnea-Hypopnea Index of ≥10, and CPAP treatment was started in 16 of them. The agreement in the Apnea-Hypopnea Index, total apneas and hypopneas, mean oxygen saturation, and time with an oxygen saturation <90% was greater than 90% between the studies transmitted in real time and those stored in the polygraph. The level of compliance with CPAP treatment was 85% for the patients who were seen in a conventional clinic and 75% in those seen by teleconsultation. Conclusions: The use of telematic techniques is useful to establish a diagnostic and therapeutic strategy for OSAS with the creation of a Wide Core Sleep Laboratory as a process controller. PMID:23186084

  11. Remission and Incidence of Obstructive Sleep Apnea from Middle Childhood to Late Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Spilsbury, James C.; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Rosen, Carol L.; Redline, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: To study the incidence, remission, and prediction of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) from middle childhood to late adolescence. Design: Longitudinal analysis. Setting: The Cleveland Children's Sleep and Health Study, an ethnically mixed, urban, community-based cohort, followed 8 y. Participants: There were 490 participants with overnight polysomnography data available at ages 8–11 and 16–19 y. Measurements and Results: Baseline participant characteristics and health history were ascertained from parent report and US census data. OSA was defined as an obstructive apnea- hypopnea index ≥ 5 or an obstructive apnea index ≥ 1. OSA prevalence was approximately 4% at each examination, but OSA largely did not persist from middle childhood to late adolescence. Habitual snoring and obesity predicted OSA in cross-sectional analyses at each time point. Residence in a disadvantaged neighborhood, African-American race, and premature birth also predicted OSA in middle childhood, whereas male sex, high body mass index, and history of tonsillectomy or adenoidectomy were risk factors among adolescents. Obesity, but not habitual snoring, in middle childhood predicted adolescent OSA. Conclusions: Because OSA in middle childhood usually remitted by adolescence and most adolescent cases were incident cases, criteria other than concern alone over OSA persistence or incidence should be used when making treatment decisions for pediatric OSA. Moreover, OSA's distinct risk factors at each time point underscore the need for alternative risk-factor assessments across pediatric ages. The greater importance of middle childhood obesity compared to snoring in predicting adolescent OSA provides support for screening, preventing, and treating obesity in childhood. Citation: Spilsbury JC, Storfer-Isser A, Rosen CL, Redline S. Remission and incidence of obstructive sleep apnea from middle childhood to late adolescence. SLEEP 2015;38(1):23–29. PMID:25325456

  12. Relationship Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity and Brain Activation During a Sustained Attention Task

    PubMed Central

    Ayalon, Liat; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Aka, Allison A.; McKenna, Benjamin S.; Drummond, Sean P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize cognitive and cerebral correlates of attention and response speed in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and (2) assess the association of performance and brain activation with measures of OSA severity. Design: Patients with OSA and controls were compared on performance and brain activation during a sustained attention task. The association of reaction time and brain activation with apnea-hypopnea index, nocturnal hypoxia, and arousals was assessed. Setting: Functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while participants performed a Go–No-Go task. The ‘Go’ trials of the Go–No-Go task were used to index attention processing. Participants: Fourteen patients with OSA and 14 normal control subjects with equivalent age, body mass index, blood pressure, and education. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Patients with OSA showed decreased brain activation in cingulate, frontal, and parietal regions typically involved in attention tasks, compared with control subjects. Within the patients with OSA, increasing arousal index, but not desaturation index, was associated with slower mean reaction time and with decreased brain activation in areas involved in arousal and attention, response selection, motor response, and decision making. The apnea-hypopnea index, by itself, was not associated with changes in cerebral response. Conclusions: Patients with OSA showed decreased brain activation compared with control subjects during an attention task. The association of arousal index (but not hypoxia) with slow reaction times and brain activation suggests that alertness and reaction times show greater correlations with measures of sleep disruption than with measures of hypoxia. Citation: Ayalon L; Ancoli-Israel S; Aka AA; McKenna BS; Drummond SPA. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea severity and brain activation during a sustained attention task. SLEEP 2009;32(3):373–381. PMID:19294957

  13. Structural and functional neural adaptations in obstructive sleep apnea: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tahmasian, Masoud; Rosenzweig, Ivana; Eickhoff, Simon B; Sepehry, Amir A; Laird, Angela R; Fox, Peter T; Morrell, Mary J; Khazaie, Habibolah; Eickhoff, Claudia R

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common multisystem chronic disorder. Functional and structural neuroimaging has been widely applied in patients with OSA, but these studies have often yielded diverse results. The present quantitative meta-analysis aims to identify consistent patterns of abnormal activation and grey matter loss in OSA across studies. We used PubMed to retrieve task/resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based morphometry studies. Stereotactic data were extracted from fifteen studies, and subsequently tested for convergence using activation likelihood estimation. We found convergent evidence for structural atrophy and functional disturbances in the right basolateral amygdala/hippocampus and the right central insula. Functional characterization of these regions using the BrainMap database suggested associated dysfunction of emotional, sensory, and limbic processes. Assessment of task-based co-activation patterns furthermore indicated that the two regions obtained from the meta-analysis are part of a joint network comprising the anterior insula, posterior-medial frontal cortex and thalamus. Taken together, our findings highlight the role of right amygdala, hippocampus and insula in the abnormal emotional and sensory processing in OSA. PMID:27039344

  14. Cost Minimization Using an Artificial Neural Network Sleep Apnea Prediction Tool for Sleep Studies

    PubMed Central

    Teferra, Rahel A.; Grant, Brydon J. B.; Mindel, Jesse W.; Siddiqi, Tauseef A.; Iftikhar, Imran H.; Ajaz, Fatima; Aliling, Jose P.; Khan, Meena S.; Hoffmann, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: More than a million polysomnograms (PSGs) are performed annually in the United States to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Third-party payers now advocate a home sleep test (HST), rather than an in-laboratory PSG, as the diagnostic study for OSA regardless of clinical probability, but the economic benefit of this approach is not known. Objectives: We determined the diagnostic performance of OSA prediction tools including the newly developed OSUNet, based on an artificial neural network, and performed a cost-minimization analysis when the prediction tools are used to identify patients who should undergo HST. Methods: The OSUNet was trained to predict the presence of OSA in a derivation group of patients who underwent an in-laboratory PSG (n = 383). Validation group 1 consisted of in-laboratory PSG patients (n = 149). The network was trained further in 33 patients who underwent HST and then was validated in a separate group of 100 HST patients (validation group 2). Likelihood ratios (LRs) were compared with two previously published prediction tools. The total costs from the use of the three prediction tools and the third-party approach within a clinical algorithm were compared. Measurements and Main Results: The OSUNet had a higher +LR in all groups compared with the STOP-BANG and the modified neck circumference (MNC) prediction tools. The +LRs for STOP-BANG, MNC, and OSUNet in validation group 1 were 1.1 (1.0–1.2), 1.3 (1.1–1.5), and 2.1 (1.4–3.1); and in validation group 2 they were 1.4 (1.1–1.7), 1.7 (1.3–2.2), and 3.4 (1.8–6.1), respectively. With an OSA prevalence less than 52%, the use of all three clinical prediction tools resulted in cost savings compared with the third-party approach. Conclusions: The routine requirement of an HST to diagnose OSA regardless of clinical probability is more costly compared with the use of OSA clinical prediction tools that identify patients who should undergo this procedure when OSA is expected to be present in less than half of the population. With OSA prevalence less than 40%, the OSUNet offers the greatest savings, which are substantial when the number of sleep studies done annually is considered. PMID:25068704

  15. Effects of central apnea on cerebral blood flow velocity in healthy term infants.

    PubMed

    Rehan, V K; Alvaro, R E; Belik, J; Allen, D W; Kwiatkowski, K; Fajardo, C A

    1995-06-01

    We evaluated a new method of monitoring cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) and described changes in CBFV in relation to central apnea in 17 healthy term infants. The area under the velocity curve during apnea did not change, whereas area under the velocity curve per the waveform showed a significant difference, suggesting that stability is maintained through an increase in CBFV with each heartbeat. The maintenance of cerebral hemodynamics during isolated central apnea supports the assumption that these episodes are benign. PMID:7776111

  16. Sleep Apnea and the Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Che; Hung, Shih-Yuan; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Lin, Chi-Wei; Wang, Hsi-Hao; Chen, Shih-Wei; Chang, Min-Yu; Ho, Li-Chun; Chen, Yi-Ting; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Tsai, Tsuen-Chiuan; Tseng, Shih-Hann; Wang, Wei-Ming; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Chiou, Yuan-Yow

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep apnea (SA) is characterized by apnea during sleep and is associated with cardiovascular diseases and an increase in all-cause mortality. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global health problem that has placed a substantial burden on healthcare resources. However, the relationship between SA and the incidence of CKD is not clear. This study aimed to determine whether SA is an independent risk factor for the development of CKD. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan. Patients or Participants: A total of 4,674 adult patients (age ≥ 30 y) in whom SA was newly diagnosed from 2000 to 2010 were included, together with 23,370 non-SA patients as the comparison group. The two groups were frequency-matched for sex, age, and year of receiving medical service. Each individual was followed until 2011. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: These two groups were monitored and observed for the occurrence of CKD. Patients with SA experienced a 1.94-fold increase (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.52–2.46; P < 0.001) in the incidence of CKD, which was independent of sex, age, and comorbid medical conditions. Additionally, they showed a 2.2-fold increase (95% CI, 1.31–3.69; P < 0.01) in the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Conclusions: Patients with sleep apnea are at increased risk for chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease compared with the general population. As such, screening renal function and treatment of chronic kidney disease is an important issue in patients with sleep apnea. Citation: Lee YC, Hung SY, Wang HK, Lin CW, Wang HH, Chen SW, Chang MY, Ho LC, Chen YT, Liou HH, Tsai TC, Tseng SH, Wang WM, Lin SH, Chiou YY. Sleep apnea and the risk of chronic kidney disease: a nationwide population-based cohort study. SLEEP 2015;38(2):213–221. PMID:25409108

  17. Sleep Apnea in Patients with and without a Right-to-Left Shunt

    PubMed Central

    Mojadidi, Mohammad Khalid; Bokhoor, Pooya Isaac; Gevorgyan, Rubine; Noureddin, Nabil; MacLellan, W. Cameron; Wen, Eugenia; Aysola, Ravi; Tobis, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the presence of right-to-left shunting (RLS) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and compare clinical characteristics and parameters of the sleep studies of patients with and without RLS. Background: The most common cause of RLS is due to intermittent flow through a patent foramen ovale (PFO). PFO occurs more frequently in patients with OSA and may be involved in the exacerbation of OSA. Methods: Patients with an abnormal polysomnogram seen at UCLA-Santa Monica Sleep Medicine Clinic were enrolled. A diagnosis of RLS was made using a transcranial Doppler (TCD) bubble study. Gender and age-matched controls were drawn from patients referred for cardiac catheterization who underwent a TCD. The frequency of RLS in OSA patients and the controls was evaluated. Clinical characteristics and polysomnogram parameters were compared between OSA patients with and without a RLS. Results: A total of 100 OSA patients and 200 controls participated in the study. The prevalence of RLS was higher in patients with OSA compared to the control group (42% versus 19%; p < 0.0001). Patients with OSA and a RLS had a lower apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), less obstructive apnea, and fewer hypopnea episodes than patients with OSA without a RLS. The baseline and nadir SpO2 were similar in both groups and did not correlate with the level of RLS assessed by TCD. The degree of desaturation for a given respiratory disturbance, as measured by oxygen desaturation index (ODI)/AHI ratio, was higher in OSA patients with RLS versus OSA patients without RLS (0.85 ± 0.07 versus 0.68 ± 0.04; p < 0.0001). Conclusion: RLS, most commonly due to a PFO, occurs 2.2 times more frequently in OSA patients compared to a control population that was matched for age and gender. The severity of sleep apnea is not greater in OSA patients who have a PFO. However, patients with OSA and a PFO are more likely to become symptomatic at a younger age with an equivalent decrease in nocturnal SpO2, and have greater arterial desaturation in proportion to the frequency of respiratory disturbances. Citation: Mojadidi MK, Bokhoor PI, Gevorgyan R, Noureddin N, MacLellan WC, Wen E, Aysola R, Tobis JM. Sleep apnea in patients with and without a right-to-left shunt. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(11):1299–1304. PMID:26094924

  18. Upper Airway Stimulation for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Durability of the Treatment Effect at 18 Months

    PubMed Central

    Strollo, Patrick J.; Gillespie, M. Boyd; Soose, Ryan J.; Maurer, Joachim T.; de Vries, Nico; Cornelius, Jason; Hanson, Ronald D.; Padhya, Tapan A.; Steward, David L.; Woodson, B. Tucker; Verbraecken, Johan; Vanderveken, Olivier M.; Goetting, Mark G.; Feldman, Neil; Chabolle, Frédéric; Badr, M. Safwan; Randerath, Winfried; Strohl, Kingman P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the stability of improvement in polysomnographic measures of sleep disordered breathing, patient reported outcomes, the durability of hypoglossal nerve recruitment and safety at 18 months in the Stimulation Treatment for Apnea Reduction (STAR) trial participants. Design: Prospective multicenter single group trial with participants serving as their own controls. Setting: Twenty-two community and academic sleep medicine and otolaryngology practices. Measurements: Primary outcome measures were the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and the 4% oxygen desaturation index (ODI). Secondary outcome measures were the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ), and oxygen saturation percent time < 90% during sleep. Stimulation level for each participant was collected at three predefined thresholds during awake testing. Procedure- and/or device-related adverse events were reviewed and coded by the Clinical Events Committee Results: The median AHI was reduced by 67.4% from the baseline of 29.3 to 9.7/h at 18 mo. The median ODI was reduced by 67.5% from 25.4 to 8.6/h at 18 mo. The FOSQ and ESS improved significantly at 18 mo compared to baseline values. The functional threshold was unchanged from baseline at 18 mo. Two participants experienced a serious device-related adverse event requiring neurostimulator repositioning and fixation. No tongue weakness reported at 18 mo. Conclusion: Upper airway stimulation via the hypoglossal nerve maintained a durable effect of improving airway stability during sleep and improved patient reported outcomes (Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire) without an increase of the stimulation thresholds or tongue injury at 18 mo of follow-up. Citation: Strollo PJ, Gillespie MB, Soose RJ, Maurer JT, de Vries N, Cornelius J, Hanson RD, Padhya TA, Steward DL, Woodson BT, Verbraecken J, Vanderveken OM, Goetting MG, Feldman N, Chabolle F, Badr MS, Randerath W, Strohl KP, Stimulation Therapy for Apnea Reduction Trial Group. Upper airway stimulation for obstructive sleep apnea: durability of the treatment effect at 18 months. SLEEP 2015;38(10):1593–1598. PMID:26158895

  19. [Successful treatment of bradyarrhythmia associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome by continuous positive airway pressure].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, A V; Buzunov, R V; Andriushina, N A; Turov, A N; Iakovleva, N F

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is an additional independent factor of growth of cardiovascular mortality. Special role disturbances of respiration during sleep play in development of nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias. Approaches to correction of OSAS associated nocturnal bradyarrhythmias have substantially changed during recent years. We present report of a clinical case in which we detected relation of nocturnal bradyarrhythmias to OSAS. Adequate correction of OSAS by continuous positive airway pressure therapy resulted in complete elimination of bradyarrhythmias during night time. This allowed to avoid implantation of permanent pacemaker. PMID:24088008

  20. [Residual excessive daytime sleepiness in CPAP-treated obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Buffle, C; Gex, G; Cervena K; Younossian, A B; Adler, D

    2014-11-19

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common condition most often characterized by daytime sleepiness. cPAP therapy is very effective in reversing symptoms. However, some patients still complain of excessive daytime sleepiness despite treatment, It is essential to document sufficient use of CPAP and to rule out the presence of residual respiratory events. Search for other underlying causes of sleepiness are then to be investigated by a detailed history together with a sleep night recording. The purpose of this article is to guide the clinician in providing comprehensive medical care for those patients. PMID:25603569

  1. High risk for obstructive sleep apnea in patients with acute myocardial infarction1

    PubMed Central

    Andrechuk, Carla Renata Silva; Ceolim, Maria Filomena

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to stratify the risk for obstructive sleep apnea in patients with acute myocardial infarction, treated at a public, tertiary, teaching hospital of the state of São Paulo, Brazil, and to identify related sociodemographic and clinical factors. Method: cross-sectional analytical study with 113 patients (mean age 59.57 years, 70.8% male). A specific questionnaire was used for the sociodemographic and clinical characterization and the Berlin Questionnaire for the stratification of the risk of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Results: the prevalence of high risk was 60.2% and the outcome of clinical worsening during hospitalization was more frequent among these patients. The factors related to high risk were body mass index over 30 kg/m2, arterial hypertension and waist circumference indicative of cardiovascular risk, while older age (60 years and over) constituted a protective factor. Conclusion: considering the high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea and its relation to clinical worsening, it is suggested that nurses should monitor, in their clinical practice, people at high risk for this syndrome, guiding control measures of modifiable factors and aiming to prevent the associated complications, including worsening of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26487128

  2. [Study of chemosensitivity in patients believed to have sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costes, F; Court-Fortune, I; Fournel, P; Vergnon, J M; Emonot, A; Geyssant, A

    1995-01-01

    We performed polysomnography and measured hypoxic ventilatory (HVR), hypercapnic ventilatory responses (HCVR) in 42 patients (60 +/- 11 years) with obesity and a clinical suspicion of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) in order to determine whether an altered chemosensitivity was associated with SAS. The apnea/hypopnea index was 38 +/- 20 events per hour of sleep in 28 patients (SAS+ group) and less than 10 in the 14 others (SAS- group). The 2 groups differed only by a lower waking PaO2 in SAS+ as compared to SAS- (71.0 +/- 9 vs 77.4 +/- 8 mmHg, p < 0.05). HVR and HCVR were not significantly different in the 2 groups (0.82 +/- 0.58 vs 0.86 +/- 0.37 l.min-1.%-1; 1.41 +/- 0.81 vs 1.40 +/- 0.67 l.min-1.mmHg-1, respectively). In SAS+ group, HVR or HCVR did not change 3 or 12 months after continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy while both polysomnography and PaO2 returned to normal. We conclude that in patients with mild obesity and SAS there is no difference in chemosensitivity due to the presence of sleep apnea and that CPAP therapy does not alter these measurements. These results suggest no direct effect of SAS on chemosensitivity in the population studied. PMID:7481048

  3. MRI of the pharynx in ischemic stroke patients with and without obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Devin L.; Bapuraj, J. Rajiv; Mukherji, Suresh K.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Concannon, Maryann; Helman, Joseph I.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common after stroke and associated with poor stroke outcomes. Whether OSA after acute stroke is caused by anatomic, physiologic, or both etiologies has not been studied. We therefore used brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans to assess oropharyngeal anatomy in stroke patients with and without OSA. Methods Patients within 7 days of ischemic stroke underwent nocturnal polysomnography. Sagittal T1-weighted MRI performed for clinical purposes was used to measure retropalatal distance, soft palatal length, soft palatal thickness, retroglossal space, and tongue length. Nasopharyngeal area and high retropharyngeal area were measured from axial T2-weighted images, and lateral pharyngeal wall thickness from coronal T1-weighted images. Results Among 27 subjects, 18 (67%) had OSA (apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5). Demographics, vascular risk factors, and stroke severity were similar in the two groups. Median retropalatal distance was shorter in subjects with OSA (Wilcoxon rank-sum test, p= 0.03). Shorter retropalatal distance was associated with higher AHI (linear regression, p=0.04). None of the other morphological characteristics differed. Conclusions Anatomic difference between awake acute stroke patients with and without OSA shows that the sleep disorder cannot be attributed solely to sleep, sleeping position, or changes in neuromuscular control that are specific to the sleep state. PMID:20466584

  4. Markers of Myocardial Ischemia in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Valo, Misa; Wons, Annette; Moeller, Albert; Teupe, Claudius

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by intermittent hypoxia during sleep. We tested the hypothesis that nocturnal myocardial ischemia is detectable by ST segment depression and elevation of high sensitive troponin T (hsTrop T) and B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in patients with OSA and coexisting coronary artery disease (CAD). Twenty-one patients with OSA and CAD and 20 patients with OSA alone underwent in-hospital polysomnography. Blood samples for hsTrop T and NT-proBNP measurements were drawn before and after sleep. ST segment depression was measured at the time of maximum oxygen desaturation during sleep. The apnea-hypopnea-index (AHI), oxygen saturation nadir, and time in bed with oxygen saturation of ≤80% were similar in both groups. Levels of hsTrop T and NT-proBNP did not differ significantly before and after sleep but NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher in patients suffering from OSA and CAD compared to patients with OSA alone. No significant ST depression was found at the time of oxygen saturation nadir in either group. Despite the fact that patients with untreated OSA and coexisting CAD experienced severe nocturnal hypoxemia, we were unable to detect myocardial ischemia or myocyte necrosis based on significant ST segment depression or elevation of hsTrop T and NT-proBNP, respectively. PMID:26090222

  5. The Development of a Screening Questionnaire for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children with Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Emma; Hill, Catherine Mary; Evans, Hazel Jean; Tuffrey, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a condition which affects an estimated 50% of children with Down syndrome, particularly in their early years. It can cause serious sequelae in affected children but may not be recognized by parents or health professionals. Routine screening has been recommended in some countries, but is not standard practice. There are no validated questionnaire-based tools available to screen this population of children for this particular sleep-related disorder. Using existing validated sleep questionnaire items, we have developed a questionnaire to screen children with Down syndrome up to 6 years of age for obstructive sleep apnea, which corresponds with the recommendations made in UK national guidelines. This paper describes these first steps in demonstrating content validity for a new questionnaire, which will be subject to further in-depth psychometric analysis. Relevance, clarity, and age appropriateness were rated for 33 items using a content review questionnaire by a group of 18 health professionals with expertise in respiratory pediatrics, neurodevelopmental pediatrics, and sleep physiology. The content validity index was calculated for individual items and contributed to decisions about item inclusion. Scale level content validity index for the modified questionnaire of 14 items was at an accepted level of 0.78. Two parents of children with Down syndrome took part in cognitive interviews after completing the modified questionnaire. We describe the development of this 14 item questionnaire to screen for OSA in children with DS from infancy to 6 years. PMID:26539127

  6. Treatment of Insomnia, Insomnia Symptoms, and Obstructive Sleep Apnea During and After Menopause: Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Joshua Z.; Suh, Sooyeon A.; Dowdle, Claire L.; Nowakowski, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Understanding sleep complaints among menopausal women is an emerging area of clinical and research interest. Several recent reviews have focused on mechanisms of menopausal insomnia and symptoms. In this review, we present a discussion on the most relevant and recent publications on the treatment of sleep disorders for menopausal women, with a focus on menopause-related insomnia, insomnia symptoms, and obstructive sleep apnea. We discuss both nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatments, including cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), complementary and alternative medicine, hormone replacement therapy, sedative hypnotics, antidepressants, and continuous positive airway pressure. In addition, we briefly discuss methods and considerations of assessment of sleep disorders in menopausal women. PMID:26478725

  7. Automatic classification of apnea/hypopnea events through sleep/wake states and severity of SDB from a pulse oximeter.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Uk; Lee, Hyo-Ki; Lee, Junghun; Urtnasan, Erdenebayar; Kim, Hojoong; Lee, Kyoung-Joung

    2015-09-01

    This study proposes a method of automatically classifying sleep apnea/hypopnea events based on sleep states and the severity of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) using photoplethysmogram (PPG) and oxygen saturation (SpO2) signals acquired from a pulse oximeter. The PPG was used to classify sleep state, while the severity of SDB was estimated by detecting events of SpO2 oxygen desaturation. Furthermore, we classified sleep apnea/hypopnea events by applying different categorisations according to the severity of SDB based on a support vector machine. The classification results showed sensitivity performances and positivity predictive values of 74.2% and 87.5% for apnea, 87.5% and 63.4% for hypopnea, and 92.4% and 92.8% for apnea + hypopnea, respectively. These results represent better or comparable outcomes compared to those of previous studies. In addition, our classification method reliably detected sleep apnea/hypopnea events in all patient groups without bias in particular patient groups when our algorithm was applied to a variety of patient groups. Therefore, this method has the potential to diagnose SDB more reliably and conveniently using a pulse oximeter. PMID:26261097

  8. Molecular Signatures of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults: A Review and Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Arnardottir, Erna S.; Mackiewicz, Miroslaw; Gislason, Thorarinn; Teff, Karen L.; Pack, Allan I.

    2009-01-01

    The consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are largely mediated by chronic intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. The primary molecular domains affected are sympathetic activity, oxidative stress and inflammation. Other affected domains include adipokines, adhesion molecules and molecules that respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress. Changes in molecular domains affected by OSA, assessed in blood and/or urine, can provide a molecular signature for OSA that could potentially be used diagnostically and to predict who is likely to develop different OSA-related comorbidities. High-throughput discovery strategies such as microarrays, assessing changes in gene expression in circulating blood cells, have the potential to find new candidates and pathways thereby expanding the molecular signatures for OSA. More research is needed to fully understand the pathophysiological significance of these molecular signatures and their relationship with OSA comorbidities. Many OSA subjects are obese, and obesity is an independent risk factor for many comorbidities associated with OSA. Moreover, obesity affects the same molecular pathways as OSA. Thus, a challenge to establishing a molecular signature for OSA is to separate the effects of OSA from obesity. We propose that the optimal strategy is to evaluate the temporal changes in relevant molecular pathways during sleep and, in particular, the alterations from before to after sleep when assessed in blood and/or urine. Such changes will be at least partly a consequence of chronic intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation that occurs during sleep. Citation: Arnardottir ES; Mackiewicz M; Gislason T; Teff KL; Pack AI. Molecular signatures of obstructive sleep apnea in adults: A review and perspective. SLEEP 2009;32(4):447–470. PMID:19413140

  9. A New Animal Model of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Responding to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Neuzeret, Pierre-Charles; Gormand, Frédéric; Reix, Philippe; Parrot, Sandrine; Sastre, Jean-Pierre; Buda, Colette; Guidon, Gérard; Sakai, Kazuya; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: An improved animal model of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is needed for the development of effective pharmacotherapies. In humans, flexion of the neck and a supine position, two main pathogenic factors during human sleep, are associated with substantially greater OSA severity. We postulated that these two factors might generate OSA in animals. Design: We developed a restraining device for conditioning to investigate the effect of the combination of 2 body positions—prone (P) or supine (S)—and 2 head positions—with the neck flexed at right angles to the body (90°) or in extension in line with the body (180°)—during sleep in 6 cats. Polysomnography was performed twice on each cat in each of the 4 sleeping positions—P180, S180, P90, or S90. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment was then investigated in 2 cats under the most pathogenic condition. Setting: NA. Patients or Participants: NA. Interventions: NA. Measurements and Results: Positions P180 and, S90 resulted, respectively, in the lowest and highest apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (3 ± 1 vs 25 ± 2, P < 0.001), while P90 (18 ± 3, P < 0.001) and S180 (13 ± 5, P < 0.01) gave intermediate values. In position S90, an increase in slow wave sleep stage 1 (28% ± 3% vs 22% ± 3%, P < 0.05) and a decrease in REM sleep (10% ± 2% vs 18% ± 2%, P < 0.001) were also observed. CPAP resulted in a reduction in the AHI (8 ± 1 vs 27 ± 3, P < 0.01), with the added benefit of sleep consolidation. Conclusion: By mimicking human pathogenic sleep conditions, we have developed a new reversible animal model of OSA. Citation: Neuzeret PC; Gormand F; Reix P; Parrot S; Sastre JP; Buda C; Guidon G; Sakai K; Lin JS. A new animal model of obstructive sleep apnea responding to continuous positive airway pressure. SLEEP 2011;34(4):541-548. PMID:21461333

  10. Advanced age and apnea-hypopnea index predict subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Both obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) are considered to be related with the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD). In this study we evaluate the association between OSAS and presence of subclinical atherosclerosis assessed by tomographic coronary calcium score in patients who had OSAS but no history of known CAD. Methods Seventy-three patients who were asymptomatic for CAD and had suspected OSAS were referred to overnight attended polysomnography. Patients were classified into 4 groups according to the Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI). All patients underwent computed tomographic examination for tomographic coronary calcification scoring. Physical examination, sleep study recordings, complete blood count and serum biochemistry were obtained from all patients. Results In the whole group, AHI levels were weakly correlated with coronary calcium score (r = 0.342, p = 0.003) and body mass index (r = 0.337, p = 0.004), moderately correlated with basal oxygen saturation (r = −0.734, p < 0.001), and strongly correlated with oxygen desaturation index (r = 0.844, p < 0.001). In an univariate analysis, age, AHI, basal oxygen saturation, and oxygen desaturation index were associated with CAC in patients with OSAS. In a multiple logistic regression model, age (OR 1.108,%95 CI 1.031-1.191, p = 0.005) and AHI (OR 1.036,% 95 CI 1.003-1.070, p = 0.033) were only independent predictors of CAC in patients with OSAS with a sensitivity of 88.9% and 77.8% and a specificity of 54.3% and 56.5% respectively. Conclusions Our findings suggest that in patients with moderate or severe OSAS and advanced age, physicians should be alert for the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis. PMID:23384202

  11. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Community-Dwelling Children: The NANOS Study

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Álvarez, María Luz; Cordero-Guevara, José Aurelio; Terán-Santos, Joaquin; Gonzalez-Martinez, Mónica; Jurado-Luque, María José; Corral-Peñafiel, Jaime; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Gozal, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Obesity in children is assumed to serve as a major risk factor in pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). However, the prevalence of OSAS in otherwise healthy obese children from the community is unknown. Aim: To determine the prevalence of OSAS in obese children identified and recruited from primary care centers. Methods: A cross-sectional, prospective, multicenter study. Spanish children ages 3–14 y with a body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to the 95th percentile for age and sex were randomly selected, and underwent medical history, snoring, and Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ) assessments, as well as physical examination, nasopharyngoscopy, and nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG) recordings. Results: Two hundred forty-eight children (54.4% males) with mean age of 10.8 ± 2.6 y were studied with a BMI of 28.0 ± 4.7 kg/m2 corresponding to 96.8 ± 0.6 percentile when adjusted for age and sex. The mean respiratory disturbance index (RDI), obstructive RDI (ORDI), and obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (OAHI) were 5.58 ± 9.90, 5.06 ± 9.57, and 3.39 ± 8.78/h total sleep time (TST), respectively. Using ≥ 3/h TST as the cutoff for the presence of OSAS, the prevalence of OSAS ranged from 21.5% to 39.5% depending on whether OAHI, ORDI, or RDI were used. Conclusions: The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in obese children from the general population is high. Obese children should be screened for the presence of OSAS. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01322763. Citation: Alonso-Álvarez ML, Cordero-Guevara JA, Terán-Santos J, Gonzalez-Martinez M, Jurado-Luque MJ, Corral-Peñafiel J, Duran-Cantolla J, Kheirandish-Gozal L, Gozal D, for the Spanish Sleep Network. Obstructive sleep apnea in obese community-dwelling children: the NANOS study. SLEEP 2014;37(5):943-949. PMID:24790273

  12. A Two-Year Weight Reduction Program in Obese Sleep Apnea Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nerfeldt, Pia; Nilsson, Bengt Y.; Mayor, Liliana; Uddén, Joanna; Friberg, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the effects of a 2-year weight reduction program on respiratory disturbances, arousal index, daytime sleepiness, metabolic status, and quality of life in obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Methods: Prospective intervention study of 33 consecutive obese OSAS patients (24 men, 9 women); 19 subjects used continuous positive airway pressure and 4 used mandibular retaining device, except during nights with sleep recording. The program consisted of 8 weeks of low calorie diet followed by group meetings with behavioral change support. Results: Seventy percent of the patients completed the program; 67% completed the sleep recordings. The success rate for the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (< 20 and reduction ≥ 50%) was 15% in the intention to treat (ITT) analysis. The AHI showed a nonsignificant decrease in mean values, from 43 to 28. The oxygen desaturation index (ODI) decreased from 42 to 23 (p = 0.010), arousal index from 24 to 11 (p = 0.019), body mass index from 40 to 35 (p = 0.003) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) from 9 to 5 (p = 0.026), all ITT. Metabolic status, physical functioning, and vitality evaluations improved only in the per protocol analysis. Reduction in weight correlated significantly to reductions in ESS (p = 0.038) and insulin levels (p = 0.002), respectively. There were no differences based on gender or use/non-use of OSAS treatment device. Conclusions: Our weight reduction program showed a limited success in reducing AHI. However, there were significant improvements in weight, ODI, arousal index, and subjective symptoms. We recommend the program as an adjunct treatment for well-motivated obese OSAS patients. Citation: Nerfeldt P; Nilsson BY; Mayor L; Uddén J; Friberg D. A two-year weight reduction program in obese sleep apnea patients. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(5):479-486. PMID:20957850

  13. Neurobehavioral Functioning in Adolescents With and Without Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Xanthopoulos, Melissa S.; Gallagher, Paul R.; Berkowitz, Robert I.; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Bradford, Ruth; Marcus, Carole L.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Children and adults with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) exhibit neurobehavioral abnormalities, but few studies have evaluated the transitional stage of adolescence. Obesity is also associated with neurobehavioral abnormalities, and many patients with OSAS are obese. However, the confounding effect of obesity on neurobehavioral abnormalities in adolescents with OSAS has not been evaluated. We hypothesized that obese adolescents with OSAS would exhibit more neurobehavioral abnormalities than obese and lean adolescents without OSAS. Design: Cross-sectional, case control. Setting: Sleep Center and community. Participants: Obese adolescents with OSAS compared to (1) nonsnoring, obese controls without OSAS, and (2) nonobese, nonsnoring controls. Interventions: Neurobehavioral evaluation. Measurements and Results: Obese adolescents with OSAS had significantly worse executive function and attention compared to both obese (P < 0.001) and lean (P < 0.001) controls, and more depression (P = 0.004) and externalizing symptoms than lean controls (P = 0.008). A higher percentage of participants in the OSAS group scored in the clinically abnormal range on executive functioning, attention, sleepiness, and behavioral functioning than lean controls. Mediation analyses indicated that level of sleep apnea significantly mediated the effect of body mass on executive functioning, attention, and behavior. Conclusions: Obese adolescents with OSAS show impaired executive and behavioral function compared to obese and lean controls, and are more likely to score in the clinically abnormal range on measures of neurobehavioral functioning. These results are especially concerning given that the frontal lobe is still developing during this critical age period. We speculate that untreated OSAS during adolescence may lead to significant neurobehavioral deficits in adulthood. Citation: Xanthopoulos MS, Gallagher PR, Berkowitz RI, Radcliffe J, Bradford R, Marcus CL. Neurobehavioral functioning in adolescents with and without obesity and obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2015;38(3):401–410. PMID:25325469

  14. A new rodent model for obstructive sleep apnea: effects on ATP-mediated dilations in cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Crossland, Randy F.; Durgan, David J.; Lloyd, Eric E.; Phillips, Sharon C.; Reddy, Anilkumar K.; Marrelli, Sean P.

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a condition in which the upper airway collapses during sleep, is strongly associated with metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Little is known how OSA affects the cerebral circulation. The goals of this study were 1) to develop a rat model of chronic OSA that involved apnea and 2) to test the hypothesis that 4 wk of apneas during the sleep cycle alters endothelium-mediated dilations in middle cerebral arteries (MCAs). An obstruction device, which was chronically implanted into the trachea of rats, inflated to obstruct the airway 30 times/h for 8 h during the sleep cycle. After 4 wk of apneas, MCAs were isolated, pressurized, and exposed to luminally applied ATP, an endothelial P2Y2 receptor agonist that dilates through endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) and endothelial-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH). Dilations to ATP were attenuated ∼30% in MCAs from rats undergoing apneas compared with those from a sham control group (P < 0.04 group effect; n = 7 and 10, respectively). When the NO component of the dilation was blocked to isolate the EDH component, the response to ATP in MCAs from the sham and apnea groups was similar. This finding suggests that the attenuated dilation to ATP must occur through reduced NO. In summary, we have successfully developed a novel rat model for chronic OSA that incorporates apnea during the sleep cycle. Using this model, we demonstrate that endothelial dysfunction occurred by 4 wk of apnea, likely increasing the vulnerability of the brain to cerebrovascular related accidents. PMID:23761641

  15. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Hospitalized Patients: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunil; Mather, Paul J.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Kahn, Daron; Shiue, Kristin Y.; Cheema, Mohammed; Malloy, Raymond; Quan, Stuart F.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an important health problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This condition often is underrecognized in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to conduct a clinical pathway evaluation (CPE) among obese patients admitted to a tertiary care hospital. We also assessed oxygen desaturation index (ODI, measured by overnight pulse oximetry) as a potential low-cost screening tool for identifying OSA. Methods: This was a prospective study of 754 patients admitted to an academic medical center between February 2013 and February 2014. Consecutive obese patients (body mass index ≥ 30) admitted to the hospital (medical services) were screened and evaluated for OSA with the snoring, tiredness during daytime, observed apnea, high blood pressure (STOP) questionnaire. The admitting team was advised to perform follow-up evaluation, including polysomnography, if the test was positive. Results: A total of 636 patients were classified as high risk and 118 as low risk for OSA. Within 4 w of discharge, 149 patients underwent polysomnography, and of these, 87% (129) were shown to have OSA. An optimal screening cutoff point for OSA (apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 10/h) was determined to be ODI ≥ 10/h [Matthews correlation coefficient = 0.36, 95% confidence interval = 0.24–0.47]. Significantly more hospitalized patients were identified and underwent polysomnography compared with the year prior to introduction of the CPE. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the CPE increased the identification of OSA in this population. Furthermore, ODI derived from overnight pulse oximetry may be a cost-effective strategy to screen for OSA in hospitalized patients. Citation: Sharma S, Mather PJ, Efird JT, Kahn D, Shiue KY, Cheema M, Malloy R, Quan SF. Obstructive sleep apnea in obese hospitalized patients: a single center experience. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(7):717–723. PMID:25766715

  16. Impact of Treatment with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) on Weight in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Stuart F.; Budhiraja, Rohit; Clarke, Denise P.; Goodwin, James L.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Nichols, Deborah A.; Simon, Richard D.; Smith, Terry W.; Walsh, James K.; Kushida, Clete A.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine the impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on weight change in persons with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Design, Setting, and Participants: The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES) was a 6-month, randomized, double-blinded sham-controlled multicenter clinical trial conducted at 5 sites in the United States. Of 1,105 participants with an apnea hypopnea index ≥ 10 events/ hour initially randomized, 812 had body weight measured at baseline and after 6 months of study. Intervention: CPAP or Sham CPAP. Measurements: Body weight, height, hours of CPAP or Sham CPAP use, Epworth Sleepiness Scale score. Results: Participants randomized to CPAP gained 0.35 ± 5.01 kg, whereas those on Sham CPAP lost 0.70 ± 4.03 kg (mean ± SD, p = 0.001). Amount of weight gain with CPAP was related to hours of device adherence, with each hour per night of use predicting a 0.42 kg increase in weight. This association was not noted in the Sham CPAP group. CPAP participants who used their device ≥ 4 h per night on ≥ 70% of nights gained the most weight over 6 months in comparison to non-adherent CPAP participants (1.0 ± 5.3 vs. -0.3 ± 5.0 kg, p = 0.014). Conclusions: OSA patients using CPAP may gain a modest amount of weight with the greatest weight gain found in those most compliant with CPAP. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 995. Citation: Quan SF; Budhiraja R; Clarke DP; Goodwin JL; Gottlieb DJ; Nichols DA; Simon RD; Smith TW; Walsh JK; Kushida CA. Impact of treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on weight in obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(10):989-993. PMID:24127141

  17. Prevalence of sleep apnea and excessive day time sleepiness in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Jahdali, Hamdan

    2012-03-01

    Sleep apnea (SA) and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) are common sleep disorders among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This cross-sectional study, carried out in two dialysis centers in Saudi Arabia, assessed the prevalence of sleep apnea and sleepiness in Saudi patients with ESRD who are on maintenance dialysis with either peritoneal or hemodialysis. We used questionnaires to assess the prevalence of SA and EDS. The association between sleep apnea, EDS, and other sleep disorders, the underlying causes of renal failure, and other demographic data were also examined. Among 227 enrolled patients, the mean patient age was 55.7 years ± 17.2 years; 53.7% were male, and 46.3% were female. The overall prevalence of SA as defined by the Berlin questionnaire (BQ) was 37% in males and 34% in females, which was not a statistically significant difference (P = 0.459). Sleep apnea was significantly associated with age, neck size, afternoon and evening hemodialysis shift, obesity, diabetes, and hypertension (P-values, 0.001, 0.029, < 0.0001, < 0.0001, < 0.008, 0.002, and < 0.001, respectively). Sleep apnea was also significantly associated with other sleep disorders such as restless leg syndrome, insomnia, habitual snoring, and EDS (P-values, < 0.001, < 0.001, < 0.001, and < 0.001, respectively). The prevalence of EDS was 44%, and EDS was significantly more prevalent in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (P < 0.001); it was also associated with older age, diabetes mellitus, and other sleep disorders. SA and EDS are common in dialysis patients and are significantly associated with other sleep disorders. PMID:22382215

  18. Monitoring respiration during sleep.

    PubMed

    Lee-Chiong, Teofilo L

    2003-06-01

    The sleep-related breathing disorders have been categorized in various ways. The most basic schema divides them into obstructive or central apneic events. An American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) Task Force Report published in 1999 defined four separate syndromes associated with abnormal respiratory events during sleep among adults, namely, obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), central sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome, Cheyne-Stokes breathing syndrome, and sleep hypoventilation syndrome. In this classification, the upper airway resistance syndrome was not regarded as a distinct syndrome; instead, respiratory event-related arousals (RERAs) were considered part of the syndrome of OSAHS. PMID:12800785

  19. Tissue Oxygenation in Brain, Muscle, and Fat in a Rat Model of Sleep Apnea: Differential Effect of Obstructive Apneas and Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Almendros, Isaac; Farré, Ramon; Planas, Anna M.; Torres, Marta; Bonsignore, Maria R.; Navajas, Daniel; Montserrat, Josep M.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To test the hypotheses that the dynamic changes in brain oxygen partial pressure (PtO2) in response to obstructive apneas or to intermittent hypoxia differ from those in other organs and that the changes in brain PtO2 in response to obstructive apneas is a source of oxidative stress. Design: Prospective controlled animal study. Setting: University laboratory. Participants: 98 Sprague-Dawley rats. Interventions: Cerebral cortex, skeletal muscle, or visceral fat tissues were exposed in anesthetized animals subjected to either obstructive apneas or intermittent hypoxia (apneic and hypoxic events of 15 s each and 60 events/h) for 1 h. Measurements and Results: Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) presented a stable pattern, with similar desaturations during both stimuli. The PtO2 was measured by a microelectrode. During obstructive apneas, a fast increase in cerebral PtO2 was observed (38.2 ± 3.4 vs. 54.8 ± 5.9 mm Hg) but not in the rest of tissues. This particular cerebral response was not found during intermittent hypoxia. The cerebral content of reduced glutathione was decreased after obstructive apneas (46.2% ± 15.2%) compared to controls (100.0% ± 14.7%), but not after intermittent hypoxia. This antioxidant consumption after obstructive apneas was accompanied by increased cerebral lipid peroxidation under this condition. No changes were observed for these markers in the other tissues. Conclusions: These results suggest that cerebral cortex could be protected in some way from hypoxic periods caused by obstructive apneas. The increased cerebral PtO2 during obstructive apneas may, however, cause harmful effects (oxidative stress). The obstructive apnea model appears to be more adequate than the intermittent hypoxia model for studying brain changes associated with OSA. Citation: Almendros I; Farre R; Planas AM; Torres M; Bonsignore MR; Navajas D; Montserrat JM. Tissue oxygenation in brain, muscle, and fat in a rat model of sleep apnea: differential effect of obstructive apneas and intermittent hypoxia. SLEEP 2011;34(8):1127-1133. PMID:21804675

  20. [Driving simulators in risk assessment of traffic accident among drivers with obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Siedlecka, Jadwiga; Bortkiewicz, Alicja

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disorders in the form of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are still underdiagnosed and insufficiently treated in drivers. This is a very important problem, because chronic sleepiness during the day and episodes of sleep during driving a road vehicle are now regarded as one of the main causes of traffic accidents, including fatal ones, caused by professional drivers. For many years driver fatigue has been considered a major risk factor of traffic accidents, while obstructive sleep apnea has remained almost completely disregarded. In the late 1980s and early 1990s epidemiological data began to indicate sleepiness and sleep deficit as the cause of up to 20% of road accidents. Later studies conducted in many countries in different groups of drivers have confirmed that people with breathing problems during sleep are much more likely to cause accidents than healthy ones. These accidents often result from sleep disorders experienced by drivers while driving, during both long monotonous journeys and in heavy urban traffic. The application of treatment involving continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) reduces the rate of accidents among drivers. In the recent years, the studies of this problem has been expanded by the use of drive simulators that quite accurately simulate real driving conditions. This approach allows to assess the driver's reactions and behaviors in different situations on the road, including the most dangerous ones. By comparing the results from the simulator with those in real conditions it will be possible to see to what extent the risk of accident in simulated conditions correlates with the risk of accident in real life settings. PMID:22779329

  1. Comparison of clinical features and polysomnographic findings between men and women with sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Takatoshi; Tomita, Yasuhiro; Takaya, Hisashi; Kasagi, Satoshi; Kawabata, Masateru; Narui, Koji; Setoguchi, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of reports comparing gender differences in polysomnographic findings among Asian patients with sleep apnea (SA). In this study, we elucidated gender differences in the clinical features and polysomnographic findings of SA patients in Japan. Methods We conducted a case-matched control study to compare the gender differences. A total of 4,714 patients (4,127 men; 587 women) were matched for age, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and body mass index (BMI). The criteria used for sex matching were (I) age ±4 years, (II) AHI ± 4 h of sleep, and (III) BMI ±2 kg/m2. This facilitated the comparison of polysomnography sleep variables in 296 men and 296 women with SA. Results Compared with their male counterparts, female SA patients had a significantly higher rapid eye movement AHI [men: 27.7 (IQR, 14.3-45.2); women: 43.3 (IQR, 25.5-56.6); P<0.001], lower supine AHI [men: 29.7 (IQR, 16.8-49.5); women: 25.0 (IQR, 14.7-39.3); P=0.004], longer total sleep time (TST), and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep stage 3 (N3), %TST [TST in men: 356.3 (IQR, 319.5-392.3); women: 372.0 (IQR, 327.8-404.5); P=0.007; N3, %TST in men: 8.8 (IQR, 3.0-14.6); women: 14.4 (IQR, 8.3-20.4); P<0.001], and better sleep efficiency [men: 80.9 (IQR, 71.0-88.0); women: 83.2 (IQR, 74.5-90.0); P=0.011]. Conclusions This study revealed that women with SA had a significantly longer TST and N3, %TST, which represents deep sleep. Future prospective studies must be conducted together with polysomnography tests including electromyography of pharyngeal muscle expansion and electroencephalography. PMID:26904223

  2. Sleep apnea and oxygen saturation in adults at 2640 m above sea level☆

    PubMed Central

    Bazurto Zapata, Maria Angelica; Dueñas Meza, Elida; Jaramillo, Claudia; Maldonado Gomez, Dario; Torres Duque, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the SpO2 in wakefulness, sleep and during the apnea–hypopnea in adults living in Bogotá, located at 2640 m above sea level. Methods Descriptive observational study in adults referred for polysomnogram (PSG). A normal Apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was defined as ≤5 and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was classified as mild (AHI 5–15), moderate (AHI 15–30), and severe (AHI >30). T-test or ANOVA test for SpO2 differences between groups was used. Results 1799 patients, 33% women. 222 (12.8%) did not have OSA (normal IAH), 268 (14.9%) mild OSA, 315 (17.5%) moderate ,and 993 (55.2%) severe. In all cases a low SpO2 (SpO2<90%) was found. The SpO2 was lower when the AHI was higher, in wakefulness, in non-REM and in REM (p<0.001). For all grades of severity, SpO2 decreased significantly from wakefulness to non-REM sleep and to REM sleep (p<0.001). Patients with severe OSA had higher desaturation during wakefulness (85.2±6.6%), non-REM sleep (83.1±7.7%), REM sleep (78.8±10.2), and during events (75.1±9.1%). Conclusions Patients with OSA at 2640 m have nocturnal desaturation lower than 88%, which decreases with higher severity of OSA. The clinical impact of sleep disorders at this point may be greater than at sea level and should be studied. PMID:26483911

  3. Wireless Wearable Multisensory Suite and Real-Time Prediction of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Changqing; Sangasoongsong, Akkarapol; Wongdhamma, Woranat; Bukkapatnam, Satish T. S.

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder found in 24% of adult men and 9% of adult women. Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has emerged as a standard therapy for OSA, a majority of patients are not tolerant to this treatment, largely because of the uncomfortable nasal air delivery during their sleep. Recent advances in wireless communication and advanced (“bigdata”) preditive analytics technologies offer radically new point-of-care treatment approaches for OSA episodes with unprecedented comfort and afforadability. We introduce a Dirichlet process-based mixture Gaussian process (DPMG) model to predict the onset of sleep apnea episodes based on analyzing complex cardiorespiratory signals gathered from a custom-designed wireless wearable multisensory suite. Extensive testing with signals from the multisensory suite as well as PhysioNet's OSA database suggests that the accuracy of offline OSA classification is 88%, and accuracy for predicting an OSA episode 1-min ahead is 83% and 3-min ahead is 77%. Such accurate prediction of an impending OSA episode can be used to adaptively adjust CPAP airflow (toward improving the patient's adherence) or the torso posture (e.g., minor chin adjustments to maintain steady levels of the airflow). PMID:27170854

  4. Upper Airway Stimulation for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Dedhia, Raj C.; Strollo, Patrick J.; Soose, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an increasingly prevalent clinical problem with significant effects on both personal and public health. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has demonstrated excellent efficacy and low morbidity; long-term adherence rates approach 50%. Although traditional upper airway surgical procedures target the anatomic component of obstruction, upper airway stimulation tackles the twin goals of improving anatomic and neuromuscular pathology. After decades of trials demonstrating proof of concept of hypoglossal nerve stimulation in animal and human subjects, the results of a large multicenter, prospective trial were recently published. The trial demonstrated that hypoglossal nerve stimulation led to significant improvements in objective and subjective measurements of the severity of OSA. This novel approach is the first to combine sleep surgery techniques with a titratable medical device for the treatment of OSA. Further research is required to define optimal patient selection and device performance and to demonstrate long-term effectiveness. Citation: Dedhia RC, Strollo PJ, Soose RJ. Upper airway stimulation for obstructive sleep apnea: past, present, and future. SLEEP 2015;38(6):899– 906. PMID:25409109

  5. Speech Signal and Facial Image Processing for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Assessment.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Cuadros, Fernando; Fernández-Pozo, Rubén; Toledano, Doroteo T; Alcázar-Ramírez, José D; López-Gonzalo, Eduardo; Hernández-Gómez, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder characterized by recurring breathing pauses during sleep caused by a blockage of the upper airway (UA). OSA is generally diagnosed through a costly procedure requiring an overnight stay of the patient at the hospital. This has led to proposing less costly procedures based on the analysis of patients' facial images and voice recordings to help in OSA detection and severity assessment. In this paper we investigate the use of both image and speech processing to estimate the apnea-hypopnea index, AHI (which describes the severity of the condition), over a population of 285 male Spanish subjects suspected to suffer from OSA and referred to a Sleep Disorders Unit. Photographs and voice recordings were collected in a supervised but not highly controlled way trying to test a scenario close to an OSA assessment application running on a mobile device (i.e., smartphones or tablets). Spectral information in speech utterances is modeled by a state-of-the-art low-dimensional acoustic representation, called i-vector. A set of local craniofacial features related to OSA are extracted from images after detecting facial landmarks using Active Appearance Models (AAMs). Support vector regression (SVR) is applied on facial features and i-vectors to estimate the AHI. PMID:26664493

  6. Speech Signal and Facial Image Processing for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza-Cuadros, Fernando; Fernández-Pozo, Rubén; Toledano, Doroteo T.; Alcázar-Ramírez, José D.; López-Gonzalo, Eduardo; Hernández-Gómez, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder characterized by recurring breathing pauses during sleep caused by a blockage of the upper airway (UA). OSA is generally diagnosed through a costly procedure requiring an overnight stay of the patient at the hospital. This has led to proposing less costly procedures based on the analysis of patients' facial images and voice recordings to help in OSA detection and severity assessment. In this paper we investigate the use of both image and speech processing to estimate the apnea-hypopnea index, AHI (which describes the severity of the condition), over a population of 285 male Spanish subjects suspected to suffer from OSA and referred to a Sleep Disorders Unit. Photographs and voice recordings were collected in a supervised but not highly controlled way trying to test a scenario close to an OSA assessment application running on a mobile device (i.e., smartphones or tablets). Spectral information in speech utterances is modeled by a state-of-the-art low-dimensional acoustic representation, called i-vector. A set of local craniofacial features related to OSA are extracted from images after detecting facial landmarks using Active Appearance Models (AAMs). Support vector regression (SVR) is applied on facial features and i-vectors to estimate the AHI. PMID:26664493

  7. Sleep Apnea Clinical Score, Berlin Questionnaire, or Epworth Sleepiness Scale: which is the best obstructive sleep apnea predictor in patients with COPD?

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Anamelia Costa; da Costa, Cláudia Henrique; Rufino, Rogério

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Sleep Apnea Clinical Score (SACS) and the Berlin Questionnaire (BQ) are used to predict the likelihood of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) is used to assess daytime sleepiness, a common OSA symptom. These clinical tools help prioritize individuals with the most severe illness regarding on whom polysomnography (PSG) should be performed. It is necessary to check the applicability of these tools in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this study is to compare SACS, BQ, and ESS performance in patients with COPD. Methods The SACS, BQ, and ESS were applied to 91 patients with COPD. From this group, 24 underwent PSG. In this transversal study, these three tests were compared regarding their likelihood to predict OSA in patients with COPD using receiver-operating characteristic curve statistics. Results In this sample, 58 (63.7%) patients were men, and their mean age was 69.4±9.6 years. Fourteen patients (15.4%) had a high probability of OSA by SACS, 32 (32.5%) had a high probability by BQ, and 37 (40.7%) had excessive diurnal somnolence according to the ESS. From the 24 patients who underwent PSG, OSA diagnosis was confirmed in five (20.8%), according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. BQ and ESS did not accurately predict OSA in this group of patients with COPD, with a receiver-operating characteristic curve area under the curves of 0.54 (95% CI: 0.329–0.745, P=0.75) and 0.69 (95% CI: 0.47–0.860, P=0.10), respectively. SACS performance was significantly better, with an area under the curve of 0.82 (95% CI: 0.606–0.943, P=0.02). Conclusion SACS was better than BQ and ESS in predicting OSA in this group of patients with COPD. PMID:26345497

  8. Ambulatory treatment of sleep apnea syndrome with CO2 laser: laser-assisted UPPP (LAUP), results on 70 patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamami, Yves-Victor

    1995-05-01

    The pharyngeal airway obstruction during sleep in the Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) can be improved after treatment by LAUP (Laser Assisted Uvulopalatoplasty). This new technique, performed under local anesthesia, permits the snoring treatment without any hospitalization, or general anesthetic; like an ordinary dental visit. This is done by reducing the amount of tissue in the uvula, the velum, and the upper part of the posterior pillars. Our experience with the LAUP in Sleep Apnea Syndrome is described, from December 1988 to May 1994, in 70 patients. Among 62 patients classified as successful `responders', the respiratory disturbance index was reduced more than 50%. Among all the 70 patients: in 51.4 % of cases (36 patients), there's a healing of snoring and Sleep Apnea Syndrome. In 37.2% of cases (26 patients), there's an improvement reduction of length and number of apneas and a significant improvement in nocturnal oxygen saturation. 11.4% (8 patients), are relative failures, with always decrease of snoring, but still Sleep Apnea Syndrome, (with a higher B.M.I.). There were no important complications reported. Patients withstand it well and there's had a better tolerance of the C.P.A.P. in the cases of OSAS LRPP failures. Popularization of LAUP will require serious training of surgeon and further long-term studies.

  9. Study of a Novel APAP Algorithm for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Women

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Nigel; King, Stuart; Shepherd, Kelly; Baker, Vanessa; Ramanan, Dinesh; Ketheeswaran, Sahisha; Bateman, Peter; Wimms, Alison; Armitstead, Jeff; Richards, Glenn; Hillman, David; Eastwood, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess the efficacy of a novel female-specific autotitrating continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) algorithm (AutoSet for her, AfH) in premenopausal women relative to a standard autotitrating algorithm (AutoSet, S9) (ResMed Ltd., Bella Vista, New South Wales, Australia). Design: Prospective randomised crossover noninferiority trial. Setting: Tertiary hospital sleep clinic and university research sleep laboratory. Participants: 20 female patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) established on long-term CPAP treatment. Interventions: Treatment with 1 night each of AfH and AutoSet while monitored with overnight laboratory-based polysomnography (PSG); order randomly allocated. Measurements and Results: The primary outcome variables were the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and 3% oxygen desaturation index (ODI 3%) determined from PSG. Treatment efficacy on the AfH night was noninferior to the AutoSet night as assessed by median (IQR) AHI (1.2 [0.60–1.85]/h versus 1.15 [0.40–2.85]/h, respectively, P = 0.51) and 3% ODI (0.85 [0.25–1.5]/h versus 0.5 [0.25–2.55]/h, respectively, P = 0.83). Other PSG measures were similar, except for the percentage of the night spent in flow limitation, which was lower on the AfH (0.14%) than the AutoSet night (0.19%, P = 0.007). The device-downloaded 95th centile pressure on the AfH night was also lower than on the AutoSet night (10.6 ± 1.7 versus 11.6 ± 2.6 cmH2O, respectively; mean difference [95% confidence interval]: −1.1 [−2.13 to −0.01] cm H2O). Conclusion: Among premenopausal women a novel female-specific autotitrating algorithm (AfH) is as effective as the standard AutoSet algorithm in controlling obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The new algorithm may reduce flow limitation more than the standard algorithm and achieve control of OSA at a lower (95th centile) pressure. Citation: McArdle N, King S, Shepherd K, Baker V, Ramanan D, Ketheeswaran S, Bateman P, Wimms A, Armitstead J, Richards G, Hillman D, Eastwood P. Study of a novel APAP algorithm for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in women. SLEEP 2015;38(11):1775–1781. PMID:26039968

  10. Heritability of Craniofacial Structures in Normal Subjects and Patients with Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Luqi; Comyn, Francois-Louis; Keenan, Brendan T.; Cater, Jacqueline; Maislin, Greg; Pack, Allan I.; Schwab, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Accumulating evidence has shown that there is a genetic contribution to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).The objectives were to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cephalometry to (1) confirm heritability of craniofacial risk factors for OSA previously shown by cephalometrics; and (2) examine the heritability of new craniofacial structures that are measurable with MRI. Design: A sib pair “quad” design examining apneics, apneic siblings, controls, and control siblings. The study design used exact matching on ethnicity and sex, frequency matching on age, and statistical control for differences in age, sex, ethnicity, height, and weight. Setting: Academic medical center. Patients: We examined 55 apneic probands (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]: 46.8 ± 33.5 events/h), 55 proband siblings (AHI: 11.1 ± 15.9 events/h), 55 controls (AHI: 2.2 ± 1.7 events/h), and 55 control siblings (AHI: 4.1 ± 4.0 events/h). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Five independent domains reflecting different aspects of the craniofacial structure were examined. We confirmed heritability of sella–nasion–subspinale (38%, P = 0.002), saddle angle (55%, P < 0.0001), mandibular length (24%, P = 0.02) and lower facial height (33%, P = 0.006) previously measured by cephalometry. In addition, the current study added new insights by demonstrating significant heritability of mandibular width (30%, P = 0.005), maxillary width (47%, P < 0.0001), distance from the hyoid bone to the retropogonion (36%, P = 0.0018) and size of the oropharyngeal space (31%, P = 0.004). Finally, our data indicate that heritability of the craniofacial structures is similar in normal patients and those with apnea. Conclusions: The data support our a priori hypothesis that the craniofacial structures that have been associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are heritable. We have demonstrated heritability for several intermediate craniofacial phenotypes for OSA. Thus, we believe that future studies should be able to identify genes associated with these intermediate craniofacial phenotypes. Citation: Chi L, Comyn FL, Keenan BT, Cater J, Maislin G, Pack AI, Schwab RJ. Heritability of craniofacial structures in normal subjects and patients with sleep apnea. SLEEP 2014;37(10):1689-1698. PMID:25197806

  11. The diagnostic method has a strong influence on classification of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Escourrou, Pierre; Grote, Ludger; Penzel, Thomas; Mcnicholas, Walter T; Verbraecken, Johan; Tkacova, Rosa; Riha, Renata L; Hedner, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Polygraphy (PG) and polysomnography (PSG) are used in clinical settings in Europe for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but their equivalence in unselected clinical cohorts is unknown. We hypothesized that the method would affect both diagnostic outcomes and disease severity stratification. Data from 11 049 patients in the multi-centre European Sleep Apnea Cohort (ESADA) with suspected OSA (male and female, aged 18-80 years) were used in two groups of patients to compare PG (n = 5745) and PSG (n = 5304). Respiratory events were scored using the 2007 American Association of Sleep Medicine (AASM) criteria. In subjects who underwent PSG, mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) using sleep time (AHIPSG 31.0 ± 26.1 h(-1) ) and total analysed time (TAT) (AHITAT 24.7 ± 22.0 h(-1) ) were higher than in subjects who underwent PG (AHIPG 22.0 ± 23.5 h(-1) ) (P < 0.0001). The oxygen desaturation index (ODI) was lower in subjects investigated with PG (ODIPG 18.4 ± 21.7 h(-1) ) compared to subjects investigated with PSG (ODIPSG 23.0 ± 25.3 h(-1) ) but not different when the PSG was indexed by TAT (ODITAT 18.6 ± 21.4 h(-1) , P < 0.65). The proportion of patients with an AHI ≥ 15 was 64% in the subjects who underwent PSG and 47% in the subjects who underwent PG (P < 0.001). Overall, patients investigated using PG are likely to have a 30% lower AHI on average, compared to patients investigated by PSG. This study suggests that PG interpreted using standard guidelines results in underdiagnosis and misclassification of OSA. We advocate the development of PG-specific guidelines for the management of OSA patients. PMID:26511017

  12. Symbolic dynamics marker of heart rate variability combined with clinical variables enhance obstructive sleep apnea screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo-García, A. G.; Saavedra-Santana, P.; Juliá-Serdá, G.; Navarro-Mesa, J. L.; Navarro-Esteva, J.; Álvarez-López, X.; Gapelyuk, A.; Penzel, T.; Wessel, N.

    2014-06-01

    Many sleep centres try to perform a reduced portable test in order to decrease the number of overnight polysomnographies that are expensive, time-consuming, and disturbing. With some limitations, heart rate variability (HRV) has been useful in this task. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate if inclusion of symbolic dynamics variables to a logistic regression model integrating clinical and physical variables, can improve the detection of subjects for further polysomnographies. To our knowledge, this is the first contribution that innovates in that strategy. A group of 133 patients has been referred to the sleep center for suspected sleep apnea. Clinical assessment of the patients consisted of a sleep related questionnaire and a physical examination. The clinical variables related to apnea and selected in the statistical model were age (p < 10-3), neck circumference (p < 10-3), score on a questionnaire scale intended to quantify daytime sleepiness (p < 10-3), and intensity of snoring (p < 10-3). The validation of this model demonstrated an increase in classification performance when a variable based on non-linear dynamics of HRV (p < 0.01) was used additionally to the other variables. For diagnostic rule based only on clinical and physical variables, the corresponding area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.907 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.848, 0.967), (sensitivity 87.10% and specificity 80%). For the model including the average of a symbolic dynamic variable, the area under the ROC curve was increased to 0.941 (95% = 0.897, 0.985), (sensitivity 88.71% and specificity 82.86%). In conclusion, symbolic dynamics, coupled with significant clinical and physical variables can help to prioritize polysomnographies in patients with a high probability of apnea. In addition, the processing of the HRV is a well established low cost and robust technique.

  13. Prevalence of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and CPAP Adherence in the Elderly Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    To, Kin-Wang; Chan, Ken K. P.; Ngai, Jenny; Tung, Alvin; Ko, Fanny W. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study assessed the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and CPAP adherence in the elderly Chinese in Hong Kong. Methods We conducted a sleep questionnaire survey among the elders aged ≥60 years in the community centres followed by level 3 home sleep study (Embletta). Subjects with an apnea hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 15/hr alone and those with AHI ≥ 5/hr plus either cardiovascular risk factors or Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS) ≥ 10 were offered CPAP treatment. Results Altogether 819 subjects were interviewed with mean (SD) age of 73.9 (7.5) years, BMI 24.2 (3.6) kg/m2, neck circumference 34.9 (3.4) cm and ESS 6.6 (5.2). Daytime sleepiness was reported by 72.4%, snoring loudly 5.1% and witnessed apnea 4%. Among 234 subjects who underwent home sleep study, 156 (66.7%), 102 (43.6%), 70 (29.9%) and 45 (19.2%) had AHI ≥ 5, ≥ 10, ≥ 15 and ≥ 20/hr respectively, with the prevalence increasing with age and BMI. In the sample, 149 subjects (63.7%) were classified as having OSAS, as defined by an AHI ≥ 5/hr with associated symptoms, involving 81 men (74.3%) and 68 women (54.4%). Neck circumference and snoring frequency were the only positive independent factors associated with the AHI and the diagnosis of OSAS. Among 141 subjects who were offered CPAP treatment, 30 accepted CPAP prescription with improvement of ESS and cognitive function over 12 months with CPAP usage of 4.2 (2.2) h/night. Conclusion This study showed a high prevalence of OSAS among the community elders in Hong Kong. Home CPAP acceptance was low but there was significant improvement of subjective sleepiness and cognitive function among those on CPAP treatment. PMID:25774657

  14. Symbolic dynamics marker of heart rate variability combined with clinical variables enhance obstructive sleep apnea screening.

    PubMed

    Ravelo-Garca, A G; Saavedra-Santana, P; Juli-Serd, G; Navarro-Mesa, J L; Navarro-Esteva, J; lvarez-Lpez, X; Gapelyuk, A; Penzel, T; Wessel, N

    2014-06-01

    Many sleep centres try to perform a reduced portable test in order to decrease the number of overnight polysomnographies that are expensive, time-consuming, and disturbing. With some limitations, heart rate variability (HRV) has been useful in this task. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate if inclusion of symbolic dynamics variables to a logistic regression model integrating clinical and physical variables, can improve the detection of subjects for further polysomnographies. To our knowledge, this is the first contribution that innovates in that strategy. A group of 133 patients has been referred to the sleep center for suspected sleep apnea. Clinical assessment of the patients consisted of a sleep related questionnaire and a physical examination. The clinical variables related to apnea and selected in the statistical model were age (p?apnea. In addition, the processing of the HRV is a well established low cost and robust technique. PMID:24985458

  15. Monitoring Sound To Quantify Snoring and Sleep Apnea Severity Using a Smartphone: Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Kenji; Sadamitsu, Yumiko; Toshimitsu, Ayaka; Fujita, Hisayuki; Shin, Shizue; Tanigawa, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Habitual snoring is a prevalent condition that is not only a marker of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) but can also lead to vascular risk. However, it is not easy to check snoring status at home. We attempted to develop a snoring sound monitor consisting of a smartphone alone, which is aimed to quantify snoring and OSA severity. Methods: The subjects included 50 patients who underwent diagnostic polysomnography (PSG), of which the data of 10 patients were used for developing the program and that of 40 patients were used for validating the program. A smartphone was attached to the anterior chest wall over the sternum. It acquired ambient sound from the built-in microphone and analyzed it using a fast Fourier transform on a real-time basis. Results: Snoring time measured by the smartphone highly correlated with snoring time measured by PSG (r = 0.93). The top 1 percentile value of sound pressure level (L1) determined by the smartphone correlated with the ambient sound L1 during sleep determined by PSG (r = 0.92). Moreover, the respiratory disturbance index estimated by the smartphone (smart-RDI) highly correlated with the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) obtained by PSG (r = 0.94). The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the smart-RDI for diagnosing OSA (AHI ≥ 15) were 0.70 and 0.94, respectively. Conclusions: A smartphone can be used for effectively monitoring snoring and OSA in a controlled laboratory setting. Use of this technology in a noisy home environment remains unproven, and further investigation is needed. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 79. Citation: Nakano H; Hirayama K; Sadamitsu Y; Toshimitsu A; Fujita H; Shin S; Tanigawa T. Monitoring sound to quantify snoring and sleep apnea severity using a smartphone: proof of concept. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(1):73-78. PMID:24426823

  16. Prevalence of EEG Paroxysmal Activity in a Population of Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miano, Silvia; Paolino, Maria Chiara; Peraita-Adrados, Rosa; Montesano, Marilisa; Barberi, Salvatore; Villa, Maria Pia

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep breathing disorders may trigger paroxysmal events during sleep such as parasomnias and may exacerbate preexisting seizures. We verified the hypothesis that the amount of EEG paroxysmal activity (PA) may be high in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Design: Prospective study Settings: Sleep unit of an academic center. Participants: Polysomnographic studies were performed in a population of children recruited prospectively, for suspected OSAS, from January to December 2007, with no previous history of epileptic seizures or any other medical conditions. All sleep studies included ≥ 8 EEG channels, including centrotemporal leads. We collected data about clinical and respiratory parameters of children with OSAS and with primary snoring, then we performed sleep microstructure analysis in 2 OSAS subgroups, matched for age and sex, with and without paroxysmal activity. Measurements and Results: We found 40 children who met the criteria for primary snoring, none of them showed PA, while 127 children met the criteria for OSAS and 18 of them (14.2%) showed PA. Children with PA were older, had a predominance of boys, a longer duration of OSAS, and a lower percentage of adenotonsillar hypertrophy than children without PA. Moreover, PA occurred over the centrotemporal regions in 9 cases, over temporal-occipital regions in 5, and over frontocentral regions in 4. Children with PA showed a lower percentage of REM sleep, a lower CAP rate and lower A1 index during slow wave sleep, and lower total A2 and arousal index than children without EEG abnormalities. Conclusions: We found a higher percentage of paroxysmal activity in children with OSAS, compared to children with primary snoring, who did not exhibit EEG abnormalities. The children with paroxysmal activity have peculiar clinical and sleep microstructure characteristics that may have implications in the neurocognitive outcome of OSAS. Citation: Miano S; Paolino MC; Peraita-Adrados R; Montesano M; Barberi S; Villa MP. Prevalence of EEG paroxysmal activity in a population of children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. SLEEP 2009;32(4):522-529. PMID:19413146

  17. Biomarkers to Improve Diagnosis and Monitoring of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Archontogeorgis, Konstantinos; Nena, Evangelia; Papanas, Nikolaos; Steiropoulos, Paschalis

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by recurrent episodes of upper airway collapse associated with oxygen desaturation and sleep disruption. It is proposed that these periodic changes lead to molecular variations that can be detected by assessing serum biomarkers. Studies have identified inflammatory, oxidative, and metabolic perturbations attributable to sleep-disordered breathing. Given that OSAS is associated with increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity, the ideal biomarker should enable timely recognition with the possibility of intervention. There is accumulating data on the utility of serum biomarkers for the evaluation of disease severity, prognosis, and response to treatment. However, current knowledge is limited by data collection techniques, disease complexity, and potential confounding factors. The current paper reviews the literature on the use of serum biomarkers in OSAS. It is concluded that the ideal serum biomarker still needs to be discovered, while caution is needed in the interpretation of hitherto available results. PMID:25538852

  18. Screening for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Veterans Seeking Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Forbus, Lauren; Kelly, Ursula A

    2015-01-01

    Disrupted sleep is an often intractable symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); however, non-PTSD-related causes of disrupted sleep are rarely considered in clinical practice. Study objectives were to determine obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) risk among veterans seeking PTSD treatment and to investigate the relationship between OSA risk and PTSD symptom severity. Veterans (N = 264; 25.8% female) completed measures of PTSD symptoms and OSA risk factors. The rate of OSA risk was 72.7% for the whole sample, 77.2% among men, and 59.7% among women. OSA risk was not significantly correlated with PTSD symptom severity. Detection and treatment of OSA in veterans with PTSD may result in decreased insomnia in affected individuals. PMID:26517341

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and hypertension: Pathogenic mechanisms and possible therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wang

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), a chronic condition characterized by collapse of the pharynx during sleep, has been increasingly recognized as a health issue of growing importance over the last decade. Recently emerging evidence suggests that there is a causal link between OSAS and hypertension, and hypertension represents an independent risk factor in OSAS patients. However, the pathophysiological basis for patients with OSAS having an increased risk for hypertension remains to be elucidated. The main acute physiological outcomes of OSAS are intermittent hypoxia, intrapleural pressure changes, and arousal from sleep, which might induce endothelial dysfunction, sympathetic activation, renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system activation, lipid metabolism dysfunction, and increased oxidative stress. This brief review focuses on the current understanding of the complex association between OSAS and hypertension. PMID:23009224

  20. A gender-aware framework for the daytime detection of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Samy, Lauren; Macey, Paul M; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2015-08-01

    Sleep is an activity that is necessary for our survival. While the body may be still during sleep, the brain is actively progressing through repeating cycles of light and deep sleep whose purpose is physical and mental recovery and regeneration. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep disorder in which breathing is frequently and repeatedly stopped during sleep. OSA severely interrupts the normal sleep cycle and the regeneration work associated with it and can thus result in detrimental health consequences. OSA, with all the adverse health effects associated with it, places a significant burden on the US healthcare system. Polysomnography (PSG) - the gold standard OSA diagnostic test - is an overnight sleep test that monitors the biophysiological changes that occur during sleep. The test is notorious for its intrusiveness, discomfort, prohibitive cost, and scarcity - all reasons contributing to OSA being a severely underdiagnosed sleep disorder. In this paper, we propose a system that can serve as an early-stage OSA diagnostic tool that can non-intrusively, affordably and accurately screen patients for the disorder before proceeding with a full-night PSG. Unlike existing tools, our solution is gender-aware and does not rely on detecting apneic events in the data to make a diagnosis; rather, it is designed to trigger brain responses that are indicative of the disorder. Our tool can therefore make diagnoses even while patients are awake and breathing normally. The system was tested in a pilot study of 21 patients and our preliminary results show an average accuracy of 96.25%. PMID:26738072

  1. Novel Approach to Simulate Sleep Apnea Patients for Evaluating Positive Pressure Therapy Devices.

    PubMed

    Isetta, Valentina; Montserrat, Josep M; Santano, Raquel; Wimms, Alison J; Ramanan, Dinesh; Woehrle, Holger; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Bench testing is a useful method to characterize the response of different automatic positive airway pressure (APAP) devices under well-controlled conditions. However, previous models did not consider the diversity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients' characteristics and phenotypes. The objective of this proof-of-concept study was to design a new bench test for realistically simulating an OSA patient's night, and to implement a one-night example of a typical female phenotype for comparing responses to several currently-available APAP devices. We developed a novel approach aimed at replicating a typical night of sleep which includes different disturbed breathing events, disease severities, sleep/wake phases, body postures and respiratory artefacts. The simulated female OSA patient example that we implemented included periods of wake, light sleep and deep sleep with positional changes and was connected to ten different APAP devices. Flow and pressure readings were recorded; each device was tested twice. The new approach for simulating female OSA patients effectively combined a wide variety of disturbed breathing patterns to mimic the response of a predefined patient type. There were marked differences in response between devices; only three were able to overcome flow limitation to normalize breathing, and only five devices were associated with a residual apnea-hypopnea index of <5/h. In conclusion, bench tests can be designed to simulate specific patient characteristics, and typical stages of sleep, body position, and wake. Each APAP device behaved differently when exposed to this controlled model of a female OSA patient, and should lead to further understanding of OSA treatment. PMID:26978077

  2. Novel Approach to Simulate Sleep Apnea Patients for Evaluating Positive Pressure Therapy Devices

    PubMed Central

    Isetta, Valentina; Montserrat, Josep M.; Santano, Raquel; Wimms, Alison J.; Ramanan, Dinesh; Woehrle, Holger; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Bench testing is a useful method to characterize the response of different automatic positive airway pressure (APAP) devices under well-controlled conditions. However, previous models did not consider the diversity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients’ characteristics and phenotypes. The objective of this proof-of-concept study was to design a new bench test for realistically simulating an OSA patient’s night, and to implement a one-night example of a typical female phenotype for comparing responses to several currently-available APAP devices. We developed a novel approach aimed at replicating a typical night of sleep which includes different disturbed breathing events, disease severities, sleep/wake phases, body postures and respiratory artefacts. The simulated female OSA patient example that we implemented included periods of wake, light sleep and deep sleep with positional changes and was connected to ten different APAP devices. Flow and pressure readings were recorded; each device was tested twice. The new approach for simulating female OSA patients effectively combined a wide variety of disturbed breathing patterns to mimic the response of a predefined patient type. There were marked differences in response between devices; only three were able to overcome flow limitation to normalize breathing, and only five devices were associated with a residual apnea-hypopnea index of <5/h. In conclusion, bench tests can be designed to simulate specific patient characteristics, and typical stages of sleep, body position, and wake. Each APAP device behaved differently when exposed to this controlled model of a female OSA patient, and should lead to further understanding of OSA treatment. PMID:26978077

  3. Overnight Polysomnography versus Respiratory Polygraphy in the Diagnosis of Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hui-Leng; Gozal, David; Ramirez, Helena Molero; Bandla, Hari P. R.; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Background: Substantial discrepancies exist in the type of sleep studies performed to diagnose pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in different countries. Respiratory polygraphic (RP) recordings are primarily performed in sleep laboratories in Europe, whereas polysomnography (PSG) constitutes the majority in the US and Australia. Home RP show consistent apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) underscoring, primarily because the total recording time is used as the denominator when calculating the AHI compared to total sleep time (TST). However, laboratory-based RP are less likely affected, since the presence of sleep technicians and video monitoring may enable more accurate TST estimates. We therefore examined differences in AHI in PSG and in-lab RP, and whether RP-based AHI may impact clinical decision making. Methods: Of all the children assessed for possible OSA who underwent PSG evaluation, 100 were identified and divided into 4 groups: (A) those with AHI < 1/h TST (n = 20), (B) 1 ≤ AHI < 5/h TST (n = 40), (C) 5 ≤ AHI < 10/h TST (n = 20), and (D) AHI ≥ 10/h TST (n = 20). Electroencephalography, electrooculography, and electromyography channels were deleted from the original unscored recordings to transform them into RP, and then rescored in random sequence. AHI-RP were compared to AHI-PSG, and therapeutic decisions based on AHI-RP and AHI-PSG were formulated and analyzed using clinical details derived from the patient's clinic letter. Results: Bland Altman analysis showed that in lab RP underestimated the AHI despite more accurate estimates of TST. This underestimation was due to missed hypopneas causing arousals without desaturation. Basing the therapeutic management decision on RP instead of PSG results changed the clinical management in 23% of all patients. The clinical management for patients in groups A and D was unaffected. However, 27.5% of patients in group B would have been given no treatment, as they would be diagnosed as having no OSA (AHI < 1/h TST) when they should have received a trial of anti-inflammatory therapy or been referred for ear, nose, and throat (ENT) review. Sixty percent of patients in group C would have received either a trial of medical treatment to treat mild OSA or no treatment, instead of referral to ENT services or commencement of continuous positive airway pressure. Conclusion: Apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) is underestimated in respiratory polygraphy (RP), and the disparity in AHI-RP and AHI-polysomnography can significantly affect clinical management decisions, particularly in children with mild and moderate obstructive sleep apnea (1 < AHI < 10/h total sleep time). Citation: Tan HL; Gozal D; Ramirez HM; Bandla HPR; Kheirandish-Gozal L. Overnight polysomnography versus respiratory polygraphy in the diagnosis of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2014;37(2):255-260. PMID:24497654

  4. The Effect of Adenotonsillectomy for Childhood Sleep Apnea on Cardiometabolic Measures

    PubMed Central

    Quante, Mirja; Wang, Rui; Weng, Jia; Rosen, Carol L.; Amin, Raouf; Garetz, Susan L.; Katz, Eliot; Paruthi, Shalini; Arens, Raanan; Muzumdar, Hiren; Marcus, Carole L.; Ellenberg, Susan; Redline, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been associated with cardiometabolic disease in adults. In children, this association is unclear. We evaluated the effect of early adenotonsillectomy (eAT) for treatment of OSAS on blood pressure, heart rate, lipids, glucose, insulin, and C-reactive protein. We also analyzed whether these parameters at baseline and changes at follow-up correlated with polysomnographic indices. Design: Data collected at baseline and 7-mo follow-up were analyzed from a randomized controlled trial, the Childhood Adenotonsillectomy Trial (CHAT). Setting: Clinical referral setting from multiple centers. Participants: There were 464 children, ages 5 to 9.9 y with OSAS without severe hypoxemia. Interventions: Randomization to eAT or Watchful Waiting with Supportive Care (WWSC). Measurements and Results: There was no significant change of cardiometabolic parameters over the 7-mo interval in the eAT group compared to WWSC group. However, overnight heart rate was incrementally higher in association with baseline OSAS severity (average heart rate increase of 3 beats per minute [bpm] for apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] of 2 versus 10; [standard error = 0.60]). Each 5-unit improvement in AHI and 5 mmHg improvement in peak end-tidal CO2 were estimated to reduce heart rate by 1 and 1.5 bpm, respectively. An increase in N3 sleep also was associated with small reductions in systolic blood pressure percentile. Conclusions: There is little variation in standard cardiometabolic parameters in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) but without severe hypoxemia at baseline or after intervention. Of all measures, overnight heart rate emerged as the most sensitive parameter of pediatric OSAS severity. Clinical Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov (#NCT00560859) Citation: Quante M, Wang R, Weng J, Rosen CL, Amin R, Garetz SL, Katz E, Paruthi S, Arens R, Muzumdar H, Marcus CL, Ellenberg S, Redline S. The effect of adenotonsillectomy for childhood sleep apnea on cardiometabolic measures. SLEEP 2015;38(9):1395–1403. PMID:25669177

  5. Myofunctional Therapy to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Macario; Certal, Victor; Abdullatif, Jose; Zaghi, Soroush; Ruoff, Chad M.; Capasso, Robson; Kushida, Clete A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the literature for articles evaluating myofunctional therapy (MT) as treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children and adults and to perform a meta-analysis on the polysomnographic, snoring, and sleepiness data. Data Sources: Web of Science, Scopus, MEDLINE, and The Cochrane Library. Review Methods: The searches were performed through June 18, 2014. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) statement was followed. Results: Nine adult studies (120 patients) reported polysomnography, snoring, and/or sleepiness outcomes. The pre- and post-MT apneahypopnea indices (AHI) decreased from a mean ± standard deviation (M ± SD) of 24.5 ± 14.3/h to 12.3 ± 11.8/h, mean difference (MD) −14.26 [95% confidence interval (CI) −20.98, −7.54], P < 0.0001. Lowest oxygen saturations improved from 83.9 ± 6.0% to 86.6 ± 7.3%, MD 4.19 (95% CI 1.85, 6.54), P = 0.0005. Polysomnography snoring decreased from 14.05 ± 4.89% to 3.87 ± 4.12% of total sleep time, P < 0.001, and snoring decreased in all three studies reporting subjective outcomes. Epworth Sleepiness Scale decreased from 14.8 ± 3.5 to 8.2 ± 4.1. Two pediatric studies (25 patients) reported outcomes. In the first study of 14 children, the AHI decreased from 4.87 ± 3.0/h to 1.84 ± 3.2/h, P = 0.004. The second study evaluated children who were cured of OSA after adenotonsillectomy and palatal expansion, and found that 11 patients who continued MT remained cured (AHI 0.5 ± 0.4/h), whereas 13 controls had recurrent OSA (AHI 5.3 ± 1.5/h) after 4 y. Conclusion: Current literature demonstrates that myofunctional therapy decreases apnea-hypopnea index by approximately 50% in adults and 62% in children. Lowest oxygen saturations, snoring, and sleepiness outcomes improve in adults. Myofunctional therapy could serve as an adjunct to other obstructive sleep apnea treatments. Citation: Camacho M, Certal V, Abdullatif J, Zaghi S, Ruoff CM, Capasso R, Kushida CA. Myofunctional therapy to treat obstructive sleep apnea: a systematic review and meta-analysis. SLEEP 2015;38(5):669–675. PMID:25348130

  6. Quality of Life and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Symptoms After Pediatric Adenotonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Ron B.; Parker, Portia D.; Moore, Reneé H.; Rosen, Carol L.; Giordani, Bruno; Muzumdar, Hiren; Paruthi, Shalini; Elden, Lisa; Willging, Paul; Beebe, Dean W.; Marcus, Carole L.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Redline, Susan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Data from a randomized, controlled study of adenotonsillectomy for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) were used to test the hypothesis that children undergoing surgery had greater quality of life (QoL) and symptom improvement than control subjects. The objectives were to compare changes in validated QoL and symptom measurements among children randomized to undergo adenotonsillectomy or watchful waiting; to determine whether race, weight, or baseline OSAS severity influenced changes in QoL and symptoms; and to evaluate associations between changes in QoL or symptoms and OSAS severity. METHODS: Children aged 5 to 9.9 years with OSAS (N = 453) were randomly assigned to undergo adenotonsillectomy or watchful waiting with supportive care. Polysomnography, the Pediatric Quality of Life inventory, the Sleep-Related Breathing Scale of the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire, the 18-item Obstructive Sleep Apnea QoL instrument, and the modified Epworth Sleepiness Scale were completed at baseline and 7 months. Changes in the QoL and symptom surveys were compared between arms. Effect modification according to race and obesity and associations between changes in polysomnographic measures and QoL or symptoms were examined. RESULTS: Greater improvements in most QoL and symptom severity measurements were observed in children randomized to undergo adenotonsillectomy, including the parent-completed Pediatric Quality of Life inventory (effect size [ES]: 0.37), the 18-item Obstructive Sleep Apnea QoL instrument (ES: –0.93), the modified Epworth Sleepiness Scale score (ES: –0.42), and the Sleep-Related Breathing Scale of the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (ES: –1.35). Effect modification was not observed by obesity or baseline severity but was noted for race in some symptom measures. Improvements in OSAS severity explained only a small portion of the observed changes. CONCLUSIONS: Adenotonsillectomy compared with watchful waiting resulted in significantly more improvements in parent-rated generic and OSAS-specific QoL measures and OSAS symptoms. PMID:25601979

  7. Incidence of hypothyroidism and its correlation with polysomnography findings in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, K Murat; Selcuk, Adin; Ozcan, Ibrahim; Ozdas, Talih; Ozdogan, Fatih; Acar, Mustafa; Dere, Huseyin

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the thyroid functions and its correlation with polysomnography findings in obstructive sleep apnea patients. This study was conducted on 203 patients evaluated with the complaints of snoring, witnessed apnea and daytime sleepiness and established polysomnography (PSG) indication between May 2008 and August 2011. All patients' nocturnal PSG recordings were carried out. The thyroid function was classified as euthyroid, subclinical hypothyroidism and clinical hypothyroidism after analyzing serum TSH and free T4 values. The correlation between the data obtained from PSG records and thyroid function values was statistically compared. Apnea hypopnea index obtained from PSG was in the range of 5.4-132.9/h, and mean value was 32.7/h. The lowest oxygen saturation level was in the range of 20-92 %, and the mean value was 76.4 %. According to PSG results, 55 patients (27.09 %) had mild obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), 48 patients (23.65 %) had moderate OSAS and 100 patients (49.26 %) had severe OSAS. On evaluation of the thyroid function test results, 10.8 % (n = 22) of the patients were defined to have subclinical hypothyroidism and 1.97 % (n = 4) clinical hypothyroidism. We found a total of 12.77 % subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism in patients with OSAS. Though the incidence of hypothyroidism was pretty high in patients with OSA, there was no statistically significant correlation between thyroid functions and polysomnography findings. We suggest that evaluation of the thyroid functions is important and necessary in patients with OSAS. Polysomnography findings do not correlate statistically with thyroid function tests, addressing the need for thyroid screening for all OSAS patients. PMID:24609648

  8. Modified STOP-Bang Tool for Stratifying Obstructive Sleep Apnea Risk in Adolescent Children

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Daniel; Goodwin, James L.; Quan, Stuart F.; Morgan, Wayne J.; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is prevalent in children and diagnostic polysomnography is costly and not readily available in all areas. We developed a pediatric modification of a commonly used adult clinical prediction tool for stratifying the risk of OSA and the need for polysomnography. Methods A total of 312 children (age 9–17 years) from phase 2 of the Tucson Children’s Assessment of Sleep Apnea cohort study, with complete anthropomorphic data, parent questionnaires, and home polysomnograms were included. An adolescent modification of STOP-Bang (teen STOP-Bang) was developed and included snoring, tired, observed apnea, blood pressure ≥ 95th percentile, BMI > 95th percentile, academic problems, neck circumference >95th percentile for age, and male gender. An apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 1.5 events/hour was considered diagnostic of OSA. Results Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves for parent-reported STOP-Bang scores were generated for teenage and pre-teen children. A STOP-Bang score of < 3 in teenagers was associated with a negative predictive value of 0.96. ROC curves were also generated based upon child-reported sexual maturity rating (SMR; n = 291). The ability of teen STOP-Bang to discriminate the presence or absence of OSA as measured by the AUC for children with SMR ≥ 4 (0.83; 95%CI 0.71–0.95) was better than children with SMR < 4 (0.63; 95%CI 0.46–0.81; p = 0.048). Conclusions In community dwelling adolescents, teen STOP-Bang may be useful in stratifying the risk of OSA. PMID:26581088

  9. Lack of Impact of Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleepiness, Mood and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Stuart F.; Budhiraja, Rohit; Batool-Anwar, Salma; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Eichling, Phillip; Patel, Sanjay; Shen, Wei; Walsh, James K.; Kushida, Clete A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with sleepiness, depression and reduced quality of life. However, it is unclear whether mild OSA has these negative impacts. Using data from the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES), this study determined whether participants with mild OSA had greater sleepiness, more depressive symptoms and poorer quality of life in comparison to those without OSA. Methods 239 individuals evaluated for participation in APPLES with a baseline apnea hypopnea index (AHI) < 15 /hour were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: No OSA (N=40, AHI < 5 /hour) or Mild OSA (N=199, 5 to <15 /hour) based on their screening polysomnogram. Scores on their Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS), Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), Profile of Mood States (POMS) and Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI) were compared between groups. Results There were no significant differences between the No OSA and Mild OSA groups on any of the 5 measures: ESS (No OSA, 9.8 ± 3.5 vs Mild OSA, 10.6