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Sample records for central west greenland

  1. Gyrfalcon diet in central west Greenland during the nestling period

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booms, Travis; Fuller, Mark R.

    2003-01-01

    We studied food habits of Gyrfalcons (Falco rusticolus) nesting in central west Greenland in 2000 and 2001 using three sources of data: time-lapse video (3 nests), prey remains (22 nests), and regurgitated pellets (19 nests). These sources provided different information describing the diet during the nesting period. Gyrfalcons relied heavily on Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus) and arctic hares (Lepus arcticus). Combined, these species contributed 79-91% of the total diet, depending on the data used. Passerines were the third most important group. Prey less common in the diet included waterfowl, arctic fox pups (Alopex lagopus), shorebirds, gulls, alcids, and falcons. All Rock Ptarmigan were adults, and all but one arctic hare were young of the year. Most passerines were fledglings. We observed two diet shifts, first from a preponderance of ptarmigan to hares in mid-June, and second to passerines in late June. The video-monitored Gyrfalcons consumed 94-110 kg of food per nest during the nestling period, higher than previously estimated. Using a combination of video, prey remains, and pellets was important to accurately document Gyrfalcon diet, and we strongly recommend using time-lapse video in future diet studies to identify biases in prey remains and pellet data.

  2. Gyrfalcon diet in central west Greenland during the nesting period

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booms, T.L.; Fuller, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    We studied food habits of Gyrfalcons (Falco rusticolus) nesting in central west Greenland in 2000 and 2001 using three sources of data: time-lapse video (3 nests), prey remains (22 nests), and regurgitated pellets (19 nests). These sources provided different information describing the diet during the nesting period. Gyrfalcons relied heavily on Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus) and arctic hares (Lepus arcticus). Combined, these species contributed 79-91% of the total diet, depending on the data used. Passerines were the third most important group. Prey less common in the diet included waterfowl, arctic fox pups (Alopex lagopus), shorebirds, gulls, alcids, and falcons. All Rock Ptarmigan were adults, and all but one arctic hare were young of the year. Most passerines were fledglings. We observed two diet shifts, first from a preponderance of ptarmigan to hares in mid-June, and second to passerines in late June. The video-monitored Gyrfalcons consumed 94-110 kg of food per nest during the nestling period, higher than previously estimated. Using a combination of video, prey remains, and pellets was important to accurately document Gyrfalcon diet, and we strongly recommend using time-lapse video in future diet studies to identify biases in prey remains and pellet data.

  3. The Ilugissoq graphite andesite volcano, Nuussuaq, central West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Asger Ken; Larsen, Lotte Melchior

    2006-11-01

    The Ilugissoq graphite andesite volcano on Nuussuaq belongs to the Asuk Member of the Paleocene Vaigat Formation. It is the largest eruption site within the Vaigat Formation and is recognized as the source of the majority of the graphite andesite tuffs found in marine sediments in central Nuussuaq. The volcano consists exclusively of pyroclastic rocks containing a diverse lithic assemblage including sediment xenoliths. The primary pyroclastic fragments consist of magnesian andesite with several weight percent of graphite, which formed when mafic magma established a shallow-level magma reservoir beneath the eruption site, and within older clastic sediments from the Nuussuaq Basin. Magma-modified mudstone is completely dominant in the xenolith assemblage and attests that the graphite andesite originated through prolonged high-temperature assimilation of mudstone. The eruptions took place on a marine shelf consisting of picritic hyaloclastites and subaqueous crater mounds. The volcano consists of four overlapping crater cones aligned along a more than 4 km long NNW-SSE oriented fissure system; two cones barely reached sea level whereas the other two reached up to 200 m above the sea. The morphology of the pyroclastic rocks demonstrates that the volcano evolved through phreatomagmatic activity, which diminished with time. The magma never degassed sufficiently to reach a subaerial lava stage. A moderate primary gas pressure well in excess of 100 bars in the graphite andesite magma facilitated the phreatomagmatic explosions, which created the Ilugissoq volcano. The rocks of the volcano are rich in graphite and contain little or no native iron. In comparison, the contemporaneous and chemically similar subaerial lavas and breccias from Disko and Nuussuaq contain less graphite and more iron. The differences are considered to be due to the extremely pressure-dependent redox-sensitivity of carbon-oxygen equilibria in the range 1 bar (the lavas) to 500 bars (the Ilugissoq

  4. Spacing and physical habitat selection patterns by peregrine falcons in central West Greenland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wightman, C.; Fuller, Mark R.

    2005-01-01

    We examined nest-site spacing and selection of nesting cliffs by Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus) in central West Greenland. Our sample included 67 nesting cliffs that were occupied at least once between 1972 and 1999 and 38 cliffs with no known history of Peregrine Falcon occupancy. We measured 29 eyrie, cliff, and topographical features at each occupied nesting cliff and unused cliff in 1998a??1999 and used them to model the probability of peregrines occupying a cliff for a breeding attempt. Nearest-neighbor distance was significantly greater than both nearest-cliff distance and nearest-occupied distance (the distance between an occupied cliff and one occupied at least once, 1972a??1999). Thus, spacing among occupied cliffs was probably the most important factor limiting nesting-cliff availability, and, ultimately, peregrine nesting densities. Although some unused cliffs were unavailable in a given year because of peregrine spacing behavior, physical characteristics apparently made some cliffs unsuitable, regardless of availability. We confirmed the importance of several features common to descriptions of peregrine nesting habitat and found that peregrines occupied tall nesting cliffs with open views. They chose nesting cliffs with eyrie ledges that provided a moderate degree of overhang protection and that were inaccessible to ground predators. Overall, we concluded that certain features of a cliff were important in determining its suitability as a nest site, but within a given breeding season there also must be sufficient spacing between neighboring falcon pairs. Our habitat model and information on spacing requirements may be applicable to other areas of Greenland and the Arctic, and can be used to test the generalities about features of Peregrine Falcon nesting cliffs throughout the species' widespread distribution.

  5. Gyrfalcon feeding behavior during the nestling period in central west Greenland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booms, Travis; Fuller, Mark R.

    2003-01-01

    We studied gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) food delivery and feeding behavior during the nestling period in central West Greenland during the 2000 and 2001 field seasons. We used time-lapse video cameras installed at three nests to record 2677.25 hours of nestling video. Ptarmigan delivered to nests were usually plucked prior to delivery and included the breast and superior thoracic vertebrae. Arctic hare leverets were rarely plucked and often delivered in parts. The most commonly delivered leveret part was the hind legs attached to the lower back. Passerines were rarely plucked and usually delivered whole. After feeding the young, adults removed 20.9% of prey items from the nest, which included items both with and without obvious muscle still attached. Prey delivery rates were similar among nests and increased as nestlings aged. Prey delivery frequency peaked in the morning and evening, with a distinct lull in the late evening and early morning hours. Male and female adults delivered a similar number of prey, though males typically delivered smaller prey than females. Gyrfalcons cached and re-delivered at least 9.1% of all items delivered, and one item was cached and retrieved three times.

  6. Paleoecology and paleoclimatology of a late holocene peat deposit from Braendevinsskaer, Central West Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Bennike, O. )

    1992-08-01

    The macroscopical plant and animal remains of a nearshore peat deposit in West Greenland are described and documented. The assemblages contain a mixture of limnic, terrestrial, and marine plants and animals. These are divided into four local macrofossil assemblage zones, of which zone 3, ca. A.D. 950 to ca. A.D. 1760, represents a wet phase which is correlated in part with the Little Ice Age.

  7. 3D-seismic observations of Late Pleistocene glacial dynamics on the central West Greenland margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Julia; Knutz, Paul; Cofaigh, Colm Ó.

    2016-04-01

    suggesting the transition between grounded ice and a glacimarine setting. The back-stepping scarps are suggestive of slide scars that were created as a result of mass movement induced by instabilities along the NW slope. The buried section contains morphologies indicating an asymmetric feature with a steeper side facing south. It comprises a thickness of c. 100 m and a length of c. 28 km. The detailed surface observations and seismic geometries suggest that the northern area represents a relict grounding-zone wedge (GZW). The wedge is covered by stratified deposits suggesting that it was at least occasionally submarine after its formation and may have served as pinning-point for floating ice shelves during periods of the Late TMF Stage. Important implications of the study are the intermittent development of floating ice shelves during the course of the Late Stage of TMF development and the presence of shelf-edge terminating grounded Late Weichselian ice outside of the troughs. Hofmann, J.C., Knutz, P.C., Nielsen, T., Kuijpers, A., submitted. Seismic architecture and evolution of the Disko Bay trough-mouth fan, central West Greenland margin. Quaternary Science Reviews.

  8. Influence of habitat heterogeneity on distribution, occupancy patterns, and productivity of breeding peregrine falcons in central west Greenland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wightman, C.; Fuller, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    We used occupancy and productivity data collected at 67 cliffs used for nesting from 1972 to 1999 to assess patterns of distribution and nest-site selection in an increasing population of Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus) in central West Greenland. Peregrine Falcons breeding at traditionally occupied cliffs used for nesting had significantly lower variation in productivity and thus these cliffs were better quality sites. This indicates that Peregrine Falcons occupied cliffs according to a pattern of despotic distribution. Falcons breeding at cliffs that were consistently occupied during the breeding season had higher average productivity and lower variation in productivity than falcons at inconsistently occupied cliffs, and thus consistent occupancy also was indicative of cliff quality. Features of high quality habitat included tall cliffs, greater change in elevation from the lowest point within 3 km of the cliff to the cliff top (elevation gain), and protection from weather on the eyrie ledge. Spacing of suitable and occupied cliffs also was an important feature, and the best cliffs generally were more isolated. Increased spacing was likely a mechanism for reducing intraspecific competition. Our results suggest that Peregrine Falcons use a resource defense strategy to compete for better quality habitats and may use spacing and physical features of a nest site to identify good quality breeding habitat.

  9. Influence of habitat heterogeneity on distribution, occupancy patterns, and productivity of breeding peregrine falcons in central West Greenland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wightman, C.S.; Fuller, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    We used occupancy and productivity data collected at 67 cliffs used for nesting from 1972 to 1999 to assess patterns of distribution and nest-site selection in an increasing population of Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus) in central West Greenland. Peregrine Falcons breeding at traditionally occupied cliffs used for nesting had significantly lower variation in productivity and thus these cliffs were better quality sites. This indicates that Peregrine Falcons occupied cliffs according to a pattern of despotic distribution. Falcons breeding at cliffs that were consistently occupied during the breeding season had higher average productivity and lower variation in productivity than falcons at inconsistently occupied cliffs, and thus consistent occupancy also was indicative of cliff quality. Features of high quality habitat included tall cliffs, greater change in elevation from the lowest point within 3 km of the cliff to the cliff top (elevation gain), and protection from weather on the eyrie ledge. Spacing of suitable and occupied cliffs also was an important feature, and the best cliffs generally were more isolated. Increased spacing was likely a mechanism for reducing intraspecific competition. Our results suggest that Peregrine Falcons use a resource defense strategy to compete for better quality habitats and may use spacing and physical features of a nest site to identify good quality breeding habitat. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2006.

  10. Basin development and structure of the area covered by Tertiary basalts, offshore central West Greenland - implications of subvolcanic plays

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, R.C.; Bate, K.J.; Chalmers, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    The West Greenland shelf area between 68{degrees} and 72{degrees} is covered by Lower Tertiary basalts and has so far proved difficult to explore seismically compared to the offshore basins farther north (Melville Bay) and south (southern West Greenland). A first seismic and geological interpretation of the basalt area has lead to a better understanding of the tectonic events during the Tertiary and their implications for hydrocarbon exploration. After a period of extension accompanied by basalt volcanic in the Paleocene, a period of transpression occurred related to sea-floor spreading in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay. The crests of the anticlines formed were then eroded and transgressive marine sediments infilled the irregular topography and formed a number of restricted basins. Strike-slip faulting continued throughout the Eocene. Ongoing geophysical studies, including acquisition of additional seismic data in 1995, are aimed at improving seismic resolution beneath the basalts and deter- mining the structure and nature of the underlying sedimentary section. It has been possible, locally, to interpret horizons beneath the Paleocene volcanics where a thick sedimentary section is inferred to be present. The geological development of this succession has to be extrapolated from offshore southern West Greenland and the nearby onshore Nuussuaq basin. Active exploration including drilling started in the onshore basin in 1995 after the discovery of hydrocarbons in basalts at the surface and in shallow wells. The most promising play concept is subbasaltic reservoir sandstones with a mid- Cretaceous marine or a Paleocene deltaic oil-prone source rock. A possible post - basaltic play has also been identified and several large structural leads have been identified by mapping the Top Paleocene Volcanics horizon.

  11. Basin development and structure of the area covered by Tertiary basalts, offshore central West Greenland - implications of subvolcanic plays

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, R.C.; Bate, K.J.; Chalmers, J.A. )

    1996-01-01

    The West Greenland shelf area between 68[degrees] and 72[degrees] is covered by Lower Tertiary basalts and has so far proved difficult to explore seismically compared to the offshore basins farther north (Melville Bay) and south (southern West Greenland). A first seismic and geological interpretation of the basalt area has lead to a better understanding of the tectonic events during the Tertiary and their implications for hydrocarbon exploration. After a period of extension accompanied by basalt volcanic in the Paleocene, a period of transpression occurred related to sea-floor spreading in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay. The crests of the anticlines formed were then eroded and transgressive marine sediments infilled the irregular topography and formed a number of restricted basins. Strike-slip faulting continued throughout the Eocene. Ongoing geophysical studies, including acquisition of additional seismic data in 1995, are aimed at improving seismic resolution beneath the basalts and deter- mining the structure and nature of the underlying sedimentary section. It has been possible, locally, to interpret horizons beneath the Paleocene volcanics where a thick sedimentary section is inferred to be present. The geological development of this succession has to be extrapolated from offshore southern West Greenland and the nearby onshore Nuussuaq basin. Active exploration including drilling started in the onshore basin in 1995 after the discovery of hydrocarbons in basalts at the surface and in shallow wells. The most promising play concept is subbasaltic reservoir sandstones with a mid- Cretaceous marine or a Paleocene deltaic oil-prone source rock. A possible post - basaltic play has also been identified and several large structural leads have been identified by mapping the Top Paleocene Volcanics horizon.

  12. Bowhead whale springtime song off West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Stafford, Kathleen M; Moore, Sue E; Laidre, Kristin L; Heide-Jørgensen, M P

    2008-11-01

    Three songs were recorded from bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus) in Disko Bay, West Greenland, during 59 h of recordings via sonobuoys deployed on seven days between 5 and 14 April 2007. Song elements were defined by units following the protocol of previous description of bowhead whale song. The two most prominent songs were loud, complex, and repeated in long bouts on multiple recording days while the third song was much simpler and recorded on only one day. Bowhead whale simple calls and faint song elements were also recorded using digital audio tape recorders and a dipping hydrophone deployed from the sea ice approximately 100-150 km southwest of Disko Bay on three separate days suggesting that song is also produced in the central portion of Baffin Bay in winter. Songs recorded in Disko Bay are from an area where approximately 85% of the whales have been determined to be adult females. Although it is not known which sex was singing, we speculate that, as in humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), male bowhead whales may sing to mediate sexual competition or mate selection behaviors. This is the first detailed description of springtime songs for bowhead whales in the eastern Arctic. PMID:19045814

  13. The multifaceted West Greenland passive margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, Sonja; Damm, Volkmar; Block, Martin; Schreckenberger, Bernd; Heyde, Ingo; Nelson, Catherine; Kouwe, Wim

    2013-04-01

    The Baffin Bay located between Greenland and Canada, is the northward extension of the Labrador Sea. The Davis Strait High separates these two marine basins. The evolution of these basins is closely linked, and is as well affiliated to the opening of the North Atlantic Ocean. The opening history started in the Cretaceous with the formation of several terrestrial rift basins with a block-faulted, metamorphic Precambrian basement. The further opening of the Baffin Bay coincides with the volcanic activity (60.9-52.5 Ma) along the West Greenland margin (Storey et al., 1998). The subsequent seafloor spreading in the Baffin Bay is linked to the Labrador Sea by the Ungava Fault Zone (UFZ), which is the most prominent transform fault in this region. Two main problems are still unsolved: 1) There are clear indications for normal seafloor spreading in the Baffin Bay like the seaward dipping reflectors (SDRs) on the Canadian side (Skaarup et al., 2006) and on the Greenland side based on our data. On the other hand, associated magnetic spreading anomalies are not yet discovered in the Baffin Bay or are not formed. These findings may either point to slow or ultraslow spreading or underlying strongly extended continental crust and/or serpentinised mantle. 2) The Greenlandic margin is much wider than the Canadian. In addition, a breakup unconformity can only be traced on the Greenland side and is not reported for the Canadian side. Which process causes this asymmetric margin and differences in shelf width? Is it a result of asymmetric spreading or connected to volcanic activity during breakup processes? In summer 2008, a marine geoscientific expedition (MSM09/03) was conducted with the research vessel "Maria S. Merian" in the Davis Strait and southern Baffin Bay. Approximately 1800 km of multichannel reflection seismic data were acquired. To supplement the database, a subsequent marine geoscientific expedition ARK-XXV/3 with RV POLARSTERN in summer 2010 was conducted. In our

  14. Crustal Structure in Central-Eastern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgin, A.; Thybo, H.

    2013-12-01

    We present the seismic structure in the interior of Greenland based on the first measurements by the seismic refraction/wide angle reflection method. Previous seismic surveys have only been carried out offshore and near the coast of Greenland, where the crustal structure is affected by oceanic break-up and may not be representative of the interior of the island. Acquisition of geophysical data onshore Greenland is logistically complicated by the presence of an up to 3.4 km thick ice sheet, permanently covering most of the land mass. The seismic data was acquired by a team of six people during a two-month long experiment in summer of 2011 on the ice cap in the interior of central-eastern Greenland. The EW-trending profile extends 310 km inland from the approximate edge of the stable ice cap near Scoresby Sund across the centre of the ice cap. The planned extension of the profile by use of OBSs and air gun shooting in Scoresbysund Fjord to the east coast of Greenland was unfortunately cancelled, because navigation was prevented by ice drift. 350 Reftek Texan receivers recorded high-quality seismic data from 8 equidistant shots along the profile. Explosive charge sizes were 1 ton at the ends and ca. 500 kg along the profile, loaded with about 100 kg at 35-85 m depth in individual boreholes. Two-dimensional velocity model based on forward ray tracing and tomography modelling shows a decrease of crustal thickness from 47 km below the centre of Greenland in the western part to 40 km in the eastern part of the profile. Earlier studies show that crustal thickness further decreases eastward to ca. 30 km below the fjord system, but details of the changes are unknown. Relatively high lower crustal velocities (Vp 6.8 - 7.3) in the western part of the TopoGreenland profile may indicate past collision tectonics or may be related or to the passage of the Iceland mantle plume. The origin of the pronounced circum-Atlantic mountain ranges in Norway and eastern Greenland, which have

  15. Contaminants in two West Greenland caribou populations.

    PubMed

    Gamberg, Mary; Cuyler, Christine; Wang, Xiaowa

    2016-06-01

    Two caribou populations in West Greenland were sampled and the kidneys, liver and muscle analyzed for contaminants, including aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, selenium and zinc. Although close in proximity, the two populations are topographically separated by an ice cap, which creates different climates and vegetation types in each region. Contaminant levels reflected the differing diets of the two caribou populations. To the south in the wetter lichen-rich region, caribou had significantly more aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, selenium and zinc, likely due to atmospheric deposition on lichens. To the north in the dry desert steppe where grasses predominate, caribou had higher levels of copper. Cows collected in late winter had significantly less hepatic copper, lead and mercury if pregnant, indicating placental transfer of these elements. Our results suggest that hepatic copper levels <200 μg g(-1) dry weight may result in copper depletion in pregnant cows and hepatic mercury concentrations above 0.5 μg g(-1) dry weight may negatively affect fertility in caribou cows. Hepatic mercury levels were negatively correlated with cow body weight, suggesting an adverse effect on body condition. Element concentrations found in tissues from these caribou are not considered to be of a health concern for those consuming this traditional food. PMID:26956180

  16. Hydrocarbon prospects offshore southern West Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, J.A.; Dahl-Jensen, T.; Bate, K.J.; Whittaker, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    Interpretation of regional seismic data acquired in the 1990s together with a re-appraisal of the wells drilled in the 1970s has lead to an appreciation that the southern West Greenland Basin is underexplored and may contain large quantities of hydrocarbons. The regional structure and stratigraphy of the basin has been worked out. An early phase of extension, probably in the Early Cretaceous, was followed by a thermal subsidence phase in the Late Cretaceous during which thick mudstones were deposited. Renewed extension and strike-slip faulting associated with the onset of sea-floor spreading in the Labrador Sea in the Early Tertiary lead to the formation of large structures capable of trapping large quantities of hydrocarbons. Flat spots have been identified in several prospects in the Fylla Structural Complex, which is presently open for licensing, and other large structural traps exist on the Kang{cflx a}miut Ridge and in the Ikermiut area. Stratigraphic traps exist in a large syn-rift fan of mid-Cretaceous age and in Lower Tertiary basin-floor fans. All of these after structures are found in an area with an {open_quotes}open-door{close_quotes} licensing policy.

  17. Hydrocarbon prospects offshore southern West Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, J.A.; Dahl-Jensen, T.; Bate, K.J.; Whittaker, R.C. )

    1996-01-01

    Interpretation of regional seismic data acquired in the 1990s together with a re-appraisal of the wells drilled in the 1970s has lead to an appreciation that the southern West Greenland Basin is underexplored and may contain large quantities of hydrocarbons. The regional structure and stratigraphy of the basin has been worked out. An early phase of extension, probably in the Early Cretaceous, was followed by a thermal subsidence phase in the Late Cretaceous during which thick mudstones were deposited. Renewed extension and strike-slip faulting associated with the onset of sea-floor spreading in the Labrador Sea in the Early Tertiary lead to the formation of large structures capable of trapping large quantities of hydrocarbons. Flat spots have been identified in several prospects in the Fylla Structural Complex, which is presently open for licensing, and other large structural traps exist on the Kang[cflx a]miut Ridge and in the Ikermiut area. Stratigraphic traps exist in a large syn-rift fan of mid-Cretaceous age and in Lower Tertiary basin-floor fans. All of these after structures are found in an area with an [open quotes]open-door[close quotes] licensing policy.

  18. Two possible source regions for central Greenland last glacial dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Újvári, Gábor; Stevens, Thomas; Svensson, Anders; Klötzli, Urs S.; Manning, Christina; Németh, Tibor; Kovács, János; Sweeney, Mark R.; Gocke, Martina; Wiesenberg, Guido L. B.; Markovic, Slobodan B.; Zech, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Dust in Greenland ice cores is used to reconstruct the activity of dust-emitting regions and atmospheric circulation. However, the source of dust material to Greenland over the last glacial period is the subject of considerable uncertainty. Here we use new clay mineral and <10 µm Sr-Nd isotopic data from a range of Northern Hemisphere loess deposits in possible source regions alongside existing isotopic data to show that these methods cannot discriminate between two competing hypothetical origins for Greenland dust: an East Asian and/or central European source. In contrast, Hf isotopes (<10 µm fraction) of loess samples show considerable differences between the potential source regions. We attribute this to a first-order clay mineralogy dependence of Hf isotopic signatures in the finest silt/clay fractions, due to absence of zircons. As zircons would also be absent in Greenland dust, this provides a new way to discriminate between hypotheses for Greenland dust sources.

  19. The diel cycle of water vapor in west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopec, B. G.; Lauder, A. M.; Posmentier, E. S.; Feng, X.

    2014-08-01

    We present a study of the dynamics of small-scale (~100 km) atmospheric circulation in west Greenland which is dominated by interactions of marine and continental air masses. Water vapor concentration and isotopic ratios measured continuously over a 25 day period in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland were used to monitor the convergence of easterly katabatic winds and westerly sea breezes that form a front between the dry, isotopically depleted, glacial air mass and the moist, isotopically enriched, marine air mass. During the latter 16 days of the measurement period, an interval with no large-scale synoptic interference, the inland penetration of the sea breeze controlled the largest day-to-day humidity and vapor isotopic variations. Kangerlussuaq experienced sea breezes in the afternoon on 9 days, consistent with the long-term average of such occurrences on 56% of days in July and August. The inland position of the sea breeze front is controlled by the katabatic wind strength, which is stronger during times of reduced cloud coverage and/or higher-pressure gradient between the coast and the Greenland ice sheet. The position and movement of the front will likely respond to changes in the general atmospheric circulation and regional radiation balance resulting from global warming, which will, in turn, impact the local hydrological cycle and ecosystem processes.

  20. Paleomagnetism and multi-model stereo photogrammetry of the West Greenland flood volcanic province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riisager, J.; Riisager, P.; Pedersen, A. K.

    2002-12-01

    We present new paleomagnetic and multi-model photogrammetry data from the West Greenland part of the North Atlantic igneous province (NAIP). During fieldwork the paleomagnetic sampling sites were photographed from helicopter with stereoscopic overlap and in colour. The photographs have been set up for multi-model photogrammetry allowing three-dimensional lithological mapping, giving us important information for interpreting the paleomagnetic data in their stratigraphic context. Another advantage of the multi-model photogrammetry coverage is that individual lavas can be traced in three-dimensional space allowing very precise measurements of the attitude of strata (+/-0.5°) to be made for tectonic correction of the paleomagnetic data. The paleomagnetic study is based on a large collection of 586 oriented paleomagnetic drill cores collected from 81 lava flows. All sampled flows carry stable thermoremanent magnetization of reversed polarity. The earliest part of the volcanic sequence (i.e. Vaigat Fm.) is characterized by several consecutive flows recording statistically indistinguishable paleomagnetic field directions. The thickest Vaigat Fm. directional group consists of 37 lava flows (combined thickness 104 meter), which based on photogrammetry and XRF observations we interpret to represent a single flow field (i.e. one eruption consisting of several lavas erupted in a short period of time). If Paleocene paleosecular variation was similar to Holocene variations, the thick directional groups would form within 100 years implying an extreme volcanic activity at the onset of NAIP volcanism on West Greenland. Based on directional groups we obtain a new well-defined paleomagnetic pole for Greenland, which is statistically similar to a recently published NAIP pole from Faroe Islands (Riisager et al., 2002) rotated to Greenland. The corresponding paleolatitude of the central NAIP in Paleocene is ~20° south of the present latitude of the Iceland hotspot, indicating that the

  1. Potential positive feedback between Greenland Ice Sheet melt and Baffin Bay heat content on the west Greenland shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro de la Guardia, Laura; Hu, Xianmin; Myers, Paul G.

    2015-06-01

    Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff has been increasing in recent decades, especially in the southwest and the northeast. To determine the impact of this accelerating meltwater flux on Baffin Bay, we examine eight numerical experiments using an ocean-sea ice model: Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean. Enhanced runoff causes shoreward increasing sea surface height and strengthens the stratification in Baffin Bay. The changes in sea surface height reduces the southward transport through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and strengthens the gyre circulation within Baffin Bay. The latter leads to further freshening of surface waters as it produces a larger northward surface freshwater transport across Davis Strait. Increasing the meltwater runoff leads to a warming and shallowing of the west Greenland Irminger water on the northwest Greenland shelf. These warmer waters can now more easily enter fjords on the Greenland coast and thus provide additional heat to accelerate the melting of marine-terminating glaciers.

  2. Divergent parasite faunas in adjacent populations of West Greenland caribou: suggested natural and anthropogenic influences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastrointestinal parasite diversity was characterized for two adjacent populations of west Greenland caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus) through examinations of abomasa and small intestines of adult and subadult females collected during late winter. Three trichostrongyline (Trichostrongylina: ...

  3. Anomalous subglacial heat flow in central Greenland induced by the Iceland plume.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrunin, Alexey G.; Rogozhina, Irina; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Johnson, Jesse; Koulakov, Ivan; Thomas, Maik

    2013-04-01

    3000 m of ice sheet thickness has ensured that central Greenland has kept it geothermal heat flow (GHF) distribution enigmatic. Some few direct ice temperature measurements from deep ice cores reveal a GHF of 50 to 60 mW/m² in the Summit region and this is noticeably above what would be expected for the underlying Early Proterozoic lithosphere. In addition, indirect estimates from zones of rapid basal melting suggest extreme anomalies 15 to 30 times continental background. Subglacial topography indicates caldera like topographic features in the zones hinting at possible volcanic activity in the past [1], and all of these observations combined hint at an anomalous lithospheric structure. Further supporting this comes from new high-resolution P-wave tomography, which shows a strong thermal anomaly in the lithosphere crossing Greenland from east to west [2]. Rock outcrops at the eastern and western end of this zone indicate significant former magmatic activity, older in the east and younger in the west. Additionally, plate modelling studies suggest that the Greenland plate passed over the mantle plume that is currently under Iceland from late Cretaceous to Neogene times, consistent with the evidence from age of magmatism. Evidence of rapid basal melt revealed by ice penetrating radar along the hypocentre of the putative plume track indicates that it continues to affect the Greenland continental geotherm today. We analyse plume-induced thermal disturbance of the present-day lithosphere and their effects on the central Greenland ice sheet by using a novel evolutionary model of the climate-ice-lithosphere-upper mantle system. Our results indicate that mantle plume-induced erosion of the lithosphere has occurred, explaining caldera-type volcanic structures, the GHF anomaly, and requiring dyke intrusion into the crust during the early Cenozoic. The residual thermo-mechanical effect of the mantle plume has raised deep-sourced heat flow by over 25 mW/m² since 60 Ma and

  4. Holocene paleoceanography of Disko Bugt area, west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellet-Bernier, Marie-Michèle; de Vernal, Anne; Moros, Matthias; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude

    2014-05-01

    Micropaleontological, palynological and isotopic analyses of sediment core MSM343300 (68° 28,311'N, 54° 00,118'W; 519 m water depth) raised off Disko Bugt area (West Greenland) were undertaken in order to document Holocene paleoceanographical changes in the Eastern Baffin bay, at a site now influenced by the Western Greenland Current. Palynological analyses were performed with special attention paid to dinocysts in order to characterize sea-surface conditions whereas isotopic analyses on benthic foraminifers aimed at documenting the "deep" water mass bathing the shelf edge. Palynological assemblages are largely dominated by dinocysts, which suggest high pelagic productivity during the Middle and Late Holocene. The assemblages are dominated by Islandinium minutum accompanied of the cyst of Pentapharsodinium dalei, Brigantedinium spp., Operculodinium centrocarpum, Spiniferites elongatus, Selenopemphix quanta and Islandinium? cezare. The application of the Modern analogue technique (MAT) highlighted a major change in sea-surface conditions at ~7300 cal. yr BP. Harsh conditions with dense sea-ice cover, low temperature and low productivity prevailed at surface from at least ~ 10 000 (age of core bottom) until ~7300 cal. yr BP with a large dominance of Islandinium minutum in the dinocyst assemblages. The overall low productivity resulted in low benthic foraminiferal abundances. However a few benchmark isotopic values could be obtained. At ~10 000 cal. yr BP, delta 18O values near +4o pointed to the presence of cold and relatively saline waters at the sea floor. A short interval corresponding to a large amplitude 13C excursion is recorded at ~8200 cal. yr BP, with deltagalues as low as -4.5 and -6.03o in Islandiella norcrossi and Nonionella labradorica, respectively, whereas 13C content in total sedimentary organic carbon did not vary much from the background value of ~ -22o . We tentatively concluded at some linkage with a sea floor methane burst. Postglacial

  5. Soil Response to Aeolian Disturbance in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heindel, R. C.; Culler, L. E.; Chipman, J. W.; Virginia, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic soils are a critical ecological resource, yet are increasingly vulnerable to global change. In the Kangerlussuaq region of West Greenland, aeolian disturbance is the greatest threat to soil stability, with strong katabatic winds eroding vegetation and soil down to the underlying glacial till or bedrock. Little is known about what controls the distribution and rate of the aeolian erosion, which initially results in a state change from tundra to a deflated and nearly unvegetated ground. It is unclear if vegetation can eventually reestablish after erosion occurs, potentially aided by the biological soil crust (BSC) that develops within the eroded areas, or if this soil loss is an irreversible change in vegetation and soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling. Our analysis of high-resolution satellite imagery shows that across the entire study region, deflated ground covers 22% of the terrestrial landscape. Aeolian erosion occurs more frequently closer to the Greenland Ice Sheet and on S-facing slopes. Using lichenometry, we estimate that erosional fronts move across the landscape at rates of 2.5 cm yr-1, leaving unproductive ground in their wake. The onset of widespread aeolian erosion occurred roughly 700-1000 years ago, pointing toward regional cooling and aridity as the drivers behind erosion. Finally, we consider whether the BSCs can improve soil quality enough to allow for full vegetation regrowth. Preliminary results show that while the BSCs fix atmospheric N and increase C storage, the rate of soil quality recovery is extremely slow. Understanding the thresholds between vegetated tundra and eroded ground is critical for predicting how the Kangerlussuaq landscape will respond to anticipated changes in climate and ice sheet dynamics.

  6. Measurement campaign for wind power potential in west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rønnow Jakobsen, Kasper

    2013-04-01

    Experiences and results from a wind resource exploring campaign 2003- in west Greenland. Like many other countries, Greenland is trying to reduce its dependency of fossil fuel by implementing renewable energy. The main challenge is that the people live on the coast in scattered settlements, without power infrastructure. Based on this a wind power potential project was established in 2002, funded by the Greenlandic government and the Technical University of Denmark. We present results and experiences of the campaign. 1 Field campaign There were only a few climate stations in or close to settlements and due to their positioning and instrumentation, they were not usable for wind resource estimation. To establish met stations in Arctic areas with complex topography, there are some challenges to face; mast positioning in complex terrain, severe weather conditions, instrumentation, data handling, installation and maintenance budget. The terrain in the ice free and populated part, mainly consists of mountains of different heights and shapes, separated by deep fjords going from the ice cap to the sea. With a generally low wind resource the focus was on the most exposed positions close to the settlements. Data from the nearest existing climate stations was studied for background estimations of predominant wind directions and extreme wind speeds, and based on that the first 10m masts were erected in 2003. 2 Instruments The first installations used standard NRG systems with low cost NRG instruments. For most of the sites this low cost setup did a good job, but there were some problems with the first design, including instrument and boom strains. In subsequent years, the systems were updated several times to be able to operate in the extreme conditions. Different types of instruments, data logger and boom systems were tested to get better data quality and reliability. Today 11 stations with heights ranging from 10-50m are installed and equipped according to the IEC standard

  7. Rapid submarine melting of the calving faces of West Greenland glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, Eric; Koppes, Michele; Velicogna, Isabella

    2010-03-01

    Widespread glacier acceleration has been observed in Greenland in the past few years associated with the thinning of the lower reaches of the glaciers as they terminate in the ocean. These glaciers thin both at the surface, from warm air temperatures, and along their submerged faces in contact with warm ocean waters. Little is known about the rates of submarine melting and how they may affect glacier dynamics. Here we present measurements of ocean currents, temperature and salinity near the calving fronts of the Eqip Sermia, Kangilerngata Sermia, Sermeq Kujatdleq and Sermeq Avangnardleq glaciers in central West Greenland, as well as ice-front bathymetry and geographical positions. We calculate water-mass and heat budgets that reveal summer submarine melt rates ranging from 0.7+/-0.2 to 3.9+/-0.8md-1. These rates of submarine melting are two orders of magnitude larger than surface melt rates, but comparable to rates of iceberg discharge. We conclude that ocean waters melt a considerable, but highly variable, fraction of the calving fronts of glaciers before they disintegrate into icebergs, and suggest that submarine melting must have a profound influence on grounding-line stability and ice-flow dynamics.

  8. Seismic stratigraphic architecture of the Disko Bay trough-mouth fan system, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Julia C.; Knutz, Paul C.

    2015-04-01

    Spatial and temporal changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet on the continental shelf bordering Baffin Bay remain poorly constrained. Then as now, fast-flowing ice streams and outlet glaciers have played a key role for the mass balance and stability of polar ice sheets. Despite their significance for Greenland Ice Sheet dynamics and evolution, our understanding of their long-term behaviour is limited. The central West Greenland margin is characterized by a broad continental shelf where a series of troughs extend from fjords to the shelf margin, acting as focal points for trough-mouth fan (TMF) accummulations. The sea-ward bulging morphology and abrupt shelf-break of these major depositional systems is generated by prograding depocentres that formed during glacial maxima when ice streams reached the shelf edge, delivering large amounts of subglacial sediment onto the continental slope (Ó Cofaigh et al., 2013). The aim of this study is to unravel the seismic stratigraphic architecture and depositional processes of the Disko Bay TMF, aerially the largest single sedimentary system in West Greenland, using 2D and 3D seismic reflection data, seabed bathymetry and stratigraphic information from exploration well Hellefisk-1. The south-west Disko Bay is intersected by a deep, narrow trough, Egedesminde Dyb, which extends towards the southwest and links to the shallower and broader cross-shelf Disko Trough (maximum water depths of > 1000 m and a trough length of c. 370 km). Another trough-like depression (trough length of c. 120 km) in the northern part of the TMF, indicating a previous position of the ice stream, can be distinguished on the seabed topographic map and the seismic images. The Disko Bay TMF itself extends from the shelf edge down to the abyssal plain (abyssal floor depths of 2000 m) of the southern Baffin Bay. Based on seismic stratigraphic configurations relating to reflection terminations, erosive patterns and seismic facies (Mitchum et al., 1977), the TMF

  9. Crustal structure of the Central-Eastern Greenland: results from the TopoGreenland refraction profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgin, Alexey; Thybo, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Until present, seismic surveys have only been carried out offshore and near the coasts of Greenland, where the crustal structure is affected by oceanic break-up. We present the deep seismic structure of the crust of the interior of Greenland, based on the new and the only existing so far seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile. The seismic data was acquired by a team of six people during a two-month long experiment in summer of 2011 on the ice cap in the interior of central-eastern Greenland. The presence of an up to 3.4 km thick ice sheet, permanently covering most of the land mass, made acquisition of geophysical data logistically complicated. The profile extends 310 km inland in E-W direction from the approximate edge of the stable ice cap near the Scoresby Sund across the center of the ice cap. 350 Reftek Texan receivers recorded high-quality seismic data from 8 equidistant shots along the profile. Explosive charge sizes were 1 ton at the ends and ca. 500 kg along the profile, loaded with about 125 kg at 35-85 m depth in individual boreholes. Given that the data acquisition was affected by the thick ice sheet, we questioned the quality of seismic records in such experiment setup. We have developed an automatic routine to check the amplitudes and spectra of the selected seismic phases and to check the differences/challenges in making seismic experiments on ice and the effects of ice on data interpretation. Using tomographic inversion and forward ray tracing modelling we have obtained the two-dimensional velocity model down to a 50 km depth. The model shows a decrease of crustal thickness from 47 km below the centre of Greenland in the western part of the profile to 40 km in its eastern part. Relatively high lower crustal velocities (Vp 6.8 - 7.3 km/s) in the western part of the TopoGreenland profile may result from past collision tectonics or, alternatively, may be related to the speculated passage of the Iceland mantle plume. Comparison of our results

  10. Surface and sub-surface multi-proxy reconstruction of middle to late Holocene palaeoceanographic changes in Disko Bugt, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moros, Matthias; Lloyd, Jeremy M.; Perner, Kerstin; Krawczyk, Diana; Blanz, Thomas; de Vernal, Anne; Ouellet-Bernier, Marie-Michele; Kuijpers, Antoon; Jennings, Anne E.; Witkowski, Andrzej; Schneider, Ralph; Jansen, Eystein

    2016-01-01

    We present new surface water proxy records of meltwater production (alkenone derived), relative sea surface temperature (diatom, alkenones) and sea ice (diatoms) changes from the Disko Bugt area off central West Greenland. We combine these new surface water reconstructions with published proxy records (benthic foraminifera - bottom water proxy; dinocyst assemblages - surface water proxy), along with atmospheric temperature from Greenland ice core and Greenland lake records. This multi-proxy approach allows us to reconstruct centennial scale middle to late Holocene palaeoenvironmental evolution of Disko Bugt and the Western Greenland coastal region with more detail than previously available. Combining surface and bottom water proxies identifies the coupling between ocean circulation (West Greenland Current conditions), the atmosphere and the Greenland Ice Sheet. Centennial to millennial scale changes in the wider North Atlantic region were accompanied by variations in the West Greenland Current (WGC). During periods of relatively warm WGC, increased surface air temperature over western Greenland led to ice sheet retreat and significant meltwater flux. In contrast, during periods of cold WGC, atmospheric cooling resulted in glacier advances. We also identify potential linkages between the palaeoceanography of the Disko Bugt region and key changes in the history of human occupation. Cooler oceanographic conditions at 3.5 ka BP support the view that the Saqqaq culture left Disko Bugt due to deteriorating climatic conditions. The cause of the disappearance of the Dorset culture is unclear, but the new data presented here indicate that it may be linked to a significant increase in meltwater flux, which caused cold and unstable coastal conditions at ca. 2 ka BP. The subsequent settlement of the Norse occurred at the same time as climatic amelioration during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and their disappearance may be related to harsher conditions at the beginning of the

  11. Reconstructing Holocene Glacier Changes in West Greenland From Multispectral ASTER Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, K.; Csatho, B.; van der Veen, C. J.; Ahn, Y.

    2006-12-01

    To understand the mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet and to identify mechanisms controlling that balance and Greenland's contribution to future changes in global sea level, it is crucial to construct longer temporal records, reaching back to the Little Ice Age (LIA) or beyond. The primary objectives of this project are to develop procedures for mapping glacial trimlines, marking maximum glacier extent during the LIA, and terminal moraines indicating earlier advanced terminus positions, in central west Greenland using multispectral ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) images. The motivation for using satellite imagery for mapping glacial-geological features is the greater spatial coverage that can be achieved, as opposed to the traditional method of field mapping in restricted areas. ASTER imagery provides spectral bands spanning from the visible to the thermal infrared bands, including two stereo bands, enabling us to map the spectral properties of the Earth's surface as well as to obtain surface topography. This poster presents examples of mapping the 3D shapes of glacial geomorphological features using supervised classification, visual interpretation and advanced pattern recognition methods, and results of the volume change computation and interpretation, focusing on the Jakobshavn drainage basin. For trimline mapping, a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) was generated from the stereo bands of the same data set, followed by orthorectification using Ground Control Points (GCPs) and checkpoints extracted from stereo aerial photographs and digital maps. Surface reflectance was estimated from the raw DN values by applying the Empirical Line Correction model for atmospheric effects. Maximum likelihood classification, in supervised mode, was applied to distinguish different land cover types. Classification of the ASTER image with nine non-thermal bands provides a good discrimination between the exposed fresh rock surfaces, moraines of

  12. Observed runoff, jokulhlaups and suspended sediment load from the Greenland ice at Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland, 2007 and 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard; Hasholt, Bent

    2009-01-01

    This study fills the gap in hydrologic measurements of runoff exiting a part of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), the Kangerlussuaq drainage area, West Greenland. The observations are of value for obtaining knowledge about the terrestrial freshwater and sediment output from part of the GrIS and the strip of land between the GrIS and the ocean, in the context of varying ice sheet surface melt and influx entering the ocean. High-resolution stage, discharge and suspended sediment load show a decrease in runoff of {approx} 25% and in sediment load of {approx} 40% from 2007 to 2008 in response to a decrease in the summer accumulated number of positive degree days. During the 2007 and 2008 runoff season, joekulhlaups are observed at Kangerlussuaq, drained from an ice-dammed lake at the margin of the GrIS.

  13. Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Bird, Kenneth J.; Brown, Philip J., II; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Gautier, Donald L.; Houseknecht, David W.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pawlewicz, Mark J.; Shah, Anjana; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently assessed the undiscovered oil and gas potential of the West Greenland?East Canada Province as part of the USGS Circum-Arctic Oil and Gas Resource Appraisal effort. The West Greenland?East Canada Province is essentially the offshore area between west Greenland and east Canada and includes Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Lancaster Sound, and Nares Strait west of and including Kane Basin. The tectonic evolution of the West Greenland?East Canada Province led to the formation of several major structural domains that are the geologic basis for the five assessment units (AU) defined in this study. The five AUs encompass the entire province. Each AU was assessed in its entirety for undiscovered, technically recoverable (assuming absence of sea ice) oil and gas resources, but the assessment results reported here are only for those portions of each AU that are north of the Arctic Circle, as that latitude defines the area of the Circum-Arctic oil and gas assessment.

  14. Meltwater chemistry and solute export from a Greenland Ice Sheet catchment, Watson River, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yde, Jacob C.; Knudsen, N. Tvis; Hasholt, Bent; Mikkelsen, Andreas B.

    2014-11-01

    Solute export from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) to coastal regions around Greenland is likely to increase in the future as a consequence of increasing icemelt production. Here, we present hydrochemical characteristics, solute and major ion exports and chemical denudation rates for 2007-2010 for the Watson River sector of the GrIS that drains into the fjord Kangerlussuaq. The hydrochemistry is dominated by Ca2+ and HCO3- with a relatively high molar K+/Na+ ratio of 0.6 ± 0.1, typical for meltwaters draining a gneissic lithology. Low molar Ca2+/Na+ and Mg2+/Na+ ratios indicate that weathering of disseminated carbonates contributes less than silicate weathering to the chemical composition. The solute export varied between 33 × 103 (2009) and 61 × 103 tons (2010), showing that increasing discharge leads to increasing solute export at the catchment scale. Deviations between ion yield estimates derived from use of discharge-weighted and mean daily concentrations methods were generally less than 5%, indicating that the choice of method is of less importance. The chemical denudation rates ranged between 36 and 56 Σ∗ meq+ m-2 per year, which are lower than previous records from glacierized catchments. However, when normalized by discharge the denudation rates are comparable to other Arctic sites. When extrapolating the results from the Watson River catchment to the entire Greenland for 2007-2010, the solute export from Greenland meltwater varied between 7.1 × 106 and 7.8 × 106 tons, whilst the major ion export was between 6.4 × 106 and 7.3 × 106 tons. Dissolved Fe, a potential biolimiting nutrient for primary productivity in the North Atlantic, had annual export rates from Greenland between 15 × 103 and 52 × 103 tons.

  15. Tidewater Margin Dynamics in Central East Greenland Over two Decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiskoot, H.; Juhlin, D.; St. Pierre, H.; Citterio, M.

    2010-12-01

    About 50% (~50000 km2) of the glaciers peripheral to the Greenland Ice Sheet are located in central East Greenland (67°-72°N). This region of extreme topography contains ice caps, mountain glaciers and large outlet glacier systems. Regional runoff to the North Atlantic is important in global thermohaline circulation and sea ice dynamics. The region has very limited glaciological research and only few quantitative remote sensing studies. Because of factors including East Greenland being predicted as a hotspot in global climate models, the positive regional correlation between the timing of sea ice break-up and increased surface melt, and the regional glacier characteristics, it is assumed that central East Greenland is highly sensitive to climate change. Many glaciers are tidewater terminating and will have a direct dynamic response to increased ocean temperatures and rising sea level, which has in some cases already led to upstream speed-up. Additionally, some glaciers are inferred polythermal, hence projected climate change may affect their thermal regime and ice dynamic behaviour. Moreover, 30-70% of regional glaciers are of surge-type, and redistribution of glacier volume to lower elevations increases ablation. Terminus fluctuations associated with surges, as well as large multi-annual calving fluxes, complicate extraction of glacioclimatic responses. In order to assess glacier characteristics, recent changes, and climate sensitivity we compiled a detailed glacier inventory of the Geikie Plateau region, using semi-automated digitization from satellite imagery between 2000 and 2005. A mosaic was created using 68 ASTER and 6 Landsat7 scenes. Glaciers were identified using a supervised Mahalanobis Distance classification. Small polygons and irregularities were removed using the Lee Filter and manual correction. The glacier inventory contains 330 glaciers (41591 km2). The largest glacier, Kong Christian IV (10696 km2), is in part an outlet of the Greenland Ice

  16. Baffin Island and West Greenland Current Systems in northern Baffin Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münchow, Andreas; Falkner, Kelly K.; Melling, Humfrey

    2015-03-01

    Temperature, salinity, and direct velocity observations from northern Baffin Bay are presented from a summer 2003 survey. The data reveal interactions between fresh and cold Arctic waters advected southward along Baffin Island and salty and warm Atlantic waters advected northward along western Greenland. Geostrophic currents estimated from hydrography are compared to measured ocean currents above 600 m depth. The Baffin Island Current is well constrained by the geostrophic thermal wind relation, but the West Greenland Current is not. Furthermore, both currents are better described as current systems that contain multiple velocity cores and eddies. We describe a surface-intensified Baffin Island Current seaward of the continental slope off Canada and a bottom-intensified West Greenland Current over the continental slope off Greenland. Acoustic Doppler current profiler observations suggest that the West Greenland Current System advected about 3.8 ± 0.27 Sv (Sv = 106 m3 s-1) towards the north-west at this time. The most prominent features were a surface intensified coastal current advecting 0.5 Sv and a bottom intensified slope current advecting about 2.5 Sv in the same direction. Most of this north-westward circulation turned southward in the Baffin Island Current System. The Baffin Island system was transporting 5.1 ± 0.24 Sv to the south-east at the time that includes additional contributions from Nares Strait to the north (1.0 ± 0.2 Sv) and Lancaster Sound to the east (1.0 ± 0.2 Sv). Net freshwater fluxes were 72 and 187 mSv for the West Greenland and Baffin Island Currents, respectively. Empirical uncertainty arises from unknown temporal variations at weekly time scales and pertubations introduced by unresolved eddies. Eddies with 10 km horizontal and 400 m vertical scales were common and recirculated up to 1 Sv. Our 2003 observations represent conditions when the North-Atlantic Oscillation index (NAO) was close to zero. Analysis of historical hydrographic

  17. Searching for giant, ancient impact structures on Earth: The Mesoarchaean Maniitsoq structure, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garde, Adam A.; McDonald, Iain; Dyck, Brendan; Keulen, Nynke

    2012-07-01

    A 100 km-scale, circular region in the Archaean North Atlantic Craton centred at 65°15'N, 51°50'W near Maniitsoq town in West Greenland comprises a set of highly unusual geological features that were created during a single event involving intense crushing and heating and are incompatible with crustal orogenic processes. The presently exposed features of the Maniitsoq structure were buried 20-25 km below the surface when this event occurred at c. 3 Ga, during waning convergent orogeny. These features include: a large aeromagnetic anomaly; a central 35×50 km2 large area of comminuted quartzo-feldspathic material; regional-scale circular deformation; widespread random fractures with featherlike textures; intense fracture cleavage; amphibolite-granite-matrix breccias unrelated to faulting or intrusions; formation and common fluidisation of microbreccias; abundant evidence of direct K-feldspar and plagioclase melting superimposed on already migmatised rocks; deformation of quartz by slip; formation of planar elements in quartz and plagioclase; and, emplacement of crustally contaminated ultramafic intrusions and regional scale hydrothermal alteration under amphibolite-facies conditions. The diagnostic tools employed to identify impacting in the upper crust are inadequate for structures preserved deep within the continental crust. Nevertheless, the inferred scale, strain rates and temperatures necessary to create the Maniitsoq structure rule out a terrestrial origin of the structure.

  18. Transfer of mercury in the marine food web of West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Rigét, F; Møller, P; Dietz, R; Nielsen, T G; Asmund, G; Strand, J; Larsen, M M; Hobson, K A

    2007-08-01

    Total mercury (THg), methylmercury (MeHg) and stable isotopes of nitrogen (delta(15)N) and carbon (delta(13)C) were measured in three invertebrate, five fish, three seabird and three marine mammal species of central West Greenland to investigate trophic transfer of mercury in this Arctic marine food web. The food web magnification factor (FWMF) estimated as the slope of the regression between the natural logarithm of THg or MeHg concentrations (mg kg(-1) dw) and tissue delta(15)N ( per thousand) was estimated to 0.183 (SE = 0.052) for THg and 0.339 (SE = 0.075) for MeHg. The FWMFs were not only comparable with those reported for other Arctic marine food webs but also with quite different food webs such as freshwater lakes in the sub-Arctic, East Africa and Papua New Guinea. This suggests similar mechanisms of mercury assimilation and isotopic (delta(15)N) discrimination among a broad range of aquatic taxa and underlines the possibility of broad ecosystem comparisons using the combined contaminant and stable isotope approach. PMID:17671670

  19. Undercutting of marine-terminating glaciers in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, Eric; Fenty, Ian; Xu, Yun; Cai, Cilan; Kemp, Chris

    2015-07-01

    Marine-terminating glaciers control most of Greenland's ice discharge into the ocean, but little is known about the geometry of their frontal regions. Here we use side-looking, multibeam echo sounding observations to reveal that their frontal ice cliffs are grounded deeper below sea level than previously measured and their ice faces are neither vertical nor smooth but often undercut by the ocean and rough. Deep glacier grounding enables contact with subsurface, warm, salty Atlantic waters (AW) which melts ice at rates of meters per day. We detect cavities undercutting the base of the calving faces at the sites of subglacial water (SGW) discharge predicted by a hydrological model. The observed pattern of undercutting is consistent with numerical simulations of ice melt in which buoyant plumes of SGW transport warm AW to the ice faces. Glacier undercutting likely enhances iceberg calving, impacting ice front stability and, in turn, the glacier mass balance.

  20. New insights into West Greenland ice sheet/stream dynamics during the last glacial cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David; Lane, Tim; Rea, Brice; Cofaigh, Colm O.; Jamieson, Stewart; Vieli, Andreas; Rodes, Angel

    2015-04-01

    Onshore and offshore geomorphological mapping and deglacial chronologies from West Greenland constrain the nature and magnitude of ice advance and decay of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) during the last glacial cycle. Several ice stream troughs are known to have fed ice to the shelf edge during the last glacial cycle. Their offshore expression suggests that many were coalescent systems fed by smaller outlet glaciers and ice streams onshore but their central flow pathways were also controlled by geology and preglacial topography. The bed morphology of these large ice streams shows they operated over soft, deforming beds with drumlins, mega-scale glacial lineations and grounding zone wedges marking an offshore transition from predominant areal scour onshore. Records of offshore deglacial chronology remain sparse but the Uummannaq and Disko Bugt ice stream corridors are now well constrained. The Uummannaq ice stream (UIS) completely deglaciated from the continental shelf between 14.8 ka and 11.0 ka in response to rising air temperatures, increasing JJA solar radiation and sea-level rise, but temporary standstills and the asynchronous retreat history of its feeder zones suggest that topography/bathymetry strongly modulated retreat rates as ice became 'locked' back into the coastal fjord system. Initial reconstructions of behaviour UIS discounted an oceanic role in early deglaciation and favoured retreat from the mid-shelf and inner-shelf prior to the Younger Dryas but both these concepts remain under investigation. In Disko Bugt, Jakobshavn Isbrae deglaciated later than the UIS and remained on the outer shelf during the Younger Dyras stadial (12.8 - 11.7 cal. kyrs BP) only reaching in the inner coast fjords at approximately 10.0 ka. The later deglaciation of the Disko system (despite similar external forcing mechanisms) was controlled by regional topographic/bathymetric contrasts in their respective trough morphologies. This hypothesis is supported by recent model

  1. Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently assessed the potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province as part of the USGS Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal program. The province lies in the offshore area between western Greenland and eastern Canada and includes Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Lancaster Sound, and Nares Strait west of and including part of Kane Basin. A series of major tectonic events led to the formation of several distinct structural domains that are the geologic basis for defining five assessment units (AU) in the province, all of which are within the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Composite Total Petroleum System (TPS). Potential petroleum source rocks within the TPS include strata of Ordovician, Early and Late Cretaceous, and Paleogene ages. The five AUs defined for this study-the Eurekan Structures AU, Northwest Greenland Rifted Margin AU, Northeast Canada Rifted Margin AU, Baffin Bay Basin AU, and the Greater Ungava Fault Zone AU-encompass the entire province and were assessed for undiscovered, technically recoverable resources.

  2. Runoff simulations from the Greenland ice sheet at Kangerlussuaq from 2006-2007 to 2007/08. West Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard; Hasholt, Bent; Van Den Broeke, Michiel; Liston, Glen

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on runoff from a large sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) - the Kangerlussuaq drainage area, West Greenland - for the runoff observation period 2006/07 to 2007/08. SnowModel, a state-of-the-art snow-evolution modeling system, was used to simulate winter accumulation and summer ablation processes, including runoff. Independent in situ end-of-winter snow depth and high-resolution runoff observations were used for validation of simulated accumulation and ablation processes. Runoff was modeled on both daily and hourly time steps, filling a data gap of runoff exiting part of the GrIS. Using hourly meteorological driving data instead of smoothed daily-averaged data produced more realistic meteorological conditions in relation to snow and melt threshold surface processes, and produced 6-17% higher annual cumulative runoff. The simulated runoff series yielded useful insights into the present conditions of inter-seasonal and inter-annual variability of Kangerlussuaq runoff, and provided an acceptable degree of agreement between simulated and observed runoff. The simulated spatial runoff distributions, in some areas of the GrIS terminus, were as high as 2,750 mm w.eq. of runoff for 2006/07, while only 900 mm w.eq was simulated for 2007/08. The simulated total runoff from Kangerlussuaq was 1.9 km{sup 3} for 2006/07 and 1.2 km{sup 3} for 2007/08, indicating a reduction of 35-40% caused by the climate conditions and changes in the GrIS freshwater storage. The reduction in runoff from 2006/07 to 2007/08 occurred simultaneously with the reduction in the overall pattern of satellite-derived GrIS surface melt from 2007 to 2008.

  3. Effect of freshwater from the West Greenland Current on the winter deep convection in the Labrador Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, T.; Hasumi, H.

    2014-03-01

    The effect of mesoscale eddies on the deep convection in the Labrador Sea is examined by using a realistically configured eddy-resolving ice-ocean model. The near-surface boundary current flowing into the Labrador Sea is realistically simulated, namely the West Greenland Current which carries upper/onshore fresh and lower/offshore warm water, and eddies separating from these boundary currents with cold/fresh water atop warm/salty water are also well reproduced. The modeled convection is confined to the southwestern Labrador Sea as observed, and its depth and width are reproduced better than in previous modeling studies. Although previous modeling studies demonstrated only the importance of eddy-induced heat transport in inhibition of deep convection over the central to northern Labrador Sea, our study found that the eddy-induced transport of near-surface fresh water also significantly contributes.

  4. Long-Term Changes In The Behaviour Of Jakobshavns Isbrae, West Greenland During The Late Quaternary-Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Cofaigh, C.; Jennings, A.; Moros, M.; Andrews, J. T.; Kilfeather, A.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Richter, T.

    2008-12-01

    This poster shows the initial results of a joint scientific project to reconstruct the Late Quaternary-Holocene behavior of Jakobshavns Isbrae in central west Greenland, one of the largest ice streams draining the modern Greenland Ice Sheet. The underlying rationale for this research is to determine if recent observed changes to the mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet are part of the natural variability in ice-sheet dynamics, or if they relate to anthropogenically-induced climate warming. Key to resolving this question is an understanding of long-term changes in ice sheet behavior during the Late Quaternary and the Holocene. This research will allow assessment of the links between deglaciation and internal and external environmental controls, such as the influence of inflowing Atlantic Water, and will facilitate modelling of the likely future behavior of the GIS. Currently, four marine sediment cores arrayed along a transect from the Disko Bugt Fan to Disko Bay are providing information on changes in sediment flux and sedimentation style, such as abrupt intervals of iceberg-rafting vs. "normal" hemipelagic sedimentation, as well as the paleoceanographic setting and ice sheet-ocean interactions. The cores are being analysed using a variety of proxies including IRD, mineralogy, oxygen isotopes, foraminiferal assemblages, lithofacies analysis and AMS radiocarbon dating. Data are presented from two piston cores from the continental slope at the trough-mouth fan collected during the HE0006 'shakedown' cruise to Baffin Bay and from two gravity cores recovered in 2007 during MS Merian cruise MSM 05/03 to West Greenland. Slope cores contain sequences of laminated facies interpreted as fine-grained turbidites and intervals of massive, bioturbated, hemipelagic mud. The two Merian cores, contributed to this project by the Baltic Sea Research Institute, were collected from the southern entrance to Disko Bugt and the Vaigat channel north of Disko. Radiocarbon dates from the

  5. Recent North West Greenland climate variability documented by NEEM shallow ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Steen-Larsen, Hans-Christian; Popp, Trevor; Vinther, Bo; Oerter, Hans; Ortega, Pablo; White, Jim; Orsi, Anais; Falourd, Sonia; Minster, Benedicte; Jouzel, Jean; Landais, Amaelle; Risi, Camille; Werner, Martin; Swingedouw, Didier; Fettweis, Xavier; Gallée, Hubert; Sveinbjornsdottir, Arny; Gudlaugsdottir, Hera; Box, Jason

    2014-05-01

    Short water stable isotope records obtained from NEEM ice cores (North West Greenland) have been shown to be sensitive to NW Greenland temperature variations, and sea-ice extent in the Baffin Bay area (Steen-Larsen et al, JGR, 2011), with maximum snowfall deposition during summer, therefore providing information complementary to other Greenland ice core records. At the NEEM deep drilling camp, several snow pits and shallow ice cores have been retrieved and analysed at high resolution (seasonal to annual) for water stable isotopes using mass spectrometry and laser instruments in order to document recent climate variability, complementing and facilitating the interpretation of the long records obtained from the deep ice core which extends back to the last interglacial period (NEEM, Nature, 2013). The different pits and shallow ice core records allow to document the signal to noise ratio and to produce a robust stack back to 1750, and up to 2011. The stack record of annual mean d18O depicts a recent isotopic enrichment in parallel with the Greenland warming inferred from coastal weather stations, and shows that many features of decadal variations are in fact well captured by the low resolution profiles measured along the deep ice core data. Recent variations can therefore be compared to long-term trends and centennial variations of the last Holocene, documented at about 5 year resolution. For the past decades to centuries, the NEEM isotopic records are compared with estimations and simulations of local temperature for different seasons, results from NEEM borehole temperature inversions, d18O records from other Greenland ice cores, large scale modes of variability (NAO and AMO) and with simulations from atmospheric general circulation models equiped with water stable isotopes.

  6. Alkenone and Isotopic Records of Holocene Climatic and Environmental Change From Laminated West Greenland Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, W. J.; Huang, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Long chain alkenones (LCAs) are a key class of biomarkers for paleotemperature reconstructions. These compounds are ubiquitous in ocean sediments, but rare in lake sediments. Here we report the first discovery of LCAs in a downcore profile and surface sediments of five Greenland lakes. The concentrations of LCAs in surface sediments of these lakes are one to two orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously in other lake surface sediments around the world. Alkenones are present in five Greenland lakes with elevated salinity, but absent from five freshwater lakes. The alkenones have exceptionally low \\delta13C values ranging from -40 to -43\\permil, and are depleted by 10 to 15\\permil relative to short-chain fatty acids and sterols within the same samples. These \\delta13C values are the lowest ever reported for alkenones in a natural setting and have important implications for tracing the alkenone producers in lakes. Using the published calibration for lake sediments, the alkenone unsaturation indices in the surface sediments of the Greenland lakes record late spring/early summer temperature when algal blooms occur, suggesting the applicability of lacustrine alkenones as a paleotemperature proxy. LCA unsaturation indices and \\deltaD from sediment cores taken from these Greenland lakes will help elucidate the environmental controls on these sedimentary parameters, and will aid the reconstruction of Holocene climate variability in West Greenland. Ongoing work on the saline lakes includes determining high resolution alkenone unsaturation ratios/abundances and bulk/compound-specific isotopic values from sediment cores, algal culturing, and establishing microbial community structure in the saline lakes using DNA/RNA fingerprinting. Up-to-date results will be presented in the meeting.

  7. Simulating Ice-Flow and Calving on Store Glacier, West Greenland, with a 3D Full Stokes Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, J.; Christoffersen, P.; Zwinger, T.; Luckman, A. J.; Benn, D.

    2015-12-01

    The mass balance and long-term stability of the ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica depend heavily on the dynamics of their ice-ocean margins. Iceberg calving accounts for the majority of the net annual loss of ice in Antarctica and around half of that from Greenland. Furthermore, climate driven changes to dynamics at these calving margins can be transmitted far inland. Thus, predicting future sea level contribution from the cryosphere requires an improved understanding of calving, and the processes which link it to climate and ice-sheet flow. We present results from a new 3D calving model coupled to a full-Stokes, time evolving glacier dynamic model, implemented for Store Glacier, a 5-km-wide calving glacier in the Uummannaq region of West Greenland, which flows at a rate of 20 m/day at its terminus. The model is developed using the open source finite element package Elmer/Ice, with the criterion that calving occurs when surface and basal crevasses meet. Crevasses open in response to tensile stresses near the terminus and water pressure at the bed. When the model was applied in 2D for the central flowline of Store Glacier, we found that basal topography exerts overarching control on the long term position of the calving front, while ice mélange buttressing allows the seasonal extension of a floating tongue, which collapses in early summer. New results emerging from implementation of calving in a 3D model indicate significant spatial heterogeneity in calving dynamics because the northern half of the terminus is grounded whereas the southern half is floating. This contrasting setting affects calving dynamics, further underlining the importance of geometry and basal topography, and suggesting that lower dimensional calving models may miss important aspects of calving dynamics. Our results also suggest that implementing grounding line dynamics is important for modelling calving, even for glaciers which are, for the most part, firmly grounded.

  8. Identifying potential seasonal and historical drivers of marine-terminating glacier retreat in Disko and Uummannaq Bays, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, A.; Frey, K. E.; Das, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    The variability in outlet glacier termini positions is an important indicator of overall glacier health and the net effects of ice-ocean-atmosphere interactions. Glacier margins fluctuate on both seasonal and interannual time scales and satellite imagery provides a critical spatially- and temporally-extensive resource for monitoring glacier behavior. Outlet glaciers have generally been retreating globally over recent decades, but the magnitude of seasonal variation, overall retreat, and foremost drivers have proven unique to each glacier. The outlet glaciers in central West Greenland are generally experiencing the same regional atmospheric forcing, yet previous studies have shown varying magnitudes of retreat over the last forty years. In this study, we utilize Landsat imagery between the years 1985 and 2014 to digitize a time series of glacier front positions of 18 marine-terminating outlet glaciers in the Disko and Uummannaq Bay regions of West Greenland. We examine potential drivers of trends in outlet glacier retreat through satellite observations of adjacent sea ice concentrations and sea surface temperatures. Additionally, reanalysis data and long-term automatic weather station measurements are investigated to contextualize the role of atmospheric drivers at both a regional and local scale. Results indicate retreat of all glaciers in the region over the study period and no indication of a south to north trend in magnitude of retreat on either a seasonal or long-term scale. The 11 glaciers in Uummannaq Bay retreated between 25 m and 3.5 km, an average of 1.22 ± 1.20 km over the entire study period. The retreat of 7 glaciers in Disko Bay ranged from 181 m to 2.3 km, an average of 1.0 ± 0.78 km over the period. Although the mean terminus retreat rate between the two bays is comparable, there remains a wide range of total retreat amounts among the glaciers. We investigate the degree of seasonal variation in terminus position as an indicator of longer

  9. Sm-Nd age of the Fiskenaesset Anorthosite Complex, West Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, Lewis D.; Goldstein, Steven J.; Jacobsen, Stein B.; Myers, John S.; Kalsbeek, Feiko

    1989-01-01

    A Sm-Nd isotopic study on samples from the Fiskenaesset Anorthosite Complex in West Greenland was conducted to estimate the age of crystallization of the complex. A five-point isochron, including data for whole-rock samples of anorthosite, metagabbro, metaperidotite, and separates of calcic plagioclase and mafic matrix from a coarse megacrystic leucogabbro, corresponds to an age of 2.86 + or - 0.05 Ga, with initial sigma(Nd) of +2.9 + or - 0.4. This implies a relatively short time interval, on the order of 70 Ma, during which anorthosite formation, tonalite emplacement, and high-grade metamorphism took place.

  10. Monitoring South-West Greenland's ice sheet melt with ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, A.; Mikesell, T. D.; Harig, C.; Lipovsky, B.; Prieto, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Greenland ice sheet (GIS) accounts for ~ 70% of global ice sheet mass loss and contributes to sea level rise at a rate of 0.7 mm/yr. Therefore, the GIS needs to be carefully monitored. The spaceborne techniques commonly used to monitor the GIS mass balance contain inherent uncertainties. These uncertainties can be reduced by comparing independent datasets and techniques. However, spaceborne methods remain inadequate in the sense that they offer low spatial and/or temporal resolution. This fact highlights the need for other complimentary methods to monitor the GIS more accurately and with greater resolution. Here we use a seismic method: the correlation of seismic noise recorded at South-West Greenland seismic stations to show that the GIS seasonal melt produces significant variations of seismic wave speed in the Greenland crust. The amplitudes of the measured velocity variations during 2012-2013 correlate with the total ice plus atmospheric mass variations measured by the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellite mission. We explain the phase delay between mass maxima and velocity minima ( 50 days) using a non-linear poroelastic model that includes a 55 cm-thick layer of till between the ice sheet and the bedrock. We, thus, interpret the velocity variations as pore pressure variations in the bedrock resulting from the loading and unloading of the overlying glacier and atmosphere. This method provides a new and independent way to monitor in near real-time the first-order state of the GIS, giving new constraints on its evolution and its contribution to the global sea level rise. By increasing the density of seismic stations in the region it will be possible to increase the spatial and temporal resolution of the method and create detailed maps of ice-mass variations across Greenland.

  11. Cenozoic uplift on the West Greenland margin: active sedimentary basins in quiet Archean terranes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jess, Scott; Stephenson, Randell; Brown, Roderick

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic is believed by some authors to have experienced tectonically induced uplift within the Cenozoic. Examination of evidence, onshore and offshore, has been interpreted to imply the presence of kilometre scale uplift across the margins of the Barents Sea, North Sea, Baffin Bay and Greenland Sea. Development of topography on the West Greenland margin (Baffin Bay), in particular, has been subject to much discussion and dispute. A series of low temperature thermochronological (AFT and AHe) studies onshore and interpretation of seismic architecture offshore have suggested uplift of the entire margin totalling ~3km. However, challenges to this work and recent analysis on the opposing margin (Baffin Island) have raised questions about the validity of this interpretation. The present work reviews and remodels the thermochronological data from onshore West Greenland with the aim of re-evaluating our understanding of the margin's history. New concepts within the discipline, such as effect of radiation damage on Helium diffusivity, contemporary modelling approaches and denudational mapping are all utilised to investigate alternative interpretations to this margins complex post rift evolution. In contrast to earlier studies our new approach indicates slow protracted cooling across much of the region; however, reworked sedimentary samples taken from the Cretaceous Nuussuaq Basin display periods of rapid reheating and cooling. These new models suggest the Nuussuaq Basin experienced a tectonically active Cenozoic, while the surrounding Archean basement remained quiet. Faults located within the basin appear to have been reactivated during the Palaeocene and Eocene, a period of well-documented inversion events throughout the North Atlantic, and may have resulted in subaerial kilometre scale uplift. This interpretation of the margin's evolution has wider implications for the treatment of low temperature thermochronological data and the geological history of the North

  12. Centennial scale benthic foraminiferal record of late Holocene oceanographic variability in Disko Bugt, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perner, K.; Moros, M.; Lloyd, J. M.; Kuijpers, A.; Telford, R. J.; Harff, J.

    2011-09-01

    A new centennial scale benthic foraminiferal record of late Holocene climate variability and oceanographic changes off West Greenland (Disko Bugt) highlights substantial subsurface water mass changes (e.g. temperature and salinity) of the West Greenland Current (WGC) over the past 3.6 ka BP. Benthic foraminifera reveal a long-term late Holocene cooling trend, which may be attributed to increased advection of cold, low-salinity water masses derived from the East Greenland Current (EGC). Cooling becomes most pronounced from c. 1.7 ka BP onwards. At this point the calcareous Atlantic benthic foraminiferal fauna decrease significantly and is replaced by an agglutinated Arctic fauna. Superimposed on this cooling trend, centennial scale variability in the WGC reveals a marked cold phase at c. 2.5 ka BP, which may correspond to the 2.7 ka BP cooling-event recorded in marine and terrestrial archives elsewhere in the North Atlantic region. A warm phase recognized at c. 1.8 ka BP is likely to correspond to the 'Roman Warm Period' and represents the warmest bottom water conditions. During the time period of the 'Medieval Climate Anomaly' we observe only a slight warming of the WGC. A progressively more dominant cold water contribution from the EGC on the WGC is documented by the prominent rise in abundance of agglutinated Arctic water species from 0.9 ka BP onwards. This cooling event culminates at c. 0.3 ka BP and represents the coldest episode of the 'Little Ice Age'. Gradually increased influence of cold, low-salinity water masses derived from the EGC may be linked to enhanced advection of Polar and Arctic water by the EGC. These changes are possibly associated with a reported shift in the large-scale North Atlantic Oscillation atmospheric circulation pattern towards a more frequent negative North Atlantic Oscillation mode during the late Holocene.

  13. Geomicrobiology of subglacial meltwater samples from Store Landgletscher and Russell Glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, K. A.; Dieser, M.; Choquette, K.; Christner, B. C.; Hagedorn, B.; Harrold, Z.; Liu, L.; Sletten, R. S.; Junge, K.

    2012-12-01

    The melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet provides direct connections between atmospheric, supraglacial and subglacial environments. The intraglacial hydrological pathways that result are believed to accommodate the microbial colonization of subglacial environments; however, little is known about the abundance, diversity and activity of microorganisms within these niches. The Greenland Ice Sheet (1.7 million square kilometers) and its associated surpaglacial and subglacial ecosystems may contribute significantly to biogeochemical cycling processes. We analyzed subglacial microbial assemblages in subglacial outflows, near Thule and Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland. The investigative approach included correlating microbial diversity, inferred function, abundance, melt water chemistry, O-18 water isotope ratios, alkalinity and sediment load. Using Illumina sequencing, bacterial small subunit ribosomal RNA hypervariable regions have been targeted and amplified from both extracted DNA and reverse transcribed rRNA. Over 3 billion sequence reads have been generated to create a comprehensive diversity profile. Total abundances ranged from 2.24E+04 to 1.58E+06 cells mL-1. In comparison, the total abundance of supraglacial early season snow samples ranged from 3.35E+02 to 2.8E+04 cells mL-1. 65 % of samples incubated with cyano ditoyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC), used to identify actively respiring cells, contained CTC-positive cells. On average, these cells represented 1.9 % of the estimated total abundance (1.86E+02 to 2.19E+03 CTC positive cells mL-1; 1.39E+03 cells mL-1 standard deviation); comparative to those measured in temperate freshwater lakes. The overarching objective of our research is to provide data that indicates the role of microbial communities, associated with ice sheets, in elemental cycling and in the release of biomass and nutrients to the surrounding marine biome.

  14. Helicopter-based Photography for use in SfM over the West Greenland Ablation Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, T. L.; Tedesco, M.; Astuti, I.; Cotten, D.; Jordan, T.; Rennermalm, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Results of low-elevation high-resolution aerial photography from a helicopter are reported for a supraglacial watershed in West Greenland. Data were collected at the end of July 2015 over a supraglacial watershed terminating in the Kangerlussuaq region of Greenland and following the Utrecht University K-Transect of meteorological stations. The aerial photography reported here were complementary observations used to support hyperspectral measurements of albedo, discussed in the Greenland Ice sheet hydrology session of this AGU Fall meeting. A compact digital camera was installed inside a pod mounted on the side of the helicopter together with gyroscopes and accelerometers that were used to estimate the relative orientation. Continuous video was collected on 19 and 21 July flights, and frames extracted from the videos are used to create a series of aerial photos. Individual geo-located aerial photos were also taken on a 24 July flight. We demonstrate that by maintaining a constant flight elevation and a near constant ground speed, a helicopter with a mounted camera can produce 3-D structure of the ablation zone of the ice sheet at unprecedented spatial resolution of the order of 5 - 10 cm. By setting the intervalometer on the camera to 2 seconds, the images obtained provide sufficient overlap (>60%) for digital image alignment, even at a flight elevation of ~170m. As a result, very accurate point matching between photographs can be achieved and an extremely dense RGB encoded point cloud can be extracted. Overlapping images provide a series of stereopairs that can be used to create point cloud data consisting of 3 position and 3 color variables, X, Y, Z, R, G, and B. This point cloud is then used to create orthophotos or large scale digital elevation models, thus accurately displaying ice structure. The geo-referenced images provide a ground spatial resolution of approximately 6 cm, permitting analysis of detailed features, such as cryoconite holes, evolving small

  15. Multi-beam survey of ice-ocean interactions in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, E. J.; Fenty, I. G.; Xu, Y.

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that ice-ocean interactions play a fundamental role in the evolution of floating ice shelves. It is less well known that they also play a fundamental role in the evolution of tidewater glaciers, and moreover that ice-ocean interactions in the case of tidewater glaciers are orders of magnitude more vigorous that in the case of floating ice shelves. In this talk, we will present results of a novel oceanographic survey of several glacial fjords situated about 150-200 km north of Ilulissat, in West Greenland, which combines precision, multi-beam bathymetry, long-range ADCP and dense CTD data to characterize the geometry of calving fronts, the distribution of melting and subglacial water discharge and to measure the rates of ice melting in the ocean in the summer. The results will be compared with model output products from the MITgcm to evaluate the quality of the model simulations and improve its boundary conditions, e.g. the precise location of outbursts of subglacial water at the glacier grounding line, the structural nature of the ice-ocean interface, the distribution of melt water outflow versus depth and its re-circulation within the glacial fjords. The survey will provide direct measurements of ice ablation rates from time-dependent multi-beam mapping, in complement with estimates derived from the conservation of heat and salt. The results will be instrumental in developing an enhanced characterization of ice-ocean interactions in Greenland, which is a major unknown for predicting the evolution of Greenland in a warming climate. This work is performed under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. Use of Glacial Fronts by Narwhals (Monodon monoceros) in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laidre, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial fronts in Greenland are known to be important summer habitat for narwhals (Monodon monoceros), as freshwater runoff and sediment discharge may aggregate prey at the terminus. We investigated the importance of glacial habitat characteristics in determining narwhal visitation. Narwhals (n=18) were instrumented with satellite transmitters in September 1993-1994 and 2006-2007 in Melville Bay, West Greenland. Daily narwhal locations were interpolated using a correlated random walk based on observed filtered locations and associated positional error. We also compiled a database on physical features of 41 glaciers along the northwest Greenland coast. This covered the entire coastal region with narwhal activity. Parameters included glacier ice velocity (km/yr) from radar satellite data, glacier front advance and retreat, and glacier width (km) at the ice-ocean interface derived using front position data digitized from 20-100m resolution radar image mosaics and Landsat imagery. We also quantified relative volumes and extent of glacial ice discharge, thickness of the glacial ice at the terminus (m), and water depth at the terminus (m) from gravity and airborne radar data, sediment flux from satellite-based analysis, and freshwater runoff from a regional atmospheric climate model (RACMO2.3). We quantified whale visits to glaciers at three distances (5, 7, and 10 km) and conducted proximity analyses on annual and monthly time steps. We estimated 1) narwhal presence or absence, 2) the number of 24 h periods spent at glaciers, and 3) the fraction of study animals that visited each glacier. The use of glacial habitat by narwhals expanded to the north and south between the 1990s (n=9 unique glaciers visited) and the 2000s (n=30 visited), likely due to loss of summer fast ice and later fall freeze-up trends (3.5 weeks later since 1979). We used a generalized linear mixed effects framework to quantify the glacier and fjord habitat characteristics preferred by narwhals.

  17. The early archaean crustal history of West Greenland as recorded by detrital zircons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinny, P. D.; Compston, W.; Mcgregor, V. R.

    1988-01-01

    The isotope systematics of some of the oldest samples on Earth from both Greenland and Australia was discussed. The antiquity was confirmed of the 4.1 to 4.2 Ga zircons from Western Australia; the model Lu-Hf age of these zircons, as measured with the ANU ion probe is 4.14 + or - 0.24 Ga, although the oldest preserved rock units there are anorthosites with a Lu-Hf model age of about 3.73 Ga. U-Pb ion probe ages of detrital zircons ranging between 2.87 and 3.89 Ga from an Akilia association quartzite was reported, whose age of deposition is probably around 3.8 Ga. It was argued that the younger age in this range are discordant because of late Pb-loss, probably associated with a high grade metamorphic event at about 3.6 Ga. It was also argued that the earliest crust in West Greenland and elsewhere is about 3.9 Ga, but in some places, such as Western Australia, crustal evolution took place much earlier, perhaps starting as far back as 4.3 Ga. This would account for the presence in that terrane of abundant K rich granitoid, the paucity of tonalitic and trondhjemitic materials, and the existence of Eu anomalies in early Archean sediments.

  18. Crust and Upper Mantle Structure in the Sarfartoq Kimberlite Province, West Greenland: A Receiver Function Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl-Jensen, Trine; Voss, Peter H.; Møller Steensgaard, Bo; Pinna, Line G.

    2015-04-01

    A marked change in crustal thickness is seen at the deformation boundary between undisturbed Archean core in the south and reworked Archean gneiss in the foreland of the Nagssugtoqidian orogen in West Greenland. In addition, intra-crustal boundaries can be tentativly interpreted. Interpretations on upper mantle structures are less clear. This is the first information on crust and upper mantle structure in the area, which is known for kimberlite, carbonatite and ultramafic lamprophyre occurrences, and diamond exploration. The data consists of two summer seasons of passive seismological data recorded on 5 broad-band seismological stations placed on an almost 200 km long profile crossing the deformation boundary. The stations were installed in the remote area with solar panels and batteries, and recorded two summer seasons. Between 7 and 28 events on the stations were used for the Receiver Function analysis.

  19. Crust and Upper Mantle Structure in the Sarfartoq Kimberlite Province, West Greenland: A Receiver Function Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl-Jensen, T.; Voss, P.; Larsen, L. M.; Steensgaard, B. M.; Pinna, L. G. B.

    2014-12-01

    A marked change in crustal thickness is seen at the deformation boundary between undisturbed Archean core in the south and reworked Archean gneiss in the foreland of the Nagssugtoqidian orogen in West Greenland. In addition, intra-crustal boundaries can be tentativly interpreted. Interpretations on upper mantle structures are less clear. This is the first information on crust and upper mantle structure in the area, which is known for kimberlite, carbonatite and ultramafic lamprophyre occurrences, and diamond exploration. The data consists of two summer seasons of passive seismological data recorded on 5 broad-band seismological stations placed on an almost 200 km long profile crossing the deformation boundary. The stations were installed in the remote area with solar panels and batteries, and recorded two summer seasons. Between 7 and 28 events on the stations were used for the Receiver Function analysis.

  20. Significance of the late Archaean granulite facies terrain boundaries, Southern West Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, C. R. L.; Nutman, A. P.; Mcgregor, V. R.

    1988-01-01

    Three distinct episodes and occurrences of granulite metamorphism in West Greenland are described: (1) the oldest fragmentary granulites occur within the 3.6-Ga Amitsoq gneisses and appear to have formed 200 Ma after the continental crust in which they lie (Spatially associated rapakivi granites have zircon cores as old as 3.8 Ga, but Rb-Sr, whole-rock Pb-Pb, and all other systems give 3.6 Ga, so these granulites apparently represent a later metamorphic event); (2) 3.0-Ga granulites of the Nordlandet Peninsula NW of Godthaab, developed immediately after crustal formation in hot, dry conditions, are carbonate-free, associated with voluminous tonalite, and formed at peak metamorphic conditions of 800 C and 7 to 8 kbar (Synmetamorphic trondhjemite abounds and the activity of H2O has been indicated by Pilar to have varied greatly); and (3) 2.8-Ga granulites south of Godthaab, lie to the south of retrogressed amphibolite terranes. Prograde amphibolite-granulite transitions are clearly preserved only locally at the southern end of this block, near Bjornesund, south of Fiskenaesset. Progressively deeper parts of the crust are exposed from south to north as a major thrust fault is approached. Characteristic big hornblende pegmatites, which outcrop close to the thrust in the east, have been formed by replacement of orthopyroxene. Comparable features were not seen in South Indian granulites. It was concluded that no one mechanism accounts for the origin of all granulites in West Greenland. Various processes have interacted in different ways, and what happened in individual areas must be worked out by considering all possible processes.

  1. Recent changes in North West Greenland climate documented by NEEM shallow ice core data and simulations, and implications for past temperature reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Delmotte, V.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    Stack records of accumulation, d18O and deuterium excess were produced from up to 4 shallow ice cores at NEEM (North-West Greenland), spanning 1724-2007 and updated to 2011 using pit water stable isotope data. Signal-to-noise ratio is high for d18O (1.3) and accumulation (1.2) but is low for deuterium excess (0.4). No long-term trend is observed in the accumulation record. By contrast, NEEM d18O shows multi-decadal increasing trends in the late 19th century and since the 1980s. Decadal d18O and accumulation variability is in phase with Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation indices, and enhanced at the beginning of the 19th century. Large-scale spatial coherency is detected between NEEM and other Greenland ice core and temperature records, strongest for North-West Greenland d18O and summer South-West coastal temperature instrumental records. The strength of correlations with the North Atlantic Oscillation is smaller than in central or south Greenland. The strongest positive d18O values are recorded at NEEM in 2010, followed by 1928, while maximum accumulation occurs in 1933. The coldest/driest decades are depicted at NEEM in 1815-1825 and 1836-1836. The spatial structure of these warm/ wet years and cold/dry decades is investigated using all available Greenland ice cores. During the period 1958-2011, the NEEM accumulation and d18O records are highly correlated with simulated precipitation, temperature and d18O from simulations performed with MAR, LMDZiso and ECHAM5iso atmospheric models, nudged to atmospheric reanalyses. Model-data agreement is better using ERA reanalyses than NCEP/NCAR and 20CR ones. Model performance is poor for deuterium excess. Gridded temperature reconstructions, instrumental data and model outputs at NEEM are used to estimate the d18O-temperature relationship for the strong warming period in 1979-2007. The estimated slope of this relationship is 1.1±0.2‰ per °C, about twice larger than previously used to estimate last interglacial temperature

  2. East Asian origin of central Greenland last glacial dust: just one possible scenario?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Újvári, Gábor; Stevens, Thomas; Svensson, Anders; Klötzli, Urs Stephan; Manning, Christina; Németh, Tibor; Kovács, János

    2016-04-01

    Dust in Greenland ice cores is used to reconstruct the activity of dust emitting regions and atmospheric circulation for the last glacial period. However, the source dust material to Greenland over this period is the subject of considerable uncertainty. Here we use new clay mineral and Sr-Nd isotopic data from eleven loess samples collected around the Northern Hemisphere and compare the 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd isotopic signatures of fine (<10 μm) separates to existing Greenland ice core dust data (GISP2, GRIP; [1]; [2]). Smectite contents and kaolinite/chlorite (K/C) ratios allow exclusion of continental US dust emitting regions as potential sources, because of the very high (>3.6) K/C ratios and extremely high (>~70%) smectite contents. At the same time, Sr-Nd isotopic compositions demonstrate that ice core dust isotopic compositions can be explained by East Asian (Chinese loess) and/or Central/East Central European dust contributions. Central/East Central European loess Sr-Nd isotopic compositions overlap most with ice core dust, while the Sr isotopic signature of Chinese loess is slightly more radiogenic. Nevertheless, an admixture of 90‒10 % from Chinese loess and circum-Pacific volcanic material would also account for the Sr‒Nd isotopic ratios of central Greenland LGM dust. At the same time, sourcing of ice core dust from Alaska, continental US and NE Siberia seems less likely based on Sr and Nd isotopic signatures. The data demonstrate that currently no unique source discrimination for Greenland dust is possible using both published and our new data [3]. Thus, there is a need to identify more diagnostic tracers. Based on initial Hf isotope analyses of fine separates of three loess samples (continental US, Central Europe, China), an apparent dependence of Hf isotopic signatures on the relative proportions of radiogenic clay minerals (primarily illite) was found, as these fine dust fractions are apparently zircon-free. The observed difference between

  3. Understanding the Factors That Control Snow Albedo Over Central Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, P.; Bergin, M. H.; Dibb, J. E.; Domine, F.; Carmagnola, C.; Courville, Z.; Sokolik, I. N.; Lefer, B. L.

    2011-12-01

    Snow albedo plays a critical role in the energy balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet. In particular, the snow albedo influences the extent to which absorbing aerosols over Greenland (i.e. dust and black carbon) force climate. With this in mind the spectral snow albedo, physical snow properties, and snow chemistry were measured during May, June, and July 2011 at Summit, Greenland to investigate the variability in snow spectral albedo and its impact on aerosol direct radiative forcing. Optical and chemical properties of aerosol and aerosol optical depth were also measured as part of this study. Strellis et. al. will present a preliminary assessment of aerosol radiative forcing at Summit in summer 2011, in a separate presentation at this meeting. Spectral albedo was measured from 350-2500 nm with an ASD FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer daily at four permanent sites and a moving fifth site where snow was sampled for characterization, as well as in more intensive diurnal and spatial surveys. Snow specific surface area (SSA), the ratio of snow crystal surface area to mass, was measured with a Dual Frequency Integrating Sphere (DUFISSS) at 1310 nm and 1550 nm, as well as with dyed and cast samples collected for stereology analysis. Snow stratigraphy, crystal size, and density were also measured on a daily basis, and snow samples will be analyzed for microstructural parameters determined from micro-CT imaging. Snow chemistry measurements include specific elements, major ions, and elemental and organic carbon. The time series of daily albedo measurements ranged from 0.88 to nearly 1.0 in visible wavelengths and from 0.42 to 0.65 in the near infrared. Changes as large as 0.1 were observed between consecutive daily measurements across the spectrum. Preliminary results show a strong correlation between variation in albedo and co-located measurements of snow specific surface area, specifically in the near infrared. By conducting our measurements near solar noon every day, and

  4. A synthesis of the ongoing seasonal work in a west Greenland tidewater outlet glacier fjord, Godthåbsfjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, J.; Bendtsen, J.; Rysgaard, S.

    2015-12-01

    The coastal waters off west Greenland is subjected to significant temperature fluctuations which might affect the mass loss from local tidewater outlet glaciers from the Greenland Ice Sheet in different ways. We present a comprehensive hydrographic data set from a west Greenland fjord, Godthåbsfjord, a fjord in contact with the Greenland Ice Sheet through tidewater outlet glaciers. We analyze with respect to water masses, dynamics, seasonal and interannual hydrographic variability. Through seasonal observations of hydrographic and moored observations we recognize a seasonal pattern in the fjords circulation system, where an intermediate baroclinic circulation mode driven by tidal currents at the fjord entrance is associated as an important local heat source for the fjord. Four distinct circulation modes are observed in the fjord of which all can contribute to glacial ice melt. In water observation of a subglacial plume core will be presented and discussed with respect to vertical distribution of water masses and local heat budget in the fjord. The example of the extreme case of subglacial plume will be discussed (ice-dammed lake drainage).

  5. View of West end of central lift span truss web ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of West end of central lift span truss web of Tensaw River Bridge, showing web brace of lift girder superstructure, looking west - Tensaw River Lift Bridge, Spanning Tensaw River at U.S. Highway 90, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  6. 19. VIEW WEST; CENTRAL ROOM, NORTH SIDE OF BUILDING, SECOND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW WEST; CENTRAL ROOM, NORTH SIDE OF BUILDING, SECOND FLOOR. - Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Bowditch Hall, 600 feet east of Smith Street & 350 feet south of Columbia Cove, West bank of Thames River, New London, New London County, CT

  7. 22. VIEW WEST; CENTRAL ROOM, NORTH SIDE OF BUILDING, THIRD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VIEW WEST; CENTRAL ROOM, NORTH SIDE OF BUILDING, THIRD FLOOR. - Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Bowditch Hall, 600 feet east of Smith Street & 350 feet south of Columbia Cove, West bank of Thames River, New London, New London County, CT

  8. General view of central and west wings with loading dock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of central and west wings with loading dock from north - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Pacific Branch, Mess Hall, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. Detail of central portion of southeast elevation; camera facing west. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of central portion of southeast elevation; camera facing west. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Hospital Ward, Johnson Lane, west side at intersection of Johnson Lane & Cossey Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  10. Continuous monitoring of deep groundwater at the ice margin, Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claesson Liljedahl, L.; Lehtinen, A. M.; Ruskeeniemi, T.; Engström, J.; Hansson, K.; Sundberg, J.; Henkemans, E.; Frape, S.; Johansson, S.; Acuna, J.

    2012-12-01

    The deep geologic repository (DGR) concept for the long-term management of used nuclear fuel involves the containment and isolation of used nuclear fuel at depths of approximately 500-1000 m below ground surface within a suitable geological formation for hundreds of thousands of years. A key objective of the used fuel DGR research programs of the Swedish, Finnish and Canadian nuclear waste management organizations (SKB, POSIVA and NWMO, respectively) is to further understanding of geosphere stability and long-term evolution. Future glaciation represents an intense external perturbation of a DGR situated in northern latitudes. To advance the understanding of processes associated with glaciation and their impact on the long-term performance of a DGR, the Greenland Analogue Project (GAP) was initiated by SKB, POSIVA and NWMO. The GAP was initiated in 2008 as a four-year field and modelling study utilizing the Greenland ice sheet and sub-surface conditions in West Greenland as an analogue for the conditions expected to prevail in Fennoscandia and Canada during future glacial cycles. One of the main aims of the GAP is to improve the understanding of how groundwater flow and water chemistry is influenced by an existing ice sheet and continuous permafrost. One way to study this is by monitoring deep drillholes. A 645 m deep drillhole (DH-GAP04) was drilled and instrumented in July 2011 at the ice-sheet margin in Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland to investigate the hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological conditions of a subglacial environment. Of particular interest is the recharge of glacial meltwater, and understanding to what depth it intrudes into the bedrock and whether it affects the chemistry and physico-chemical properties of the deep groundwater. DH-GAP04 is instrumented with a two-packer multi-sensor system, installed at a depth of 560 m, dividing the hole into three sections. The upper section extends from the base of permafrost (about 350 m) down to the upper packer

  11. Paleo- and environmental magnetic record of Holocene marine sediments from West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, R. G.; Stoner, J. S.; Jennings, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    High resolution records of paleosecular variation (PSV) and relative paleointensity (RPI) are useful relative dating tools and provide opportunities to understand patterns in the apparently stochastic behavior of the earth's geodynamo. The quality of these records is dependent upon sedimentological and environmental conditions that permit the complex, and still poorly understood, sediment magnetic acquisition process; changes to these conditions potentially impacts the fidelity of these records and our interpretation of the paleogeomagnetic field. To understand the potential influence of these effects we measured the paleo- and environmental-magnetic properties of a 12kyr marine record from Disko Bugt, West Greenland which experiences large sedimentological changes related to deglaciation and retreat of the Greenland ice sheet. Proximity of the ice margin to the core site during the early Holocene provided abundant terrigenous fine-grained sediment, resulting in high sedimentation rate, high magnetic susceptibility (MS) and coercivity typical of PSD size magnetite. Maximum angular deviation (MAD) values <1° indicate that the paleomagnetic record is well defined, and PSV and RPI records agree well with well-established regional analogues (e.g. MD99-2269 and MD99-2322) and field models (e.g. CALS10k). Ice-sheet retreat during the mid-late Holocene reduced the flux of terrigenous sediment resulting in lower values of MS and coercivity and consistently higher MAD values (ranging from 2-14°) indicating possible sediment source changes and a less well defined paleomagnetic record. While both PSV and RPI are affected by environmental changes the PSV record appears more resilient, maintaining relatively strong coherence to regional analogues, whereas the RPI record becomes less well defined. These results highlight the dependence of the paleomagnetic record on the environmental regime in which it was deposited, the sensitivity of PSV, and particularly RPI to these

  12. Variability of subglacial discharge recorded with thermal infrared timelapse of a tidewater glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, L. C.; Stearns, L. A.; Brunsell, N. A.; Catania, G. A.; Fried, M.; Bartholomaus, T.; Felikson, D.; Sutherland, D.; Carroll, D.; Shroyer, E.; Nash, J. D.; Walker, R. T.; Finnegan, D. C.; LeWinter, A.

    2015-12-01

    Subglacial hydrology and the dynamics therein are important modulators of ice flow in the Greenland Ice Sheet. At tidewater outlet glaciers the characteristics of proglacial discharge affect fjord circulation, sediment deposition, submarine melt rates, and iceberg calving. Information about the spatio-temporal variability of discharge is limited by the challenges of in situ data collection at tidewater glaciers. Here, we present summertime measurements of subglacial discharge variability using a thermal infrared (7.5μm to 13μm) camera and intervalometer at Kangerlussuup Sermia (KS), a ~4km wide outlet glacier in the Uummannaq Bay region of West Greenland (71.46 N, 51.43 W). KS has an advantageous geometry for this investigation because of its shallow grounding zone and well-entrenched subglacial hydrologic system. In tandem, these characteristics promote buoyant freshwater to rise to the fjord surface from discrete outlets at the glacier's base. We investigate the timing of plume activity at these outlets and discuss potential controls on outlet switching. Raw camera measurements cannot be accurately converted to surface temperature without correcting for environmental variables and scene geometry, both of which are time-evolving during data acquisition. Our processing methodology relies on a variety of existing techniques -- image segmentation, ray casting, atmospheric radiative transfer modeling, Monte Carlo simulations -- and a variety of ancillary data products -- satellite imagery, atmospheric reanalysis, meteorologic and hydrologic measurements -- to produce the final results. What is gained is an unprecedented view into interactions between the cryosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere that control the dynamic and sensitive terminus region of a tidewater outlet glacier.

  13. Land cover heterogeneity and soil respiration in a west Greenland tundra landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley-Cook, J. I.; Burzynski, A.; Hammond, C. R.; Virginia, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Multiple direct and indirect pathways underlie the association between land cover classification, temperature and soil respiration. Temperature is a main control of the biological processes that constitute soil respiration, yet the effect of changing atmospheric temperatures on soil carbon flux is unresolved. This study examines associations amongst land cover, soil carbon characteristics, soil respiration, and temperature in an Arctic tundra landscape in western Greenland. We used a 1.34 meter resolution multi-spectral WorldView2 satellite image to conduct an unsupervised multi-staged ISODATA classification to characterize land cover heterogeneity. The four band image was taken on July 10th, 2010, and captures an 18 km by 15 km area in the vicinity of Kangerlussuaq. The four major terrestrial land cover classes identified were: shrub-dominated, graminoid-dominated, mixed vegetation, and bare soil. The bare soil class was comprised of patches where surface soil has been deflated by wind and ridge-top fellfield. We hypothesize that soil respiration and soil carbon storage are associated with land cover classification and temperature. We set up a hierarchical field sampling design to directly observe spatial variation between and within land cover classes along a 20 km temperature gradient extending west from Russell Glacier on the margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet. We used the land cover classification map and ground verification to select nine sites, each containing patches of the four land cover classes. Within each patch we collected soil samples from a 50 cm pit, quantified vegetation, measured active layer depth and determined landscape characteristics. From a subset of field sites we collected additional 10 cm surface soil samples to estimate soil heterogeneity within patches and measured soil respiration using a LiCor 8100 Infrared Gas Analyzer. Soil respiration rates varied with land cover classes, with values ranging from 0.2 mg C/m^2/hr in the bare soil

  14. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment - SAFIRE - on Store Glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, P.; Hubbard, B. P.; Doyle, S. H.; Young, T. J.; Hofstede, C. M.; Bougamont, M. H.; Todd, J.; Toberg, N.; Nicholls, K. W.; Box, J.; Walter, J. I.; Hubbard, A.

    2015-12-01

    Marine-terminating outlet glaciers drain 90 percent of the Greenland Ice Sheet and are responsible for about half of the ice sheet's net annual mass loss, which currently raises global sea level by 1 mm per year. The basal controls on these fast-flowing glaciers are, however, poorly understood, with the implication that numerical ice sheet models needed to predict future dynamic ice loss from Greenland relies on uncertain and often untested basal parameterizations. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment - SAFIRE - is addressing this paucity of observational constraints by drilling to the bed of Store Glacier, a fast-flowing outlet glacier terminating in Uummannaq Fjord, West Greenland. In 2014, we gained access to the bed in four boreholes drilled to depths of 603-616 m near the center of the glacier, 30 km inland from the calving terminus where ice flows at a rate of 700 m/year. A seismic survey showed the glacier bed to consist of water-saturated, soft sediment. The water level in all four boreholes nevertheless dropped rapidly to 80 m below the ice surface when the drill connected with a basal water system, indicating effective drainage over a sedimentary bed. We were able to install wired sensor strings at the bed (water pressure, temperature, electrical conductivity and turbidity) and within the glacier (temperature and tilt) in three boreholes. The sensors operated for up to 80+ days before cables stretched and ultimately snapped due to high internal strain. The data collected during this sensor deployment show ice as cold as -21 degrees Celcius; yet, temperature of water in the basal water system was persistently above the local freezing point. With diurnal variations detected in several sensor records, we hypothesise that surface water lubricates the ice flow while also warming basal ice. The fast basal motion of Store Glacier not only occurs by basal sliding, but from high rates of concentrated strain in the bottom third of the glacier

  15. The origin of decoupled Hf-Nd isotope compositions in Eoarchean rocks from southern West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, J. Elis; Münker, Carsten; Polat, Ali; Rosing, Minik T.; Schulz, Toni

    2011-11-01

    Radiogenic isotope compositions of Hf and Nd are typically coupled in Phanerozoic and Proterozoic mafic rocks due to a similar behaviour of Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd during mantle melting. Eoarchean rocks, for instance those from southern West Greenland, exhibit an apparent decoupling of Hf and Nd isotope compositions. This apparent decoupling may either indicate metamorphic disturbance or, alternatively, mirror early differentiation processes in the silicate Earth. To evaluate the issue, we performed combined measurements of Hf-Nd isotope compositions together with major and trace element concentrations for well preserved >3720 to >3800 Ma old tholeiitic metabasalts and gabbros from the ˜3700 Ma and ˜3800 Ma old terranes of the Isua Supracrustal Belt, southern West Greenland. In contrast to younger mafic rocks, calculated initial ɛHf-ɛNd values of the Isua tholeiites show similar spreads and are both near chondritic to strongly depleted (-0.7 to +6.3 and -0.8 to +4.4, respectively), also in contrast to previously reported more depleted signatures in nearby boninite-like metabasalts of the Garbenschiefer unit. An evaluation of alteration effects based on preserved major and trace element arrays reveals pristine magmatic trends and therefore the measured isotope compositions indeed in most cases characterize contrasting Eoarchean mantle sources. In accord with this view, compositions of the Isua metabasalts yield Eoarchean regression ages in Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf isochron spaces, overlapping with emplacement ages inferred from crosscutting relationships with tonalites. Lutetium-Hf systematics of the Isua metabasalts studied here, yield clear isochron relationships. For both terranes, there is some scatter in Sm-Nd space, indicating early disturbance of the Sm-Nd system close in time to the extrusion ages, possibly by seafloor alteration. Trace element compositions of the metabasalts indicate an arc setting and a strong source overprint by melt-like subduction components. It is

  16. Two years of Irminger Ring observations offshore of the West Greenland Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Femke de Jong, M.; Bower, Amy S.; Furey, Heather; Lilly, Jonathan M.

    2013-04-01

    Anti-cyclonic eddies, called Irminger Rings, shed from the boundary current along the west coast of Greenland, transport warm and saline Irminger Current water into the interior Labrador Sea. The transport of heat and salt by Irminger Rings into the relatively fresh and cold Labrador Sea is thought to be important in the restratification of the basin after convection. However, since there are few observations, recent estimates of the importance of Irminger Rings are mostly based on models. This study shows new data from a mooring deployed offshore of the west Greenland shelf near the local maximum of eddy kinetic energy associated with the shedding of Irminger Rings. The mooring was deployed between September 2007 and September 2009. It recorded the hydrographic properties and current velocities of the water column, thus obtaining a time series of passing Irminger Rings. During the 2 year mooring deployment 12 eddies fitting the description of an Irminger Ring were observed to pass the mooring location. The Irminger Ring core properties show a seasonal cycle in temperature and salinity with a range of about 2°C and 0.05 psu, with maxima observed in late fall. This results in larger heat and salt contribution estimates compared to observations in literature, which were either taken earlier in the year or further downstream sampling older modified Irminger Rings. Some inter-annual variability was also observed. Most of the 12 Irminger Rings described here were observed during the first year. The decrease in the number of observed eddies during the second year of deployment appears to be due to a change in boundary current strength, as determined from satellite altimetry and surveys of the AR7W section. The resulting change in the circulation pattern was evident in the current meter records at the mooring site. More information about the seasonal to inter-annual variability is needed to fully understand the exchange between the boundary current and the interior

  17. INTERIOR FIRST FLOOR WEST CENTRAL ELEVATOR LOBBY DETAIL VIEW, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR FIRST FLOOR WEST CENTRAL ELEVATOR LOBBY DETAIL VIEW, FACING SOUTHEAST. - NASA Industrial Plant, Systems Integration & Checkout Facility, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Modelling twentieth century global ocean circulation and iceberg flux at 48°N: implications for west Greenland iceberg discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilton, David J.; Bigg, Grant R.; Hanna, Edward

    2015-11-01

    We have used a coupled ocean-iceberg model to study the variation in global ocean circulation and North Atlantic iceberg flux from 1900 to 2008. The latter component of the study focused particularly on Greenland icebergs feeding into the Labrador Current and past Newfoundland. The model was forced with daily heat, freshwater and wind fluxes from the Twentieth Century Reanalysis. The reanalysis heat fluxes were shown to be offset from the, shorter, NCEP reanalysis and a grid-point correction was applied to this component of the forcing. The model produces a generally realistic ocean circulation, although with an enhanced Atlantic Meridional Overturning largely due to the forcing. The modelled iceberg flux at 48°N is well correlated with the long-term observed flux when using a modelled iceberg discharge that varies in a similar fashion to the highly variable observed flux at 48°N. From this model we infer changes in the spatial and temporal variability of iceberg calving from western Greenland. During the first third of the twentieth century the majority of modelled icebergs reaching 48°N derive from southern Greenland, while only after 1930 is the traditional perspective of a majority of such icebergs originating from Baffin Bay consistent with model results. Decadal-scale changes in the dominant regional sources are found, with oscillations between western Greenland and northern Baffin Bay. The latter origin was modelled to be most important in the last third of the twentieth century, although west Greenland sources have increased in importance in recent years. The model correctly reproduces the pronounced late spring peak in flux at 48°N for southern Greenland icebergs, but has an approximately six month offset for icebergs from Baffin Bay, most likely due to resolution issues leading to model icebergs not being delayed in shallow coastal waters, whereas in reality they may be grounded for some time or trapped in coastal sea-ice.

  19. Bedrock topography of west-central Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, R.E.; Runkle, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Bedrock in Iowa (Hershey 1969) generally is overlain by deposits of glacial drift and alluvium. The drift, consisting of glacial till and glacial outwash, ranges in thickness from zero to more than 500 feet in western Iowa; the alluvium in stream valleys ranges in thickness from less than 1 to more than 70 feet. The configuration of the bedrock surface is the result of a long period of preglacial erosion and during shorter, but more intense, periods of interglacial erosion. This map, for a 12-county area in west-central Iowa, is the eighth of a series of nine reports that will provide statewide coverage of the bedrock topograhy of Iowa. 

  20. Zinc, cadmium, mercury and selenium in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from Central East Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.; Born, E.W.; Agger, C.T.; Nielsen, C.O.

    1995-02-01

    Muscle, liver, and kidney tissues from 38 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) caught in the Scoresby Sound area, Central East Greenland, were analysed for zinc, cadmium, mercury and selenium. In general, cadmium concentrations were low in muscle, liver and kidney tissue. This finding can be explained by low cadmium levels in the blubber of ringed seals. The concentration of mercury in muscle tissue was low, whereas concentrations in liver and kidney tissue were relatively high. Mercury and cadmium were positively correlated with age in liver and kidney. Zinc was positively correlated with in kidney, and selenium was correlated with age in liver. Contrary to other marine mammals, polar bears had higher mercury levels in the kidneys than in the liver. In all three tissues polar bears had significantly lower cadmium levels than ringed seals from the same area. Mercury levels were significantly lower in the muscle tissue of polar bears than in ringed seals, where-as levels in the liver and kidney were significantly higher. The previous geographic trend for cadmium and mercury found in Canadian polar bears could be extended to cover East Greenland as well. Hence cadmium levels were higher in Greenland than in Canada, while the opposite was the case for mercury. Greenland polar bears had higher mercury and cadmium contents in livers and kidneys than polar bears from Svalbard. The mercury levels in muscle and liver tissue from polar bears from East Greenland were twice as high as found in bears from western Alaska, but half the levels found in northern Alaska. Cadmium and zinc were partially correlated in kidney tissue, and this was found for mercury and selenium as well. Cadmium and zinc showed molar ratios close to unity with the highest concentrations occurring in kidney tissue, while the levels of zinc exceeded cadmium in muscle and liver tissue by up to several decades. Mercury and selenium showed molar ratios close to unity in liver and kidneys. 56 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Coeval fluctuations of the Greenland ice sheet and a local glacier, central East Greenland, during late glacial and early Holocene time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Laura B.; Kelly, Meredith A.; Lowell, Thomas V.; Hall, Brenda L.; Howley, Jennifer A.; Smith, Colby A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a 10Be chronology of late glacial to early Holocene fluctuations of a Greenland ice sheet outlet glacier and the adjacent Milne Land ice cap in central East Greenland. Ages of boulders on bedrock indicate that both ice masses receded during the Younger Dryas (YD), likely due to rising summer temperatures. Since Greenland ice core records register cold mean annual temperatures throughout the YD, these ice-marginal data support climate conditions characterized by strong seasonality. The ice sheet outlet glacier and ice cap deposited inner Milne Land Stade moraines at 11.4 ± 0.8 ka and 11.4 ± 0.6 ka, respectively (mean moraine ages and 1σ uncertainties). Based on the coeval moraine ages, we suggest that both ice masses responded to climate conditions acting on the ice margins, specifically ablation. Moreover, the ice sheet responded sensitively (i.e., on the same time scale as a small ice cap) to climate conditions.

  2. Ice Sheet Meltwater Impacts on Biological Productivity in High-Latitude Coastal Zones - Observations and Model Results for West Antarctica and Southwest Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager, P. L.; Oliver, H.; Sherrell, R. M.; Stammerjohn, S. E.; St-Laurent, P.; Hofmann, E. E.; Mote, T. L.; Castelao, R. M.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Tedesco, M.; Arrigo, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    Surface mass balance observations and models confirm that both the west Antarctic and Greenland Ice Sheets have undergone accelerating ice mass losses during the past decade. These losses enhance freshwater discharge to the ocean and have important implications for ocean circulation and sea level, but they can also impact marine ecosystems and carbon cycling. High-latitude primary productivity is limited by light or nutrients (or both), and phytoplankton access to these limiting factors can be altered by freshwater additions. Mechanisms for delivering meltwater to the ocean are complex and depend in part on whether the melt occurs at the ice-atmosphere or ice-ocean interface. Marine-terminus glaciers may generate buoyant plumes at depth, similar to upwelling whereas runoff from glacial termini on land will behave more like a riverine point source at the ocean surface. Here, we present preliminary results from two ongoing efforts to understand these impacts: one from the Amundsen Sea Polynya (ASP) in west Antarctica (NSF-funded INSPIRE), and another from NASA-IDS Ice Sheet Impact Study in coastal Greenland. Field observations from the Amundsen Sea Polynya International Research Expedition (ASPIRE) showed how the enormous phytoplankton bloom in the central ASP depends on an iron supply from the Dotson Ice Shelf (DIS). This outcome implied a three-dimensional pathway for iron, from the DIS cavity to the euphotic zone of the ASP bloom region located 20-100 km offshore. Such a pathway differs from the traditional one-dimensional view, where nutrients are injected into the euphotic zone by vertical mixing. Mesoscale structures and eddies may play a central role. A ROMS model is used to investigate key physical and biogeochemical processes in the ASP region. A similar effort is underway to investigate the fate of extreme melt from Greenland and its impact on primary productivity. In coastal Greenland, meltwater is modeled as surface runoff and the resulting shallower

  3. Divergent parasite faunas in adjacent populations of west Greenland caribou: Natural and anthropogenic influences on diversity☆

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Jillian; Orsel, Karin; Cuyler, Christine; Hoberg, Eric P.; Schmidt, Niels M.; Kutz, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal parasite diversity was characterised for two adjacent populations of west Greenland caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus) through examinations of abomasa and small intestines collected from adult and subadult females during late winter. Three trichostrongyline (Trichostrongylina: Nematoda) species were identified from the abomasa, although none were recovered from the small intestines, with faunal composition differing between the caribou populations. In caribou from Kangerlussuaq-Sisimiut, Marshallagia marshalli and Teladorsagia boreoarcticus were highly prevalent at 100% and 94.1%, respectively. In contrast, Ostertagia gruehneri was found at 100% prevalence in Akia-Maniitsoq caribou, and was the only abomasal parasite species present in that population. We hypothesise that parasite faunal differences between the populations are a consequence of parasite loss during caribou colonisation of the region approximately 4000–7000 years ago, followed by a more recent spill-over of parasites from muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus wardi) and semi-domesticated Norwegian reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) introduced to Kangerlussuaq-Sisimiut and Akia-Maniitsoq regions, respectively, in the 20th century. PMID:24533335

  4. Plant and vegetation dynamics on Disko Island, west Greenland: snapshots separated by over 40 years.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Terry V; Christensen, Torben R; Jantze, Elin J

    2011-09-01

    We report on a revisit in 2009 to sites where vegetation was recorded in 1967 and 1970 on Disko Island, West Greenland. Re-sampling of the same clones of the grass Phleum alpinum after 39 years showed complete stability in biometrics but dramatic earlier onset of various phenological stages that were not related to changes in population density. In a fell-field community, there was a net species loss, but in a herb-slope community, species losses balanced those that were gained. The type of species establishing and increasing in frequency and/or cover abundance at the fell-field site, particularly prostrate dwarf shrubs, indicates a possible start of a shift towards a heath, rather than a fell-field community. At the herb-slope site, those species that established or increased markedly in frequency and/or cover abundance indicate a change to drier conditions. This is confirmed both by the decrease in abundance of Alchemilla glomerulans and Epilobium hornemanii, and the drying of a nearby pond. The causes of these changes are unknown, although mean annual temperature has risen since 1984. PMID:21954725

  5. Lu-Hf total-rock age for the Amîtsoq gneisses, West Greenland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pettingill, H.S.; Patchett, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Lu-Hf total-rock data for the Amîtsoq gneisses of West Greenland yield an age of 3.55±0.22Gy(2σ), based on the decay constant λ176Lu=1.96×10−11y−1, and an initial176Hf/177Hf ratio of 0.280482±33. The result is in good agreement with Rb-Sr total-rock and U-Pb zircon ages. In spite of severe metamorphism of the area at 2.9 Gy, zircons from two of the samples have remained on the total-rock line, and define points close to the initial Hf ratio. The initial176Hf/177Hf lies close to a chondritic Hf isotopic evolution curve from 4.55 Gy to present. This is consistent with the igneous precursors to the Amîtsoq gneisses having been derived from the mantle at or shortly before 3.6 Gy. Anomalous relationships between Hf concentration and the176Lu/177Hf ratio may suggest that trace element abundances in the Amîtsoq gneisses are partly controlled by processes related to metamorphism.

  6. Lu-Hf total-rock age for the Amitsoq gneisses, West Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettingill, H. S.; Patchett, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    Lu-Hf total-rock data for the Amitsoq gneisses of West Greenland yield an age of 3.55 + or - 0.22 billion years, based on the decay constant for Lu-176 of 1.96 x 10 to the -11th/year, and an initial Hf-176/Hf-177 ratio of 0.280482 + or - 33. The result is in good agreement with Rb-Sr total-rock and U-Pb zircon ages. In spite of severe metamorphism of the area at 2.9 billion years, zircons from two of the samples have remained on the total-rock line, and define points close to the initial Hf ratio. The initial Hf-176/Hf-177 lies close to a chondritic Hf isotopic evolution curve from 4.55 billion years to present. This is consistent with the igneous precursors to the Amitsoq gneisses having been derived from the mantle at or shortly before 3.6 billion years. Anomalous relationships between Hf concentration and the Lu-176/Hf-177 ratio may suggest that trace element abundances in the Amitsoq gneisses are partly controlled by processes related to metamorphism.

  7. A new Eimeria species (Protozoa: Eimeriidae) from caribou in Ameralik, West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Skirnisson, K; Cuyler, C

    2016-04-01

    Fecal samples of 11 calves shot in the Ameralik area, West Greenland, in August-September 2014 were examined for coccidian parasites. The calves belonged to a population of interbreeding indigenous caribou Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus and feral semi-domestic Norwegian reindeer Rangifer tarandus tarandus. Two coccidian species were found: Eimeria rangiferis and a coccidium that was identified and described as a new species. The latter's sporulated oocyst is spherical or slightly subspherical. Average size is 25.6 × 24.8 μm. The oocyst has two distinct walls. Wall thickness is ∼1.4 μm. The unicolored outer wall is brown, the inner wall is dark gray. The oocysts contain a small polar granule but are devoid of a microphyle. The oocysts enclose four ovoid-shaped sporocysts with a rounded end opposite to the Stieda body. The average size of sporocysts is 15.2 × 7.8 μm. Sporocysts contain a granular sporocyst residuum that forms a spherical cluster between the sporocysts, one large refractile body is present in each sporozoite. The spherical form easily distinguishes oocysts of the new species from the seven previously described eimerid species in R. tarandus. This is the first eimerid described as a new species to the sciences from caribou in the Nearctic. PMID:26758447

  8. The presence of thrust-block naled after a major surge event: Kuannersuit Glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yde, Jacob C.; Knudsen, N. Tvis; Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Kronborg, Christian; Nielsen, Ole B.; Heinemeier, Jan; Olsen, Jesper

    Thrust-block naled in front of Kuannersuit Glacier, West Greenland, appears to have formed during the termination of a terrestrial surge event by a combination of enhanced winter runoff, rapid advance of the glacier terminus, and proglacial stress release by thrusting and stacking of naled blocks. This process is equivalent to the formation of thrust-block moraines. The thrust-block naled consists of at least seven thrust sheets, which are characterized by stratified ice with beds composed of a lower debris-rich lamina, an intermediate dispersed lamina and a top clean-ice lamina, and underlain by frozen outwash deposits. The thrust-block naled differs from basal stratified ice in the absence of internal deformation structures, a relatively low debris concentration, a clay-rich particle-size distribution and a preferential sorting of lighter minerals. The oxygen isotope composition of the thrust-block naled is indistinguishable from δ18O values from meteoric glacier ice and bulk meltwater, but different from basal stratified ice facies. The d-δD relationship indicates that thrust-block naled has been formed by freezing of successive thin layers of bulk waters with variable isotopic composition, whereas basal stratified ice has developed in a subglacial environment with regelation. This work shows that the association between proglacial naled and rapidly advancing glaciers may have significant consequences for the proglacial geomorphology and the interpretation of basal ice layers.

  9. Meltwater flux and runoff modeling in the abalation area of jakobshavn Isbrae, West Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard; Chylek, Petr; Liston, Glen; Steffen, Konrad

    2009-01-01

    The temporal variability in surface snow and glacier melt flux and runoff were investigated for the ablation area of lakobshavn Isbrae, West Greenland. High-resolution meteorological observations both on and outside the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) were used as model input. Realistic descriptions of snow accumulation, snow and glacier-ice melt, and runoff are essential to understand trends in ice sheet surface properties and processes. SnowModel, a physically based, spatially distributed meteorological and snow-evolution modeling system was used to simulate the temporal variability of lakobshavn Isbrre accumulation and ablation processes for 2000/01-2006/07. Winter snow-depth observations and MODIS satellite-derived summer melt observations were used for model validation of accumulation and ablation. Simulations agreed well with observed values. Simulated annual surface melt varied from as low as 3.83 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2001/02) to as high as 8.64 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2004/05). Modeled surface melt occurred at elevations reaching 1,870 m a.s.l. for 2004/05, while the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) fluctuated from 990 to 1,210 m a.s.l. during the simulation period. The SnowModel meltwater retention and refreezing routines considerably reduce the amount of meltwater available as ice sheet runoff; without these routines the lakobshavn surface runoff would be overestimated by an average of 80%. From September/October through May/June no runoff events were simulated. The modeled interannual runoff variability varied from 1.81 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2001/02) to 5.21 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2004/05), yielding a cumulative runoff at the Jakobshavn glacier terminus of {approx}2.25 m w.eq. to {approx}4.5 m w.eq., respectively. The average modeled lakobshavn runoff of {approx}3.4 km{sup 3} y{sup -1} was merged with previous estimates of Jakobshavn ice discharge to quantify the freshwater flux to Illulissat Icefiord. For both runoff and ice discharge the average trends are

  10. Paleomagnetism of large igneous provinces: case-study from West Greenland, North Atlantic igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riisager, Janna; Riisager, Peter; Pedersen, Asger Ken

    2003-09-01

    We present new paleomagnetic and multi-model stereo photogrammetry data from lava sequences in the West Greenland part of the North Atlantic igneous province (NAIP). The joint analyses of paleomagnetic and photogrammetric data yield a well-defined paleomagnetic pole located at Lat=73.6°N, Long=160.5°E ( N=44, α95=6.2°, K=13.1; age ˜61-55 Ma), which is statistically indistinguishable from a pole recently obtained for the Eurasian part of the NAIP on Faroe Islands [Riisager et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 201 (2002) 261-276]. Combining the two datasets we obtain a joint NAIP paleomagnetic pole in Greenland coordinates: Lat=71.1°N, Long=161.1°E ( N=87, α95=4.3°, K=13.6; age ˜61-54 Ma). The results presented here represent the first study in which photogrammetry profiles were photographed at the exact same locations where paleomagnetic fieldwork was carried out, and a direct flow-to-flow comparison of the two datasets is possible. Photogrammetry is shown to be particularly useful because of (i) highly precise dip/strike measurements and (ii) detailed 'field observations' that can be made in the laboratory. Highly precise determination of the structural attitude of well-exposed Kanisut Mb lava sequences demonstrates that their apparently reliable in-field dip/strike measurements typically are up to ˜6° wrong. Erroneous dip/strike readings are particularly problematic as they offset paleomagnetic poles without affecting their confidence limits. Perhaps more important for large igneous provinces is the recognition of a variable temporal relationship between consecutive lava flows. We demonstrate how correct interpretation of paleosecular variation, facilitated by the detailed photogrammetry analysis, is crucial for the rapidly emplaced Vaigat Formation lavas. Inaccurate tectonic correction, non-averaged paleosecular variation and unrecognized excursional directions may, perhaps, explain why coeval paleomagnetic poles from large igneous provinces are often

  11. Modeling of Ice Flow and Internal Layers Along a Flow Line Through Swiss Camp in West Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W. L.; Zwally, H. Jay; Abdalati, W.; Luo, S.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An anisotropic ice flow line model is applied to a flow line through Swiss Camp (69.57 N, 49.28 W) in West Greenland to estimate the dates of internal layers detected by Radio-Echo Sounding measurements. The effect of an anisotropic ice fabric on ice flow is incorporated into the steady state flow line model. The stress-strain rate relationship for anisotropic ice is characterized by an enhancement factor based on the laboratory observations of ice deformation under combined compression and shear stresses. By using present-day data of accumulation rate, surface temperature, surface elevation and ice thickness along the flow line as model inputs, a very close agreement is found between the isochrones generated from the model and the observed internal layers with confirmed dates. The results indicate that this part of Greenland ice sheet is primarily in steady state.

  12. Estimating ice-melange properties with repeat UAV surveys over Store Glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toberg, Nick; Ryan, Johnny; Christoffersen, Poul; Snooke, Neal; Todd, Joe; Hubbard, Alun

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, tidewater outlet glaciers of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) have thinned and retreated when compared to the 1980s when the ice sheet was in a state of dynamic balance. With a growing amount of ice discharged into the sea by tidewater glaciers as well as more ice melting on the surface, the Greenland Ice Sheet has become the single largest cryospheric source of global sea level rise. Today, the ice sheet causes sea level rise of 1 mm per year, highlighting the need to understand the ice sheet's response to climate change. Atmospheric warming will inevitably continue to increase surface meltwater production, but the dynamic response, which includes hundreds of fast-flowing tidewater glaciers, is largely unknown. To develop new understanding of ice sheet dynamics, we investigated the mechanism whereby icebergs break off tidewater glaciers and form a proglacial ice melange. This melange is rigid in winter when sea ice and friction along the sidewalls of the fjord, or even at the sea floor, hold it together. The result is a resistive force, which reduces the rate of iceberg calving when the ice melange is rigid and is lost when the melange disappears in the summer. From early May to late July 2014, we launched unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) from a basecamp on a bluff overlooking the calving front of Store Glacier, a 5 km wide tidewater glacier flowing into Uummannaq Fjord in West Greenland. The Skywalker X8 UAVs had a wing-span of 2.1m and a payload containing a high resolution camera, an autopilot system and a GPS data logger. We generated almost 70,000 georeferenced images during 63 sorties over the glacier during a 10 week field season starting 13 May 2014. The images were used to construct orhorectified mosaics and digital elevation models of the proglacial melange with Photoscan structure-from-motion software. The imagery and the DEMs were analysed statistically to understand the spatial characteristics of the ice melange. By combining the

  13. Cryo-Hydrologic Warming Explains Increased Ice Velocities on Sermeq Avannarleq, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, H.; Phillips, T. P.; Colgan, W.; Steffen, K.

    2011-12-01

    The area of West Greenland experiencing surface melt is increasing at a rate of ~3.9%/year, in response to a > 200m increase in equilibrium line altitude (ELA) between 1990 and 2000. Recent observations indicate that meltwater is retained in the englacial and subglacial cryo-hydrologic systems (CHS) through multiple years in this region. Latent heat transfer from this retained meltwater has the potential to warm ice relatively rapidly (decadal time scales) by cryo-hydrologic warming (CHW). Warmer ice temperature leads to reduced ice viscosity and higher ice velocity. We incorporated CHW into a flowline thermo-mechanical model of Sermeq Avannarleq (SA), west Greenland, to quantify the influence of CHW on ice velocities. Our model also considers the influence of softer Wisconsin ice at greater depths in the ice, and basal sliding. The dependence of the flow law parameter on depth and the local temperature was explicitly represented. We calculate mutually consistent temperature and velocity fields accounting for subtle thermo-mechanical feedbacks such as the enhancement of horizontal advection of cold ice by basal sliding. Our model uses measured ice surface and bedrock elevations, thus avoiding potential errors from calculating ice thickness based on mass balance (MB). We demonstrate that InSAR derived ice surface velocities on SA in winter 2005 cannot be reproduced unless the influence of CHW is invoked; conventional thermo-mechanical models that neglect CHW predict surface velocities that are up to 70 m/year smaller. The only available ice temperature measurements in this region (from 1990) are also not matched unless the influence of CHW is incorporated. Thus, our results provide the first quantitative demonstration of the impact of cryo-hydrologic warming on ice velocities, based on comparisons with real data. The influence of CHW on ice velocities is most significant in the region where melt inputs were initiated relatively recently (after ~ 1990) due to the

  14. The pre-LGM evolution of the Uummannaq ice Stream system in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David; Lane, Tim; Rea, Brice; Jamieson, Stewart

    2016-04-01

    Ice streams are a key component of an ice sheet system. They are fast flowing, dynamic corridors of ice that play a pivotal role in modulating ice flux from the interior of an ice sheet to its terrestrial or marine margin. The behaviour of marine-terminating ice streams in particular is critical in determining the dynamic (in)stability of ice sheets and ice/ocean interaction through time. However, despite an increase in palaeo-ice stream reconstructions and improvements in numerical modelling, in many instances we know little about the evolution of ice streams beyond the last glacial cycle. This is particularly true for topographically-guided or constrained ice stream systems that must represent the end-member state of a system that has developed over million year time scales. Recent research suggests that topographic focussing, subglacial geology, meltwater routing and calving margins are the primary controls on ice stream evolution. However, few studies have considered the combined role of geology, pre Quaternary landscapes and uplift in pre-conditioning a landscape for ice stream onset. This paper explores the factors that have controlled the evolution of the Uummannaq Ice Stream (UIS) system in West Greenland. During the last glacial cycle the UIS was a topographically-guided system, but the variables that led to ice stream onset prior to the Late Quaternary remain poorly understood. Geology, selective linear erosion and dynamic feedbacks were all important controls, but the influence of rifting, early uplift and pre-glacial topography in particular may have been pivotal controls on the evolution and location of the UIS onset zone.

  15. The Archean geology of the Godthabsfjord Region, southern west Greenland (includes excursion guide)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgregor, V. R.; Nutman, A. P.; Friend, C. R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The part of the West Greenland Archean gneiss complex centered around Godthabsfjord and extending from Isukasia in the north to south Faeringehavn is studied. Extensive outcrops of 3800 to 3400 Ma rocks can provide some direct evidence of conditions and processes that operated on the Earth in the early Archean. However, the ways in which primary characteristics have been modified by later deformation, metamorphism, and chemical changes are first taken into account. The rocks exposed are the products of two major phases of accretion of continental crust, at 3800 to 3700 Ma and 3100 to 29 Ma. The main features of these two accretion phases are similar, but careful study of the least modified rocks may reveal differences related to changes in the Earth in the intervening period. The combination of excellent exposure over an extensive area, relatively detailed geological mapping of much of the region, and a considerable volume of isotopic and other geochemical data gives special insights into processes that operated at moderately deep levels of the crust in the Archean. Of particular interest is the effect of late Archean granulite facies metamorphism on early Archean rocks, especially the extent to which isotope systems were disturbed. Similar processes may well have partly or wholly destroyed evidence of more ancient components of other high grade terrains. This account does not attempt to be an exhaustive review of all work carried out on the geology of the region. Rather, it attempts to summarize aspects of the geology and some interest in the context of early crustal genesis.

  16. Fatty Acid Composition of Muscle, Adipose Tissue and Liver from Muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) Living in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Alves, Susana P; Raundrup, Katrine; Cabo, Ângelo; Bessa, Rui J B; Almeida, André M

    2015-01-01

    Information about lipid content and fatty acid (FA) composition of muskoxen (Ovibos moschatos) edible tissues is very limited in comparison to other meat sources. Thus, this work aims to present the first in-depth characterization of the FA profile of meat, subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver of muskoxen living in West Greenland. Furthermore, we aim to evaluate the effect of sex in the FA composition of these edible tissues. Samples from muscle (Longissimus dorsi), subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver were collected from female and male muskoxen, which were delivered at the butchery in Kangerlussuaq (West Greenland) during the winter hunting season. The lipid content of muscle, adipose tissue and liver averaged 284, 846 and 173 mg/g of dry tissue, respectively. This large lipid contents confirms that in late winter, when forage availability is scarce, muskoxen from West Greenland still have high fat reserves, demonstrating that they are well adapted to seasonal feed restriction. A detailed characterization of FA and dimethylacetal composition of muskoxen muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver showed that there are little differences on FA composition between sexes. Nevertheless, the 18:1cis-9 was the most abundant FA in muscle and adipose tissue, reaching 43% of total FA in muscle. The high content of 18:1cis-9 suggests that it can be selectively stored in muskoxen tissues. Regarding the nutritional composition of muskoxen edible tissues, they are not a good source of polyunsaturated FA; however, they may contribute to a higher fat intake. Information about the FA composition of muskoxen meat and liver is scarce, so this work can contribute to the characterization of the nutritional fat properties of muskoxen edible tissues and can be also useful to update food composition databases. PMID:26678792

  17. Fatty Acid Composition of Muscle, Adipose Tissue and Liver from Muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) Living in West Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Susana P.; Raundrup, Katrine; Cabo, Ângelo; Bessa, Rui J. B.; Almeida, André M.

    2015-01-01

    Information about lipid content and fatty acid (FA) composition of muskoxen (Ovibos moschatos) edible tissues is very limited in comparison to other meat sources. Thus, this work aims to present the first in-depth characterization of the FA profile of meat, subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver of muskoxen living in West Greenland. Furthermore, we aim to evaluate the effect of sex in the FA composition of these edible tissues. Samples from muscle (Longissimus dorsi), subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver were collected from female and male muskoxen, which were delivered at the butchery in Kangerlussuaq (West Greenland) during the winter hunting season. The lipid content of muscle, adipose tissue and liver averaged 284, 846 and 173 mg/g of dry tissue, respectively. This large lipid contents confirms that in late winter, when forage availability is scarce, muskoxen from West Greenland still have high fat reserves, demonstrating that they are well adapted to seasonal feed restriction. A detailed characterization of FA and dimethylacetal composition of muskoxen muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver showed that there are little differences on FA composition between sexes. Nevertheless, the 18:1cis-9 was the most abundant FA in muscle and adipose tissue, reaching 43% of total FA in muscle. The high content of 18:1cis-9 suggests that it can be selectively stored in muskoxen tissues. Regarding the nutritional composition of muskoxen edible tissues, they are not a good source of polyunsaturated FA; however, they may contribute to a higher fat intake. Information about the FA composition of muskoxen meat and liver is scarce, so this work can contribute to the characterization of the nutritional fat properties of muskoxen edible tissues and can be also useful to update food composition databases. PMID:26678792

  18. Numerical Simulation and Sensitivity Analysis of Subglacial Meltwater Plumes: Implications for Ocean-Glacier Coupling in Rink Isbrae, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, D.; Sutherland, D.; Shroyer, E.; Nash, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The rate of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet quadrupled over the last two decades and may be due in part to changes in ocean heat transport to marine-terminating outlet glaciers. Meltwater commonly discharges at the grounding line in these outlet glacier fjords, generating a turbulent upwelling plume that separates from the glacier face when it reaches neutral density. This mechanism is the current paradigm for setting the magnitude of net heat transport in Greenland's glacial fjords. However, sufficient observations of meltwater plumes are not available to test the buoyancy-driven circulation hypothesis. Here, we use an ocean general circulation model (MITgcm) of the near-glacier field to investigate how plume water properties, terminal height, centerline velocity and volume transport depend on the initial conditions and numerical parameter choices in the model. These results are compared to a hydrodynamic mixing model (CORMIX), typically used in civil engineering applications. Experiments using stratification profiles from the continental shelf quantify the errors associated with using far-field observatons to initialize near-glacier plume models. The plume-scale model results are then integrated with a 3-D fjord-scale model of the Rink Isbrae glacier/fjord system in west Greenland. We find that variability in the near-glacier plume structure can strongly control the resulting fjord-scale circulation. The fjord model is forced with wind and tides to examine how oceanic and atmospheric forcing influence net heat transport to the glacier.

  19. 13. View of west entrance to central corridor of filtration ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of west entrance to central corridor of filtration bed building. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  20. INTERIOR FROM MEZZANINE LEVEL OF CENTRAL SECTION, VIEW FACING WEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR FROM MEZZANINE LEVEL OF CENTRAL SECTION, VIEW FACING WEST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Aircraft Storehouse, Between Midway & Card Streets at Enterprise Avenue intersection, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  1. 88. 451 MADISON AVENUE, LIBRARY, SOUTH WALL, WEST CENTRAL SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    88. 451 MADISON AVENUE, LIBRARY, SOUTH WALL, WEST CENTRAL SECTION SHOWING WINDOW AND RADIATOR (Pair with NY-5635-89) - Villard Houses, 451-457 Madison Avenue & 24 East Fifty-first Street, New York County, NY

  2. 9. Partial elevation of west side showing pillar, central and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Partial elevation of west side showing pillar, central and southern sections, from San Antonio Highway Bridge. - Puente Ferroviario San Antonio, Spanning San Antonio Channel at PR-1, San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  3. Central portion of front (south side) from west parking area ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Central portion of front (south side) from west parking area - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Main Hospital Building, Charlie Kelly Boulevard, North side, at intersection of Sharon A. Lane Drive, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Mechanisms that Amplify, Attenuate and Deviate Glacier Response to Climate Change in Central East Greenland. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiskoot, H.

    2013-12-01

    A multidecadal review of glacier fluctuations and case-studies of glacier processes and environments in central East Greenland will be used to demonstrate Mechanisms that Amplify, Attenuate and Deviate glacier response to climate forcings (MAAD). The different spatial and temporal scales at which MAAD affect mass balance and ice flow may complicate interpretation and longterm extrapolation of glacier response to climate change. A framework of MAAD characterisation and best-practice for interpreting climate signals while taking into account MAAD will be proposed. Glaciers in the Watkins Bjerge, Geikie Plateau and Stauning Alps regions of central East Greenland (68°-72°N) contain about 50000 km2 of glacierized area peripheral to the Greenland Ice Sheet. Within the region, large north-south and coast-inland climatic gradients, as well as complicated topography and glacier dynamics, result in discrepant glacier behaviour. Average retreat rates have doubled from about 2 to 4 km2 a-1 between the late 20th and early 21st centuries. However, glaciers terminating along the Atlantic coast display two times the retreat, thinning, and acceleration rates compared to glaciers terminating in inland fjords or on land. Despite similar climatic forcing variable glacier behaviour is apparent: individual glacier length change ranges from +57 m a-1 to -428 m a-1, though most retreat -20 to -100 m a-1. Interacting dynamic, mass balance and glacio-morphological mechanisms can amplify, attenuate or deviate glacier response (MAAD) to climate change, thus complicating the climatological interpretation of glacier length, area, and thickness changes. East Greenland MAAD include a range of common positive and negative feedback mechanisms in surface mass balance and terminus and subglacial boundary conditions affecting ice flow, but also mechanisms that have longterm or delayed effects. Certain MAAD may affect glacier change interpretation on multiple timescales: e.g. surging glaciers do not

  5. Automated Ground-based Time-lapse Camera Monitoring of West Greenland ice sheet outlet Glaciers: Challenges and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Y.; Box, J. E.; Balog, J.; Lewinter, A.

    2008-12-01

    Monitoring Greenland outlet glaciers using remotely sensed data has drawn a great attention in earth science communities for decades and time series analysis of sensory data has provided important variability information of glacier flow by detecting speed and thickness changes, tracking features and acquiring model input. Thanks to advancements of commercial digital camera technology and increased solid state storage, we activated automatic ground-based time-lapse camera stations with high spatial/temporal resolution in west Greenland outlet and collected one-hour interval data continuous for more than one year at some but not all sites. We believe that important information of ice dynamics are contained in these data and that terrestrial mono-/stereo-photogrammetry can provide theoretical/practical fundamentals in data processing along with digital image processing techniques. Time-lapse images over periods in west Greenland indicate various phenomenon. Problematic is rain, snow, fog, shadows, freezing of water on camera enclosure window, image over-exposure, camera motion, sensor platform drift, and fox chewing of instrument cables, and the pecking of plastic window by ravens. Other problems include: feature identification, camera orientation, image registration, feature matching in image pairs, and feature tracking. Another obstacle is that non-metric digital camera contains large distortion to be compensated for precise photogrammetric use. Further, a massive number of images need to be processed in a way that is sufficiently computationally efficient. We meet these challenges by 1) identifying problems in possible photogrammetric processes, 2) categorizing them based on feasibility, and 3) clarifying limitation and alternatives, while emphasizing displacement computation and analyzing regional/temporal variability. We experiment with mono and stereo photogrammetric techniques in the aide of automatic correlation matching for efficiently handling the enormous

  6. Seasonal and interannual variability of the West Greenland Current System in the Labrador Sea in 1993-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykova, Tatiana; Straneo, Fiammetta; Bower, Amy S.

    2015-02-01

    The West Greenland Current System (WGCS) transports heat and freshwater into the Labrador Sea, influencing the formation of Labrador Sea Water, a key component of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Notwithstanding its importance, relatively little is known about the structure and transport of this current system and its seasonal and interannual variability. Here we use historical hydrographic data from 1992 to 2008, combined with AVISO satellite altimetry, to diagnose the mean properties as well as seasonal and interannual variability of the boundary current system. We find that while the surface, fresh, cold West Greenland Current is amplified in summer, the subsurface warm, salty Irminger Current has maximum transport in winter, when its waters are also warmer and saltier. Seasonal changes in the total transport are thus mostly due to changes in the baroclinic structure of the current. By contrast, we find a trend toward warmer/saltier waters and a slowdown of the WGCS, within the period studied. The latter is attributed to changes in the barotropic component of the current. Superimposed on this trend, warm and salty anomalies transit through the system in 1997 and 2003 and are associated with a rapid increase in the transport of the boundary current due to changes in the baroclinic component. The boundary current changes precede similar changes in the interior with a 1-2 year lag, indicating that anomalies advected into the region by the boundary current can play an important role in the modulation of convection in the Labrador Sea.

  7. Regional sea level change in response to ice mass loss in Greenland, the West Antarctic and Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunnabend, S.-E.; Schröter, J.; Rietbroek, R.; Kusche, J.

    2015-11-01

    Besides the warming of the ocean, sea level is mainly rising due to land ice mass loss of the major ice sheets in Greenland, the West Antarctic, and the Alaskan Glaciers. However, it is not clear yet how these land ice mass losses influence regional sea level. Here, we use the global Finite Element Sea-ice Ocean Model (FESOM) to simulate sea surface height (SSH) changes caused by these ice mass losses and combine it with the passive ocean response to varying surface loading using the sea level equation. We prescribe rates of fresh water inflow, not only around Greenland, but also around the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and the mountain glaciers in Alaska with approximately present-day amplitudes of 200, 100, and 50 Gt/yr, respectively. Perturbations in sea level and in freshwater distribution with respect to a reference simulation are computed for each source separately and in their combination. The ocean mass change shows an almost globally uniform behavior. In the North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean, mass is redistributed toward coastal regions. Steric sea level change varies locally in the order of several centimeters on advective timescales of decades. Steric effects to local sea level differ significantly in different coastal locations, e.g., at North American coastal regions the steric effects may have the same order of magnitude as the mass driven effect, whereas at the European coast, steric effects remain small during the simulation period.

  8. Solar forcing as an important trigger for West Greenland sea-ice variability over the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Longbin; Jiang, Hui; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Muscheler, Raimund; Zhang, Xu; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; Olsen, Jesper; Knudsen, Karen Luise; Zhang, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Arctic sea ice represents an important component of the climate system, and the present reduction of sea ice in the Arctic is of major concern. Despite its importance, little is known about past changes in sea-ice cover and the underlying forcing mechanisms. Here, we use diatom assemblages from a marine sediment core collected from the West Greenland shelf to reconstruct changes in sea-ice cover over the last millennium. The proxy-based reconstruction demonstrates a generally strong link between changes in sea-ice cover and solar variability during the last millennium. Weaker (or stronger) solar forcing may result in the increase (or decrease) in sea-ice cover west of Greenland. In addition, model simulations show that variations in solar activity not only affect local sea-ice formation, but also control the sea-ice transport from the Arctic Ocean through a sea-ice-ocean-atmosphere feedback mechanism. The role of solar forcing, however, appears to have been more ambiguous during an interval around AD 1500, after the transition from the Medieval Climate Anomaly to the Little Ice Age, likely to be driven by a range of factors.

  9. Comparative Carbon and Water Relations of Betula nana and Poa pratensis in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahoon, S. M. P.; Sullivan, P. F.; Welker, J. M.; Post, E.

    2014-12-01

    The expansion of woody shrubs throughout much of the Arctic in recent decades is a common observation in response to climate change. However, we lack a complete understanding of how woody shrubs differ physiologically from neighboring species and how these differences may confer competitive advantages to woody shrubs as the climate continues to change. At a site in West Greenland, we combined detailed leaf physiological measurements with stable isotope analysis of plant leaf material, xylem water and soil water to elucidate the processes governing seasonal carbon (C) gain in the two dominant plant species at our study site: Betula nana and Poa pratensis. We hypothesized that cooler, drier soils beneath the Betula canopy would result in greater drought sensitivity during times of high atmospheric demand (i.e. greater water vapor pressure deficit; VPD), which would manifest in reduced leaf carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13C), reduced stomatal conductance (gs) and a negative relationship between leaf Δ13C and Δ18O in accordance with the dual-isotope conceptual model. Data collected over two consecutive growing seasons, however, revealed greater drought sensitivity in Poa, which displayed a dramatic reduction in Amax and gs during periods of high VPD, along with reduced leaf Δ13C. Additionally, leaf Δ13C and Δ18O were negatively correlated in Poa, suggesting strong stomatal influence on Δ13C. Conversely, we found no relationship between leaf Δ13C and Δ18O in Betula, indicating that seasonal variation in Δ13C may have been driven primarily by changes in photosynthesis. Our results suggest that, although Poa maintains greater average leaf-level photosynthesis, this species is more susceptible to drought than Betula. Meanwhile, it may be that Betula employs a strategy to avoid drought stress and maintain steady, yet conservative, C gain. This strategy may enable growth to continue during warm and dry conditions, conferring a competitive advantage for Betula in

  10. Regime Change of Ice Draft in Nares Strait to the West of Greenland 2003 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, P. A.; Muenchow, A.; Huntley, H.

    2014-12-01

    The last of remaining multi-year ice exits the Arctic Ocean via Nares Strait to the west of northern Greenland. Measuring ice draft and velocity directly, we maintained moored sensors in Nares Strait from 2003 through 2009. Two ice profiling sonars measured acoustic travel times from about 100-m depth to the bottom of the sea ice. Estimates of ice draft result, if vertically averaged density, speed of sound, and depth of the sensor are known. We use concurrently measured temperature, salinity, and pressure at nearby mooring locations for those properties at daily time scales. Sensitivity tests reveal that our ice draft estimates are accurate to within 0.1 m. With ice drafts sampled at 15 second intervals, we construct ice draft probability density functions to define ice categories and to compare these at inter-annual and seasonal time sales. Categories are open water (no ice), thin ice (< 0.5 m), first year ice (0.5- 2 m; FYI), multi year ice (>2 m; MYI). FYI dominated the ice draft distribution from 2003 to 2006 when it was observed about half of the time. It diminished to ~20% from 2006 to 2009 when much FYI was replaced by a combination of thin ice and MYI. We interpret this finding as a transition towards a more dynamic and advective ice regime in Nares Strait. At seasonal time scales we found the largest ice drafts always during the period prior to prolonged periods of zero ice velocity, that is, the onset of landfast ice conditions. The duration of this landfast season reduced from more than 180 days per year on average for the 2003-06 period to less than 20 days per year on average for the 2006-09 period. Implications on ice flux are profound as the transition from landfast to mobile ice conditions enhances both local wind forcing, local ice formation (thin ice), and ice export. We emphasize that this transition precedes the record setting Arctic ice minimum in the summer of 2007.

  11. Exploring controls on ice stream destabilisation during the LGM/Holocene transition in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D. H.; Lane, T. P.; Rea, B. R.; Ó Cofaigh, C.; Jamieson, S.; Vieli, A.

    2015-12-01

    Deglacial chronologies from West Greenland enable investigation of the role of climate and topography in controlling ice stream dynamics. The Uummannaq ice stream system (UIS) in particular has a comprehensive deglacial chronology which, when coupled with geometry, provides a framework for exploring controls on ice stream dynamics under changing climatic conditions. Here, we use a 2D numerical model to simulate grounding line-retreat behaviour and surface thinning in order explore the principal drivers of linear and non-linear ice stream behaviour during the end of the last glacial cycle. Deglaciation of the UIS began on the outer shelf at ~14.8 ka with ice retreat eastward to Ubekendt Ejland by ~12.4 ka. This initial retreat coincided with increasing air temperature, increasing solar radiation and sea-level rise. Awide, mid-shelf, trough also facilitated rapid retreat. The UIS then withdrew eastward ~ 100 km by ~11.4 ka - 10.8 ka as the northern and southern feeder zones unzipped. This coincided with increasing insolation and peak sea-level, but bathymetric over-deepening and fjord widening were also influential. Staircases of lateral moraines throughout the region point to step-wise thinning as ice retreated between 14.8 - 11.0 ka. By 8.7 ka the southern arm of the UIS had reached Store Gletscher and thereafter it retreated beyond the present day grounding line. This coincided with increased air/ocean temperatures and peak summer insolation. In contrast, the northern arm of the UIS stabilised until ~6.5 ka and became unresponsive to both atmospheric and ocean forcing due to topographic pinning. New research has adopted a 2D model approach to establish and quantify the relative importance of various mechanisms in governing UIS dynamics. These model results indicate that the non-linear retreat of the UIS is strongly influenced by vertical and lateral constrictions in the marine trough system which regulates grounding line stability. In turn, grounding line

  12. Measurements of supraglacial lake drainage and surface streams over West Greenland and effects on ice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedesco, M.; Willis, I. C.; Alexander, P. M.; Banwell, A. F.

    2011-12-01

    During the summer of 2011 we measured the filling and draining of two surface lakes in the Paakitsoq region of the West Greenland Ice Sheet (49.79 W, 69.57 N), together with the level of streams flowing into the basins feeding the lakes. We also used GPS to record the horizontal and vertical movement of the ice sheet surface at five locations surrounding the lakes for a two week period (overlapping the draining of the two lakes). In this talk we report results concerning the processes of lake filling and draining between the two lakes. 'Lake Half Moon', with a smaller catchment area, filled slowly at a steady rate over several days, then drained gradually over a 24 hour period as an existing moulin located outside the bottom of the lake became active; the lake level continued to drop very slowly over the remaining week as the surface stream leading from the lake to the moulin incised. 'Lake Ponting', with the larger catchment area, filled more rapidly and at an accelerating rate as depressions upstream of the lake filled with water, overflowed and delivered increasing volumes of water to the lake. Lake Ponting drained by hydrofracture following a particularly rapid rise in water level, generating a new ~ 800m long extensional crevasse on the ice sheet surface. The entire ~ 3 x 106 m3 lake drained within a few hours. For the Lake Pointing, we show, for the first time, a movie of the lake draining, showing many features that we observed right after its drainage. The rate of lake level lowering during the drainage varied; initially moderately rapid while the fractures formed and accommodated the water, then exceptionally rapid as the fractures reached the bed allowing the lake to drain completely. The analysis of the GPS data suggest that the different styles of lake draining affect the vertical and horizontal movement of the ice sheet in different ways. We also anticipate that the effect of the draining of Lake Ponting was affecting the GPS sensors in a different

  13. Coeval dust accumulation minima in Greenland and East Central Europe over 31-23 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Újvári, Gábor; Stevens, Thomas; Varga, György; Kovács, János; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    As reflected in δ18O values in ice cores, the North Atlantic area experienced a series of abrupt, dramatic climatic fluctuations over the last glacial during which oceanic and atmospheric conditions alternated between full glacial (stadial) and relatively mild (interstadial) conditions [1,2]. Beyond the δ18O profiles, calcium ion concentration data (hereafter [Ca2+]) also exhibit particularly clear stadial/interstadial contrasts [3]. The Ca2+/dust concentration records are considered as a proxy for the amount of terrestrial dust reaching the ice sheet [4] and/or changing dust storm activity in the source areas around the Northern Hemisphere, mainly in East Asia [5,6]. The mode of the dust size distributions is thought to reflect transit times during transport, with larger modes indicating shorter transit times and transport routes, i.e. changed atmospheric circulation patterns [5]. However, based on clay mineralogy and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of loess sediments Újvári, et al. [7] suggested that Central European dust cannot be excluded as a potential source of Greenland dust. As such, it is vital to analyze dust deposition in the key dust depocentres of Eastern Europe. As a record of Carpathian Basin dust source activity, we therefore studied loess sedimentation and grain size changes in the Dunaszekcsö loess sequence in Southern Hungary. For this record, we developed the highest resolution geochronological dataset for European loess based on 61 AMS 14C dates from molluscs and charcoal fragments. This allowed us to establish a uniquely high precision Bayesian age-depth model, with the mean 95% confidence ranges that vary between 119 and 798 yr. Sedimentation rates (SR) calculated from the age-depth model vary between 0.36-1.7 mm yr‑1 and the estimated bulk dust mass accumulation rates (MAR) range from 551 to 2525 g m‑2 yr‑1. Both the SR and MAR display millennial/sub-millennial scale variations, visible uniquely due to the high precision dating

  14. Hydrogeochemistry of Groundwater as Part of the Greenland Analogue Project in an Area of Continuous Permafrost Adjacent to the Greenland Ice Sheet, Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkemans, E.; Frape, S.; Ruskeeniemi, T.; Claesson-Liljedahl, L.; Lehtinen, A.; Annable, W. K.

    2011-12-01

    Studying groundwater in areas of continuous permafrost is often limited to studies of springs and open pingos (eg. Pollard et al. 1999 and Allen et al. 1976). Boreholes in such locations are expensive, risky and logistically challenging (eg. Stotler et al. 2011) resulting in a limited understanding of the interaction between continental scale ice sheets and groundwater. Continental ice sheet models are often coupled to groundwater flow systems; however, there is a lack of modern field data with which to compare the results of models and their treatment of groundwater flow systems under the influence of glaciation. The Greenland Analogue Project (GAP) aims to eliminate some of the uncertainties in modeling ice sheets by using the Greenland ice sheet as a modern analogue for past glaciations. Since 2009, 3 boreholes have been drilled, 2 of which contain sampling systems. DH-GAP01 is a 191 m deep borehole drilled at an angle into a talik and has been sampled and studied since 2009. DH-GAP04 is a 632 m deep, angled borehole that intersects the groundwater flow system directly beneath Isunguata Sermia and is producing preliminary groundwater samples. Additional information on groundwater in the Kangerlussuaq area comes from a spring located directly in front of the Leverett ice lobe. Geochemical and isotopic (δ18O, δ2H, δ37Cl, 87Sr/86Sr, and δ34S and δ18O of SO4) tools are used to interpret geochemical processes acting on groundwaters and provide insight into groundwater flow. Analyses of δ18O and δ2H in groundwaters from DH-GAP01 show the borehole waters fall along the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL). Evaporation is an important process affecting the δ18O-δ2H of surface waters in the region causing lakes to plot along a local evaporation line (Leng and Anderson, 2003). The waters from the Leverett spring plot to the right of the GMWL as possibly a mixture of groundwater and surface evaporated fluids. However, both the waters from DH-GAP01 and the Leverett

  15. 3. VIEW OF CENTRAL AVENUE LOOKING WEST FROM JUST EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF CENTRAL AVENUE LOOKING WEST FROM JUST EAST OF THE INTERSECTION OF CENTRAL AVENUE AND THE EAST PERIMETER ROAD. THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT IS ABOUT 16 MILES NORTHWEST OF DENVER ON A PLATEAU AT THE EASTERN EDGE OF THE FRONT RANGE OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS. - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  16. A diatom-based sea-ice reconstruction of the last 5000 years in Vaigat Strait, Disko Bugt, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Longbin; Jiang, Hui; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Luise Knudsen, Karen; Olsen, Jesper; Kuijpers, Antoon; Liu, Yanguang

    2013-04-01

    Sea ice is a major component of the climate system, because it influences the planetary albedo and the exchanges of heat, moisture and gases between the ocean and the atmosphere. Thus, sea ice is a key parameter in atmospheric and ocean models assessing future climate change. However, observed reliable data on sea-ice cover, such as satellite data, are only available as far back as 30 years with the exception of records from ship logs, which are sporadic and irregular. To obtain longer time series of Arctic SIC, microfossils such as diatoms and dinoflagellate cysts are commonly used. We have developed a diatom-based sea-ice concentration (SIC) transfer function using 72 surface samples from west of Greenland and around Iceland, and through comparison with the associated modern SIC. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) on surface sediment diatoms and monthly average of SIC reveals that April SIC is the most important environmental factor controlling the distribution of diatoms in the area, and permits the development of a diatom-based SIC transfer function. The consistency between reconstructed SIC based on diatoms from West Greenland core GA306-BC4 and the instrumental and documentary data during the last ~75 years demonstrates that the diatom-based SIC reconstruction is reliable for studying the palaeoceanography off West Greenland. Based on the diatom record from a 446 cm long gravity core DA06-139G, collected from Vaigat Strait in Disko Bugt (water depth 384 m), the reconstructed April SIC varies between 40 and 70% with a mean value around 55% over the last 5000 years. Relatively warm conditions with strong influence of the IC are indicated for the early part of the record (~5000-3860 cal. yr BP), corresponding in time to the latest part of the Holocene Thermal Maximum. The April SIC oscillated around the mean value between 3860 and 1510 cal. yr BP and was above mean afterwards, particularly during the time interval 1510-1120 cal. yr BP and after 650 cal. yr

  17. Variations of the glacio-marine air mass front in West Greenland through water vapor isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopec, B. G.; Lauder, A. M.; Posmentier, E. S.; Feng, X.

    2012-12-01

    While the isotopic distribution of precipitation has been widely used for research in hydrology, paleoclimatology, and ecology for decades, intensive isotopic studies of atmospheric water vapor has only recently been made possible by spectral-based technology. New instrumentation based on this technology opens up many opportunities to investigate short-term atmospheric dynamics involving the water cycle and moisture transport. We deployed a Los Gatos Water Vapor Isotope Analyzer (WVIA) at Kangerlussuaq, Greenland from July 21 to August 15, and measured the water vapor concentration and its isotopic ratios continuously at 10s intervals. A Danish Meteorological Institute site is located about 1 km from the site of the deployment, and meteorological data is collected at 30 min intervals. During the observation period, the vapor concentration of the ambient air ranges from 5608.4 to 11189.4 ppm; dD and d18O range from -254.5 to -177.7 ‰ and -34.2 to -23.2 ‰, respectively. The vapor content (dew point) and the isotopic ratios are both strongly controlled by the wind direction. The easterly winds are associated with dry, isotopically depleted air masses formed over the glacier, while westerly winds are associated with moist and isotopically enriched air masses from the marine/fjord surface. This region typically experiences katabatic winds off of the ice sheet to the east. However, during some afternoons, the wind shifts 180 degrees, blowing off the fjord to the west. This wind switch marks the onset of a sea breeze, and significant isotopic enrichment results. Enrichment in deuterium is up to 60 ‰ with a mean of 15‰, and oxygen-18 is enriched by 3‰ on average and up to 8 ‰. Other afternoons have no change in wind, and only small changes in humidity and vapor isotopic ratios. The humidity and isotopic variations suggest the local atmosphere circulation is dominated by relatively high-pressure systems above the cold glaciers and cool sea surface, and diurnal

  18. Origin of Mesoarchaean arc-related rocks with boninite/komatiite affinities from southern West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilas, Kristoffer; Næraa, Tomas; Scherstén, Anders; Stendal, Henrik; Frei, Robert; van Hinsberg, Vincent J.; Kokfelt, Thomas F.; Rosing, Minik T.

    2012-07-01

    We report whole-rock elemental and Sm-Nd isotope geochemical data from mafic-ultramafic supracrustal rocks from the Nunatak 1390 area in southern West Greenland. Additionally, we report the metamorphic temperature history for these rocks as derived from tourmaline thermometry on a tourmalinite inlier, as well as in situ U-Pb, Hf and O isotopic data from zircons extracted from tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) gneisses that intruded the mafic-ultramafic sequence. The supracrustal rocks from the Nunatak 1390 area have a minimum age of c. 2900 Ma defined by U-Pb zircon ages of cross-cutting aplite sheets of TTG composition. The supracrustal sequence comprises mafic rocks with pillow structures and ultramafic rocks with no evidence of their protolith. They all have amphibolite-facies mineral assemblages and a peak metamorphic temperature of approximately 550 °C. The mafic sequence has relatively flat trace element patterns (LaN/SmN of 0.70-2.4) and mostly negative Nb-anomalies (Nb/Nb* of 0.30-1.0) and resembles modern island arc tholeiites. The mafic sequence can be divided into a high- and low-Ti group, where the former group has lower MgO, and significantly higher contents of incompatible elements such as TiO2, P2O5, Zr, Nb and Th. The ultramafic rocks have major and trace element compositions similar to Ti-enriched/Karasjok-type komatiites described in the literature. However, there are no textural indications that the ultramafic rocks from Nunatak 1390 are komatiites sensu stricto. The low-Ti group of the mafic sequence appears to have been derived from a N-MORB source, whereas the high-Ti group and the ultramafic rocks appear to have been derived from a mantle source that is more enriched than the N-MORB source. However, there is no difference in the initial ɛNd of the mafic and ultramafic rocks. Additionally, assimilation-fractional-crystallisation (AFC) modelling is consistent with this enrichment being caused by introduction of juvenile low

  19. Longitudinal Inter-Comparison of Modeled and Measured West Greenland Ice Sheet Meltwater Runoff Losses (2004-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, S.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Tedesco, M.; Mote, T. L.; Koenig, L.; Smith, L. C.; Hagedorn, B.; Overeem, I.; Sletten, R. S.; Mikkelsen, A. B.; Hasholt, B.; Hall, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Increased surface meltwater runoff, that exits the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) margin via supra-, en-, and sub-glacial drainage networks into fjords, pro-glacial lakes and rivers, accounts for half or more of total mass loss. Despite its importance, modeled meltwater runoff fluxes are poorly constrained, primarily due to a lack of direct in situ observations. Here, we present the first ever longitudinal (north-south) inter-comparison of a multi-year dataset (2004-2014) of discharge for four drainage basins - Watson, Akuliarusiarsuup Kuua, Naujat Kuat, and North Rivers - along West Greenland. These in situ hydrologic measurements are compared with modeled runoff output from Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR) regional climate model, and the performance of the model is examined. An analysis of the relationship between modeled and actual ice sheet runoff patterns is assessed, and provides insight into the model's ability to capture inter-annual and intra-annual variability, spatiotemporal patterns, and extreme melt events. This study's findings will inform future development and parameterization of ice sheet surface mass balance models.

  20. Bathymetry data reveal glaciers vulnerable to ice-ocean interaction in Uummannaq and Vaigat glacial fjords, west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, E.; Fenty, I.; Xu, Y.; Cai, C.; Velicogna, I.; Cofaigh, C. Ó.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Weinrebe, W.; Catania, G.; Duncan, D.

    2016-03-01

    Marine-terminating glaciers play a critical role in controlling Greenland's ice sheet mass balance. Their frontal margins interact vigorously with the ocean, but our understanding of this interaction is limited, in part, by a lack of bathymetry data. Here we present a multibeam echo sounding survey of 14 glacial fjords in the Uummannaq and Vaigat fjords, west Greenland, which extends from the continental shelf to the glacier fronts. The data reveal valleys with shallow sills, overdeepenings (>1300 m) from glacial erosion, and seafloor depths 100-1000 m deeper than in existing charts. Where fjords are deep enough, we detect the pervasive presence of warm, salty Atlantic Water (AW) (>2.5°C) with high melt potential, but we also find numerous glaciers grounded on shallow (<200 m) sills, standing in cold (<1°C) waters in otherwise deep fjords, i.e., with reduced melt potential. Bathymetric observations extending to the glacier fronts are critical to understand the glacier evolution.

  1. Modelling calving front dynamics using a level-set method: application to Jakobshavn Isbræ, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondzio, Johannes H.; Seroussi, Hélène; Morlighem, Mathieu; Kleiner, Thomas; Rückamp, Martin; Humbert, Angelika; Larour, Eric Y.

    2016-03-01

    Calving is a major mechanism of ice discharge of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets, and a change in calving front position affects the entire stress regime of marine terminating glaciers. The representation of calving front dynamics in a 2-D or 3-D ice sheet model remains non-trivial. Here, we present the theoretical and technical framework for a level-set method, an implicit boundary tracking scheme, which we implement into the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). This scheme allows us to study the dynamic response of a drainage basin to user-defined calving rates. We apply the method to Jakobshavn Isbræ, a major marine terminating outlet glacier of the West Greenland Ice Sheet. The model robustly reproduces the high sensitivity of the glacier to calving, and we find that enhanced calving triggers significant acceleration of the ice stream. Upstream acceleration is sustained through a combination of mechanisms. However, both lateral stress and ice influx stabilize the ice stream. This study provides new insights into the ongoing changes occurring at Jakobshavn Isbræ and emphasizes that the incorporation of moving boundaries and dynamic lateral effects, not captured in flow-line models, is key for realistic model projections of sea level rise on centennial timescales.

  2. Gravity Data for west-central Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-04-06

    Modeled Bouger Gravity data was extracted from the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies Gravity Database of the U.S. at http://irpsrvgis08.utep.edu/viewers/Flex/GravityMagnetic/GravityMagnetic_CyberShare/ on 2/29/2012. The downloaded text file was opened in an Excel spreadsheet. This spreadsheet data was then converted into an ESRI point shapefile in UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection, showing location and gravity (in milligals). This data was then converted to grid and then contoured using ESRI Spatial Analyst. This dataset contains the original spreadsheet data, a point shapefile showing gravity station locations and Bouger gravity, and a line shapefile showing 1 milligal contours. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Gravity Contour Shapefile Extent: West -108.366690 East -105.478730 North 40.932318 South 36.961606 Gravity Point Shapefile Extent: West -108.366692 East -105.478847 North 40.932361 South 36.961606 Data from From University of Texas: Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies

  3. The metamorphic record of subduction-accretion processes in the Neoarchaean: the Nuuk region, southern West Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziggel, Annika; Kolb, Jochen

    2013-04-01

    The Nuuk region of southern West Greenland exposes an exceptionally well preserved section through Archaean mid- to lower continental crust, and therefore provides a natural laboratory to study the tectonic processes in the Archaean. The area mainly consists of amphibolite to granulite facies TTG gneisses, narrow supracrustal belts, and minor late-tectonic granites. It is made up of several distinct terranes, including, from NW to SE, the Færingehavn, Tre Brødre, and Tasiusarsuaq terranes. Extensive high-grade metamorphism and a clockwise PT evolution of the Færingehavn terrane in the Neoarchaean (2.72-2.71 Ga) have been interpreted as a result of crustal thickening and thrusting of the Tasiusarsuaq terrane on top of the Tre Brødre and Færingehavn terranes (Nutman and Friend, 2007). Prior to final collision, the Tasiusarsuaq terrane (the upper plate in a plate tectonic model) underwent a prolonged period of compressive deformation between 2.8 and 2.72 Ga (Kolb et al., 2012). The structural evolution was associated with near-isobaric cooling from medium-pressure granulite facies conditions of ca. 850°C and 7.5 kbar to amphibolite facies conditions of ca. 700°C and 6.5-7 kbar (Dziggel et al., 2012). Despite this long period of crustal convergence, there is no evidence for exhumation and/or loading, pointing to a rheologically weak and unstable Archaean crust perhaps due to low density differences and ongoing melt extraction. Rocks of the structurally underlying Færingehavn terrane record a distinctly different metamorphic evolution. Although generally more strongly retrogressed, relict higher-pressure mineral assemblages in mafic granulites and felsic gneisses record conditions of > 8-9 kbar and >= 750°C, indicating burial to depths of at least 30 km along an apparent geothermal gradient of 20-25°C/km. The peak of metamorphism was followed by isothermal decompression at ca. 2.715 Ga (Nutman and Friend, 2007), indicating rapid exhumation of lower crustal

  4. Holocene temperature history at the west Greenland Ice Sheet margin reconstructed from lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, Y.; Losee, S.; Briner, J. P.; Francis, D.; Langdon, P. G.; Walker, I.

    2011-12-01

    Paleoclimate proxy data can help reduce uncertainties regarding how the Greenland Ice Sheet, and thus global sea level, will respond to future climate change. Studies of terrestrial deposits along Greenland's margins offer opportunities to reconstruct both past temperature changes and the associated changes in Greenland Ice Sheet extent, thus empirically characterizing the ice sheet's response to temperature change. Here we present Holocene paleoclimate reconstructions developed from sediment records of five lakes along the western ice sheet margin, near Jakobshavn Isbræ and Disko Bugt. Insect (Chironomidae, or non-biting midge) remains from North Lake provide quantitative estimates of summer temperatures over the past ca. 7500 years at multi-centennial resolution, and changes in sediment composition at all five lakes offer evidence for glacier fluctuations, changes in lake productivity, and other environmental changes throughout the Holocene. Aims of this study include quantification of warmth in the early to mid Holocene, when summer solar insolation forcing exceeded present-day values at northern latitudes and the local Greenland Ice Sheet margin receded inboard of its present position, and the magnitude of subsequent Neoglacial and Little Ice Age cooling that drove ice sheet expansion. We find that the Jakobshavn Isbrae region experienced the warmest temperatures of the Holocene (with summers 2 to 3.5 degrees C warmer than present) between ~6000 and 4000 years ago. Neoglacial cooling began rather abruptly ~4000 years ago and intensified 3000 years ago. Our proxy data suggest that the coldest summers of the Holocene occurred during the 18th and 19th centuries in the Jakobshavn region. These results agree well with previous glacial geologic studies reconstructing local ice margin positions through the Holocene. Such reconstructions of paleoclimate and past ice sheet extent provide targets for testing and improving ice sheet models.

  5. Using Coastal Ice Cap Records to Investigate Maritime Climate and Ice Sheet Processes in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. B.; Evans, M. J.; Frey, K. E.; Osman, M. B.; Smith, B. E.; Stevens, L. A.; Trusel, L. D.; York, A.; Bingham, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent changes, including outlet glacier retreat and speedup, and increased rates of surface melting, have dramatically increased the Greenland ice sheet contribution to sea-level rise over the past few decades. Increasingly studies point towards the influence of coupled ocean-ice processes in modulating Greenland ice sheet mass balance and glacier behavior in response to climate change, but many of these studies are limited to the past few years to decades, restricting our ability to understand these ocean-ice relationships over longer time periods. Ice core records have the potential to provide unique, high-resolution records of interest (e.g. accumulation and melt variability, as well as contemporaneous proxy records of regional air temperature and sea surface conditions), but suitable Greenland ice sheet coring regions are often located far inland (>200 km) from many maritime regions of interest. In this study we focus on new records from previously unstudied maritime ice caps (10-30 km from the coast) to reconstruct past environmental conditions in the Disko, Ummannaq and Baffin Bay regions. Here we present results from our recent 2014 field investigation of three high altitude ice caps (1300-2000 m) on Disko Island and the Nuussuaq Peninsula, as well as complementary results from two sites in the western ice sheet accumulation zone. Geophysical observations provide constraints on ice thickness, layering, and ice flow. Physical and chemical stratigraphic observations from snow pits and shallow firn cores are used to reconstruct recent accumulation rate and melt variability, as well as to develop and test environmental proxy relationships over the satellite era. Multi-century records from longer coastal ice cores, to be drilled in 2015, will contribute a key missing component to the existing observational record documenting ice, ocean and atmospheric changes in this region over a time period of dramatic change in Greenland ice sheet behavior (retreat and

  6. Hydrocarbon accumulations of Mississippian Berea sandstone in west-central West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.L. )

    1988-08-01

    The Berea Sandstone is a widely recognized producer of oil and gas in the Appalachian basin. Subsurface mapping, core analysis, and production data from producing wells have been evaluated in west-central West Virginia, where the Berea Sandstone represents a wide range of nearshore and coastal environments. Fluvial system deposits are found in southern Jackson County as channel sands (Gay-Fink) and adjacent deltaic facies. Coastal sediments were deposited to the north as intertidal shoals, tidal flats, and coarse-grained tidal-creek point bars. Marine shelf sands are found to the west.

  7. 15. View west of central corridor between filtration beds which ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. View west of central corridor between filtration beds which are located to the left and right of the photograph. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  8. 16. View west from center of central corridor between filtration ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. View west from center of central corridor between filtration beds which are located to the left and right of the photograph. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  9. 12. DETAIL OF WEST END OF CENTRAL ATLAS CONTROL CONSOLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL OF WEST END OF CENTRAL ATLAS CONTROL CONSOLE IN SLC-3W CONTROL ROOM SHOWING LAUNCH CONDUCTOR AND ASSISTANT LAUNCH CONDUCTOR PANELS - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  10. Enterobacteriaceae isolated from iguanid lizards of west-central Texas.

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, J J

    1979-01-01

    The prevalence of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae in the intestines of seven species of iguanid lizards native to west-central Texas was determined. Of the 67 lizard specimens examined, 48.7% were infected with Salmonella and 9% were infected with Salmonella arizonae. Two lizard species (Sceloporus olivaceus and Crotaphytus collaris) were shown to have a 100% prevalence of Salmonella. PMID:533273

  11. 3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH WEST OVER CENTRAL ATLANTIC WITH ATLANTIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH WEST OVER CENTRAL ATLANTIC WITH ATLANTIC OCEAN IN THE FOREGROUND. DENNIS HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL, AND MARLBOROUGH HOTEL (LEFT TO RIGHT) ARE LOCATED IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THE CLARIDGE HOTEL IS THE HIGHRISE IMMEDIATELY TO THE RIGHT OF THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  12. 4. VIEW LOOKING WEST DOWN CENTRAL AVENUE AT THE INTERSECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW LOOKING WEST DOWN CENTRAL AVENUE AT THE INTERSECTION WITH SEVENTH STREET. THE PLANT HAS MOST OF THE AMENITIES OF A SMALL TOWN - WATER SUPPLY, WASTE WATER TREATMENT, POLICE FORCE, FIRE DEPARTMENT, FOOD SERVICES, HOSPITAL, COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK, STEAM GENERATION, VEHICLE MAINTENANCE, TRANSPORTATION, AND A GOVERNMENT. - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  13. Coeval dust accumulation minima in Greenland and East Central Europe over 31-23 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Újvári, Gábor; Stevens, Thomas; Varga, György; Kovács, János; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    As reflected in δ18O values in ice cores, the North Atlantic area experienced a series of abrupt, dramatic climatic fluctuations over the last glacial during which oceanic and atmospheric conditions alternated between full glacial (stadial) and relatively mild (interstadial) conditions [1,2]. Beyond the δ18O profiles, calcium ion concentration data (hereafter [Ca2+]) also exhibit particularly clear stadial/interstadial contrasts [3]. The Ca2+/dust concentration records are considered as a proxy for the amount of terrestrial dust reaching the ice sheet [4] and/or changing dust storm activity in the source areas around the Northern Hemisphere, mainly in East Asia [5,6]. The mode of the dust size distributions is thought to reflect transit times during transport, with larger modes indicating shorter transit times and transport routes, i.e. changed atmospheric circulation patterns [5]. However, based on clay mineralogy and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of loess sediments Újvári, et al. [7] suggested that Central European dust cannot be excluded as a potential source of Greenland dust. As such, it is vital to analyze dust deposition in the key dust depocentres of Eastern Europe. As a record of Carpathian Basin dust source activity, we therefore studied loess sedimentation and grain size changes in the Dunaszekcsö loess sequence in Southern Hungary. For this record, we developed the highest resolution geochronological dataset for European loess based on 61 AMS 14C dates from molluscs and charcoal fragments. This allowed us to establish a uniquely high precision Bayesian age-depth model, with the mean 95% confidence ranges that vary between 119 and 798 yr. Sedimentation rates (SR) calculated from the age-depth model vary between 0.36-1.7 mm yr‑1 and the estimated bulk dust mass accumulation rates (MAR) range from 551 to 2525 g m‑2 yr‑1. Both the SR and MAR display millennial/sub-millennial scale variations, visible uniquely due to the high precision dating

  14. The crustal structure of central East Greenland-II: From the Precambrian shield to the recent mid-oceanic ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Aursch, Mechita C.; Jokat, Wilfried

    2005-02-01

    We present a 3-D crustal model of the East Greenland Fjord Region between 69°N and 74°N. The model covers the Precambrian shield and the Caledonian orogenic belt, the adjoining Devonian and Mesozoic basins, the continent-ocean transition and the Cenozoic oceanic areas as far as the Kolbeinsey and the Mohns mid-oceanic ridges. Existing seismic models of the crustal structure are extrapolated into adjacent areas using 3-D gravity modelling. For this purpose, we compile a new regional-scale Bouguer anomaly map. The Precambrian shield, west of the Caledonian orogen (approximately west of 32°W), shows a mean thickness of 35 km with only small-scale undulations. This thickness is at the lower limit of the global range in shield thickness. The Caledonian orogen exhibits a pronounced mountain root with overall crustal thicknesses up to 51 km. Beside the Urals, the East Greenland Caledonides are one of the two Palaeozoic mountain belts where a crustal root has preserved to the present day. Continuation of the crustal model to the east, beyond the continent-ocean transition, yielded thicknesses of the crystalline oceanic crust from 9 km near the Kolbeinsey Ridge to 3 km west of the Mohns Ridge. Differences in the thermal structures of the old continental and the young oceanic lithosphere are responsible for the low-density mantle beneath the oceanic crust, which is also demonstrated by 3-D gravity modelling.

  15. Middle to late Holocene fluctuations of the Vindue glacier, an outlet glacier of the Greenland Ice Sheet, central East Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, L.; Hammer, S. K.; Kelly, M. A.; Lowell, T. V.; Hall, B. L.; Howley, J. A.; Wilcox, P.; Medford, A.

    2014-12-01

    The margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet are currently responding to present-day climate changes. Determining how the ice sheet margins have responded to past climate changes provides a means to understand how they may respond in the future. Here we present a multi-proxy record used to reconstruct the Holocene fluctuations of the Vindue glacier, an ice sheet outlet glacier in eastern Greenland. Lake sediment cores from Qiviut lake (informal name), located ~0.75 km from the present-day Vindue glacier margin contain a sharp transition from medium sand/coarse silt to laminated gyttja just prior to 6,340±130 cal yr BP. We interpret this transition to indicate a time when the Vindue glacier retreated sufficiently to cease glacial sedimentation into the lake basin. Above this contact the core contains laminated gyttja with prominent, ~0.5 cm thick, silt layers. 10Be ages of boulders on bedrock located between Qiviut lake and the present-day ice margin date to 6.81 ± 0.67 ka (n = 3), indicating the time of deglaciation. These ages also agree well with the radiocarbon age of the silt-gyttja transition in Qiviut lake cores. 10Be ages on boulders on bedrock located more proximal to the ice margin (~0.5 km) yield ages of 2.67 ± 0.18 ka (n = 2). These ages indicate either the continued recession of the ice margin during the late Holocene or an advance at this time. Boulders on the historical moraines show that ice retreated from the moraine by AD 1620 ± 20 yrs (n = 2). These results are in contrast with some areas of the western margin of the ice sheet where 10Be ages indicate that the ice sheet was behind its Historical limit from the middle Holocene (~6-7 ka) to Historical time. This may indicate that the eastern margin may have responded to late Holocene cooling more sensitively or that the advance associated with the Historical moraines overran any evidence of late Holocene fluctuations along the western margin of the ice sheet.

  16. Nuuk, Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Nuuk (or Gadthab) is the capital and largest city of Greenland. It is located at the mouth of the Nuup Kangerlua inlet on the west coast of Greenland. It has a population of about 15,000. The site has a long history of different inhabitation: first by the Inuit people around 2000 B.C., later by Viking explorers in the 10th century. Inuit and Vikings lived together for about 500 years until about 1500, when human habitation suddenly stopped, most likely due to change in climate and vegetation.

    The image was acquired August 2, 2004, covers an area of 22.7 x 26 km, and is located at 64.2 degrees north latitude, 51.8 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  17. Palynology of the late Holocene in Disko Bugt, West Greenland: evidence for centennial variability in sea-surface conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Estelle; de Vernal, Anne; Matthias, Moros; Marie-Michèle, Ouellet-Bernier

    2016-04-01

    The palynological analyses of a sediment core collected in Disko Bay (core 343310; 68° 38,861'N, 53° 49,493'W) provide a dinocyst record of the last 1500 years with 5-30 year time resolution and thus permit reconstruction of changes in surface water, including sea-ice cover, temperature and salinity. Dinocyst assemblages are characterized by high taxonomic diversity (18 taxa) with dominance of Islandinium minutum, Pentapharsodinium dalei, Brigantedinium spp. and Islandinium? cezare and by very high concentrations (>105 cysts.cm‑3) leading to calculate fluxes of the order of (>104 cysts.cm‑2.years‑1). The modern analogue technique (MAT) was applied to dinocyst assemblages to quantitatively reconstruct paleo-sea-surface conditions. The seasonal sea ice cover shows large amplitude variations from 2 to 8 months.yr‑1(sea ice coverage >50%), with maxima at 1050-1300 AD, 1400-1500 AD, 1550-1600 AD and 1770-1800 AD, which reflect episodic cooling during the last millennium. In the overall record, sea ice cover and salinity variation are correlated with increase sea ice extent corresponding with decrease salinity and vice versa, which suggests strong linkages between the regional freshwater/meltwater budget and winter sea ice. Relationship between sea ice cover and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is also possible. The increased sea ice being associated with dominant NAO+ mode can be linked with change of the regional properties of the West Greenland Current, the marked by lower influence of warm and saline Atlantic waters relative to an increase influence of the polar and low salinity in Arctic waters from East Greenland Current under NAO+ situation.

  18. Long-term dynamics of a tidewater outlet glacier in West Greenland and its relation to external forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieli, Andreas; Luethi, Martin; Moreau, Luc; Reisser, Moritz; Ian, Joughin

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic changes of ocean-terminating outlet glaciers such as terminus retreat and flow acceleration are responsible for about half of the current mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet. Although these changes seem related to the general warming in recent decades, the detailed link between external forcing from the atmosphere and/or ocean and glacier response is not well understood. Further, existing observations of tidewater outlet glacier change also show strong temporal fluctuations and are mostly limited to the last two decades of satellite observations. It is therefore difficult to derive and interpret long-term trends in outlet glacier change which is relevant in the context of century scale predictions. Here we present and analyse a detailed long-term record of flow and geometry evolution of Eqi Sermia, a ocean terminating outlet glacier in West Greenland. This record starts in 1912 and has, due to its proximity to the main access route for early expeditions to the ice sheet, a decadal and smaller resolution. This historic record is supplemented by data from satellites and ground based radar interferometry for deriving front positions and flow velocities in the two recent decades. The front and flow speed of Eqi Sermia was more or less stable between 1912 with aslow retreat phase between 1920 to the 1960, followed by a slight readvance in the 1980s. In 2007 the terminus started to retreat very rapidly, retreated 3 km since and in a step wise fashion and almost quadrupled its flow speed at the terminus. A comparison with surface mass balance and temperature records suggests a close relation of the long-term evolution of Egi Sermia to atmospheric forcing rather than oceanic, perhaps reflecting the relatively shallow fjord depths. In contrast, the recent rapid retreat and acceleration may be due to a changing regime in the calving process and geometric effects.

  19. Mapping Layer Sequence and Folds of Pre-Holocene Ice at the Pakitsoq "Horizontal Ice Coring"-Site, West Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeh, N.; Severinghaus, J.; Ahlstrom, A.; Brook, E.; Petrenko, V.

    2005-12-01

    Since 1985, the δ18O content of the surface ice has been studied at several ice-margin locations in Greenland. A provisional chronology for the ice margin records was established by correlating characteristic δ18O-features in the ice margin records with similar features in dated Greenland deep ice core records. This demonstrated that, at many ice-margin locations, a several hundred metre wide band of ice pre-dating the present warm interglacial occurs adjacent to the ice edge. A main concern with utilizing this aincient ice for studies of the past has been the fear of likely disturbances of the layer sequence by folds and faults. Recent trace element analyses of ice samples from the ice-sheet margin at Pakitsoq, 50 km northeast of Ilulissat/Jakobshavn, West Greenland have unambiguously demonstrated the occurrence of ice from the transition from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene including ice from the Bølling-Allerød and Younger Dryas intervals. Thus large amounts of well-dated old ice with intact content of trace constituents are available at the Pakitsoq ice-margin. However, analysis of the trace constituents as well as visual inspection also demonstrated the occurrence of a large-scale fold in ice representing the Allerød/Younger Dryas/Pre-Boreal climate oscillation. Moreover, observations of ice ablation and dynamics clearly showed that the Pakitsoq ice-margin sector is presently far from a balanced state, stressing the need for developing a model for the evolution of the ice margin in order to support future ice-mining activities. Here, we report on the development of such a model based on mapping of the large-scale structures on the ice margin by using GPS, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and trace element geo-chemical analysis (mainly δ18O-analysis of ice samples). Samples for δ18O-analysis were collected each year in the period 2001 - 2005 in several profiles across the large scale fold in order to document the time evolution. Altogether more

  20. Microfossils from silicified stromatolitic carbonates of the Upper Proterozoic Limestone-Dolomite 'Series', central East Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. W.; Knoll, A. H.; Swett, K.

    1989-01-01

    Silicified flake conglomerates and in situ stratiform stromatolites of the Upper Proterozoic (c. 700-800 Ma) Limestone-Dolomite 'Series', central East Greenland, contain well preserved microfossils. Five stratigraphic horizons within the 1200 m succession contain microbial mat assemblages, providing a broad palaeontological representation of late Proterozoic peritidal mat communities. Comparison of assemblages demonstrates that the taxonomy and diversity of mat builder, dweller, and allochthonous populations all vary considerably within and among horizons. The primary mat builder in most assemblages is Siphonophycus inornatum, a sheath-forming prokaryote of probable but not unequivocally established cyanobacterial affinities. An unusual low diversity unit in Bed 17 is dominated by a different builder, Tenuofilum septatum, while a thin cryptalgal horizon in Bed 18 is built almost exclusively by Siphonophycus kestron. Although variable taphonomic histories contribute to observed assemblage variation, most differences within and among horizons appear to reflect the differential success or failure of individual microbial populations in colonizing different tidal flat microenvironments. Twenty-two taxa are recognized, of which two are described as new: Myxococcoides stragulescens n.sp. and Scissilisphaera gradata n. sp.

  1. Microfossils from oolites and pisolites of the Upper Proterozoic Eleonore Bay Group, Central East Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. W.; Knoll, A. H.; Swett, K.

    1988-01-01

    Silicified oolites and pisolites from Bed 18 of the Upper Proterozoic (about 700-800 Ma) Limestone-Dolomite "Series" of the Eleonore Bay Group, central East Greenland, contain a diverse suite of organically preserved microfossils that is, for the most part. [Of the] assemblages previously described from Proterozoic cherts and shales. Three principal assemblages occur in these rocks: 1) a class bound assemblage found in detrital carbonate grains (now silicified) that served as nuclei for ooid and pisoid growth, as well as in uncoated mud and mat clasts that were carried into the zone of ooid and pisoid deposition; 2) an epilithic and interstitial assemblage consisting of microorganisms that occurred on top of and between grains; and 3) a euendolithic assemblage composed of microbes that actively bored into coated grains. The Upper Proterozoic euendolithic assemblage closely resembles a community of euendolithic cyanobacteria found today in shallow marine ooid sands of the Bahama Banks. Thirteen species are described, of which eight are new, five representing new genera: Eohyella dichotoma n. sp., Eohyella endoatracta n. sp., Eohyella rectoclada n. sp., Thylacocausticus globorum n. gen. and sp., Cunicularius halleri n. gen. and sp., Graviglomus incrustus n. gen. and sp., Perulagranum obovatum n. gen. and sp., and Parenchymodiscus endolithicus n. gen. and sp.

  2. Paleobiology of distinctive benthic microfossils from the upper Proterozoic Limestone-Dolomite "Series," central East Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. W.; Knoll, A. H.; Golubic, S.; Swett, K.

    1987-01-01

    Populations of Polybessurus bipartitus Fairchild ex Green et al., a large morphologically distinctive microfossil, occur in silicified carbonates of the Upper Proterozoic (700-800 Ma) Limestone-Dolomite "Series," central East Greenland. Large populations of well-preserved individuals permit reconstruction of P. bipartitus as a coccoidal unicell that "jetted" upward from the sediment by the highly unidirectional secretion of extracellular mucopolysaccharide envelopes. Reproduction by baeocyte formation is inferred on the basis of clustered envelope stalks produced by small cells. Sedimentological evidence indicates that P. bipartitus formed surficial crusts locally within a shallow peritidal carbonate platform. Among living microorganisms a close morphological, reproductive, and behavioral counterpart to Polybessurus is provided by populations of an as yet underscribed cyanobacterium found in coastal Bahamian environments similar to those in which the Proterozoic fossils occur. In general morphology and "jetting" behavior, this population resembles species of the genus Cyanostylon, Geitler (1925), but reproduces via baeocyte formation. Polybessurus is but one of the more than two dozen taxa in the richly fossiliferous biota of the Limestone-Dolomite "Series." This distinctive population, along with co-occurring filamentous cyanobacteria and other microfossils, contributes to an increasingly refined picture of ecological heterogeneity in late Proterozoic oceans.

  3. The crust and upper mantle of central East Greenland - implications for continental accretion and rift evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffer, Christian; Balling, Niels; Ebbing, Jörg; Holm Jacobsen, Bo; Bom Nielsen, Søren

    2016-04-01

    The geological evolution of the North Atlantic Realm during the past 450 Myr, which has shaped the present-day topographic, crustal and upper mantle features, was dominated by the Caledonian orogeny and the formation of the North Atlantic and associated igneous activity. The distinct high altitude-low relief landscapes that accompany the North Atlantic rifted passive margins are the focus of a discussion of whether they are remnant and modified Caledonian features or, alternatively, recently uplifted peneplains. Teleseismic receiver function analysis of 11 broadband seismometers in the Central Fjord Region in East Greenland indicates the presence of a fossil subduction complex, including a slab of eclogitised mafic crust and an overlying wedge of hydrated mantle peridotite. This model is generally consistent with gravity and topography. It is shown that the entire structure including crustal thickness variations and sub-Moho heterogeneity gives a superior gravity and isostatic topographic fit compared to a model with a homogeneous lithospheric layer (1). The high topography of >1000 m in the western part of the area is supported by the c. 40 km thick crust. The eastern part requires buoyancy from the low velocity/low density mantle wedge. The geometry, velocities and densities are consistent with structures associated with a fossil subduction zone. The spatial relations with Caledonian structures suggest a Caledonian origin. The results indicate that topography is isostatically compensated by density variations within the lithosphere and that significant present-day dynamic topography seems not to be required. Further, this structure is suggested to be geophysically very similar to the Flannan reflector imaged north of Scotland, and that these are the remnants of the same fossil subduction zone, broken apart and separated during the formation of the North Atlantic in the early Cenozoic (2). 1) Schiffer, C., Jacobsen, B.H., Balling, N., Ebbing, J. and Nielsen, S

  4. Evolution of a trough-fan system: Scoresby Sund fjord, central-east Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Lara F.; Nielsen, Tove; Knutz, Paul C.; Kuijpers, Antoon; Damm, Volkmar

    2016-04-01

    The continental shelf along the east margin of Greenland is shaped by several, glacially carved transverse troughs that constitute the oceanward extension of the major fjords. Scoresby Sund is the most prominent fjord of central-east Greenland and separates Liverpool Land, to the north, from Blosseville Kyst to the south. Offshore of Scoresby Sund a large glacial trough mouth fan (TMF) has been built through successive phases of glacial advances. Morpho-structural and seismo-stratigraphic analyses of the Scoresby Sund TMF have been done using all Multichannel Seismic (MCS) profiles available in the area. The ODP site 987 of the leg 162 is located in the abyssal plain offshore of Scoresby Sund and was used for age estimations. The width of the continental shelf in the study area ranges from a 65 km narrow part along the Blosseville Kyst to 120 km off Scoresby Sund. The average water depth is shallower than 300 m, deepening to 600 m along Scoresby Sund glacial trough. Oceanwards a steep slope, seafloor falls into the 2250 m deep abyssal plain of the south Greenland Sea. The sedimentary cover displays maximum thickness along the middle continental shelf (2.8 s TWTT on average). Seven major stratigraphic discontinuities could be identified within the sedimentary record. They restrict eight major seismic units, named from 8 to 1, in upward stratigraphic order. The distribution and seismic facies of these units reveal the evolutionary sequence of the study area from early Cenozoic to Present. The lowest unit, Unit 8, is post-basalt to middle-late Miocene age and represents a pre-glacial depositional stage when tectonic events controlled the sedimentation. Deposition of Unit 7 occurred by late Miocene, revealing glacial-related deposits and ice-stream along Scoresby Sund fjord. Unit 6 was formed during early Pliocene by glacial advance over the continental shelf leading to strong erosive surfaces in the shelf area and Mass Transport Deposits (MTDs) in the northern abyssal

  5. Rerouting of subglacial water flow between neighboring glaciers in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Winnie; Creyts, Timothy T.; Bell, Robin E.

    2016-05-01

    Investigations of the Greenland ice sheet's subglacial hydrological system show that the connectivity of different regions of the system influences how the glacier velocity responds to variations in surface melting. Here we examine whether subglacial water flow paths can be rerouted beneath three outlet glaciers in the ablation zone of western Greenland. We use Lamont-Doherty and Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets of University of Kansas (CReSIS) ice-penetrating radar data to create a new ice thickness map. We then use a simple subglacial water flow model to examine whether flow paths can be rerouted and identify the topographic conditions that are sensitive to subglacial rerouting. By varying water pressures within an observationally constrained range, we show that moderate changes in pressure can cause flow paths to reroute and exchange water from one subglacial catchment to another. Flow across subglacial overdeepenings is particularly sensitive to rerouting. These areas have low hydraulic gradients driving flow, so subtle water pressure variations have a strong influence on water flow direction. Based on correlations between water flow paths and ice velocity changes, we infer that water piracy between neighboring catchments can result in a different spatial pattern of hydrologically induced ice velocity speedup depending on the amount and timing of surface melt. The potential for subglacial water to reroute across different catchments suggests that multiple hydrographs from neighboring glaciers are likely necessary to accurately ascertain melt budgets from proglacial point measurements. The relationship between surface runoff, ice dynamics, and proglacial discharge can be altered by rerouting of subglacial water flow within and across outlet glaciers.

  6. Modelling the dynamic response of Jakobshavn Isbræ, West Greenland, to calving rate perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondzio, J. H.; Seroussi, H.; Morlighem, M.; Kleiner, T.; Rückamp, M.; Humbert, A.; Larour, E.

    2015-10-01

    Calving is a major means of ice discharge of the Antarctic and Greenland Ice Sheets. The breaking off of icebergs changes the ice front configuration of marine terminating glaciers, which affects the stress regime of their upstream areas. Recent observations show the close correlation between the ice front position and the behaviour of many outlet glaciers. However, modelling of a glacier subject to calving poses various challenges. No universal calving rate parametrisation is known, and tracking of a moving ice front and the related boundary conditions in two or three spatial dimensions is non-trivial. Here, we present the theoretical and technical framework for a Level-Set Method, an implicit boundary tracking scheme, which we implemented into the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). The scheme allows us to study the dynamic response of a drainage basin to user-defined front ablation rates. We apply the method in a suite of experiments to Jakobshavn Isbræ, a major marine terminating outlet glacier of the western Greenland Ice Sheet. The model robustly reproduces the high sensitivity of the glacier to frontal ablation in form of calving. We find that enhanced calving is able to trigger significant acceleration of the ice stream. Upstream acceleration is sustained through a combination of various feedback mechanisms. However, lateral stress and ice influx into the trough are able to stabilise the ice stream. This study contributes to the present discussion on causes and effects of the continued changes occurring at Jakobshavn Isbræ, and emphasises that the incorporation of seasonal calving and dynamic lateral effects is key for realistic model projections of future global sea level rise on centennial time scales.

  7. Tidewater Dynamics at Store Glacier, West Greenland from Daily Repeat UAV Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, A., II; Ryan, J.; Toberg, N.; Todd, J.; Christoffersen, P.; Snooke, N.; Box, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    A significant component of the Greenland ice sheet's mass wasteage to sea level rise is attributed to the acceleration and dynamic thinning at its tidewater margins. To improve understanding of the rapid mass loss processes occurring at large tidewater glaciers, we conducted a suite of daily repeat aerial surveys across the terminus of Store Glacier, a large outlet draining the western Greenland Ice Sheet, from May to July 2014 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-y8kauAVAfE). A suite flock of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) were equipped with digital cameras, which, in combination with onboard GPS, enabled production of high spatial resolution orthophotos and digital elevation models (DEMs) using standard structure-from-motion techniques. These data provide insight into the short-term dynamics of Store Glacier surrounding the break-up of the sea-ice mélange that occurred between 4 and 7 June. Feature tracking of the orthophotos reveals that mean speed of the terminus is 16 - 18 md-1, which was independently verified against a high temporal resolution time-series derived from an expendable/telemetric GPS deployed at the terminus. Differencing the surface area of successive orthophotos enable quantification of daily calving rates, which significantly increase just after melange break-up. Likewise, by differencing bulk freeboard volume of icebergs through time we could also constrain the magnitude and variation of submarine melt. We calculate a mean submarine melt rate of 0.18 md-1 throughout the spring period with relatively little supraglacial runoff and no active meltwater plumes to stimulate fjord circulation and upwelling of deeper, warmer water masses. Finally, we relate calving rates to the zonation and depth of water-filled crevasses, which were prominent across parts of the terminus from June onwards.

  8. Physical and chemical limnology of a subsaline athalassic lake in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willemse, N. W.; van Dam, O.; van Helvoort, P. J.; Dankers, R.; Brommer, M.; Schokker, J.; Valstar, T. E.; de Wolf, H.

    2004-08-01

    Physical and chemical profiles of a shallow (c. 12-m-deep) subsaline (total dissolved solids 2.3-2.8 g l(-1)) closed-basin lake in the continental area of southwestern Greenland are described for the first time. Watercolumn data for every 5th consecutive day between April 20 and October 6, 2001, and continuous recordings of lake water level and meteorological conditions are used to infer controls on contemporary lake functioning, sediment formation and climate-lake interactions. Limnological observations demonstrate the importance of lake-ice formation and its role in haline convection and the development of meromixis. Observed lake cycling suggest that the lake at present is in a state of near-meromixis where stagnant bottom waters de-stratify through deep penetration of weak haline convective cells by the end of June. From this study, the primary reasons the shallow Greenlandic low salinity lakes develop meromixis are: (i) lack of an outflow (ii) meltwater dilution and chemical strati. cation of surface waters, (iii) insubstantial wind mixing, (iv) a weak winter thermohaline convective cell forced by cryoconcentration, and (v) biogeochemically enhanced solute concentrations near the sediment bed. Throughout the open water period the hydrological balance is dominated by evaporative losses. Lake surface water conductivities change from 2110 to 2890 muS cm(-1) due to the combined effects of open water evaporation, meltwater dilution, diffusive exchanges over the seasonal pycnocline, and boundary mixing. Freeze-out of salts and resulting deep haline convection increase overall water column salinity during winter. Owing to deep convective mixing, plant nutrients are relatively high in the upper watercolumn with a dominant internal source of phosphorous. Extreme productivity pulses of phytoplankton are observed as soon as sub-ice radiation levels increase and directly after ice-out when sufficient wind mixing can support an intense monospecific diatom bloom of Diatoma

  9. 7. VIEW LOOKING WEST DOWN CENTRAL AVENUE AT THE INTERSECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW LOOKING WEST DOWN CENTRAL AVENUE AT THE INTERSECTION WITH SEVENTH STREET. THE PLANT WAS BUILT ON THE SITE WITH FOUR SEPARATE PRODUCTION AREAS, AND AN ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT AREA. THIS PHOTOGRAPH SHOWS THE EASTERN EDGE OF THE CORE ADMINSTRATION AND SUPPORT AREA, BUILT IN THE EARLY 1950S. IN THE LEFT FOREGROUND OF THE PHOTOGRAPH IS BUILDING 442, USED TO TEST ALL HEPA FILTERS ON SITE. - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  10. 40 CFR 81.231 - Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Central West Virginia Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.231 Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area...

  11. 40 CFR 81.234 - North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false North Central West Virginia Intrastate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.234 North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the...

  12. 40 CFR 81.234 - North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false North Central West Virginia Intrastate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.234 North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the...

  13. 40 CFR 81.231 - Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Central West Virginia Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.231 Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area...

  14. 40 CFR 81.234 - North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false North Central West Virginia Intrastate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.234 North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the...

  15. 40 CFR 81.231 - Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Central West Virginia Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.231 Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area...

  16. 40 CFR 81.231 - Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Central West Virginia Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.231 Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area...

  17. 40 CFR 81.231 - Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Central West Virginia Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.231 Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area...

  18. 40 CFR 81.234 - North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false North Central West Virginia Intrastate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.234 North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the...

  19. 40 CFR 81.234 - North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false North Central West Virginia Intrastate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.234 North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the...

  20. Modeling of ocean-induced ice melt rates of five west Greenland glaciers over the past two decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, E.; Xu, Y.; Menemenlis, D.; Mouginot, J.; Scheuchl, B.; Li, X.; Morlighem, M.; Seroussi, H.; den Broeke, M. van; Fenty, I.; Cai, C.; An, L.; Fleurian, B. de

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution, three-dimensional simulations from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model ocean model are used to calculate the subaqueous melt rate of the calving faces of Umiamako, Rinks, Kangerdlugssup, Store, and Kangilerngata glaciers, west Greenland, from 1992 to 2015. Model forcing is from monthly reconstructions of ocean state and ice sheet runoff. Results are analyzed in combination with observations of bathymetry, bed elevation, ice front retreat, and glacier speed. We calculate that subaqueous melt rates are 2-3 times larger in summer compared to winter and doubled in magnitude since the 1990s due to enhanced subglacial runoff and 1.6 ± 0.3°C warmer ocean temperature. Umiamako and Kangilerngata retreated rapidly in the 2000s when subaqueous melt rates exceeded the calving rates and ice front retreated to deeper bed elevation. In contrast, Store, Kangerdlugssup, and Rinks have remained stable because their subaqueous melt rates are 3-4 times lower than their calving rates, i.e., the glaciers are dominated by calving processes.

  1. Silicon isotopes in ˜3.8 Ga West Greenland rocks as clues to the Eoarchaean supracrustal Si cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Luc; Cardinal, Damien; Alleman, Laurent Y.; Moorbath, Stephen

    2006-05-01

    We report MC-ICP-MS Si-isotopic measurements ( δ29Si recalculated as δ30Si) on micro-subsamples (at 500 μm scale) from several major rock types of the ˜3.8-Ga-old Isua Greenstone Belt (IGB, southern West Greenland) and surrounding Eoarchaean terrains. With a large overall range of variations (- 2.80‰ < δ30Si < + 0.68‰), they demonstrate strong involvement of surface fluids enriched with dissolved Si. The resistance of Si-isotopes to metamorphic resettings and metasomatic overprints is also established. Metabasaltic pillows and metasediments display similar 30Si-enriched signatures, suggesting that emergent surfaces of the Eoarchaean protocrust were composed of slightly weathered, hydrothermally altered, mafic-ultramafic bodies. Isua magnetite-quartz Banded Iron Formation (BIF) is strongly depleted in 30Si relative to all coeval rocks. This depletion supports Rayleigh-controlled precipitation from seafloor-vented hydrothermal fluids. In contrast, banded quartz-pyroxene rocks (from Akilia Island, some 150 km southwest of the IGB), which some authors have identified as BIF-related, yield quartz with Si-isotopic composition ( δ30Si = - 0.36‰) similar to metamorphic-derived quartz ( δ30Si = - 0.50‰). This supports their derivation from tectonic reworking of ultramafic protoliths penetrated by metamorphic silica and is at variance with their proposed role as harboring earliest biogenic tracers.

  2. Recognition of > or = 3850 Ma water-lain sediments in West Greenland and their significance for the early Archaean Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nutman, A. P.; Mojzsis, S. J.; Friend, C. R.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    A layered body of amphibolite, banded iron formation (BIF), and ultramafic rocks from the island of Akilia, southern West Greenland, is cut by a quartz-dioritic sheet from which SHRIMP zircon 206Pb/207Pb weighted mean ages of 3865 +/- 11 Ma and 3840 +/- 8 Ma (2 sigma) can be calculated by different approaches. Three other methods of assessing the zircon data yield ages of >3830 Ma. The BIFs are interpreted as water-lain sediments, which with a minimum age of approximately 3850 Ma, are the oldest sediments yet documented. These rocks provide proof that by approximately 3850 Ma (1) there was a hydrosphere, supporting the chemical sedimentation of BIF, and that not all water was stored in hydrous minerals, and (2) that conditions satisfying the stability of liquid water imply surface temperatures were similar to present. Carbon isotope data of graphitic microdomains in apatite from the Akilia island BIF are consistent with a bio-organic origin (Mojzsis et al. 1996), extending the record of life on Earth to >3850 Ma. Life and surface water by approximately 3850 Ma provide constraints on either the energetics or termination of the late meteoritic bombardment event (suggested from the lunar cratering record) on Earth.

  3. Multi-Year Elevation Changes Near the West Margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet from Satellite Radar Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingle, Craig S.; Brenner, Anita C.; Zwally, H. Jay; DiMarzio, John P.

    1991-01-01

    Mean changes in the surface elevation near the west margin of the Greenland ice sheet are measured using Seasat altimetry and altimetry from the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission (ERM). The Seasat data extend from early July through early October 1978. The ERM data extend from winter 1986-87 through fall 1988. Both seasonal and multi-year changes are measured using altimetry referenced to GEM T2 orbits. The possible effects of orbit error are minimized by adjusting the orbits into a common ocean surface. Seasonal mean changes in the surface height are recognizable during the Geosat ERM. The multi-year measurements indicate the surface was lower by 0.4 +/- 0.4 m on average in late summer 1987 than in late summer 1978. The surface was lower by 0.2 +/- 0.5 m on average in late summer 1988 than in late summer 1978. As a control case, the computations art also carried out using altimetry referenced to orbits not adjusted into a common ocean surface.

  4. Fluid flow and methane occurrences in the Disko Bugt area offshore West Greenland: indications for gas hydrates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Tove; Laier, Troels; Kuijpers, Antoon; Rasmussen, Tine L.; Mikkelsen, Naja E.; Nørgård-Pedersen, Niels

    2014-12-01

    The present study is the first to directly address the issue of gas hydrates offshore West Greenland, where numerous occurrences of shallow hydrocarbons have been documented in the vicinity of Disko Bugt (Bay). Furthermore, decomposing gas hydrate has been implied to explain seabed features in this climate-sensitive area. The study is based on archive data and new (2011, 2012) shallow seismic and sediment core data. Archive seismic records crossing an elongated depression (20×35 km large, 575 m deep) on the inner shelf west of Disko Bugt (Bay) show a bottom simulating reflector (BSR) within faulted Mesozoic strata, consistent with the occurrence of gas hydrates. Moreover, the more recently acquired shallow seismic data reveal gas/fluid-related features in the overlying sediments, and geochemical data point to methane migration from a deeper-lying petroleum system. By contrast, hydrocarbon signatures within faulted Mesozoic strata below the strait known as the Vaigat can be inferred on archive seismics, but no BSR was visible. New seismic data provide evidence of various gas/fluid-releasing features in the overlying sediments. Flares were detected by the echo-sounder in July 2012, and cores contained ikaite and showed gas-releasing cracks and bubbles, all pointing to ongoing methane seepage in the strait. Observed seabed mounds also sustain gas seepages. For areas where crystalline bedrock is covered only by Pleistocene-Holocene deposits, methane was found only in the Egedesminde Dyb (Trough). There was a strong increase in methane concentration with depth, but no free gas. This is likely due to the formation of gas hydrate and the limited thickness of the sediment infill. Seabed depressions off Ilulissat Isfjord (Icefjord) previously inferred to express ongoing gas release from decomposing gas hydrate show no evidence of gas seepage, and are more likely a result of neo-tectonism.

  5. Modeling of Store Gletscher's calving dynamics, West Greenland, in response to ocean thermal forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlighem, M.; Bondzio, J.; Seroussi, H.; Rignot, E.; Larour, E.; Humbert, A.; Rebuffi, S.

    2016-03-01

    Glacier-front dynamics is an important control on Greenland's ice mass balance. Warmer ocean waters trigger ice-front retreats of marine-terminating glaciers, and the corresponding loss in resistive stress leads to glacier acceleration and thinning. Here we present an approach to quantify the sensitivity and vulnerability of marine-terminating glaciers to ocean-induced melt. We develop a plan view model of Store Gletscher that includes a level set-based moving boundary capability, a parameterized ocean-induced melt, and a calving law with complete and precise land and fjord topographies to model the response of the glacier to increased melt. We find that the glacier is stabilized by a sill at its terminus. The glacier is dislodged from the sill when ocean-induced melt quadruples, at which point the glacier retreats irreversibly for 27 km into a reverse bed. The model suggests that ice-ocean interactions are the triggering mechanism of glacier retreat, but the bed controls its magnitude.

  6. Estimating supraglacial lake depth in West Greenland using Landsat 8 and comparison with other multispectral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, A.; Scambos, T. A.; Moussavi, M.; Tedesco, M.; Willis, M.; Shean, D.; Grigsby, S.

    2016-01-01

    Liquid water stored on the surface of ice sheets and glaciers impacts surface mass balance, ice dynamics, and heat transport. Multispectral remote sensing can be used to detect supraglacial lakes and estimate their depth and area. In this study, we use in situ spectral and bathymetric data to assess lake depth retrieval using the recently launched Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI). We also extend our analysis to other multispectral sensors to evaluate their performance with similar methods. Digital elevation models derived from WorldView stereo imagery (pre-lake filling and post-drainage) are used to validate spectrally derived depths, combined with a lake edge determination from imagery. The optimal supraglacial lake depth retrieval is a physically based single-band model applied to two OLI bands independently (red and panchromatic) that are then averaged together. When OLI- and WorldView-derived depths are differenced, they yield a mean and standard deviation of 0.0 ± 1.6 m. This method is then applied to OLI data for the Sermeq Kujalleq (Jakobshavn Isbræ) region of Greenland to study the spatial and intra-seasonal variability of supraglacial lakes during summer 2014. We also give coefficients for estimating supraglacial lake depth using a similar method with other multispectral sensors.

  7. Integrating climate science, glaciology and hydrology to predict future run-off at the Greenland ice sheet margin: A case study from Ilulissat, West Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, R. H.; Ahlstrøm, A. P.; Nielsen, C.; Reeh, N.; Stendel, M.; Andersen, S. Bech

    2009-04-01

    Predicting future hydrological regimes with regard to climate change is an increasingly important task for hydrologists. In polar regions the task is more difficult due to the lack of datasets and long term monitoring as well as logistical difficulties in remote and inaccessible basins. Here, we demonstrate a case study predicting the future run-off in a difficult to model hydrological basin by integrating a range of data, methods and numerical models. A study, evaluating the future conditions in the Pakitsup Akuliarusersua basin near Ilulissat, West Greenland, was initiated to determine the viability of a small hydropower scheme based around two lakes adjacent to the ice-sheet margin. This basin is mainly supplied by meltwater from the ice-sheet margin and the position of the ice sheet relative to the lakes makes them sensitive to changes in drainage pathways. We combined glaciological and hydrological models with data from climate models in order to resolve these issues. An ice dynamic model (Reeh, 1988), incorporating new digital terrain models for the ice sheet surface and basal topographies (Mottram and other, 2009), was driven by climate data from a combined global/regional climate model (HIRHAM4) for the period 1950-2080 (Stendel and others, 2007). The climate data was downscaled to catchment scale and corrected using observational data from the local area. The corrected HIRHAM4 output was used as input to a temperature-index mass-balance model (Reeh, 1991) and used to force the ice-dynamic model in order to predict the future ice sheet geometry and to drive meltwater production at the ice sheet surface. These ice sheet geometries were used to predict the size of the ice-sheet part of the hydrological basin for a range of different levels of ice sheet basal water pressure every 5 years from present day to 2080. Thus, the present analysis takes into account global and regional climate change, ice dynamical response and changes in the internal drainage system

  8. Seasonal changes of chemical, isotopic and microbiological signatures in meltwater outflows of the West Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, B.; Choquette, K.; Sletten, R. S.; Dieser, M.; Cameron, K. A.; Liu, L.; Harrold, Z.; Christner, B. C.; Junge, K.

    2012-12-01

    The faster rate of melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet and its implications for global hydrological and biogeochemical cycles has led to detailed studies of hydrological pathways and biogeochemical processes on top, within, and underneath the Ice Sheet. A challenge up to now is the identification of water sources and pathways and their seasonal development that can provide important information about glacier dynamics. Most studies are based on bulk glacier outflow and attempts that separate hydrographs in different water sources are often based on a combination of isotopic, geochemical, and hydrological information. These parameters can be indicative for meltwater sources as well as being indicative for fast and delayed flow. In this paper we present stable isotopes of water and strontium together with detailed chemical analysis and microbial counts. The data are used to evaluate the potential and limits of these parameters to delineate sources of water and solutes throughout a season and its implication for identifying and quantifying major biogeochemical processes. The study is performed at two terrestrial outflows of the West Greenland Ice Sheet: i) Thule on the Pituffik Peninsula (76°N, 68°W) and ii) Kangerlussuaq (Sondre Stromfjord, 67°N, 50°W). To identify primary meltwater sources fresh snow was collected along transects and depth profiles on the Ice Sheet catchment area and basal ice was collected from the border of the Ice Sheet. Supraglacial and bulk meltwater samples were collected throughout the season together with precipitation such as rain and snow. All samples were analyzed for isotopes, major and trace elements, organic and inorganic carbon and microbial counts. Stable isotope of waters collected on the surface of the Ice Sheet display an elevation and depth trend; however, there is overlap in the stable isotope ratios suggesting that isotopes alone may not be sufficient to identify meltwater source areas. Contrary, rain has unique isotope

  9. Local and synoptic controls on rapid supraglacial lake drainage in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Andrew; Banwell, Alison; Arnold, Neil; Willis, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Many supraglacial lakes within the ablation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) are known to drain rapidly (in <1 day) in the mid- to late melt season, delivering large meltwater pulses to the subglacial drainage system, thus affecting basal water pressures and ice-sheet dynamics. Although it is now generally recognised that rapid lake drainage is caused by hydrofracture, the precise controls on hydrofracture initiation remain poorly understood: they may be linked to a local critical water-volume threshold, or they may be associated with synoptic-scale factors, such as ice thickness, driving stresses, ice velocities and strain rates. A combination of the local water-volume threshold and one or more synoptic-scale factors may explain the overall patterns of rapid lake drainage, but this requires verification using targeted field- and remotely-based studies that cover large areas of the GrIS and span long timescales. Here, we investigate a range of potential controls on rapid supraglacial lake drainage in the land-terminating Paakitsoq region of the ice sheet, northeast of Jakobshavn Isbræ, for the 2014 melt season. We have analysed daily 250-m Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery in order to calculate lake areas, depths and volumes, and have developed an automatic lake-tracking algorithm to determine the dates on which all rapid lake drainage events occur. For each rapidly draining lake, the water volumes immediately prior to drainage are compared with other local factors, notably lake-filling rate and ice thickness, and with a variety of synoptic-scale features, such as slope angles, driving stresses, surface velocities, surface strain rates and the incidence of nearby lake-drainage events. We present the outcomes of our statistical analysis to elicit the statistically significant controls on hydrofracture beneath supraglacial lakes.

  10. Preliminary results from hot-water drilling and borehole instrumentation on Store Glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, S. H.; Christoffersen, P.; Hubbard, B. P.; Young, T. J.; Hofstede, C. M.; Box, J.; Todd, J.; Bougamont, M. H.; Hubbard, A.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment (SAFIRE) pressurised hot water was used to drill four 603-616 m-long boreholes to the bed of the Greenland Ice Sheet at a site located 30 km from the calving front of fast-flowing, marine-terminating Store Glacier (70° N, ~1000 m elevation). Despite the boreholes freezing within hours, 4 wired sensor strings were successfully deployed in three of the boreholes. These included a thermistor string to obtain the englacial temperature profile installed in the same borehole as a string of tilt sensors to measure borehole deformation, and two sets of water pressure, electrical conductivity and turbidity sensors installed just above the bed in separate, adjacent boreholes. The boreholes made a strong hydrological connection to the bed during drilling, draining rapidly to ~80 m below the ice surface. The connection of subsequent boreholes was observed as a perturbation in water pressure and temperature recorded in neighbouring boreholes, indicating an effective hydrological sub- or en-glacial connection between them. The sensors, which were all connected to loggers at the surface by cables, operated for between ~30 and 80+ days before indications suggest that the cables stretched and then snapped - with the lowermost sensors failing first. The records obtained from these sensors reveal (i) high and increasing water pressure varying diurnally close to overburden albeit of a small magnitude (~ 0.3 m H2O), (ii) a minimum extrapolated englacial temperature of -21°C with above-freezing temperatures at the bed, and (iv) high rates of internal deformation and strain increasing towards the bed as evinced by increasing tilt with depth. These borehole observations are complemented by GPS measurements of ice motion, meteorological data, and seismic and radar surveys.

  11. Determining Firn Compaction Rates Using Repeat-Track Radar Surveys in West Antarctica and Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medley, B.; Ligtenberg, S.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; Joughin, I. R.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Gogineni, S.; Nowicki, S.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of surface elevation change must be properly partitioned between thickness changes from firn versus ice processes to determine the actual mass change because of the density difference between firn and ice. While ice dynamics controls changes in the ice column, fluctuations in both the snow accumulation and firn compaction rates result in variations in the firn column thickness. Several recent studies using both ground-based and airborne radar have greatly improved our understanding of the spatiotemporal variations in the accumulation rate. On the other hand, because of the difficulty in measuring firn compaction rates, the number of measurements remains quite low and the coverage is very sparse. Here, we present measurements of the firn compaction rate using the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets snow radar data from NASA's Operation IceBridge repeat-track surveys. To measure firn compaction rates from the aerial survey we first measure the depths to various horizons in the firn column. In the subsequent survey, we measure the depths to the same firn horizons but must remove the additional thickness from accumulated snow. To account for the additional accumulation, we measure the thickness to the buried horizon that represents the surface from the first survey. The change in thickness between the initial surface and the radar horizons provides total compaction and when divided by the time interval between surveys, provides the compaction rate.Specifically, we measure the spatiotemporal variations in the firn compaction rate in the Thwaites Glacier catchment area between 2009 and 2011. In addition, we present newly derived compaction rates from the dry-snow zone of Greenland. We also discuss the limitations of the method resulting from (1) the vertical resolution of the radar system, (2) colocation errors, (3) the dependence of radar wave speed on firn density, which varies in both space and time, and (4) measuring to a horizon of constant age

  12. Changing surface-atmosphere energy exchange and refreezing capacity of the lower accumulation area, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampidis, C.; van As, D.; Box, J. E.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Colgan, W. T.; Doyle, S. H.; Hubbard, A. L.; MacFerrin, M.; Machguth, H.; Smeets, C. J. P. P.

    2015-11-01

    We present 5 years (2009-2013) of automatic weather station measurements from the lower accumulation area (1840 m a.s.l. - above sea level) of the Greenland ice sheet in the Kangerlussuaq region. Here, the summers of 2010 and 2012 were both exceptionally warm, but only 2012 resulted in a strongly negative surface mass budget (SMB) and surface meltwater run-off. The observed run-off was due to a large ice fraction in the upper 10 m of firn that prevented meltwater from percolating to available pore volume below. Analysis reveals an anomalously low 2012 summer-averaged albedo of 0.71 (typically ~ 0.78), as meltwater was present at the ice sheet surface. Consequently, during the 2012 melt season, the ice sheet surface absorbed 28 % (213 MJ m-2) more solar radiation than the average of all other years. A surface energy balance model is used to evaluate the seasonal and interannual variability of all surface energy fluxes. The model reproduces the observed melt rates as well as the SMB for each season. A sensitivity analysis reveals that 71 % of the additional solar radiation in 2012 was used for melt, corresponding to 36 % (0.64 m) of the 2012 surface lowering. The remaining 64 % (1.14 m) of surface lowering resulted from high atmospheric temperatures, up to a +2.6 °C daily average, indicating that 2012 would have been a negative SMB year at this site even without the melt-albedo feedback. Longer time series of SMB, regional temperature, and remotely sensed albedo (MODIS) show that 2012 was the first strongly negative SMB year, with the lowest albedo, at this elevation on record. The warm conditions of recent years have resulted in enhanced melt and reduction of the refreezing capacity in the lower accumulation area. If high temperatures continue, the current lower accumulation area will turn into a region with superimposed ice in coming years.

  13. Siderophile and chalcophile metal variations in Tertiary picrites and basalts from West Greenland with implications for the sulphide saturation history of continental flood basalt magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keays, Reid R.; Lightfoot, Peter C.

    2007-04-01

    Sixty-five million year old continental flood basalts crop out on Qeqertarssuaq Island and the Nuussuaq Peninsula in West Greenland, and they include ˜1,000 m of picritic lavas and discrete 10- to 50-m-thick members of highly contaminated basalts. On Qeqertarssuaq, the lavas are allocated to the Vaîgat and Maligât Formations of which the former includes the Naujánguit member, which consists of picrites with 7-29 wt% MgO, 80-1,400 ppm Ni, 5.7-9.4 ppb Pt and 4.2-12.9 ppb Pd. The Naujánguit member contains two horizons of contaminated basalts, the Asûk and Kûgánguaq, which have elevated SiO2 (52-58 wt%) and low to moderate MgO (7.5-12.8 wt%). These lavas are broadly characterized by low Cu and Ni abundances (average, 40 ppm Ni and 45 ppm Cu) and very low Pt (0.16-0.63 ppb) and Pd (0.13-0.68 ppb) abundances, and in the case of the Asûk, they contain shale xenoliths and droplets of native iron and troilite. The contaminated basalts from Nuussuaq, the B0 to B4 members, are also usually Ni-, Cu-, and platinum-group elements (PGE)-depleted. The geochemical signatures (especially the ratios of incompatible trace elements such as Th/Nb) of all of the contaminated basalts from Qeqertarssuaq and some of those from Nuussuaq record what appears to be a chemical contribution from deltaic shales that lie immediately below the lavas. This suggests that the contamination of the magmas occurred during the migration of the magmas through plumbing systems developed in sedimentary rocks, and hence, at a high crustal level. Nickel, Cu, and PGE depletion together with geochemical signatures produced by crustal contamination are also a feature of Siberian Trap basalts from the Noril’sk region. These basalts belong to the 0- to 500-m thick, ˜5,000- to 10,000-km3 Nadezhdinsky Formation, which is centered in the Noril’sk Region. A major difference between Siberia and West Greenland is that PGE depletion in the Nadezhdinsky Formation samples with the lowest Cu and Ni contents is

  14. Petrology of the Plutonic Rocks of west-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Thomas P.

    1970-01-01

    A series of plutons in west-central Alaska defines the Hogatza plutonic belt which extends for about 200 miles in an east-west direction from the northeastern Seward Peninsula to the Koyukuk River. The plutonic rocks have an aggregate area of about 1,200 square miles and their composition, distribution, and possible petrogenesis are discussed for the first time in this report. Field, petrographic and chemical data supported by K/Ar age dating indicate the plutonic rocks are divisible into two suites differing in age, location, and composition. The western plutons are mid-Cretaceous (~100 m.y.) in age and consist of a heterogeneous assemblage of monzonite, syenite, quartz monzonite. Associated with these granitic rocks is a group of alkaline sub-silicic rocks that forma belt of intrusive complexes extending for a distance of at least 180 miles from west-central Alaska to the Bering Sea. The complex at Granite Mountain shows a rare example of zoning from an alkaline rim to a quartz-bearing core. The occurrence of a similar complex at Cape Dezhnev on the easternmost tip of Siberia suggests the alkaline province may extend into Siberia. The easternmost plutons are Late Cretaceous (180 m.y.) in age and composed primarily of granodiorite and quartz monzonite similar to calc-alkaline plutons found throughout the North America Cordillera. The plutons are epizonal and intrude deformed but unmetamorphosed Lower Cretaceous andesitic volcanics and volcanic graywacke which constitute the highly mobile Yukon-Koyukuk volcanogenic province of west-central Alaska. No older rocks have been found within the confines of this vast tract; the occurrence of a bounding ophiolite sequence has lead to the suggestion that the province was formed by large-scale rifting and is underlain by oceanic crust. The possibility of no juvenile sialic crust over much of the area suggests that the potassium-rich magma now represented by the alkaline rocks originated in the mantle. The distribution of the

  15. 9 CFR 93.320 - Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Horses from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Central America and the West Indies 17 § 93.320 Horses from Central America and the West Indies. Horses from Central America and...

  16. 9 CFR 93.320 - Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Horses from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Central America and the West Indies 17 § 93.320 Horses from Central America and the West Indies. Horses from Central America and...

  17. 9 CFR 93.320 - Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Horses from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Central America and the West Indies 17 § 93.320 Horses from Central America and the West Indies. Horses from Central America and...

  18. 9 CFR 93.320 - Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Horses from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Central America and the West Indies 17 § 93.320 Horses from Central America and the West Indies. Horses from Central America and...

  19. 9 CFR 93.320 - Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Horses from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Central America and the West Indies 17 § 93.320 Horses from Central America and the West Indies. Horses from Central America and...

  20. Atmospheric concentrations of organochlorine pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychloronaphthalenes in Nuuk, South-West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossi, Rossana; Skov, Henrik; Vorkamp, Katrin; Christensen, Jesper; Rastogi, Suresh C.; Egeløv, Axel; Petersen, Dorthe

    Atmospheric concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychloronaphthalenes (PCNs) were measured for the first time in Nuuk, Greenland in 2004 and 2005. The annual mean concentrations of the measured OCs were: α-HCH 20.2 pg m -3, γ-HCH (lindane) 5.1 pg m -3, endosulfan 4.8 pg m -3 and dieldrin 1.9 pg m -3. Concentrations of Σ-chlordanes, DDEs and heptachlor epoxide were generally similar and lower than those of α-HCH and γ-HCH. The concentrations of most chlorinated pesticides did not show any clear seasonal variation, with the exception of γ-HCH, which had maximum concentration in August in both years. The average annual mean for ΣPBDEs was 1.14 ± 0.81 pg m -3. The predominant congeners measured in Nuuk were BDE-47 and BDE-99 followed by BDE-100, -153 and -28, indicating the use of penta-BDE technical products as the main source. A clear seasonal variation of PBDE concentrations was observed with maximum concentrations occurring in the summer months. The ΣPCNs concentrations ranged between 0.062 and 0.258 pg m -3 with an annual mean concentration of 0.161 ± 0.004 pg m -3. The PCNs profile was dominated by the tetra-PCNs (74% of the annual mean) and the penta-PCNs (18% of the annual mean). A seasonal trend for ΣPCNs was not observed. Atmospheric concentrations of the investigated compounds were correlated with temperature and anthropogenic CO in order to obtain information about their transport pattern. Positive correlations were found between CO and chlordanes, p, p'-DDE and trifluralin, while a negative correlation was found for γ-HCH. A significant correlation with temperature variations was found for dieldrin, heptachlor epoxide, α-HCH, γ-HCH, BDE-47, BDE-99 and tetra-PCNs, which indicates that re-emission of these compounds from previously contaminated surfaces as an important factor for the observed variations in concentrations.

  1. Changing Surface-Atmosphere Energy Exchange and Refreezing Capacity of the Lower Accumulation Area, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampidis, C.; van As, D.; Machguth, H.; Smeets, P.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Box, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    We present five years (2009-2013) of automatic weather station (AWS) data from the lower accumulation area (1840 m above sea level) of the Kangerlussuaq region, western Greenland ice sheet. The summers of 2010 and 2012 were both exceptionally warm, but only 2012 resulted in negative surface mass budget (SMB) and surface runoff. The observed runoff was due to a large ice fraction in the upper 10 m of firn that prevented melt water from percolating to available pore space below. Analysis of the in situ data reveals a relatively low 2012 summer albedo of ~0.7 as melt water was present at the surface. Consequently, during the 2012 melt season the surface absorbed 30% (213 MJ m-2) more solar radiation than in 2010. We drive a surface energy balance model with the AWS data to evaluate the seasonal and interannual variability of all surface energy fluxes. The model is able to reproduce the observed melt rates as well as the SMB for each season. While the drive for melt is solar radiation, year-to-year differences are controlled by terrestrial radiation, apart from 2012 when solar radiation dominated melt. Sensitivity tests reveal that 72% of the excess solar energy in 2012 was used for melt, corresponding to 40% (0.67 m) of the 2012 surface ablation. The remaining ablation (0.99 m) was primarily due to the relatively high atmospheric temperatures up to +2.6 °C daily average, indicating that 2012 would have been a negative SMB year in the lower accumulation area even without the melt-albedo feedback. Longer time series of SMB, regional temperature and remotely sensed albedo (MODIS) suggest that 2012 was the first negative SMB year with the lowest albedo at this elevation on record. The warming conditions of the last years resulted in enhanced melt and reduction of the refreezing capacity of the lower accumulation area. If the warming continues the lower accumulation area will be transformed into superimposed ice.

  2. Ocean properties, ice-ocean interactions, and calving front morphology at two major west Greenland glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauché, N.; Hubbard, A.; Gascard, J.-C.; Box, J. E.; Bates, R.; Koppes, M.; Sole, A.; Patton, H.

    2013-11-01

    Warm sub-polar mode water (SPMW) has been identified as a primary driver of mass loss of marine terminating glaciers draining the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) yet, the specific mechanisms by which SPMW interacts with these tidewater termini remain uncertain. We present oceanographic data from Rink Glacier (RG) and Store Glacier (SG) fjords, two major marine outlets draining the western sector of the GrIS into Baffin Bay over the contrasting melt-seasons of 2009 and 2010. Submarine melting occurs wherever ice is in direct contact with warmer water and the consistent presence of 2.8 °C SPMW adjacent to both ice fronts below 400 m throughout all surveys indicates that melting is maintained by a combination of molecular diffusion and large scale, weak convection, diffusional (hereafter called ubiquitous) melting. At shallower depths (50-200 m), cold, brine-enriched water (BEW) formed over winter appears to persist into the summer thereby buffering this melt by thermal insulation. Our surveys reveal four main modes of glacier-ocean interaction, governed by water depth and the rate of glacier runoff water (GRW) injected into the fjord. Deeper than 200 m, submarine melt is the only process observed, regardless of the intensity of GRW or the depth of injection. However, between the surface and 200 m depth, three further distinct modes are observed governed by the GRW discharge. When GRW is weak (≲1000 m3 s-1), upward motion of the water adjacent to the glacier front is subdued, weak forced or free convection plus diffusional submarine melting dominates at depth, and seaward outflow of melt water occurs from the glacier toe to the base of the insulating BEW. During medium intensity GRW (∼1500 m3 s-1), mixing with SPMW yields deep mixed runoff water (DMRW), which rises as a buoyant plume and intensifies local submarine melting (enhanced buoyancy-driven melting). In this case, DMRW typically attains hydrostatic equilibrium and flows seaward at an intermediate depth of

  3. West Nile Virus Infection in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Evandro R.; Luo, Huanle; Wang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), a neurotropic single-stranded flavivirus has been the leading cause of arboviral encephalitis worldwide.  Up to 50% of WNV convalescent patients in the United States were reported to have long-term neurological sequelae.  Neither antiviral drugs nor vaccines are available for humans.  Animal models have been used to investigate WNV pathogenesis and host immune response in humans.  In this review, we will discuss recent findings from studies in animal models of WNV infection, and provide new insights on WNV pathogenesis and WNV-induced host immunity in the central nervous system. PMID:26918172

  4. Floods of May 1981 in west-central Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrett, Charles; Omang, R.J.; Hull, J.A.; Fassler, John W.

    1982-01-01

    Extensive flooding occurred in west-central Montana during May 22-23, 1981, as a result of a series of rainstorms. Flooding was particularly severe in the communities of East Helena, Belt, and Deer Lodge. Although no lives were lost, total flood damages were estimated by the Montana Disaster Emergency Services Division to be in excess of $30 million. Peak discharges were determined at 75 sites in the flooded area. At 25 sites the May 1981 peak discharge exceeded the computed 100-year frequency flood, and at 29 sites, where previous flow records are available, the May 1981 peak discharge exceeded the previous peak of record. (USGS)

  5. Mantle Sources, Mantle Melting and the Genesis of the Central East Greenland Plateau Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. L.; Barfod, G. H.; Lesher, C. E.

    2006-12-01

    The Central East Greenland (CEG) plateau lavas (56-54 Ma) contain a very complete geochemical record of the opening of the North Atlantic basin in response to the breakup of Pangaea. This record provides an unique opportunity for identifying the mantle source compositions and melting processes involved in the genesis of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP). The plateau lavas consist of three compositional suites: the volumetrically dominant high-Ti suite (TiO2 ca. 1.67 - 4 wt. %) (HTS) and the minor low-Ti (TiO2 < 1.96 wt. %) and very high-Ti (TiO2 ca. 4 - 6 wt. %) suites (LTS and VHTS, respectively). We present detailed Hf-Nd-Sr data and trace element data for VHTS and LTS lavas closely associated within the lava succession. These uncontaminated lava suites represent the extreme compositional ranges of the plateau lavas and show limited variability in ɛHf (9.58 - 10.96 [VHTS] and 14.39 - 14.68 [LTS]) and a somewhat broader variation in ɛNd (5.42 - 6.73 [VHTS] and 8.29 - 9.68 [LTS]). The LTS and VHTS source compositions bracket the chemical range observed for the HTS lavas. Drawing from the model of [1], we propose that the mantle sources for the VHTS and LTS were intimately associated within the mantle melting regime beneath CEG and were present throughout the generation of the plateau lavas. Correlations between trace element and isotopic data can be accounted for by a forward melting model involving a heterogeneous source containing fusible eclogite and refractory peridotite. These findings are in contrast to the model of [2] proposing that temporal sampling of three distinct and isolated mantle domains within a zoned plume is the dominant control on plateau lava chemistry. Our study highlights the importance of combining isotope and trace element data in understanding melt production in the NAIP and elsewhere. (1) Tegner et al., 1998, Nature, v 395, p 591-594; (2) Barker et al., 2006, Geology, v 34, p 481-484

  6. Metamorphism of the ca. 3800 Ma supracrustal rocks at Isua, West Greenland: implications for early Archaean crustal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boak, Jeremy L.; Dymek, Robert F.

    1982-06-01

    A detailed mineralogical and petrological study has been carried out on samples from two clastic metasedimentary lithologies from the ˜ 3800 Ma Isua Supracrustal Belt, West Greenland. Semipelitic to pelitic "garnet-biotite schist" contains the limiting AKFM assemblage: muscovite-biotite-garnet-staurolite (+ quartz + plagioclase + ilmenite), whereas "muscovite-biotite gneiss", derived from felsic volcanogenic graywacke, locally contains kyanite (+ quartz+ plagioclase + Ca-, Mn-rich garnet). Temperatures calculated from Fe-Mg partitioning between coexisting garnet- biotite indicate equilibration for garnet coresat T ˜550°C, and ˜460°C for garnet rims. We interpret the higher T as a minimum estimate for prograde regional metamorphism which we argue occurred before 3600 Ma, whereas the lower T reflects later retrogression as indicated by the development of chlorite ± sericite in many samples. The presence of kyanite as the stable aluminosilicate polymorph, combined with phase assemblage data, indicate P ˜5 kbar during prograde metamorphism, and a depthof burial of at least 15 km. The Isua supracrustals are the oldest comprehensively dated rocks on Earth, and the metamorphic mineral assemblages reported here constitute the earliest direct record of thermal regimes in Archaean crust. Therefore, characterization of the metamorphic history of the Isua region places an important constraint on models of early Earth history. Our data and observations indicate that prograde regional metamorphism at Isua occurred at conditions which are considered "normal" for an orogenic system, with a metamorphic thermal gradient ˜35°C/km. Moreover, our results contraindicate the universal occurrence of "thin" Archaean crust and excessively "steep" crustal thermal gradients as proposed by some investigators. Such conclusion appears at odds with estimates for higher terrestrial heat production during the early Archaean, but can be resolved by appealing to more rapid convection and

  7. Seismic evidence for the erosion of subglacial sediments by rapidly draining supraglacial lakes on the West Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulessa, Bernd; Booth, Adam; Hubbard, Alun; Dow, Christine; Doyle, Samuel; Clark, Roger; Gusmeroli, Alessio; Lindbäck, Katrin; Pettersson, Rickard; Jones, Glenn; Murray, Tavi

    2013-04-01

    As part of a multi-disciplinary, multi-national project investigating the ice-dynamic implications of rapidly draining supraglacial lakes on the West Greenland Ice Sheet, we have conducted a series of seismic reflection experiments immediately following the rapid drainage of Lake F in the land-terminating Russell Glacier catchment to [1] isolate the principal mode of basal motion, and [2] identify and characterise the modification of that mode as forced by ingress of surface-derived meltwaters. Lake F had a surface area of ~3.84 km2 and drained entirely in less than two hours at a maximum rate of ~ 3300 m3 s-1, marked by local ice extension and uplift of up to 1 m. Two seismic profiles (A and B) were acquired and optimised for amplitude versus angle (AVA) characterisation of the substrate. All seismic data were recorded with a Geometrics GEODE system, using 48 vertically-orientated 100-Hz geophones installed at 10 m intervals. 250 g pentalite charges were fired in shallow auger holes at 80 m intervals along each line, providing six-fold coverage. Profile A targets the subglacial hydrological basin into which the Lake-F waters drained, and reveals a uniform, flat glacier bed beneath ~1.3 km of ice, characterised by the presence of a very stiff till with an acoustic impedance of 4.17 ± 0.11 x 106 kg m-2 s1 and a Poisson's ratio of 0.06 ± 0.05. In profile B, to the southeast of Lake F in an isolated subglacial hydrological basin, ice thickness is 1.0-1.1 km and a discrete sedimentary basin is evident; within this feature, we interpret a stratified subglacial till deposit, having lodged till (acoustic impedance = 4.26 ± 0.59×106 kgm-2 s-1) underlying a water-saturated dilatant till layer (thickness

  8. Ground Magnetic Data for west-central Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-03-08

    Ground Magnetic Data for west-central Colorado Modeled ground magnetic data was extracted from the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies database at http://irpsrvgis08.utep.edu/viewers/Flex/GravityMagnetic/GravityMagnetic_CyberShare/ on 2/29/2012. The downloaded text file was then imported into an Excel spreadsheet. This spreadsheet data was converted into an ESRI point shapefile in UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection, showing location and magnetic field strength in nano-Teslas. This point shapefile was then interpolated to an ESRI grid using an inverse-distance weighting method, using ESRI Spatial Analyst. The grid was used to create a contour map of magnetic field strength. This dataset includes the raw spreadsheet data, an ESRI point shapefile showing magnetic sample locations and magnetic field strength, and an ESRI line shapefile showing magnetic contours. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Magnetic Contour Shapefile Extent: West -108.698836 East -105.283977 North 41.048206 South 36.950086 Magnetic Point Shapefile Extent: West -108.698832 East -105.283908 North 41.048142 South 36.950086

  9. 22. AERIAL VIEW LOOKING EAST DOWN CENTRAL AVENUE FROM WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. AERIAL VIEW LOOKING EAST DOWN CENTRAL AVENUE FROM WEST OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPPORT AREA OF THE PLANT. ON THE LEFT (NORTH) SIDE OF THE STREET IN THE FOREGROUND OF THE PHOTOGRAPH IS BUILDING 111, THE GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BUILDING. TO THE EAST OF BUILDING 111 IS BUILDING 112, THE CAFETERIA. FURTHER TO THE EAST IS BUILDING 331, THE VEHICLE MAINTENANCE GARAGE AND FIRE DEPARTMENT; BUILDING 333, THE PAINT SHOP; BUILDING 334, THE ELECTRICAL AND GENERAL MAINTENANCE SHOP; AND BUILDING 551, THE GENERAL WAREHOUSE. ON THE RIGHT (SOUTH) SIDE OF CENTRAL AVENUE, IN THE FOREGROUND IS BUILDING 121, FIREARMS REPAIR. BEHIND BUILDING 121 IS BUILDING 122, EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES, AND BUILDING 123, HEALTH PHYSICS LABORATORY. BUILDING 441, THE PRODUCTION ... - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  10. The diorite at West Warren, south-central Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pomeroy, John S.

    1974-01-01

    Follated, syntectonic, concordant intrusive bodies of mostly diorite and meladiorite with less abundant quartz diorite and norite have been mapped in the West Warren area of south-central Massachusetts. The rocks of the pluton range from a medium colored phase of diorite and quartz diorite to a dark colored phase of meladiorite and norite. Major minerals In the dioritic rocks are calcic andesine, green hornblende, brown biotite, and hypersthene. Igneous textures are dominant, and retrograde or deuteric effects are generally minor. Silica and alumina contents of the dioritic rocks are somewhat higher than for average diorites; conversely, the oxides of iron, magnesium, and calcium are generally lower. Normative quartz, albite, and anorthite are higher and orthoclase is lower in the samples than In the average diorite. Sizeable plutons of diorite-norite are uncommon in central Massachusetts. The West Warren body, roughly 26 km2 (10 square miles) in area, bears little petrochemical relation to adjacent rock units. The pluton can be construed as belonging to a belt of intrusive mafic rocks which stretches from southeastern New York to coastal Maine.

  11. Observations of vertical currents and convection in the central Greenland Sea during the winter of 1988-1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, Friedrich; Visbeck, Martin; Fischer, Jürgen

    1993-01-01

    During the winter of 1988-1989 five acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) were moored in the central Greenland Sea to measure vertical currents that might occur in conjunction with deep mixing and convection. Two ADCPs were looking up from about 300 m and combined with thermistor strings in the depth range 60-260 m, two were looking downward from 200 m, and one was looking upward from 1400 m. First maxima of vertical velocity variance occurred at two events of strong cold winds in October and November when cooling and turbulence in the shallow mixed layer generated internal waves in the thermocline. Beginning in late November the marginal ice zone expanded eastward over the central Greenland Sea, reaching its maximum extent in late December. In mid-January a bay of ice-free water opened over the central Greenland Sea, leaving a wedge of ice, the "is odden," curled around it along the axis of the Jan Mayen Current and then northeastward and existing well into April 1989. Below the ice a mixed layer at freezing temperatures developed that increased in thickness from 60 to 120 m during the period of ice cover, corresponding to an average heat loss of about 40 W m-2. Through brine rejection, mixed-layer salinity increased steadily, reducing stability to underlying weakly stratified layers (Roach et al., 1993). During the ice cover period, vertical currents were at a minimum. After the opening of the ice-free bay, successive mixed-layer deepening to >350 m occurred in conjunction with cooling events around February 1 and 15, accompanied by strong small-scale vertical velocity variations. Upward mixing of more saline waters of Atlantic origin during this phase reduced the stability further, generating a pool of homogeneous water of >50 km horizontal extent in the central Greenland Sea, preconditioned for subsequent convection to greater depths. Individual convection events were observed during March 6-16, associated with downward velocities at the 1400-m level of

  12. Geology and total petroleum systems of the West-Central Coastal province (7203), West Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownfield, Michael E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.

    2006-01-01

    The West-Central Coastal Province of the Sub-Saharan Africa Region consists of the coastal and offshore areas of Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Republic of the Congo, Angola (including the disputed Cabinda Province), and Namibia. The area stretches from the east edge of the Niger Delta south to the Walvis Ridge. The West-Central Coastal Province includes the Douala, Kribi-Campo, Rio Muni, Gabon, Congo, Kwanza, Benguela, and Namibe Basins, which together form the Aptian salt basin of equatorial west Africa. The area has had significant exploration for petroleum; more than 295 oil fields have been discovered since 1954. Since 1995, several giant oil fields have been discovered, especially in the deep-water area of the Congo Basin. Although many total petroleum systems may exist in the West-Central Coastal Province, only four major total petroleum systems have been defined. The area of the province north of the Congo Basin contains two total petroleum systems: the Melania-Gamba Total Petroleum System, consisting of Lower Cretaceous source and reservoir rocks, and the Azile-Senonian Total Petroleum System, consisting of Albian to Turonian source rocks and Cretaceous reservoir rocks. Two assessment units are defined in the West-Central Coastal Province north of the Congo Basin: the Gabon Subsalt and the Gabon Suprasalt Assessment Units. The Congo Basin contains the Congo Delta Composite Total Petroleum System, consisting of Lower Cretaceous to Tertiary source and reservoir rocks. The Central Congo Delta and Carbonate Platform and the Central Congo Turbidites Assessment Units are defined in the Congo Delta Composite Total Petroleum System. The area south of the Congo Basin contains the Cuanza Composite Total Petroleum System, consisting of Lower Cretaceous to Tertiary source and reservoir rocks. The Cuanza-Namibe Assessment Unit is defined in the Cuanza Composite Total Petroleum System. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessed the

  13. 9 CFR 93.423 - Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ruminants from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Central America and West Indies 9 § 93.423 Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies. (a) Ruminants intended...

  14. 9 CFR 93.423 - Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ruminants from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Central America and West Indies 9 § 93.423 Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies. (a) Ruminants intended...

  15. 9 CFR 93.423 - Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ruminants from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Central America and West Indies 9 § 93.423 Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies. (a) Ruminants intended...

  16. 9 CFR 93.423 - Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ruminants from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Central America and West Indies 9 § 93.423 Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies. (a) Ruminants intended...

  17. 9 CFR 93.423 - Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ruminants from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Central America and West Indies 9 § 93.423 Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies. (a) Ruminants intended...

  18. Kimberlite and related rocks from Garnet Lake, West Greenland, including their mantle constituents, diamond occurrence, age and provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Mark T.; Frei, Dirk

    2009-11-01

    Observations of thickness, orientation and morphology and mineral chemistry of the principal diamondiferous intrusive sheet and associated bodies in the vicinity of Garnet Lake, Sarfartoq, West Greenland are reported. The principal body dips to the east on a NE/SW (true) trend and reaches a maximum thickness of 4.25 m. Multiple intrusive events are identified within the main sheet including sub-parallel bands occasionally exhibiting grain size sorting, cross-cutting layers and late-stage carbonate-rich emplacement, particularly at the contacts with country rock. Phenocrystic mineral assemblages and compositional measurements reveal two principal petrological types. The dominant type is an aillikite and the second rock type is a kimberlite. The kimberlite exhibits thin Ba-rich rims (towards kinoshitalite) on Al-rich phlogopite crysts, and an abundance of perovskite. Compositional zonation in groundmass spinels suggest a later transition towards an aillikite component. The aillikite is characterised by abundant phlogopite, heavily zoned with tetraferriphlogopite rims, transitional Type 1-Type 2 spinel compositions, rare Al,Ti-rich groundmass clinopyroxene and occasional exotic Sr-carbonate phases such as olekminskite. The Garnet Lake main sheet is characterised by mantle phases occurring as individual grains, most strikingly as garnet xenocrysts up to 5 mm and disaggregated mantle olivine crysts. Xenoliths occur rarely and are typically garnet dunites and garnet lherzolites. Heavy mineral separation reveals an abundance of G10D garnets and, whilst peridotitic garnets dominate, eclogitic G3D and G4D garnets also occur. Trace element compositions of garnet crysts reveal sinusoidal REE patterns in harzburgitic garnets however a component of flat and REE-enriched G11 garnets is apparent, reflecting significant mantle refertilisation. Thermorbarometric calculations on assemblages in Garnet Lake main sheet garnet lherzolites reveal equilibrium conditions clustering closely

  19. Authigenic quartz in the Upper Freeport coalbed, west- central Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppert, L.P.

    1985-05-01

    Cathodoluminescence petrography was used to examine quartz grains contained in facies of the Upper Freeport coalbed (Middle Pennsylvanian) of west-central Pennsylvania. Samples included ash concentrates, polished blocks of different lithotypes, and standard petrographic pellets of specific gravity separates of facies channel samples. More than 80% of the quartz in mineral and vitrain-rich bands in the polished blocks do not exhibit cathodoluminescence. In specific gravity separates, 100% of the quartz in the lightest gravity separates did not luminesce. In the heaviest gravity separates, which included shale-parting material, 60% of the quartz did not luminesce. In contrast, in a sample of shale directly overlying the coalbed, more than 90% of the quartz luminesced. On the basis of these data and of other published data, quartz in the Upper Freeport coalbed is interpreted to be authigenic in origin. The authigenic quartz grains are postulated to have been derived from phytoclasts.

  20. Climatic factors influencing triatomine occurrence in Central-West Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Joyce Mendes; de Almeida, Paulo Silva; de Sousa, Adair Vieira; de Paula, Aécio Moraes; Machado, Ricardo Bomfim; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    We estimated the geographic distributions of triatomine species in Central-West Region of Brazil (CW) and analysed the climatic factors influencing their occurrence. A total of 3,396 records of 27 triatomine species were analysed. Using the maximum entropy method, ecological niche models were produced for eight species occurring in at least 20 municipalities based on 13 climatic variables and elevation. Triatoma sordida and Rhodnius neglectus were the species with the broadest geographic distributions in CW Brazil. The Cerrado areas in the state of Goiás were found to be more suitable for the occurrence of synanthropic triatomines than the Amazon forest areas in the northern part of the state of Mato Grosso. The variable that best explains the evaluated models is temperature seasonality. The results indicate that almost the entire region presents climatic conditions that are appropriate for at least one triatomine species. Therefore, it is recommended that entomological surveillance be reinforced in CW Brazil. PMID:23778666

  1. Flood profiles for Cypress Creek, west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, W.R., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Flood profiles are included for selected recurrence-interval floods in west-central Florida for a 27-mile reach of Cypress Creek, for a 4-mile tributary reach, and for a 1.2-mile distributary reach. The procedure for constructing flood profiles is based on flood heights computed in a step-backwater analysis using the following data: 2-, 2.33-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year flood-peak discharges; data for 53 Cypress Creek channel cross sections, 11 tributary cross sections, and 7 distributary cross sections (including roughness coefficients); and stage-discharge relations. Computed flood heights are judged to be generally accurate to plus-or-minus 0.5 foot. Flood data presented can be used to delineate areal extent of flooding on topographic maps. This information can be used by local governmental agencies to control flood-plain development. (Woodard-USGS)

  2. Past sea-level data from Lakse Bugt, Disko Island, West Greenland from ground-penetrating radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Priscila E.; Nielsen, Lars; Kroon, Aart; Clemmensen, Lars B.

    2016-04-01

    Beach-ridge deposits have been used as sea-level indicators in numerous studies from temperate coastal regions. However, their present surface morphology in artic regions may not accurately correspond to past sea-level, because subsequent surface erosion, solifluction processes and/or later sediment deposition may have altered the surface significantly. The internal structure of these beach ridges, however, is often well-preserved and thus constitutes an important key to reconstruction of past sea levels as seen elsewhere. In the present study, high-resolution reflection GPR data and high-precision topographic data were collected at Lakse Bugt (Disko Island, West Greenland) using a shielded 250 MHz antennae system and a RTK-Trimble R8 DGPS, respectively. Three transects were collected across a sequence of fossil, raised beach ridge deposits, and two transects were obtained across modern beach deposits at the shoreline of the mesotidal regime. Along all radar profiles we observed downlap reflection points, which we interpret to represent the boundary between sediments deposited on the beachface and sediments deposited in the upper shoreface regime. Both the upper shoreface and the beachface deposits exhibit reflection patterns dipping in the seaward direction. The beachface deposits show the strongest dip. At or just below the downlap points strong diffractions are often observed indicating the presence of a layer containing stones. These stones are large enough to generate significant signal scattering. At the present day beach a sharp transition defined by the presence of large stones is observed near the low tide water level: cobbles characterize the seaside, while the land side is characterized by sand and gravel. Therefore, it seems reasonable to conclude that downlap points observed in the GPR data serve as indicators of past low-tide levels (at the time of deposition). The downlap points show a consistent offset with respect to present surface topography

  3. Year round subglacial water pressure and ice velocity data from the West-Greenland ice sheet margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeets, C. J. P. P.; Boot, W.; Hubbard, A.; Pettersson, R.; Wilhelms, F.; van den Broeke, M. R.; van de Wal, R. S. W.

    2012-04-01

    Surface melt water plays in important role in controlling the motion of ice caps or ice sheets. However, the lack of subglacial pressure information currently hampers the interpretation of the physics of the hydraulic system beneath the ice and the melt and ice velocity at the surface. In July 2010 an experiment was started at Russell glacier, a land terminating glacier near Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland. The drilling location is proven to experience a particular strong coupling between melt water production and ice velocity. During the experiment two pressure, one tilt, and 23 temperature sensors were installed in two 600 m deep holes using a newly developed wireless sensor system (WiSe). Surface melt water production and surface velocity are monitored simultaneously at nearby locations. The measurements are ongoing and currently a continuous data set of subglacial pressure, ice velocity and surface melt has been collected for the period July 2010 to August 2011 from which results are presented. At the start of summer melt the ice velocity quickly increases with daytime maxima up to 500% of its wintertime background values and a clear daily variation in line with subglacial pressure. During a period of 20 days thereafter the mean ice velocity and subglacial pressure decrease substantially while maintaining a diurnal cycle. It is apparent that the subglacial drainage network quickly develops into an efficient channelized (low pressure) system. Throughout the second half of the melt season the mean ice velocity is slightly decreasing and the diurnal minima show values below wintertime. Only during periods with intense melting the ice velocity increases substantially. The evolution of subglacial pressure during this period appears quite different between 2010 and 2011 indicating that the sensor location was connected to a system influenced by either channels or cavities. At the end of the melt season daily variations in subglacial pressure and ice velocity cease at

  4. Ordovician sponges from west-central and east-central Alaska and western Yukon Territory, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rigby, J.K.; Blodgett, R.B.; Britt, B.B.

    2008-01-01

    Moderate collections of fossil sponges have been recovered over a several-year period from a few scattered localities in west-central and east-central Alaska, and from westernmost Yukon Territory of Canada. Two fragments of the demosponge agelasiid cliefdenellid, Cliefdenella alaskaensis Stock, 1981, and mostly small unidentifiable additional fragments were recovered from a limestone debris flow bed in the White Mountain area, McGrath A-4 Quadrangle in west-central Alaska. Fragments of the agelasiid actinomorph girtyocoeliids Girtyocoeliana epiporata (Rigby & Potter, 1986) and Girtyocoelia minima n. sp., plus a specimen of the vaceletid colospongiid Corymbospongia amplia Rigby, Karl, Blodgett & Baichtal, 2005, were collected from probable Ashgillian age beds in the Livengood B-5 Quadrangle in east-central Alaska. A more extensive suite of corymbospongiids, including Corymbospongia betella Rigby, Potter & Blodgett, 1988, C. mica Rigby & Potter, 1986, and C.(?) perforata Rigby & Potter, 1986, along with the vaceletiid colospongiids Pseudo-imperatoria minima? (Rigby & Potter, 1986), and Pseudoimperatoria media (Rigby & Potter, 1986), and with the heteractinid Nucha naucum? Pickett & Jell, 1983, were recovered from uppermost part of the Jones Ridge Limestone (Ashgillian), on the south flank of Jones Ridge, in the Sheep Mountain Quadrangle, in westernmost Yukon Territory, Canada. The fossil sponges from the McGrath A-4 and Livengood B-5 quadrangles were recovered from attached Siberian terranes, and those from the Sheep Mountain Quadrangle were recovered from an allochthonous Laurentian terrane in the Yukon Territory.

  5. Deglaciation and postglacial vegetation history of the West Mountains, west-central Idaho, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doerner, J.P.; Carrara, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    The West Mountains, west-central Idaho, were deglaciated before ca. 11,500 BP, as indicated by radiocarbon ages and Glacier Peak tephra, at several sites in cirques. Pollen analysis of a sediment core, and plant macrofossils from sediments recovered from the cirque at the head of Van Wyck Creek, indicate that a closed spruce-pine forest surrounded the site from ca. 11,500 to 9800 BP. Early in this period, spruce (probably krummholz) was already growing near the present-day altitudinal limit of large upright spruce. Hence, the climate during this period was significantly warmer than before 11,500 BP. Between ca. 9800 and 3200 BP the climate was warmer and drier than present. Pollen data indicate that from ca. 9300 to the time of Mazama tephra deposition (ca. 6700 BP), the climate was warmer and drier than at any time since 11,500 BP. From ca. 6700 to 3200 BP there was a small decrease in temperature with a minor increase in effective moisture. Beginning ca. 3200 BP, the climate was characterized by cooler temperatures and more mesic conditions. Modern plant communities were established by ca. 1500 BP.

  6. Increasing Freshwater Runoff and Tidal Action Influences on Spatial Mixing Patterns in Søndre Strømfjord, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, C. R.; Kamenos, N.; Hoey, T.; Cottier, F.; Ellam, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Greenland Ice Sheet melt has the potential to affect global sea levels and the strength of the thermohaline circulation (THC). Investigating spatial mixing patterns of seawater in Greenlandic fjords can help reveal characteristics of changes in runoff from the GrIS; for example higher runoff may be associated with lower salinity within GrIS fjords, which can be recorded by palaeoenvironmental proxies (Kamenos et al 2012). The Kangerlussuaq Drainage Basin mirrors melt patterns of the whole GrIS and drains into Søndre Strømfjord, a 170km long fjord on the west coast of Greenland. Temperature and salinity profiles to 40m depth were obtained at 11 stations along Søndre Strømfjord during the 2014 melt season. Each station was sampled twice once at high KDB runoff and once at low KDB runoff. With increasing freshwater runoff, salinity decreases by 1.65 - 2.91 at each station over a 7 hour time period. Higher salinities occur at low run-off. In addition, with increasing run-off, the disparity between surface and deeper water (30m) becomes greater with a 19.3 difference between the surface and 30m. With higher KDB runoff temperature increases by 0.47oC - 2.34oC. This information will be integrated with oxygen and deuterium isotope patterns to pinpoint the exact source of the runoff causing salinity reductions. Our data show a relationship between KDB runoff and salinity of Søndre Strømfjord, data that will enable further calibration of marine proxies of GrIS melt.

  7. The tholeiite-TTG connection during Eoarchean crust formation in Isua, southern West Greenland: the role of subduction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, J. E.; Münker, C.; Nagel, T. J.; Næraa, T.; Polat, A.; Rosing, M. T.

    2012-04-01

    The processes and the geodynamic settings that generated Earth's oldest parts of continental crust are still a matter of debate. A pertinent issue is the genetic relationship between the tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) suite and the mafic fragments that are found as inclusions within this felsic crust. Here we propose a coherent model for the geodynamic evolution of the oldest (3.65 to 3.85 Ga) continental crust in southern West Greenland. Within the Isua Supracrustal Belt, the best preserved and largest fragment of mafic Eoarchean crust worldwide, tholeiitic and boninite-like amphibolites dominate the sequence, both yielding trace element patterns consistent with a subduction-related origin. The tholeiites yield correlated trace element variations in Nb/Th, La/Yb, Gd/Yb, Zr/Nb, in agreement with a subduction zone setting where a depleted mantle source is overprinted by melt-like slab components (Hoffmann et al., 2011a). Boninite-like rocks in Isua are derived from ultradepleted sources with epsHf(3720) of up to ca. +12.9 (Hoffmann et al., 2010). Petrological phase equilibrium modeling combined with trace element modeling suggests a relationship between the typical Isua arc tholeiites and the TTGs (Nagel et al., 2012). Notably, Hf-Nd isotope signatures between the two lithologies overlap (epsHf(t) = -0.7 to +2.5; epsNd(t) = -0.8 to +4.4), both showing the characteristic decoupling of initial Hf-Nd isotope compositions. Systematically elevated 142Nd anomalies of tholeiites and TTGs are also in agreement with a related origin of both rock types (e.g., Caro et al., 2006). Trace element modeling shows that the Isua TTGs likely formed by melting of thickened mafic arc crust with tholeiite compositions (Hoffmann et al., 2011b) and that the decoupled Hf-Nd signature is likely an inherited feature from melting of the tholeiites. This is also underlined by new Hf and O in zircon data from TTGs in the area (Næraa et al., submitted) that indicate melting of a

  8. The hydrology of Lake Rousseau, west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    German, E.R.

    1978-01-01

    Lake Rousseau, about 4 miles southwest of Inglis, Florida, was formed in 1909 by impoundment of the Withlacooche River by Inglis Dam, west of Dunnellon, Florida. The lake was to have been part of the Cross-Florida Barge Canal; a lock and channel associated with the presently inactive project were completed in 1969. Lake Rousseau is about 11 miles long, covers about 4,000 acres, and contains about 34,000 acre-feet of water at the normal pool elevation of 27.5 feet above mean sea level. Inflow to the lake is relatively constant and responds slowly to rainfall. The estimated 100-year peak inflow, 10,400 cubic feet per second, is only 19 percent higher than the 100-year high monthly inflow. Water in Lake Rousseau is a calcium-bicarbonate type and is hard. Mean total phosphorus and organic nitrogen concentrations are considerably lower in Lake Rousseau than in north-central Florida lakes which have been considered to be eutrophic by other investigators, however, the lake supports of prolific aquatic plant community. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations near the water surface are occasionally less than 3 mg/liter. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. Volcanism on the Eggvin Bank (Central Norwegian-Greenland Sea, latitude ˜71°N): age, source, and relationship to the Iceland and putative Jan Mayen plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz, Dieter F.; Sharp, Warren D.; Haase, Karsten M.

    2004-08-01

    The Eggvin Bank (Central Norwegian-Greenland Sea, latitude ˜71°N) is a topographically anomalous shallow area with scattered volcanic peaks extending between the island of Jan Mayen and East Greenland and straddling the northern segment of the mid-Atlantic Kolbeinsey Ridge axis. Basalts dredged from the Eggvin Bank range from variably depleted, tholeiitic, near-axis lavas to enriched, transitional-to-alkaline, off-axis seamount lavas. In terms of normalised incompatible element patterns, the most depleted, near-axis tholeiite is similar to neighbouring Kolbeinsey Ridge basalts, whereas the off-axis, transitional-to-alkaline lavas are similar to other alkaline basalts occurring close to the Eggvin Bank region, e.g., those of Jan Mayen. 40Ar/ 39Ar step heating data indicate that the off-axis seamount lavas are coeval with other alkaline lavas erupted in the Central Norwegian-Greeland Sea at ca. 0.6-0.7 Ma. In contrast, the Eggvin near-axis tholeiites are <0.1 Ma. Volcanic peaks west and north of Jan Mayen show no indication of a systematic age progression. Therefore, the Jan Mayen hot spot hypothesis is not supported by the available radiometric age data. Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope compositions of near-axis and off-axis Eggvin Bank lavas are distinct, implying differences in their mantle sources. Isotope ratios of the off-axis basalts ( 87Sr/ 86Sr=0.70344-0.70352, 143Nd/ 144Nd=0.51283-0.51288, 206Pb/ 204Pb=18.82-18.85) resemble those of neighbouring alkali basalt occurrences, however, isotope ratios of the near-axis tholeiites correspond to lavas erupting in the south-eastern volcanic zone of Iceland, e.g., at Vestmannaeyjar. The near-axis tholeiites are generated by an unusual source with highly radiogenic Pb ( 206Pb/ 204Pb=18.95) together with relatively radiogenic Nd ( 143Nd/ 144Nd=0.51295) and low-radiogenic Sr ( 87Sr/ 86Sr=0.70314), respectively, representing an unique composition in the mantle north of central Iceland. The overlap in isotope compositions between

  10. Earthquake swarms in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Tine B.; Voss, Peter H.; Dahl-Jensen, Trine

    2014-05-01

    Earthquake swarms occur primarily near active volcanoes and in areas with frequent tectonic activity. However, intraplate earthquake swarms are not an unknown phenomenon. They are located near zones of weakness, e.g. in regions with geological contrasts, where dynamic processes are active. An earthquake swarm is defined as a period of increased seismicity, in the form of a cluster of earthquakes of similar magnitude, occurring in the same general area, during a limited time period. There is no obvious main shock among the earthquakes in a swarm. Earthquake swarms occur in Greenland, which is a tectonically stable, intraplate environment. The first earthquake swarms in Greenland were detected more than 30 years ago in Northern and North-Eastern Greenland. However, detection of these low-magnitude events is challenging due to the enormous distances and the relatively sparse network of seismographs. The seismograph coverage of Greenland has vastly improved since the international GLISN-project was initiated in 2008. Greenland is currently coved by an open network of 19 BB seismographs, most of them transmitting data in real-time. Additionally, earthquake activity in Greenland is monitored by seismographs in Canada, Iceland, on Jan Mayen, and on Svalbard. The time-series of data from the GLISN network is still short, with the latest station been added in NW Greenland in 2013. However, the network has already proven useful in detecting several earthquake swarms. In this study we will focus on two swarms: one occurring near/on the East Greenland coast in 2008, and another swarm occurring in the Disko-area near the west coast of Greenland in 2010. Both swarms consist of earthquakes with local magnitudes between 1.9 and 3.2. The areas, where the swarms are located, are regularly active with small earthquakes. The earthquake swarms are analyzed in the context of the general seismicity and the possible relationship to the local geological conditions.

  11. Strontium and neodymium isotopic variations in early Archean gneisses affected by middle to late Archean high-grade metamorphic processes: West Greenland and Labrador

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collerson, K. D.; Mcculloch, M. T.; Bridgwater, D.; Mcgregor, V. R.; Nutman, A. P.

    1986-01-01

    Relicts of continental crust formed more than 3400 Ma ago are preserved fortuitously in most cratons. The cratons provide the most direct information about crust and mantle evolutionary processes during the first billion years of Earth history. In view of their polymetamorphic character, these terrains are commonly affected by subsequent tectonothermal events. Hence, their isotope systematics may be severely disturbed as a result of bulk chemical change or local isotopic homogenization. This leads to equivocal age and source information for different components within these terrains. The Sr and Nd isotopic data are presented for early Archean gneisses from the North Atlantic Craton in west Greenland and northern Labrador which were affected by younger metamorphic events.

  12. Are seasonal calving dynamics forced by buttressing from ice mélange or undercutting by melting? Outcomes from full-Stokes simulations of Store Gletscher, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, J.; Christoffersen, P.

    2014-07-01

    We use a full-Stokes 2-D model (Elmer/Ice) to investigate the flow and calving dynamics of Store Gletscher, a fast flowing outlet glacier in West Greenland. Based on a new, subgrid-scale implementation of the crevasse depth calving criterion, we perform two sets of simulations; one to identify the primary forcing mechanisms and another to constrain future stability. We find that the mixture of icebergs and sea-ice, known as ice mélange or sikussak, is principally responsible for the observed seasonal advance of the ice front, whereas submarine melting plays a secondary role. Sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the glacier's calving dynamics are sensitive to seasonal perturbation, but are stable on interannual timescales due to the glacier's topographic setting. Our results shed light on the dynamics of calving glaciers while explaining why neighbouring glaciers do not necessarily respond synchronously to changes in atmospheric and oceanic forcing.

  13. Increasing freshwater runoff and tidal action influences on spatial mixing patterns in Søndre Strømfjord, West Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, Crystal; Kamenos, Nick; Hoey, Trevor; Cottier, Finlo; Ellam, Rob

    2015-04-01

    Greenland Ice Sheet melt has the potential to affect global sea levels and the strength of the thermohaline circulation (THC). Investigating spatial mixing patterns of seawater in Greenlandic fjords can help reveal characteristics of changes in runoff from the GrIS; for example higher runoff may be associated with lower salinity within GrIS fjords, which can be recorded by palaeoenvironmental proxies (Kamenos et al 2012). The Kangerlussuaq Drainage Basin mirrors melt patterns of the whole GrIS and drains into Søndre Strømfjord, a 170km long fjord on the west coast of Greenland. Temperature and salinity profiles to 40m depth were obtained at 11 stations along Søndre Strømfjord during the 2014 melt season. Each station was sampled twice once at high KDB runoff and once at low KDB runoff. With increasing freshwater runoff, salinity decreased by 1.65 - 2.91 and temperature increased by 0.47oC- 2.34oC at each station over a 7 hour time period. Higher salinities occurred at low run-off. In addition, with increasing run-off, the disparity between surface and deeper water (30m) salinity became greater with a 19.3 difference between the surface and 30m. This information was integrated with oxygen and deuterium isotopic signatures collected at 10 m depth from each station to pinpoint the exact source of the runoff causing salinity reductions. With increasing freshwater runoff, the chemistry of the fjord exhibits an enrichment of the heavier isotope. δ18Ovsmow values enrich by 7.40 permil while δDvsmow enrich 53.26 permil. Our data shows a relationship between KDB runoff, salinity, and oxygen, hydrogen isotopic chemistry of Søndre Strømfjord, data that will enable further calibration of marine proxies of GrIS melt. References Kamenos, N.A, Hoey, T.B, Nienow, P., Fallick, A.E., & Claverie, T., 2012: Reconstructing Greenland Ice Sheet runoff using coralline algae; Geological Society of America, Geology, doi: 10.1130/G33405.1

  14. Recent Deposition of Trace Metals to Central (Summit) Greenland as Recorded in 3-Meter Snow Pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overdier, J.; Shafer, M.; Schauer, J.; von Schneidemesser, E.; Hagler, G.; Bergin, M.

    2007-12-01

    During the summer 2005 and 2006 field seasons at Summit (3270 m) Greenland we collected snow core samples for comprehensive geochemical characterization. This sampling effort was one facet of our larger program with the overall objective of improving our understanding of the sourcing and post depositional diagenesis of organic carbon depositing on the Greenland ice sheet. From snow pits of 3-meter depth, representing ~4 years of recent accumulation, detailed profiles of a suite of chemical variables were obtained, including: total and water soluble organic carbon, particulate organic and elemental carbon, inorganic ions, and comprehensive elemental and isotopic analysis. The elemental characterization supports our source reconciliation efforts in providing sub-seasonal data on aerosol particulate matter chemistry from which sourcing vectors can be inferred. Elemental and isotopic analyses on the melted snow cores were carried-out using high-resolution (sector-field) ICP-MS (Finnegan Element 2). A large suite of elements were quantified, including: the major/crustal elements (Al, Ca, K, Fe. Na, Mg, Si), minor crustal elements (Ba, Cs, Li, Rb, Sc, Sr, Ti) light transition metals (Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Zn), heavy transition metals (Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Tl, W), oxyanion metals (As, Mo, U, V), platinum group metals (Rh, Pd, Pt), rare earths (Ce, Er, Eu, La, Nd, Sm, Y, Yb), as well as, Be, Sb, Sn, sulfur and phosphorus. Very large (>30x) temporal variation in snow core concentrations were measured for Al, Ba, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, P, Rb, Sr, Ti, U, Zn and all the rare earths, while low variation (~5x) is observed for the elements As, Cd, Hg, Mo, S and Sn. The later group is representative of the more mobile, anthropogenically dominated/sourced trace metals. Principal crustal elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na) and sulfate (S) present similar profiles, with significant burial peaks in spring. Major burial peaks are relatively uniformly spaced (~70 cm apart), indicating some consistency

  15. [Production systems of Spondias purpurea (Anacardiaceae) in Central West Mexico].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Hernández, Blanca C; Barrios Eulogio, Pimienta; Castellanos Ramos, Javier Z; Muñoz Urias, Alejandro; Palomino Hasbach, Guadalupe; Pimienta Barrios, Enrique

    2008-06-01

    Morphological, physical and chemical traits related with fruit quality characteristics of Spondias purpurea L. agroecosystems were studied in Central-West Mexico for wild and cultivated populations. Spondias purpurea regularly thrive in shallow, rocky infertile soils unsuitable for conventional crops. The weight, axial and radial length, pH, total soluble solids (SST), reducing sugars, proteins and mineral content in fruits were recorded. The mean fresh fruit weight was superior in the cultivated varieties (20 g) than in the wild (16 g). Similarly the highest values of pH, SST, reducing sugars and protein content (3.3, 12.15 degrees Brix, 0.38 g/100 g and 1.18 g/100 g, respectively) were observed in the cultivated plantations compared with wild populations (3.0, 8.31 degrees Brix, 0.24 g/100 g and 0.14 g/100 g, respectively). In cultivated plantations, productivity ranged from 0.15 ton ha(-1) to 5.0 ton ha(-1), and must be considered satisfactory, considering the low inputs of fertilizers and pesticides applied to orchards. The fruits of S. purpurea are similar in nutrimental content to more important commercial fruit species; it produces fresh fruits during the dry months of spring, when few fresh fruits are available in the local markets. In addition, S. purpurea is a source of water and food for domestic animals and wild fauna. These traits emphasize their agronomical and ecological importance for tropical and subtropical environments, where it can also be used in reforestation programs because it can grow in infertile rocky soils, and in agroecosystems inhabited by low income farmers that practice subsistence agriculture. In fact, the cultivation of Spondias has helped convert marginal lands into productive lands. PMID:19256436

  16. Melting at the base of the Greenland ice sheet explained by Iceland hotspot history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhina, Irina; Petrunin, Alexey G.; Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Johnson, Jesse V.; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Calov, Reinhard; Rickers, Florian; Thomas, Maik; Koulakov, Ivan

    2016-05-01

    Ice-penetrating radar and ice core drilling have shown that large parts of the north-central Greenland ice sheet are melting from below. It has been argued that basal ice melt is due to the anomalously high geothermal flux that has also influenced the development of the longest ice stream in Greenland. Here we estimate the geothermal flux beneath the Greenland ice sheet and identify a 1,200-km-long and 400-km-wide geothermal anomaly beneath the thick ice cover. We suggest that this anomaly explains the observed melting of the ice sheet’s base, which drives the vigorous subglacial hydrology and controls the position of the head of the enigmatic 750-km-long northeastern Greenland ice stream. Our combined analysis of independent seismic, gravity and tectonic data implies that the geothermal anomaly, which crosses Greenland from west to east, was formed by Greenland’s passage over the Iceland mantle plume between roughly 80 and 35 million years ago. We conclude that the complexity of the present-day subglacial hydrology and dynamic features of the north-central Greenland ice sheet originated in tectonic events that pre-date the onset of glaciation in Greenland by many tens of millions of years.

  17. Nitrogen emission and deposition budget in West and Central Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galy-Lacaux, C.; Delon, C.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen depends on land surface exchanges of nitrogen compounds. In Sub Saharan Africa, deposition and emission fluxes of nitrogen compounds are poorly quantified, and are likely to increase in the near future due to land use change and anthropogenic pressure. This work proposes an estimate of atmospheric N compounds budget in West and Central Africa, along an ecosystem transect, from dry savanna to wet savanna and forest, for years 2000-2007. The budget may be considered as a one point in time budget, to be included in long term studies as one of the first reference point for Sub Saharan Africa. Gaseous dry deposition fluxes are estimated by considering N compounds concentrations measured in the frame of the IDAF network (IGAC/DEBITS/AFrica) at the monthly scale and modeling of deposition velocities at the IDAF sites, taking into account the bi directional exchange of ammonia. Particulate dry deposition fluxes are calculated using the same inferential method. Wet deposition fluxes are calculated from measurements of ammonium and nitrate chemical content in precipitations at the IDAF sites combined with the annual rainfall amount. In terms of emission, biogenic NO emissions are simulated at each IDAF site with a surface model coupled to an emission module elaborated from an artificial neural network equation. Ammonia emissions from volatilization are calculated from literature data on livestock quantity in each country and N content in manure. NOx and NH3 emission from biomass burning and domestic fires are estimated from satellite data and emission factors. The total budget shows that emission sources of nitrogen compounds are in equilibrium with deposition fluxes in dry and wet savannas, with respectively 7.40 (±1.90) deposited and 9.01 (±3.44) kgN ha-1 yr-1 emitted in dry savanna, 8.38 (±2.04) kgN ha-1 yr-1 deposited and 9.60 (±0.69) kgN ha-1 yr-1 emitted in wet savanna. In forested ecosystems, the total budget is dominated by wet plus dry

  18. Karrat REE mineralization on Niaqornakavsak and extension on Umiamako Nuna, West Greenland: mineralogic, geochronologic, and carbon and oxygen isotope constraints on the origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, A.; Bird, D. K.; Grove, M.; Bernstein, S.; Mackay, H.; Rose, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Karrat rare earth element (REE) mineralization is located in the Niaqornakavsak (NIAQ) area of Qeqertarssuaq Island in Greenland (~72°N). A mineralized horizon occurs as a single distinct layer (35-40° dip) within an amphibolite host rock of the Qeqertarssuaq Formation: a member of the Paleoproterozoic Karrat Group sequence. Average Yttrium + REE-oxide (YREEO) concentration is ~1.0 wt. % with concentrations up to 2.59 wt. % over one meter intervals. Eight drill holes across three locations on NIAQ allow for an estimated true thickness of REE enrichment (YREEO ≥ 0.2 wt. %) of 29-38m in the east and central area, and a fault restricted thickness at the site in the west of 16m (at surface) to 28m (at depth). Two distinct metasomatic reaction zones comprise the mineralized horizon and are universal across NIAQ: the upper unit (CCA ~1.5 %YREEO) has a primary mineralogy of calcite + ankerite + fluorite (>50%), grunerite, cummingtonite, magnetite, fergusonite, bastnasite, allanite, and monazite, while the lower unit (BLC) consists of biotite (>50%), calcite, ilmenite, magnetite, allanite, fergusonite, and monazite. An extension of the Karrat REE deposit outcrops 7 km to the east on Umiamako Nuna. Hand samples from Umiamako Nuna similar to CCA (YREEO up to 2.4 wt. %) have been collected, but two exploratory drill holes revealed the majority of the REE enriched zone is comparable to the mineralogy of the incomplete reaction zone around CCA on NIAQ with concentrations of YREEO ranging from 0.5-1.0 wt. % with an estimated thickness of 15m. The mineralization consists of Ca-amphiboles, biotite, calcite, pyrite, albite, and garnet. Enrichment of REE continues to a depth of 60m from vein mineralization. In addition, a secondary occurrence at depth can be found on Umiamako Nuna tens of meters below the primary mineralized horizon, which is characterized by high modal concentrations of calcite, fluorite, and amphiboles. Carbon and oxygen isotope analyses of 145 carbonate

  19. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment (SAFIRE): 1. Programme of investigation on Store Glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, Poul; Hubbard, Bryn; Bougamont, Marion; Doyle, Samuel; Young, Tun Jan; Hofstede, Coen; Nicholls, Keith; Todd, Joe; Box, Jason; Ryan, Johnny; Toberg, Nick; Walter, Jacob; Hubbard, Alun

    2015-04-01

    Marine-terminating outlet glaciers drain 90 percent of the Greenland Ice Sheet and are responsible for about half of the ice sheet's net annual mass loss, which currently raises global sea level by almost 1 mm per year. Understanding the processes that drive the fast flow of these glaciers is crucial because a growing body of evidence points to a strong, but spatially varied and often complex, response to oceanographic as well as atmospheric forcing. While the bed of glaciers elsewhere is known to strongly influence the flow of ice, no observations have ever been made at the bed of a marine-terminating glacier in Greenland. The flow of ice in numerical models of the Greenland Ice Sheet consequently rely on untested basal parameterisations, which form a likely and potentially significant source of error in the prediction of sea level rise over the coming decades and century. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment (SAFIRE) is addressing this paucity of observational constraints by gaining access to the bed of Store Glacier, a marine-terminating outlet of the Greenland Ice Sheet which has a drainage basin of 35,000 square kilometres and terminates in Uummannaq Fjord. In 2014, the SAFIRE programme drilled four boreholes in a region where ice flows at a rate of 700 m per year and where a seismic survey revealed a bed consisting of soft sediment. (See joint abstract by Hofstede et al. for details.) The boreholes were 603-616 m deep and direct access to the bed was confirmed by a clear hydrological connectivity with a basal water system. (See joint abstract by Doyle et al. for details.) With sensors deployed englacially (temperature and tilt) and at the bed (water pressure, turbidity, electrical conductivity), the SAFIRE will inform the ratio of internal ice deformation and basal slip, vertical strain, ice temperature, and fluctuations in water pressure linked to supraglacial lake drainage as well as diurnal drainage into moulins. In 2015, we plan to

  20. Modelling Greenland Outlet Glaciers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderVeen, Cornelis; Abdalati, Waleed (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop simple yet realistic models of Greenland outlet glaciers to better understand ongoing changes and to identify possible causes for these changes. Several approaches can be taken to evaluate the interaction between climate forcing and ice dynamics, and the consequent ice-sheet response, which may involve changes in flow style. To evaluate the icesheet response to mass-balance forcing, Van der Veen (Journal of Geophysical Research, in press) makes the assumption that this response can be considered a perturbation on the reference state and may be evaluated separately from how this reference state evolves over time. Mass-balance forcing has an immediate effect on the ice sheet. Initially, the rate of thickness change as compared to the reference state equals the perturbation in snowfall or ablation. If the forcing persists, the ice sheet responds dynamically, adjusting the rate at which ice is evacuated from the interior to the margins, to achieve a new equilibrium. For large ice sheets, this dynamic adjustment may last for thousands of years, with the magnitude of change decreasing steadily over time as a new equilibrium is approached. This response can be described using kinematic wave theory. This theory, modified to pertain to Greenland drainage basins, was used to evaluate possible ice-sheet responses to perturbations in surface mass balance. The reference state is defined based on measurements along the central flowline of Petermann Glacier in north-west Greenland, and perturbations on this state considered. The advantage of this approach is that the particulars of the dynamical flow regime need not be explicitly known but are incorporated through the parameterization of the reference ice flux or longitudinal velocity profile. The results of the kinematic wave model indicate that significant rates of thickness change can occur immediately after the prescribed change in surface mass balance but adjustments in flow

  1. Seasonal and Intra-Seasonal Variability of Surface Streams Over the West Greenland Ice Sheet from High Resolution Satellite Optical Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. G.; Tedesco, M.

    2014-12-01

    The surface hydrology of the Greenland ice sheet plays a crucial role on surface energy and mass balance, as well as on the englacial and sub-glacial environments. The spatial distribution of these surface streams is poorly understood and their temporal variability is (to our knowledge) unknown. One of the reasons for the lack of knowledge on the temporal variability of such streams is related to the historical unavailability of satellite data that could spatially resolve the presence and associated properties of the streams. In recent years, however, multi-spectral commercial satellite data in the visible and infra-red bands have been made available to the scientific community. These newly accessible data sets are provided at spatial resolutions of the order of 1-2 meters, therefore, allowing to perform accurate spatial and temporal analysis of surface streams (and small lakes and ponds that cannot be resolved with sensors such as MODIS or LANDSAT). In this study, we report results concerning the seasonal and intra-seasonal variability of surface streams over a selected area on the west Greenland ice sheet. Using a combination of ENVI® and ArcGIS® software packages applied to multispectral high resolution imagery from World View 2 and Quickbird satellites, surface streams are identified through multiple approaches (either based on unsupervised classifications, band combinations, band ratio thresholds, or digitization) and vector maps of the surface hydrology network were created. Stream networks created during one melting season (at three different stages of the season) were compared and discussed as well as the networks mapped between two consecutive years for proximate dates.

  2. A Method of Detecting Change in the Ice Conditions of the Central Greenland Sea by the Whelping Locations of Harp Seals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, J. P.; Wadhams, P.

    2005-04-01

    Variations in the extent of sea ice within the Greenland Sea on daily, seasonal, or longer time scales are well documented, while changes in ice conditions are not. By combining historical information on the location and timing of the hunt for the whelping harp seal (Phoca groenlandica) with the ice conditions needed for the seals to give birth, details of the types, concentration, and extent of ice within the central Greenland Sea in winter have been determined for the mid- to late nineteenth century. These in turn have been compared to ice extent and concentration from the passive microwave era, as well as ice types from field work in the region. Results suggest that the ice conditions in the central Greenland Sea in the mid- to late nineteenth century were significantly different from those witnessed in recent decades. These differences manifest themselves not only in the extent of ice, but in ice types, concentration, and longevity of the ice cover. It is hypothesized that these changes could be due to an increase in both air temperature and wave energy, which is consistent with an increase in the strength and frequency of southerly and easterly winds during winter.

  3. Snow Core Records of Recent Deposition of Trace Metals to Central (Summit) Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, M. M.; Schauer, J. J.; Bergin, M.

    2009-12-01

    During the summer 2005 and 2006 field seasons at Summit (3270 m) Greenland we collected snow core samples for comprehensive geochemical characterization. From snow pits of 3-meter depth, dug in the clean-air sector, representing ~4 years of recent accumulation, detailed profiles (10 cm intervals) of: total and water soluble organic carbon, particulate organic and elemental carbon, inorganic ions, organic acids (LMWA), and comprehensive elemental and isotopic species were obtained. The elemental characterization supports our source reconciliation efforts in providing sub-seasonal data on aerosol particulate matter chemistry from which sourcing vectors can be inferred. Elemental analysis on the snow core sections was carried-out using magnetic-sector ICP-MS. A large suite of elements was quantified, including: the major/crustal elements (Al, Ca, K, Fe, Na, Mg, Si); minor crustal elements (Ba, Be, Cs, Li, Rb, Sc, Sr, Ti); light transition metals (Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Zn); heavy transition metals (Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Tl, W); oxyanion metals (As, Mo, U, V); platinum group metals (Rh, Pd, Pt); rare earths (Ce, Er, Eu, La, Nd, Sm, Y, Yb); as well as semi- and non-metals Sb, Sn, S, and P. Signal-noise was adequate to quantify all but 4 of the 52 elements studied. Chemical profiles from separate cores collected in 2005 and 2006 exhibited excellent coherence (when offset by the 45 cm of annual snow deposition) between years, indicating that the deposition archive is relatively uniform and that the sampling and analytical methods applied were robust. Clearly resolved intra- and inter-annual burial patterns were apparent for most elements, with strong covariance between many; indicating that relatively few deposition modalities are represented. Large (>30x) temporal variation in snow core concentrations were measured for Al, Ba, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, P, Rb, Sr, Ti, U, Zn and all the rare earths, while low variation (~5x) was observed for the elements As, Cd, Hg, Mo, Pt, S and Sn. The

  4. A review of structural patterns and melting processes in the Archean craton of West Greenland: Evidence for crustal growth at convergent plate margins as opposed to non-uniformitarian models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Ali; Wang, Lu; Appel, Peter W. U.

    2015-11-01

    The Archean craton of West Greenland consists of many fault-bounded Eoarchean to Neoarchean tectonic terranes (crustal blocks). These tectonic terranes are composed mainly of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) gneisses, granitic gneisses, metavolcanic-dominated supracrustal belts, layered anorthositic complexes, and late- to post-tectonic granites. Rock assemblages and geochemical signatures in these terranes suggest that they represent fragments of dismembered oceanic island arcs, consisting mainly of TTG plutons, tholeiitic to calc-alkaline basalts, boninites, picrites, and cumulate layers of ultramafic rocks, gabbros, leucogabbros and anorthosites, with minor sedimentary rocks. The structural characteristics of the terrane boundaries are consistent with the assembly of these island arcs through modern style of horizontal tectonics, suggesting that the Archean craton of West Greenland grew at convergent plate margins. Several supracrustal belts that occur at or near the terrane boundaries are interpreted as relict accretionary prisms. The terranes display fold and thrust structures and contain numerous 10 cm to 20 m wide bifurcating, ductile shear zones that are characterized by a variety of structures including transposed and redistributed isoclinal folds. Geometrically these structures are similar to those occurring on regional scales, suggesting that the Archean craton of West Greenland can be interpreted as a continental scale accretionary complex, such as the Paleozoic Altaids. Melting of metavolcanic rocks during tectonic thickening in the arcs played an important role in the generation of TTGs. Non-uniformitarian models proposed for the origin of Archean terranes have no analogs in the geologic record and are inconsistent with structural, lithological, petrological and geochemical data collected from Archean terranes over the last four decades. The style of deformation and generation of felsic rocks on outcrop scales in the Archean craton of West

  5. Geographic distribution of phlebotomine sandfly species (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Central-West Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Paulo Silva; de Andrade, Andrey José; Sciamarelli, Alan; Raizer, Josué; Menegatti, Jaqueline Aparecida; Hermes, Sandra Cristina Negreli Moreira; de Carvalho, Maria do Socorro Laurentino; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    This study updates the geographic distributions of phlebotomine species in Central-West Brazil and analyses the climatic factors associated with their occurrence. The data were obtained from the entomology services of the state departments of health in Central-West Brazil, scientific collections and a literature review of articles from 1962-2014. Ecological niche models were produced for sandfly species with more than 20 occurrences using the Maxent algorithm and eight climate variables. In all, 2,803 phlebotomine records for 127 species were analysed. Nyssomyia whitmani, Evandromyia lenti and Lutzomyia longipalpis were the species with the greatest number of records and were present in all the biomes in Central-West Brazil. The models, which were produced for 34 species, indicated that the Cerrado areas in the central and western regions of Central-West Brazil were climatically more suitable to sandflies. The variables with the greatest influence on the models were the temperature in the coldest months and the temperature seasonality. The results show that phlebotomine species in Central-West Brazil have different geographical distribution patterns and that climate conditions in essentially the entire region favour the occurrence of at least one Leishmania vector species, highlighting the need to maintain or intensify vector control and surveillance strategies. PMID:26018450

  6. Shifts in Mycobacterial Populations and Emerging Drug-Resistance in West and Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Fissette, Kristina; de Rijk, Pim; Uwizeye, Cécile; Nduwamahoro, Elie; Goovaerts, Odin; Affolabi, Dissou; Gninafon, Martin; Lingoupou, Fanny M.; Barry, Mamadou Dian; Sow, Oumou; Merle, Corinne; Olliaro, Piero; Ba, Fatoumata; Sarr, Marie; Piubello, Alberto; Noeske, Juergen; Antonio, Martin; Rigouts, Leen; de Jong, Bouke C

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we retrospectively analysed a total of 605 clinical isolates from six West or Central African countries (Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Guinea-Conakry, Niger and Senegal). Besides spoligotyping to assign isolates to ancient and modern mycobacterial lineages, we conducted phenotypic drug-susceptibility-testing for each isolate for the four first-line drugs. We showed that phylogenetically modern Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are more likely associated with drug resistance than ancient strains and predict that the currently ongoing replacement of the endemic ancient by a modern mycobacterial population in West/Central Africa might result in increased drug resistance in the sub-region. PMID:25493429

  7. CHARACTER AND REGIONAL SIGNIFICANCE OF GREAT FALLS TECTONIC ZONE, EAST-CENTRAL IDAHO AND WEST-CENTRAL MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neill, J. Michael; Lopez, David A.

    1985-01-01

    The Great Falls tectonic zone, here named, is a belt of diverse northeast-trending geologic features that can be traced from the Idaho batholith in the Cordilleran miogeocline, across thrust-belt structures and basement rocks of west-central and southwestern Montana, through cratonic rocks of central Montana, and into southwestern-most Saskatchewan, Canada. Geologic mapping in east-central Idaho and west-central Montana has outlined a continuous zone of high-angle faults and shear zones. Recurrent fault movement in this zone and strong structural control over igneous intrusion suggest a fundamental tectonic feature that has influenced the tectonic development of the Idaho-Montana area from a least middle Proterozoic time to the present. Refs.

  8. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment (SAFIRE): 2. High magnitude englacial strain detected with autonomous phase-sensitive FMCW radar on Store Glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Tun Jan; Christoffersen, Poul; Nicholls, Keith; Bun Lok, Lai; Doyle, Samuel; Hubbard, Bryn; Stewart, Craig; Hofstede, Coen; Bougamont, Marion; Todd, Joseph; Brennan, Paul; Hubbard, Alun

    2016-04-01

    Fast-flowing outlet glaciers terminating in the sea drain 90% of the Greenland Ice Sheet. It is well-known that these glaciers flow rapidly due to fast basal motion, but its contributing processes and mechanisms are, however, poorly understood. In particular, there is a paucity of data to quantify the extent to which basal sliding and internal ice deformation by viscous creep contribute to the fast motion of Greenland outlet glaciers. To study these processes, we installed a network of global positioning system (GPS) receivers around an autonomous phase-sensitive radio-echo sounder (ApRES) capable of imaging internal reflectors and the glacier bed. The ApRES system, including antennas, were custom-designed to monitor and image ice sheets and ice shelves in monostatic and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) modes. Specifically, the system transmits a frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) that increases linearly from 200 to 400 MHz over a period of 1 second. We installed this system 30 km up-flow of the tidewater terminus of Store Glacier, which flows into Uummannaq Fjord in West Greenland, and data were recorded every hour from 06 May to 16 July 2014 and every 4 hours from 26 July to 11 December 2014. The same site was used to instrument 600 m deep boreholes drilled to the bed as part of the SAFIRE research programme. With range and reflector distances captured at high temporal (hourly) and spatial (millimetre) resolutions, we obtained a unique, 6-month-long time series of strain through the vertical ice column at the drill site where tilt was independently recorded in a borehole. Our results show variable, but persistently high vertical strain. In the upper three-fourths of the ice column, we have calculated strain rates on the order of a few percent per year, and the strain regime curiously shifts from vertical thinning in winter to vertical thickening at the onset of summer melt. In the basal ice layer we observed high-magnitude vertical strain rates on

  9. Formation of native iron in sediment-contaminated magma: I. A. case study of the Hanekammen Complex on Disko Island, West Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Ulff-Moller, F. )

    1990-01-01

    For the first time a compositional range of native iron bodies is described in a cogenetic series of sediment-contaminated volcanic rocks from the Tertiary West Greenland Basalt Province. The iron-bearing rocks occur in a high-level composite intrusion, the Hanekammen Complex. Reaction between a tholeiitic parent magma with >11% MgO and carbonaceous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-rich shale took place in a reservoir >3 km below the paleosurface and created magmatic layering with basaltic magma overlain by less dense andesitic magma. The contaminated rock series bears a strong imprint of assimilation but very little fractional crystallization, which implies that the two processes were not intimately coupled in the present in basalt and andesite form a general trend, defined by Co versus Ni concentrations, that reflects the degree of assimilation, the amount of immiscible sulfide liquid, and the degree of reduction (in order of decreasing importance). The zoning of single iron grains reflects the dynamics of their growth and, to some extent, subsequent homogenization and reaction with magma. Weakly zoned iron spherules in viscous andesite were formed and remained in situ, whereas iron grains in basalt settled through the layered magma and developed strong zoning. All iron types contain Co-rich domains (<1 mm in diameter); their conservation implies a residence time for the iron at magmatic temperatures on the order of a month or less before the emplacement in the subvolcanic intrusions.

  10. Long-term response of an arctic fiord system to lead-zinc mining and submarine disposal of mine waste (Maarmorilik, West Greenland).

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Jens; Asmund, Gert; Johansen, Poul; Rigét, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Contamination by lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) was studied in seawater, sediments, seaweeds and blue mussels near the former Black Angel Pb-Zn Mine in Maarmorilik, West Greenland. The mine operated during the period 1973-90 when mine waste (tailings and later waste rock) was discharged directly into the sea. Metal concentrations peaked during the mining period and Pb and Zn in seawater within the discharge area were measured up to 440 and 790 μg L⁻¹, respectively. Pb in fiord sediments, seaweeds and blue mussels just outside the discharge area were measured in concentrations up to 190, 84 and 2650 and Zn up to 300, 360 and 1190 μg g⁻¹ dry wt., respectively. Within the discharge area, seawater metal concentrations (especially Pb) decreased abruptly after mine closure. Metals concentrations in sediments and biota, however, decreased more slowly and two decades after mine closure seaweeds and blue mussels were still contaminated 12 km from the mine. PMID:21492930

  11. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment (SAFIRE): 3. Englacial and subglacial conditions revealed by seismic reflection data on Store Glacier, West Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstede, Coen; Eisen, Olaf; Young, Tun Jan; Doyle, Samuel; Hubbard, Bryn; Christoffersen, Poul; Hubbard, Alun

    2015-04-01

    Basal conditions have a profound influence on the dynamics of outlet glaciers. As part of the SAFIRE research programme, we carried out a seismic survey on Store Glacier, a tidewater glacier terminating in Uummanaq Fjord in West Greenland (see joint abstracts by Christoffersen et al. and Doyle et al. for details). At the survey site the ice moves 700m/a making the terrain crevassed and bumpy. Despite the rough terrain we collected two 1.5 km long survey lines parallel and perpendicular to the ice flow direction using a 300m snow streamer and explosives as a source. The seismic data reveal an ice thickness of about 620m and 20 to 30m of subglacial sediment on the upstream side of the area thinning in the downstream direction. From polarity reversals seen along the ice-bed contact we speculate that the sediments have varying degrees of water content. The ice itself has several englacial reflections parallel and close to the bed. At approximately 475m depth, a clear single englacial reflection is observed in the parallel survey line. Thermistor data installed at this location show a clear increase in ice temperature starting at this depth. We speculate that the observed englacial reflection is caused by a change in crystal orientation fabric allowing greater ice deformation below this depth causing increased strain heating.

  12. Average sedimentary rock rare Earth element patterns and crustal evolution: Some observations and implications from the 3800 Ma ISUA supracrustal belt, West Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dymek, R. F.; Boak, J. L.; Gromet, L. P.

    1983-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE) data is given on a set of clastic metasediments from the 3800 Ma Isua Supracrustal belt, West Greenland. Each of two units from the same sedimentary sequence has a distinctive REE pattern, but the average of these rocks bears a very strong resemblance to the REE pattern for the North American Shale Composite (NASC), and departs considerably from previous estimates of REE patterns in Archaean sediments. The possibility that the source area for the Isua sediments resembled that of the NASC is regarded as highly unlikely. However, REE patterns like that in the NASC may be produced by sedimentary recycling of material yielding patterns such as are found at Isua. The results lead to the following tentative conclusions: (1) The REE patterns for Isua Seq. B MBG indicate the existence of crustal materials with fractionated REE and negative Eu anomalies at 3800 Ma, (2) The average Seq. B REE pattern resembles that of the North American Shale Composite (NASC), (3) If the Seq. B average is truly representative of its crustal sources, then this early crust could have been extensively differentiated. In this regard, a proper understanding of the NASC pattern, and its relationship to post-Archaean crustal REE reservoirs, is essential, (4) The Isua results may represent a local effect.

  13. Tracking Fine-Grain Phenological Dynamics at a Landscape Extent Using a Network of Near-Surface Digital Repeat Photography Stations in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerby, J.; Post, E.

    2014-12-01

    The phenology of vegetation emergence in the Arctic is highly sensitive to climatic fluctuations. Spring phenology drives ecological processes across local, population, and ecosystem scales. Traditional approaches to capturing spatio-temporal variation in the annual timing and pace of Arctic green-up, like satellite-derived and plot-level records, are limited by trade-offs in the grain and extent of monitoring through both space and time. Recent studies demonstrate the utility of tracking canopy phenology using near-surface digital repeat photography (phenocams) to overcome spatial and temporal grain limitations at the extent of individual plants or vegetation stands. However, our understanding of how fine-grain phenological dynamics scale to landscape extents is incomplete. Here we report on the fine-grain green-up dynamics of a low-Arctic tundra system in West Greenland at the extent of a caribou calving range (40 km2) using three years (2012-2014) of phenological records derived from a network of 50 phenocams, field observations, and high-resolution satellite imagery. Using geostatistics and multiple-regression models, we characterize spatiotemporal patterns of plant phenology, landscape controls on the timing of emergence of common shrub and graminoid species, and assess scale-dependency in patterns of vegetation green-up. We link these results with coarse-grained satellite records of plant phenology to clarify how fine-grained dynamics contribute to the widely reported broad-scale patterns of phenological and ecological change in the Arctic.

  14. Are seasonal calving dynamics forced by buttressing from ice mélange or undercutting by melting? Outcomes from full-Stokes simulations of Store Glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, J.; Christoffersen, P.

    2014-12-01

    We use a full-Stokes 2-D model (Elmer/Ice) to investigate the flow and calving dynamics of Store Glacier, a fast-flowing outlet glacier in West Greenland. Based on a new, subgrid-scale implementation of the crevasse depth calving criterion, we perform two sets of simulations: one to identify the primary forcing mechanisms and another to constrain future stability. We find that the mixture of icebergs and sea ice, known as ice mélange or sikussak, is principally responsible for the observed seasonal advance of the ice front. On the other hand, the effect of submarine melting on the calving rate of Store Glacier appears to be limited. Sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the glacier's calving dynamics are sensitive to seasonal perturbation, but are stable on interannual timescales due to the strong topographic control on the flow regime. Our results shed light on the dynamics of calving glaciers and may help explain why neighbouring glaciers do not necessarily respond synchronously to changes in atmospheric and oceanic forcing.

  15. Nuussuaq basin of west Greenland: Subsidence and structural inversion in an Albian - early Tertiary pull-apart basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tankard, A.; Ng, T. Renner, T.

    1996-12-31

    The western margin of Greenland consists of a complex of linked extensional basins which formed during opening of Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay in Albian - early Tertiary time. The Nuussuaq basin, which straddles Nuussuaq peninsula and Disko Island, is onshore. Its sedimentary succession is generally hidden beneath a cover of early Tertiary extrusives. Slim-hole exploration drilling has been based on an integrated basin analysis and magnetotelluric data acquisition. Nuussuaq basin developed at a left-lateral releasing stepover at the end of the Ungava fault, an interplate strike-slip fault zone. SW-directed extension was accommodated by several transfer faults which compartmented the Nuussuaq basin. Although the principal depocenter is only 1500 km{sup 2} in area, interpretation of the magnetotelluric: data shows basin depths greater than 10 km. Persistent overpressuring and the low resistivity lower basin fill are believed to be typical of a young basin which has subsided rapidly. The Cretaceous - lower Tertiary succession is indicative of a restricted, underfilled basin. In contrast, the mid-Paleocene paleogeography was controlled by dextral slip along the basement strike-slip fault zones, broadscale structural inversion of the earlier extensional faults, and widespread volcanism. Catastrophic crestal collapse of inversion anticlines is reflected in sudden incision and rapid filling of a suite of paleovalleys. In Paleocene time, the Nuussuag basin was generally overfilled and dominated by terrestrial depositional systems. Oil seeps are associated with crestal collapse and fracturing of inversion structures. Biomarkers suggest a source rock of Paleocene age.

  16. Nuussuaq basin of west Greenland: Subsidence and structural inversion in an Albian - early Tertiary pull-apart basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tankard, A. ); Ng, T. ) Renner, T. )

    1996-01-01

    The western margin of Greenland consists of a complex of linked extensional basins which formed during opening of Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay in Albian - early Tertiary time. The Nuussuaq basin, which straddles Nuussuaq peninsula and Disko Island, is onshore. Its sedimentary succession is generally hidden beneath a cover of early Tertiary extrusives. Slim-hole exploration drilling has been based on an integrated basin analysis and magnetotelluric data acquisition. Nuussuaq basin developed at a left-lateral releasing stepover at the end of the Ungava fault, an interplate strike-slip fault zone. SW-directed extension was accommodated by several transfer faults which compartmented the Nuussuaq basin. Although the principal depocenter is only 1500 km[sup 2] in area, interpretation of the magnetotelluric: data shows basin depths greater than 10 km. Persistent overpressuring and the low resistivity lower basin fill are believed to be typical of a young basin which has subsided rapidly. The Cretaceous - lower Tertiary succession is indicative of a restricted, underfilled basin. In contrast, the mid-Paleocene paleogeography was controlled by dextral slip along the basement strike-slip fault zones, broadscale structural inversion of the earlier extensional faults, and widespread volcanism. Catastrophic crestal collapse of inversion anticlines is reflected in sudden incision and rapid filling of a suite of paleovalleys. In Paleocene time, the Nuussuag basin was generally overfilled and dominated by terrestrial depositional systems. Oil seeps are associated with crestal collapse and fracturing of inversion structures. Biomarkers suggest a source rock of Paleocene age.

  17. Interregional comparison of karst disturbance: west-central Florida and southeast Italy.

    PubMed

    North, Leslie A; van Beynen, Philip E; Parise, Mario

    2009-04-01

    The karst disturbance index (KDI) consists of 31 environmental indicators contained within the five broad categories: geomorphology, hydrology, atmosphere, biota, and cultural. The purpose of this research is to apply the KDI to two distinct karst areas, west Florida, USA, and Apulia, Italy. Through its application, the utility of the index can be validated and other important comparisons can be made, such as differences in the karst legislations implemented in each region and the effect of time exposure to human occupation to each karst terrain. Humans have intensively impacted the karst of southeast Italy for thousands of years compared to only decades in west-central Florida. However, west-central Florida's higher population density allows the region to reach disturbance levels comparable to those reached over a longer period in Apulia. Similarly, Italian karst is more diverse than the karst found in west-central Florida, creating an opportunity to test all the KDI indicators. Overall, major disturbances for southeast Italy karst include quarrying, stone clearing, and the dumping of refuse into caves, while west-central Florida suffers most from the infilling of sinkholes, soil compaction, changes in the water table, and vegetation removal. The application of the KDI allows a benchmark of disturbance to be established and later revisited to determine the changing state of human impact for a region. The highlighting of certain indicators that recorded high levels of disturbance also allows regional planners to allocate resources in a more refined manner. PMID:19135774

  18. Autosomal and mtDNA Markers Affirm the Distinctiveness of Lions in West and Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Bertola, Laura D; Tensen, Laura; van Hooft, Pim; White, Paula A; Driscoll, Carlos A; Henschel, Philipp; Caragiulo, Anthony; Dias-Freedman, Isabela; Sogbohossou, Etotépé A; Tumenta, Pricelia N; Jirmo, Tuqa H; de Snoo, Geert R; de Iongh, Hans H; Vrieling, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary history of a species is key for understanding the taxonomy and for the design of effective management strategies for species conservation. The knowledge about the phylogenetic position of the lion (Panthera leo) in West/Central Africa is largely based on mitochondrial markers. Previous studies using mtDNA only have shown this region to hold a distinct evolutionary lineage. In addition, anthropogenic factors have led to a strong decline in West/Central African lion numbers, thus, the conservation value of these populations is particularly high. Here, we investigate whether autosomal markers are concordant with previously described phylogeographic patterns, and confirm the unique position of the West/Central African lion. Analysis of 20 microsatellites and 1,454 bp of the mitochondrial DNA in 16 lion populations representing the entire geographic range of the species found congruence in both types of markers, identifying four clusters: 1) West/Central Africa, 2) East Africa, 3) Southern Africa and 4) India. This is not in line with the current taxonomy, as defined by the IUCN, which only recognizes an African and an Asiatic subspecies. There are no indications that genetic diversity in West/Central Africa lions is lower than in either East or Southern Africa, however, given this genetic distinction and the recent declines of lion numbers in this region, we strongly recommend prioritization of conservation projects in West/Central Africa. As the current taxonomic nomenclature does not reflect the evolutionary history of the lion, we suggest that a taxonomic revision of the lion is warranted. PMID:26466139

  19. Autosomal and mtDNA Markers Affirm the Distinctiveness of Lions in West and Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bertola, Laura D.; Tensen, Laura; van Hooft, Pim; White, Paula A.; Driscoll, Carlos A.; Henschel, Philipp; Caragiulo, Anthony; Dias-Freedman, Isabela; Sogbohossou, Etotépé A.; Tumenta, Pricelia N.; Jirmo, Tuqa H.; de Snoo, Geert R.

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary history of a species is key for understanding the taxonomy and for the design of effective management strategies for species conservation. The knowledge about the phylogenetic position of the lion (Panthera leo) in West/Central Africa is largely based on mitochondrial markers. Previous studies using mtDNA only have shown this region to hold a distinct evolutionary lineage. In addition, anthropogenic factors have led to a strong decline in West/Central African lion numbers, thus, the conservation value of these populations is particularly high. Here, we investigate whether autosomal markers are concordant with previously described phylogeographic patterns, and confirm the unique position of the West/Central African lion. Analysis of 20 microsatellites and 1,454 bp of the mitochondrial DNA in 16 lion populations representing the entire geographic range of the species found congruence in both types of markers, identifying four clusters: 1) West/Central Africa, 2) East Africa, 3) Southern Africa and 4) India. This is not in line with the current taxonomy, as defined by the IUCN, which only recognizes an African and an Asiatic subspecies. There are no indications that genetic diversity in West/Central Africa lions is lower than in either East or Southern Africa, however, given this genetic distinction and the recent declines of lion numbers in this region, we strongly recommend prioritization of conservation projects in West/Central Africa. As the current taxonomic nomenclature does not reflect the evolutionary history of the lion, we suggest that a taxonomic revision of the lion is warranted. PMID:26466139

  20. SEISMIC-REFRACTION PROFILE ACROSS THE SAN ANDREAS, SARGENT, AND CALAVERAS FAULTS, WEST-CENTRAL CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooney, Walter D.; Colburn, Robert H.

    1985-01-01

    Geophysical studies of the upper crustal structure of west-central California are important for the further understanding of the geologic structure and tectonics in this seismically active region. In 1981, the United States Geological Survey recorded a seismic-refraction profile across the southern Santa Cruz Mountains in west-central California to examine the shallow velocity structure of this seismogenic region. This 40-km-long profile, which consisted of three shotpoints, extended northeastward from near Watsonville, California, to Coyote Lake, crossing the San Andreas, Sargent, and Calaveras faults. Refs.

  1. Colonization history and clonal richness of asexual Daphnia in periglacial habitats of contrasting age in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Haileselasie, Tsegazeabe H; Mergeay, Joachim; Weider, Lawrence J; Jeppesen, Erik; De Meester, Luc

    2016-07-01

    Due to climate change, Arctic ice sheets are retreating. This leads to the formation of numerous new periglacial ponds and lakes, which are being colonized by planktonic organisms such as the water flea Daphnia. This system provides unique opportunities to test genotype colonization dynamics and the genetic assemblage of populations. Here, we studied clonal richness of the Daphnia pulex species complex in novel periglacial habitats created by glacial retreat in the Jakobshavn Isbrae area of western Greenland. Along a 10 km transect, we surveyed 73 periglacial habitats out of which 61 were colonized by Daphnia pulex. Hence, for our analysis, we used 21 ponds and 40 lakes in two clusters of habitats differing in age (estimated <50 years vs. >150 years). We tested the expectation that genetic diversity would be low in recently formed (i.e. young), small habitats, but would increase with increasing age and size. We identified a total of 42 genetically distinct clones belonging to two obligately asexual species of the D. pulex species complex: D. middendorffiana and the much more abundant D. pulicaria. While regional clonal richness was high, most clones were rare: 16 clones were restricted to a single habitat and the five most widespread clones accounted for 68% of all individuals sampled. On average, 3·2 clones (range: 1-12) coexisted in a given pond or lake. There was no relationship between clonal richness and habitat size when we controlled for habitat age. Whereas clonal richness was statistically higher in the cluster of older habitats when compared with the cluster of younger ponds and lakes, most young habitats were colonized by multiple genotypes. Our data suggest that newly formed (periglacial) ponds and lakes are colonized within decades by multiple genotypes via multiple colonization events, even in the smallest of our study systems (4 m(2) ). PMID:27279332

  2. Origin and Role of Recycled Crust in Flood Basalt Magmatism: Case Study of the Central East Greenland Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E.; Lesher, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Continental flood basalts (CFB) are extreme manifestations of mantle melting derived from chemically/isotopically heterogeneous mantle. Much of this heterogeneity comes from lithospheric material recycled into the convecting mantle by a range of mechanisms (e.g. subduction, delamination). The abundance and petrogenetic origins of these lithologies thus provide important constraints on the geodynamical origins of CFB magmatism, and the timescales of lithospheric recycling in the mantle. Basalt geochemistry has long been used to constrain the compositions and mean ages of recycled lithologies in the mantle. Typically, this work assumes the isotopic compositions of the basalts are the same as their mantle source(s). However, because basalts are mixtures of melts derived from different sources (having different fusibilities) generated over ranges of P and T, their isotopic compositions only indirectly represent the isotopic compositions of their mantle sources[1]. Thus, relating basalts compositions to mantle source compositions requires information about the melting process itself. To investigate the nature of lithologic source heterogeneity while accounting for the effects of melting during CFB magmatism, we utilize the REEBOX PRO forward melting model[2], which simulates adiabatic decompression melting in lithologically heterogeneous mantle. We apply the model to constrain the origins and abundance of mantle heterogeneity associated with Paleogene flood basalts erupted during the rift-to-drift transition of Pangea breakup along the Central East Greenland rifted margin of the North Atlantic igneous province. We show that these basalts were derived by melting of a hot, lithologically heterogeneous source containing depleted, subduction-modified lithospheric mantle, and <10% recycled oceanic crust. The Paleozoic mean age we calculate for this recycled crust is consistent with an origin in the region's prior subduction history, and with estimates for the mean age of

  3. Phytoplankton Productivity in an Arctic Fjord (West Greenland): Estimating Electron Requirements for Carbon Fixation and Oxygen Production

    PubMed Central

    Hancke, Kasper; Dalsgaard, Tage; Sejr, Mikael Kristian; Markager, Stiig; Glud, Ronnie Nøhr

    2015-01-01

    Accurate quantification of pelagic primary production is essential for quantifying the marine carbon turnover and the energy supply to the food web. Knowing the electron requirement (Κ) for carbon (C) fixation (ΚC) and oxygen (O2) production (ΚO2), variable fluorescence has the potential to quantify primary production in microalgae, and hereby increasing spatial and temporal resolution of measurements compared to traditional methods. Here we quantify ΚC and ΚO2 through measures of Pulse Amplitude Modulated (PAM) fluorometry, C fixation and O2 production in an Arctic fjord (Godthåbsfjorden, W Greenland). Through short- (2h) and long-term (24h) experiments, rates of electron transfer (ETRPSII), C fixation and/or O2 production were quantified and compared. Absolute rates of ETR were derived by accounting for Photosystem II light absorption and spectral light composition. Two-hour incubations revealed a linear relationship between ETRPSII and gross 14C fixation (R2 = 0.81) during light-limited photosynthesis, giving a ΚC of 7.6 ± 0.6 (mean ± S.E.) mol é (mol C)−1. Diel net rates also demonstrated a linear relationship between ETRPSII and C fixation giving a ΚC of 11.2 ± 1.3 mol é (mol C)−1 (R2 = 0.86). For net O2 production the electron requirement was lower than for net C fixation giving 6.5 ± 0.9 mol é (mol O2)−1 (R2 = 0.94). This, however, still is an electron requirement 1.6 times higher than the theoretical minimum for O2 production [i.e. 4 mol é (mol O2)−1]. The discrepancy is explained by respiratory activity and non-photochemical electron requirements and the variability is discussed. In conclusion, the bio-optical method and derived electron requirement support conversion of ETR to units of C or O2, paving the road for improved spatial and temporal resolution of primary production estimates. PMID:26218096

  4. Ilheus Virus Isolation in the Pantanal, West-Central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pauvolid-Corrêa, Alex; Kenney, Joan L.; Couto-Lima, Dinair; Campos, Zilca M. S.; Nogueira, Rita M. R.; Brault, Aaron C.; Komar, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The wetlands of the Brazilian Pantanal host large concentrations of diverse wildlife species and hematophagous arthropods, conditions that favor the circulation of zoonotic arboviruses. A recent study from the Nhecolândia sub-region of Pantanal reported serological evidence of various flaviviruses, including West Nile virus and Ilheus virus (ILHV). According to the age of seropositive horses, at least three flaviviruses, including ILHV, circulated in the Brazilian Pantanal between 2005 and 2009. To extend this study, we collected 3,234 adult mosquitoes of 16 species during 2009 and 2010 in the same sub-region. Mosquito pool homogenates were assayed for infectious virus on C6/36 and Vero cell monolayers and also tested for flaviviral RNA by a group-specific real-time RT-PCR. One pool containing 50 non-engorged female specimens of Aedes scapularis tested positive for ILHV by culture and for ILHV RNA by real-time RT-PCR, indicating a minimum infection rate of 2.5 per 1000. Full-length genomic sequence exhibited 95% identity to the only full genome sequence available for ILHV. The present data confirm the circulation of ILHV in the Brazilian Pantanal. PMID:23875051

  5. Watershed sediment yield reduction through soil conservation in a west-central Oklahoma watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil conservation practices on the Fort Cobb Reservoir watershed in West-Central Oklahoma were few before the 1950s. In the second half of the 20th century, extensive soil conservation measures were implemented to protect agriculturally fertile but erosion-prone soils. Fortuitously, the U.S. Geolo...

  6. Skip-row Corn and Sorghum in the West Central Great Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skip-row planting of corn and sorghum has recently developed as a strategy for mitigating drought in the dryland regions of the western Central Great Plains. Here we compare 16 site-years of no-till feed grain yields when planted skip-row and when planted conventionally in Eastern Colorado and Weste...

  7. Effects of climate variations and soil conservation on sedimentation of a west-central Oklahoma reservoir

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the second half of the 20th century, extensive soil conservation practices were implemented on the Fort Cobb Reservoir watershed in West-Central Oklahoma. Sediment and flow observations were made on major tributaries in 1943-1950 (pre-conservation time period), and again in 2004-2008 (post-co...

  8. 40 CFR 81.96 - West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of... West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries of the following jurisdictions or described area (including the territorial area...

  9. Gravity gradient for Greenland and its tectonic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grushinsky, Andrew N.

    2013-04-01

    , evidently, was the Nares strait. To the south-west of the Nares strait observed axis of gravity gradient maximum, which lengthened along the shore of islands of Canadian Arctic Archipelago and proper Canada. It marked the narrow lengthy compression zone, arised, probably, from the character of the considering rift zone (its incomplete disclosure), which was not allowed free shifting of Canada and Canadian Arctic Archipelago from Greenland. 2. The fading of the west rift began after disclosure of the rift zone of northern part of the Mid-Atlantic ridge. Meanwhile arising east rift zone lead to the changing of the Greenland moving direction, that, probably, offer to origin compression zones in all coastal zone of Greenland, lead to orogeny. At the same time the central part of the Greenland plate was not compressed and remained weakly strained. Now the central part of Greenland was subjected to small extension, caused by glaciation. 3. The Mid-Atlantic ridge is exhibited in the gravity gradients much weaker than the west rift zone. The linear structure (axis of the gravity gradient minimum) was not observed, but then the changing and character of the gravity gradient on the different side of the rift are different. Region to the west of the rift characterized by the negative gravity gradient, while region to the east of the rift, gravity gradient are positive. One from the possible explanations of such picture can be the different petrological composition of these blocks with the different mechanical and reological features. 4. Region northeasterly of the central part of the Greenland shore have a complex enough picture of the changing compression and expansion zones, and Svalbard Archipelago from west and south bordered by zone of weaken rock.

  10. Evaluation of the use of common sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius) organ histology as bioindicator for element exposure in the fjord of the mining area Maarmorilik, West Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Sonne, Christian; Bach, Lis; Søndergaard, Jens; Rigét, Frank F.; Dietz, Rune; Mosbech, Anders; Leifsson, Pall S.; Gustavson, Kim

    2014-08-15

    The former Black Angel lead–zinc mine in Maarmorilik, West Greenland, is a historic example of how mining activity may result in a significant impact on the surrounding fjord system in terms of elevated concentrations of especially lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) in seawater, sediments and surrounding biota. In order to shed light on the present contamination and possible effects in the fjord we initiated a range of studies including a pilot study on gill and liver morphology of common sculpins (Myoxocephalus scorpius) around Maarmorilik. Sculpins were caught and sampled at five different stations known to represent a gradient of Pb concentrations. Fish livers from all specimens were analyzed for relevant elements in the area: Fe, Zn, As, Cu, Se, Cd, Pb, Ag, Hg, Co and Ni. Lead, As and Hg showed significant differences among the five stations. For 20% of the sculpins, Hg concentrations were in the range of lowest observed effect dose (LOED) of 0.1–0.5 μg/g ww for toxic threshold on reproduction and subclinical endpoints. Likewise LOEDs for tissue lesions, LOEDs for biochemistry, growth, survival and reproduction were exceeded for Cd (0.42–1.8 μg/g ww) and for As (11.6 μg/g ww) in 28% and 85% of the sculpins, respectively. Similar to this, the no observed effect dose (NOED) for biochemistry was exceeded for Pb (0.32 μg/g ww) and for growth, mortality and reproduction for Zn (60–68 μg/g ww) in 33% and 24% of the sculpins, respectively. For all sculpins, females were significantly larger than males and for five of the elements (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Se) females had higher concentrations. The chronic lesions observed in liver (mononuclear cell infiltrates, necrosis, vacuolar hepatocytes, portal fibrosis, bile duct hyperplasia, active melanomacrophage centers) and gills (fusion and edema of secondary lamellae, laminar telangiectasis, mononuclear cell infiltrates, blebs) were similar to those in the literature studies for both wild and laboratory exposed sculpins and