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Sample records for centralization ratio fcr

  1. Taxonomic and gene-centric metagenomics of the fecal microbiome of low and high feed conversion ratio (FCR) broilers.

    PubMed

    Singh, K M; Shah, T M; Reddy, Bhaskar; Deshpande, S; Rank, D N; Joshi, C G

    2014-02-01

    Individual weight gain in broiler growers appears to vary, which may in part be due to variation in their gut microbiota. In this paper we analyse the fecal microbiota of low and high feed conversion ratio (FCR) broilers. After shotgun sequencing of the fecal microbiome, we used the SEED database to identify the microbial diversity and metabolic potential in low and high FCR birds. The domain-level breakdown of our samples was bacteria (>95 %), eukaryotes (>2 %), archaea (>0.2 %), and viruses (>0.2 %). At the phylum level, Proteobacteria (78.83 % in low and 52.04 % in high FCR), Firmicutes (11.97 % in low and 27.53 % in high FCR) and Bacteroidetes (7.10 % in low FCR and 17.53 % in high FCR) predominated in the fecal microbial community. Poultry fecal metagenomes revealed the sequences related to 33 genera in both low and high FCR with significantly different proportion. Functional analysis revealed that genes for the metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids and derivatives and protein metabolism were most abundant in SEED subsystem in both samples. Genes associated with stress, virulence, cell wall and cell capsule were also abundant. Indeed, genes associated with sulphur assimilation, flagellum and flagellar motility were over represented in low FCR birds. This information could help in developing strategies to improve feed efficiency and feed formulation for broiler chickens. PMID:24136777

  2. So FCR, so good.

    PubMed

    Dearden, Claire

    2015-10-15

    In this issue of Blood, Rossi et al show that certain predictive biomarkers are able to identify a subgroup of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who have an exceptionally good outcome following front-line therapy with the combination of fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR). PMID:26472735

  3. Formant Centralization Ratio: A Proposal for a New Acoustic Measure of Dysarthric Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapir, Shimon; Ramig, Lorraine O.; Spielman, Jennifer L.; Fox, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The vowel space area (VSA) has been used as an acoustic metric of dysarthric speech, but with varying degrees of success. In this study, the authors aimed to test an alternative metric to the VSA--the "formant centralization ratio" (FCR), which is hypothesized to more effectively differentiate dysarthric from healthy speech and register…

  4. High through put 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing analysis of the fecal microbiota of high FCR and low FCR broiler growers.

    PubMed

    Singh, K M; Shah, T; Deshpande, S; Jakhesara, S J; Koringa, P G; Rank, D N; Joshi, C G

    2012-12-01

    The performance of birds appears to vary among the flock of growing broilers which may in part be due to variation in their gut microbiota. In the view of poultry industry, it is desirable to minimise such variation. We investigated metagenomic profile of fecal bacteria in birds with high and low feed conversion ratio (FCR) to identify microbial community linked to low and high FCR by employing high throughput pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genomic targets. Therefore feeding trial was investigated in order to identify fecal bacteria consistently linked with better feed conversion ratio in bird performance as measured by body weight gain. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene based pyrosequencing was used to provide a comparative analysis of fecal microbial diversity. The fecal microbial community of birds was predominated by Proteobacteria (48.04 % in high FCR and 49.98 % in low FCR), Firmicutes (26.17 % in high FCR and 36.23 % in low FCR), Bacteroidetes (18.62 % in high FCR and 11.66 % in low FCR), as well as unclassified bacteria (15.77 % in high FCR and 14.29 % in low FCR), suggesting that a large portion of fecal microbiota is novel and could be involved in currently unknown functions. The most prevalent bacterial classes in high FCR and low FCR were Gammaproteobacteria, Clostridia and Bacteroidia. However in low FCR birds Phascolarctobacterium, Faecalibacterium and Clostridium predominated among the Clostridia. In FCR comparison of fecal bacteria, about 36 genera were differentially abundant between high and low FCR birds. This information could be used to formulate effective strategies to improve feed efficiency and feed formulation for optimal gut health. PMID:23053958

  5. Human FcR Polymorphism and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinrui; Gibson, Andrew W.; Kimberly, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Fc receptors play a central role in maintaining the homeostatic balance in the immune system. Our knowledge of the structure and function of these receptors and their naturally occurring polymorphisms, including single nucleotide polymorphisms and/or copy number variations, continues to expand. Through studies of their impact on human biology and clinical phenotype, the contributions of these variants to the pathogenesis, progression, and/or treatment outcome of many diseases that involve immunoglobulin have become evident. They affect susceptibility to bacterial and viral pathogens, constitute as risk factors for IgG or IgE mediated inflammatory diseases, and impact the development of many autoimmune conditions. In this chapter, we will provide an overview of these genetic variations in classical Fc?Rs, FcRLs, and other Fc receptors, as well as challenges in achieving an accurate and comprehensive understanding of the FcR polymorphisms and genomic architecture. PMID:25116105

  6. Can We Improve Catfish Growth and FCR Through Oxygen Management?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted in 15 1-acre and six -acre ponds over several years to determine the effect of low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on food conversion ratio (FCR), food consumption, growth, and net production of channel catfish. Control ponds in each study were maintained with a minimum D...

  7. Long-term remissions after FCR chemoimmunotherapy in previously untreated patients with CLL: updated results of the CLL8 trial.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Kirsten; Bahlo, Jasmin; Fink, Anna Maria; Goede, Valentin; Herling, Carmen Diana; Cramer, Paula; Langerbeins, Petra; von Tresckow, Julia; Engelke, Anja; Maurer, Christian; Kovacs, Gabor; Herling, Marco; Tausch, Eugen; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Eichhorst, Barbara; Böttcher, Sebastian; Seymour, John F; Ghia, Paolo; Marlton, Paula; Kneba, Michael; Wendtner, Clemens-Martin; Döhner, Hartmut; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Hallek, Michael

    2016-01-14

    Despite promising results with targeted drugs, chemoimmunotherapy with fludarabine, cyclophosphamide (FC), and rituximab (R) remains the standard therapy for fit patients with untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Herein, we present the long-term follow-up of the randomized CLL8 trial reporting safety and efficacy of FC and FCR treatment of 817 treatment-naïve patients with CLL. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). With a median follow-up of 5.9 years, median PFS were 56.8 and 32.9 months for the FCR and FC group (hazard ratio [HR], 0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.50-0.69, P < .001). Median overall survival (OS) was not reached for the FCR group and was 86.0 months for the FC group (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.54-0.89, P = .001). In patients with mutated IGHV (IGHV MUT), FCR improved PFS and OS compared with FC (PFS: HR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.33-0.68, P < .001; OS: HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.34-1.11, P = .1). This improvement remained applicable for all cytogenetic subgroups other than del(17p). Long-term safety analyses showed that FCR had a higher rate of prolonged neutropenia during the first year after treatment (16.6% vs 8.8%; P = .007). Secondary malignancies including Richter's transformation occurred in 13.1% in the FCR group and in 17.4% in the FC group (P = .1). First-line chemoimmunotherapy with FCR induces long-term remissions and highly relevant improvement in OS in specific genetic subgroups of fit patients with CLL, in particular those with IGHV MUT. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00281918. PMID:26486789

  8. Mouse and human FcR effector functions.

    PubMed

    Bruhns, Pierre; Jnsson, Friederike

    2015-11-01

    Mouse and human FcRs have been a major focus of attention not only of the scientific community, through the cloning and characterization of novel receptors, and of the medical community, through the identification of polymorphisms and linkage to disease but also of the pharmaceutical community, through the identification of FcRs as targets for therapy or engineering of Fc domains for the generation of enhanced therapeutic antibodies. The availability of knockout mouse lines for every single mouse FcR, of multiple or cell-specific--' la carte'--FcR knockouts and the increasing generation of hFcR transgenics enable powerful in vivo approaches for the study of mouse and human FcR biology. This review will present the landscape of the current FcR family, their effector functions and the in vivo models at hand to study them. These in vivo models were recently instrumental in re-defining the properties and effector functions of FcRs that had been overlooked or discarded from previous analyses. A particular focus will be made on the (mis)concepts on the role of high-affinity IgG receptors in vivo and on results from antibody engineering to enhance or abrogate antibody effector functions mediated by FcRs. PMID:26497511

  9. [Evaluation of the 1Shot Phantom dedicated to the mammography system using FCR].

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Chieko; Uchiyama, Nachiko; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Nagata, Mio; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Sankoda, Katsuhiro; Saotome, Shigeru; Tagi, Masahiro; Kusunoki, Tetsurou

    2009-07-20

    Currently daily quality control (QC) tests for mammography systems are generally evaluated by using visual analysis phantoms, which of course means subjective measurement. In our study, however, we evaluated a novel digital phantom, the 1Shot Phantom M plus (1Shot Phantom), together with automatic analysis software dedicated for mammography systems using Fuji computed radiography (FCR). The digital phantom enables objective evaluation by providing for actual physical measurement rather than subjective visual assessment. We measured 1) contrast to noise ratio (CNR), 2) image receptor homogeneity, 3) missed tissue at chest wall side, 4) modulation transfer function (MTF), and 5) geometric distortion utilizing the 1Shot Phantom. We then compared the values obtained using the 1Shot Phantom with values obtained from the European guidelines and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards. In addition, we evaluated the convenience of using the digital phantom. The values utilizing the 1Shot Phantom and those from the European guidelines and IEC standards were consistent, but the QC tests for the European guidelines and IEC standards methods took about six hours while the same QC tests using the 1Shot Phantom took 10 minutes or less including exposure of the phantom image, measurement, and analysis. In conclusion, the digital phantom and dedicated software proved very useful and produced improved analysis for mammography systems using FCR in clinical daily QC testing because of their objectivity and substantial time-saving convenience. PMID:19661726

  10. Central Elemental Abundance Ratios In the Perseus Cluster: Resonant Scattering or SN Ia Enrichment?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupke, Renato A.; Arnaud, Keith; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have determined abundance ratios in the core of the Perseus Cluster for several elements. These ratios indicate a central dominance of Type 1a supernova (SN Ia) ejects similar to that found for A496, A2199 and A3571. Simultaneous analysis of ASCA spectra from SIS1, GIS2, and GIS3 shows that the ratio of Ni to Fe abundances is approx. 3.4 +/- 1.1 times solar within the central 4'. This ratio is consistent with (and more precise than) that observed in other clusters whose central regions are dominated by SN Ia ejecta. Such a large Ni overabundance is predicted by "convective deflagration" explosion models for SNe Ia such as W7 but is inconsistent with delayed detonation models. We note that with current instrumentation the Ni K(alpha) line is confused with Fe K(beta) and that the Ni overabundance we observe has been interpreted by others as an anomalously large ratio of Fe K(beta) to Fe K(alpha) caused by resonant scattering in the Fe K(alpha) line. We argue that a central enhancement of SN Ia ejecta and hence a high ratio of Ni to Fe abundances are naturally explained by scenarios that include the generation of chemical gradients by suppressed SN Ia winds or ram pressure stripping of cluster galaxies. It is not necessary to suppose that the intracluster gas is optically thick to resonant scattering of the Fe K(alpha) line.

  11. Measurement and Study of Lidar Ratio by Using a Raman Lidar in Central China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Gong, Wei; Mao, Feiyue; Pan, Zengxin; Liu, Boming

    2016-01-01

    We comprehensively evaluated particle lidar ratios (i.e., particle extinction to backscatter ratio) at 532 nm over Wuhan in Central China by using a Raman lidar from July 2013 to May 2015. We utilized the Raman lidar data to obtain homogeneous aerosol lidar ratios near the surface through the Raman method during no-rain nights. The lidar ratios were approximately 57 ± 7 sr, 50 ± 5 sr, and 22 ± 4 sr under the three cases with obviously different pollution levels. The haze layer below 1.8 km has a large particle extinction coefficient (from 5.4e-4 m(-1) to 1.6e-4 m(-1)) and particle backscatter coefficient (between 1.1e-05 m(-1)sr(-1) and 1.7e-06 m(-1)sr(-1)) in the heavily polluted case. Furthermore, the particle lidar ratios varied according to season, especially between winter (57 ± 13 sr) and summer (33 ± 10 sr). The seasonal variation in lidar ratios at Wuhan suggests that the East Asian monsoon significantly affects the primary aerosol types and aerosol optical properties in this region. The relationships between particle lidar ratios and wind indicate that large lidar ratio values correspond well with weak winds and strong northerly winds, whereas significantly low lidar ratio values are associated with prevailing southwesterly and southerly wind. PMID:27213414

  12. Measurement and Study of Lidar Ratio by Using a Raman Lidar in Central China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Gong, Wei; Mao, Feiyue; Pan, Zengxin; Liu, Boming

    2016-01-01

    We comprehensively evaluated particle lidar ratios (i.e., particle extinction to backscatter ratio) at 532 nm over Wuhan in Central China by using a Raman lidar from July 2013 to May 2015. We utilized the Raman lidar data to obtain homogeneous aerosol lidar ratios near the surface through the Raman method during no-rain nights. The lidar ratios were approximately 57 ± 7 sr, 50 ± 5 sr, and 22 ± 4 sr under the three cases with obviously different pollution levels. The haze layer below 1.8 km has a large particle extinction coefficient (from 5.4e-4 m−1 to 1.6e-4 m−1) and particle backscatter coefficient (between 1.1e-05 m−1sr−1 and 1.7e-06 m−1sr−1) in the heavily polluted case. Furthermore, the particle lidar ratios varied according to season, especially between winter (57 ± 13 sr) and summer (33 ± 10 sr). The seasonal variation in lidar ratios at Wuhan suggests that the East Asian monsoon significantly affects the primary aerosol types and aerosol optical properties in this region. The relationships between particle lidar ratios and wind indicate that large lidar ratio values correspond well with weak winds and strong northerly winds, whereas significantly low lidar ratio values are associated with prevailing southwesterly and southerly wind. PMID:27213414

  13. Lead isotope ratios in the urban air of eastern and central Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Hitoshi; Machida, Toshinobu; Tanaka, Atsushi; Vera, Yelpatievskiy Pavel; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    In order to characterize airborne lead in eastern and central Russian cities in terms of lead isotope ratios, aerosol samples were collected at six selected cities and Moscow, and their lead concentrations and isotope ratios were studied by comparing them to the data of ore lead used in Russia. All eastern Russian cities (Vladivostok, Khabarovsk and Yakutsk) were found to have isotope ratios similar to those of ore leads in Kazakhstan, the major lead producer for Russia. Samples collected in Moscow also showed isotope ratios similar to those of eastern Russian cities. The contribution from coal combustion to airborne lead was considered to be small even in winter, in these cities. This observation suggested that the origin of lead in these Russian atmosphere regions is closely related to the lead products (e.g. leaded gasoline). The lead isotope ratios in three eastern Russian cities were very close to the value for Russian air mass reported previously in Japan, which were also in good agreement with the same observation in Sweden. However, considerably different lead isotope ratios were observed in central Russian cities, Kemerovo and Nizhnevartovsk, indicating that specific lead emissions, such as industrial activities using Precambrian-age ores or unique leaded gasoline, might contribute to the atmospheric lead.

  14. Metabolic Flux Ratio Analysis of Genetic and Environmental Modulations of Escherichia coli Central Carbon Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Uwe; Lasko, Daniel R.; Fiaux, Jocelyne; Hochuli, Michel; Glaser, Ralf; Szyperski, Thomas; Wthrich, Kurt; Bailey, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The response of Escherichia coli central carbon metabolism to genetic and environmental manipulation has been studied by use of a recently developed methodology for metabolic flux ratio (METAFoR) analysis; this methodology can also directly reveal active metabolic pathways. Generation of fluxome data arrays by use of the METAFoR approach is based on two-dimensional 13C-1H correlation nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with fractionally labeled biomass and, in contrast to metabolic flux analysis, does not require measurements of extracellular substrate and metabolite concentrations. METAFoR analyses of E. coli strains that moderately overexpress phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, pyruvate decarboxylase, or alcohol dehydrogenase revealed that only a few flux ratios change in concert with the overexpression of these enzymes. Disruption of both pyruvate kinase isoenzymes resulted in altered flux ratios for reactions connecting the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and pyruvate pools but did not significantly alter central metabolism. These data indicate remarkable robustness and rigidity in central carbon metabolism in the presence of genetic variation. More significant physiological changes and flux ratio differences were seen in response to altered environmental conditions. For example, in ammonia-limited chemostat cultures, compared to glucose-limited chemostat cultures, a reduced fraction of PEP molecules was derived through at least one transketolase reaction, and there was a higher relative contribution of anaplerotic PEP carboxylation than of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle for oxaloacetate synthesis. These two parameters also showed significant variation between aerobic and anaerobic batch cultures. Finally, two reactions catalyzed by PEP carboxykinase and malic enzyme were identified by METAFoR analysis; these had previously been considered absent in E. coli cells grown in glucose-containing media. Backward flux from the TCA cycle to glycolysis, as indicated by significant activity of PEP carboxykinase, was found only in glucose-limited chemostat culture, demonstrating that control of this futile cycle activity is relaxed under severe glucose limitation. PMID:10542169

  15. Nomenclature of Toso, Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule 3, and IgM FcR.

    PubMed

    Kubagawa, Hiromi; Carroll, Michael C; Jacob, Chaim O; Lang, Karl S; Lee, Kyeong-Hee; Mak, Tak; McAndrews, Monica; Morse, Herbert C; Nolan, Garry P; Ohno, Hiroshi; Richter, Günther H; Seal, Ruth; Wang, Ji-Yang; Wiestner, Adrian; Coligan, John E

    2015-05-01

    Hiromi Kubagawa and John E. Coligan coordinated an online meeting to define an appropriate nomenclature for the cell surface glycoprotein presently designated by different names: Toso, Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule 3 (FAIM3), and IgM FcR (FcμR). FAIM3 and Faim3 are the currently approved symbols for the human and mouse genes, respectively, in the National Center for Biotechnology Information, Ensembl, and other databases. However, recent functional results reported by several groups of investigators strongly support a recommendation for renaming FAIM3/Faim3 as FCMR/Fcmr, a name better reflecting its physiological function as the FcR for IgM. Participants included 12 investigators involved in studying Toso/FAIM3(Faim3)/FμR, representatives from the Human Genome Nomenclature Committee (Ruth Seal) and the Mouse Genome Nomenclature Committee (Monica McAndrews), and an observer from the IgM research field (Michael Carroll). In this article, we provide a brief background of the key research on the Toso/FAIM3(Faim3)/FcμR proteins, focusing on the ligand specificity and functional activity, followed by a brief summary of discussion about adopting a single name for this molecule and its gene and a resulting recommendation for genome nomenclature committees. PMID:25888699

  16. Central enhancement of the nitrogen-to-oxygen abundance ratio in barred galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florido, E.; Zurita, A.; Pérez, I.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Coelho, P. R. T.; Gadotti, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Bar-induced gas inflows towards galaxy centres are recognised as a key agent for the secular evolution of galaxies. One immediate consequence of this inflow is the accumulation of gas in the centre of galaxies where it can form stars and alter the chemical and physical properties. Aims: Our aim is to study whether the properties of the ionised gas in the central parts of barred galaxies are altered by the presence of a bar and whether the change in central properties is related to bar and/or parent galaxy properties. Methods: We use a sample of nearby face-on disc galaxies with available SDSS spectra, morphological decomposition, and information on the stellar population of their bulges, to measure the internal Balmer extinction from the Hα to Hβ line ratio, star formation rate, and relevant line ratios to diagnose chemical abundances and gas density. Results: The distributions of all the parameters analysed (internal Balmer extinction at Hβ (c(Hβ)), star formation rate per unit area, electron density, [N ii]λ6583/Hα emission-line ratio, ionisation parameter, and nitrogen-to-oxygen (N/O) abundance ratio) are different for barred and unbarred galaxies, except for the R23 metallicity tracer and the oxygen abundance obtained from photoionisation models. The median values of the distributions of these parameters point towards (marginally) larger dust content, star formation rate per unit area, electron density, and ionisation parameter in the centres of barred galaxies than in their unbarred counterparts. The most remarkable difference between barred and unbarred galaxies appears in the [N ii]λ6583/Hα line ratio that is, on average, ~25% higher in barred galaxies, due to an increased N/O abundance ratio in the centres of these galaxies compared to the unbarred ones. We analyse these differences as a function of galaxy morphological type (as traced by bulge-to-disc light ratios and bulge mass), total stellar mass, and bulge Sérsic index. We observe an enhancement of the differences between central gas properties in barred and unbarred galaxies in later-type galaxies or galaxies with less massive bulges. However, the bar seems to have a lower impact on the central gas properties for galaxies with bulges above ~1010 M⊙ or total mass M⋆ ≳ 1010.8 M⊙. Conclusions: We find observational evidence that the presence of a galactic bar affects the properties of the ionised gas in the central parts of disc galaxies (radii ≲0.6-2.1 kpc). The most striking effect is an enhancement in the N/O abundance ratio. This can be interpreted qualitatively in terms of our current knowledge of bar formation and evolution, and of chemical evolution models, as being the result of a different star formation history in the centres of barred galaxies caused by the gas inflow induced by the bar. Our results lend support to the scenario in which less massive and more massive bulges have different origins or evolutionary processes, with the gaseous phase of the former currently having a closer relation to the bars. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgExtinction-corrected line fluxes are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http:// http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/584/A88

  17. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  18. Assessment of the statistics of the Strehl ratio: predictions of central limit theorem analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Glenn A.

    2006-11-01

    For a beam propagating through turbulence, the statistics of the Strehl ratio are determined by recognizing that the real and imaginary parts of the on-axis far-field pattern can be represented as the sum of many contributions from the aperture. With this in mind, the central limit theorem (CLT) can be used to develop the statistics of the real and imaginary parts of the optical field, which through the appropriate mathematical manipulations as described here can then be used to develop the probability distribution of the far-field irradiance. The results obtained in this way (which we call the CLT theory or analysis) provide an analytic expression that agrees with the results of detailed wave-optics simulations. This provides an approach by which the statistics of the Strehl ratio can be rapidly determined. A key feature of this work is that the analytic results depend on the values of a few relevant turbulence parameters that include r0,fG, and σ2l. Therefore, a measurement of these parameters at various sites of interest allows us to rapidly assess the detailed nature of the statistical fluctuations of the far-field irradiance that will be experienced at these locations.

  19. Disparities and relative risk ratio of preterm birth in six Central and Eastern European centers

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Chander P; Kacerovsky, Marian; Zinner, Balazs; Ertl, Tibor; Ceausu, Iuliana; Rusnak, Igor; Shurpyak, Serhiy; Sandhu, Meenu; Hobel, Calvin J; Dumesic, Daniel A; Vari, Sandor G

    2015-01-01

    Aim To identify characteristic risk factors of preterm birth in Central and Eastern Europe and explore the differences from other developed countries. Method Data on 33 794 term and 3867 preterm births (<37 wks.) were extracted in a retrospective study between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2009. The study took place in 6 centers in 5 countries: Czech Republic, Hungary (two centers), Romania, Slovakia, and Ukraine. Data on historical risk factors, pregnancy complications, and special testing were gathered. Preterm birth frequencies and relevant risk factors were analyzed using Statistical Analysis System (SAS) software. Results All the factors selected for study (history of smoking, diabetes, chronic hypertension, current diabetes, preeclampsia, progesterone use, current smoking, body mass index, iron use and anemia during pregnancy), except the history of diabetes were predictive of preterm birth across all participating European centers. Preterm birth was at least 2.4 times more likely with smoking (history or current), three times more likely with preeclampsia, 2.9 times more likely with hypertension after adjusting for other covariates. It had inverse relationship with the significant predictor body mass index, with adjusted risk ratio of 0.8 to 1.0 in three sites. Iron use and anemia, though significant predictors of preterm birth, indicated mixed patterns for relative risk ratio. Conclusion Smoking, preeclampsia, hypertension and body mass index seem to be the foremost risk factors of preterm birth. Implications of these factors could be beneficial for design and implementation of interventions and improve the birth outcome. PMID:25891871

  20. Identification and characterization of a FcR homolog in an ectothermic vertebrate, the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Fc receptor homolog (IpFcRI)3, representing the first such receptor from an ectothermic vertebrate, has been identified in the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). Mining of the catfish expressed sequence tag (EST) databases using mammalian FcR sequences for CD16, CD32, and CD64 resulted in the ...

  1. FUNDAMENTAL COMBUSTION RESEARCH APPLIED TO POLLUTION FORMATION. VOLUME 1. FCR PROGRAM OVERVIEW AND GAS-PHASE CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is the first in a series of four, documenting research performed under EPA's Fundamental Combustion Research (FCR) program. It is divided in two: Part A is a program overview and an introduction to the series; and Part B documents research performed in the gas-phase ch...

  2. Reduced-dose fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR-Lite) plus lenalidomide, followed by lenalidomide consolidation/maintenance, in previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mato, Anthony R; Foon, Kenneth A; Feldman, Tatyana; Schuster, Stephen J; Svoboda, Jakub; Chow, Kar Fai; Valentinetti, Marisa; Mrkulic, Mary; Azzollini, Kelly; Gadaleta, Gabriella; Bhattacharyya, Pritish K; Zenreich, Joshua; Pascual, Lauren-Nicole; Yannotti, Kara; Kdiry, Sabrina; Howlett, Christina; Strelec, Lauren; Porter, David; Bejot, Coleen; Goy, André

    2015-06-01

    Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) remains the standard of care for fit chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients requiring first therapy. However, side effects can be significant, and patients with poor risk features have inferior outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate reduced-dose FCR (FCR-Lite) plus lenalidomide (FCR(2) ) followed by lenalidomide maintenance as a strategy to shorten immunochemotherapy in untreated CLL. Patients received four to six cycles of FCR(2) . Patients who were minimal residual disease (MRD) negative in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) initiated 12 months of lenalidomide maintenance after either four or six cycles (based on MRD status). The primary study endpoint was the complete response (CR) rate after four cycles of FCR(2) . Twenty patients were evaluable. After four cycles of FCR(2) , response rates were: CR, 45.0%; CR with incomplete blood count recovery (CRi), 5.0%; partial response (PR), 45.0%; and stable disease (SD), 5.0%. BM and PB samples from 27.8% and 52.9% of patients, respectively, were MRD negative. After six cycles, response rates were: CR, 58.3%; CRi, 16.7%; and PR, 25.0%. BM and PB samples from 50.0% and 72.7% of patients, respectively, were MRD negative. Overall, 75% of evaluable patients achieved a CR or CRi following FCR(2) . After 17.4 months of median follow-up, one progression and one death occurred. Our findings suggest that FCR(2) combines encouraging clinical activity with acceptable toxicity in previously untreated CLL. Lenalidomide can be safely added to FCR and may reduce chemotherapy exposure without compromising outcomes. PMID:25691474

  3. Waist circumference, waist-hip ratio and waist-height ratio percentiles and central obesity among Pakistani children aged five to twelve years

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Central obesity has been associated with the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease in children and anthropometric indices predictive of central obesity include waist circumference (WC), waist-hip ratio (WHR) and waist-height ratio (WHtR). South Asian children have higher body fat distribution in the trunk region but the literature regarding WC and related indices is scarce in this region. The study was aimed to provide age- and gender-specific WC, WHR and WHtR smoothed percentiles, and to explore prevalence and correlates of central obesity, among Pakistani children aged five to twelve years. Methods A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted with a representative multistage random cluster sample of 1860 primary school children aged five to twelve years in Lahore, Pakistan. Smoothed percentile curves were constructed for WC, WHR and WHtR by the LMS method. Central obesity was defined as having both age- and gender-specific WC percentile ≥90th and WHtR ≥0.5. Chi-square test was used as the test of trend. Multivariate logistic regression was used to quantify the independent predictors of central obesity and adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% CI were obtained. Linear regression was used to explore the independent determinants of WC and WHtR. Statistical significance was considered at P < 0.05. Results First ever age- and gender-specific smoothed WC, WHR and WHtR reference curves for Pakistani children aged five to twelve years are presented. WC increased with age among both boys and girls. Fiftieth WC percentile curves for Pakistani children were higher as compared to those for Hong Kong and British children, and were lower as compared to those for Iranian, German and Swiss children. WHR showed a plateau pattern among boys while plateau among girls until nine years of age and decreased afterwards. WHtR was age-independent among both boys and girls, and WHtR cut-off of ≥0.5 for defining central obesity corresponded to 85th WHtR percentile irrespective of age and gender. Twelve percent children (95% CI 10.1-13.0) had a WC ≥90th percentile and 16.5% children (95% CI 14.7-18.1) had a WHtR ≥0.5 while 11% children (95% CI 8.9-11.6) had both WC ≥90th percentile and WHtR ≥0.5. Significant predictors of central obesity included higher grade, urban area with high socioeconomic status (SES), high-income neighborhood and higher parental education. Children studying in higher grade (aOR 5.11, 95% CI 1.76-14.85) and those living in urban area with high SES (aOR 82.34, 95% CI 15.76-430.31) showed a significant independent association. Urban area with high SES and higher parental education showed a significant independent association with higher WC and higher WHtR while higher grade showed a significant independent association with higher WC. Conclusions Comprehensive worldwide reference values are needed to define central obesity and the present study is the first one to report anthropometric indices predictive of central obesity for Pakistani school-aged children. Eleven percent children were centrally obese and strong predictors included higher grade, urban area with high SES and higher parental education. These findings support the need for developing a National strategy for childhood obesity and implementing targeted interventions, prioritizing the higher social class and involving communities. PMID:22104025

  4. The relationship between accommodative amplitude and the ratio of central lens thickness to its equatorial diameter in vertebrate eyes

    PubMed Central

    Schachar, Ronald A; Pierscionek, Barbara K; Abolmaali, Ali; Le, Tri

    2007-01-01

    Aim To determine the relationship between accommodative amplitude and central lens thickness/equatorial lens diameter (CLT/ELD) ratio in vertebrates. Methods Midsagittal sections of lenses from fixed, post mortem eyes from 125 different vertebrate species were photographed. Their CLT/ELD ratios were correlated with independently published measurements of their accommodative amplitudes. Using the non‐linear finite element method (FEM), the efficiency of zonular traction (the absolute change in central radius of curvature per unit force [|ΔCR|/F]) for model lenses with CLT/ELD ratios from 0.45 to 0.9 was determined. Results Vertebrates with CLT/ELD ratios ⩽0.6 have high accommodative amplitudes. Zonular traction was found to be most efficient for those model lenses having CLT/ELD ratios ⩽0.6. Conclusions Vertebrates with lenses that have CLT/ELD ratios ⩽0.6 – i.e. “long oval” shapes – have the greatest accommodative amplitudes; e.g. primates, diving birds and diurnal birds of prey. Vertebrates that have oval or spherical shaped lenses, like owls and most mammals, have low accommodative amplitudes. Zonular traction was found to be most efficient when applied to model lenses with CLT/ELD ratios ⩽0.6. The implications of these findings on the mechanism of accommodation are discussed. PMID:17050574

  5. Impact of the augmentation time ratio on direct measurement of central aortic pressure in the presence of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Atsushi; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Nishizaki, Yuji; Yamazoe, Masahiro; Komatsu, Ikki; Asano, Taku; Mitsuhashi, Hirotsugu; Nishi, Yutaro; Niwa, Koichiro; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    The augmentation index measured by using the central artery pressure is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, no study has examined the role of the time duration of the central artery pressure on CAD. Therefore, we evaluated the relationship between the central blood pressure time duration and the presence of CAD. All patients without a history of revascularization or prior myocardial infarction who underwent an elective coronary angiography at one of the two hospitals from January to September 2013 were analyzed. CAD was defined as a significant stenosis in one of the main coronary branches. The augmentation time ratio was defined as the ratio of the reflection to peak systolic time T2T1 duration divided by the peak systolic time to aortic notch T3T2 duration. We analyzed the relationship between the central pressure waveform (not only augmentation pressure) and the presence of CAD. A total of 146 (57.3%) out of 255 patients had a significant CAD. T2T1 duration was longer in the CAD group than the no CAD group, and the T3T2 duration was shorter in the CAD group than the no CAD group. The augmentation time ratio (T2T1/T3T2) was significantly larger in the CAD group than in the no CAD group. The augmentation index and augmentation pressure were lower in the no CAD group, but this difference was not statistically significant. The augmentation time ratio was an independent factor related to no CAD, especially in patients with a high augmentation index (odds ratio, 2.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-4.63). The augmentation time ratio was an independent factor related to the presence of CAD. PMID:25854988

  6. Isotopic Ratios of 18O/17O in the Galactic Central Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. S.; Sun, L. L.; Riquelme, D.; Henkel, C.; Lu, D. R.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, M.; Li, J.

    2015-08-01

    The 18O/17O isotopic ratio of oxygen is a crucial measure of the secular enrichment of the interstellar medium by ejecta from high-mass versus intermediate-mass stars. So far, however, there is a lack of data, particularly from the Galactic center (GC) region. Therefore, we have mapped typical molecular clouds in this region in the J = 1-0 lines of C18O and C17O with the Delingha 13.7 m telescope (DLH). Complementary pointed observations toward selected positions throughout the GC region were obtained with the IRAM 30 m and Mopra 22 m telescopes. C18O/C17O abundance ratios reflecting the 18O/17O isotope ratios were obtained from integrated intensity ratios of C18O and C17O. For the first time, C18O/C17O abundance ratios are determined for Sgr C (V -58 km s-1), Sgr D (V 80 km s-1), and the 1.3 complex (V 80 km s-1). Through our mapping observations, abundance ratios are also obtained for Sgr A (0 and 50 km s-1 component) and Sgr B2 (60 km s-1), which are consistent with the results from previous single-point observations. Our frequency-corrected abundance ratios of the GC clouds range from 2.58 0.07 (Sgr D, V 80 km s-1, DLH) to 3.54 0.12 (Sgr A, 50 km s-1). In addition, strong narrow components (line width less than 5 km s-1) from the foreground clouds are detected toward Sgr D (-18 km s-1), the 1.3 complex (-18 km s-1), and M+5.3-0.3 (22 km s-1), with a larger abundance ratio around 4.0. Our results show a clear trend of lower C18O/C17O abundance ratios toward the GC region relative to molecular clouds in the Galactic disk. Furthermore, even inside the GC region, ratios appear not to be uniform. The low GC values are consistent with an inside-out formation scenario for our Galaxy.

  7. Search for Quark Compositeness with the Dijet Centrality Ratio in $pp$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2010-12-01

    A search for quark compositeness in the form of quark contact interactions, based on hadronic jet pairs (dijets) produced in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV, is described. The data sample of the study corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 inverse picobarns collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The dijet centrality ratio, which quantifies the angular distribution of the dijets, is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the dijet system and is found to agree with the predictions of the Standard Model. A statistical analysis of the data provides a lower limit on the energy scale of quark contact interactions. The sensitivity of the analysis is such that the expected limit is 2.9 TeV; because the observed value of the centrality ratio at high invariant mass is below the expectation, the observed limit is 4.0 TeV at the 95% confidence level.

  8. Search for Quark Compositeness with the Dijet Centrality Ratio in pp Collisions at s=7TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hänsel, S.; Hartl, C.; Hoch, M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kasieczka, G.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Teischinger, F.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Benucci, L.; Ceard, L.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; Adler, V.; Beauceron, S.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Devroede, O.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, J.; Maes, M.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hammad, G. H.; Hreus, T.; Marage, P. E.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wickens, J.; Costantini, S.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Marinov, A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, J.; de Favereau de Jeneret, J.; Delaere, C.; Demin, P.; Favart, D.; Giammanco, A.; Grégoire, G.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Militaru, O.; Ovyn, S.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Alves, G. A.; de Jesusdamiao, D.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Carvalho, W.; da Costa, E. M.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Silva Do Amaral, S. M.; Sznajder, A.; Torres da Silva de Araujo, F.; Dias, F. A.; Dias, M. A. F.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Marinho, F.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Darmenov, N.; Dimitrov, L.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vankov, I.; Dyulendarova, M.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Marinova, E.; Mateev, M.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Yang, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Hu, Z.; Li, W.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Zhu, B.; Cabrera, A.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Lelas, K.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Fereos, R.; Galanti, M.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Abdel-Basit, A.; Assran, Y.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Hektor, A.; Kadastik, M.; Kannike, K.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Klem, J.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Sillou, D.; Besancon, M.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Gentit, F. X.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Marionneau, M.; Millischer, L.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Baffioni, S.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Thiebaux, C.; Wyslouch, B.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Besson, A.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Greder, S.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Mikami, Y.; van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Baty, C.; Beaupere, N.; Bedjidian, M.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, H.; Chanon, N.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Falkiewicz, A.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Le Grand, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Xiao, H.; Roinishvili, V.; Anagnostou, G.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Mohr, N.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Weber, M.; Wittmer, B.; Ata, M.; Bender, W.; Erdmann, M.; Frangenheim, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hinzmann, A.; Hoepfner, K.; Hof, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Lanske, D.; Magass, C.; Masetti, G.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Bontenackels, M.; Davids, M.; Duda, M.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Giffels, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Heydhausen, D.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Linn, A.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Rennefeld, J.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Thomas, M.; Tornier, D.; Zoeller, M. H.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Borras, K.; Cakir, A.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Dammann, D.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flossdorf, A.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hauk, J.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katkov, I.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Olzem, J.; Parenti, A.; Raspereza, A.; Raval, A.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Stein, M.; Tomaszewska, J.; Volyanskyy, D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Autermann, C.; Bobrovskyi, S.; Draeger, J.; Enderle, H.; Gebbert, U.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Klanner, R.; Mura, B.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nowak, F.; Pietsch, N.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Schwandt, J.; Srivastava, A. K.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Wolf, R.; Bauer, J.; Buege, V.; Chwalek, T.; Daeuwel, D.; de Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Dirkes, G.; Feindt, M.; Gruschke, J.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Honc, S.; Kuhr, T.; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Neuland, M. B.; Niegel, M.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Piparo, D.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Renz, M.; Sabellek, A.; Saout, C.; Scheurer, A.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Zeise, M.; Zhukov, V.; Ziebarth, E. B.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Petrakou, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T.; Panagiotou, A.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Triantis, F. A.; Aranyi, A.; Bencze, G.; Boldizsar, L.; Debreczeni, G.; Hajdu, C.; Horvath, D.; Kapusi, A.; Krajczar, K.; Laszlo, A.; Sikler, F.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Veszpremi, V.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Jindal, M.; Kaur, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, R.; Singh, A. P.; Singh, J. B.; Singh, S. P.; Ahuja, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chauhan, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Gupta, P.; Jain, S.; Jain, S.; Kumar, A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kataria, S. K.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Suggisetti, P.; Aziz, T.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, D.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Saha, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Mondal, N. K.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi, A.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Fedele, F.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Manna, N.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pierro, G. A.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Romano, F.; Roselli, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Trentadue, R.; Tupputi, S.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, M.; Grandi, C.; Marcellini, S.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Broccolo, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Genta, C.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Benaglia, A.; Cerati, G. B.; de Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malberti, M.; Malvezzi, S.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Tancini, V.; Buontempo, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Cimmino, A.; de Cosa, A.; de Gruttola, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Noli, P.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellan, P.; Bellato, M.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; de Mattia, M.; Dorigo, T.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gonella, F.; Gresele, A.; Gulmini, M.; Kaminskiy, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Nespolo, M.; Pegoraro, M.; Perrozzi, L.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Triossi, A.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Baesso, P.; Berzano, U.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Caponeri, B.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Santocchia, A.; Servoli, L.; Taroni, S.; Valdata, M.; Volpe, R.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Sarkar, S.; Segneri, G.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Diemoz, M.; Franci, D.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Organtini, G.; Palma, A.; Pandolfi, F.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Botta, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Castello, R.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Graziano, A.; Mariotti, C.; Marone, M.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Mila, G.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Trocino, D.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ambroglini, F.; Belforte, S.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Heo, S. G.; Chang, S.; Chung, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. E.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Son, D.; Son, D. C.; Kim, Zero; Kim, J. Y.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Rhee, H. B.; Seo, E.; Shin, S.; Sim, K. S.; Choi, M.; Kang, S.; Kim, H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Bilinskas, M. J.; Grigelionis, I.; Janulis, M.; Martisiute, D.; Petrov, P.; Sabonis, T.; Castilla Valdez, H.; de La Cruz Burelo, E.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sánchez Hernández, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Allfrey, P.; Krofcheck, D.; Tam, J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Ahmed, I.; Asghar, M. I.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Frueboes, T.; Gokieli, R.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Almeida, N.; David, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Martins, P.; Mini, G.; Musella, P.; Nayak, A.; Raposo, L.; Ribeiro, P. Q.; Seixas, J.; Silva, P.; Soares, D.; Varela, J.; Wöhri, H. 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T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Friis, E.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Liu, H.; Maruyama, S.; Miceli, T.; Nikolic, M.; Pellett, D.; Robles, J.; Schwarz, T.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Veelken, C.; Andreev, V.; Arisaka, K.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Deisher, A.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Plager, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Tucker, J.; Valuev, V.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kao, S. C.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Pasztor, G.; Satpathy, A.; Shen, B. C.; Stringer, R.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Dusinberre, E.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Mangano, B.; Muelmenstaedt, J.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pi, H.; Pieri, M.; Ranieri, R.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Geffert, P.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; McColl, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; Vlimant, J. R.; Witherell, M.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Gataullin, M.; Kcira, D.; Litvine, V.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Shin, K.; Timciuc, V.; Traczyk, P.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Calamba, A.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Jun, S. Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Terentyev, N.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Dinardo, M. E.; Drell, B. 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J.; Khalatyan, S.; Lacroix, F.; O'Brien, C.; Silvestre, C.; Smoron, A.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Cankocak, K.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Lae, C. K.; McCliment, E.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bonato, A.; Eskew, C.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Tran, N. V.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Radicci, V.; Sanders, S.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Bandurin, D.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Wan, Z.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Eno, S. C.; Ferencek, D.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Rossato, K.; Rumerio, P.; Santanastasio, F.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Alver, B.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Everaerts, P.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Harris, P.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, J.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Wenger, E. A.; Xie, S.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cole, P.; Cooper, S. I.; Cushman, P.; Dahmes, B.; de Benedetti, A.; Dudero, P. R.; Franzoni, G.; Haupt, J.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Rekovic, V.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kelly, T.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Lundstedt, C.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Smith, K.; Zennamo, J.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Boeriu, O.; Chasco, M.; Kaadze, K.; Reucroft, S.; Swain, J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Kolberg, T.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Ziegler, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gu, J.; Hill, C.; Killewald, P.; Ling, T. 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S.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Flacher, H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Gotra, Y.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Orbaker, D.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Yan, M.; Atramentov, O.; Barker, A.; Duggan, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Patel, R.; Richards, A.; Rose, K.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Asaadi, J.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Gurrola, A.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Nguyen, C. N.; Pivarski, J.; Safonov, A.; Sengupta, S.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Weinberger, M.; Akchurin, N.; Bardak, C.; Damgov, J.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Mane, P.; Roh, Y.; Sill, A.; Volobouev, I.; Wigmans, R.; Yazgan, E.; Appelt, E.; Brownson, E.; Engh, D.; Florez, C.; Gabella, W.; Johns, W.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Buehler, M.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Patel, T.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Mattson, M.; Milstène, C.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Bellinger, J. N.; Carlsmith, D.; Dasu, S.; Efron, J.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Liu, J.; Lomidze, D.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Parker, W.; Reeder, D.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.; Weinberg, M.

    2010-12-01

    A search for quark compositeness in the form of quark contact interactions, based on hadronic jet pairs (dijets) produced in proton-proton collisions at s=7TeV, is described. The data sample of the study corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.9pb-1 collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The dijet centrality ratio, which quantifies the angular distribution of the dijets, is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the dijet system and is found to agree with the predictions of the standard model. A statistical analysis of the data provides a lower limit on the energy scale of quark contact interactions. The sensitivity of the analysis is such that the expected limit is 2.9 TeV; because the observed value of the centrality ratio at high invariant mass is below the expectation, the observed limit is 4.0 TeV at the 95% confidence level.

  9. Waist circumference, waist/height ratio, and neck circumference as parameters of central obesity assessment in children☆

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Elma Izze da Silva; Sant'Ana, Luciana Ferreira da Rocha; Priore, Silvia Eloiza; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze studies that assessed the anthropometric parameters waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHR) and neck circumference (NC) as indicators of central obesity in children. Data sources: We searched PubMed and SciELO databases using the combined descriptors: "Waist circumference", "Waist-to-height ratio", "Neck circumference", "Children" and "Abdominal fat" in Portuguese, English and Spanish. Inclusion criteria were original articles with information about the WC, WHR and NC in the assessment of central obesity in children. We excluded review articles, short communications, letters and editorials. Data synthesis: 1,525 abstracts were obtained in the search, and 68 articles were selected for analysis. Of these, 49 articles were included in the review. The WC was the parameter more used in studies, followed by the WHR. Regarding NC, there are few studies in children. The predictive ability of WC and WHR to indicate central adiposity in children was controversial. The cutoff points suggested for the parameters varied among studies, and some differences may be related to ethnicity and lack of standardization of anatomical site used for measurement. Conclusions: More studies are needed to evaluate these parameters for determination of central obesity children. Scientific literature about NC is especially scarce, mainly in the pediatric population. There is a need to standardize site measures and establish comparable cutoff points between different populations. PMID:25479861

  10. Metastatic Lymph Node Ratio of Central Neck Compartment Has Predictive Values for Locoregional Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Microcarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung Yong; Cho, Jae-Keun; Moon, Jeong Hwan; Son, Young-Ik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the significance of metastatic lymph node ratio (the ratio between the metastatic lymph node and the harvested lymph nodes; MLNR) in the central neck for the prediction of locoregional recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid microcarcinoma. Methods After reviewing medical records of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma patients who received total thyroidectomy with central neck node dissection, 573 consecutive adult patients were enrolled in this study, with a follow-up period of more than 36 months. Regarding the risk of recurrence, multivariate analyses were performed with the following variables; sex, age, multiplicity of the primary tumor, presence of pathological extrathyroidal extension, the level of postoperative stimulated serum thyroglobulin, the number of harvested lymph nodes, the number of lymph node metastasis and MLNR. Results The MLNR showed a predictive significance for the locoregional recurrence (P<0.05). Most recurrences were occurred in the lateral neck (n=12, 80%) with a median interval of 20 months. The lowest cutoff value of the MLNR for a meaningful separation of disease recurrence was 0.44 (hazard ratio, 8.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.49 to 52.58; P=0.001). Conclusion When the MLNR is higher than 0.44, there is an increased risk of locoregional recurrence mostly in the lateral neck. Therefore, MLNR of the central neck in a permanent or frozen biopsy may be helpful in decision making in the extent of thyroidectomy and/or the need for contralateral central neck lymph nodes dissection. PMID:26976031

  11. High aspect ratio template and method for producing same for central and peripheral nerve repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeff S. (Inventor); Tuszynski, Mark Henry (Inventor); Gros, Thomas (Inventor); Chan, Christina (Inventor); Mehrotra, Sumit (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Millimeter to nano-scale structures manufactured using a multi-component polymer fiber matrix are disclosed. The use of dissimilar polymers allows the selective dissolution of the polymers at various stages of the manufacturing process. In one application, biocompatible matrixes may be formed with long pore length and small pore size. The manufacturing process begins with a first polymer fiber arranged in a matrix formed by a second polymer fiber. End caps may be attached to provide structural support and the polymer fiber matrix selectively dissolved away leaving only the long polymer fibers. These may be exposed to another product, such as a biocompatible gel to form a biocompatible matrix. The polymer fibers may then be selectively dissolved leaving only a biocompatible gel scaffold with the pores formed by the dissolved polymer fibers. The scaffolds may be used in, among other applications, the repair of central and peripheral nerves. Scaffolds for the repair of peripheral nerves may include a reservoir for the sustained release of nerve growth factor. The scaffolds may also include a multifunctional polyelectrolyte layer for the sustained release of nerve growth factor and enhance biocompatibility.

  12. Search for quark compositeness with the dijet centrality ratio in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV.

    PubMed

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    2010-12-31

    A search for quark compositeness in the form of quark contact interactions, based on hadronic jet pairs (dijets) produced in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV, is described. The data sample of the study corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 pb(-1) collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The dijet centrality ratio, which quantifies the angular distribution of the dijets, is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the dijet system and is found to agree with the predictions of the standard model. A statistical analysis of the data provides a lower limit on the energy scale of quark contact interactions. The sensitivity of the analysis is such that the expected limit is 2.9 TeV; because the observed value of the centrality ratio at high invariant mass is below the expectation, the observed limit is 4.0 TeV at the 95% confidence level. PMID:21231646

  13. Increasing the resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio of magnetic resonance sounding data using a central loop configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozmand, Ahmad A.; Auken, Esben; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Rejkjaer, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance technique, also called magnetic resonance sounding (MRS), is an emerging geophysical method that can detect the presence and spatial variations of the subsurface water content directly. In this paper, we introduce the MRS central loop geometry, in which the receiver loop is smaller than the transmitter loop and placed in its centre. In addition, using a shielded receiver coil we show how this configuration greatly increases signal-to-noise ratio and improves the resolution of the subsurface layers compared to the typically used coincident loop configuration. We compare sensitivity kernels for different loop configurations and describe advantages of the MRS central loop geometry in terms of superior behaviour of the sensitivity function, increased sensitivity values, reduced noise level of the shielded receiver coil, improved resolution matrix and reduced instrument dead time. With no extra time and effort in the field, central-loop MRS makes it possible to reduce measurement time and to measure data in areas with high anthropogenic noise. The results of our field example agree well with the complementary data, namely airborne electromagnetics, borehole data, and the hydrologic model of the area.

  14. Deficiency of Fc?R1 Increases Body Weight Gain but Improves Glucose Tolerance in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Jung; Liu, Conglin; Liao, Mengyang; Sukhova, Galina K; Shirakawa, Jun; Abdennour, Meriem; Iamarene, Karine; Andre, Sebastien; Inouye, Karen; Clement, Karine; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Banks, Alexander S; Libby, Peter; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2015-11-01

    Prior studies demonstrated increased plasma IgE in diabetic patients, but the direct participation of IgE in diabetes or obesity remains unknown. This study found that plasma IgE levels correlated inversely with body weight, body mass index, and body fat mass among a population of randomly selected obese women. IgE receptor Fc?R1-deficient (Fcer1a(-/-)) mice and diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice demonstrated that Fc?R1 deficiency in DIO mice increased food intake, reduced energy expenditure, and increased body weight gain but improved glucose tolerance and glucose-induced insulin secretion. White adipose tissue from Fcer1a(-/-) mice showed an increased expression of phospho-AKT, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-?, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-?, glucose transporter-4 (Glut4), and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) but reduced uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) expression, tissue macrophage accumulation, and apoptosis, suggesting that IgE reduces adipogenesis and glucose uptake but induces energy expenditure, adipocyte apoptosis, and white adipose tissue inflammation. In 3T3-L1 cells, IgE inhibited the expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-? and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-?, and preadipocyte adipogenesis and induced adipocyte apoptosis. IgE reduced the 3T3-L1 cell expression of Glut4, phospho-AKT, and glucose uptake, which concurred with improved glucose tolerance in Fcer1a(-/-) mice. This study established two novel pathways of IgE in reducing body weight gain in DIO mice by suppressing adipogenesis and inducing adipocyte apoptosis while worsening glucose tolerance by reducing Glut4 expression, glucose uptake, and insulin secretion. PMID:26295369

  15. Plutonium concentration and isotopic ratio in soil samples from central-eastern Japan collected around the 1970s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guosheng; Zheng, Jian; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2015-04-01

    Obtaining Pu background data in the environment is essential for contamination source identification and assessment of environmental impact of Pu released from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. However, no baseline information on Pu isotopes in Fukushima Prefecture has been reported. Here we analyzed 80 surface soil samples collected from the central-eastern Japan during 1969-1977 for 239+240Pu activity concentration and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio to establish the baseline before the FDNPP accident. We found that 239+240Pu activity concentrations ranged from 0.004 -1.46 mBq g-1, and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios varied narrowly from 0.148 to 0.229 with a mean of 0.186 +/- 0.015. We also reconstructed the surface deposition density of 241Pu using the 241Pu/239Pu atom ratio in the Japanese fallout reference material. The obtained results indicated that, for the FDNPP-accident released 241Pu, a similar radiation impact can be estimated as was seen for the global fallout deposited 241Pu in the last decades.

  16. Plutonium concentration and isotopic ratio in soil samples from central-eastern Japan collected around the 1970s

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jian; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Obtaining Pu background data in the environment is essential for contamination source identification and assessment of environmental impact of Pu released from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. However, no baseline information on Pu isotopes in Fukushima Prefecture has been reported. Here we analyzed 80 surface soil samples collected from the central-eastern Japan during 1969–1977 for 239+240Pu activity concentration and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio to establish the baseline before the FDNPP accident. We found that 239+240Pu activity concentrations ranged from 0.004 –1.46 mBq g−1, and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios varied narrowly from 0.148 to 0.229 with a mean of 0.186 ± 0.015. We also reconstructed the surface deposition density of 241Pu using the 241Pu/239Pu atom ratio in the Japanese fallout reference material. The obtained results indicated that, for the FDNPP-accident released 241Pu, a similar radiation impact can be estimated as was seen for the global fallout deposited 241Pu in the last decades. PMID:25881009

  17. Plutonium concentration and isotopic ratio in soil samples from central-eastern Japan collected around the 1970s.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guosheng; Zheng, Jian; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Obtaining Pu background data in the environment is essential for contamination source identification and assessment of environmental impact of Pu released from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. However, no baseline information on Pu isotopes in Fukushima Prefecture has been reported. Here we analyzed 80 surface soil samples collected from the central-eastern Japan during 1969-1977 for (239+240)Pu activity concentration and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio to establish the baseline before the FDNPP accident. We found that (239+240)Pu activity concentrations ranged from 0.004 -1.46 mBq g(-1), and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios varied narrowly from 0.148 to 0.229 with a mean of 0.186 ± 0.015. We also reconstructed the surface deposition density of (241)Pu using the (241)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio in the Japanese fallout reference material. The obtained results indicated that, for the FDNPP-accident released (241)Pu, a similar radiation impact can be estimated as was seen for the global fallout deposited (241)Pu in the last decades. PMID:25881009

  18. var gene transcription and PfEMP1 expression in the rosetting and cytoadhesive Plasmodium falciparum clone FCR3S1.2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The pathogenicity of Plasmodium falciparum is in part due to the ability of the parasitized red blood cell (pRBC) to adhere to intra-vascular host cell receptors and serum-proteins. Binding of the pRBC is mediated by Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), a large multi-variant molecule encoded by a family of ≈60 var genes. Methods The study of var gene transcription in the parasite clone FCR3S1.2 was performed by semi-quantitative PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR). The expression of the major PfEMP1 in FCR3S1.2 pRBC was analysed with polyclonal sera in rosette disruption assays and immunofluorecence. Results Transcripts from var1 (FCR3S1.2var1; IT4var21) and other var genes were detected by semi-quantitative PCR but results from qPCR showed that one var gene transcript dominated over the others (FCR3S1.2var2; IT4var60). Antibodies raised in rats to the recombinant NTS-DBL1α of var2 produced in E. coli completely and dose-dependently disrupted rosettes (≈95% at a dilution of 1/5). The sera reacted with the Maurer's clefts in trophozoite stages (IFA) and to the infected erythrocyte surface (FACS) indicating that FCR3S1.2var2 encodes the dominant PfEMP1 expressed in this parasite. Conclusion The major transcript in the rosetting model parasite FCR3S1.2 is FCR3S1.2var2 (IT4var60). The results suggest that this gene encodes the PfEMP1-species responsible for the rosetting phenotype of this parasite. The activity of previously raised antibodies to the NTS-DBL1α of FCR3S1.2var1 is likely due to cross-reactivity with NTS-DBL1α of the var2 encoded PfEMP1. PMID:21266056

  19. Use of diagnostic ratios for studying source apportionment and reactivity of ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons over Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorská, Alice; Lammel, Gerhard; Klánová, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Ratios of levels of 9 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in air at central European sites during 1996-2008 were used to assess the suitability of 5 commonly used diagnostic ratios (DRs) for PAH source apportionment. DRs derived from a detailed literature study on emission factors were reflected in ambient air samples only at sites located near major sources. A significant seasonality was observed in a long-term time series of ambient DRs at a background site indicating possible capability of this method to reflect changes in source characteristics. The results of a mass balance study suggest that current knowledge of PAH reactivities is insufficient for a source apportionment based on DRs at receptor sites, even when limited to major types of PAH sources. However, DRs could be used to narrow down ozone and hydroxyl radical reaction rate coefficients' uncertainties: k O 3(2) of pyrene and benzo(ghi)perylene in the particulate phase seem to be ≤ 10% of the highest rate coefficient measured using model aerosols in the laboratory and k O 3(2) of indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene in the gas phase could be higher than previously estimated by three orders of magnitude. The suitability of DRs for source apportionment at (especially background) receptor sites cannot be expected in the general case. However, measurements carried out close to sources are in accordance with literature data suggesting that the ratios of benzo(a)anthracene/(benzo(a)anthracene + chrysene) and indeno(123cd)pyrene/(indeno(123cd)pyrene + benzo(ghi)perylene) are capable of distinguishing between traffic and residential heating, while the ratio of anthracene/(anthracene + phenanthrene) was the least useful DR due to its low variability.

  20. Poisson's ratios of the upper and lower crust and the sub-Moho mantle beneath central Honshu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukawa, Motoo; Fukao, Yoshio

    1981-08-01

    Poisson's ratios of the upper and lower crust and the sub-Moho mantle beneath central Honshu, Japan, are investigated using three independent methods that are based on S to P ratios of apparent velocities, the Wadati diagrams and an inversion of P and S arrivals. Shallow earthquakes at distances of 200—500 km from the Nagoya University Telemeter Network are used for the apparent velocity ratio method. Crustal and subcrustal earth-quakes under the network are used for the other two methods. The network consists of wide-band seismometers with three components which are particularly suitable for detecting S waves. The three different methods give a consistent result for Poisson's ratio σ, that is, (1) σ = 0.23 ± 0.01 in the upper crust, (2) σ = 0.26-0.28 in both the lower crust and in the sub-Moho mantle. The result indicates a sharp contrast in σ between the upper and the lower crust rather than at the Moho. The low σ in the upper crust can only be explained by the presence of a substantial amount of free quartz, indicating granitic rocks. A higher σ in the lower crust suggests that this portion is presumably less saturated in silica and may be even undersaturated, pointing to intermediate to mafic rocks. The sub-Moho σ is almost equal to the σ averaged over the entire upper mantle that has been estimated from the Wadati diagrams of deep shocks beneath Japan but is higher than those calculated from Pn and Sn velocities in oceanic and stable continental regions.

  1. Mass-loss rates and C/He ratios in the winds of the WC central stars of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.; Costa, R. D. D.; de Araujo, F. X.; Petrini, D.

    1993-01-01

    We estimate the C/He ratio in the central star winds of five planetary nebulae that have WC spectra: SwSt-l, He2-99, He2-113, BD + 30 deg 3639 and NGC 5315. These estimates take into account optical depth effects in the wind. Our results indicate that C/He is 0.41-0.68 by number, suggesting exposure of He-burned material. If helium and carbon are the dominant elements in the winds of those stars, the mass-loss rates are in the range 5.7 x 10 exp -7 to 6.7 x 10 exp -6 solar masses/yr, substantially higher than previous estimates.

  2. Is radio jet power linearly proportional to the product of central black hole mass and Eddington ratio in AGN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; Han, Zhenhua

    2014-12-01

    A model for the relation between radio jet power and the product of central black hole (BH) mass and Eddington ratio of AGN is proposed, and the model is examined with data from the literature. We find that radio jet power positively correlates but not linearly with the product of BH mass ( m in solar mass) and Eddington ratio ( λ), and the power law indices ( μ) are significantly less than unity for relatively low accretion ( λ<0.1) AGN, P j ∝( λm) μ , in the radio galaxies and the Seyfert galaxies. This leads to a negative correlation between radio loudness and λm for the low luminosity AGN, i.e. R∝( λm) ρ with ρ=(7/6) μ-1<0, which may be attributed to a contribution of BH spin to total jet power assuming that the spin induced jet is gradually suppressed as the accretion rate increases. Whereas, for the high- z quasars which often show the slope μ≥1, a positive correlation between the radio loudness and disc luminosity is predicted. We discuss that the jet powers of the high- z FRII quasars are likely dominated by the accretion disc rather than by the BH spin.

  3. Phagocytic efficacy of macrophage-like cells as a function of cell cycle and Fc? receptors (Fc?R) and complement receptor (CR)3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Y; Cook, E; Fries, B C; Casadevall, A

    2006-01-01

    Summary Previous studies have shown that the efficiency of phagocytosis is a function of cell cycle and that phagocytosis promotes cell cycle progression. Because phagocytosis is dependent on cellular receptors we hypothesized that Fc? receptors (Fc?R) and complement receptors (CR) expression varied with cell cycle. Consequently, we used centrifugal elutriation of macrophage-like cells, fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis and receptor staining to investigate expression of Fc?R and CR as a function of cell cycle. We confirmed that Fc?R expression on macrophage-like cells increased as the cells progressed from G1 to G2 phases. Moreover, CR3 expression varied as a function of cell cycle in a manner similar to Fc?R. Correlation of receptor expression with cell size showed that Fc?R and CR3 expression on macrophages was determined largely by cell size enlargement during the cell cycle. The efficacy of both Fc- and complement-mediated phagocytosis of live Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) showed a biphasic pattern with the efficacy of phagocytosis decreasing when the cells approached the G1S interface, which paralleled the changes in receptor surface expression when cells exited G1 phase. Live Cn cells were significantly more resistant to phagocytosis than dead cells at all stages of macrophage-like cell cycle. In contrast to live cells, the efficacy of phagocytosis of dead Cn decreased as surface receptor expression increased. Hence, the efficacy of phagocytosis in this system as function of cell cycle is not related to phagocytic receptor expression. PMID:16879260

  4. Stable sulfur isotope ratios and water-soluble inorganic compositions of PM10 in Yichang City, central China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhou; Li, Xiao-Dong; Deng, Jie; Wang, Hai-Yun

    2015-09-01

    Chemical and sulfate-sulfur isotopic compositions of water-soluble inorganic ions were analyzed for aerosol sample particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm (PM10) collected during 17-28 December 2012 at Yichang City, Hubei Province, central China. Most water-soluble inorganic ions, except for NO3 (-) and NH4 (+), showed slightly higher concentration in daytime than in nighttime, and the major detected ions followed the order of SO4 (2-) > NO3 (-) > Ca(2+) > Na(+) > NH4 (+) > Cl(-) in daytime and nighttime, of which SO4 (2-) is the most abundant ionic component that accounted for about 49.1 and 49.3 % of the total mass of analyzed ions in daytime and nighttime, respectively. According to the correlation coefficients among the mass concentrations of water-soluble inorganic ions, there may mainly exist in forms of (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3 in daytime and NH4NO3 in nighttime. The δ(34)S values of sulfate ranged from +2.82 to +4.63 ‰ (average +3.97 ‰) in daytime and from +2.90 to +5.39 ‰ (average +4.08 ‰) in nighttime, indicating that the source of sulfate in PM10 was mainly derived from coal burning (δ(34)S, +3.68 ‰) in Yichang City. The [NO3 (-)]/[SO4 (2-)] mass ratio varied between 0.2 and 0.6 with an average of 0.4 in daytime and 0.1 to 0.8 with an average of 0.4 in nighttime, which implying that the stationary source emissions would be more important than the vehicle emissions in the studied area. As a whole, the mixture of coal burning, vehicle exhaust, and resuspended road dust would be responsible for the sources of PM10 in Yichang City during wintertime. PMID:25960017

  5. Centrality dependence of charged antiparticle to particle ratios near midrapidity in d+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Baker, M.D.; Barton, D.S.; Becker, B.; Carroll, A.; George, N.; Gushue, S.; Holzman, B.; Pak, R.; Sedykh, I.; Steinberg, P.; Sukhanov, A.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M.P.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J.L.; Kulinich, P.; Lee, J.W.

    2004-07-01

    The ratios of the yields of charged antiparticles to particles have been obtained for pions, kaons, and protons near midrapidity for d+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV as a function of centrality. The reported values represent the ratio of the yields averaged over the rapidity range of 0.1centrality dependence is observed in all three ratios. The data are compared to results from other systems and model calculations.

  6. Experiment investigations on the performance of a centrally fuel rich swirl coal combustion burner: Influence of primary air ratio - article no. A39

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.C.; Li, Z.Q.; Jing, J.P.; Wei, H.D.; Chen, L.Z.; Wu, S.H.; Yao, Y.

    2008-07-01

    A three-component particle-dynamics anemometer is used to measure, in the near-burner region, the influence of the primary air ratio on the gas/particle two phase characteristics for a centrally fuel rich swirl coal combustion burner, on a gas/particle two phase test facility. Velocities, particle volume flux profiles and particle relative number concentrations were obtained. With a low primary air ratio, the axial velocities for gas and particles on the chamber axis are always small and easily reach the negative, and the central recirculation zone is easily formed and much closer to the outlet of the burner. In each cross-section, in the radius range from Rratio is higher than that with a low primary air ratio. The influence of gas/particle flow characteristics with a different primary air ratio on combustion has been analyzed.

  7. Age, growth, sex ratio, and maturity of the whitefish in central Green Bay and adjacent waters of Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mraz, Donald

    1964-01-01

    This study is based on 1,023 whitefish, Coregonus clupeaformis (Mitchill)--819 in seven samples from five localitites in central Green Bay in 1948-49 and 1851-52 and 204 in a single 1948 collection from northwestern Lake Michigan proper. Records of age indicated unusual strength for only one year class--1943 which strongly dominated the 1948 sample from Lake Michigan and the 1949 sample from Green Bay and was well represented in the 1948 collection from green Bay. Collection of 1951-52 without exception were dominated by age group III. Length distributions of samples varied widely according to the age composition. Among fish more than 2 years old, the length distributions of age groups overlapped broadly. Several 1-inch intervals included fish of four age groups. The length-weight relation varied considerably among central Green Bay samples, but differences among localitites were nearly equalled by the year-to-year difference at a single locality. Lake Michigan whitefish were generally lighter than those from Green Bay. Weight increased to the 3.386 power of length in Green Bay (combined samples) and the 3.359 power in Lake Michigan. Growth in length, calculated by direct proportion from diameter measurements of growth fields on scales, differed among localities in central Green Bay and between samples of different years at a single locality. If permanent locality differences exist they are not large and can be obscured by the evident annual fluctuations of growth. The grand average calculated length of Green Bay whitefish (combined collections) exceeded that of Lake Michigan fish in all years of life. The advantage was greatest (2.2 inches) at 3 years (calculated lengths of 16.0 inches and 13.8 inches) and subsequently declined to 0.5 inch at 9 years (lengths of 24.6 and 24.1 inches). Both groups reached the minimum legal length of 17 inches during the fourth growing season. Green Bay whitefish also had the larger calculated weights. The advantage reached 9.3 ounces in 3 years (calculated weights of 22.4 and 13.1 ounces). In years of life 4-9, the weight advantage over Lake Michigan fish ranged from 8.7 ounces, (seventh year; weights of 74.4 and 65.7 ounces) to 12.2 ounces (ninth year; weights of 96.2 and 84.0 ounces). Comparison of growth of whitefish at four localities in northern Lake Michigan indicates that fastest growth is in central Green Bay and slowest near the Fox Islands. Growth is intermediate and similar in northwestern Lake Michigan proper and sorthern Green Bay. Youngest mature male whitefish in green Bay belonged to age group II and youngest mature females to age group III. All IV-group fish were mature. Shortest mature males were at 14.5-14.9 inches and shortest mature females at 16.5-16.9 inches. All males longer than 17.9 inches and all females longer than 18.4 inches were mature.

  8. Temporal evolution of lead isotope ratios in sediments of the Central Portuguese Margin: a fingerprint of human activities.

    PubMed

    Mil-Homens, Mário; Caetano, Miguel; Costa, Ana M; Lebreiro, Susana; Richter, Thomas; de Stigter, Henko; Trancoso, Maria A; Brito, Pedro

    2013-09-15

    Stable Pb isotope ratios ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(206)Pb), (210)Pb, Pb, Al, Ca, Fe, Mn and Si concentrations were measured in 7 sediment cores from the west coast of the Iberian Peninsula to assess the Pb contamination throughout the last 200 years. Independently of their locations, all cores are characterized by increasing Pb/Al rends not related to grain-size changes. Conversely, decreasing trends of (206)Pb/(207)Pb were found towards the present. This tendency suggest a change in Pb sources reflecting an increased proportion derived from anthropogenic activities. The highest anthropogenic Pb inventories for sediments younger than 1950s were found in the two shallowest cores of Cascais and Lisboa submarine canyons, reflecting the proximity of the Tagus estuary. Lead isotope signatures also help demonstrate that sediments contaminated with Pb are not constrained to estuarine-coastal areas and upper parts of submarine canyons, but are also to transferred to a lesser extent to deeper parts of the Portuguese Margin. PMID:23871578

  9. A Focus on Variation in Morphology of Soft Palate Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography with Assessment of Need’s Ratio in Central Madhya Pradesh Population

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Priyal; Phulambrikar, Tushar; Singh, Siddharth Kumar; Sharma, B.K.; Rodricks, Deepshikha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Soft palate is an anatomical structure that helps in modifying the quality of voice and to breathe while swallowing. Through the variants and shapes of the soft palate, we can assess the age and gender of an individual. Aim The aim of the present study was to investigate the variation in morphology of soft palate and to find its association with the Need’s ratio, Velar Length (VL), Velar Width (VW) and Pharyngeal Depth (PD), in age groups and gender using CBCT in Central Madhya Pradesh population. Materials and Methods The study sample consisted of 121 CBCT scans of individuals aged between 15 to 45 years. These scans were retrieved from the Department of Oral Radiology. The velar morphology on CBCT was examined and grouped into six types. The results obtained were subjected to a statistical analysis to find the association between variants of the soft palate with gender and different age groups. ANOVA and Z-test were used for statistical analysis. The p≤0.05 was considered as significant while p≤0.001 was considered as highly significant. Results The most frequent type of soft palate was rat tail shaped. The mean VL and VW values were significantly higher in males while PD and Need’s ratio were higher among females, insignificantly associated with the types of soft palate. A significant association was observed between the mean VL and VW with various age groups, showing an increase in values with an increase in age. Conclusion A variation in morphology of soft palate plays an important role in the assessment of velopharyngeal closure and in diagnosing obstructive sleep apnoea individuals.

  10. Time Series analysis of CO2 mixing ratios, Root zone Soil-Water, and Soil Temperature in a Mixed Rangeland of Central Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, K. C.

    2008-05-01

    In rangelands, water can be the limiting resource that determines how vegetation will respond spatially and temporally to rising CO2 levels. Spatially, the transition zones between shrub and grasslands will be likely influenced by the water balance. Temporally, the soil-water dynamics in the soils of mixed rangelands is determined by antecedent soil-moisture conditions, shallow rooting depth of grasses, and water uptake by shrubs of water infiltrated past grass roots. At NOAA's GMD WKT tall tower in Moody, Texas, CO2 mole fractions have been collected as function of height (9m, 30m, 61m, 122m, 244m, 457m) from a very tall tower since February, 2001. Within the tower footprint, continuous soil-water, and soil temperature measurements from the root zone of grasses and shrubs were made during March, 2003 - June, 2004. Time series data were analyzed for coherence and phase using wavelets. My presentation focuses on the temporal relationship between the CO2 mixing ratios measured near ground (at 9m, 30m) from the tower, soil-water content, and soil temperature from this mixed rangeland site in Central Texas.

  11. From emissions to ambient mixing ratios: online seasonal field measurements of volatile organic compounds over a Norway spruce-dominated forest in central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourtsoukidis, E.; Williams, J.; Kesselmeier, J.; Jacobi, S.; Bonn, B.

    2014-07-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are substantial contributors to atmospheric chemistry and physics and demonstrate the close relationship between biosphere and atmosphere. Their emission rates are highly sensitive to meteorological and environmental changes with concomitant impacts on atmospheric chemistry. We have investigated seasonal isoprenoid and oxygenated VOC (oxVOC) fluxes from a Norway spruce (Picea abies) tree in central Germany and explored the emission responses under various atmospheric conditions. Emission rates were quantified by using dynamic branch enclosure and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) techniques. Additionally, ambient mixing ratios were derived through application of a new box model treatment on the dynamic chamber measurements. These are compared in terms of abundance and origin with the corresponding emissions. Isoprenoids dominate the BVOC emissions from Norway spruce, with monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes accounting for 50.8 7.2% and 19.8 8.1% respectively of the total emissions. Normalizing the VOC emission rates, we have observed a trend of reduction of carbon-containing emissions from April to November, with an enhancement of oxVOC. Highest emission rates were observed in June for all measured species, with the exception of sesquiterpenes, which were emitted most strongly in April. Finally, we evaluate the temperature-dependent algorithm that seems to describe the temperature-dependent emissions of methanol, acetaldehyde and monoterpenes but only with the use of the monthly derived values for emission potential, Es, and temperature dependency, ? factor.

  12. Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy Alters the Frequency, as well as the FcR and CLR Expression Profiles of Human Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Broos, Sissela; Andersson, Morgan; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) induces tolerance and shifts the Th2 response towards a regulatory T-cell profile. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, but dendritic cells (DC) play a vital role as key regulators of T-cell responses. DCs interact with allergens via Fc receptors (FcRs) and via certain C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), including CD209/DC-SIGN, CD206/MR and Dectin-2/CLEC6A. In this study, the effect of AIT on the frequencies as well as the FcR and CLR expression profiles of human DC subsets was assessed. PBMC was isolated from peripheral blood from seven allergic donors before and after 8 weeks and 1 year of subcutaneous AIT, as well as from six non-allergic individuals. Cells were stained with antibodies against DC subset-specific markers and a panel of FcRs and CLRs and analyzed by flow cytometry. After 1 year of AIT, the frequency of CD123+ DCs was increased and a larger proportion expressed FcεRI. Furthermore, the expression of CD206 and Dectin-2 was reduced on CD141+ DCs after 1 year of treatment and CD206 as well as Dectin-1 was additionally down regulated in CD1c+ DCs. Interestingly, levels of DNGR1/CLEC9A on CD141+ DCs were increased by AIT, reaching levels similar to cells isolated from non-allergic controls. The modifications in phenotype and occurrence of specific DC subsets observed during AIT suggest an altered capacity of DC subsets to interact with allergens, which can be part of the mechanisms by which AIT induces allergen tolerance. PMID:26863539

  13. Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy Alters the Frequency, as well as the FcR and CLR Expression Profiles of Human Dendritic Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Broos, Sissela; Andersson, Morgan; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) induces tolerance and shifts the Th2 response towards a regulatory T-cell profile. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, but dendritic cells (DC) play a vital role as key regulators of T-cell responses. DCs interact with allergens via Fc receptors (FcRs) and via certain C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), including CD209/DC-SIGN, CD206/MR and Dectin-2/CLEC6A. In this study, the effect of AIT on the frequencies as well as the FcR and CLR expression profiles of human DC subsets was assessed. PBMC was isolated from peripheral blood from seven allergic donors before and after 8 weeks and 1 year of subcutaneous AIT, as well as from six non-allergic individuals. Cells were stained with antibodies against DC subset-specific markers and a panel of FcRs and CLRs and analyzed by flow cytometry. After 1 year of AIT, the frequency of CD123+ DCs was increased and a larger proportion expressed FcεRI. Furthermore, the expression of CD206 and Dectin-2 was reduced on CD141+ DCs after 1 year of treatment and CD206 as well as Dectin-1 was additionally down regulated in CD1c+ DCs. Interestingly, levels of DNGR1/CLEC9A on CD141+ DCs were increased by AIT, reaching levels similar to cells isolated from non-allergic controls. The modifications in phenotype and occurrence of specific DC subsets observed during AIT suggest an altered capacity of DC subsets to interact with allergens, which can be part of the mechanisms by which AIT induces allergen tolerance. PMID:26863539

  14. Seasonal variations in the stable oxygen isotope ratio of wood cellulose reveal annual rings of trees in a Central Amazon terra firme forest.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Shinta; Durgante, Flávia M; Kagawa, Akira; Kajimoto, Takuya; Trumbore, Susan E; Xu, Xiaomei; Ishizuka, Moriyoshi; Higuchi, Niro

    2016-03-01

    In Amazonian non-flooded forests with a moderate dry season, many trees do not form anatomically definite annual rings. Alternative indicators of annual rings, such as the oxygen (δ(18)Owc) and carbon stable isotope ratios of wood cellulose (δ(13)Cwc), have been proposed; however, their applicability in Amazonian forests remains unclear. We examined seasonal variations in the δ(18)Owc and δ(13)Cwc of three common species (Eschweilera coriacea, Iryanthera coriacea, and Protium hebetatum) in Manaus, Brazil (Central Amazon). E. coriacea was also sampled in two other regions to determine the synchronicity of the isotopic signals among different regions. The annual cyclicity of δ(18)Owc variation was cross-checked by (14)C dating. The δ(18)Owc showed distinct seasonal variations that matched the amplitude observed in the δ(18)O of precipitation, whereas seasonal δ(13)Cwc variations were less distinct in most cases. The δ(18)Owc variation patterns were similar within and between some individual trees in Manaus. However, the δ(18)Owc patterns of E. coriacea differed by region. The ages of some samples estimated from the δ(18)Owc cycles were offset from the ages estimated by (14)C dating. In the case of E. coriacea, this phenomenon suggested that missing or wedging rings may occur frequently even in well-grown individuals. Successful cross-dating may be facilitated by establishing δ(18)Owc master chronologies at both seasonal and inter-annual scales for tree species with distinct annual rings in each region. PMID:26621690

  15. A measurement of the e/{pi} ratio difference between short (250 ns) and long (2.2 {mu}s) integration times with the D0 uranium-liquid argon central calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Pi, B.

    1992-12-31

    The difference of the ratios of the high energy electron and pion responses(e/{pi}) in the DO Uranium-liquid Argon central calorimeter is measured using the DO calorimeter trigger readout (short integration time: 250 ns) and precision readout (long integration time: 2.2 {mu}s). This measurement found a 5% difference in the e/{pi} ratio between short and long integration times, with estimated uncertainty of 2.3%.

  16. a Measurement of the Electron/pion Ratio Difference Between Short (250 Nanoseconds) and Long (2.2 Microseconds) Integration Times with the d0 Uranium-Liquid Argon Central Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Bo.

    1992-01-01

    The differences of the ratios of the high energy electron and pion responses (e/pi) in the D0 Uranium-liquid Argon central calorimeter is measured using the D0 calorimeter trigger readout (short integration time: 250 ns) and precision readout (long integration time: 2.2 mus). This measurement found a 5% difference in the e/pi ratio between short and long integration times, with estimated uncertainty of 2.3%.

  17. Production, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of two nanobodies against the Duffy binding-like (DBL) domain DBL6∊-FCR3 of the Plasmodium falciparum VAR2CSA protein

    PubMed Central

    Vuchelen, Anneleen; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Gamain, Benoît; Loris, Remy; van Nuland, Nico A. J.; Ramboarina, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    The VAR2CSA protein has been closely associated with pregnancy-associated malaria and is recognized as the main adhesin exposed on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Chondroitin sulfate A was identified as the main host receptor in the placenta. Single-domain heavy-chain camelid antibodies, more commonly called nanobodies, were selected and produced against the DBL6∊-FCR3 domain of VAR2CSA. Crystals of two specific nanobodies, Nb2907 and Nb2919, identified as strong binders to DBL6∊-FCR3 and the full-length VAR2CSA exposed on the surface of FCR3 P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes, were obtained. Crystals of Nb2907 diffract to 2.45 Å resolution and belong to space group C2 with unit-cell parameters a = 136.1, b = 78.5, c = 103.4 Å, β = 118.8°, whereas Nb2919 crystals diffract to 2.15 Å resolution and belong to space group P43212 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 62.7, c = 167.2 Å. PMID:23519802

  18. The effects of essential oils BIOMIN PEP MGE on weight gain feed conversion ratio and survival of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the effects of matrix encapsulated essential oils (Biomin® P.E.P. MGE) on weight gain, specific growth rate (SGR), feed conversion ratio (FCR), and survival of channel catfish. Five hundred catfish (32.4 ± 1.7 g/fish) were randomly assigned to two treatments with five replicate tanks/tre...

  19. From emissions to ambient mixing ratios: on-line seasonal field measurements of volatile organic compounds over a Norway spruce dominated forest in central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourtsoukidis, E.; Williams, J.; Kesselmeier, J.; Jacobi, S.; Bonn, B.

    2013-11-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) are substantial contributors to atmospheric chemistry and physics and demonstrate the close relationship between biosphere and atmosphere. Their emission rates are highly sensitive to meteorological and environmental changes with concomitant impacts on atmospheric chemistry. We have investigated seasonal isoprenoid and oxygenated VOC (oxVOC) fluxes from a Norway spruce (Picea abies) tree in Central Germany and explored the emission responses under various atmospheric conditions. Emission rates were quantified by using dynamic branch enclosure and Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) techniques. Additionally, ambient mixing ratios were derived through application of a new box model treatment on the dynamic chamber measurements. These are compared in terms of abundance and origin with the corresponding emissions. Isoprenoids govern the BVOC emissions from Norway spruce, with monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes accounting for 50.8 ± 7.2% and 19.8 ± 8.1% respectively of the total emissions. Normalizing the VOC emission rates, we have observed a trend of reduction of carbon containing emissions from April to November, with an enhancement of oxVOC. Highest emission rates were observed in June for all measured species, with the exception of sesquiterpenes that were emitted most strongly in April. We exploit the wide range of conditions experienced at the site to filter the dataset with a combination of temperature, ozone and absolute humidity values in order to derive the emission potential and temperature dependency development for the major chemical species investigated. A profound reduction of monoterpene emission potential (E30) and temperature dependency (β) was found under low temperature regimes, combined with low ozone levels (E30MT, LTLO3=56 ± 9.1 ng g(dw)-1 h-1, βMT,LTLO3=0.03±0.01 K-1) while a combination of both stresses was found to alter their emissions responses with respect to temperature substantially (E30MT,HTHO3=1420.1 ± 191.4 ng g(dw)-1 h-1, βMT,HTHO3=0.15 ± 0.02 K-1). Moreover, we have explored compound relationships under different atmospheric condition sets, addressing possible co-occurrence of emissions under specific conditions. Finally, we evaluate the temperature dependent algorithm that seems to describe the temperature dependent emissions. Highest emission deviations were observed for monoterpenes and these emission fluctuations were attributed to a fraction which is triggered by an additional light dependency.

  20. Estimation of the optimal ratio of standardized ileal digestible threonine to lysine for finishing barrows fed low crude protein diets.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chunyuan; Zhang, Shihai; Zhang, Guijie; Zhang, Fengrui; Chu, Licui; Qiao, Shiyan

    2013-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the standardized ileal digestible (SID) lysine (Lys) requirement and the ideal SID threonine (Thr) to Lys ratio for finishing barrows. In Exp. 1, 120 barrows with an average body weight of 72.8±3.6 kg were allotted to one of six dietary treatments in a randomized complete block design conducted for 35 d. Each diet was fed to five pens of pigs containing four barrows. A normal crude protein (CP) diet providing 15.3% CP and 0.71% SID Lys and five low CP diets providing 12% CP with SID Lys concentrations of 0.51, 0.61, 0.71, 0.81 and 0.91% were formulated. Increasing the SID Lys content of the diet resulted in an increase in weight gain (linear effect p = 0.04 and quadratic effect p = 0.08) and an improvement in feed conversion ratio (FCR) (linear effect p = 0.02 and quadratic effect p = 0.02). For weight gain and FCR, the estimated SID Lys requirement of finishing barrows were 0.71 and 0.71% (linear broken-line analysis), 0.79 and 0.78% (quadratic analysis), respectively. Exp. 2 was a 26 d dose-response study using SID Thr to Lys ratios of 0.56, 0.61, 0.67, 0.72 and 0.77. A total of 138 barrows weighing 72.5±4.4 kg were randomly allotted to receive one of the five diets. All diets were formulated to contain 0.61% SID Lys (10.5% CP), which is slightly lower than the pig's requirement. Weight gain was quadratically (p = 0.03) affected by SID Thr to Lys ratio while FCR was linearly improved (p = 0.02). The SID Thr to Lys ratios for maximal weight gain and minimal FCR and serum urea nitrogen (SUN) were 0.67, 0.71 and 0.64 using a linear broken-line model and 0.68, 0.78 and 0.70 using a quadratic model, respectively. Based on the estimates obtained from the broken-line and quadratic analysis, we concluded that the dietary SID Lys requirement for both maximum weight gain and minimum FCR was 0.75%, and an optimum SID Thr to Lys ratio was 0.68 to maximize weight gain, 0.75 to optimize FCR and 0.67 to minimize SUN for finishing barrows. PMID:25049898

  1. Estimation of the Optimal Ratio of Standardized Ileal Digestible Threonine to Lysine for Finishing Barrows Fed Low Crude Protein Diets

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chunyuan; Zhang, Shihai; Zhang, Guijie; Zhang, Fengrui; Chu, Licui; Qiao, Shiyan

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the standardized ileal digestible (SID) lysine (Lys) requirement and the ideal SID threonine (Thr) to Lys ratio for finishing barrows. In Exp. 1, 120 barrows with an average body weight of 72.8±3.6 kg were allotted to one of six dietary treatments in a randomized complete block design conducted for 35 d. Each diet was fed to five pens of pigs containing four barrows. A normal crude protein (CP) diet providing 15.3% CP and 0.71% SID Lys and five low CP diets providing 12% CP with SID Lys concentrations of 0.51, 0.61, 0.71, 0.81 and 0.91% were formulated. Increasing the SID Lys content of the diet resulted in an increase in weight gain (linear effect p = 0.04 and quadratic effect p = 0.08) and an improvement in feed conversion ratio (FCR) (linear effect p = 0.02 and quadratic effect p = 0.02). For weight gain and FCR, the estimated SID Lys requirement of finishing barrows were 0.71 and 0.71% (linear broken-line analysis), 0.79 and 0.78% (quadratic analysis), respectively. Exp. 2 was a 26 d dose-response study using SID Thr to Lys ratios of 0.56, 0.61, 0.67, 0.72 and 0.77. A total of 138 barrows weighing 72.5±4.4 kg were randomly allotted to receive one of the five diets. All diets were formulated to contain 0.61% SID Lys (10.5% CP), which is slightly lower than the pig’s requirement. Weight gain was quadratically (p = 0.03) affected by SID Thr to Lys ratio while FCR was linearly improved (p = 0.02). The SID Thr to Lys ratios for maximal weight gain and minimal FCR and serum urea nitrogen (SUN) were 0.67, 0.71 and 0.64 using a linear broken-line model and 0.68, 0.78 and 0.70 using a quadratic model, respectively. Based on the estimates obtained from the broken-line and quadratic analysis, we concluded that the dietary SID Lys requirement for both maximum weight gain and minimum FCR was 0.75%, and an optimum SID Thr to Lys ratio was 0.68 to maximize weight gain, 0.75 to optimize FCR and 0.67 to minimize SUN for finishing barrows. PMID:25049898

  2. Management factors affecting mortality, feed intake and feed conversion ratio of grow-finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Agostini, P S; Fahey, A G; Manzanilla, E G; O'Doherty, J V; de Blas, C; Gasa, J

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of animal management and farm facilities on total feed intake (TFI), feed conversion ratio (FCR) and mortality rate (MORT) of grower-finishing pigs. In total, 310 batches from 244 grower-finishing farms, consisting of 454 855 Pietrain sired pigs in six Spanish pig companies were used. Data collection consisted of a survey on management practices (season of placement, split-sex by pens, number of pig origins, water source in the farm, initial or final BW) and facilities (floor, feeder, ventilation or number of animals placed) during 2008 and 2009. Results indicated that batches of pigs placed between January and March had higher TFI (P=0.006), FCR (P=0.005) and MORT (P=0.03) than those placed between July and September. Moreover, batches of pigs placed between April and June had lower MORT (P=0.003) than those placed between January and March. Batches which had split-sex pens had lower TFI (P=0.001) and better FCR (P<0.001) than those with mixed-sex in pens; pigs fed with a single-space feeder with incorporated drinker also had the lowest TFI (P<0.001) and best FCR (P<0.001) in comparison to single and multi-space feeders without a drinker. Pigs placed in pens with <50% slatted floors presented an improvement in FCR (P<0.05) than pens with 50% or more slatted floors. Batches filled with pigs from multiple origins had higher MORT (P<0.001) than those from a single origin. Pigs housed in barns that performed manual ventilation control presented higher MORT (P<0.001) in comparison to automatic ventilation. The regression analysis also indicated that pigs which entered to grower-finisher facilities with higher initial BW had lower MORT (P<0.05) and finally pigs which were sent to slaughterhouse with a higher final BW presented higher TFI (P<0.001). The variables selected for each dependent variable explained 61.9%, 24.8% and 20.4% of the total variability for TFI, FCR and MORT, respectively. This study indicates that farms can increase growth performance and reduce mortality by improving farm facilities and/or modifying management practices. PMID:24229728

  3. Nitrous oxide emissions from yellow brown soil as affected by incorporation of crop residues with different carbon-to-nitrogen ratios: a case study in central China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan; Iqbal, Javed; Hu, Ronggui; Shaaban, Muhammad; Cai, Jianbo; Chen, Xi

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the influence of crop residues decomposition on nitrous oxide (N2O) emission, a field study was performed with application of crop residues with different C:N ratios in a bare yellow brown soil at the experimental station of Zhangjiachong at Zigui, China. We set up six experimental treatments: no crop residue (CK), rapeseed cake (RC), potato stalk (PS), rice straw (RS), wheat straw (WS), and corn straw (CS). The carbon (C) to nitrogen (N) ratios of these crop residues were 7.5, 32.9, 40.4, 65.7, and 90.9, respectively. Nitrous oxide fluxes were measured using a static closed chamber method. N2O emissions were significantly enhanced by incorporation of crop residues. Cumulative N2O emissions negatively correlated with C:N ratio (R (2) = 0.9821) of the crop residue, but they were positively correlated with average concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon. Nitrogen emission fraction, calculated as N2O-N emissions originated from the crop residues N, positively correlated with C:N ratio of the residues (P < 0.05). Soil temperature did, whereas soil moisture did not, control the residue's induced N2O emissions because a significant correlation (P < 0.01) existed between soil temperature and N2O emissions in all treatments except the control. In contrast, a significant relationship between soil moisture and N2O emissions was found in the control only. Furthermore, N2O emission significantly correlated (P < 0.05) with NO3 (-)-N, and NH4 (+)-N contents from all residue treatments. These results indicate that (1) crop residues with distinct carbon and nitrogen contents can significantly alter soil N2O flux rates; and (2) soil biotic as well as abiotic variables are critical in determining soil-atmospheric N2O emissions after crop residue incorporation into soil. PMID:23609028

  4. Utility of waist-to-height ratio in assessing the status of central obesity and related cardiometabolic risk profile among normal weight and overweight/obese children: The Bogalusa Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Body Mass Index (BMI) is widely used to assess the impact of obesity on cardiometabolic risk in children but it does not always relate to central obesity and varies with growth and maturation. Waist-to-Height Ratio (WHtR) is a relatively constant anthropometric index of abdominal obesity across different age, sex or racial groups. However, information is scant on the utility of WHtR in assessing the status of abdominal obesity and related cardiometabolic risk profile among normal weight and overweight/obese children, categorized according to the accepted BMI threshold values. Methods Cross-sectional cardiometabolic risk factor variables on 3091 black and white children (56% white, 50% male), 4-18 years of age were used. Based on the age-, race- and sex-specific percentiles of BMI, the children were classified as normal weight (5th - 85th percentiles) and overweight/obese (≥ 85th percentile). The risk profiles of each group based on the WHtR (<0.5, no central obesity versus ≥ 0.5, central obesity) were compared. Results 9.2% of the children in the normal weight group were centrally obese (WHtR ≥0.5) and 19.8% among the overweight/obese were not (WHtR < 0.5). On multivariate analysis the normal weight centrally obese children were 1.66, 2.01, 1.47 and 2.05 times more likely to have significant adverse levels of LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides and insulin, respectively. In addition to having a higher prevalence of parental history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, the normal weight central obesity group showed a significantly higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome (p < 0.0001). In the overweight/obese group, those without central obesity were 0.53 and 0.27 times less likely to have significant adverse levels of HDL cholesterol and HOMA-IR, respectively (p < 0.05), as compared to those with central obesity. These overweight/obese children without central obesity also showed significantly lower prevalence of parental history of hypertension (p = 0.002), type 2 diabetes mellitus (p = 0.03) and metabolic syndrome (p < 0.0001). Conclusion WHtR not only detects central obesity and related adverse cardiometabolic risk among normal weight children, but also identifies those without such conditions among the overweight/obese children, which has implications for pediatric primary care practice. PMID:20937123

  5. Three-dimensional models of P wave velocity and P-to-S velocity ratio in the southern central Andes by simultaneous inversion of local earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeber, Frank M.; Asch, Günter

    1999-09-01

    The PISCO'94 (Proyecto de Investigatión Sismológica de la Cordillera Occidental, 1994) seismological network of 31 digital broad band and short-period three-component seismometers was deployed in northern Chile between the Coastal Cordillera and the Western Cordillera. More than 5300 local seismic events were observed in a 100 day period. A subset of high-quality P and S arrival time data was used to invert simultaneously for hypocenters and velocity structure. Additional data from two other networks in the region could be included. The velocity models show a number of prominent anomalies, outlining an extremely thickened crust (about 70 km) beneath the forearc region, an anomalous crustal structure beneath the recent magmatic arc (Western Cordillera) characterized by very low velocities, and a high-velocity slab. A region of an increased Vp/Vs ratio has been found directly above the Wadati-Benioff zone, which might be caused by hydration processes. A zone of lower than average velocities and a high Vp/Vs ratio might correspond to the asthenospheric wedge. The upper edge of the Wadati-Benioff zone is sharply defined by intermediate depth hypocenters, while evidence for a double seismic zone can hardly be seen. Crustal events between the Precordillera and the Western Cordillera have been observed for the first time and are mainly located in the vicinity of the Salar de Atacama down to depths of about 40 km.

  6. First Measurement of the Ratio of Central-Electron to Forward-Electron W Partial Cross Sections in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-02-01

    We present a measurement of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W) x {Beta}(W {yields} e{nu}) at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, using electrons identified in the forward region (1.2 < |{eta}| < 2.8) of the CDF II detector. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 223 pb{sup -1}. We measure {sigma} x {Beta} = 2796 {+-} 13(stat){sub -90}{sup +95}(syst){+-}162 (lum) pb. Combining this result with a previous CDF measurement obtained using electrons in the central region (|{eta}| {approx}< 1), we present the first measurement of the ratio of central-electron to forward-electron W partial cross sections R{sub exp} = 0.925 {+-} 0.006(stat){+-}0.032(syst), consistent with theoretical predictions using CTEQ and MRST parton distribution functions.

  7. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and 10Be-fluxes (230Thxs-normalized) in central Baffin Bay sediments during the last glacial cycle: Paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L.; Nuttin, Laurence; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; St-Onge, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and 10Be-fluxes reconstructed using the 230Thxs normalization, proxies of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be production rate in the atmosphere, have been measured in a sedimentary core from Baffin Bay (North Atlantic) spanning the last 136 ka BP. The normalization applied on the exchangeable (authigenic) 10Be concentrations using the authigenic 9Be isotope and 230Thxs methods yield equivalent results strongly correlated with sedimentological parameters (grain-size and mineralogy). Lower authigenic beryllium (Be) concentrations and 10Be/9Be ratios are associated with coarse-grained carbonate-rich layers, while higher authigenic Be values are related to fine-grained felspar-rich sediments. This variability is due to: i) sediment composition control over beryllium-scavenging efficiency and, ii) glacial history that contributed to modify the 10Be concentration in Baffin Bay by input and boundary scavenging condition changes. Most paleo-denudation rates inferred from the 10Be/9Be ratio vary weakly around 220 ± 76 tons.km-2.yr-1 (0.09 ± 0.03 mm.yr-1) corresponding to relatively steady weathering fluxes over the last glacial cycle except for six brief intervals characterized by sharp increases of the denudation rate. These intervals are related to ice-surging episodes coeval with Heinrich events and the last deglaciation period. An average freshwater flux of 180.6 km3.yr-1 (0.006 Sv), consistent with recent models, has been calculated in order to sustain glacially-derived 10Be inputs into Baffin Bay. It is concluded that in such environments, the authigenic 10Be measured mainly depends on climatic effects related to the glacial dynamics, which masks the 10Be production variation modulated by geomagnetic field changes. Altogether, these results challenge the simple interpretation of 10Be-concentration variation as a proxy of Interglacial/Glacial (interstadial/stadial) cycles in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions. They rather suggest the effect of higher-frequency paleoclimatic changes and local glacial dynamics on 10Be signature.

  8. Central Nervous System Effects of the Second-Generation Antihistamines Marketed in Japan -Review of Inter-Drug Differences Using the Proportional Impairment Ratio (PIR)-

    PubMed Central

    Isomura, Tatsuya; Kono, Takeshi; Hindmarch, Ian; Kikuchi, Norimasa; Murakami, Aya; Inuzuka, Kyoko; Kawana, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Background Second-generation antihistamines (AHs) have, in general, fewer sedative effects than the first-generation. However, important inter-drug differences remain in the degree of cognitive and/or psychomotor impairment. The extent to which a particular compound causes disruption can be conveniently compared, to all other AHs, using the Proportional Impairment Ratio (PIR). Although the PIR can differentiate the relative impairment caused by individual drugs, there is no indication of the reliability of the ratios obtained. Objective To calculate the PIRs –together with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), as an index of reliability– and compare AHs currently, or soon to be, available in Japan, with respect to their intrinsic capacity to cause impairment. Methods Results from studies of cetirizine, desloratadine, ebastine, fexofenadine, levocetirizine, loratadine, mequitazine, and olopatadine were included in the PIR calculations. All data utilised came from crossover studies in healthy volunteers which were randomised and placebo and positive-internal controlled. Existing databases from studies reporting the sedative effects of AHs on objective (speed, accuracy, memory) and subjective (feeling) psychometrics were augmented, via results from suitable studies published after the previous reviews. The null value for a PIR was one. Results A total of 45 studies were finally included for this review. Of the AHs assessed, fexofenadine, ebastine, and levocetirizine showed a PIR for objective tests of 0. However, only fexofenadine (PIR = 0.49) had an upper limit of the 95% CI of less than 1. Fexofenadine, levocetirizine, desloratadine, olopatadine, loratadine, and mequitazine all had a PIR for subjective ratings of 0, but the upper limits of the 95% CIs were all in excess of 1, although fexofenadine (PIR = 2.57) was the lowest. Conclusions The results show that there are differences between second-generation AHs in the extent of sedation produced. However, subjective ratings indicate that patients may not necessarily be aware of this. PMID:25501360

  9. Lipid D/H Ratios from Multiple Sources and Deposits Indicate Drier Little Ice Age at Washington Island (4°43`N, 160°25`W), Central Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muegler, I.; Sachse, D.; Sachs, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    To compare the sensitivity of biomarker D/H ratios from two distinct climate archives, a lake and a peat bog on the Tropical Pacific Island of Terrania, compound-specific hydrogen isotope ratios (expressed as δD values) were determined on lipid biomarkers from various biological sources deposited in the two climate archives. At present, Terrania or Washington Island (4°43`N, 160°25`W) permanently lies in the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and receives an annual precipitation of 2,903 mm. The interior of this lens shaped island contains a freshwater lake and peat bogs. Previous studies on the lake sediments found evidence for a substantially drier climate at times during the Little Ice Age (AD 1400-1850) based on the lithologic transition from modern freshwater sediments to a sequence of pure cyanobacterial mat in concert with δD values from total lipid extracts (Sachs et al., 2009). Here we report on δD values from lipids of various sources: dinoflagellate algae (dinosterol and a saturated C30 sterol (4α -methyl-24-ethyl-5α -cholestan-3β-ol), microbial sources (diploptene and nC21 alkane) and higher plants (fern-7-ene, β-sitosterol and stigmastanol). Mean δD values from all lipids, measured in both archives, are significantly enriched in deuterium by between 22 and 86‰ during previously inferred drier climate conditions and simultaneously record the transition towards a freshwater lake at around AD1550. Measured δD values of all lipids cover a wide range from -281‰ to -105‰ during freshwater deposition and from -185‰ to -50‰ when climate was drier. In agreement with the observed isotopic difference between lipids produced via the acetogenic and the mevalonic acid biosynthetic pathway δD values for algae and higher plant sterols are depleted in deuterium relative to the nC21 alkane by 150‰ on average. The consistent δD values from dinosterol and 4α -methyl-24-ethyl-5α -cholestan-3β-ol from the lake and peat deposits signify the robustness of these lipid δD values to indicate hydrologic changes in the sedimentary record. δD values among lipids of similar and disparate sources and/or biosynthetic origin from Washington Island lake (AD ~ 800-1550) and peat bog (AD~1200-1660) sediments are significantly enriched in deuterium prior to AD 1560/1640 and thus both suggest drier climate conditions resembling today’s environmental and depositional setting at Christmas Island which is located 300km SSE of Washington Island beyond the influence of the ITCZ.

  10. Further Evidence for Large Central Mass-to-light Ratios in Early-type Galaxies: The Case of Ellipticals and Lenticulars in the A262 Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, G. A.; Corsini, E. M.; Thomas, J.; Saglia, R. P.; Bender, R.; Pu, S. B.

    2012-09-01

    We present new radially resolved spectroscopy of eight early-type galaxies in the A262 cluster. The measurements include stellar rotation, velocity dispersion, H 3 and H 4 coefficients of the line-of-sight velocity distribution along the major and minor axes and an intermediate axis as well as line-strength index profiles of Mg, Fe, and Hβ. The ionized-gas velocity and velocity dispersion is measured for six sample galaxies along different axes. We derive dynamical mass-to-light ratios and dark matter densities from orbit-based dynamical models, complemented by the galaxies' ages, metallicities, and α-element abundances from single stellar-population models. The ionized-gas kinematics give a valuable consistency check for the model assumptions about orientation and intrinsic shape of the galaxies. Four galaxies have a significant detection of dark matter and their halos are about 10 times denser than in spirals of the same stellar mass. By calibrating dark matter densities to cosmological simulations we find assembly redshifts of z DM ≈ 1-3, as previously reported for the Coma Cluster. The dynamical mass that follows the light is larger than expected for a Kroupa stellar initial mass function (IMF), especially in galaxies with high velocity dispersion σeff inside the effective radius r eff. This could indicate a "massive" IMF in massive galaxies. Alternatively, some of the dark matter in massive galaxies could follow the light very closely. In combination with our comparison sample of Coma early-type galaxies, we now have 5 of 24 galaxies where (1) mass follows light to 1-3 r eff, (2) the dynamical mass-to-light ratio of all the mass that follows the light is large (≈8-10 in the Kron-Cousins R band), and (3) the dark matter fraction is negligible to 1-3 r eff. Unless the IMF in these galaxies is particularly "massive" and somehow coupled to the dark matter content, there seems to be a significant degeneracy between luminous and dark matter in at least some early-type galaxies. The role of violent relaxation is briefly discussed. Based on data collected with the 2.4 m Hiltner Telescope.

  11. Using H/V Spectral Ratio Analysis to Map Sediment Thickness and to Explain Macroseismic Intensity Variation of a Low-Magnitude Seismic Swarm in Central Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Noten, K.; Lecocq, T.; Camelbeeck, T.

    2013-12-01

    Between 2008 and 2010, the Royal Observatory of Belgium received numerous ';Did You Feel It'-reports related to a 2-year lasting earthquake swarm at Court-Saint-Etienne, a small town in a hilly area 20 km SE of Brussels, Belgium. These small-magnitude events (-0.7 ≤ ML ≤ 3.2, n = c. 300 events) were recorded both by the permanent seismometer network in Belgium and by a locally installed temporary seismic network deployed in the epicentral area. Relocation of the hypocenters revealed that the seismic swarm can be related to the reactivation of a NW-SE strike-slip fault at 3 to 6 km depth in the basement rocks of the Lower Palaeozoic London-Brabant Massif. This sequence caused a lot of emotion in the region because more than 60 events were felt by the local population. Given the small magnitudes of the seismic swarm, most events were more often heard than felt by the respondents, which is indicative of a local high-frequency earthquake source. At places where the bedrock is at the surface or where it is covered by thin alluvial sediments (<10 m), such as in incised river valleys and on hill slopes, reported macroseismic intensities are higher than those on hill tops where respondents live on a thicker Quaternary and Cenozoic sedimentary cover (> 30 m). In those river valleys that have a considerable alluvial sedimentary cover, macroseismic intensities are again lower. To explain this variation in macroseismic intensity we present a macroseismic analysis of all DYFI-reports related to the 2008-2010 seismic swarm and a pervasive H/V spectral ratio (HVSR) analysis of ambient noise measurements to model the thickness of sediments covering the London-Brabant Massif. The HVSR method is a very powerful tool to map the basement morphology, particularly in regions of unknown subsurface structure. By calculating the soil's fundamental frequency above boreholes, we calibrated the power-law relationship between the fundamental frequency, shear wave velocity and the thickness of sediments. This relationship is useful for places where the sediment thickness is unknown and where the fundamental frequency can be calculated by H/V spectral ratio analysis of ambient noise. In a subsequent research step macroseismic intensity of the different felt events is compared to sediment thickness in order to investigate if the people's perception of earthquake strong ground motions relates to the local sediment column above bedrock. We discovered that the decrease in macroseismic intensity of the felt/heard events on the hill tops can be explained by the absorption of high frequency seismic energy due the thickness of the local sediment column. Our results illustrate that it is fundamental to study regional soil properties to understand the effects of earthquake strong ground motions in an intraplate tectonic setting.

  12. Variations in the elemental ratio of organic matter in the central Baltic Sea: Part I-Linking primary production to remineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreus, Markus; Schartau, Markus; Engel, Anja; Nausch, Monika; Voss, Maren

    2015-06-01

    For most marine ecosystems the growth of diazotrophic cyanobacteria and the associated amount of nitrogen fixation are regulated by the availability of phosphorus. The intensity of summer blooms of nitrogen (N2) fixing algae in the Baltic Sea is assumed to be determinable from a surplus of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) that remains after the spring bloom has ended. But this surplus DIP concentration is observed to continuously decrease at times when no appreciable nitrogen fixation is measured. This peculiarity is currently discussed and has afforded different model interpretations for the Baltic Sea. In our study we propose a dynamical model solution that explains these observations with variations of the elemental carbon-to-nitrogen-to-phosphorus (C:N:P) ratio during distinct periods of organic matter production and remineralization. The biogeochemical model resolves seasonal C, N and P fluxes with depth at the Baltic Sea monitoring site BY15, based on three assumptions: (1) DIP is utilized by algae though not needed for immediate growth, (2) the uptake of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) is hampered when the algae's phosphorus (P) quota is low, and (3) carbon assimilation continues at times of nutrient depletion. Model results describe observed temporal variations of DIN, DIP and chlorophyll-a concentrations along with partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2). In contrast to other model studies, our solution does not require N2 fixation to occur shortly after the spring bloom to explain DIP drawdown and pCO2 levels. Model estimates of annual N2 fixation are 297 ± 24 mmol Nm-2a-1. Estimates of total production are 14200 ± 700 mmol Cm-2a-1, 1400 ± 70 mmol Nm-2a-1, and 114 ± 5 mmol Pm-2a-1 for the upper 50 m. The models C, N and P fluxes disclose preferential remineralization of P and of organic N that was introduced via N2 fixation. Our results are in support of the idea that P uptake by phytoplankton during the spring bloom contributes to the consecutive availability of labile dissolved organic phosphorus (LDOP). The LDOP is retained within upper layers and its remineralization affects algal growth in summer, during periods of noticeable N2 fixation.

  13. Reconstructing C3 and C4 vegetation cover using n-alkane carbon isotope ratios in recent lake sediments from Cameroon, Western Central Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Yannick; Schefuß, Enno; Schwab, Valérie F.; Garreta, Vincent; Gleixner, Gerd; Vincens, Annie; Todou, Gilbert; Séné, Olivier; Onana, Jean-Michel; Achoundong, Gaston; Sachse, Dirk

    2014-10-01

    Trees and shrubs in tropical Africa use the C3 cycle as a carbon fixation pathway during photosynthesis, while grasses and sedges mostly use the C4 cycle. Leaf-wax lipids from sedimentary archives such as the long-chain n-alkanes (e.g., n-C27 to n-C33) inherit carbon isotope ratios that are representative of the carbon fixation pathway. Therefore, n-alkane δ13C values are often used to reconstruct past C3/C4 composition of vegetation, assuming that the relative proportions of C3 and C4 leaf waxes reflect the relative proportions of C3 and C4 plants. We have compared the δ13C values of n-alkanes from modern C3 and C4 plants with previously published values from recent lake sediments and provide a framework for estimating the fractional contribution (areal-based) of C3 vegetation cover (fC3) represented by these sedimentary archives. Samples were collected in Cameroon, across a latitudinal transect that accommodates a wide range of climate zones and vegetation types, as reflected in the progressive northward replacement of C3-dominated rain forest by C4-dominated savanna. The C3 plants analysed were characterised by substantially higher abundances of n-C29 alkanes and by substantially lower abundances of n-C33 alkanes than the C4 plants. Furthermore, the sedimentary δ13C values of n-C29 and n-C31 alkanes from recent lake sediments in Cameroon (-37.4‰ to -26.5‰) were generally within the range of δ13C values for C3 plants, even when from sites where C4 plants dominated the catchment vegetation. In such cases simple linear mixing models fail to accurately reconstruct the relative proportions of C3 and C4 vegetation cover when using the δ13C values of sedimentary n-alkanes, overestimating the proportion of C3 vegetation, likely as a consequence of the differences in plant wax production, preservation, transport, and/or deposition between C3 and C4 plants. We therefore tested a set of non-linear binary mixing models using δ13C values from both C3 and C4 vegetation as end-members. The non-linear models included a sigmoid function (sine-squared) that describes small variations in the fC3 values as the minimum and maximum δ13C values are approached, and a hyperbolic function that takes into account the differences between C3 and C4 plants discussed above. Model fitting and the estimation of uncertainties were completed using the Monte Carlo algorithm and can be improved by future data addition. Models that provided the best fit with the observed δ13C values of sedimentary n-alkanes were either hyperbolic functions or a combination of hyperbolic and sine-squared functions. Such non-linear models may be used to convert δ13C measurements on sedimentary n-alkanes directly into reconstructions of C3 vegetation cover.

  14. The Use of the Ratio between the Veno-arterial Carbon Dioxide Difference and the Arterial-venous Oxygen Difference to Guide Resuscitation in Cardiac Surgery Patients with Hyperlactatemia and Normal Central Venous Oxygen Saturation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Long, Yun; Wang, Xiao-Ting; Liu, Da-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background: After cardiac surgery, central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) and serum lactate concentration are often used to guide resuscitation; however, neither are completely reliable indicators of global tissue hypoxia. This observational study aimed to establish whether the ratio between the veno-arterial carbon dioxide and the arterial-venous oxygen differences (P(v−a)CO2/C(a−v)O2) could predict whether patients would respond to resuscitation by increasing oxygen delivery (DO2). Methods: We selected 72 patients from a cohort of 290 who had undergone cardiac surgery in our institution between January 2012 and August 2014. The selected patients were managed postoperatively on the Intensive Care Unit, had a normal ScvO2, elevated serum lactate concentration, and responded to resuscitation by increasing DO2 by >10%. As a consequence, 48 patients responded with an increase in oxygen consumption (VO2) while VO2 was static or fell in 24. Results: At baseline and before resuscitative intervention in postoperative cardiac surgery patients, a P(v−a)CO2/C(a−v)O2 ratio ≥1.6 mmHg/ml predicted a positive VO2 response to an increase in DO2 of >10% with a sensitivity of 68.8% and a specificity of 87.5%. Conclusions: P(v−a)CO2/C(a−v)O2 ratio appears to be a reliable marker of global anaerobic metabolism and predicts response to DO2 challenge. Thus, patients likely to benefit from resuscitation can be identified promptly, the P(v−a)CO2/C(a−v)O2 ratio may, therefore, be a useful resuscitation target. PMID:25963349

  15. Freedom of information applications as an "evergreening" tactic: Secretary, Department of Health and Ageing v iNOVA Pharmaceuticals (Australia) Pty Ltd (2010) 191 FCR 573; [2010] FCA 1442.

    PubMed

    Vines, Tim; Faunce, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    A recent decision of the Federal Court of Australia illustrates how patent-holding pharmaceutical companies are attempting to use Australia's Freedom of Information Act 1982 (Cth) to force Australian safety, quality and efficacy regulators to disclose whether generic competitors are attempting to enter the market. In Secretary, Department of Health and Ageing v iNova Pharmaceuticals (Australia) Pty Ltd (2010) 191 FCR 573; [2010] FCA 1442 a single judge of the Federal Court overturned a decision of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT) that would have compelled the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) to reveal whether they were in possession of an application to register generic versions of two iNova products: imiquimod and phentermine. In its justification to the AAT for refusing to confirm or deny the existence of any application, the TGA argued that to reveal the existence of such a document would prejudice the proper administration of the National Health Act 1953 (Cth) as it could compromise the listing of a generic on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. The AAT failed to appreciate the extent to which this revelation to a competitor would have undercut 2004 amendments to the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989 (Cth) that provided penalties for evergreening tactics involving TGA notifications to drug patent-holders and 2006 amendments to the Patents Act 1990 (Cth) which protected the right of generic manufacturers to "springboard". The decision of the Federal Court is one of the first to explore the use of freedom of information legislation by patent-holders as a potential "evergreening" technique to prolong royalties by marginalising generic competition. Because of the significant amounts of money involved in ensuring rapid market entry of low-cost generic products, the issue has considerable public health significance. PMID:21988009

  16. Effects of maturity and harvest season of grass-clover silage and of forage-to-concentrate ratio on milk production of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Alstrup, L; Søegaard, K; Weisbjerg, M R

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of maturity and season of harvest of grass-clover silages and forage:concentrate ratio (FCR) on feed intake, milk production, chewing activity, digestibility, and fecal consistency of Holstein dairy cows. Comparison included 2 cuts in spring season (early and late) and 2 cuts in summer season (early and late) combined with high FCR (80:20; HFCR) and low FCR (50:50; LFCR). The experiment included 24 lactating Holstein cows arranged as 2 repeated 4 × 4 Latin squares with four 21-d periods and included measurements of feed composition, feed intake, milk production and composition, chewing activities, digestibilities, and fecal dry matter (DM) concentration and scoring. Forages were fed as two-thirds grass-clover and one-third corn silage supplemented with either 20 or 50% concentrate. Rations were fed ad libitum as total mixed rations. Early maturity cuts were more digestible than late maturity cuts, which was also reflected in a lower concentration of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) in early maturity cuts, whereas summer cuts had a higher crude protein concentration than spring cuts. Increased maturity decreased the intake of DM and energy, increased NDF intake, and decreased the yield of energy-corrected milk (ECM). Summer cuts increased the ECM yield compared with spring cuts. Milk yield (kg and kilogram of ECM) was numerically higher for cows fed early summer cut, independent of FCR in the ration. Milk protein concentration decreased, or tended to decrease, with maturity. For LFCR, the milk fat concentration increased with maturity resulting in a decreased protein:fat ratio. At HFCR, increased maturity increased the time spent chewing per kilogram of DM. Digestibility of silages was positively correlated with the fecal DM concentration. The DM intake and ECM yield showed no significant response to FCR in the ration, but the milk composition was affected. The LFCR decreased the milk fat percentage and increased the milk protein percentage numerically followed by a higher protein:fat ratio. Total chewing time per kilogram of DM decreased and total chewing time per kilogram of NDF increased with LFCR. This study indicates that silages from summer cuts have a similar value for milk production as do spring cuts, when forage digestibility is taken into account. Moreover, it appears that supplementation of extra concentrate has no effect on ECM production when forages with a high digestibility are fed, and that the physical structural value is adequate even when feeding high digestible forages. PMID:26506543

  17. Feeding of by-products completely replaced cereals and pulses in dairy cows and enhanced edible feed conversion ratio.

    PubMed

    Ertl, P; Zebeli, Q; Zollitsch, W; Knaus, W

    2015-02-01

    When fed human-edible feeds, such as grains and pulses, dairy cows are very inefficient in transforming them into animal products. Therefore, strategies to reduce human-edible inputs in dairy cow feeding are needed to improve food efficiency. The aim of this feeding trial was to analyze the effect of the full substitution of a common concentrate mixture with a by-product concentrate mixture on milk production, feed intake, blood values, and the edible feed conversion ratio (eFCR), defined as human-edible output per human edible input. The experiment was conducted as a change-over design, with each experimental period lasting for 7wk. Thirteen multiparous and 5 primiparous Holstein cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments. Treatments consisted of a grass silage-based forage diet supplemented with either conventional ingredients or solely by-products from the food processing industry (BP). The BP mixture had higher contents of fiber and ether extract, whereas starch content was reduced compared with the conventional mixture. Milk yield and milk solids were not affected by treatment. The eFCR in the BP group were about 4 and 2.7 times higher for energy and protein, respectively. Blood values did not indicate negative effects on cows' metabolic health status. Results of this feeding trial suggest that by-products could replace common concentrate supplements in dairy cow feeding, resulting in an increased eFCR for energy and protein which emphasizes the unique role of dairy cows as net food producers. PMID:25483200

  18. Intensity ratios: a cautionary tale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Claire-Elise; Cunningham, Maria; Green, Jimi; Dawson, Joanne; Jones, Paul; Lopez-Sanchez, Angel; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Henkel, Christian; Baan, Willem; Martin, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Molecular line intensity ratios can be used as diagnostic tools to examine the effect of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) or central black hole on circum-nuclear gas. These intensity ratios allow the identification of X-ray dominated regions (XDRs) and photon-dominated regions (PDRs), which facilitates determination of whether the star formation or AGN has the dominant effect on the gas . The chemistry of these regions is dependent upon the type of radiation, thus they are differentiated by the relative intensity of their rotational molecular lines, HCO+/HCN and HNC/HCN (1-0). The ratio of the intensity of these molecular lines can be calculated in an unexpectedly large variety of ways. I present a cautionary tale regarding the calculation and interpretation of these ratios and a recommendation on how this calculation should be performed in the identification of XDRs and PDRs.

  19. Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Guastad, Krista; Riihimaki, Laura; none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (TWRMR) value-added product (VAP) is to calculate water-vapor mixing ratio at the 25-meter and 60-meter levels of the meteorological tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility.

  20. RNA/DNA ratio and LPL and MyoD mRNA expressions in muscle of Oreochromis niloticus fed with elevated levels of palm oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayisi, Christian Larbi; Zhao, Jinliang

    2016-02-01

    Palm oil is of great potential as one of the sustainable alternatives to fish oil (FO) in aquafeeds. In this present study, five isonitrogenous diets (32% crude protein) with elevated palm oil levels of 0%, 2%, 4%, 6% and 8% were used during an 8-week feeding trial to evaluate its effects on RNA/DNA ratio and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and MyoD mRNA expressions in muscle of Oreochromis niloticus. The results showed that RNA, DNA content as well as ratio of RNA to DNA were significantly affected ( P < 0.05), in each case the highest was recorded in fish group subjected to 6% palm oil level. There was a strong positive correlation between nucleic acid concentration (RNA concentration and RNA: DNA ratio) and specific growth rate (SGR), protein efficiency ratio (PER), while a negative correlation existed between nucleic acid concentration (RNA concentration and RNA: DNA ratio) and feed conversion ratio (FCR). The mRNA expressions of LPL and MyoD in muscle were not significantly affected by the different palm oil levels, although the highest expression was observed in fish fed with 6% palm oil level. There also existed a strong positive correlation between the mRNA expression of LPL, MyoD and SGR, PER, while their correlation with FCR was negative. In conclusion, elevated palm oil affected the RNA, DNA concentration as well as RNA/DNA ratio significantly, although the mRNA expression of LPL and MyoD were not affected significantly by elevated palm oil levels.

  1. Optimal content and ratio of lysine to arginine in the diet of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhengfu; Dong, Chaohua; Wang, Linlin; Hu, Yanjiang; Zhu, Wei

    2013-07-01

    The optimal quantity of dietary lysine (Lys) and arginine (Arg), and the optimal ratio of dietary Lys to Arg for Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei were investigated. Coated Lys and Arg were added to a basal diet (37.99% crude protein and 7.28% crude lipid) to provide graded levels of Lys and Arg. The experimental diets contained three Lys levels (2.51%, 2.11%, and 1.70% of total diet), and three Arg levels (1.41%, 1.80%, and 2.21% of total diet) and all combinations of these levels were tested. Pacific white shrimp, with a mean weight of 3.62±0.1 g, were randomly distributed in 36 fiberglass tanks with 30 shrimp per tank and reared on the experimental diets for 50 days. After the feeding trial, the growth performance, survival, feed conversion rate (FCR), body composition and protease and lipase activities in the hepatopancreases of the experimental shrimps were determined. The results show that weight gain (WG), specific growth rate (SGR), FCR, body protein, body Lys and Arg content were significantly affected by dietary Lys and Arg ( P <0.05) and improved when dietary Lys and Arg levels were 2.11% ˜ 2.51% and 1.80%˜2.21%, respectively. Protease and lipase activities in the hepatopancreases of the shrimps appeared higher when dietary Lys and Arg quantities were 2.11% ˜2.51% and 1.80%˜2.21%, although the difference was not statistically significant ( P >0.05). Therefore, according to our results, the optimal Lys and Arg quantities in the diet of Pacific white shrimp, L. vannamei, were considered to be 2.11%-2.51% and 1.80%-2.21%, respectively, and the optimal ratio to be 1:0.88-1:1.05.

  2. Birthweight ratio revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Brownlee, K G; Ng, P C; Roussounis, S H; Dear, P R

    1991-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis suggested in a recent report that the birthweight ratio might be a useful predictor of several important clinical outcome measures in babies of less than 31 weeks' gestation, we examined the association between the birthweight ratio and aspects of both short and long term outcome in 436 Leeds babies of less than 31 weeks' gestation. Unlike the report, and contrary to what we had expected, we were unable to find any significant association between birthweight ratio and length of time on the ventilator, mortality, neurological outcome, or intellectual outcome. PMID:2025035

  3. Deterrence and arrest ratios.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Stephanie E; Piquero, Alex R

    2006-02-01

    In the limited research on the origins of sanction threat perceptions, researchers have focused on either the effects of actively engaging in crime or the effects of formal sanctioning but rarely on both (i.e., the arrest ratio or the number of arrests relative to the number of crimes committed). This article extends this line of research by using a sample of Colorado inmates and measures arrest ratios and sanction perceptions for eight different crime types. Analyses reveal that the offenders report both significant experiential and arrest ratio effects. Theoretical and policy implications, limitations, and directions for future research are outlined. PMID:16397123

  4. Ratio and Proportion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipton, Sheila

    1980-01-01

    Examples of ratio and proportion problems from engineering, science, business, and catering are presented and solved. The goal is to illustrate how certain basic processes are used across a wide spectrum of occupations. (MK)

  5. High pressure ratio turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Woollenweber, W.E.

    1991-06-25

    This patent describes a turbocharger system for an internal combustion engine. It comprises means forming a turbine adapted to be driven by exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine comprising: a turbine wheel having a central core and outwardly extending vanes, the turbine wheel being rotatable about a central axis; a meridionally divided volute for exhaust gas surrounding the turbine wheel, the meridionally divided volute including a divider wall defining first and second volute passageways with openings at the turbine wheel; means forming a high-pressure compressor driven by the turbine means, the high-pressure compressor comprising: rotating compressor blades, the compressor blades adapted to be driven in rotation about the central axis by the turbine means to deliver a flow of air at high pressures for an internal combustion engine, and blades being moveable about longitudinal axes generally transverse to the central axis to impart positive or negative pre-whirl motion to the air leaving the stator blades prior to entering the rotating blades of the compressor stage; closure means for providing a flow of engine exhaust gas from one of the first and second volute passageways into the turbine wheel; and a control means for operating the closure means and the stator blades in synchronization.

  6. Determining maintenance cost ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Donald S.; Sherif, Josef S.; Buchanan, Harry R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the wide range of costs involved in maintaining equipment and discusses methods that different industries use to measure and report their maintenance cost. Results are presented of the study of maintenance costs in the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) and of a comparison of DSN maintenance cost with the maintenance costs of a number of other reports. A comparison of the maintenance costs in terms of the maintenance cost ratio (annual maintenance cost/capital replacement cost) shows that DSN has the lowest maintenance cost ratio of the industries and organizations surveyed.

  7. Dietary lysine requirement of fingerling Catla catla (Hamilton) based on growth, protein deposition, lysine retention efficiency, RNA/DNA ratio and carcass composition.

    PubMed

    Zehra, Seemab; Khan, Mukhtar A

    2013-06-01

    A 12-week experiment was conducted to quantify dietary lysine requirement of fingerling Catla catla (3.65 ± 0.05 cm; 0.58 ± 0.02 g) by feeding casein-gelatine-based diets (33.0 % crude protein; 14.3 kJ/g digestible energy) with six levels of L-lysine (1.25, 1.50, 1.75, 2.00, 2.25 and 2.50 % dry diet). The experiment was conducted in eighteen 70-L indoor polyvinyl circular troughs provided with a water flow-through system (1-1.5 L/min). Live weight gain (LWG), feed conversion ratio (FCR), protein deposition (PD), lysine retention efficiency (LRE%) and RNA/DNA ratio were used as the response criteria. Second-degree polynomial regression analysis at 95 % maximum and minimum response of LWG and FCR data exhibited the lysine requirement between 1.8 and 1.9 % dry diet, corresponding to 5.5-5.7 % dietary protein. Regression analysis of PD, LRE and RNA/DNA ratio yielded the requirement between 1.7 and 1.8 % dry diet, corresponding to 5.2-5.5 % dietary protein. Since live weight gain and protein deposition are the key parameters for estimating nutrient requirement, these tools were used to recommend the lysine requirement of fingerling C. catla which ranges between 1.7 and 1.8 % dry diet. Data generated during this study will be useful to formulate lysine-balanced feed for intensive culture of this fish. PMID:22968345

  8. Deformation mechanisms in negative Poisson's ratio materials - Structural aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakes, R.

    1991-01-01

    Poisson's ratio in materials is governed by the following aspects of the microstructure: the presence of rotational degrees of freedom, non-affine deformation kinematics, or anisotropic structure. Several structural models are examined. The non-affine kinematics are seen to be essential for the production of negative Poisson's ratios for isotropic materials containing central force linkages of positive stiffness. Non-central forces combined with pre-load can also give rise to a negative Poisson's ratio in isotropic materials. A chiral microstructure with non-central force interaction or non-affine deformation can also exhibit a negative Poisson's ratio. Toughness and damage resistance in these materials may be affected by the Poisson's ratio itself, as well as by generalized continuum aspects associated with the microstructure.

  9. Interstellar CNO Isotope Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, C.; Wilson, T. L.; Langer, N.; Chin, Y.-N.; Mauersberger, R.

    In an interpretation of interstellar, circumstellar, and solar system CNO isotope ratios, we find two scenarios which are free of internal inconsistencies. The first requires that the early solar system was enriched by material from massive stars, leading to enhanced 12C/13C and 18O/17O ratios and to a reduced 14N/15N ratio. The second involves infall of gas onto the galactic disk after the formation of the solar system. Both scenarios require that the bulk of the interstellar 16O, 18O and 15N originates from massive stars (>8M⊙), with 18O and perhaps 15N being destroyed in lower mass stars. 17O is mainly synthesized in stars of intermediate mass while 12C, 13C, and 14N are produced in stars of high and intermediate masses. With respect to nucleosynthesis, evolutionary models of massive stars applying the Ledoux criterion for convection and semiconvective mixing should be preferred. These yield high 18O abundances above the convective He-burning core. For 17O, theoretical yields and observational data are not consistent, since models predict too much 17O from massive stars. The absence of an 18O/17O gradient in the galactic plane remains unexplained. Since 18O and 17O are products of quite different processes, this absence strongly constrains numerical models of the "chemical" evolution of the Galaxy.

  10. Infinitely variable ratio transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Geppert, E.F.

    1989-02-21

    A variable ratio vehicle transmission is described whose gear ratio is determined essentially only by torque on the output shaft of the transmission, comprising: a housing fixed in the vehicle; a power input shaft entering one end of the housing; a power output shaft entering the other end of the housing; a planet carrier mounted concentrically on the input shaft; a planet shaft mounted rotatably to the planet carrier; planet gears fixed coaxially to the planet shaft, one planet gear being a power transferring gear, a second planet gear being a reaction planet gear; a brake means rotatable about the input shaft sleeve for controlling the rate of rotation of the reaction planet gear about the planet shaft axis when the reaction planet gear orbits about the input shaft axis, the brake means having an inhibitor means for providing a substantially constant drag against rotation of the brake means about the input shaft; the brake means having a disk-like wall encircling the input shaft and a brake gear meshed with the reaction planet gear; the inhibitor means having two sets of annular friction disks disposed between the disk-like wall and the one end of the housing; the transmission further comprising means for operatively connecting the transferring planet gear to the output shaft.

  11. Directional gear ratio transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafever, A. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Epicyclic gear transmissions which transmit output at a gear ratio dependent only upon the input's direction are considered. A transmission housing envelops two epicyclic gear assemblies, and has shafts extending from it. One shaft is attached to a sun gear within the first epicyclic gear assembly. Planet gears are held symmetrically about the sun gear by a planet gear carrier and are in mesh with both the sun gear and a ring gear. Two unidirectional clutches restrict rotation of the first planet gear carrier and ring gear to one direction. A connecting shaft drives a second sun gear at the same speed and direction as the first planet gear carrier while a connecting portion drives a second planet gear carrier at the same speed and direction as the first ring gear. The transmission's output is then transmitted by the second ring gear to the second shaft. Input is transmitted at a higher gear ratio and lower speed for all inputs in the first direction than in the opposite direction.

  12. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  13. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  14. High-Ratio Gear Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefever, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed arrangement of two connected planetary differentials results in gear ratio many times that obtainable in conventional series gear assembly of comparable size. Ratios of several thousand would present no special problems. Selection of many different ratios is available with substantially similar gear diameters. Very high gear ratios would be obtained from small mechanism.

  15. Central hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal; Lee, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    Central hypothyroidism is defined as hypothyroidism due to insufficient stimulation by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) of an otherwise normal thyroid gland. It has an estimated prevalence of approximately 1 in 80,000 to 1 in 120,000. It can be secondary hypothyroidism (pituitary) or tertiary hypothyroidism (hypothalamus) in origin. In children, it is usually caused by craniopharyngiomas or previous cranial irradiation for brain tumors or hematological malignancies. In adults, it is usually due to pituitary macroadenomas, pituitary surgeries or post-irradiation. Fatigue and peripheral edema are the most specific clinical features. Diagnosis is established by the presence of normal to low-normal TSH on the background of low-normal thyroid hormones, confirmed by the thyrotropin releasing hormone stimulation test. Therapy includes use of levothyroxine titrated to improvement in symptomology and keeping free T4 in the upper limit of normal reference range. PMID:21966662

  16. Energy Profit Ratio Compared

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Osamu

    2007-07-01

    We need more oil energy to take out oil under the ground. Limit resources make us consider other candidates of energy source instead of oil. Electricity shall be the main role more and more like electric vehicles and air conditioners so we should consider electricity generation ways. When we consider what kind of electric power generation is the best or suitable, we should not only power generation plant but whole process from mining to power generation. It is good way to use EPR, Energy Profit Ratio, to analysis which type is more efficient and which part is to do research and development when you see the input breakdown analysis. Electricity by the light water nuclear power plant, the hydrogen power plant and the geothermal power plant are better candidates from EPR analysis. Forecasting the world primly energy supply in 2050, it is said that the demand will be double of the demand in 2000 and the supply will not be able to satisfy the demand in 2050. We should save 30% of the demand and increase nuclear power plants 3.5 times more and recyclable energy like hydropower plants 3 times more. When the nuclear power plants are 3.5 times more then uranium peak will come and we will need breed uranium. I will analysis the EPR of FBR. Conclusion: A) the EPR of NPS in Japan is 17.4 and it is the best of all. B) Many countries will introduce new nuclear power plants rapidly may be 3.5 times in 2050. C) Uranium peak will happen around 2050. (author)

  17. Dietary L-arginine supplement alleviates hepatic heat stress and improves feed conversion ratio of Pekin ducks exposed to high environmental temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Jiang, W; Wu, L Y

    2014-12-01

    The current intensive indoor production system of commercial Pekin ducks never allows adequate water for swimming or wetting. Therefore, heat stress is a key factor affecting health and growth of ducks in the hot regions and season. Experiment 1 was conducted to study whether heat stress was deleterious to certain organs of ducks. Forty-one-day-old mixed-sex Pekin ducks were randomly allocated to four electrically heated battery brooders comprised of 10 ducks each. Ducks were suddenly exposed to 37 °C ambient temperature for 3 h and then slaughtered, in one brooder at 21 days and in another brooder at 49 days of age. The results showed that body weight and weight of immune organs, particularly liver markedly decreased in acute heat stress ducks compared with the control. Experiment 2 was carried out to investigate the influences of dietary L-arginine (Arg) supplement on weight and compositions of certain lymphoid organs, and growth performance in Pekin ducks, under daily cyclic hot temperature environment. A total of 151-day-old mixed-sex Pekin ducks were randomly divided into one negative control and two treatment groups, fed experimental diets supplemented with 0, 5, and 10 g L-Arginine (L-Arg)/kg to the basal diet respectively. Ducks were exposed to cyclic high temperature simulating natural summer season. The results showed that the addition of L-Arg improves feed conversion ratio (FCR) during a period of 7-week trial, as well as increases hepatic weight relative to body weight at 21 days, while decreases the hepatic water content at 49 days of age. This study indicated that the liver was more sensitive to acute heat stress, and the hepatic relative weight and chemical composition could be regulated by dietary L-Arg supplementation in Pekin ducks being reared at high ambient temperature. These beneficial effects of Arg on liver might be a cause of improved FCR. PMID:24773570

  18. Central Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The crater in this VIS image is a beautiful example of a central peak crater. Note also the slumped interior crater walls and the well defined lobes of the ejecta blanket. This crater is located in the Isidis basin.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.6, Longitude 83.8 East (276.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. CO (Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Biraud, S

    2011-02-23

    The main function of the CO instrument is to provide continuous accurate measurements of carbon monoxide mixing ratio at the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF) 60-meter tower (36.607 °N, 97.489 °W, 314 meters above sea level). The essential feature of the control and data acquisition system is to record signals from a Thermo Electron 48C and periodically calibrate out zero and span drifts in the instrument using the combination of a CO scrubber and two concentrations of span gas (100 and 300 ppb CO in air). The system was deployed on May 25, 2005.

  20. Ratio estimation in SIMS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogliore, R. C.; Huss, G. R.; Nagashima, K.

    2011-09-01

    The determination of an isotope ratio by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) traditionally involves averaging a number of ratios collected over the course of a measurement. We show that this method leads to an additive positive bias in the expectation value of the estimated ratio that is approximately equal to the true ratio divided by the counts of the denominator isotope of an individual ratio. This bias does not decrease as the number of ratios used in the average increases. By summing all counts in the numerator isotope, then dividing by the sum of counts in the denominator isotope, the estimated ratio is less biased: the bias is approximately equal to the ratio divided by the summed counts of the denominator isotope over the entire measurement. We propose a third ratio estimator (Beale's estimator) that can be used when the bias from the summed counts is unacceptably large for the hypothesis being tested. We derive expressions for the variance of these ratio estimators as well as the conditions under which they are normally distributed. Finally, we investigate a SIMS dataset showing the effects of ratio bias, and discuss proper ratio estimation for SIMS analysis.

  1. Growth and haematological response of indigenous Venda chickens aged 8 to 13 weeks to varying dietary lysine to energy ratios.

    PubMed

    Alabi, O J; Ng'ambi, J W; Mbajiorgu, E F; Norris, D; Mabelebele, M

    2015-06-01

    The effect of feeding varying dietary lysine to energy levels on growth and haematological values of indigenous Venda chickens aged 8 - 13 weeks was evaluated. Four hundred and twenty Venda chickens (BW 362 10 g) were allocated to four dietary treatments in a completely randomized design. Each treatment was replicated seven times, and each replicate had fifteen chickens. Four maize-soya beans-based diets were formulated. Each diet had similar CP (150 g/kg DM) and lysine (8 g lysine/kg DM) but varying energy levels (11, 12, 13 and 14 MJ ME/kg DM). The birds were reared in a deep litter house; feed and water were provided ad libitum. Data on growth and haematological values were collected and analysed using one-way analysis of variance. Duncan's test for multiple comparisons was used to test the significant difference between treatment means (p < 0.05). A quadratic equation was used to determine dietary lysine to energy ratios for optimum parameters which were significant difference. Results showed that dietary energy level influenced (p < 0.05) feed intake, feed conversion ratio, live weight, haemoglobin and pack cell volume values of chickens. Dry matter digestibility, metabolizable energy and nitrogen retention not influenced by dietary lysine to energy ratio. Also, white blood cell, red blood cell, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration in female Venda chickens aged 91 days were not influenced by dietary lysine to energy ratio. It is concluded that dietary lysine to energy ratios of 0.672, 0.646, 0.639 and 0.649 optimized feed intake, growth rate, FCR and live weight in indigenous female Venda chickens fed diets containing 8 g of lysine/kg DM, 150 g of CP/kg DM and 11 MJ of ME/kg DM. This has implications in diet formulation for indigenous female Venda chickens. PMID:25495676

  2. Ratios of internal conversion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Ertugrul, M.; Nestor, C.W. . E-mail: CNestorjr@aol.com; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2006-03-15

    We present here a database of available experimental ratios of internal conversion coefficients for different atomic subshells measured with an accuracy of 10% or better for a number of elements in the range 26 {<=} Z {<=} 100. The experimental set involves 414 ratios for pure and 1096 ratios for mixed-multipolarity nuclear transitions in the transition energy range from 2 to 2300 keV. We give relevant theoretical ratios calculated in the framework of the Dirac-Fock method with and without regard for the hole in the atomic subshell after conversion. For comparison, the ratios obtained within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation are also presented. In cases where several ratios were measured for the same transition in a given isotope in which two multipolarities were involved, we present the mixing ratio {delta} {sup 2} obtained by a least squares fit.

  3. Lidar ratio and depolarization ratio for cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Nai; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Nee, Jan-Bai

    2002-10-20

    We report on studies of the lidar and the depolarization ratios for cirrus clouds. The optical depth and effective lidar ratio are derived from the transmission of clouds, which is determined by comparing the backscattering signals at the cloud base and cloud top. The lidar signals were fitted to a background atmospheric density profile outside the cloud region to warrant the linear response of the return signals with the scattering media. An average lidar ratio, 29 +/- 12 sr, has been found for all clouds measured in 1999 and 2000. The height and temperature dependences ofthe lidar ratio, the optical depth, and the depolarization ratio were investigated and compared with results of LITE and PROBE. Cirrus clouds detected near the tropopause are usually optically thin and mostly subvisual. Clouds with the largest optical depths were found near 12 km with a temperature of approximately -55 degrees C. The multiple-scattering effect is considered for clouds with high optical depths, and this effect lowers the lidar ratios compared with a single-scattering condition. Lidar ratios are in the 20-40 range for clouds at heights of 12.5-15 km and are smaller than approximately 30 in height above 15 km. Clouds are usually optically thin for temperatures below approximately -65 degrees C, and in this region the optical depth tends to decrease with height. The depolarization ratio is found to increase with a height at 11-15 km and smaller than 0.3 above 16 km. The variation in the depolarization ratio with the lidar ratio was also reported. The lidar and depolarization ratios were discussed in terms of the types of hexagonal ice crystals. PMID:12396200

  4. Increased skeletal:renal uptake ratio. [Bone-seekers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, T.H.; Holman, B.L.

    1980-08-01

    Twenty-four patients with increased skeletal:renal uptake ratios of /sup 99m/Tc-methylene diphosphonate were studied. Increased uptake was central in metastatic prostate carcinoma, peripheral in hematologic disorders, and heterogeneous in Paget disease and fibrous dysplasia. There was no discernible redistribution of skeletal uptake in patients with renal failure. Absence of both renal and bladder activity was not observed in patients with normal renal function. An increased ratio was always abnormal and frequently indicated diffuse bone disease.

  5. On the optimal sex ratio.

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, S; Lessard, S

    1983-01-01

    The equilibrium structures for various multiallele sex-determining genetic models of panmictic populations with sex expression depending on the genotypes of either the zygote or a parent are described. Even-sex-ratio equilibrium surfaces can exist apart from equilibrium points having coincident male and female allelic frequency sets. The latter (symmetric) equilibrium states entail biased sex ratios. A stable symmetric equilibrium and an even-sex-ratio equilibrium segregating the same alleles cannot coexist. The tendency to evolve toward an even-sex ratio is embodied by the following optimality property: starting from an equilibrium having a biased sex ratio, mutant sex-determining alleles can accumulate only in the case in which in the augmented system all attainable equilibrium states have a sex ratio closer to one to one. PMID:6577461

  6. Air/fuel ratio controller

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1980-12-23

    An internal combustion engine has a fuel injection pump and an air/fuel ratio controller. The controller has a lever that is connected to the pump lever. An aneroid moves the controller lever as a function of changes in intake manifold vacuum to maintain a constant air/fuel ratio to the mixture charge. A fuel enrichment linkage is provided that modifies the movement of the fuel flow control lever by the aneroid in response to changes in manifold gas temperature levels and exhaust gas recirculation to maintain the constant air/fuel ratio. A manual override is provided to obtain a richer air/fuel ratio for maximum acceleration.

  7. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Central Pain Syndrome? Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition ...

  8. Central sleep apnea

    MedlinePlus

    ... central sleep apnea. A condition called Cheyne-Stokes respiration can mimic central sleep apnea. This involves breathing ... Complications may result from the underlying disease causing the central sleep apnea.

  9. Progressive Ratio Schedules of Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Killeen, Peter R.; Posadas-Sanchez, Diana; Johansen, Espen Borgå; Thrailkill, Eric A.

    2009-01-01

    Pigeons’ pecks produced grain under progressive ratio (PR) schedules, whose response requirements increased systematically within sessions. Experiment 1 compared arithmetic (AP) and geometric (GP) progressions. Response rates increased as a function of the component ratio requirement, then decreased linearly (AP) or asymptotically (GP). Experiment 2 found the linear decrease in AP rates to be relatively independent of step size. Experiment 3 showed pausing to be controlled by the prior component length, which predicted the differences between PR and regressive ratio schedules found in Experiment 4. When the longest component ratios were signaled by different key colors, rates at moderate ratios increased, demonstrating control by forthcoming context. Models for response rate and pause duration described performance on AP schedules; GP schedules required an additional parameter representing the contextual reinforcement. PMID:19159161

  10. RATIO_TOOL - SOFTWARE FOR COMPUTING IMAGE RATIOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    Geological studies analyze spectral data in order to gain information on surface materials. RATIO_TOOL is an interactive program for viewing and analyzing large multispectral image data sets that have been created by an imaging spectrometer. While the standard approach to classification of multispectral data is to match the spectrum for each input pixel against a library of known mineral spectra, RATIO_TOOL uses ratios of spectral bands in order to spot significant areas of interest within a multispectral image. Each image band can be viewed iteratively, or a selected image band of the data set can be requested and displayed. When the image ratios are computed, the result is displayed as a gray scale image. At this point a histogram option helps in viewing the distribution of values. A thresholding option can then be used to segment the ratio image result into two to four classes. The segmented image is then color coded to indicate threshold classes and displayed alongside the gray scale image. RATIO_TOOL is written in C language for Sun series computers running SunOS 4.0 and later. It requires the XView toolkit and the OpenWindows window manager (version 2.0 or 3.0). The XView toolkit is distributed with Open Windows. A color monitor is also required. The standard distribution medium for RATIO_TOOL is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. An electronic copy of the documentation is included on the program media. RATIO_TOOL was developed in 1992 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. Sun, SunOS, and OpenWindows are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T Bell Laboratories.

  11. Updated thinking on positivity ratios.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Barbara L

    2013-12-01

    This article presents my response to the article by Brown, Sokal, and Friedman (2013), which critically examined Losada's conceptual and mathematical work (as presented in Losada, 1999; Losada & Heaphy, 2004; and Fredrickson & Losada; 2005) and concluded that mathematical claims for a critical tipping point positivity ratio are unfounded. In the present article, I draw recent empirical evidence together to support the continued value of computing and seeking to elevate positivity ratios. I also underscore the necessity of modeling nonlinear effects of positivity ratios and, more generally, the value of systems science approaches within affective science and positive psychology. Even when scrubbed of Losada's now-questioned mathematical modeling, ample evidence continues to support the conclusion that, within bounds, higher positivity ratios are predictive of flourishing mental health and other beneficial outcomes. PMID:23855895

  12. Photovoltaic central-station power conditioner subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauthamer, S.; Das, R.; Bahrami, K.; Bulawka, A.

    1984-01-01

    The potential of applying new advanced circuit topologies and semiconductors with improved switching characteristics to the design and development of central-station power conditioning subsystems is assessed. State-of-the-art large power conditioners suitable for photovoltaic central-station application are reviewed. Advanced topology power conditioning subsystems, when compared to available production hardware, promise improved performance, significant cost reduction, and lower cost-to-efficiency ratios.

  13. Pressure Ratio to Thermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Pedro; Wang, Winston

    2012-01-01

    A pressure ratio to thermal environments (PRatTlE.pl) program is a Perl language code that estimates heating at requested body point locations by scaling the heating at a reference location times a pressure ratio factor. The pressure ratio factor is the ratio of the local pressure at the reference point and the requested point from CFD (computational fluid dynamics) solutions. This innovation provides pressure ratio-based thermal environments in an automated and traceable method. Previously, the pressure ratio methodology was implemented via a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and macro scripts. PRatTlE is able to calculate heating environments for 150 body points in less than two minutes. PRatTlE is coded in Perl programming language, is command-line-driven, and has been successfully executed on both the HP and Linux platforms. It supports multiple concurrent runs. PRatTlE contains error trapping and input file format verification, which allows clear visibility into the input data structure and intermediate calculations.

  14. Arcjet nozzle area ratio effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Birkner, Bjorn W.; Kwasny, James

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of nozzle area ratio on the operating characteristics and performance of a low power dc arcjet thruster. Conical thoriated tungsten nozzle inserts were tested in a modular laboratory arcjet thruster run on hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. The converging and diverging sides of the inserts had half angles of 30 and 20 degrees, respectively, similar to a flight type unit currently under development. The length of the diverging side was varied to change the area ratio. The nozzle inserts were run over a wide range of specific power. Current, voltage, mass flow rate, and thrust were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between tests. While small differences in performance were observed between the two nozzle inserts, it was determined that for each nozzle insert, arcjet performance improved with increasing nozzle area ratio to the highest area ratio tested and that the losses become very pronounced for area ratios below 50. These trends are somewhat different than those obtained in previous experimental and analytical studies of low Re number nozzles. It appears that arcjet performance can be enhanced via area ratio optimization.

  15. Continually variable transmission having fixed ratio and variable ratio mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Moan, R.D

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes a transmission for producing a stepless, continually variable range of ratios of the speed of its output to its input comprising: a fluid coupling having an impeller adapted for connection to a power source and a turbine hydrodynamically connected to the impeller; as planetary gearset having a ring gear, a sun gear, a first set of planet pinions meshing with the sun gear, a second set of planet pinions meshing with the first set of pinions and with the ring gear, and a pinion carrier on which the first and second sets of pinions are rotatably supported; first drive means drivable connecting the turbine and the sun gear for producing a variable speed ratio therebetween having a range between an underdrive ratio and an overdrive ratio; second drive means drivably connecting the impeller and the ring gear for producing a fixed speed ratio therebetween; a first clutch means for drivably connecting and disconnecting the ring gear and the second drive means; and a second clutch means for drivably connecting and disconnecting the first drive means and the pinion carrier.

  16. Cosmological parameters from lenses distance ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardone, Vincenzo F.; Piedipalumbo, Ester; Scudellaro, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Strong lensing provides popular techniques to investigate the mass distribution of intermediate redshift galaxies, testing galaxy evolution and formation scenarios. It especially probes the background cosmic expansion, hence constraining cosmological parameters. The measurement of Einstein radii and central velocity dispersions indeed allows to trace the ratio Ds/Dls between the distance Ds from the observer to the source and the distance Dls from the lens to the source. We present an improved method to explicitly include the two-component structure in the galaxy lens modelling, in order to analyse the role played by the redshift and the model dependence on a nuisance parameter, F_E, which is usually marginalized in the cosmological applications. We show how to deal with these problems and carry on a Fisher matrix analysis to infer the accuracy on cosmological parameters achieved by this method.

  17. Quantifying asymmetry: ratios and alternatives.

    PubMed

    Franks, Erin M; Cabo, Luis L

    2014-08-01

    Traditionally, the study of metric skeletal asymmetry has relied largely on univariate analyses, utilizing ratio transformations when the goal is comparing asymmetries in skeletal elements or populations of dissimilar dimensions. Under this approach, raw asymmetries are divided by a size marker, such as a bilateral average, in an attempt to produce size-free asymmetry indices. Henceforth, this will be referred to as "controlling for size" (see Smith: Curr Anthropol 46 (2005) 249-273). Ratios obtained in this manner often require further transformations to interpret the meaning and sources of asymmetry. This model frequently ignores the fundamental assumption of ratios: the relationship between the variables entered in the ratio must be isometric. Violations of this assumption can obscure existing asymmetries and render spurious results. In this study, we examined the performance of the classic indices in detecting and portraying the asymmetry patterns in four human appendicular bones and explored potential methodological alternatives. Examination of the ratio model revealed that it does not fulfill its intended goals in the bones examined, as the numerator and denominator are independent in all cases. The ratios also introduced strong biases in the comparisons between different elements and variables, generating spurious asymmetry patterns. Multivariate analyses strongly suggest that any transformation to control for overall size or variable range must be conducted before, rather than after, calculating the asymmetries. A combination of exploratory multivariate techniques, such as Principal Components Analysis, and confirmatory linear methods, such as regression and analysis of covariance, appear as a promising and powerful alternative to the use of ratios. PMID:24842694

  18. Isotopic ratios in planetary atmospheres.

    PubMed

    de Bergh, C

    1995-03-01

    Recent progress on measurements of isotopic ratios in planetary or satellite atmospheres include measurements of the D/H ratio in the methane of Uranus, Neptune and Titan and in the water of Mars and Venus. Implications of these measurements on our understanding of the formation and evolution of the planets and satellite are discussed. Our current knowledge of the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen isotopic ratios in the atmospheres of these planets, as well as on Jupiter and Saturn, is also reviewed. We finally show what progress can be expected in the very near future due to some new ground-based instrumentation particularly well suited to such studies, and to forthcoming space missions. PMID:11539257

  19. Density Ratio Estimation: A New Versatile Tool for Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Masashi

    A new general framework of statistical data processing based on the ratio of probability densities has been proposed recently and gathers a great deal of attention in the machine learning and data mining communities [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17]. This density ratio framework includes various statistical data processing tasks such as non-stationarity adaptation [18,1,2,4,13], outlier detection [19,20,21,6], and conditional density estimation [22,23,24,15]. Furthermore, mutual information—which plays a central role in information theory [25]—can also be estimated via density ratio estimation. Since mutual information is a measure of statistical independence between random variables [26,27,28], density ratio estimation can be used also for variable selection [29,7,11], dimensionality reduction [30,16], and independent component analysis [31,12].

  20. Overconfidence, Incentives and Digit Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Neyse, Levent; Bosworth, Steven; Ring, Patrick; Schmidt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    This paper contributes to a better understanding of the biological underpinnings of overconfidence by analyzing performance predictions in the Cognitive Reflection Test with and without monetary incentives. In line with the existing literature we find that the participants are too optimistic about their performance on average; incentives lead to higher performance; and males score higher than females on this particular task. The novelty of this paper is an analysis of the relation between participants’ performance prediction accuracy and their second to fourth digit ratio. It has been reported that the digit ratio is a negatively correlated bio-marker of prenatal testosterone exposure. In the un-incentivized treatment, we find that males with low digit ratios, on average, are significantly more overconfident about their performance. In the incentivized treatment, however, we observe that males with low digit ratios, on average, are less overconfident about their performance. These effects are not observed in females. We discuss how these findings fit into the literature on testosterone and decision making and how they might help to explain seemingly opposing evidence. PMID:27039893

  1. A Ratio Explanation for Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riss, Pam Helfers

    1993-01-01

    Describes hands-on physical anthropology activities for teaching students about evolution. Using evidence found in hominid skulls, students conduct investigations that involve calculating ratios. Eight full-page photographs of skulls from the program Stones and Bones are included. (PR)

  2. Overconfidence, Incentives and Digit Ratio.

    PubMed

    Neyse, Levent; Bosworth, Steven; Ring, Patrick; Schmidt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    This paper contributes to a better understanding of the biological underpinnings of overconfidence by analyzing performance predictions in the Cognitive Reflection Test with and without monetary incentives. In line with the existing literature we find that the participants are too optimistic about their performance on average; incentives lead to higher performance; and males score higher than females on this particular task. The novelty of this paper is an analysis of the relation between participants' performance prediction accuracy and their second to fourth digit ratio. It has been reported that the digit ratio is a negatively correlated bio-marker of prenatal testosterone exposure. In the un-incentivized treatment, we find that males with low digit ratios, on average, are significantly more overconfident about their performance. In the incentivized treatment, however, we observe that males with low digit ratios, on average, are less overconfident about their performance. These effects are not observed in females. We discuss how these findings fit into the literature on testosterone and decision making and how they might help to explain seemingly opposing evidence. PMID:27039893

  3. Gender Ratios for Reading Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawke, Jesse L.; Olson, Richard K.; Willcut, Erik G.; Wadsworth, Sally J.; DeFries, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of reading difficulties is typically higher in males than females in both referred and research-identified samples, and the ratio of males to females is greater in more affected samples. To explore possible gender differences in reading performance, we analysed data from 1133 twin pairs in which at least one member of each pair had…

  4. Air/fuel ratio regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Simko, A.

    1980-07-22

    A description is given of an air/fuel ratio regulator for use with the fuel injection control system of an internal combustion engine of the spark ignition type having an air and exhaust gas (gas) induction passage open at one end to air at ambient pressure level and connected at its other end to the engine combustion chamber to be subject to manifold vacuum changes therein, a throttle valve rotatably mounted for movement across the passage to control the gas flow therethrough, exhaust gas recirculation (egr) passage means connecting engine exhaust gases to the induction passage above the closed position of the throttle valve, an egr flow control valve mounted in the egr passage means for movement between open and closed postions to control the volume of egr gas flow, an engine speed responsive positive displacement type fuel injection pump having a fuel flow output to the engine that varies in direct proportion to changes in engines speed to match fuel flow and mass airflow through the induction system of the engine over the entire speed and load range of the engine to maintain the intake mixture ratio of air to fuel constant, the pump having a fuel flow control lever movable to vary the fuel rate of flow, the regulator being characterized by engine manifold vacuum responsive first servo means operably connected to the fuel control lever for maintaining a constant air/fuel (A/F) ratio by changing fuel output as a function of changing manifold vacuum and air flow upon opening of the throttle valve, a fuel enrichment control lever operably connected to the pump control lever and movable to modify the position of the pump lever dictated by the first servo means to change the A/F ratio, and further means responsive to engine operating conditions for moving the fuel enrichment control lever to provide the changed A/F ratio.

  5. Central venous catheters - ports

    MedlinePlus

    Central venous catheter - subcutaneous; Port-a-Cath; InfusaPort; PasPort; Subclavian port; Medi - port; Central venous line - port ... catheter is attached to a device called a port that will be under your skin. The port ...

  6. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed. PMID:26944242

  7. Centrality of Cognitive Attributes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, William A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Develops measures of individual differences in attribute centrality, investigates convergent validity, and explores differences in central and noncentral attribute functions within same person. University students in three countries completed questionnaires. Four relative centrality measures correlated with information required to make decisions…

  8. Estimating diversity via frequency ratios.

    PubMed

    Willis, Amy; Bunge, John

    2015-12-01

    We wish to estimate the total number of classes in a population based on sample counts, especially in the presence of high latent diversity. Drawing on probability theory that characterizes distributions on the integers by ratios of consecutive probabilities, we construct a nonlinear regression model for the ratios of consecutive frequency counts. This allows us to predict the unobserved count and hence estimate the total diversity. We believe that this is the first approach to depart from the classical mixed Poisson model in this problem. Our method is geometrically intuitive and yields good fits to data with reasonable standard errors. It is especially well-suited to analyzing high diversity datasets derived from next-generation sequencing in microbial ecology. We demonstrate the method's performance in this context and via simulation, and we present a dataset for which our method outperforms all competitors. PMID:26038228

  9. Optomechanical Raman-ratio thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, T. P.; Yu, P.-L.; Kampel, N. S.; Peterson, R. W.; Cicak, K.; Simmonds, R. W.; Regal, C. A.

    2015-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the asymmetry between Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman scattering can be exploited for self-calibrating, optically based thermometry. In the context of cavity optomechanics, we observe the cavity-enhanced scattering of light interacting with the standing-wave drumhead modes of a Si3N4 membrane mechanical resonator. The ratio of the amplitude of Stokes to anti-Stokes scattered light is used to measure temperatures of optically cooled mechanical modes, down to the level of a few vibrational quanta. We demonstrate that the Raman-ratio technique allows the measurement of the physical temperature of our device over a range extending from cryogenic temperatures to within an order of magnitude of room temperature.

  10. GUT Scale Fermion Mass Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinrath, Martin

    2014-10-01

    We present a series of recent works related to group theoretical factors from GUT symmetry breaking which lead to predictions for the ratios of quark and lepton Yukawa couplings at the unification scale. New predictions for the GUT scale ratios yμ/ys, yτ/yb and yt/yb in particular are shown and compared to experimental data. For this comparison it is important to include possibly large supersymmetric threshold corrections. Due to this reason the structure of the fermion masses at the GUT scale depends on TeV scale physics and makes GUT scale physics testable at the LHC. We also discuss how this new predictions might lead to predictions for mixing angles by discussing the example of the recently measured last missing leptonic mixing angle θ13 making this new class of GUT models also testable in neutrino experiments.

  11. Gender ratios for reading difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Richard K.; Willcutt, Erik G.; Wadsworth, Sally J.; DeFries, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of reading difficulties is typically higher in males than females in both referred and research-identified samples, and the ratio of males to females is greater in more affected samples. To explore possible gender differences in reading performance, we analyzed data from 1,133 twin pairs in which at least one member of each pair had a school-history of reading problems and from 684 twin pairs from a comparison sample with no reading difficulties. Although the difference between the average scores of males and females in these two samples was very small, the variance of reading performance was significantly greater for males in both groups. We suggest that a greater variance of reading performance measures in males may account at least in part for their higher prevalence of reading difficulties as well as for the higher gender ratios that are observed in more severely impaired samples. PMID:19367616

  12. Segregation Ratios in Alport's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    MacNeill, Elizabeth; Shaw, Richard F.

    1973-01-01

    Pooled data of 35 pedigrees for Alport's syndrome were analysed. Affected to normal ratios among the offspring of heterozgyous fathers and mothers were tabulated. Offspring of heterozygous mothers were tabulated separately where the mother showed symptoms of the disease and where she was asymptomatic. Three current theories on the inheritance of Alport's syndrome are considered and discussed. Each theory fails to account fully for the known facts. A non-chromosomal agent has not yet been excluded for this intriguing disease. PMID:4697851

  13. Envera Variable Compression Ratio Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mendler

    2011-03-15

    Aggressive engine downsizing, variable compression ratio and use of the Atkinson cycle are being combined to improve fuel economy by up to 40 percent relative to port fuel injected gasoline engines, while maintaining full engine power. Approach Engine downsizing is viewed by US and foreign automobile manufacturers as one of the best options for improving fuel economy. While this strategy has already demonstrated a degree of success, downsizing and fuel economy gains are currently limited. With new variable compression ratio technology however, the degree of engine downsizing and fuel economy improvement can be greatly increased. A small variable compression ratio (VCR) engine has the potential to return significantly higher vehicle fuel economy while also providing high power. Affordability and potential for near term commercialization are key attributes of the Envera VCR engine. VCR Technology To meet torque and power requirements, a smaller engine needs to do more work per stroke. This is typically accomplished by boosting the incoming charge with either a turbo or supercharger so that more energy is present in the cylinder per stroke to do the work. With current production engines the degree of engine boosting (which correlates to downsizing) is limited by detonation (combustion knock) at high boost levels. Additionally, the turbo or supercharger needs to be responsive and efficient while providing the needed boost. VCR technology eliminates the limitation of engine knock at high load levels by reducing compression ratio to {approx}9:1 (or whatever level is appropriate) when high boost pressures are needed. By reducing the compression ratio during high load demand periods there is increased volume in the cylinder at top dead center (TDC) which allows more charge (or energy) to be present in the cylinder without increasing the peak pressure. Cylinder pressure is thus kept below the level at which the engine would begin to knock. When loads on the engine are low the compression ratio can be raised (to as much as 18:1) providing high engine efficiency. It is important to recognize that for a well designed VCR engine cylinder pressure does not need to be higher than found in current production turbocharged engines. As such, there is no need for a stronger crankcase, bearings and other load bearing parts within the VCR engine. The Envera VCR mechanism uses an eccentric carrier approach to adjust engine compression ratio. The crankshaft main bearings are mounted in this eccentric carrier or 'crankshaft cradle' and pivoting the eccentric carrier 30 degrees adjusts compression ratio from 9:1 to 18:1. The eccentric carrier is made up of a casting that provides rigid support for the main bearings, and removable upper bearing caps. Oil feed to the main bearings transits through the bearing cap fastener sockets. The eccentric carrier design was chosen for its low cost and rigid support of the main bearings. A control shaft and connecting links are used to pivot the eccentric carrier. The control shaft mechanism features compression ratio lock-up at minimum and maximum compression ratio settings. The control shaft method of pivoting the eccentric carrier was selected due to its lock-up capability. The control shaft can be rotated by a hydraulic actuator or an electric motor. The engine shown in Figures 3 and 4 has a hydraulic actuator that was developed under the current program. In-line 4-cylinder engines are significantly less expensive than V engines because an entire cylinder head can be eliminated. The cost savings from eliminating cylinders and an entire cylinder head will notably offset the added cost of the VCR and supercharging. Replacing V6 and V8 engines with in-line VCR 4-cylinder engines will provide high fuel economy at low cost. Numerous enabling technologies exist which have the potential to increase engine efficiency. The greatest efficiency gains are realized when the right combination of advanced and new technologies are packaged together to provide the greatest gains at the least cost. Aggressive engine downsizing with variable compression ratio and use of the extended Atkinson cycle can provide large fuel economy gains that are exceptionally cost effective. Analysis indicates that a 2.2L supercharged Envera VCR engine can match the torque of a larger V8 engine at 2000 rpm. The VCR engine's high torque value at low engine speed is beneficial for maintaining the driving feel and responsiveness of the larger V8 engine. The Envera VCR engine will attain high efficiency at {approx}100 Nm primarily due to the combination of engine down-sizing and use of the Atkinson cycle. Qualitatively the fuel economy gain realized from down-sizing from a V8 to an Atkinson-cycle I-4 is about twice as large as the benefits from down-sizing from a V8 to a Turbo V6 when evaluated at 100 Nm 2000 rpm.

  14. Two-stage treatment reduces water/oil ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, F.; Dairymple, D. ); McKown, K.; Matthews, B. )

    1990-09-10

    This paper reports how a treatment of amphoteric polymer followed by chrome-complexed anionic polyacrylamide has successfully decreased the water/oil (WOR) ratio of wells producing from the Arbuckle dolomite formation in central Kansas. This technique, the fractured-matrix, water-control (FMWC) treatment, is designed to alter both primary and secondary permeability to water production. In 10 treated wells, the average WOR was reduced by a factor of five.

  15. Martian Central Pit Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillman, E.; Barlow, N. G.

    2005-01-01

    Impact craters containing central pits are rare on the terrestrial planets but common on icy bodies. Mars is the exception among the terrestrial planets, where central pits are seen on crater floors ( floor pits ) as well as on top of central peaks ( summit pits ). Wood et al. [1] proposed that degassing of subsurface volatiles during crater formation produced central pits. Croft [2] argued instead that central pits might form during the impact of volatile-rich comets. Although central pits are seen in impact craters on icy moons such as Ganymede, they do show some significant differences from their martian counterparts: (a) only floor pits are seen on Ganymede, and (b) central pits begin to occur at crater diameters where the peak ring interior morphology begins to appear in terrestrial planet craters [3]. A study of craters containing central pits was conducted by Barlow and Bradley [4] using Viking imagery. They found that 28% of craters displaying an interior morphology on Mars contain central pits. Diameters of craters containing central pits ranged from 16 to 64 km. Barlow and Bradley noted that summit pit craters tended to be smaller than craters containing floor pits. They also noted a correlation of central pit craters with the proposed rings of large impact basins. They argued that basin ring formation fractured the martian crust and allowed subsurface volatiles to concentrate in these locations. They favored the model that degassing of the substrate during crater formation was responsible for central pit formation due to the preferential location of central pit craters along these basin rings.

  16. Low conversion ratio fuel studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. A.

    2006-02-28

    Recent studies on TRU disposition in fast reactors indicated viable reactor performance for a sodium cooled low conversion ratio reactor design. Additional studies have been initiated to refine the earlier work and consider the feasibility of alternate fuel forms such as nitride and oxide fuel (rather than metal fuel). These alternate fuel forms may have significant impacts upon the burner design and the safety behavior. The work performed thus far has focused on compiling the necessary fuel form property information and refinement of the physics models. For this limited project, the burner design and performance using nitride fuel will be assessed.

  17. High-aspect-ratio wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    High-aspect-ratio aircraft include most transport aircraft such as commercial and military transports, business aircraft, and cargo aircraft. Generally, these types of aircraft are designed to cruise over a narrow range of lift coefficients and Mach numbers in the performance of their mission. Emphasis is therefore placed on the cruise performance of transport aircraft and every effort is made to obtain accurate wind-tunnel data to use as a basis for prediction of full-scale cruise performance. However, off-cruise performance is also important and methods were developed for extrapolating wind-tunnel data on buffet and flutter at transonic speed. Transport-type aircraft were tested extensively in various wind tunnels around the world and many different test techniques were developed to simulate higher Reynolds numbers. Methods developed for one tunnel may not be applicable to another tunnel because of differences in size, Reynolds number capability, running time, and test objectives. Many of the methods of boundary-layer control developed in two-dimensional airfoil testing can be applied in tests of transport configurations, but sometimes the three-dimensional flow fields that develop on tranpsort aircraft can make application of the two-dimensional methods difficult or impossible. The discussion is intended to be a representative, but not exhaustive, survey of the various methods of high Reynolds number simulation in the testing of high-aspect-ratio aircraft.

  18. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  19. How learn the branching ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achasov, N. N.; Rogozina, E. V.

    2014-10-01

    Enfant terrible of charmonium spectroscopy, the resonance X(3872), generated a stream of interpretations and ushered in a new exotic XYZ spectroscopy. In the meantime, many (if not all) characteristics of X(3872) are rather ambiguous. We construct spectra of decays of the resonance X(3872) with good analytical and unitary properties which allows to define the branching ratio of the decay studying only one more decay, for example, the X(3872) → π+π- J/ψ(1 S) decay. We next define the range of values of the coupling constant of the X(3872) resonance with the system. Finally, we show that our spectra are effective means of selection of models for the resonance X(3872).

  20. Lorentz ratio of quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Khalfaoui, A.; Bennaceur, D. )

    1994-06-01

    A quantum collective approach is developed to investigate linear transport properties of a system of highly degenerate weakly coupled electrons and strongly coupled semiclassical ions. The basic formalism rests upon suitable extention of the Boltzmann--Bloch quantum transport equation. The model considers electron--ion (e--i) and electron--electron (e--e) collisions in a unified scheme of both long- and short-range Coulomb interactions. The e--e collisions contribute to the thermal conductivity calculation in the low coupling regime. Even though they can be insignificant for strongly coupled systems, the extensively used Lorentz gas approximation cannot be justified for plasmas of astrophysical interests. It is shown that the Lorentz ratio of high-density plasma may exhibit substantial negative deviation from the ideal Sommerfeld value, due to some nonidealities, such as e--e interaction and quantum effects. Results are presented under analytical and compact forms allowing numerical applications, as well as comparisons with existing theories.

  1. Likelihood ratios for DNA identification.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, A; Morton, N E

    1994-01-01

    Likelihood ratio (LR) tests are provided for the three alternatives to DNA identity: exclusion, coincidence, and kinship. The coincidence test uses the radius of coalescence to conserve the observed frequency of single band phenotypes. Genotype probabilities under kinship are derived for mating groups, specified relatives, and structured populations; and unbiased estimates of the genetic parameters are provided. The LR is made robust to gene frequency errors by specifying the mean matching probability, and the tolerable loss of information this entails is determined by LR theory. This straightforward application of the seminal work of Jerzy Neyman and Sewall Wright strongly supports the use of LRs and kinship for presentation of DNA evidence by expert witnesses and committees. PMID:8016106

  2. Variable ratio regenerative braking device

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1981-12-15

    Disclosed is a regenerative braking device (10) for an automotive vehicle. The device includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (36) and an output shaft (42), clutches (38, 46) and brakes (40, 48) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. The rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the output shaft is applied, and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the input shaft is applied. The transmission ratio is varied to control the rate of energy accumulation and delivery for a given rotational speed of the vehicle drivetrain.

  3. Weather-Corrected Performance Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Dierauf, T.; Growitz, A.; Kurtz, S.; Cruz, J. L. B.; Riley, E.; Hansen, C.

    2013-04-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) system performance depends on both the quality of the system and the weather. One simple way to communicate the system performance is to use the performance ratio (PR): the ratio of the electricity generated to the electricity that would have been generated if the plant consistently converted sunlight to electricity at the level expected from the DC nameplate rating. The annual system yield for flat-plate PV systems is estimated by the product of the annual insolation in the plane of the array, the nameplate rating of the system, and the PR, which provides an attractive way to estimate expected annual system yield. Unfortunately, the PR is, again, a function of both the PV system efficiency and the weather. If the PR is measured during the winter or during the summer, substantially different values may be obtained, making this metric insufficient to use as the basis for a performance guarantee when precise confidence intervals are required. This technical report defines a way to modify the PR calculation to neutralize biases that may be introduced by variations in the weather, while still reporting a PR that reflects the annual PR at that site given the project design and the project weather file. This resulting weather-corrected PR gives more consistent results throughout the year, enabling its use as a metric for performance guarantees while still retaining the familiarity this metric brings to the industry and the value of its use in predicting actual annual system yield. A testing protocol is also presented to illustrate the use of this new metric with the intent of providing a reference starting point for contractual content.

  4. Variable expansion ratio reaction engine

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, W.R.

    1987-11-24

    A variable expansion ratio reaction rocket engine for producing a mainstream of hot combustion gases is described comprising: a reaction chamber including a thrust nozzle portion formed by converging and diverging wall portions in which the diverging portion terminates in a gas discharge and through which the combustion gases pass; a nozzle throat section at the juncture of the convergent-divergent wall portions; rows of circumferentially and axially spaced injection ports formed within the wall portions and communicating therethrough and into the reaction chamber; fluid conduit means in communication with the injection ports; at least one high pressure pump in communication with the fluid conduit means; a fluid containing storage tank including a conduit in communication with the high pressure pump; and means for selectively controlling a flow of fluid out of the tank, through the pump and to the fluid conduit means and the injection ports for controlling a cross-sectional area of the mainstream combustion gases passing through the thrust nozzle.

  5. Difference in effect of single immunosuppressive agents (cyclophosphamide, CCNU, 5-FU) on peripheral blood immune cell parameters and central nervous system immunoglobulin synthesis rate in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shih, W W; Baumhefner, R W; Tourtellotte, W W; Haskell, C M; Korn, E L; Fahey, J L

    1983-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CY), 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) were given in single course schedules to chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) patients clinically stable for 6 months. The following peripheral immune cellular parameters were measured before, during and after each drug administration: white blood count (WBC), polymorphonuclear count (PMN), lymphocyte count, percentage of T cells, T cell response to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), percentage of B cells, percentage of cells bearing receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin (% FcR cells), killer (K) cell activity defined by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and natural killer (NK) cell activity. Central nervous system (CNS) immunoglobulin G (IgG) synthesis was also measured. The patients were followed carefully by both quantitative and qualitative methods for any change in their neurologic condition. Selective reduction in NK activity was observed with CY and 5-FU while no significant alteration was seen in %FcR cells and K activity. CY differed from 5-FU in reducing lymphocyte count and B cell percentage while 5-FU decreased the percentage of T cells. CCNU, but not the other drugs, reduced T cell proliferative response to PHA. In addition, CCNU, which is known to penetrate well into the nervous system, caused a modest reduction in CNS IgG synthesis, while 5-FU had an uncertain effect. Clinically the patients were unchanged or continued to progress in their disability. The results suggest an independence of the CNS immune from the systemic immune system in MS in response to many immunosuppressive drugs. PMID:6603303

  6. ASNT central certification program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, Robert W.; Snell, John R., Jr.

    1997-04-01

    The American Society of Nondestructive Testing (ASNT) has recently established a new central certification program. This program will allow individuals who meet the requirements to receive a 'portable' certificate. Augmenting the existing employer-based certification, this program will have significant impact on industries that may ultimately require nondestructive testing (NDT) personnel to have central certification. This paper explains show ASNT has structured central certification and when and how it will effect thermal/infrared thermography (T/IRT) personnel. The paper also discusses the industry specific certification process.

  7. Effect of Subject Rotation on Assessment of Esthetic Dental Ratios: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Pokharel, Prabhat Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to find out the change in esthetic ratios during rotation of patient's head using a simulation. Materials and Methods. A plaster study model was photographed placing its midline along the long axis of the camera. Then a series of photographs were taken by rotating the model each degree till 10° on both right and left sides. These photographs were digitally measured and the ratio of the maxillary anterior teeth at zero-degree rotation was compared with that at various degrees of rotation. Results. As the model was rotated to the right side till 10°, the ratio of the right lateral to central incisor gradually decreased while the ratio of the left lateral to central incisor gradually increased. However, the ratio of the canine to lateral incisor on both sides gradually increased. Similar results were obtained when the model was rotated to the left side. The ratio of the lateral to central incisor deviated from the acceptable range (±10%) when there was rotation of more than 7°, whereas the ratio of the canine to lateral incisor was within the acceptable range till 10° rotation on either side. Conclusions. Rotation of the model by more than 7° leads to a substantial change in the esthetic ratio. PMID:27092181

  8. Precipitation chemistry in central Amazonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Talbot, R. W.; Berresheim, H.; Beecher, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    Rain samples from three sites in central Amazonia were collected over a period of 6 weeks during the 1987 wet season and analyzed for ionic species and dissolved organic carbon. A continuous record of precipitation chemistry and amount was obtained at two of these sites, which were free from local or regional pollution, for a time period of over 1 month. The volume-weighted mean concentrations of most species were found to be about a factor of 5 lower during the wet season compared with previous results from the dry season. Only sodium, potassium, and chloride showed similar concentrations in both seasons. When the seasonal difference in rainfall amount is taken into consideration, the deposition fluxes are only slightly lower for most species during the wet season than during the dry season, again with the exception of chloride, potassium, and sodium. Sodium and chloride are present in the same ratio as in sea salt; rapid advection of air masses of marine origin to the central Amazon Basin during the wet season may be responsible for the observed higher deposition flux of these species. Statistical analysis suggests that sulfate is, to a large extent, of marine (sea salt and biogenic) origin, but that long-range transport of combustion-derived aerosols also makes a significant contribution to sulfate and nitrate levels in Amazonian rain. Organic acid concentrations in rain were responsible for a large fraction of the observed precipitation acidity; their concentration was strongly influenced by gas/liquid interactions.

  9. Amino acids and central fatigue.

    PubMed

    Blomstrand, E

    2001-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the mechanisms behind central fatigue, particularly in relation to changes in brain monoamine metabolism and the influence of specific amino acids on fatigue. Several studies in experimental animals have shown that physical exercise increases the synthesis and metabolism of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Support for the involvement of 5-HT in fatigue can be found in studies where the brain concentration of 5-HT has been altered by means of pharmacological agents. When the 5-HT level was elevated in this way the performance was impaired in both rats and human subjects, and in accordance with this a decrease in the 5-HT level caused an improvement in running performance in rats. The precursor of 5-HT is the amino acid tryptophan and the synthesis of 5-HT in the brain is thought to be regulated by the blood supply of free tryptophan in relation to other large neutral amino acids (including the branched-chain amino acids, BCAA) since these compete with tryptophan for transport into the brain. Studies in human subjects have shown that the plasma ratio of free tryptophan/BCAA increases during and, particularly, after sustained exercise. This would favour the transport of tryptophan into the brain and also the synthesis and release of 5-HT which may lead to central fatigue. Attempts have been made to influence the 5-HT level by giving BCAA to human subjects during different types of sustained heavy exercise. The results indicate that ingestion of BCAA reduces the perceived exertion and mental fatigue during exercise and improves cognitive performance after the exercise. In addition, in some situations ingestion of BCAA might also improve physical performance; during exercise in the heat or in a competitive race when the central component of fatigue is assumed to be more pronounced than in a laboratory experiment. However, more experiments are needed to further clarify the effect of BCAA and also of tryptophan ingestion on physical performance and mental fatigue. PMID:11310928

  10. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk is higher if you: Are in the intensive care unit (ICU) Have a weakened immune system or serious ... unless you have washed your hands. Tell your nurse if your central line: Gets dirty Is coming ...

  11. Diabetes insipidus - central

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms of central diabetes insipidus include: Increased urine production Excessive thirst Confusion and changes in alertness due to dehydration and higher than normal sodium level in the body, if the person is ...

  12. Central nervous system

    MedlinePlus

    The central nervous system is composed of the brain and spinal cord. Your brain and spinal cord serve as the main "processing center" for your entire nervous system. They control all the workings of your body.

  13. Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health. Overview Listen Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a disorder of the autonomic nervous system that affects breathing. It causes a person to ...

  14. Central ballast tanker design

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the CENTRAL BALLAST TANKER Design. This design is intended to reduce the volume of oil spilled from tankers by giving the crew a tanker properly designed and equipped to allow large quantities of oil from ruptured tank(s) to flow safely to a fully-inerted central ballast tank. In addition to reducing the volume of oil spilled, the design also addresses many of the shortcomings of the DOUBLE HULL DESIGN which are increasingly becoming a concern. The following is a brief review of the development of the CENTRAL BALLAST TANKER. The simple operational features, stability, low cost and ease of maintenance of the single hull tanker were important and can be retained with the CENTRAL BALLAST DESIGN.

  15. An assessment of the cord blood:maternal blood methylmercury ratio: implications for risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Alan H; Smith, Andrew E

    2003-01-01

    In the current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reference dose (RfD) for methylmercury, the one-compartment pharmacokinetic model is used to convert fetal cord blood mercury (Hg) concentration to a maternal intake dose. This requires a ratio relating cord blood Hg concentration to maternal blood Hg concentration. No formal analysis of either the central tendency or variability of this ratio has been done. This variability contributes to the overall variability in the dose estimate. A ratio of 1.0 is implicitly used in the model, but an uncertainty factor adjustment is applied to the central tendency estimate of dose to address variability in that estimate. Thus, incorporation of the cord:maternal ratio and its variability into the estimate of intake dose could result in a significant change in the value of the RfD. We analyzed studies providing data on the cord:maternal blood Hg ratio and conducted a Monte Carlo-based meta-analysis of 10 studies meeting all inclusion criteria to generate a comprehensive estimate of the central tendency and variability of the ratio. This analysis results in a recommended central tendency estimate of 1.7, a coefficient of variation of 0.56, and a 95th percentile of 3.4. By analogy to the impact of the similar hair:blood Hg ratio on the overall variability in the dose estimate, incorporation of the cord:maternal ratio may support a 3-fold uncertainty factor adjustment to the central tendency estimate of dose to account for pharmacokinetic variability. Whether the information generated in this analysis is sufficient to warrant a revision to the RfD will depend on the outcome of a comprehensive reanalysis of the entire one-compartment model. We are currently engaged in such an analysis. PMID:12948885

  16. Urine Albumin and Albumin/ Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Urine Albumin and Albumin/Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page ... known as: Microalbumin; ACR; UACR Formal name: Urine Albumin; Albumin-to-Creatinine Ratio Related tests: Albumin ; Creatinine ; ...

  17. Variable mixture ratio performance through nitrogen augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichel, R.; Obrien, C. J.; Bair, E. K.

    1988-01-01

    High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 candidate engine cycles are examined for earth-to-orbit vehicle application. Engine performance and power balance information are presented for the candidate cycles relative to chamber pressure, bulk density, and mixture ratio. Included in the cycle screening are concepts where a third fluid (liquid nitrogen) is used to achieve a variable mixture ratio over the trajectory from liftoff to earth orbit. The third fluid cycles offer a very low risk, fully reusable, low operation cost alternative to high/variable mixture ratio bipropellant cycles. Variable mixture ratio engines with extendible nozzle are slightly lower performing than a single mixture ratio engine (MR = 7:1) with extendible nozzle. Dual expander engines (MR = 7:1) have slightly better performance than the single mixture ratio engine. Dual fuel dual expander engines offer a 16 percent improvement over the single mixture ratio engine.

  18. Poisson`s ratio and crustal seismology

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, N.I.

    1996-02-10

    This report discusses the use of Poisson`s ratio to place constraints on continental crustal composition. A summary of Poisson`s ratios for many common rock formations is also included with emphasis on igneous and metamorphic rock properties.

  19. Management Ratios 1. For Colleges & Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, John, Ed.

    Ratios that enable colleges and universities to select other institutions for comparison are presented. The ratios and underlying data also enable colleges to rank order institutions and to calculate means, quartiles, and ranges for these groups. The data are based on FY 1983 U.S. Department of Education Statistics. The ratios summarize the…

  20. Spray Gun With Constant Mixing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual mechanism mounted in handle of spray gun maintains constant ratio between volumetric flow rates in two channels leading to spray head. With mechanism, possible to keep flow ratio near 1:1 (or another desired ratio) over range of temperatures, orifice or channel sizes, or clogging conditions.

  1. Strehl ratio: a tool for optimizing optical nulls and singularities.

    PubMed

    Hnault, Franois

    2015-07-01

    In this paper a set of radial and azimuthal phase functions are reviewed that have a null Strehl ratio, which is equivalent to generating a central extinction in the image plane of an optical system. The study is conducted in the framework of Fraunhofer scalar diffraction, and is oriented toward practical cases where optical nulls or singularities are produced by deformable mirrors or phase plates. The identified solutions reveal unexpected links with the zeros of type-J Bessel functions of integer order. They include linear azimuthal phase ramps giving birth to an optical vortex, azimuthally modulated phase functions, and circular phase gratings (CPGs). It is found in particular that the CPG radiometric efficiency could be significantly improved by the null Strehl ratio condition. Simple design rules for rescaling and combining the different phase functions are also defined. Finally, the described analytical solutions could also serve as starting points for an automated searching software tool. PMID:26367157

  2. The accuracy of the central landmark used for central venous catheterization of the internal jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Peter L; Whitaker, Emmett E; Palmer, Linda S; Glance, Laurent G

    2006-05-01

    We simulated needle paths based on the central landmark used for central venous catheterization of the internal jugular vein. We obtained ultrasound images to quantify the landmark's accuracy (precision and bias) in 107 subjects placed in Trendelenburg position with their heads turned 30-35 degrees. We also determined the frequency of simulated carotid artery puncture. The simulated needle path missed the middle 80% of the lumen of the internal jugular vein in 34% of subjects (95% confidence interval [CI], 25% to 44%) and traversed the carotid artery in 26% of subjects (95% CI, 18% to 35%). Both events occurred in 20% of subjects (95% CI, 13%-29%). The landmark had a medial bias of 3.7 mm (95% CI, 2.7 to 4.8); it was more often (77 of 104 subjects) medial to the center of the right internal jugular vein (P < 0.001). The landmark was more likely to miss the internal jugular vein (odds ratio, 3.11; P < 0.016) and intersect the carotid (odds ratio, 3.03; P < 0.024) in obese patients. The central landmark should not be expected to yield frequent success on first needle pass without risk of carotid puncture because of its imprecision and bias. The measured bias should be considered when the central landmark is used for central venous catheterization. PMID:16632804

  3. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    ROMINE, L.D.

    2006-02-01

    A systematic approach to closure planning is being implemented at the Hanford Site's Central Plateau to help achieve the goal of closure by the year 2035. The overall objective of Central Plateau remediation is to protect human health and the environment from the significant quantity of contaminated material that resulted from decades of plutonium production in support of the nation's defense. This goal will be achieved either by removing contaminants or placing the residual contaminated materials in a secure configuration that minimizes further migration to the groundwater and reduces the potential for inadvertent intrusion into contaminated sites. The approach to Central Plateau cleanup used three key concepts--closure zones, closure elements, and closure process steps--to create an organized picture of actions required to complete remediation. These actions were merged with logic ties, constraints, and required resources to produce an integrated time-phased schedule and cost profile for Central Plateau closure. Programmatic risks associated with implementation of Central Plateau closure were identified and analyzed. Actions to mitigate the most significant risks are underway while high priority remediation projects continue to make progress.

  4. Hypothalamic self-stimulation in rats following immunosympathectomy or central nerve growth factor antiserum injection.

    PubMed

    Tarpy, R M; Augenbraun, C B; Holman, W L

    1975-02-01

    In Experiment 1, immunosympathectomized rats self-stimulated at a much lower rate on high variable ratio schedules of reinforcement than injected controls. No differences were found for responding on continuous reinforcement or low variable ratio reinforcement schedules. In Experiment 2, a similar reduction in varialbe ratio response rate was found for subjects centrally injected with nerve growth factor-antiserum relative to controls. The results suggest a reduction in central catecholamine levels as a result of antiserum treatment. PMID:1150934

  5. Spectral ratio method for measuring emissivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    1992-01-01

    The spectral ratio method is based on the concept that although the spectral radiances are very sensitive to small changes in temperature the ratios are not. Only an approximate estimate of temperature is required thus, for example, we can determine the emissivity ratio to an accuracy of 1% with a temperature estimate that is only accurate to 12.5 K. Selecting the maximum value of the channel brightness temperatures is an unbiased estimate. Laboratory and field spectral data are easily converted into spectral ratio plots. The ratio method is limited by system signal:noise and spectral band-width. The images can appear quite noisy because ratios enhance high frequencies and may require spatial filtering. Atmospheric effects tend to rescale the ratios and require using an atmospheric model or a calibration site. ?? 1992.

  6. Central pancreatectomy without anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Michael; Neragi-Miandoab, Siyamek; Kasmin, Franklin; Brown, William; Pahuja, Anil; Cooperman, Avram M

    2009-01-01

    Background Central pancreatectomy has a unique application for lesions in the neck of the pancreas. It preserves the distal pancreas and its endocrine functions. It also preserves the spleen. Methods This is a retrospective review of 10 patients who underwent central pancreatectomy without pancreatico-enteric anastomosis between October 2005 and May 2009. The surgical indications, operative outcomes, and pathologic findings were analyzed. Results All 10 lesions were in the neck of the pancreas and included: 2 branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), a mucinous cyst, a lymphoid cyst, 5 neuroendocrine tumors, and a clear cell adenoma. Conclusion Central pancreatectomy without pancreatico-enteric anastomosis for lesions in the neck and proximal pancreas is a safe and effective procedure. Morbidity is low because there is no anastomosis. Long term endocrine and exocrine function has been maintained. PMID:19719851

  7. Central American update

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, S.F.

    1987-07-01

    The Central American Energy Resources Project is designed to help the countries of Honduras, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Panama develop their geothermal resources. Auxiliary project goals are to increase economic development and employment in Central America; to provide a scientific basis for the private sector to develop natural resources; and to provide scientific training to in-country scientists, engineers, and technicians. The energy resources project began in March 1985. The progress being made in El Salvador (production well logging and geophysical operations), Panama (site selection for the first temperature-gradient well), and Honduras (well drilling of temperature-gradient wells) is summarized.

  8. Centralized Mouse Repositories

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Leah Rae; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Hagn, Michael; Franklin, Craig; Lloyd, K. C. Kent; Magnuson, Terry; McKerlie, Colin; Nakagata, Naomi; Obata, Yuichi; Read, Stuart; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hrlein, Andreas; Davisson, Muriel T.

    2013-01-01

    Because the mouse is used so widely for biomedical research and the number of mouse models being generated is increasing rapidly, centralized repositories are essential if the valuable mouse strains and models that have been developed are to be securely preserved and fully exploited. Ensuring the ongoing availability of these mouse strains preserves the investment made in creating and characterizing them and creates a global resource of enormous value. The establishment of centralized mouse repositories around the world for distributing and archiving these resources has provided critical access to and preservation of these strains. This article describes the common and specialized activities provided by major mouse repositories around the world. PMID:22945696

  9. Context: a central concept.

    PubMed

    Fantino, E

    2001-05-01

    Seminal research in several areas has underscored the central role played by context in the control of behavior. Landmark studies in classical conditioning (with both conditioned suppression and autoshaping procedures) and in conditioned reinforcement (using the observing paradigm) are reviewed. The role of context also proved central in the study of choice (including the matching law and delay-reduction theory). This latter work contributed to the development of experimental analogs to foraging behavior. Research on foraging has also highlighted the importance of context and has led to some counterintuitive predictions that are mediated by context. PMID:11369463

  10. Effect of Compression Ratio on Perception of Time Compressed Phonemically Balanced Words in Kannada and Monosyllables

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Prashanth; Sujan, Mirale Jagadish; Rakshith, Satish

    2015-01-01

    The present study attempted to study perception of time-compressed speech and the effect of compression ratio for phonemically balanced (PB) word lists in Kannada and monosyllables. The test was administered on 30 normal hearing individuals at compression ratios of 40%, 50%, 60%, 70% and 80% for PB words in Kannada and monosyllables. The results of the study showed that the speech identification scores for time-compressed speech reduced with increase in compression ratio. The scores were better for monosyllables compared to PB words especially at higher compression ratios. The study provides speech identification scores at different compression ratio for PB words and monosyllables in individuals with normal hearing. The results of the study also showed that the scores did not vary across gender for all the compression ratios for both the stimuli. The same test material needs to be compared the clinical population with central auditory processing disorder for clinical validation of the present results. PMID:26557363

  11. Central Exclusive Dijet Production

    SciTech Connect

    Dechambre, A.; Cudell, J. R.; Ivanov, I. P.; Hernandez, O.

    2008-08-29

    The ingredients of central exclusive production cross section include large perturbative corrections and soft quantities that must be parametrized and fitted to data. In this talk, we summarize the results of a study of the uncertainties coming from these ingredients, in the case of exclusive dijet production.

  12. Central Nervous System Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the VF E-News HERE A A A Youtube LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Behcet’s Syndrome Webinar + Vasculitis Behcet’s ... Book Vasculitis Terms A – Z VF Medical Consultants YouTube Education Videos YouTube Extraordinary Patient Video Stories – Central ...

  13. Ghrelin in Central Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ferrini, F; Salio, C; Lossi, L; Merighi, A

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide synthesized by endocrine cells of the gastric mucosa, is released in the bloodstream in response to a negative energetic status. Since discovery, the hypothalamus was identified as the main source of ghrelin in the CNS, and effects of the peptide have been mainly observed in this area of the brain. In recent years, an increasing number of studies have reported ghrelin synthesis and effects in specific populations of neurons also outside the hypothalamus. Thus, ghrelin activity has been described in midbrain, hindbrain, hippocampus, and spinal cord. The spectrum of functions and biological effects produced by the peptide on central neurons is remarkably wide and complex. It ranges from modulation of membrane excitability, to control of neurotransmitter release, neuronal gene expression, and neuronal survival and proliferation. There is not at present a general consensus concerning the source of ghrelin acting on central neurons. Whereas it is widely accepted that the hypothalamus represents the most important endogenous source of the hormone in CNS, the existence of extra-hypothalamic ghrelin-synthesizing neurons is still controversial. In addition, circulating ghrelin can theoretically be another natural ligand for central ghrelin receptors. This paper gives an overview on the distribution of ghrelin and its receptor across the CNS and critically analyses the data available so far as regarding the effects of ghrelin on central neurotransmission. PMID:19721816

  14. Education in Central America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, George R.; Waggoner, Barbara Ashton

    The first chapter of this book describes the physical and cultural environment of Central America and includes analytical comments showing the complexity of the problems confronting the region. Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama are then treated in separate chapters including: 1) political, economic, social and…

  15. CENTRALIZATION OF CAMPUS CONTROLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    A COLLEGE CAMPUS HAVING A LARGE NUMBER OF SEPARATE BUILDINGS WITH ONE BASIC HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEM IS AN IDEAL SITUATION FOR REALIZING GREAT BENEFITS FROM CENTRALIZED BUILDING CONTROL SYSTEMS. TYPICAL REQUIREMENTS AND ADVANTAGES OF SUCH SYSTEMS ARE DISCUSSED BRIEFLY AND DESCRIPTIONS OF THE SYSTEM AT FOUR MAJOR UNIVERSITIES ARE GIVEN. THIS…

  16. Central Idaho Debris Flow

    During August 2013, the Beaver Creek wildfire burned more than 114,000 acres in south-central Idaho. Shortly after the fire was contained, heavy rainfall triggered numerous debris flows, including this one in Badger Gulch. USGS hydrologists Dave Evetts (left) and Jake Jacobson examine the debris flo...

  17. Postexercise Hypotension: Central Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao-Yin; Bonham, Ann C.

    2010-01-01

    A single bout of exercise can lead to a postexercise decrease in blood pressure in hypertensive individuals, called postexercise hypotension. Compelling evidence suggests that the central baroreflex pathway plays a crucial role in the development of postexercise hypotension. This review focuses on the exercise-induced changes in brainstem nuclei involved in blood pressure regulation. PMID:20577060

  18. Central sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Thalhofer, S; Dorow, P

    1997-01-01

    A central apnea is a disorder characterized by apneic events during sleep with no associated ventilatory effort. Central sleep apnea syndrome is characterized by repeated apneas during sleep resulting from loss of respiratory effort. Although the etiology of central apnea remains obscure in most cases, current investigations into breathing control system during sleep and association with certain diseases have pointed out possible mechanisms. Ventilation during sleep is highly dependent on the nonbehavioral control system. As a result, any diseases affecting this control system could influence the breathing patterns while the patient is asleep. As our results show, most patients with central sleep apnea and without congestive heart failure had quantifiable abnormalities like diminished carbon dioxide response curves. Neurological diseases affecting the brainstem are able to produce breathing pattern disorders in sleep. Well-known neurological diseases such as arteriosclerosis in the elderly, infarctions, tumors, hemorrhage, accidents with damage of this region, encephalitis, poliomyelitis or other infectious diseases may cause central apnea during sleep, even if in wakefulness no abnormalities of breathing patterns are present. Apneas cause hypoxemia, hypercapnia and increased sympathicotonia. This may result in development of pulmonary artery hypertension or systemic hypertension. Published results demonstrate that medical treatment is ineffective in these patients. Implantation of a diaphragm pacing device is an invasive measure, the efficacy of the diaphragm pacing has not been proven by long-term trials, however. Mechanical ventilation was shown to be the most efficient treatment. A therapeutic procedure using a timed n-BiPAP device is able to normalize blood gases during sleep. The n-BiPAP prevented the development of severe pulmonary artery hypertension during sleep. PMID:9044468

  19. Eccentric crank variable compression ratio mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, Keith Edward; Moser, William Elliott; Roozenboom, Stephan Donald; Knox, Kevin Jay

    2008-05-13

    A variable compression ratio mechanism for an internal combustion engine that has an engine block and a crankshaft is disclosed. The variable compression ratio mechanism has a plurality of eccentric disks configured to support the crankshaft. Each of the plurality of eccentric disks has at least one cylindrical portion annularly surrounded by the engine block. The variable compression ratio mechanism also has at least one actuator configured to rotate the plurality of eccentric disks.

  20. CENTRAL AND HEMI-CENTRAL RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh; Podhajsky, Patricia A.; Zimmerman, M. Bridget

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate systematically the role of anti-platelet aggregating drugs or anticoagulant in central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and hemi-CRVO. Design Cohort study. Participants Consecutive 686 patients with CRVO (567 patients, 585 eyes) and non-ischemic hemi-CRVO (119 patients, 122 eyes). Methods At first visit, all patients had a detailed ophthalmic and medical history (including the use of anti-platelet aggregating drugs or anticoagulants), and comprehensive ophthalmic and retinal evaluation. Visual evaluation was done by recording visual acuity, using the Snellen visual acuity chart, and visual fields with a Goldmann perimeter. The same ophthalmic evaluation was performed at each follow-up visit. CRVO and hemi-CRVO were classified into non-ischemic and ischemic at initial visit. Main Outcome Measures Visual acuity, visual fields and severity of retinal hemorrhages. Results For all three type of CRVO, there was a significantly greater severity of retinal hemorrhages among aspirin users than non-users (p<0.001). Initial visual acuity and visual fields were significantly worse in aspirin users than non-users in non-ischemic CRVO and hemi-CRVO, but did not differ for ischemic CRVO. Among the patients with non-ischemic CRVO that initially presented with 20/60 or better visual acuity, there was a significant association of aspirin use with visual acuity deterioration. The odds ratio of visual acuity deterioration, after adjusting for age, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and hypertension, for aspirin users relative to non-users was 2.24 (95% CI (confidence interval): 1.14, 4.41; p=0.020). Of those in whom macular edema resolved, over-all cumulative visual acuity outcome also suggested a higher percentage with deterioration among aspirin users, with the odds ratio for deterioration of 3.62 (95% CI: 0.97, 13.54; p=0.05) for aspirin users relative to non-users. For the non-ischemic CRVO that had 20/70 or worse visual acuity at initial visit, after resolution of macular edema, improvement in visual acuity was less likely in the aspirin users than non-users (odds ratio 0.18; 95% CI:0.04, 0.72; p=0.016). Conclusion Findings of this study indicate that, for patients with CRVO and hemi-CRVO, the use of aspirin, other antiplatelet aggregating agents or anticoagulants was associated with a worse visual outcome, and no apparent benefit. PMID:21704382

  1. Conceptualizing Ratios with Look-Alike Polygons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Nancy K.; Causey-Lee, Betty J.; Irby, Nekeya M.

    2003-01-01

    Presents an activity using similar rectangles to help children conceptualize ratio relationships in several different ways. Develops proportional reasoning without introducing the process of cross- multiplication. (YDS)

  2. 7 CFR 400.162 - Qualification ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Reinsurance Agreement-Standards for Approval; Regulations for the 1997 and Subsequent Reinsurance Years § 400.162 Qualification ratios. The...

  3. Effect of particle aspect ratio in magnetorheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morillas, Jose R.; Carreón-González, Elizabeth; de Vicente, Juan

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the influence of the aspect ratio of the dispersed particles in magnetorheology. Two systems are studied: conventional magnetorheological fluids prepared by dispersion of nickel nanowires, and inverse ferrofluids prepared by dispersion of glass fibers in a ferrofluid. In both cases the apparent yield stress is found to increase with aspect ratio in contradiction to available models in the literature. Experimental observations demonstrate that the particle volume fraction within the aggregates initially increases with increasing the aspect ratio of the dispersed particles. When the aspect ratio is further raised, a gel-like percolating structure forms inhibiting the formation of elongated clusters in the field direction.

  4. Force dynamics in fixed-ratio schedules.

    PubMed

    Pinkston, Jonathan W; McBee, Lindsey N

    2014-03-01

    Fixed-ratio schedules are widely used in behavioral research. Although fixed-ratio schedules often conjure up relationships to work and effort, little is known about effort-related measures in these schedules. Early research had shown that force and effort of operant behavior vary systematically during the execution of ratio schedules, and the goal of the present study was to revisit early research on force dynamics in fixed-ratio schedules. Four rats earned sucrose by pressing an isometric force transducer. Presses produced sucrose after ten or twenty responses. In general, the force of responses increased then decreased systematically across the ratio. The possibility that decreases in force during ratio execution was due to a trade-off with the differential reinforcement of short inter-response times (IRT) was investigated in an additional condition where sucrose was made available according to a tandem fixed-ratio 19 inter-response (IRT)> t schedule. The tandem IRT requirement did not eliminate decreasing trends in force across the ratio; unexpectedly, the tandem requirement did eliminate increases in force early in the ratio, which may reflect sequence-level organization operating in the control of force dynamics. PMID:24315798

  5. Sex ratio at birth in Croatia: update.

    PubMed

    Pavić, Dario

    2014-06-01

    There is strong evidence that the sex ratio at birth is partially determined by environmental and social factors. The modern change in those factors serves as an explanation for the secular decline in sex ratio at birth in most of the industrialized countries. This article is the reexamination of the results from my previous communication in which no trend in sex ratio at birth was established for the Croatian data from 1946 to 2007. The data for the years 2008 to 2011 were added, which didn't result with the detection of a significant change in sex ratio at birth by the regression analysis or by the Box-Jenkins time series analysis. Although the numerous factors associated with the decline in sex ratio at birth did occur during the studied period (e.g. increased exposure to the environmental pollution through food, air and water, the rise of the obesity and diabetes incidence, the economic crisis etc.), it appears that none of them made the measurable impact on sex ratio at birth. Also, the possible marginally significant decline in sex ratio at birth could be the result of a high sex ratio at birth immediately after the World War II. The results of this study caution against rapid generalization of the factors found to influence the sex ratio at birth in the epidemiological and clinical studies on the population level data. PMID:25144988

  6. Waist to height ratio is correlated with height in US children and adolescents age 2-18y

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The waist-to-height ratio is an anthropometric measure of central adiposity that has emerged as a significant predictor of cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents. The simple waist-to-height ratio, however, retains residual correlation with height, which could cause the measure to o...

  7. Correlation between Atomic Size Ratio and Poisson's Ratio in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ai-Kun; Wang, Shi-Guang; Xue, Rong-Jie; Liu, Guo-Cai; Zhao, Kun

    2014-06-01

    We report the correlation between atomic size ratio and Poisson's ratio in various metallic glasses. It is found that atomic size ratio has an influence on the atomic packing density of metallic glasses, which would significantly impact the shear modulus rather than bulk modulus. The findings may be helpful for understanding the structural origin of Poisson's ratio in metallic glasses, and are instructive for designing tough metallic glasses with large Poisson's ratio.

  8. Sustainable sex ratio in lattice populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tainaka, K.; Hayashi, T.; Yoshimura, J.

    2006-05-01

    We present a lattice model of mating populations. Simulation is performed by two different methods: local and global interactions. Simulation results account for the reason why the observed sex ratio is nearly one half in many animals. The male-biased sex ratio, such as in human populations, is also explained.

  9. 34 CFR 668.172 - Financial ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Financial ratios. 668.172 Section 668.172 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Financial Responsibility § 668.172 Financial... for private non-profit institutions. (1) The ratios for proprietary institutions are: For...

  10. ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC CORRELOGRAM RATIOS AND THEIR STABILITY.

    PubMed

    DANIEL, R S

    1964-08-14

    Autocorrelations of electroencephalograms can be reduced to ratios of estimated power among distinguishable parameters of typical tracings: the dominant rhythm, background activity, abundance, and total power. These data reduction methods permit statistical evaluation of differences among experimental conditions, thus extending the usefulness of graphic correlograms in research. Ratios discriminate between two experimental conditions and two subjects, while showing stability over days. PMID:14163806

  11. Manganese nodules: thorium-230: protactinium-231 ratios.

    PubMed

    Sackett, W M

    1966-11-01

    The Th(230): Pa(231) activity ratio in 7 of 11 manganese nodules is less than 10.8, the theoretical production ratio of activities in the ocean. This finding indicates difierential accumulation of these nuclides in authigenic deposits of manganese-iron oxide. PMID:17778807

  12. CCSSM Challenge: Graphing Ratio and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastberg, Signe E.; D'Ambrosio, Beatriz S.; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Mintos, Alexia; Krawczyk, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    A renewed emphasis was placed on ratio and proportional reasoning in the middle grades in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). The expectation for students includes the ability to not only compute and then compare and interpret the results of computations in context but also interpret ratios and proportions as they are…

  13. CCSSM Challenge: Graphing Ratio and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastberg, Signe E.; D'Ambrosio, Beatriz S.; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Mintos, Alexia; Krawczyk, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    A renewed emphasis was placed on ratio and proportional reasoning in the middle grades in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). The expectation for students includes the ability to not only compute and then compare and interpret the results of computations in context but also interpret ratios and proportions as they are

  14. Osmosis and Surface Area to Volume Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, D. R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to help students understand the concepts of osmosis and surface area to volume ratio (SA:VOL). The task for students is to compare water uptake in different sizes of potato cubes and relate differences to their SA:VOL ratios. (JN)

  15. 34 CFR 668.172 - Financial ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Financial Responsibility § 668.172 Financial... Primary Reserve, Equity, and Net Income ratios, as described under paragraph (b) of this section; (2...) Rounding the composite score to one digit after the decimal point. (b) Ratios. The Primary Reserve,...

  16. Sex ratios in pheasant research and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dale, F.H.

    1952-01-01

    Sex ratios are of primary importance in interpretation of extensive studies of pheasant populations. They are necessary for converting crowing-cock indices to population estimates even where annual trends are to be studied in the same area. Reliability of population estimates from hunting season kill of pheasants suffers primarily from inability to estimate sex ratios accurately. Fall sex ratio is an index to production and where adult sex ratios are divergent can serve as a good check on production per hen. Age ratios of cocks cannot be interpreted directly as an index of productivity, even within the boundaries of one state, unless adult sex ratios are known. The relationship between observed and actual sex ratio varies significantly from season to season and according to the method of observation. In view of their importance in population studies and the lack of reliability of present methods, it is believed that intensive studies on techniques for obtaining sex ratios are a major need in pheasant research.

  17. The Golden Ratio--A Contrary Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falbo, Clement

    2005-01-01

    Many assertions about the occurrence of the golden ratio phi in art, architecture, and nature have been shown to be false, unsupported, or misleading. For instance, we show that the spirals found in sea shells, in particular the "Nautilus pompilius," are not in the shape of the golden ratio, as is often claimed. Some of the most interesting…

  18. Administrator-Teacher Ratio Study: Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Services of California, Inc., Sacramento.

    Since the early 1970s, financial penalties have been levied in California school districts if their administrator-to-teacher ratio is in excess of a standard set by law. A study was conducted to determine whether the provisions of administrator-teacher maximum ratio are effective for calculating, monitoring, and reporting administrative costs.…

  19. FNAL central email systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Jack; Lilianstrom, Al; Pasetes, Ray; Hill, Kevin; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    The FNAL Email System is the primary point of entry for email destined for an employee or user at Fermilab. This centrally supported system is designed for reliability and availability. It uses multiple layers of protection to help ensure that: (1) SPAM messages are tagged properly; (2) All mail is inspected for viruses; and (3) Valid mail gets delivered. This system employs numerous redundant subsystems to accomplish these tasks.

  20. Strehl Ratio Meter for Focusing Segmented Mirrors 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivier, Philip D.

    1996-01-01

    Initial focusing segmented mirrors that must be deployed in space, such as the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), provide challenges not faced before in the area of adaptive optics. The devices used to focus the mirror must minimize the power used and unnecessary mechanical movement. The device described in this report requires no movable parts except for the essential actuators required to move the mirror segments. Detail description of the components can be found in Coker, 1996. The primary mirror of the NGST will consist of 9 segments, a central annular segment, surrounded by 8 segments. The entire mirror assembly will be an 8 meter nearly filled circle (with the corners of the segments clipped to allow for storage in an Atlas IIe shroud). As the segments of the primary mirror are deployed to their operational positions, they must be positioned to within small fractions of a wavelength of near infrared light. When focused, the NGST will put most of its collected li-ht into the small region near the center of its focal plane. The ratio of the total light in the diffraction limited spot about the center of the focal plane to the total light in the focal plane. The purpose of this research effort is to design and build a device that will measure Strehl ratio and to use demonstrate that the Strehl ratio can be used to focus a segmented mirror.

  1. Central core disease

    PubMed Central

    Jungbluth, Heinz

    2007-01-01

    Central core disease (CCD) is an inherited neuromuscular disorder characterised by central cores on muscle biopsy and clinical features of a congenital myopathy. Prevalence is unknown but the condition is probably more common than other congenital myopathies. CCD typically presents in infancy with hypotonia and motor developmental delay and is characterized by predominantly proximal weakness pronounced in the hip girdle; orthopaedic complications are common and malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a frequent complication. CCD and MHS are allelic conditions both due to (predominantly dominant) mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene, encoding the principal skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release channel (RyR1). Altered excitability and/or changes in calcium homeostasis within muscle cells due to mutation-induced conformational changes of the RyR protein are considered the main pathogenetic mechanism(s). The diagnosis of CCD is based on the presence of suggestive clinical features and central cores on muscle biopsy; muscle MRI may show a characteristic pattern of selective muscle involvement and aid the diagnosis in cases with equivocal histopathological findings. Mutational analysis of the RYR1 gene may provide genetic confirmation of the diagnosis. Management is mainly supportive and has to anticipate susceptibility to potentially life-threatening reactions to general anaesthesia. Further evaluation of the underlying molecular mechanisms may provide the basis for future rational pharmacological treatment. In the majority of patients, weakness is static or only slowly progressive, with a favourable long-term outcome. PMID:17504518

  2. Central auditory system.

    PubMed

    Masterton, R B

    1993-01-01

    A biological view of the central auditory system seems to be replacing the older Galilean or physics-based view as the guide for research in the late 20th century. This emerging view is primarily Darwinian in origin and recognizes that the entire auditory system is an adaptation for extracting information from natural sounds and their sources, usually for the guidance of immediate behavioral action. The fact that natural sounds themselves are almost always transients, too brief in duration to have tonal quality, suggests that the ear is far more of a Fast Fourier Transformer (and less of a Fourier analyzer) than is usually explicitly stated. Since the brief sounds constituting most of the acoustical environment contain critical information for guiding behavioral activity, several further hypotheses regarding the cell-level and tissue-level contributions of the central auditory system also follow. For example, the new view suggests that the central auditory system's role is likely to include the extraction of the behaviorally most important features, aspects, or dimensions of the sources of sounds in addition to, or possibly instead of, the physical dimensions of the sounds themselves. Because this new view has already enjoyed some measure of success and has also suggested a number of new and unusual directions for future research, it may become the dominant theory for research in the 21st century. PMID:8321548

  3. Central American development

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, L.M.

    1995-05-01

    While Asia`s power markets have garnered much of the attention in the global power market, Central America and the Caribbean also present private power developers with opportunities. Each Central American and Caribbean country has approached inependent power project development at its own pace. While some countries in the region have been more aggressive in encouraging independent power, others are still deciding whether and how to allow private deelopment to proceed. While there are clearly significant challenges associated with project development, there are advantages as well. A practical advantage is the fact that the region is geographically consolidated and proximate to the United States. Accordingly, a dveloper with limited resources can nevertheless operate in several markets at the same time. Moreover, because these markets are close, US-based developers have been able to avoid some of the more serious logistical problems that have been encountered in more remote markets, such as China and India. This can also be an advantage to smaller independent developers. Summaries of recent developments in Central America and the Caribbean are preented.

  4. Central respiratory chemoreception

    PubMed Central

    Guyenet, Patrice G.; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary By definition central respiratory chemoreceptors (CRCs) are cells that are sensitive to changes in brain PCO2 or pH and contribute to the stimulation of breathing elicited by hypercapnia or metabolic acidosis. CO2 most likely works by lowering pH. The pertinent proton receptors have not been identified and may be ion channels. CRCs are probably neurons but may also include acid-sensitive glia and vascular cells that communicate with neurons via paracrine mechanisms. Retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) neurons are the most completely characterized CRCs. Their high sensitivity to CO2 in vivo presumably relies on their intrinsic acid-sensitivity, excitatory inputs from the carotid bodies and brain regions such as raphe and hypothalamus, and facilitating influences from neighboring astrocytes. RTN neurons are necessary for the respiratory network to respond to CO2 during the perinatal period and under anesthesia. In conscious adults, RTN neurons contribute to an unknown degree to the pH-dependent regulation of breathing rate, inspiratory and expiratory activity. The abnormal prenatal development of RTN neurons probably contributes to the congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. Other CRCs presumably exist but the supportive evidence is less complete. The proposed locations of these CRCs are the medullary raphe, the nucleus tractus solitarius, the ventrolateral medulla, the fastigial nucleus and the hypothalamus. Several wake-promoting systems (serotonergic and catecholaminergic neurons, orexinergic neurons) are also putative CRCs. Their contribution to central respiratory chemoreception may be behavior-dependent or vary according to the state of vigilance. PMID:20737591

  5. Central sensitization in humans: assessment and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    It is evident that chronic pain can modify the excitability of central nervous system which imposes a specific challenge for the management and for the development of new analgesics. The central manifestations can be difficult to quantify using standard clinical examination procedures, but quantitative sensory testing (QST) may help to quantify the degree and extend of the central reorganization and effect of pharmacological interventions. Furthermore, QST may help in optimizing the development programs for new drugs.Specific translational mechanistic QST tools have been developed to quantify different aspects of central sensitization in pain patients such as threshold ratios, provoked hyperalgesia/allodynia, temporal summation (wind-up like pain), after sensation, spatial summation, reflex receptive fields, descending pain modulation, offset analgesia, and referred pain areas. As most of the drug development programs in the area of pain management have not been very successful, the pharmaceutical industry has started to utilize the complementary knowledge obtained from QST profiling. Linking patients QST profile with drug efficacy profile may provide the fundamentals for developing individualized, targeted pain management programs in the future. Linking QST-assessed pain mechanisms with treatment outcome provides new valuable information in drug development and for optimizing the management regimes for chronic pain. PMID:25846615

  6. Schroeter's ratios for Martian craters - Radar results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Schroeter's ratios (ratios of the rim volume to the apparent volume) are determined for a sample of 29 large, degraded Martian craters selected from the Goldstone Mars radar altimetry data. On the average, the values of the calculated Schroeter's ratios are about two orders of magnitude smaller than the same ratios for fresh lunar craters. This indicates a severe rim volume deficit in degraded Martian craters and it provides an additional support to the notion of a widespread resurfacing of intercrater plains on Mars. Schroeter's ratios for degraded craters could provide a semi-quantitative measure of the effects of the modification processes that had been active on Mars and on the other planetary bodies.

  7. Scavenging ratios based on inflow air concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.E.; Dana, M.T.; Lee, R.N.; Slinn, W.G.N.; Thorp, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    Scavenging ratios were calculated from field measurements made during April 1985. Event precipitation samples were collected at the surface, but air chemistry measurements in the air mass feeding the precipitation were made from an aircraft. In contrast, ratios calculated in previous studies have used air concentration and precipitation chemistry data from only surface measurements. Average scavenging ratios were calculated for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, total sulfate, total nitrate, and total ammonium for 5 events; the geometric mean of these scavenging ratios were 8.5 {times} 10{sup 5}, 5.6 {times} 10{sup 6}, 4.3 {times} 10{sup 5}, 3.4 {times} 10{sup 5}, 2.4 {times} 10{sup 6}, and 9.7 {times} 10{sup 4}, respectively. These means are similar to but less variable than previous ratios formed using only surface data.

  8. Using a Market Ratio Factor in Faculty Salary Equity Studies. Professional File Number 103, Spring 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luna, Andrew L.

    2007-01-01

    This study used two multiple regression analyses to develop an explanatory model to determine which model might best explain faculty salaries. The central purpose of the study was to determine if using a single market ratio variable was a stronger predictor for faculty salaries than the use of dummy variables representing various disciplines.…

  9. C/O Ratios in Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhusudhan, N.

    2012-04-01

    Recent observations are allowing unprecedented constraints on the carbon-to-oxygen (C/O) ratios of giant exoplanetary atmospheres. Elemental abundance ratios, such as the C/O ratio, of planetary atmospheres provide important constraints on planetary interior compositions and formation conditions, and on the chemical and dynamical processes in the atmospheres. In addition, for super-Earths, the potential availability of water and oxygen, and hence the notion of `habitability', is contingent on the C/O ratio. Typically, an oxygen-rich composition, motivated by the solar nebula C/O of 0.5, is assumed in models of exoplanetary formation, interiors, and atmospheres. However, recent observations of exoplanetary atmospheres are suggesting the possibility of C/O ratios of 1.0 or higher, motivating the new class of Carbon-rich Planets (CRPs). In this talk, we will present observational constraints on atmospheric C/O ratios for an ensemble of transiting exoplanets and discuss their implications on the various aspects of exoplanetary characterization described above. Motivated by these results, we propose a two-dimensional classification scheme for irradiated giant exoplanets in which the incident irradiation and the atmospheric C/O ratio are the two dimensions. We demonstrate that some of the extreme anomalies reported in the literature for hot Jupiter atmospheres can be explained based on this 2-D scheme. An overview of new theoretical avenues and observational efforts underway for chemical characterization of extrasolar planets, from hot Jupiters to super-Earths, will be presented.

  10. Characteristic ratio assignment in fractional order systems.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, Mohammad; Haeri, Mohammad

    2010-10-01

    In this paper the characteristic ratios and generalized time constant are defined for all-pole commensurate fractional order systems. The sufficient condition for stability of these systems in terms of their characteristic ratios is obtained. Also an analytical approach for characteristic ratio assignment (CRA) to have a non-overshooting fast closed loop step response is introduced. The proposed CRA method is then employed to design a fractional order controller. Computer simulation results are presented to illustrate the performance of the CRA based designed fractional order controllers. PMID:20619834

  11. The golden ratio in facial symmetry.

    PubMed

    Prokopakis, E P; Vlastos, I M; Picavet, V A; Nolst Trenite, G; Thomas, R; Cingi, C; Hellings, P W

    2013-03-01

    Symmetry is believed to be a hallmark of appealing faces. However, this does not imply that the most aesthetically pleasing proportions are necessary those that arise from the simple division of the face into thirds or fifths. Based on the etymology of the word symmetry, as well as on specific examples and theories of beauty, we conclude that ?-value, a ratio also known as the golden ratio or the divine proportion, can also characterize symmetrical forms. Therefore, we propose the utilization of this ratio in facial aesthetics. PMID:23441307

  12. Optimal sampling ratios in comparative diagnostic trials

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ting; Tang, Liansheng Larry; Rosenberger, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A subjective sampling ratio between the case and the control groups is not always an efficient choice to maximize the power or to minimize the total required sample size in comparative diagnostic trials.We derive explicit expressions for an optimal sampling ratio based on a common variance structure shared by several existing summary statistics of the receiver operating characteristic curve. We propose a two-stage procedure to estimate adaptively the optimal ratio without pilot data. We investigate the properties of the proposed method through theoretical proofs, extensive simulation studies and a real example in cancer diagnostic studies. PMID:24948841

  13. Central mechanisms of itch.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Hideki; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-09-01

    Itch is a complex sensory and emotional experience. Functional brain imaging studies have been performed to identify brain regions associated with this complex experience, and these studies reported that several brain regions are activated by itch stimuli. The possible roles of these regions in itch perception and difference in cerebral mechanism between healthy subjects and chronic itch patients are discussed in this review article. Additionally, the central itch modulation system and cerebral mechanisms of contagious itch, pleasurable sensation evoked by scratching have also been investigated in previous brain imaging studies. We also discuss how these studies advance our understanding of these mechanisms. PMID:25534483

  14. Fires in Central Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Hundreds of fires are set every year during the dry season in Central Africa. This true color image from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) shows dozens of smoke plumes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo on June 29, 2000. Residents burn away scrub and brush annually in the woody savanna to clear land for farming and grazing. For more information, visit the SeaWiFS Home Page, Global Fire Monitoring Fact Sheet, and 4km2 Fire Data Image Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  15. Central American resource studies

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eeckhout, E.; Laughlin, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has been working with five Central American countries to assist in the development of their energy and mineral resources. Since 1985, mineral resources in Costa Rica, peat resources in Costa Rica and Panama, geothermal energy resources in Honduras and Guatemala, and geothermal field development in El Salvador and Costa Rica have been topics of study. This paper presents an overview of this work -- within these proceedings are papers that deal with specific aspects of each topic, and these will be duly noted. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Central American electrical interconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    A technical cooperation grant of $2.25 million, designed to strengthen the capacity of Central American countries to operate their regional interconnected electrical system, was announced by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The grant, extended from the banks Fund for Special Operations, will help improve the capacity of the regions electric power companies to achieve economical, safe operation of the interconnected electric power systems. The funds will also be used to finance regional studies of the accords, procedures, regulations, and supervisory mechanisms for the system, as well as program development and data bases.

  17. Floods in Central China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This pair of true- and false-color images from the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) shows flooding in central China on July 4, 2002. In the false-color image vegetation appears orange and water appears dark blue to black. Because of the cloud cover and the fact that some of the water is filled with sediment, the false-color image provides a clearer picture of where rivers have exceeded their banks and lakes have risen. The river in this image is the Yangtze River, and the large lake is the Poyang Hu. Credits: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  18. Central ignition scenarios for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Redi, M.H.; Bateman, G.

    1986-03-01

    The possibility of obtaining ignition in TFTR by means of very centrally peaked density profiles is examined. It is shown that local central alpha heating can be made to exceed local central energy losses (''central ignition'') under global conditions for which Q greater than or equal to 1. Time dependent 1-D transport simulations show that the normal global ignition requirements are substantially relaxed for plasmas with peaked density profiles. 18 refs., 18 figs.

  19. Intralocus sexual conflict and offspring sex ratio.

    PubMed

    Katsuki, Masako; Harano, Tomohiro; Miyatake, Takahisa; Okada, Kensuke; Hosken, David J

    2012-03-01

    Males and females frequently have different fitness optima for shared traits, and as a result, genotypes that are high fitness as males are low fitness as females, and vice versa. When this occurs, biasing of offspring sex-ratio to reduce the production of the lower-fitness sex would be advantageous, so that for example, broods produced by high-fitness females should contain fewer sons. We tested for offspring sex-ratio biasing consistent with these predictions in broad-horned flour beetles. We found that in both wild-type beetles and populations subject to artificial selection for high- and low-fitness males, offspring sex ratios were biased in the predicted direction: low-fitness females produced an excess of sons, whereas high-fitness females produced an excess of daughters. Thus, these beetles are able to adaptively bias sex ratio and recoup indirect fitness benefits of mate choice. PMID:22225600

  20. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Ratios for Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Lebzelter, Thomas; Straniero, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    We have measured vibration-rotation first and second overtone 12C16O, 13C16O, 12C17O, 12C18O lines in 1.5 to 2.5 micron spectra of 41 Mira and SRa stars. These measurements have been used to derive 12C/13C, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O isotopic ratios. The ratios are compared to available literature values for the individual stars and the ratios are compared to isotopic ratios for various samples of evolved stars. Models for solar composition AGB stars of different initial masses are compared to the results. We find that the majority of the M stars had main sequence masses <1.5 solar mass and have not experienced the third dredge up. The progenitors of the S and C Miras in the sample were more massive but no stars in the sample show evidence of hot bottom burning.

  1. Doing Mathematics with Bicycle Gear Ratios.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stump, Sheryl L.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students examine bicycle chain-rings, cogs, and gear ratios as a means of exploring algebraic relationships, data collection, scatter plots, and lines of best fit. (KHR)

  2. Ratio Analysis: Where Investments Meet Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Susan D.; Woodbury, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Discusses ratio analysis by which investments may be evaluated. Requires the use of fundamental mathematics, problem solving, and a comparison of the mathematical results within the framework of industry. (Author/NB)

  3. Measuring Isotope Ratios Across the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, C. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2012-10-01

    We will overview how stable isotope ratios in C, H, N, O and S are powerful indicators of a wide variety of planetary processes identifying origin, transport, temperature history, radiation exposure, atmospheric escape, habitability, and biology.

  4. Approaches to high aspect ratio triangulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posenau, M.-A.

    1993-01-01

    In aerospace computational fluid dynamics calculations, high aspect ratio, or stretched, triangulations are necessary to adequately resolve the features of a viscous flow around bodies. In this paper, we explore alternatives to the Delaunay triangulation which can be used to generate high aspect ratio triangulations of point sets. The method is based on a variation of the lifting map concept which derives Delaunay triangulations from convex hull calculations.

  5. Three-dimensional stereo by photometric ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, L.B.; Angelopoulou, E.

    1994-11-01

    We present a methodology for corresponding a dense set of points on an object surface from photometric values for three-dimensional stereo computation of depth. The methodology utilizes multiple stereo pairs of images, with each stereo pair being taken of the identical scene but under different illumination. With just two stereo pairs of images taken under two different illumination conditions, a stereo pair of ratio images can be produced, one for the ratio of left-hand images and one for the ratio of right-hand images. We demonstrate how the photometric ratios composing these images can be used for accurate correspondence of object points. Object points having the same photometric ratio with respect to two different illumination conditions constitute a well-defined equivalence class of physical constraints defined by local surface orientation relative to illumination conditions. We formally show that for diffuse reflection the photometric ratio is invariant to varying camera characteristics, surface albedo, and viewpoint and that therefore the same photometric ratio in both images of a stereo pair implies the same equivalence class of physical constraints. The correspondence of photometric ratios along epipolar lines in a stereo pair of images under different illumination conditions is a correspondence of equivalent physical constraints, and the determination of depth from stereo can be performed. Whereas illumination planning is required, our photometric-based stereo methodology does not require knowledge of illumination conditions in the actual computation of three-dimensional depth and is applicable to perspective views. This technique extends the stereo determination of three-dimensional depth to smooth featureless surfaces without the use of precisely calibrated lighting. We demonstrate experimental depth maps from a dense set of points on smooth objects of known ground-truth shape, determined to within 1% depth accuracy.

  6. On ratio-based color indexing.

    PubMed

    Adjeroh, D A; Lee, M C

    2001-01-01

    The color ratio approach to indexing has been found to be robust and effective in indexing image and video databases, in different color spaces, and when using transformed color features, such as those from the Karhunen-Loeve transform (KLT) or the discrete cosine transform (DCT). However, the reason for the superior performance of the color ratio model, especially on different color spaces or with transformed color features has, at best, been speculative. This paper develops a generalized form for the color ratio model, based on which we characterize the general distribution of the color ratios. From the distribution, we present a theory that explains and supports the performance of the color ratio approach in image and video indexing. It is shown that the same theory accounts for its effectiveness in different color spaces and in the transform domain. Some general problems encountered in using the original retinex lightness algorithm, and some other issues specific to ratio-based color indexing are discussed in the light of the theory. Results are presented which show that the proposed theory is supported by empirical evidence. PMID:18249595

  7. Temporal Trends in Deep Ocean Redfield Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlow, Markus; Riebesell, Ulf

    2000-02-01

    The Redfield ratio [carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus (C:N:P)] of particle flux to the deep ocean is a key factor in marine biogeochemical cycling. Changes in oceanic carbon sequestration have been linked to variations in the Redfield ratio on geological time scales, but this ratio generally is assumed to be constant with time in the modern ocean. However, deep-water Redfield ratios in the northern hemisphere show evidence for temporal trends over the past five decades. The North Atlantic Ocean exhibits a rising N:P ratio, which may be related to increased deposition of atmospheric nitrous oxides from anthropogenic N emissions. In the North Pacific Ocean, increasing C:N and C:P ratios are accompanied by rising remineralization rates, which suggests intensified export production. Stronger export of carbon in this region may be due to enhanced bioavailability of aeolian iron. These findings imply that the biological part of the marine carbon cycle currently is not in steady state.

  8. Plutonium isotope ratio variations in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert E; La Mont, Stephen P; Eisele, William F; Fresquez, Philip R; Mc Naughton, Michael; Whicker, Jeffrey J

    2010-12-14

    Historically, approximately 12,000 TBq of plutonium was distributed throughout the global biosphere by thermo nuclear weapons testing. The resultant global plutonium fallout is a complex mixture whose {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio is a function of the design and yield of the devices tested. The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in global fallout is 0.176 + 014. However, the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio at any location may differ significantly from 0.176. Plutonium has also been released by discharges and accidents associated with the commercial and weapons related nuclear industries. At many locations contributions from this plutonium significantly alters the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios from those observed in global fallout. We have measured the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in environmental samples collected from many locations in North America. This presentation will summarize the analytical results from these measurements. Special emphasis will be placed on interpretation of the significance of the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios measured in environmental samples collected in the Arctic and in the western portions of the United States.

  9. A Note on Trader Sharpe Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Coates, John M.; Page, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    Traders in the financial world are assessed by the amount of money they make and, increasingly, by the amount of money they make per unit of risk taken, a measure known as the Sharpe Ratio. Little is known about the average Sharpe Ratio among traders, but the Efficient Market Hypothesis suggests that traders, like asset managers, should not outperform the broad market. Here we report the findings of a study conducted in the City of London which shows that a population of experienced traders attain Sharpe Ratios significantly higher than the broad market. To explain this anomaly we examine a surrogate marker of prenatal androgen exposure, the second-to-fourth finger length ratio (2D∶4D), which has previously been identified as predicting a trader's long term profitability. We find that it predicts the amount of risk taken by traders but not their Sharpe Ratios. We do, however, find that the traders' Sharpe Ratios increase markedly with the number of years they have traded, a result suggesting that learning plays a role in increasing the returns of traders. Our findings present anomalous data for the Efficient Markets Hypothesis. PMID:19946367

  10. A note on trader Sharpe Ratios.

    PubMed

    Coates, John M; Page, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    Traders in the financial world are assessed by the amount of money they make and, increasingly, by the amount of money they make per unit of risk taken, a measure known as the Sharpe Ratio. Little is known about the average Sharpe Ratio among traders, but the Efficient Market Hypothesis suggests that traders, like asset managers, should not outperform the broad market. Here we report the findings of a study conducted in the City of London which shows that a population of experienced traders attain Sharpe Ratios significantly higher than the broad market. To explain this anomaly we examine a surrogate marker of prenatal androgen exposure, the second-to-fourth finger length ratio (2D:4D), which has previously been identified as predicting a trader's long term profitability. We find that it predicts the amount of risk taken by traders but not their Sharpe Ratios. We do, however, find that the traders' Sharpe Ratios increase markedly with the number of years they have traded, a result suggesting that learning plays a role in increasing the returns of traders. Our findings present anomalous data for the Efficient Markets Hypothesis. PMID:19946367

  11. Seasonality, waist-to-hip ratio, and salivary testosterone.

    PubMed

    van Anders, Sari M; Hampson, Elizabeth; Watson, Neil V

    2006-08-01

    Patterns of seasonal variation in testosterone (T) and T-dependent measures are poorly understood in humans and particularly in women, despite their importance in other animals. We examined seasonal fluctuations in salivary T in women and men, and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) in women. Participants were 220 women and 127 men from central and West Coast North America. Results showed that T was significantly highest in autumn for both women and men, and that WHR in women closely matched the seasonal variation in T, with high values in the fall and summer. This suggests that T does show a reliable fluctuation over the seasons, which may result in meaningful fluctuations in behavioral, cognitive, and somatic variables associated with T. PMID:16675146

  12. Prospects for detection of gravitational waves from intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals.

    PubMed

    Brown, Duncan A; Brink, Jeandrew; Fang, Hua; Gair, Jonathan R; Li, Chao; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Mandel, Ilya; Thorne, Kip S

    2007-11-16

    We explore prospects for detecting gravitational waves from stellar-mass compact objects spiraling into intermediate mass black holes (BHs) M approximately 50M to 350M) with ground-based observatories. We estimate a rate for such intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals of central body is not a BH but its metric is stationary, axisymmetric, reflection symmetric and asymptotically flat, then the waves will likely be triperiodic, as for a BH. We suggest that the evolutions of the waves' three fundamental frequencies and of the complex amplitudes of their spectral components encode (in principle) details of the central body's metric, the energy and angular momentum exchange between the central body and the orbit, and the time-evolving orbital elements. We estimate that advanced ground-based detectors can constrain central body deviations from a BH with interesting accuracy. PMID:18233130

  13. Central waste processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kester, F. L.

    1973-01-01

    A new concept for processing spacecraft type wastes has been evaluated. The feasibility of reacting various waste materials with steam at temperatures of 538 - 760 C in both a continuous and batch reactor with residence times from 3 to 60 seconds has been established. Essentially complete gasification is achieved. Product gases are primarily hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methane, and carbon monoxide. Water soluble synthetic wastes are readily processed in a continuous tubular reactor at concentrations up to 20 weight percent. The batch reactor is able to process wet and dry wastes at steam to waste weight ratios from 2 to 20. Feces, urine, and synthetic wastes have been successfully processed in the batch reactor.

  14. [Central manifestations of dystrophinopathies].

    PubMed

    Cuisset, J-M; Rivier, F

    2015-12-01

    Le gène dystrophine impliqué dans les dystrophies musculaires de Duchenne et de Becker est exprimé dans 3 principaux tissus à l'origine des manifestations cliniques: le muscle strié squelettique, le cœur et le système nerveux central. Les 6 dystrophines différentes présentes au niveau du cerveau joueraient un rôle dans la maturation et la plasticité des synapses des neurones en particulier par leur fonction au niveau de l'agrégation et de la stabilisation de différents récepteurs de la membrane post synaptique. La possibilité d'une déficience intellectuelle dans la dystrophie musculaire de Duchenne est connue depuis la description princeps par Duchenne lui-même. Les données actuelles vont dans le sens d'une atteinte cognitive constante avec une courbe de Gauss des quotients intellectuels (QI) décalée de -1 écart-type par rapport à la population standard, et un QI moyen autour de 80. Les manifestations témoignant d'une atteinte du système nerveux central peuvent concerner l'ensemble des dystrophinopathies classiques avec atteinte musculaire, et se présenter isolément, sans signe myopathique. Le spectre phénotypique apparaît plus large et subtil que la déficience intellectuelle. L'atteinte isolée ou combinée de fonctions cognitives spécifiques (fonctions mnésiques, fonctions exécutives, attention) est possible, associée ou non à une déficience intellectuelle. Les troubles du spectre de l'autisme font également partie des manifestations rencontrées. En pratique clinique, il faut penser à réaliser un dosage des CPK plasmatiques dans ces différentes situations, en sachant qu'il a été rapporté très récemment des formes centrales pures de dystrophinopathies à CPK plasmatiques normales. PMID:26773588

  15. Developmental basis of sexually dimorphic digit ratios

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhengui; Cohn, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Males and females generally have different finger proportions. In males, digit 2 is shorter than digit 4, but in females digit 2 is the same length or longer than digit 4. The second- to fourth-digit (2D:4D) ratio correlates with numerous sexually dimorphic behavioral and physiological conditions. Although correlational studies suggest that digit ratios reflect prenatal exposure to androgen, the developmental mechanism underlying sexually dimorphic digit development remains unknown. Here we report that the 2D:4D ratio in mice is controlled by the balance of androgen to estrogen signaling during a narrow window of digit development. Androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor α (ER-α) activity is higher in digit 4 than in digit 2. Inactivation of AR decreases growth of digit 4, which causes a higher 2D:4D ratio, whereas inactivation of ER-α increases growth of digit 4, which leads to a lower 2D:4D ratio. We also show that addition of androgen has the same effect as inactivation of ER and that addition of estrogen mimics the reduction of AR. Androgen and estrogen differentially regulate the network of genes that controls chondrocyte proliferation, leading to differential growth of digit 4 in males and females. These studies identify previously undescribed molecular dimorphisms between male and female limb buds and provide experimental evidence that the digit ratio is a lifelong signature of prenatal hormonal exposure. Our results also suggest that the 2D:4D ratio can serve as an indicator of disrupted endocrine signaling during early development, which may aid in the identification of fetal origins of adult diseases. PMID:21896736

  16. Sex Ratio Variation in Iberian Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Toro, M. A.; Fernández, A.; García-Cortés, L. A.; Rodrigáñez, J.; Silió, L.

    2006-01-01

    Within the area of sex allocation, one of the topics that has attracted a lot of attention is the sex ratio problem. Fisher (1930) proposed that equal numbers of males and females have been promoted by natural selection and it has an adaptive significance. But the empirical success of Fisher's theory remains doubtful because a sex ratio of 0.50 is also expected from the chromosomal mechanism of sex determination. Another way of approaching the subject is to consider that Fisher's argument relies on the underlying assumption that offspring inherit their parent's tendency in biased sex ratio and therefore that genetic variance for this trait exists. Here, we analyzed sex ratio data of 56,807 piglets coming from 550 boars and 1893 dams. In addition to classical analysis of heterogeneity we performed analyses fitting linear and threshold animal models in a Bayesian framework using Gibbs sampling techniques. The marginal posterior mean of heritability was 2.63 × 10−4 under the sire linear model and 9.17 × 10−4 under the sire threshold model. The probability of the hypothesis p(h2 = 0) fitting the last model was 0.996. Also, we did not detect any trend in sex ratio related to maternal age. From an evolutionary point of view, the chromosomal sex determination acts as a constraint that precludes control of offspring sex ratio in vertebrates and it should be included in the general theory of sex allocation. From a practical view that means that the sex ratio in domestic species is hardly susceptible to modification by artificial selection. PMID:16582431

  17. Central pit craters on Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzate, Nathalia; Barlow, Nadine G.

    2011-02-01

    Central pit craters are common on Mars, Ganymede and Callisto, and thus are generally believed to require target volatiles in their formation. The purpose of this study is to identify the environmental conditions under which central pit craters form on Ganymede. We have conducted a study of 471 central pit craters with diameters between 5 and 150 km on Ganymede and compared the results to 1604 central pit craters on Mars (diameter range 5-160 km). Both floor and summit pits occur on Mars whereas floor pits dominate on Ganymede. Central peak craters are found in similar locations and diameter ranges as central pit craters on Mars and overlap in location and at diameters <60 km on Ganymede. Central pit craters show no regional variations on either Ganymede or Mars and are not concentrated on specific geologic units. Central pit craters show a range of preservation states, indicating that conditions favoring central pit formation have existed since crater-retaining surfaces have existed on Ganymede and Mars. Central pit craters on Ganymede are generally about three times larger than those on Mars, probably due to gravity scaling although target characteristics and resolution also may play a role. Central pits tend to be larger relative to their parent crater on Ganymede than on Mars, probably because of Ganymede's purer ice crust. A transition to different characteristics occurs in Ganymede's icy crust at depths of 4-7 km based on the larger pit-to-crater-diameter relationship for craters in the 70-130-km-diameter range and lack of central peaks in craters larger than 60-km-diameter. We use our results to constrain the proposed formation models for central pits on these two bodies. Our results are most consistent with the melt-drainage model for central pit formation.

  18. Central Nervous System Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nabors, Louis Burt; Ammirati, Mario; Bierman, Philip J.; Brem, Henry; Butowski, Nicholas; Chamberlain, Marc C.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Fenstermaker, Robert A.; Friedman, Allan; Gilbert, Mark R.; Hesser, Deneen; Holdhoff, Matthias; Junck, Larry; Lawson, Ronald; Loeffler, Jay S.; Maor, Moshe H.; Moots, Paul L.; Morrison, Tara; Mrugala, Maciej M.; Newton, Herbert B.; Portnow, Jana; Raizer, Jeffrey J.; Recht, Lawrence; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Sills, Allen K.; Tran, David; Tran, Nam; Vrionis, Frank D.; Wen, Patrick Y.; McMillian, Nicole; Ho, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Primary and metastatic tumors of the central nervous system are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with varied outcomes and management strategies. Recently, improved survival observed in 2 randomized clinical trials established combined chemotherapy and radiation as the new standard for treating patients with pure or mixed anaplastic oligodendroglioma harboring the 1p/19q codeletion. For metastatic disease, increasing evidence supports the efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery in treating patients with multiple metastatic lesions but low overall tumor volume. These guidelines provide recommendations on the diagnosis and management of this group of diseases based on clinical evidence and panel consensus. This version includes expert advice on the management of low-grade infiltrative astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, anaplastic gliomas, glioblastomas, medulloblastomas, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and brain metastases. The full online version, available at NCCN.org, contains recommendations on additional subtypes. PMID:24029126

  19. Future Flight Central

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA 'Future Flight Central,' the world's first full-scale virtual airport control tower, opened December 13, 1999 at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. Constructed at a cost of $10 million, the two story facility was jointly funded by NASA and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The facility is designed to test ways to solve potential air and ground traffic problems at commercial airports under realistic airport conditions and configurations. The facility provides an opportunity for airlines and airports to mitigate passenger delays by fine tuning airport hub operations, gate management, ramp movement procedures, and various other airport improvements. Twelve rear projection screens provide a seamless 360 degree high- resolution view of the airport or other screens being depicted. The imaging system, powered by supercomputers, provides a realistic view of weather conditions, enviromental and seasonal effects and the movement of up to 200 active aircraft and ground vehicles.

  20. Sucker rod centralizer

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, O.; Newski, A.

    1989-10-03

    This patent describes a device for centralizing at least one sucker rod within a production pipe downhole in a well and for reducing frictional forces between the pipe and at least one sucker rod. It comprises an elongate, substantially cylindrical body member having a longitudinal axis, a plurality of slots within the member and a rotatable member mounted within each slot, each of the plurality of slots has its major dimension along a first axis parallel to the longitudinal axis of the body member and is oriented with respect to the other seats so as to form a helicoidal array for maximizing the total surface contact area between the rotatable members and the pipe and for decreasing the forces acting on each rotatable member.

  1. Central solar energy receiver

    DOEpatents

    Drost, M. Kevin

    1983-01-01

    An improved tower-mounted central solar energy receiver for heating air drawn through the receiver by an induced draft fan. A number of vertically oriented, energy absorbing, fin-shaped slats are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical arrays on top of the tower coaxially surrounding a pipe having air holes through which the fan draws air which is heated by the slats which receive the solar radiation from a heliostat field. A number of vertically oriented and wedge-shaped columns are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical clusters surrounding the slat arrays. The columns have two mirror-reflecting sides to reflect radiation into the slat arrays and one energy absorbing side to reduce reradiation and reflection from the slat arrays.

  2. A new ratio for protocol categorization.

    PubMed

    Squara, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The present review describes and validates a new ratio "S" created for matching predictability and balance between TP and TN. Validity of S was studied in a three-step process as follows: (i) S was applied to the data of a past study predicting cardiac output response to fluid bolus from response to passive leg raise (PLR); (ii) S was comparatively analyzed with traditional ratios by modeling different 2 ∗ 2 contingency tables in 1000 hypothetical patients; (iii) precision of S was compared with other ratios by computing random fluctuations in the same patients. In comparison to other ratios, S performs better in predicting the cardiac response to fluid bolus and supports more directly the clinical conclusions. When the proportion of false responses is high, S is close to the coefficient correlation (CC). When the proportion of true responses is high, S is the unique ratio that identifies the categorization that balances the proportion of TP and TN. The precision of S is close to that of CC. In conclusion, S should be considered for creating categories from quantitative variables; especially when matching predictability with balance between TP and TN is a concern. PMID:24738007

  3. Optimal aspect ratio of endocytosed spherocylindrical nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-Bing; Liu, Yan-Hui; Zeng, Yan; Mao, Wei; Hu, Lin; Mao, Zong-Liang; Xu, Hou-Qiang

    2015-02-01

    Recent simulations have demonstrated that bioparticle size and shape modulate the process of endocytosis, and studies have provided more quantitative information that the endocytosis efficiency of spherocylindrical bioparticles is decided by its aspect ratio. At the same time, the dimensions of the receptor-ligand complex have strong effects on the size-dependent exclusion of proteins within the cellular environment. However, these earlier theoretical works including simulations did not consider the effects of ligand-receptor complex dimension on the endocytosis process. Thus, it is necessary to resolve the effects of ligand-receptor complex dimension and determine the optimal aspect ratio of spherocylindrical bioparticles in the process of endocytosis. Accordingly, we proposed a continuum elastic model, of which the results indicate that the aspect ratio depends on the ligand-receptor complex dimension and the radius of the spherocylindrical bioparticle. This model provides a phase diagram of the aspect ratio of endocytosed spherocylindrical bioparticles, the larger aspect ratio of which appears in the phase diagram with increasing ligand density, and highlights the bioparticle design.

  4. CO isotopologue ratios in the solar photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, James; Gharib-Nezhad, Ehsan; Ayres, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Determination of the oxygen isotope ratios in the solar photosphere is essential to constraining the formation environment of the solar system. The solar CO fundamental and first-overtone bands were previously measured by the shuttle-borne ATMOS Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), and with the National Solar Observatory FTS on the McMath-Pierce telescope at Kitt Peak. Analyzing the rovibrational bands from these photospheric spectra, a 3D convection model was employed to calculate ratios with improved uncertainties (16O/17O=2738±118 and 16O/18O =511±10 Ayres et al. 2013), which fall between the terrestrial values and those inferred from solar wind measurements by the Genesis spacecraft. However, differences in published CO dipole moment functions yielded a range of isotopic ratios spanning ~ 3 % in δ18O. Here we re-evaluate the CO dipole moment function in order to obtain more accurate isotope ratios for the photosphere. We used a new set of dipole moments from HITEMP which were accurately determined by both semi-empirical and ab initio methods. Preliminary values of isotope ratios using the new dipole moments are in better agreement with the inferred photosphere values from Genesis, showing that the solar photosphere is isotopically similar to primitive inclusions in meteorites, but different from the terrestrial planets by ~ 6 %. New spectral observations are needed to reduce uncertainties in photospheric C17O abundances.

  5. Autofluorescence ratio imaging of human colonic adenomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaizumi, Katsuichi; Harada, Yoshinori; Wakabayashi, Naoki; Yamaoka, Yoshihisa; Dai, Ping; Tanaka, Hideo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2011-02-01

    Recently autofluorescence imaging (AFI) endoscopy, visualizing tissue fluorescence in combination with reflected light, has been adopted as a technique for detecting neoplasms in the colon and other organs. However, autofluorescence colonoscopy is not infallible, and improvement of the detection method can be expected to enhance the performance. Colonic mucosa contains metabolism-related fluorophores, such as reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, which may be useful for visualizing neoplasia in autofluorescence endoscopy. We examined sliced cross-sections of endoscopically resected tubular adenomas under a microscope. Fluorescence images acquired at 365-nm excitation (F365ex) and 405-nm excitation (F405ex), and reflectance images acquired at 550 nm (R550) were obtained. Fluorescence ratio (F365ex/F405ex) images and reflectance/fluorescence ratio (R550/F405ex) images were calculated from the acquired images. The fluorescence ratio images could distinguish adenomatous mucosa from normal mucosa more clearly than the reflectance/fluorescence ratio images. The results showed that the autofluorescence ratio imaging is a potential technique for increasing the diagnostic power of autofluorescence endoscopy.

  6. Local sex ratio affects the cost of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Nicolaus, Marion; Michler, Stephanie P M; Ubels, Richard; van der Velde, Marco; Bouwman, Karen M; Both, Christiaan; Tinbergen, Joost M

    2012-05-01

    1.?Costs and benefits of reproduction are central to life-history theory, and the outcome of reproductive trade-offs may depend greatly on the ecological conditions in which they are estimated. In this study, we propose that costs and benefits of reproduction are modulated by social effects, and consequently that selection on reproductive rates depends on the social environment. 2.?We tested this hypothesis in a great tit Parus major population. Over 3 years, we altered parental reproductive effort via brood size manipulations (small, intermediate, large) and manipulated the local social environment via changes in the local fledgling density (decreased, increased) and the local sex ratio (female-biased, control, male-biased). 3.?We found that male-biased treatment consistently increased the subsequent local breeding densities over the 3-year study period. We also found that parents rearing small broods in these male-biased plots had increased survival rates compared with the other experimental groups. 4.?We conclude that reproductive costs are the product of an interaction between parental phenotypic quality after reproduction and the social environment: raising a small brood had long-lasting effects on some phenotypic traits of the parents and that this increased their survival chances in male-biased environment where habitat quality may have deteriorated (via increased disease/predation risk or intraspecific competition). 5.?Our results provide the first experimental evidence that local sex ratio can affect reproductive costs and thus optimal clutch size. PMID:22112192

  7. The anomalous C 4 intensity ratio in symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalitsianos, A. G.; Kafatos, M.; Fahey, R. P.

    1988-01-01

    The C IV lambda lambda 1548.2,1550.8 resonance doublet in a symbiotic stars was shown to exhibit anomalous line intensity ratios in which I (lambda 1548.2)/I(lambda 1550.8) less than 1, or less than the optically-thick limit of unity. The R Aquarii-central HII region and RX Puppis exhibit this phenomena. The I(lambda 1548.2)/I(lambda 1550.8) ratio in RX Puppis is found to vary inversely with the total C IV line intensity, and with the FES-visual light, as the object declined over a 5 yr period following a brightening in UV and optical emission which peaked in 1982. This doublet intensity behavior could be explained by a wind which has a narrow velocity range of 600 approx. less than sup v wind approx. less than 1000 km/sec, or by the pumping of the Fe II (mul. 45.01) transition a sup 4 F sub 9/2 - y sup 4 H(o) sub 11/2 by C IV lambda 1548.2, which effectively scatters C IV photons into the Fe II spectrum in these objects.

  8. Poisson ratio map of Brazil: Data compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franca, G.; Bianchi, M.; Pavo, C.; Moreira, L. P.; Farrapo Albuquerque, D.; Peres Rocha, M.; Marotta, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    We present a Poisson ration map of Brazil based on a compilation of data published in the literature as well as new measurements. We only used Poisson ration derived from receiver function analyses deep seismic refraction experiments . Our compilation shows that the crust in the stable continental area onshore has an Poisson ratio of 0.24 +- 0.03. The Poisson ratio highest is found along boundary with three provinces; Sao Francisco craton, Tocantins belt and Parana basin. Prelimary results have not clear difference can be observed between low altitude, intracratonic sedimentary basins, NeoProterozoic foldbelts and cratonic aeas. Although sparse in data coverage, we expect the resulting Poisson ratio map to be useful for future studies of isostasy, constraint, dynamic topography, and crustal evolution of the country.

  9. The D/H ratio for Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Wm. H.; Schempp, W. V.; Baines, K. H.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of Jupiter's spectrum near the R5(0) HD line at 6063.88 A are reported. A feature with an equivalent width of 0.065 + or - 0.021 mA is coincident with the expected line. This feature is compared with HD profiles computed for inhomogeneous scattering models for Jupiter to yield a range for the Jovian D/H ratio of 1.0-2.9 x 10 to the -5th. This D/H ratio is in the lower range of previously reported D/H values for Jupiter and corresponds to an essentially solar D/H ratio for Jupiter. The detection of HD features in the presence of probable blends with spectral features of minor atmospheric hydrocarbon molecules is discussed. Such blends may make unambiguous identification of HD features difficult.

  10. Kinship Institutions and Sex Ratios in India

    PubMed Central

    CHAKRABORTY, TANIKA; KIM, SUKKOO

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between kinship institutions and sex ratios in India at the turn of the twentieth century. Because kinship rules vary by caste, language, religion, and region, we construct sex ratios by these categories at the district level by using data from the 1901 Census of India for Punjab (North), Bengal (East), and Madras (South). We find that the male-to-female sex ratio varied positively with caste rank, fell as one moved from the North to the East and then to the South, was higher for Hindus than for Muslims, and was higher for northern Indo-Aryan speakers than for the southern Dravidian-speaking people. We argue that these systematic patterns in the data are consistent with variations in the institution of family, kinship, and inheritance. PMID:21308567

  11. Haplodiploidy, sex-ratio adjustment, and eusociality.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andy; Ross, Laura

    2013-03-01

    Hamilton's "haplodiploidy hypothesis" holds that inflated sororal relatedness has promoted altruistic sib rearing in haplodiploids, potentially explaining their apparent predisposition to eusociality. Here, we suggest that haplodiploidy may instead promote eusociality simply by facilitating sex-ratio adjustment. Specifically, haplodiploidy may enable sex-ratio bias toward the more helpful sex, owing to "local resource enhancement," and such sex-ratio bias may promote the evolution of helping by individuals of that sex, owing to the "rarer-sex effect." This could explain why haplodiploidy appears to have been important for eusociality in taxa with only female helpers, such as ants, wasps, and bees, but not in taxa with both male and female helpers, such as termites. PMID:23448893

  12. Nonlinear trading models through Sharpe Ratio maximization.

    PubMed

    Choey, M; Weigend, A S

    1997-08-01

    While many trading strategies are based on price prediction, traders in financial markets are typically interested in optimizing risk-adjusted performance such as the Sharpe Ratio, rather than the price predictions themselves. This paper introduces an approach which generates a nonlinear strategy that explicitly maximizes the Sharpe Ratio. It is expressed as a neural network model whose output is the position size between a risky and a risk-free asset. The iterative parameter update rules are derived and compared to alternative approaches. The resulting trading strategy is evaluated and analyzed on both computer-generated data and real world data (DAX, the daily German equity index). Trading based on Sharpe Ratio maximization compares favorably to both profit optimization and probability matching (through cross-entropy optimization). The results show that the goal of optimizing out-of-sample risk-adjusted profit can indeed be achieved with this nonlinear approach. PMID:9730018

  13. Ratio versus difference comparators in choice.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbon, J; Fairhurst, S

    1994-01-01

    Several theories in the learning literature describe decision rules for performance utilizing ratios and differences. The present paper analyzes rules for choice based on either delays to food, immediacies (the inverse of delays), or rates of food, combined factorially with a ratio or difference comparator. An experiment using the time-left procedure (Gibbon & Church, 1981) is reported with motivational differentials induced by unequal reinforcement durations. The preference results were compatible with a ratio-comparator decision rule, but not with decision rules based on differences. Differential reinforcement amounts were functionally equivalent to changes in delays to food. Under biased reinforcement, overall food rate was increased, but variance in preference was increased or decreased depending on which alternative was favored. This is a Weber law finding that is compatible with multiplicative, scalar sources of variance but incompatible with pacemaker rate changes proportional to food presentation rate. PMID:7983462

  14. Photometry of the central region of the Andromeda Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharov, A. S.; Lyutyj, V. M.

    1980-06-01

    The photoelectric U, B, V observations of the central region of M81 made in 166 fields at distances of 54-351 arcsec from the center are used to explain the structure of the central condensation of the galaxy. The surface-brightness isophotes can be fit by ellipses varying in axial ratio from 0.9 to 0.6 and in position angle from 70 to 45 deg. The central condensation may include a bar in the form of a triaxial ellipsoid; the nucleus occupies an asymmetric position in this condensation, shifted by 22 arcsec northwest relative to the most distant U isophote at a = 368 arcsec. The apparent eccentricity with respect to the outlying isophotes is caused by distribution of dust, as shown by the colorimetric B - V, U - B color-index profiles reflecting the dust in the central condensation of M31.

  15. Photometry of the central region of the Andromeda Nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Sharov, A.S.; Liutyi, V.M.

    1980-05-01

    The photoelectric U, B, V observations of the central region of M81 made in 166 fields at distances of 54-351 arcsec from the center are used to explain the structure of the central condensation of the galaxy. The surface-brightness isophotes can be fit by ellipses varying in axial ratio from 0.9 to 0.6 and in position angle from 70 to 45 deg. The central condensation may include a bar in the form of a triaxial ellipsoid the nucleus occupies an asymmetric position in this condensation, shifted by 22 arcsec northwest relative to the most distant U isophote at a 368 arcsec. The apparent eccentricity with respect to the outlying isophotes is caused by distribution of dust, as shown by the colorimetric B - V, U - B color-index profiles reflecting the dust in the central condensation of M31.

  16. Synoptic Control of Cross-Barrier Precipitation Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mass, C.; Vargas, R.

    2013-12-01

    The substantial precipitation contrasts across mountain barriers, with windward enhancement on one side and leeward reduction on the other, have been the subject of several studies and reviews, both observational and theoretical. A lesser number of papers have examined the temporal variability of the orographic precipitation contrasts, including the origins of such variability. For example, Siler et al. (2013) examined the variability of the rain-shadow effect across the Cascade Mountains of Washington State. They found that the intensity of the winter-mean rain shadow was weaker in El Nino than La Nina years, and suggested that the strongest (weakest) rain shadows occurred for warm-sector (warm-frontal) situations. Dettinger et al. (2004) examined the synoptic controls of varying orographic precipitation ratios across the Sierra Nevada of California, with ratios defined by the difference in precipitation between the Central Valley and the western slopes of the barrier. They found increased ratios when the flow was more normal to the terrain and when vertical stability was less, with higher ratios after cold frontal passage compared to the warm sectors of midlatitude cyclones. The latter result appears to contradict the findings of Siler et al (2013). This presentation explores the temporal variations in the intensity of the precipitation gradient across the Cascade Mountains of Washington State and describes the synoptic conditions associated with periods in which precipitation is heavier on the western side, heavier on the eastern side, or nearly equal across the barrier. The talk will begin by summarizing the temporal variations of precipitation on the windward and leeward sides of the Cascades for a several year period. Segregating the hours when precipitation is substantially greater on the windward side, greater on the leeward side, or roughly equal, provides a series of dates used for synoptic composites for these three situations. It is shown that there are coherent and significant synoptic differences between the three precipitation ratio regimes, and these differences are illustrated for several case studies. For example, windward enhancement is greater after the passage of cold or occluded fronts, when stability is reduced and the flow is more westerly. Finally, the physical connection between synoptic flow and the changing cross-barrier precipitation contrasts are discussed.

  17. Algorithms for high aspect ratio oriented triangulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posenau, Mary-Anne K.

    1995-01-01

    Grid generation plays an integral part in the solution of computational fluid dynamics problems for aerodynamics applications. A major difficulty with standard structured grid generation, which produces quadrilateral (or hexahedral) elements with implicit connectivity, has been the requirement for a great deal of human intervention in developing grids around complex configurations. This has led to investigations into unstructured grids with explicit connectivities, which are primarily composed of triangular (or tetrahedral) elements, although other subdivisions of convex cells may be used. The existence of large gradients in the solution of aerodynamic problems may be exploited to reduce the computational effort by using high aspect ratio elements in high gradient regions. However, the heuristic approaches currently in use do not adequately address this need for high aspect ratio unstructured grids. High aspect ratio triangulations very often produce the large angles that are to be avoided. Point generation techniques based on contour or front generation are judged to be the most promising in terms of being able to handle complicated multiple body objects, with this technique lending itself well to adaptivity. The eventual goal encompasses several phases: first, a partitioning phase, in which the Voronoi diagram of a set of points and line segments (the input set) will be generated to partition the input domain; second, a contour generation phase in which body-conforming contours are used to subdivide the partition further as well as introduce the foundation for aspect ratio control, and; third, a Steiner triangulation phase in which points are added to the partition to enable triangulation while controlling angle bounds and aspect ratio. This provides a combination of the advancing front/contour techniques and refinement. By using a front, aspect ratio can be better controlled. By using refinement, bounds on angles can be maintained, while attempting to minimize the number of Steiner points.

  18. Large extinction ratio optical electrowetting shutter.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Ryan D; Underwood, Kenneth; Terrab, Soraya; Watson, Alexander M; Bright, Victor M; Gopinath, Juliet T

    2016-05-01

    A large extinction ratio optical shutter has been demonstrated using electrowetting liquids. The device is based on switching between a liquid-liquid interface curvature that produces total internal reflection and one that does not. The interface radius of curvature can be tuned continuously from 9 mm at 0 V to -45 mm at 26 V. Extinction ratios from 55.8 to 66.5 dB were measured. The device shows promise for ultracold chip-scale atomic clocks. PMID:27137579

  19. Oxygen isotopic ratios in RGB & AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halabi, Ghina M.; El Eid, Mounib

    2016-04-01

    Stars in the mass range 1.2-7M⊙, with solar-like initial composition are evolved from the zero age main sequence till the early AGB phase. Their predicted oxygen isotopic ratios are compared to observationally inferred values in red giants to investigate how well standard evolutionary calculation reproduces available observations and to illustrate the role of convective mixing. We find that extra mixing beyond the convective boundary determined by the Schwarzschild criterion is needed to explain the observational oxygen isotopic ratios, particularly in low mass stars. The effect of recent determinations of proton capture reactions and their uncertainties on 16O/17O is also shown.

  20. Radioactive anomaly discrimination from spectral ratios

    DOEpatents

    Maniscalco, James; Sjoden, Glenn; Chapman, Mac Clements

    2013-08-20

    A method for discriminating a radioactive anomaly from naturally occurring radioactive materials includes detecting a first number of gamma photons having energies in a first range of energy values within a predetermined period of time and detecting a second number of gamma photons having energies in a second range of energy values within the predetermined period of time. The method further includes determining, in a controller, a ratio of the first number of gamma photons having energies in the first range and the second number of gamma photons having energies in the second range, and determining that a radioactive anomaly is present when the ratio exceeds a threshold value.

  1. The Boron Isotopic Ratio in HD 76932

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebull, Luisa; Duncan, Douglas; Johansson, Sveneric; Thorburn, Julie; Schramm, David; Fields, Brian

    Data in the lambda2090 B region of HD 76932 were obtained using the HST GHRS echelle at a resolution of 90,000. This wavelength region has been previously identified as a likely candidate for observing the 11B/10B isotopic splitting (Johansson et al. 1993). However, data presented here reveal that the B line in question is blended with unknown stellar absorption feature(s), making an unambiguous detection of the isotopic ratio impossible. A detailed analysis of the line shape and relative wavelength accuracies is presented. The constraints that can be placed on the isotopic ratio based on these data are also discussed.

  2. Effect of grid aspect ratio on convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buelow, P. E. O.; Venkateswaran, S.; Merkle, Charles L.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of high-aspect-ratio grids on algorithm convergence are considered by means of vector stability theory and computational experiments. The results indicate that approximately factored implicit schemes experience convergence deterioration because of nonoptimum local time-stepping procedures and increased need for viscous preconditioning. Based on this insight, an enhanced algorithm is devised using improved selection of the local time step, appropriate definition of the viscous preconditioning matrix, and proper implementation of the boundary conditions. The new algorithm provides uniformly efficient convergence at all aspect ratios for both Euler and Navier-Stokes computations for a variety of test problems.

  3. On the variability of alligator sex ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Chabreck, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Samples of alligators from wild and 'farm' populations exhibited disproportionate sex ratios. Males predominated among young alligators from wild populations, whereas females were much more abundant than males in the farm population, where resources were superabundant. These results and other considerations lead us to hypothesize that environmental factors influence sex determination in alligators. During favorable environmental conditions natural selection is expected to favor a preponderance of the sex whose individuals exhibit the greater environmentally associated variation in relative fitness. We hypothesize that environmentally associated variation in age at sexual maturity of females produces sufficient variation in relative fitness of females to result in selection for low sex ratios during periods of resource abundance.

  4. Cosmic-Ray Proton to Electron Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persic, Massimo; Rephaeli, Yoel

    2015-01-01

    A basic quantity in the characterization of relativistic particles is the proton-to-electron (p/e) energy density ratio. We derive a simple approximate expression suitable to estimate this quantity, Up/Ue = (mp/me)(3-q)/2, valid when a nonthermal `gas' of these particles is electrically neutral and the particles' power-law spectral indices are equal -- e.g., at injection. This relation partners the well-known p/e number density ratio at 1GeV, Np/Ne = (mp/me)(q-1)/2.

  5. Controlling Gas-Flow Mass Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed system automatically controls proportions of gases flowing in supply lines. Conceived for control of oxidizer-to-fuel ratio in new gaseous-propellant rocket engines. Gas-flow control system measures temperatures and pressures at various points. From data, calculates control voltages for electronic pressure regulators for oxygen and hydrogen. System includes commercially available components. Applicable to control of mass ratios in such gaseous industrial processes as chemical-vapor depostion of semiconductor materials and in automotive engines operating on compressed natural gas.

  6. Microbial respiration per unit microbial biomass depends on litter layer carbon-to-nitrogen ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohn, M.

    2015-02-01

    Soil microbial respiration is a central process in the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle. In this study, I tested the effect of the carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratio of soil litter layers on microbial respiration in absolute terms and per unit microbial biomass C. For this purpose, a global data set on microbial respiration per unit microbial biomass C - termed the metabolic quotient (qCO2) - was compiled from literature data. It was found that qCO2 in the soil litter layers was positively correlated with the litter C:N ratio and was negatively correlated with the litter nitrogen (N) concentration. The positive relation between qCO2 and the litter C:N ratio resulted from an increase in respiration with the C:N ratio in combination with no significant effect of the litter C:N ratio on the soil microbial biomass C concentration. The results suggest that soil microorganisms respire more C both in absolute terms and per unit microbial biomass C when decomposing N-poor substrate. The reasons for the observed relationship between qCO2 and the litter layer C:N ratio could be microbial N mining, overflow respiration or the inhibition of oxidative enzymes at high N concentrations. In conclusion, the results show that qCO2 increases with the litter layer C:N ratio. Thus, the findings indicate that atmospheric N deposition, leading to decreased litter C:N ratios, might decrease microbial respiration in soils.

  7. Watershed flow paths and stream water nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratios under simulated precipitation regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Mark B.; Wang, Dong

    2008-12-01

    Stream water nitrogen-to-phosphorus (N:P) ratios influence algal community composition and nutrient limitation in lotic ecosystems. N:P ratios trend across climates, with low stream water N:P ratios more common in arid climates, yet little is known about mechanisms that cause this spatial and temporal variation. This study evaluates the relationship between precipitation regime (mean annual precipitation and its frequency), watershed flow pathways, and stream water total N-to-total P (TN:TP) ratios, using a model based on a central Minnesota watershed. The purpose of the study was to examine hydrologic mechanisms that control stream water TN:TP ratios. We constructed a model that accounted for hydrological and biogeochemical processes, followed by 161 simulations under a wide range of precipitation frequency and intensity scenarios. Precipitation regime controlled total runoff and subsurface hydrologic connectivity, which had implications for TN and TP concentrations and TN:TP ratios. Results supported the hypothesis that watershed hydrology is an important control on stream water TN:TP ratios and suggested that variation of flow pathways can lead to fundamental changes of N:P ratios.

  8. Localization and centrality in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Travis; Zhang, Xiao; Newman, M. E. J.

    2014-11-01

    Eigenvector centrality is a common measure of the importance of nodes in a network. Here we show that under common conditions the eigenvector centrality displays a localization transition that causes most of the weight of the centrality to concentrate on a small number of nodes in the network. In this regime the measure is no longer useful for distinguishing among the remaining nodes and its efficacy as a network metric is impaired. As a remedy, we propose an alternative centrality measure based on the nonbacktracking matrix, which gives results closely similar to the standard eigenvector centrality in dense networks where the latter is well behaved but avoids localization and gives useful results in regimes where the standard centrality fails.

  9. Collisional Transport in a Low Aspect Ratio Tokamak -- Beyond the Drift Kinetic Formalism

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Gates; R.B. White

    2004-01-28

    Calculations of collisional thermal and particle diffusivities in toroidal magnetic plasma confinement devices order the toroidal gyroradius to be small relative to the poloidal gyroradius. This ordering is central to what is usually referred to as neoclassical transport theory. This ordering is incorrect at low aspect ratio, where it can often be the case that the toroidal gyroradius is larger than the poloidal gyroradius. We calculate the correction to the particle and thermal diffusivities at low aspect ratio by comparing the diffusivities as determined by a full orbit code (which we refer to as omni-classical diffusion) with those from a gyroaveraged orbit code (neoclassical diffusion). In typical low aspect ratio devices the omni-classical diffusion can be up to 2.5 times the calculated neoclassical value. We discuss the implications of this work on the analysis of collisional transport in low aspect ratio magnetic confinement experiments.

  10. A Ratio Scale Measurement of Conformity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beins, Bernard C.; Porter, J. William

    A sensitive technique for assessing conformity on a ratio scale was designed and tested in one group of 18 naive subjects and one group of 20 volunteer subjects, 10 of whom were naive and 10 of whom were informed. All subjects were undergraduates from Thomas More College (New York). The experiment required subjects to observe a line briefly…

  11. 34 CFR 668.172 - Financial ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Financial ratios. 668.172 Section 668.172 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Financial Responsibility § 668.172 Financial... program authorized by the HEA only if— (i) In the notes to the institution's audited financial...

  12. 34 CFR 668.172 - Financial ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Financial ratios. 668.172 Section 668.172 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Financial Responsibility § 668.172 Financial... program authorized by the HEA only if— (i) In the notes to the institution's audited financial...

  13. An Experiment in Teaching Ratio and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adjiage, Robert; Pluvinage, Francois

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes our analysis of the complexity of ratio problems at Grades 6 and 7, and reports a two-year experiment related to the teaching and learning of rational numbers and proportionality in these grades. Two classes were followed and observed. Part of the teaching material was common to both classes, mainly the objectives and the…

  14. The Prigogine-Defay ratio revisited.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Jrn W P; Gutzow, Ivan

    2006-11-14

    One of the basic characteristics of the glass transition, the Prigogine-Defay ratio, connecting jumps of the thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal compressibility, and isobaric specific heat capacity in vitrification is rederived in the framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes employing the order-parameter concept introduced by de Donder and van Rysselberghe [Thermodynamic Theory of Affinity (Stanford University Press, Stanford, 1936)]. In our analysis, glass-forming liquids and glasses are described by only one structural order parameter. However, in contrast to previous approaches to the derivation of this ratio, the process of vitrification is treated not in terms of Simon's simplified model [Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem. 203, 219 (1931)] as a freezing-in process proceeding at some sharp temperature, the glass transition temperature T(g), but in some finite temperature interval accounting appropriately for the nonequilibrium character of vitrifying systems in this temperature range. As the result of the theoretical analysis, we find, in particular, that the Prigogine-Defay ratio generally has to have values larger than 1 for vitrification in cooling processes. Quantitative estimates of the Prigogine-Defay ratio are given utilizing a mean-field lattice-hole model of glass-forming melts. Some further consequences are derived concerning the behavior of thermodynamic coefficients, in particular, of Young's modulus in vitrification. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with experimental data. PMID:17115769

  15. Male pygmy hippopotamus influence offspring sex ratio

    PubMed Central

    Saragusty, Joseph; Hermes, Robert; Hofer, Heribert; Bouts, Tim; Göritz, Frank; Hildebrandt, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-determining fetal sex is against the random and equal opportunity that both conceptus sexes have by nature. Yet, under a wide variety of circumstances, populations shift their birth sex ratio from the expected unity. Here we show, using fluorescence in situ hybridization, that in a population of pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) with 42.5% male offspring, males bias the ratio of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa in their ejaculates, resulting in a 0.4337±0.0094 (mean±s.d.) proportion of Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa. Three alternative hypotheses for the shifted population sex ratio were compared: female counteract male, female indifferent, or male and female in agreement. We conclude that there appears little or no antagonistic sexual conflict, unexpected by prevailing theories. Our results indicate that males possess a mechanism to adjust the ratio of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa in the ejaculate, thereby substantially expanding currently known male options in sexual conflict. PMID:22426218

  16. Flowmeter determines mix ratio for viscous adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.

    1967-01-01

    Flowmeter determines mix ratio for continuous flow mixing machine used to produce an adhesive from a high viscosity resin and aliphatic amine hardener pumped through separate lines to a rotary blender. The flowmeter uses strain gages in the two flow paths and monitors their outputs with appropriate instrumentation.

  17. A Ratio Scale Measurement of Conformity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beins, Bernard C.; Porter, J. William

    1989-01-01

    Research with 38 undergraduates studied a technique for assessing conformity on a ratio scale and variables used to analyze normative and information factors. Computer presentation of the statistics and storage of responses allows assessment of discrepancies between actual line length and length of the reproductions made with/without peer…

  18. IKONOS Signal-to-Noise Ratio Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanoni, Vicki; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation focuses on the differences in Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) between IKONOS imagery with and without Modulation Transfer Function Correction (MTFC). The researchers used a simulated scene to evaluate the effects of MTFC on SNR. They also used four very uniform IKONOS scenes, two of Antarctica, one of Ivanpah, CA, and one of Mali to estimate SNR.

  19. Developing Ratio Concepts: An Asian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Jane-Jane; Watanabe, Tad; Cai, Jinfa

    2004-01-01

    The concepts of ratio and proportion are among the most important topics in school mathematics, especially at the middle school level. However, studies have repeatedly shown that most middle school students have difficulties with these concepts (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics 2000). This article includes ideas and examples used by…

  20. The standardized mortality ratio and life expectancy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S P; Hardy, R J; Wen, C P

    1992-04-01

    This paper develops a theoretical relation between the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and the expected years of life and establishes a regression equation for easy conversion between these two statistics. The mathematical expression of the derived relation is an approximation, requiring an assumption of constant age-specific mortality ratios. It underestimates the "true" value calculated based on life table technique when the age-specific mortality ratios increase with age. This equation provides a conservative method to estimate the expected years of life for cohort mortality studies and facilitates an assessment of the impact of work-related factors on the length of life of the worker. It also allows one to convert the SMR to life expectancy in smaller studies whose sole objective is to determine the SMR in a working population. A 1% decrease (or increase) in the standardized mortality ratio will result in 0.1373 years increased (or decreased) life expectancy based on white male data for the US population. Furthermore, with data from 14 large oil refinery and chemical worker cohorts of white males, the "derived" expected years of life based on the regression equation closely predicts the corresponding value calculated using a standard life table technique. This statistical equation is expected to have practical applications when used in conjunction with the SMR to provide an approximate measure of life expectancy, a term and statistic familiar to most lay people. PMID:1595682

  1. Male pygmy hippopotamus influence offspring sex ratio.

    PubMed

    Saragusty, Joseph; Hermes, Robert; Hofer, Heribert; Bouts, Tim; Göritz, Frank; Hildebrandt, Thomas B

    2012-01-01

    Pre-determining fetal sex is against the random and equal opportunity that both conceptus sexes have by nature. Yet, under a wide variety of circumstances, populations shift their birth sex ratio from the expected unity. Here we show, using fluorescence in situ hybridization, that in a population of pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) with 42.5% male offspring, males bias the ratio of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa in their ejaculates, resulting in a 0.4337±0.0094 (mean±s.d.) proportion of Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa. Three alternative hypotheses for the shifted population sex ratio were compared: female counteract male, female indifferent, or male and female in agreement. We conclude that there appears little or no antagonistic sexual conflict, unexpected by prevailing theories. Our results indicate that males possess a mechanism to adjust the ratio of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa in the ejaculate, thereby substantially expanding currently known male options in sexual conflict. PMID:22426218

  2. 34 CFR 668.172 - Financial ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Financial ratios. 668.172 Section 668.172 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Financial Responsibility § 668.172 Financial... program authorized by the HEA only if— (i) In the notes to the institution's audited financial...

  3. Giving More Realistic Definitions of Trigonometric Ratios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Pramode Ranjan

    2012-01-01

    Trigonometry is a well known branch of Mathematics. The study of trigonometry is of great importance in surveying, astronomy, navigation, engineering, and in different branches of science. This paper reports on the discovery of flaws in the traditional definitions of trigonometric ratios of an angle, which (in most cases) make use of the most…

  4. Disproportionate sex ratios of wolf pups

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    1975-01-01

    Males comprised 66 percent of wild wolf (Canis lupus) pups from a saturated, high-density wolf range in northeastern Minnesota, possibly reflecting disproportionate conception of males. Packs from areas of lower wolf density in other areas of Minnesota had equal sex ratios of pups or a disproportionate number of female pups. Captive wolves showed a slight preponderance of male pups.

  5. Branching ratios of b-flavored mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Fajfer, S.; Tadic, D.

    1986-02-01

    The branching ratios of b-flavored mesons are investigated in a dynamical framework based on current algebra modified for the meson moment dependence. Matrix elements are calculated using quark models. A comparison is made with results obtained in separable approximation.

  6. Ratio method of measuring $w$ boson mass

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Feng; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation describes an alternative method of measuring the W boson mass in D0 experiment. Instead of extracting M{sub W} from the fitting of W {yields} e{nu} fast Monte Carlo simulations to W {yields} e{nu} data as in the standard method, we make the direct fit of transverse mass between W {yields} e{nu} data and Z {yields} ee data. One of the two electrons from Z boson is treated as a neutrino in the calculation of transverse mass. In ratio method, the best fitted scale factor corresponds to the ratio of W and Z boson mass (M{sub W}/M{sub Z}). Given the precisely measured Z boson mass, W mass is directly fitted from W {yields} e{nu} and Z {yields} ee data. This dissertation demonstrates that ratio method is a plausible method of measuring the W boson mass. With the 1 fb{sup -1} D0 Run IIa dataset, ratio method gives M{sub W} = 80435 {+-} 43(stat) {+-} 26(sys) MeV.

  7. 75 FR 79286 - Designated Reserve Ratio

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... sector showed signs of stabilization after the expiration of Federal tax credits, but recent concerns... a strategy for assessment rates and dividends (the October NPR).\\7\\ \\7\\ 75 FR 66262 (Oct. 27, 2010... reserve ratio reaches 1.35 percent by September 30, 2020, as required by Dodd-Frank. 75 FR 66293 (Oct....

  8. Sex ratio manipulation and selection for attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Burley, N

    1981-02-13

    Laboratory experiments performed on a monogamous estrildid, the zebra finch (Poephila guttata), indicate that sex ratio of offspring is affected by non-genetic markers (colored plastic leg bands) that vary in attractiveness to birds. Results suggest that natural selection favors individuals that produce offspring of the sex of the more attractive parent within a breeding pair. PMID:17776654

  9. Thermal evolution and Urey ratio of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, A.-C.; Tosi, N.; Grott, M.; Breuer, D.

    2015-05-01

    The upcoming InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) mission, to be launched in 2016, will carry out the first in situ Martian heat flux measurement, thereby providing an important baseline to constrain the present-day heat budget of the planet and, in turn, the thermal and chemical evolution of its interior. The surface heat flux can be used to constrain the amount of heat-producing elements present in the interior if the Urey ratio (Ur)—the planet's heat production rate divided by heat loss—is known. We used numerical simulations of mantle convection to model the thermal evolution of Mars and determine the present-day Urey ratio for a variety of models and parameters. We found that Ur is mainly sensitive to the efficiency of mantle cooling, which is associated with the temperature dependence of the viscosity (thermostat effect), and to the abundance of long-lived radiogenic isotopes. If the thermostat effect is efficient, as expected for the Martian mantle, assuming typical solar system values for the thorium-uranium ratio and a bulk thorium concentration, simulations show that the present-day Urey ratio is approximately constant, independent of model parameters. Together with an estimate of the average surface heat flux as determined by InSight, models of the amount of heat-producing elements present in the primitive mantle can be constrained.

  10. Measuring Poisson Ratios at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boozon, R. S.; Shepic, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    Simple extensometer ring measures bulges of specimens in compression. New method of measuring Poisson's ratio used on brittle ceramic materials at cryogenic temperatures. Extensometer ring encircles cylindrical specimen. Four strain gauges connected in fully active Wheatstone bridge self-temperature-compensating. Used at temperatures as low as liquid helium.

  11. Measuring Isotope Ratios Across the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Chris R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios in C, H, N, O and S are powerful indicators of a wide variety of planetary geophysical processes that can identify origin, transport, temperature history, radiation exposure, atmospheric escape, environmental habitability and biology [1]. For the Allan Hills 84001 meteorite, for example, the (sup 1)(sup 3)C/(sup 1)(sup 2)C ratio identifies it as a Mars (SNC) meteorite; the ??K/??Ar ratio tells us the last time the rock cooled to solid, namely 4 Gya; isotope ratios in (sup 3)He, (sup 2)(sup 1)Ne and (sup 3)?Ar show it was in space (cosmic ray exposure) for 10-20 million years; (sup 1)?C dating that it sat in Antarctica for 13,000 years before discovery; and clumped isotope analysis of (sup 1)?O(sup 1)(sup 3)C(sup 1)?O in its carbonate that it was formed at 18+/-4 ?C in a near-surface aqueous environment [2]. Solar System Formation

  12. On logarithmic ratio quantities and their units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Ian; Morfey, Christopher

    2005-08-01

    The use of special units for logarithmic ratio quantities is reviewed. The neper is used with a natural logarithm (logarithm to the base e) to express the logarithm of the amplitude ratio of two pure sinusoidal signals, particularly in the context of linear systems where it is desired to represent the gain or loss in amplitude of a single-frequency signal between the input and output. The bel, and its more commonly used submultiple, the decibel, are used with a decadic logarithm (logarithm to the base 10) to measure the ratio of two power-like quantities, such as a mean square signal or a mean square sound pressure in acoustics. Thus two distinctly different quantities are involved. In this review we define the quantities first, without reference to the units, as is standard practice in any system of quantities and units. We show that two different definitions of the quantity power level, or logarithmic power ratio, are possible. We show that this leads to two different interpretations for the meaning and numerical values of the units bel and decibel. We review the question of which of these alternative definitions is actually used, or is used by implication, by workers in the field. Finally, we discuss the relative advantages of the alternative definitions.

  13. Fission Product Ratios as Treaty Monitoring Discriminants

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Harry S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Arthur, Richard J.

    2008-05-15

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is currently under construction. The IMS is intended for monitoring of nuclear explosions. The radionuclide branch of the IMS monitors the atmosphere for short-lived radioisotopes indicative of a nuclear weapon test, and includes field collection and measurement stations, as well as laboratories to provide reanalysis of the most important samples and a quality control function. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington hosts the United States IMS laboratory, with the designation “RL16.” Since acute reactor containment failures and chronic reactor leakage may also produce similar isotopes, it is tempting to compute ratios of detected isotopes to determine the relevance of an event to the treaty or agreement in question. In this paper we will note several shortcomings of simple isotopic ratios: (1) fractionation of different chemical species, (2) difficulty in comparing isotopes within a single element, (3) the effect of unknown decay times. While these shortcomings will be shown in the light of an aerosol sample, several of the problems extend to xenon isotopic ratios. The result of the difficulties listed above is that considerable human expertise will be required to convert a simple mathematical ratio into a criterion which will reliably categorize an event as ‘reactor’ or ‘weapon’.

  14. Low Poisson Ratios in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, B. R.; Abers, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    The growing capability to measure seismic velocities in subduction zones has led to an unusual observation: VP/VS ratios as low as 1.65 with VS ~ 4.7 km/s. This is difficult to explain because most minerals have VP/VS ratios exceeding 1.75, and some of the likely alteration phases, like antigorite, clinohumite and chlorite have high VP/VS ratios. Here we explore how these unusually low VP/VS ratios might be produced, using three methods. 1. Velocity anisotropy was calculated for deformed peridotite, using the Christoffel equation and crystal preferred orientations (CPOs) reported in the literature. Peridotite with ‘Type-A’ olivine CPOs can reproduce the observed values for VP/VS1, but not VP/VS2, and only at temperatures <1000°C; other types of olivine CPOs yield VP/VS1 > 1.73. Anisotropy may be effective in situations where measurements of Vs are dominated by the fast, first-arriving signal, as may be the case in some local tomography studies. 2. Isotropic velocities were calculated for rocks other than peridotite. Although the presence of free quartz produces low VP/VS, it requires extensive SiO2 metasomatism, produces rocks too buoyant to remain in the wedge, is stable only over a narrow 1000-1342°C temperature interval at 3 GPa, and yields VS that are too slow. Brucite and talc are also too slow. Less SiO2 metasomatism produces orthopyroxene, and this yields peridotite with appropriate VP/VS ratios, but only at 600-900°C and only for pure enstatite, not the Mg# 93-95 expected. 3. Mineralogy was calculated as a function of P & T for a range of rock compositions (including metasomatized peridotite, igneous rocks, and sediment) using Perple_X, and velocity anisotropy calculations were made using the Christoffel equation and typical crystal preferred orientations for the constituent phases. Metasomatized mantle containing talc can produce the appropriate VP/VS ratios and VS at 600°C as can mantle with mica + amphibole + pyroxene at 800°C. At 1000°C, no calculated velocities were found that match those observed. Thus, the unusually low VP/VS ratios observed in some subduction zones can be explained as the result of metasomatized peridotite with “Type-A” olivine CPOs at temperatures <1000°C.

  15. Central Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Touchard, Arturo; Somers, Virend K.; Olson, Lyle J.; Caples, Sean M.

    2009-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (HF), an exceedingly common and costly disease, is frequently seen in association with central sleep apnea (CSA), which often manifests as a periodic breathing rhythm referred to as Cheyne-Stokes respiration. CSA has historically been considered to be a marker of heart disease, since improvement in cardiac status is often associated with the attenuation of CSA. However, this mirroring of HF and CSA may suggest bidirectional importance to their relationship. In fact, observational data suggest that CSA, associated with repetitive oxyhemoglobin desaturations and surges in sympathetic neural activity, may be of pathophysiologic significance in HF outcomes. In light of the disappointing results from the first large trial assessing therapy with continuous positive airway pressure in patients with CSA and HF, further large-scale interventional trials will be needed to assess the role, if any, of CSA treatment on the outcomes of patients with HF. This review will discuss epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic considerations of CSA in the setting of HF. PMID:18574295

  16. Mother's occupation and sex ratio at birth

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many women are working outside of the home, occupying a multitude of jobs with varying degrees of responsibilities and levels of psychological stress. We investigated whether different job types in women are associated with child sex at birth, with the hypothesis that women in job types, which are categorized as "high psychological stress" jobs, would be more likely to give birth to a daughter than a son, as females are less vulnerable to unfavourable conditions during conception, pregnancy and after parturition, and are less costly to carry to term. Methods We investigated the effects of mother's age, maternal and paternal job type (and associated psychological stress levels) and paternal income on sex ratio at birth. Our analyses were based on 16,384 incidences of birth from a six-year (2000 to 2005 inclusive) childbirth dataset from Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge, UK. We obtained a restricted data set from Addenbrooke's hospital with: maternal age, maternal and paternal occupations, and whether or not the child was first-born. Results Women in job types that were categorized as "high stress" were more likely to give birth to daughters, whereas women in job types that were categorized as "low stress" had equal sex ratios or a slight male bias in offspring. We also investigated whether maternal age, and her partner's income could be associated with reversed offspring sex ratio. We found no association between mother's age, her partner's job stress category or partner income on child sex. However, there was an important interaction between job stress category and partner income in some of the analyses. Partner income appears to attenuate the association between maternal job stress and sex ratios at moderate-income levels, and reverse it at high-income levels. Conclusions To our knowledge this is the first report on the association between women's job type stress categories and offspring sex ratio in humans, and the potential mitigating effect of their partners' income. PMID:20492728

  17. CHARACTERIZING TRITIUM WASTE USING HELIUM RATIOS

    SciTech Connect

    Ovink, R.W.; McMahon, W.J.; Borghese, J.V.; Olsen, K.B.

    2003-02-27

    When routine sampling revealed greatly elevated tritium levels (3.14 x 105 Bq/L [8.5-million pCi/liter]) in the groundwater near a solid waste landfill at the Hanford Site, an innovative technique was used to assess the extent of the plume. Helium-3/helium-4 ratios, relative to ambient air-in-soil gas samples, were used to identify the tritium source and initially delineate the extent of the groundwater tritium plume. This approach is a modification of a technique developed in the late 1960s to age-date deep ocean water as part of the GEOSECS ocean monitoring program. Poreda, et al. (1) and Schlosser, et al. (2) applied this modified technique to shallow aquifers. A study was also conducted to demonstrate the concept of using helium-3 as a tool to locate vadose zone sources of tritium and tracking groundwater tritium plumes at Hanford (3). Seventy sampling points were installed around the perimeter and along four transects downgradient of the burial ground. Soil gas samples were collected, analyzed for helium isotopes, and helium-3/helium-4 ratios were calculated for these 70 points. The helium ratios indicated a vadose zone source of tritium along the northern edge of the burial ground that is likely the source of tritium in the groundwater. The helium ratios also indicate the groundwater plume is traveling east-northeast from the burial ground and that no up-gradient tritium sources are affecting the burial ground. Based on the helium ratio results, six downgradient groundwater sampling locations were identified to verify the tritium plume extent and groundwater tritium concentrations. The tritium results from the initial groundwater samples confirmed that elevated helium ratios were indicative of tritium contamination in the local groundwater. The measurement of helium isotopes in soil gas provided a rapid and cost- effective technique to define the shape and extent of tritium contamination from the burial ground. Using this soil gas sampling approach, the project team was able to identify areas where elevated tritium existed in groundwater without going to the time and expense of conducting conventional groundwater characterization sampling. The savings from this characterization approach were $1.4 million.

  18. Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    1989-11-01

    The Central African Republic contains 242,000 square miles, which rolling terrain almost 2000 feet above sea level. The climate is tropical, and it has a population of 2.8 million people with a 2.5% growth rate. There are more than 80 ethnic groups including Baya 34%, Banda 28%, Sara 10%, Mandja 9%, Mboum 9%, and M'Baka 7%. The religions are traditional African 35%, protestant 25%, Roman Catholic 25%, and Muslim 15%, and the languages are French and Sangho. The infant mortality rate is 143/1000, with expectancy at 49 years and a 40% literacy rate. The work force of 1 million is 70% agricultural, industry 6% and commerce and service 6% and government 3%. The government consists of a president assisted by cabinet ministers and a single party. Natural resources include diamonds, uranium, timber, gold, and oil, and major industries are beverages, textiles, and soap. Agricultural products feature coffee, cotton, peanuts, tobacco, food crops and livestock. Most of the population live in rural areas and most of the 80 ethnic groups have their own language. This is one of the world's least developed countries, with a per capita income of $375/year. The main problems with development are the poor transportation infrastructure, and the weak internal and international marketing systems. The US and various international organizations have aided in agriculture development, health programs, and family planning. US investment is mainly in diamond and gold mining, and although oil drilling has been successful it is not economically feasible at current prices. PMID:12178020

  19. Central and southern Africa

    SciTech Connect

    McGrew, H.J.

    1981-10-01

    Exploration in central and southern Africa continued to expand during 1980. The greatest concentration of activity was in Nigeria. However, there was considerable increase in the level of exploratory work in Cameroon and Congo. Significant new finds have been made in Ivory Coast. Geological and geophysical activity was carried out in 18 of the countries, with those in the western part having the largest share. Seismic work involved 225 party months of operation. Most of this time was spent on land, but marine operations accounted for 73,389 km of new control. Gravity and magnetic data were recorded during the marine surveys, and several large aeromagnetic projects were undertaken to obtain a total of 164,498 line km of data. Exploratory and development drilling accounted for a total of 304 wells and 2,605,044 ft (794,212 m) of hole. The 92 exploratory wells that were drilled resulted in 47 oil and gas discoveries. In development drilling 89% of the 212 wells were successful. At the end of the year, 27 exploratory wells were underway, and 34 development wells were being drilled for a total of 61. Oil production from the countries that this review covers was 918,747,009 bbl in 1980, a drop of about 9% from the previous year. Countries showing a decline in production were Nigeria, Gabon, Cabinda, and Zaire. Increases were recorded in Cameroon, Congo, and Ghana. A new country was added to the list of producers when production from the Belier field in Ivory Coast came on stream. 33 figures, 15 tables.

  20. OFFSPRING SEX RATIO IN DEER MALE REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY AND OFFSPRING SEX RATIO IN ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary sex ratio of the family Cervidae may vary at conception and/or birth from an expected 50:50 (males:females). Fertilization by X- or Y- chromosome-bearing sperm (referred to simply as X- and Y- sperm) ultimately controls the sex of offspring; however, alteration of the fetal sex ratio co...

  1. Method for nanomachining high aspect ratio structures

    DOEpatents

    Yun, Wenbing; Spence, John; Padmore, Howard A.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Howells, Malcolm R.

    2004-11-09

    A nanomachining method for producing high-aspect ratio precise nanostructures. The method begins by irradiating a wafer with an energetic charged-particle beam. Next, a layer of patterning material is deposited on one side of the wafer and a layer of etch stop or metal plating base is coated on the other side of the wafer. A desired pattern is generated in the patterning material on the top surface of the irradiated wafer using conventional electron-beam lithography techniques. Lastly, the wafer is placed in an appropriate chemical solution that produces a directional etch of the wafer only in the area from which the resist has been removed by the patterning process. The high mechanical strength of the wafer materials compared to the organic resists used in conventional lithography techniques with allows the transfer of the precise patterns into structures with aspect ratios much larger than those previously achievable.

  2. The Story behind the Bowen Ratio.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, J. M.

    1995-12-01

    Ira Sprague Bowen (1898-1973) was a prominent astrophysicist during the twentieth century. In his impressive oeuvre of work over the 50-year span (1920-70), there appears a lone contribution to the geophysical sciences on the subject of evaporation and conduction from water surfaces. This theoretical development led to an expression for the ratio of heat conduction to evaporative flux at the air-water interface, labeled the Bowen ratio by Harald Sverdrup in the early 1940s. The circumstances that led to this contribution are examined with attention to the character of education and research at the California Institute of Technology during the 1920s. Bowen was unaware of the important precedent work in meteorology and fluid dynamics that is also reviewed.

  3. The HNC/HCN ratio in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Dickens, J. E.; Lovell, A. J.; Schloerb, F. P.; Senay, M.; Bergin, E. A.; Jewitt, D.; Matthews, H. E.; Ferris, J. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The abundance ratio of the isomers HCN and HNC has been investigated in comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) through observations of the J = 4-3 rotational transitions of both species for heliocentric distances 0.93 < r < 3 AU, both pre- and post-perihelion. After correcting for the optical depth of the stronger HCN line, we find that the column density ratio of HNC/HCN in our telescope beam increases significantly as the comet approaches the Sun. We compare this behavior to that predicted from an ion-molecule chemical model and conclude that the HNC is produced in significant measure by chemical processes in the coma; i.e., for comet Hale-Bopp, HNC is not a parent molecule sublimating from the nucleus.

  4. Econometric models for predicting confusion crop ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umberger, D. E.; Proctor, M. H.; Clark, J. E.; Eisgruber, L. M.; Braschler, C. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    Results for both the United States and Canada show that econometric models can provide estimates of confusion crop ratios that are more accurate than historical ratios. Whether these models can support the LACIE 90/90 accuracy criterion is uncertain. In the United States, experimenting with additional model formulations could provide improved methods models in some CRD's, particularly in winter wheat. Improved models may also be possible for the Canadian CD's. The more aggressive province/state models outperformed individual CD/CRD models. This result was expected partly because acreage statistics are based on sampling procedures, and the sampling precision declines from the province/state to the CD/CRD level. Declining sampling precision and the need to substitute province/state data for the CD/CRD data introduced measurement error into the CD/CRD models.

  5. Signal-to-noise ratio determination circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deerkoski, L. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) determination of an input is described, having signal components within a given frequency range and noise components, without actual measurement of the noise components. Bandpass limiter having a constant signal plus noise output level is connected to the output of the first filter, the signal-to-noise ratio of the input to the bandpass limiter being linearly related to the dbm level of signal components at the output. Calibration is connected to the bandpass limiter and is responsive to the signal components at the output to derive the SNR of the input to the determination circuit. The SNR determination circuit is disclosed for use in a diversity receiver having a plurality of input channels.

  6. Maternal transmission, sex ratio distortion, and mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Steve J.; Hodson, Christina N.; Hamilton, Phineas T.; Opit, George P.; Gowen, Brent E.

    2015-01-01

    In virtually all multicellular eukaryotes, mitochondria are transmitted exclusively through one parent, usually the mother. In this short review, we discuss some of the major consequences of uniparental transmission of mitochondria, including deleterious effects in males and selection for increased transmission through females. Many of these consequences, particularly sex ratio distortion, have well-studied parallels in other maternally transmitted genetic elements, such as bacterial endosymbionts of arthropods. We also discuss the consequences of linkage between mitochondria and other maternally transmitted genetic elements, including the role of cytonuclear incompatibilities in maintaining polymorphism. Finally, as a case study, we discuss a recently discovered maternally transmitted sex ratio distortion in an insect that is associated with extraordinarily divergent mitochondria. PMID:25870270

  7. True gender ratios and stereotype rating norms.

    PubMed

    Garnham, Alan; Doehren, Sam; Gygax, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    We present a study comparing, in English, perceived distributions of men and women in 422 named occupations with actual real world distributions. The first set of data was obtained from previous a large-scale norming study, whereas the second set was mostly drawn from UK governmental sources. In total, real world ratios for 290 occupations were obtained for our perceive vs. real world comparison, of which 205 were deemed to be unproblematic. The means for the two sources were similar and the correlation between them was high, suggesting that people are generally accurate at judging real gender ratios, though there were some notable exceptions. Beside this correlation, some interesting patterns emerged from the two sources, suggesting some response strategies when people complete norming studies. We discuss these patterns in terms of the way real world data might complement norming studies in determining gender stereotypicality. PMID:26257681

  8. Prolactin/cortisol ratio in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zoli, Angelo; Ferlisi, Ester Maria; Lizzio, Marco; Altomonte, Lorenzo; Mirone, Luisa; Barini, Angela; Scuderi, Flavia; Bartolozzi, F; Magaro, Mario

    2002-06-01

    Prolactin (PRL) and glucocorticoids are hormones involved in the regulation of the immune system. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory condition that presents a diurnal rhythm of disease activity. PRL/cortisol ratio, and IL-1beta and TNF-alpha levels were determined in patients with RA and in control subjects at 0600, 1000, 1400, 1800, 2200, and 0200 hours. In patients with RA we observed higher PRL/cortisol ratio at 0200 hours, whereas IL-1beta and TNF-alpha reached their highest serum levels at 0200 and 0600 hours. In patients with RA we observed an imbalance in favor of proinflammatory hormones as opposed to levels of antiinflammatory hormones during nocturnal hours together with increased levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha of the diurnal rhythm of disease activity. PMID:12114312

  9. The HNC/HCN ratio in comets.

    PubMed

    Irvine, W M; Dickens, J E; Lovell, A J; Schloerb, F P; Senay, M; Bergin, E A; Jewitt, D; Matthews, H E

    1997-01-01

    The abundance ratio of the isomers HCN and HNC has been investigated in comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) through observations of the J = 4-3 rotational transitions of both species for heliocentric distances 0.93 < r < 3 AU, both pre- and post-perihelion. After correcting for the optical depth of the stronger HCN line, we find that the column density ratio of HNC/HCN in our telescope beam increases significantly as the comet approaches the Sun. We compare this behavior to that predicted from an ion-molecule chemical model and conclude that the HNC is produced in significant measure by chemical processes in the coma; i.e., for comet Hale-Bopp, HNC is not a parent molecule sublimating from the nucleus. PMID:11543322

  10. Gyromagnetic ratio of a massive body.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. M.; Tiomno, J.; Wald, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    It is well known that the gyromagnetic ratio (g factor) of a classical, slowly rotating body whose charge density is proportional to its mass density must be equal to unity. However, if the body is very massive, the spacetime curvature effects of general relativity become important and the result g = 1 is no longer valid. We calculate here the gyromagnetic ratio of a slowly rotating, massive shell with uniform charge density. When the shell is large compared with the Schwarzschild radius we have g = 1, but as the shell becomes more massive the g factor increases. In the limit as the shell approaches its Schwarzschild radius we obtain g approaching 2 (the same value as for an electron).

  11. Low fineness ratio kinetic energy penetrators

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, C.F.; Gogolewski, R.P.; Reaugh, J.E.

    1989-02-01

    We have modeled the penetration process of a low fineness ratio, heavy metal kinetic energy projectile impacting a semi-infinite steel target at and above typical ordnance speeds using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) two-dimensional, finite difference code, GLO. We have also performed ballistic experiments using an LLNL two-stage light gas gun to gather data over a range of impact speeds from 2.0 to 7.5 km/s. On this basis, we have constructed relationships between penetration efficiency (total penetration/projectile length), projectile fineness ratio (projectile length/profile diameter), and projectile impact speed. Furthermore, we have constructed a three-dimensional surface of penetration efficiency for tungsten alloy projectiles impacting semi-infinite steel. From these constructions, it is straightforward to determine minimum kinetic energy requirements at a target for a prespecified level of penetration. 12 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. True gender ratios and stereotype rating norms

    PubMed Central

    Garnham, Alan; Doehren, Sam; Gygax, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    We present a study comparing, in English, perceived distributions of men and women in 422 named occupations with actual real world distributions. The first set of data was obtained from previous a large-scale norming study, whereas the second set was mostly drawn from UK governmental sources. In total, real world ratios for 290 occupations were obtained for our perceive vs. real world comparison, of which 205 were deemed to be unproblematic. The means for the two sources were similar and the correlation between them was high, suggesting that people are generally accurate at judging real gender ratios, though there were some notable exceptions. Beside this correlation, some interesting patterns emerged from the two sources, suggesting some response strategies when people complete norming studies. We discuss these patterns in terms of the way real world data might complement norming studies in determining gender stereotypicality. PMID:26257681

  13. CFD assessment of orifice aspect ratio and mass flow ratio on jet mixing in rectangular ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, D. B.; Smith, C. E.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Isothermal CFD analysis was performed on axially opposed rows of jets mixing with cross flow in a rectangular duct. Laterally, the jets' centerlines were aligned with each other on the top and bottom walls. The focus of this study was to characterize the effects of orifice aspect ratio and jet-to-mainstream mass flow ratio on jet penetration and mixing. Orifice aspect ratios (L/W) of 4-to-1, 2-to-1, and 1-to-1, along with circular holes, were parametrically analyzed. Likewise, jet-to-mainstream mass flow ratios (MR) of 2.0, 0.5, and 0.25 were systematically investigated. The jet-to-mainstream momentum-flux ratio (J) was maintained at 36 for all cases, and the orifice spacing-to-duct height (S/H) was varied until optimum mixing was attained for each configuration. The numerical results showed that orifice aspect ratio (and likewise orifice blockage) had little effect on jet penetration and mixing. Based on mixing characteristics alone, the 4-to-1 slot was comparable to the circular orifice. The 4-to-1 slot has a smaller jet wake which may be advantageous for reducing emissions. However, the axial length of a 4-to-1 slot may be prohibitively long for practical application, especially for MR of 2.0. The jet-to-mainstream mass flow ratio had a more significant effect on jet penetration and mixing. For a 4-to-1 aspect ratio orifice, the design correlating parameter for optimum mixing (C = (S/H)(sq. root J)) varied from 2.25 for a mass flow ratio of 2.0 to 1.5 for a mass flow ratio of 0.25.

  14. Central American Grandparents Raising Grandchildren

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Minkler, Meredith

    2007-01-01

    This study documents the prevalence and profile of Central American grandparents raising grandchildren in the United States of America. Using nationally representative data from the Census 2000 Supplementary Survey, Central American grandparent caregivers are compared with their noncare-giving peers. Results indicate that nationally an estimated…

  15. Theater SBI cost-effectiveness ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1993-11-01

    To address M missiles spaced at intervals longer than the constillation reconstitution time t, the defense needs at the absentee ratio N{sub a} of SBIs to fill the belt plus the M SBIs needed for the intercepts; the resulting cost effectiveness scales as M/(M + N{sub a}). N{sub a} is large and CER small for small ranges and numbers of missiles. For several-hundred missile threats, CERs are greater than unity for ranges of interest.

  16. Polyatomic ions, branching ratios and hot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J. Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    A discussion is given of the reason for the sharp fall-off observed in Dissociative Recombination (DR) cross sections above about 0.1 eV and of the need for accurate branching ratios being used in complex models of molecular ion chemistry. New measurements from TSR have shown that stored ions are not as cold as they were once thought to be and a new experiment facility is presented.

  17. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry in nutrition research

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, A.H.

    1994-12-31

    Many of the biochemical pathways and processes that form the foundation of modern nutrition research was elucidated using stable isotopes as physiological tracers. Since the discovery of stable isotopes, improvements and innovations in mass spectrometry and chromatography have led to greatly expanded applications. This research project was designed to evaluate gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) as a tool for isotopic tracer studies and to delineate the operational parameters for the analysis of {sup 13}C-labeled cholesterol, leucine and {alpha}-ketoisocaproate. The same isotope ratio mass spectrometer was then used as the base instrument for the ratio mass spectrometer was then used as the base instrument for the development of two additional inlet systems: a continuous-flow inlet for the analyses of {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O as CO{sub 2} and a filament inlet for on-line combustion and isotopic analysis of non-volatile organic compounds. Each of these three inlets was evaluated and their utility in nutrition research illustrated. GC/C/IRMS was used to analyze cholesterol, leucine and {alpha}-ketoisocaproate with good accuracy, precision and little isotopic memory. For all three compounds the detection limits achieved well surpassed currently used technologies. For compounds that can be well separated by GC, GC/C/IRMS is a valuable analytical tool. The continuous-flow inlet provided good accuracy and precision for measurements of {sup 13}CO{sub 2} from breath tests and {sup 18}O as CO{sub 2} from total energy expenditure tests. Most importantly, the continuous-flow inlet increased sample throughput by at least a factor of three over conventional analytical techniques. The filament inlet provided accurate and precise {sup 13}C ratio measurements of both natural abundance and enriched standards of non-volatile organic compounds of physiological interest.

  18. Chen’s Double Eyelid Fold Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen-Chia; Tai, Hao-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Background: Double eyelidplasty can construct palpebral folds and enhance beauty perception for Asians with single eyelids. A new palpebral parameter for the quantitative interpretation of surgical outcomes is proposed on the basis of a photometric study of the altered proportions of Asian eyes after double eyelid operation. Methods: A total of 100 Asian adults with single upper eyelids who were satisfied with the enlarged eyes by operation were included in the study. A retrospective measurement of palpebral parameters in the frontal profile both preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively was performed. The proportions of various parameters in the eyebrow–eye aesthetic unit were calculated and analyzed. Results: Double eyelidplasty can augment the vertical dimension of palpebral fissure by 27.9% increase on average. The vertical ratio of palpebral fissure to the eyebrow–eye unit is augmented by 34.4% increase. The vertical ratio of the subunit below double eyelid fold peak to the unit is augmented by 82.6% increase. Conclusions: Double eyelidplasty can substantially enlarge the vertical dimensions of the eyes of Asians with single eyelids. The eyes are perceived to be larger because of the visually assimilated illusion of the superimposed eyelid fold and the relative proportions of the eyebrow–eye unit. The authors propose using a vertical ratio of the subunit below double eyelid fold peak in the eyebrow–eye unit to measure the visually perceived proportion of the eye in the unit. This ratio can be applied clinically for a quantitative evaluation of the surgical outcome after double eyelidplasty. PMID:27200243

  19. Omniclassical Diffusion in Low Aspect Ratio Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick; R.B. White; D.A. Gates

    2004-03-19

    Recently reported numerical results for axisymmetric devices with low aspect ratio A found radial transport enhanced over the expected neoclassical value by a factor of 2 to 3. In this paper, we provide an explanation for this enhancement. Transport theory in toroidal devices usually assumes large A, and that the ratio B{sub p}/B{sub t} of the poloidal to the toroidal magnetic field is small. These assumptions result in transport which, in the low collision limit, is dominated by banana orbits, giving the largest collisionless excursion of a particle from an initial flux surface. However in a small aspect ratio device one may have B{sub p}/B{sub t} {approx} 1, and the gyroradius may be larger than the banana excursion. Here, we develop an approximate analytic transport theory valid for devices with arbitrary A. For low A, we find that the enhanced transport, referred to as omniclassical, is a combination of neoclassical and properly generalized classical effects, which become dominant in the low-A, B{sub p}/B{sub t} {approx} 1 regime. Good agreement of the analytic theory with numerical simulations is obtained.

  20. Activity ratios of thorium daughters in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Toohey, R.E.; Rundo, J.; Sha, J.Y.; Essling, M.A.; Pedersen, J.C.; Slane, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    A computerized method of least squares has been used to analyze the /sup 228/Ac and /sup 212/Pb-/sup 212/Bi and daughter ..gamma..-ray spectra obtained in vivo from 133 former workers at a thorium refinery. In addition, the exhalation rate of /sup 220/Rn was determined for each subject and expressed as pCi of emanating /sup 224/Ra. This value was added to the /sup 212/Pb value determined from the ..gamma..-ray measurements to obtain the total /sup 224/Ra present, and the ratio of /sup 224/Ra to /sup 228/Ac was calculated. Values of the ratio ranged from 0.52 +- 0.32 to 2.1 +- 1.7, with a weighted mean of 0.92 +- 0.17. However, it appears that the ratio observed in a given case is characteristic for that case alone; the computed mean value may not be meaningful. The least squares fitting procedure and the overall calibration of the counting system were validated by measurements of /sup 224/Ra in the lungs of one subject postmortem, compared with results obtained from the same subject in vivo. 6 references, 5 figures.

  1. Poisson's ratio over two centuries: challenging hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, G. Neville

    2013-01-01

    This article explores Poisson's ratio, starting with the controversy concerning its magnitude and uniqueness in the context of the molecular and continuum hypotheses competing in the development of elasticity theory in the nineteenth century, moving on to its place in the development of materials science and engineering in the twentieth century, and concluding with its recent re-emergence as a universal metric for the mechanical performance of materials on any length scale. During these episodes France lost its scientific pre-eminence as paradigms switched from mathematical to observational, and accurate experiments became the prerequisite for scientific advance. The emergence of the engineering of metals followed, and subsequently the invention of composites—both somewhat separated from the discovery of quantum mechanics and crystallography, and illustrating the bifurcation of technology and science. Nowadays disciplines are reconnecting in the face of new scientific demands. During the past two centuries, though, the shape versus volume concept embedded in Poisson's ratio has remained invariant, but its application has exploded from its origins in describing the elastic response of solids and liquids, into areas such as materials with negative Poisson's ratio, brittleness, glass formation, and a re-evaluation of traditional materials. Moreover, the two contentious hypotheses have been reconciled in their complementarity within the hierarchical structure of materials and through computational modelling. PMID:24687094

  2. Kaon production and kaon to pion ratio in Au + Au collisions at s NN=130 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Bonner, B. E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R. V.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S. P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Deng, W. S.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, J. E.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K. J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T. J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J. W.; Henry, T. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu. I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Klyachko, A.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunz, C. L.; Kutuev, R. Kh.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C. P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lebedev, A.; Lednický, R.; Leontiev, V. M.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q. J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; LoCurto, G.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, W. A.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, J.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Messer, M.; Miller, M. L.; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, N. G.; Mitchell, J.; Moiseenko, V. A.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, V.; de Moura, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nelson, J. M.; Nevski, P.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Norman, B.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, S. U.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rai, G.; Rakness, G.; Ravel, O.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reichhold, D.; Reid, J. G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevski, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Rykov, V.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saulys, A. C.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, L. S.; Schüttauf, A.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shestermanov, K. E.; Shimanskii, S. S.; Shvetcov, V. S.; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Struck, C.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Šumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Thomas, J. H.; Thompson, M.; Tikhomirov, V.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; VanderMolen, A. M.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vigdor, S. E.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wang, F.; Ward, H.; Watson, J. W.; Wells, R.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yakutin, A. E.; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zanevski, Y. V.; Zborovský, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, W. M.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zubarev, A. N.; STAR Collaboration

    2004-08-01

    Mid-rapidity transverse mass spectra and multiplicity densities of charged and neutral kaons are reported for Au+Au collisions at sNN=130 GeV at RHIC. The spectra are exponential in transverse mass, with an inverse slope of about 280 MeV in central collisions. The multiplicity densities for these particles scale with the negative hadron pseudo-rapidity density. The charged kaon to pion ratios are K+/π-=0.161±0.002(stat)±0.024(syst) and K-/π-=0.146±0.002(stat)±0.022(syst) for the most central collisions. The K+/π- ratio is lower than the same ratio observed at the SPS while the K-/π- is higher than the SPS result. The ratios are enhanced by about 50% relative to p+p and p¯+p collision data at similar energies.

  3. Controlling centrality in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Nicosia, V.; Criado, R.; Romance, M.; Russo, G.; Latora, V.

    2012-01-01

    Spectral centrality measures allow to identify influential individuals in social groups, to rank Web pages by popularity, and even to determine the impact of scientific researches. The centrality score of a node within a network crucially depends on the entire pattern of connections, so that the usual approach is to compute node centralities once the network structure is assigned. We face here with the inverse problem, that is, we study how to modify the centrality scores of the nodes by acting on the structure of a given network. We show that there exist particular subsets of nodes, called controlling sets, which can assign any prescribed set of centrality values to all the nodes of a graph, by cooperatively tuning the weights of their out-going links. We found that many large networks from the real world have surprisingly small controlling sets, containing even less than 5 – 10% of the nodes. PMID:22355732

  4. Central control of body temperature

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shaun F.

    2016-01-01

    Central neural circuits orchestrate the behavioral and autonomic repertoire that maintains body temperature during environmental temperature challenges and alters body temperature during the inflammatory response and behavioral states and in response to declining energy homeostasis. This review summarizes the central nervous system circuit mechanisms controlling the principal thermoeffectors for body temperature regulation: cutaneous vasoconstriction regulating heat loss and shivering and brown adipose tissue for thermogenesis. The activation of these thermoeffectors is regulated by parallel but distinct efferent pathways within the central nervous system that share a common peripheral thermal sensory input. The model for the neural circuit mechanism underlying central thermoregulatory control provides a useful platform for further understanding of the functional organization of central thermoregulation, for elucidating the hypothalamic circuitry and neurotransmitters involved in body temperature regulation, and for the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches to modulating body temperature and energy homeostasis.

  5. Controlling centrality in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicosia, V.; Criado, R.; Romance, M.; Russo, G.; Latora, V.

    2012-01-01

    Spectral centrality measures allow to identify influential individuals in social groups, to rank Web pages by popularity, and even to determine the impact of scientific researches. The centrality score of a node within a network crucially depends on the entire pattern of connections, so that the usual approach is to compute node centralities once the network structure is assigned. We face here with the inverse problem, that is, we study how to modify the centrality scores of the nodes by acting on the structure of a given network. We show that there exist particular subsets of nodes, called controlling sets, which can assign any prescribed set of centrality values to all the nodes of a graph, by cooperatively tuning the weights of their out-going links. We found that many large networks from the real world have surprisingly small controlling sets, containing even less than 5 - 10% of the nodes.

  6. North Central Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This radar image shows the dramatic landscape in the Phang Hoei Range of north central Thailand, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northeast of the city of Lom Sak. The plateau, shown in green to the left of center, is the area of Phu Kradung National Park. This plateau is a remnant of a once larger plateau, another portion of which is seen along the right side of the image. The plateaus have been dissected by water erosion over thousands of years. Forest areas appear green on the image; agricultural areas and settlements appear as red and blue. North is toward the lower right. The area shown is 38 by 50 kilometers (24 by 31 miles) and is centered at 16.96 degrees north latitude, 101.67 degrees east longitude. Colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted and horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received; blue is C-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture (SIR-C/X-SAR) imaging radar on October 3, 1994, when it flew aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR is a joint mission of the U.S./German and Italian space agencies.

    Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.v.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations, and data processing of X-SAR.

  7. Noise of Embedded High Aspect Ratio Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2011-01-01

    A family of high aspect ratio nozzles were designed to provide a parametric database of canonical embedded propulsion concepts. Nozzle throat geometries with aspect ratios of 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 were chosen, all with convergent nozzle areas. The transition from the typical round duct to the rectangular nozzle was designed very carefully to produce a flow at the nozzle exit that was uniform and free from swirl. Once the basic rectangular nozzles were designed, external features common to embedded propulsion systems were added: extended lower lip (a.k.a. bevel, aft deck), differing sidewalls, and chevrons. For the latter detailed Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were made to predict the thrust performance and to optimize parameters such as bevel length, and chevron penetration and azimuthal curvature. Seventeen of these nozzles were fabricated at a scale providing a 2.13 inch diameter equivalent area throat." ! The seventeen nozzles were tested for far-field noise and a few data were presented here on the effect of aspect ratio, bevel length, and chevron count and penetration. The sound field of the 2:1 aspect ratio rectangular jet was very nearly axisymmetric, but the 4:1 and 8:1 were not, the noise on their minor axes being louder than the major axes. Adding bevel length increased the noise of these nozzles, especially on their minor axes, both toward the long and short sides of the beveled nozzle. Chevrons were only added to the 2:1 rectangular jet. Adding 4 chevrons per wide side produced some decrease at aft angles, but increased the high frequency noise at right angles to the jet flow. This trend increased with increasing chevron penetration. Doubling the number of chevrons while maintaining their penetration decreased these effects. Empirical models of the parametric effect of these nozzles were constructed and quantify the trends stated above." Because it is the objective of the Supersonics Project that future design work be done more by physics-based computations and less by experiments, several codes under development were evaluated against these test cases. Preliminary results show that the RANS-based code JeNo predicts the spectral directivity of the low aspect ratio jets well, but has no capability to predict the non-axisymmetry. An effort to address this limitations, used in the RANS-based code of Leib and Goldstein, overpredicted the impact of aspect ratio. The broadband shock noise code RISN, also limited to axisymmetric assumptions, did a good job of predicting the spectral directivity of underexpanded 2:1 cold jet case but was not as successful on high aspect ratio jets, particularly when they are hot. All results are preliminary because the underlying CFD has not been validated yet. An effort using a Large Eddy Simulation code by Stanford University predicted noise that agreed with experiments to within a few dB.

  8. Planning applications in East Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannah, J. W. (Principal Investigator); Thomas, G. L.; Esparza, F.; Millard, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. This is a study of applications of ERTS data to planning problems, especially as applicable to East Central Florida. The primary method has been computer analysis of digital data, with visual analysis of images serving to supplement the digital analysis. The principal method of analysis was supervised maximum likelihood classification, supplemented by density slicing and mapping of ratios of band intensities. Land-use maps have been prepared for several urban and non-urban sectors. Thematic maps have been found to be a useful form of the land-use maps. Change-monitoring has been found to be an appropriate and useful application. Mapping of marsh regions has been found effective and useful in this region. Local planners have participated in selecting training samples and in the checking and interpretation of results.

  9. Irreversible diesel cycle -- fine tuning of compression ratio and cut-off ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    1998-07-01

    A simplified irreversible model has been proposed for the air-standard Diesel cycle. Global thermal and friction losses have been lumped into an equivalent friction term. Optimization of the cycle has been performed for power output as well as for thermal efficiency with respect to compression ratio and cut-off ratio. The optimum values of these ratios compare well with standard values used in real Diesel engines. The cycle also demonstrates a loop-shaped power-versus-efficiency curve as is exhibited by real heat engines.

  10. 45 CFR 800.203 - Medical loss ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical loss ratio. 800.203 Section 800.203 Public... PROGRAM Premiums, Rating Factors, Medical Loss Ratios, and Risk Adjustment § 800.203 Medical loss ratio. (a) Required medical loss ratio. An MSPP issuer must attain: (1) The medical loss ratio...

  11. Central chemoreceptors: locations and functions.

    PubMed

    Nattie, Eugene; Li, Aihua

    2012-01-01

    Central chemoreception traditionally refers to a change in ventilation attributable to changes in CO2/H(+) detected within the brain. Interest in central chemoreception has grown substantially since the previous Handbook of Physiology published in 1986. Initially, central chemoreception was localized to areas on the ventral medullary surface, a hypothesis complemented by the recent identification of neurons with specific phenotypes near one of these areas as putative chemoreceptor cells. However, there is substantial evidence that many sites participate in central chemoreception some located at a distance from the ventral medulla. Functionally, central chemoreception, via the sensing of brain interstitial fluid H(+), serves to detect and integrate information on (i) alveolar ventilation (arterial PCO2), (ii) brain blood flow and metabolism, and (iii) acid-base balance, and, in response, can affect breathing, airway resistance, blood pressure (sympathetic tone), and arousal. In addition, central chemoreception provides a tonic "drive" (source of excitation) at the normal, baseline PCO2 level that maintains a degree of functional connectivity among brainstem respiratory neurons necessary to produce eupneic breathing. Central chemoreception responds to small variations in PCO2 to regulate normal gas exchange and to large changes in PCO2 to minimize acid-base changes. Central chemoreceptor sites vary in function with sex and with development. From an evolutionary perspective, central chemoreception grew out of the demands posed by air versus water breathing, homeothermy, sleep, optimization of the work of breathing with the "ideal" arterial PCO2, and the maintenance of the appropriate pH at 37°C for optimal protein structure and function. PMID:23728974

  12. Central Chemoreceptors: Locations and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Nattie, Eugene; Li, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Central chemoreception traditionally refers to a change in ventilation attributable to changes in CO2/H+ detected within the brain. Interest in central chemoreception has grown substantially since the previous Handbook of Physiology published in 1986. Initially, central chemoreception was localized to areas on the ventral medullary surface, a hypothesis complemented by the recent identification of neurons with specific phenotypes near one of these areas as putative chemoreceptor cells. However, there is substantial evidence that many sites participate in central chemoreception some located at a distance from the ventral medulla. Functionally, central chemoreception, via the sensing of brain interstitial fluid H+, serves to detect and integrate information on 1) alveolar ventilation (arterial PCO2), 2) brain blood flow and metabolism and 3) acid-base balance, and, in response, can affect breathing, airway resistance, blood pressure (sympathetic tone) and arousal. In addition, central chemoreception provides a tonic ‘drive’ (source of excitation) at the normal, baseline PCO2 level that maintains a degree of functional connectivity among brainstem respiratory neurons necessary to produce eupneic breathing. Central chemoreception responds to small variations in PCO2 to regulate normal gas exchange and to large changes in PCO2 to minimize acid-base changes. Central chemoreceptor sites vary in function with sex and with development. From an evolutionary perspective, central chemoreception grew out of the demands posed by air vs. water breathing, homeothermy, sleep, optimization of the work of breathing with the ‘ideal’ arterial PCO2, and the maintenance of the appropriate pH at 37°C for optimal protein structure and function. PMID:23728974

  13. Stable isotope ratio profiling of testosterone preparations.

    PubMed

    Cawley, Adam; Collins, Michael; Kazlauskas, Rymantas; Handelsman, David J; Heywood, Robert; Longworth, Mitchell; Arenas-Queralt, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is the preferred method of confirming the administration of exogenous testosterone by athletes. This relies on synthetic testosterone preparations being depleted in (13) C compared to natural testosterone. There is concern, however, about the existence of synthetic testosterone products that are unexpectedly (13) C-enriched and which may allow athletes to circumvent the current GC-C-IRMS test. Further to the reported studies of legitimate pharmaceutical-grade testosterone products, a detailed analysis of seized materials from border-level seizures was required to obtain intelligence concerning trends in 'black market' testosterone manufacture and distribution. The sample set collected for this study between 2006 and 2009 inclusive provided a δ(13) C range (n = 266) of -22.9‰ to -32.6‰ with mean and median values of -28.4‰ and -28.6‰, respectively. Within this distribution there were 24 samples (9%) confirmed to have δ(13) C values in the range reported for endogenous urinary steroid metabolites (≥ -25.8‰). The benefit of δ(13) C profiling for testosterone preparations was demonstrated by the ability to identify specific seized products that can be target tested for future intelligence purposes. In addition, the potential of stable hydrogen isotope ratio ((2) H/(1) H; δ(2) H) discrimination to complement δ(13) C analysis was investigated. Methodologies for the determination of δ(2) H values by gas chromatography-thermal conversion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-TC-IRMS) were developed to provide a δ(2) H range (n = 173) of -177‰ to -268‰ with mean and median values of -231‰ and -234‰, respectively. PMID:20967879

  14. Centralized digital control of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Melen, R.E.

    1983-09-01

    In contrasting the title of this paper with a second paper to be presented at this conference entitled Distributed Digital Control of Accelerators, a potential reader might be led to believe that this paper will focus on systems whose computing intelligence is centered in one or more computers in a centralized location. Instead, this paper will describe the architectural evolution of SLAC's computer based accelerator control systems with respect to the distribution of their intelligence. However, the use of the word centralized in the title is appropriate because these systems are based on the use of centralized large and computationally powerful processors that are typically supported by networks of smaller distributed processors.

  15. DPOAE generation dependence on primary frequencies ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botti, Teresa; Sisto, Renata; Moleti, Arturo; D'Amato, Luisa; Sanjust, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Two different mechanisms are responsible for the DPOAE generation. The nonlinear distortion wave-fixed mechanism generates the DPOAE Zero-Latency (ZL) component, as a backward traveling wave from the "overlap" region. Linear reflection of the forward DP wave (IDP) generates the DPOAE Long-Latency (LL) component through a place-fixed mechanism. ZL and LL components add up vectorially to generate the DPOAE recorded in the ear canal. The 2f1 - f2 and 2f2 - f1 DPOAE intensity depends on the stimulus level and on the primary frequency ratio r = f2/f1, where f1 and f2 are the primary stimuli frequencies. Here we study the behavior of the ZL and LL DPOAE components as a function of r by both numerical and laboratory experiments, measuring DPAOEs with an equal primary levels (L1 = L2) paradigm in the range [35, 75] dB SPL, with r ranging in [1.1, 1.45]. Numerical simulations of a nonlocal nonlinear model have been performed without cochlear roughness, to suppress the linear reflection mechanism. In this way the model solution at the base represents the DPOAE ZL component, and the solution at the corresponding DPOAE tonotopic place corresponds to the IDP. This technique has been not effectual to study the 2f2 - f1 DPOAE, as a consequence of its generation mechanism. While the 2f1 - f2 generation place is known to be the tonotopic place x(f2), the 2f2 - f1 DPOAE one has to be assumed basal to its corresponding reflection place. That is because ZL components generated in x(f2) cannot significantly pass through their resonant place. Moreover increasing the ratio r, 2f2 - f1 ZL and LL generation place approach each other, because the overlap region of primary tones decreases. Consequently, the distinction between the two places becomes complicated. DPOAEs have been measured in six young normal-hearing subjects. DPOAE ZL and LL components have been separated by a time-frequency filtering method based on the wavelet transform 1. due to their different phase gradient delay. Amplitude/phase vs ratio and ratio-frequency maps have been analyzed both in numerical and laboratory data. As already observed in animal studies [4], the generation of 2f1 - f2 DPOAE is around the f2 tonotopic place with a maximum around r = 1.2 for the ZL component, while the LL component shows a decreasing trend with r. Instead, 2f2 - f1 DPOAEs show a decreasing trend with r for both ZL and LL components.

  16. Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-minute estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity (RH). Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

  17. Passive High Ratio Sunlight Concentration Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnitsky, A.; Zaban, A.; Zalevsky, Z.

    2013-05-01

    During the day the sun is moving along curved 1-D trajectory across the sky. This is essential a priori information that can be used in order to design passive optics to perform efficient collection of sunlight without tracking after sun's location in the sky. Despite the movement of the sun along its trajectory the optics will collect the energy to the same spatial location where the photo-voltaic cell is positioned. Two novel designs are proposed while the first one is based on waveguides and the second on prisms with high concentration ratio of above 10X. The proposed configurations are validated numerically and experimentally.

  18. Implications of Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays

    2010-11-01

    Theoretically, the transuranic conversion ratio (CR), i.e. the transuranic production divided by transuranic destruction, in a fast reactor can range from near zero to about 1.9, which is the average neutron yield from Pu239 minus 1. In practice, the possible range will be somewhat less. We have studied the implications of transuranic conversion ratio of 0.0 to 1.7 using the fresh and discharge fuel compositions calculated elsewhere. The corresponding fissile breeding ratio ranges from 0.2 to 1.6. The cases below CR=1 (“burners”) do not have blankets; the cases above CR=1 (“breeders”) have breeding blankets. The burnup was allowed to float while holding the maximum fluence to the cladding constant. We graph the fuel burnup and composition change. As a function of transuranic conversion ratio, we calculate and graph the heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; whether the material is “attractive” for direct weapon use using published criteria; the uranium utilization and rate of consumption of natural uranium; and the long-term radiotoxicity after fuel discharge. For context, other cases and analyses are included, primarily once-through light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup (UOX-51). For CR<1, the heat, gamma, and neutron emission increase as material is recycled. The uranium utilization is at or below 1%, just as it is in thermal reactors as both types of reactors require continuing fissile support. For CR>1, heat, gamma, and neutron emission decrease with recycling. The uranium utilization exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. At the system equilibrium, heat and gamma vary by somewhat over an order of magnitude as a function of CR. Isotopes that dominate heat and gamma emission are scattered throughout the actinide chain, so the modest impact of CR is unsurprising. Neutron emitters are preferentially found among the higher actinides, so the neutron emission varies much stronger with CR, about three orders of magnitude.

  19. High aspect ratio, remote controlled pumping assembly

    DOEpatents

    Brown, S.B.; Milanovich, F.P.

    1995-11-14

    A miniature dual syringe-type pump assembly is described which has a high aspect ratio and which is remotely controlled, for use such as in a small diameter penetrometer cone or well packer used in water contamination applications. The pump assembly may be used to supply and remove a reagent to a water contamination sensor, for example, and includes a motor, gearhead and motor encoder assembly for turning a drive screw for an actuator which provides pushing on one syringe and pulling on the other syringe for injecting new reagent and withdrawing used reagent from an associated sensor. 4 figs.

  20. High aspect ratio, remote controlled pumping assembly

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Steve B.; Milanovich, Fred P.

    1995-01-01

    A miniature dual syringe-type pump assembly which has a high aspect ratio and which is remotely controlled, for use such as in a small diameter penetrometer cone or well packer used in water contamination applications. The pump assembly may be used to supply and remove a reagent to a water contamination sensor, for example, and includes a motor, gearhead and motor encoder assembly for turning a drive screw for an actuator which provides pushing on one syringe and pulling on the other syringe for injecting new reagent and withdrawing used reagent from an associated sensor.

  1. Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station (EBBR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2011-02-23

    The energy balance Bowen ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-minute estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity (RH). Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

  2. The fog influence on bit error ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitasek, Jan; Látal, Jan; Vašinek, Vladimir; Hejduk, Stanislav; Liner, Andrej; Papes, Martin; Koudelka, Petr; Ganiyev, Artem

    2012-01-01

    The free space optic links are used in places, where it is very difficult to use optical fiber links. The advantages of free space optic link are a great bit rate, easy and fast installation, unlicensed frequency band. The greatest disadvantage is transmission medium, which it uses in case of FSO link, the atmosphere. The worst influence on FSO link is caused by atmospherical effect called fog. This article deals with the study of fog influence on FSO link and its bit error ratio. The real measurement of BER with artificial generated fog and FSO link was performed. The measurement was done in laboratory conditions. The results are presented in this article.

  3. Sex Ratios at Birth and Environmental Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerchl, Alexander

    The relationship between average monthly air temperature and sex ratios at birth (SRB) was analyzed for children born in Germany during the period 1946-1995. Both the absolute temperature and - more markedly - the monthly temperature deviations from the overall mean were significantly positively correlated with the SRB (P<0.01) when temperatures were time-lagged against the SRB data by -10 or -11months. It is concluded that the sex of the offspring is partially determined by environmental temperatures prior to conception.

  4. Does the Mother or Father Determine the Offspring Sex Ratio? Investigating the Relationship between Maternal Digit Ratio and Offspring Sex Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Beom; Oh, Jin Kyu; Kim, Kwang Taek; Yoon, Sang Jin; Kim, Soo Woong

    2015-01-01

    Objective In mammals, high parental testosterone levels present around the time of conception are thought to skew offspring sex ratio toward sons. The second to fourth digit ratio (digit ratio) is now widely accepted as a negative correlate of prenatal testosterone. Thus, we investigated the association between digit ratio and offspring sex ratio. Methods A total of 508 Korean patients (257 males and 251 females) less than 60 years old who had one or more offspring were prospectively enrolled. The lengths of the 2nd and 4th digits of the right hand were measured by a single investigator using a digital vernier calliper. Next, the patients’ lifetime offspring birth sex ratios were investigated. Results Maternal (rather than paternal) digit ratio was significantly associated with the number of sons (r = -0.153, p = 0.015), number of daughters (r = 0.130, p = 0.039), and offspring sex ratio (r = -0.171, p = 0.007). And, the maternal digit ratio was a significant factor for predicting offspring sex ratio (B = -1.620, p = 0.008) on multiple linear regression analysis. The female patients with a lower digit ratio (< 0.95) were found to have a higher offspring sex ratio (0.609 versus 0.521, p = 0.046) compared to those with a higher digit ratio (≥ 0.95). Furthermore, females in the low digit ratio group have a probability 1.138 greater of having sons than females in the high digit ratio group. Conclusions Maternal digit ratio was negatively associated with offspring sex ratio. Females with a lower digit ratio were more likely to have more male offspring compared to those with a higher digit ratio. Thus, our results suggest that the sex of offspring might be more influenced by maternal rather than paternal factors. PMID:26575995

  5. Glycosaminoglycans of the porcine central nervous system†

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenling; Masuko, Sayaka; Solakyildirim, Kemal; Pu, Dennis; Linhardt, Robert J.; Zhang, Fuming

    2010-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are known to participate in central nervous system processes such as development, cell migration, and neurite outgrowth. In this paper, we report an initial glycomics study on GAGs from porcine central nervous system. GAGs of the porcine central nervous system, brain and spinal cord, were isolated and purified by defating, proteolysis, anion-exchange chromatography and methanol precipitation. The isolated GAG content in brain was 5-times higher than in spinal cord (0.35 mg/g, compared to 0.07 mg/g dry sample). In both tissues, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and heparan sulfate (HS) were the major and the minor GAG. The average molecular weight of CS from brain and spinal cord was 35.5 and 47.1 kDa, respectively, and HS from brain and spinal cord was 56.9 and 34 kDa, respectively. The disaccharide analysis showed that the composition of CS from brain and spinal cords are similar with uronic acid (1→3) 4-O-sulfo-N-acetylgalactosamine residue corresponding to the major disaccharide unit (CS type-A) along with five minor disaccharide units. The major disaccharides of both brain and spinal cord HS were uronic acid (1→4) N-acetylglucosamine and uronic acid (1→4) 6-O-sulfo-N-sulfoglucosamine but their composition of minor disaccharides differed. Analysis by 1H- and two-dimensional-NMR spectroscopy confirmed these disaccharide analyses and provided the glucuronic/iduronic acid ratio. Finally, both purified CS and HS were biotinylated and immobilized on BIAcore SA biochips. Interactions between these GAGs and fibroblast growth factors (FGF1 and FGF2) and sonic hedgehog (Shh) were investigated by surface plasmon resonance. PMID:20954748

  6. Ocean's 16: Optimal protein:RNA ratio has near Redfield nitrogen:phosphorus ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elser, J. J.; Loladze, I.

    2010-12-01

    One of the biosphere’s most intriguing patterns is the near equality of the atomic nitrogen:phosphorus ratio (N:P) found in waters throughout the deep ocean (~16) and its average in plankton in the upper ocean. When Redfield discovered this pattern 75 years ago, he suggested that it is driven by the cellular composition of plankton. However, no theoretical explanation for an N:P ~16 in microorganisms has ever been found. Moreover, recently it has been suggested that N:P ~16 may have no significance for either plankton nor for N/P cycling on geological time scales. Here we show that an N:P ratio of 16 emerges from fundamental biochemical and biomolecular properties: N in amino acids, N and P in nucleotides, and the square root of the ratio of the maximal translation and transcription rates. Our theoretical results are supported by a comprehensive compilation of literature data on microbial protein:rRNA ratios. Thus, the N:P ratio of ~16 appears to correspond to the biochemically optimal protein:RNA ratio for maximal growth rates for both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  7. Prevalence of Low Birth Weight and Obesity in Central Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafiei, M.; Ayatollahi, S. M. T.

    2008-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of low birth weight (LBW) and to document distribution of body mass index (BMI) at birth in Arak (central Iran) neonates of the 10,241 live neonates (5241 boys, 5000 girls, sex ratio 105) born in 2004 in Arak. A birth weight of less than 2500 g was classified as LBW. BMI based on the original supine length and weight…

  8. Prevalence of Low Birth Weight and Obesity in Central Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafiei, M.; Ayatollahi, S. M. T.

    2008-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of low birth weight (LBW) and to document distribution of body mass index (BMI) at birth in Arak (central Iran) neonates of the 10,241 live neonates (5241 boys, 5000 girls, sex ratio 105) born in 2004 in Arak. A birth weight of less than 2500 g was classified as LBW. BMI based on the original supine length and weight

  9. Emission Ratios from SCIAMACHY simultaneous measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystova, Iryna; Richter, Andreas; Wittrock, Folkard; Burrows, John P.; Buchwitz, Michael; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    The spectra of reflected and backscattered solar radiation as measured by SCIAMACHY in nadir observation mode in the UV/visible/near-infrared/short-wave-infrared spectral region contain information on the vertical columns of numerous air pollutants and therefore provide a large-scale perspective on spacious and uncertain pollution sources like biomass burnings. It will be shown that under a number of reasonable assumptions we can obtain a quantitative charac-teristics of biomass burning emissions in terms of emission ratios (ER) using only the averages of the atmospheric gas columns retrieved from the space-based simultaneous measurements. Considering for example the SCIAMACHY carbon monoxide (CO), taken as a reference car-bon component, together with the SCIAMACHY formaldehyde (HCHO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns in the scope of a well established emission quantification method we calcu-late the emission ratios, CO/HCHO and CO/NO2, over large biomass burning events in 2004 (established with the help of the AATSR fire counts product). We show that the calculated ER values are in reasonable agreement with the values obtained locally over similar biomass burning events reported in the literature. In addition, we discuss the relatively large values over the boreal forest fires in Alaska and Siberia, where ER values from local measurements were not yet reported.

  10. The basic reproductive ratio of life

    PubMed Central

    Manapat, Michael L.; Chen, Irene A.; Nowak, Martin A.

    2010-01-01

    Template-directed polymerization of nucleotides is believed to be a pathway for the replication of genetic material in the earliest cells. We assume that activated monomers are produced by prebiotic chemistry. These monomers can undergo spontaneous polymerization, a system that we call “prelife.” Adding template-directed polymerization changes the equilibrium structure of prelife if the rate constants meet certain criteria. In particular, if the basic reproductive ratio of sequences of a certain length exceeds one, then those sequences can attain high abundance. Furthermore, if many sequences replicate, then the longest sequences can reach high abundance even if the basic reproductive ratios of all sequences are less than one. We call this phenomenon “subcritical life.” Subcritical life suggests that sequences long enough to be ribozymes can become abundant even if replication is relatively inefficient. Our work on the evolution of replication has interesting parallels to infection dynamics. Life (replication) can be seen as an infection of prelife. PMID:20034501

  11. Edge ratio and community structure in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafieri, Sonia; Hansen, Pierre; Liberti, Leo

    2010-02-01

    A hierarchical divisive algorithm is proposed for identifying communities in complex networks. To that effect, the definition of community in the weak sense of Radicchi [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 101, 2658 (2004)] is extended into a criterion for a bipartition to be optimal: one seeks to maximize the minimum for both classes of the bipartition of the ratio of inner edges to cut edges. A mathematical program is used within a dichotomous search to do this in an optimal way for each bipartition. This includes an exact solution of the problem of detecting indivisible communities. The resulting hierarchical divisive algorithm is compared with exact modularity maximization on both artificial and real world data sets. For two problems of the former kind optimal solutions are found; for five problems of the latter kind the edge ratio algorithm always appears to be competitive. Moreover, it provides additional information in several cases, notably through the use of the dendrogram summarizing the resolution. Finally, both algorithms are compared on reduced versions of the data sets of Girvan and Newman [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 7821 (2002)] and of Lancichinetti [Phys. Rev. E 78, 046110 (2008)]. Results for these instances appear to be comparable.

  12. Ultra-High Bypass Ratio Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, John K. C.

    1994-01-01

    The jet noise from a 1/15 scale model of a Pratt and Whitney Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) was measured in the United Technology Research Center anechoic research tunnel (ART) under a range of operating conditions. Conditions were chosen to match engine operating conditions. Data were obtained at static conditions and at wind tunnel Mach numbers of 0.2, 0.27, and 0.35 to simulate inflight effects on jet noise. Due to a temperature dependence of the secondary nozzle area, the model nozzle secondary to primary area ratio varied from 7.12 at 100 percent thrust to 7.39 at 30 percent thrust. The bypass ratio varied from 10.2 to 11.8 respectively. Comparison of the data with predictions using the current Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Jet Noise Prediction Method showed that the current prediction method overpredicted the ADP jet noise by 6 decibels. The data suggest that a simple method of subtracting 6 decibels from the SAE Coaxial Jet Noise Prediction for the merged and secondary flow source components would result in good agreement between predicted and measured levels. The simulated jet noise flight effects with wind tunnel Mach numbers up to 0.35 produced jet noise inflight noise reductions up to 12 decibels. The reductions in jet noise levels were across the entire jet noise spectra, suggesting that the inflight effects affected all source noise components.

  13. Finger Length Ratios in Serbian Transsexuals

    PubMed Central

    Vujović, Svetlana; Popović, Srdjan; Mrvošević Marojević, Ljiljana; Ivović, Miomira; Tančić-Gajić, Milina; Stojanović, Miloš; Marina, Ljiljana V.; Barać, Marija; Barać, Branko; Kovačević, Milena; Duišin, Dragana; Barišić, Jasmina; Djordjević, Miroslav L.; Micić, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Atypical prenatal hormone exposure could be a factor in the development of transsexualism. There is evidence that the 2nd and 4th digit ratio (2D : 4D) associates negatively with prenatal testosterone and positively with estrogens. The aim was to assess the difference in 2D : 4D between female to male transsexuals (FMT) and male to female transsexuals (MFT) and controls. We examined 42 MFT, 38 FMT, and 45 control males and 48 control females. Precise measurements were made by X-rays at the ventral surface of both hands from the basal crease of the digit to the tip using vernier calliper. Control male and female patients had larger 2D : 4D of the right hand when compared to the left hand. Control male's left hand ratio was lower than in control female's left hand. There was no difference in 2D : 4D between MFT and control males. MFT showed similar 2D : 4D of the right hand with control women indicating possible influencing factor in embryogenesis and consequently finger length changes. FMT showed the lowest 2D : 4D of the left hand when compared to the control males and females. Results of our study go in favour of the biological aetiology of transsexualism. PMID:24982993

  14. The Log-Ratio Beam Position Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, A.

    2002-12-01

    Bergoz Instrumentation has designed a new Log-Ratio Beam Position Monitor (LRBPM). It can be used to measure position of a single short bunch, a bunch train, successive and repetitive (circulating) bunches/trains. The monitor has four parallel channels with band pass filters and logarithmic demodulating high dynamic range amplifiers. The amplifiers detect the envelopes of the RF-bursts brought about by the pickup signals in the filters. Log-ratio processing and conversion of the pickup axes to X,Y is done using a broadband analog technique. The monitor can be used either in a continuous mode, or Sample&Hold or Track&Hold modes. In the last two modes, the LRBPM can be triggered by the beam signal itself. The accuracy limits coming from an inherent demodulator noise, logarithmic nonlinearity, speed of response, etc. of the amplifiers (Analog Devices) are discussed. An accessory developed to determine the LRBPM center offset and resolution with the present beam signals is described.

  15. Hydraulic system for a ratio change transmission

    DOEpatents

    Kalns, Ilmars

    1981-01-01

    Disclosed is a drive assembly (10) for an electrically powered vehicle (12). The assembly includes a transaxle (16) having a two-speed transmission (40) and a drive axle differential (46) disposed in a unitary housing assembly (38), an oil-cooled prime mover or electric motor (14) for driving the transmission input shaft (42), an adapter assembly (24) for supporting the prime mover on the transaxle housing assembly, and a hydraulic system (172) providing pressurized oil flow for cooling and lubricating the electric motor and transaxle and for operating a clutch (84) and a brake (86) in the transmission to shift between the two-speed ratios of the transmission. The adapter assembly allows the prime mover to be supported in several positions on the transaxle housing. The brake is spring-applied and locks the transmission in its low-speed ratio should the hydraulic system fail. The hydraulic system pump is driven by an electric motor (212) independent of the prime mover and transaxle.

  16. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-06-30

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

  17. Central Fan Integrated Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-12

    This information sheet describes one example of a ventilation system design, a central fan integrated supply (CFIS) system, a mechanical ventilation and pollutant source control to ensure that there is reasonable indoor air quality inside the house.

  18. Central-Office Real Estate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardini, Priscilla

    2003-01-01

    Describes how to upgrade a school district's central-office facilities without incurring taxpayer enmity. Includes case studies from Harford County, Maryland; Orange and Broward Counties, Florida; South Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Mt. Baker, Washington; Chicago, Illinois; and Rochester, New Hampshire. (PKP)

  19. Super Kitchen Centralizes Food Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1975

    1975-01-01

    To centralize food service within the entire Pittsburgh school district, a 90,000-square-foot food service preparation building contains cranes and monorails to move 500-pound capacity vats throughout the kitchen. (Author/MLF)

  20. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  1. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    BERGMAN, T. B.; STEFANSKI, L. D.; SEELEY, P. N.; ZINSLI, L. C.; CUSACK, L. J.

    2012-09-19

    THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

  2. Rehabilitation innovations in Central America.

    PubMed

    Couch, R H

    1993-01-01

    In an extensive qualitative research project sponsored by the Partners of the Americas (32 professional and lay people from Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, Belize, the United States and the Dominican Republic) employment opportunities were examined for disabled youth in Central America. Despite economic and attitudinal barriers field researchers found innovations in financing, special education and rehabilitation programming, job development and job placement alternatives for those who live with disability in Central America. PMID:8486439

  3. Microbial respiration per unit microbial biomass depends on soil litter carbon-to-nitrogen ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohn, M.

    2014-10-01

    Soil microbial respiration is a central process in the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle. In this study I tested the effect of the carbon-to-nitrogen (C : N) ratio of soil litter layers on microbial respiration in absolute terms and per unit microbial biomass C. For this purpose, a global dataset on microbial respiration per unit microbial biomass C - termed the metabolic quotient (qCO2) - was compiled form literature data. It was found that the qCO2 in the soil litter layers was positively correlated with the litter C : N ratio and negatively related with the litter nitrogen (N) concentration. The positive relation between qCO2 and litter C : N ratio resulted from an increase in respiration with the C : N ratio in combination with no significant effect of the litter C : N ratio on the soil microbial biomass C concentration. The results suggest that soil microorganisms respire more C both in absolute terms and per unit microbial biomass C when decomposing N-poor substrate. Thus, the findings indicate that atmospheric N deposition, leading to decreased litter C : N ratios, might decrease microbial respiration in soils.

  4. Co-composting of green waste and food waste at low C/N ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Mathava; Ou, Y.-L.; Lin, J.-G.

    2010-04-15

    In this study, co-composting of food waste and green waste at low initial carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratios was investigated using an in-vessel lab-scale composting reactor. The central composite design (CCD) and response surface method (RSM) were applied to obtain the optimal operating conditions over a range of preselected moisture contents (45-75%) and C/N ratios (13.9-19.6). The results indicate that the optimal moisture content for co-composting of food waste and green waste is 60%, and the substrate at a C/N ratio of 19.6 can be decomposed effectively to reduce 33% of total volatile solids (TVS) in 12 days. The TVS reduction can be modeled by using a second-order equation with a good fit. In addition, the compost passes the standard germination index of white radish seed indicating that it can be used as soil amendment.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Barred & unbarred galaxies N, O abundance ratio (Florido+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florido, E.; Zurita, A.; Perez, I.; Perez-Montero, E.; Coelho, P. R. T.; Gadotti, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    The tables contain nebular emission line fluxes for the central region of 251 barred and 324 unbarred galaxies. The sample contains all spiral face-on galaxies (axial ratio b/a>=0.9) in the SDSS DR-2, with stellar masses larger than 1010 the solar mass, redshift 0.02ratio above 0.043, and signal-to-noise ratio in their corresponding SDSS spectra greater or equal than 10 (in g-band). See Sect. 2 of the paper and Coelho & Gadotti (2011ApJ...743L..13C) for further details about the galaxy sample. (2 data files).

  6. Near infrared hydrogen emission line ratios as diagnostics of the broad emission line region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, Andrea J.; Floyd, David J. E.; Korista, Kirk T.; Webster, Rachel L.; Porter, Ryan L.; Ferland, Gary J.

    2012-07-01

    Broad emission line flux ratios are a powerful diagnostic of the physical conditions of the broad-line region gas in Active Galactic Nuclei. With recent advances in infrared spectroscopy, previously unstudied emission lines provide a new means to investigate the physical nature of the BELR gas. The hydrogen emission lines are particularly sensitive to the upper limits of both the radius from the central ionising source and the number density of the gas. Using an existing subset of near-infrared quasar spectra from the Glikman et al. (2006) sample [1] together with Cloudy photoionization simulations, we confirm the Locally Optimally emitting Cloud (LOC) model's ability to reproduce observed emission line flux ratios. The model is then used to constrain physical conditions for individual sources. The photoionization models show that high number density, low incident flux gas is required to reproduce observed near-infrared hydrogen emission line ratios. We also find that comparison to individual sources, rather than composites, is vital.

  7. Co-composting of green waste and food waste at low C/N ratio.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mathava; Ou, Yan-Liang; Lin, Jih-Gaw

    2010-04-01

    In this study, co-composting of food waste and green waste at low initial carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratios was investigated using an in-vessel lab-scale composting reactor. The central composite design (CCD) and response surface method (RSM) were applied to obtain the optimal operating conditions over a range of preselected moisture contents (45-75%) and C/N ratios (13.9-19.6). The results indicate that the optimal moisture content for co-composting of food waste and green waste is 60%, and the substrate at a C/N ratio of 19.6 can be decomposed effectively to reduce 33% of total volatile solids (TVS) in 12days. The TVS reduction can be modeled by using a second-order equation with a good fit. In addition, the compost passes the standard germination index of white radish seed indicating that it can be used as soil amendment. PMID:20034778

  8. Compressible bubble dynamic simulations with central-upwind schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukouvinis, P.; Gavaises, M.; Georgoulas, A.; Marengo, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of an explicit density-based solver, based on the central-upwind schemes originally suggested by Kurganov, for the simulation of cavitating bubble dynamic flows. Explicit density based solvers are suited for highly dynamic, violent flows, involving large density ratios, as is rather common in cavitating flows. Moreover, the central-upwind schemes have the advantage of avoiding direct evaluation of the Jacobian matrix or estimation of the wave pattern emerging from Euler equations. Second order accuracy can be achieved with TVD MUSCL schemes. Basic comparison with the predicted wave pattern of the central-upwind schemes is performed with the exact solution of the Riemann problem showing an excellent agreement. Then several different bubble configurations were tested, similar to the work of Lauer et al. (2012). The central-upwind schemes prove to be able to handle the large pressure and density ratios appearing in cavitating flows, giving similar predictions in the evolution of the bubble shape.

  9. Feature centrality: naming versus imagining.

    PubMed

    Sloman, S A; Ahn, W K

    1999-05-01

    Being white is central to whether we call an animal a "polar bear," but it is fairly peripheral to our concept of what a polar bear is. We propose that a feature is central to category naming in proportion to the feature's category validity--the probability of the feature, given the category. In contrast, a feature is conceptually central in a representation of the object to the extent that the feature is depended on by other features. Further, we propose that naming and conceptual centrality are more likely to disagree for features that hold at more specific levels (such as is white, which holds only for the specific category of polar bear) than for features that hold at intermediate levels of abstraction (such as has claws, which holds for all bears). In support of these hypotheses, we report evidence that increasing the abstractness of category features has a greater effect on judgments of conceptual centrality than on judgments of name centrality and that other category features depend more on intermediate-level category features than on specific ones. PMID:10355241

  10. Attribute centrality and imaginative thought.

    PubMed

    Ward, T B; Dodds, R A; Saunders, K N; Sifonis, C M

    2000-12-01

    Participants' representations of the concept human were examined to differentiate three types of associations between concepts and their component attributes: the capacity of concepts to cue attributes (attribute accessibility), the capacity of attributes to cue concepts (instance accessibility), and the extent to which attributes are thought of as central to concepts (attribute centrality). The findings provide information about the concept human itself and, more generally, about the functionally distinct roles those different attribute-concept associations play in guiding imaginative thought. College students listed attributes that differentiate humans from other animals, rated the centrality of those attributes, and listed animals that possess those attributes. Other students drew and described extraterrestrials that possessed some of the attributes that were found to vary across those listing and rating tasks. Rated centrality was the most important determinant of an attribute's impact on imaginative generation. When the imagined extraterrestrials were supposed to possess attributes that had been rated as central to humans (intelligence, emotional complexity, or opposable thumbs), participants projected more aspects of human form onto them than when the creatures were supposed to possess less central attributes or when attributes were unspecified. PMID:11219966

  11. Female social reproductive roles affect central monoamines.

    PubMed

    Summers, T R; Hunter, A L; Summers, C H

    1997-09-01

    Central monoamines display a variety of activation patterns in different social groups, and among males and females. We addressed three social conditions for female lizards of the species Anolis carolinensis: Isolated, paired with a mate, and in a group of 5 competing for one mate. Among those in a group, only 1 or 2 females exhibited recrudescing ovaries. Individuals paired with a mate (for one month) exhibited ovarian growth, isolated animals (initial controls) had quiescent ovaries. Reproductively dominant females had significantly greater telencephalic 5-HIAA, and serotonergic activation, as indicated by the ratio of 5-HIAA to 5-HT. Telencephalic HVA as well as the HVA/DA ratio were also significantly greater in dominant females compared to all other groups. In contrast, serotonergic activation in brainstem was elevated in subordinate females only. These results suggest that serotonergic activation in telencephalon, found only in dominant females, not in other reproductively active females, is a function of the unique social role of a dominant female, possibly combining submissive behaviors toward a male with dominance over other females and competition for access to that male. Dopaminergic activation in telencephalon, also found only in dominant females, may be related to aggressive interactions with other females. Activation of serotonin in brainstem, found in this study in subordinate females and previously in males [C.H. Summers and N. Greenberg, Activation of central biogenic amines following aggressive interaction in male lizards, Anolis carolinensis, Brain Behav. Evol., 45 (1995) 339-349], may be associated with subordinate social status. Monoamines, involved in social behaviors, appear to be regionally specialized for dominant and subordinate social roles, in males [C.H. Summers and N. Greenberg, Activation of central biogenic amines following aggressive interaction in male lizards, Anolis carolinensis, Brain Behav. Evol., 45 (1995) 339-349][T.R. Summers, E.T. Larson, A.L. Hunter, K.J. Renner, N. Greenberg and C.H. Summers, Amygdalar serotonin mediates long-term social roles following aggressive interaction, Soc. Neurosci. Abs., 22 (1996) 1147] and females. Dominant females exhibit unique social position, behavior and monoamine profile whereas subordinate females and males have a similar serotonergic response in this species. PMID:9367258

  12. The Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio mu(p) G**p(E)/G**p(M) at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ron; J. Glister; B. Lee; K. Allada; W. Armstrong; J. Arrington; A. Beck; F. Benmokhtar; B.L. Berman; W. Boeglin; E. Brash; A. Camsonne; J. Calarco; J. P. Chen; Seonho Choi; E. Chudakov; L. Coman; B. Craver; F. Cusanno; J. Dumas; C. Dutta; R. Feuerbach; A. Freyberger; S. Frullani; F. Garibaldi; R. Gilman; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; C.E. Hyde; H. Ibrahim; Y. Ilieva; C. W. de Jager; X. Jiang; M. K. Jones; A. Kelleher; E. Khrosinkova; E. Kuchina; G. Kumbartzki; J. J. LeRose; R. Lindgren; P. Markowitz; S. May-Tal Beck; E. McCullough; D. Meekins; M. Meziane; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; B.E. Norum; Y. Oh; M. Olson; M. Paolone; K. Paschke; C. F. Perdrisat; E. Piasetzky; M. Potokar; R. Pomatsalyuk; I. Pomerantz; A. Puckett; V. Punjabi; X. Qian; Y. Qiang; R. Ransome; M. Reyhan; J. Roche; Y. Rousseau; A. Saha; A.J. Sarty; B. Sawatzky; E. Schulte; M. Shabestari; A. Shahinyan; R. Shneor; S. ˇ Sirca; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; J. Song; R. Sparks; R. Subedi; S. Strauch; G. M. Urciuoli; K. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Yan; H. Yao; X. Zhan; X. Zhu

    2007-11-01

    High precision measurements of the proton elastic form factor ratio have been made at four-momentum transfers, Q^2, between 0.2 and 0.5 GeV^2. The new data, while consistent with previous results, clearly show a ratio less than unity and significant differences from the central values of several recent phenomenological fits. By combining the new form-factor ratio data with an existing cross-section measurement, one finds that in this Q^2 range the deviation from unity is primarily due to GEp being smaller than the dipole parameterization.

  13. Seismic Attenuation beneath Tateyama Volcano, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, K.; Kawakata, H.; Doi, I.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface structures beneath active volcanoes have frequently been investigated (e.g., Oikawa et al., 1994: Sudo et al., 1996), and seismic attenuation beneath some active volcanoes are reported to be strong. On the other hand, few local subsurface structures beneath volcanoes whose volcanic activities are low have been investigated in detail, though it is important to study them to understand the potential of volcanic activity of these volcanoes. Then, we analyzed the seismic attenuation beneath Tateyama volcano (Midagahara volcano) located in central Japan, whose volcanic activity is quite low. We used seismograms obtained by Hi-net deployed by NIED (National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention). Hi-net is one of the densest seismic station networks in the world, and the spatial interval of their seismographs is about 20 km, which is suitable for investigating local structure beneath an individual volcano. We estimated S-wave attenuation using seismograms at five stations near Tateyama volcano for nineteen small, local, shallow earthquakes (M 2.7-4.0) that occurred from January 2012 to December 2013. We divided these earthquakes into six groups according to their hypocenter locations. We used twofold spectral ratios around the first S-arrivals to investigate the S-wave attenuation when S-waves passed through the region beneath Tateyama volcano. We focused on station pairs located on opposite sides of Tateyama volcano to each other, and earthquake pairs whose epicenters were located almost along the line connecting Tateyama volcano and the two stations, so that the spectral ratios reflect a local structure beneath Tateyama volcano. Twofold spectral ratios of all seismograms for S waves having northwestern or southeastern sources show strong attenuation beneath Tateyama volcano. On the other hand, those of seismograms having northeastern or southwestern sources show much weaker attenuation, which suggested that the region of strong attenuation is anisotropic and/or has complicated shape.

  14. Winglets on low aspect ratio wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, John M.; Liaw, Paul

    1987-01-01

    The drag reduction potentially available from the use of winglets at the tips of low aspect ratio (1.75-2.67) wings with pronounced (45-60 deg) leading edge sweep is assessed numerically for the case of a cruise design point at Mach of 0.8 and a lift coefficient of 0.3. Both wing-winglet and wing-alone design geometries are derived from a linear-theory, minimum induced drag design methodology. Relative performance is evaluated with a nonlinear extended small disturbance potential flow analysis code. Predicted lift coefficient/pressure drag coefficient increases at equal lift for the wing-winglet configurations over the wing-alone planform are of the order of 14.6-15.8, when boundary layer interaction is included.

  15. Horizon ratio bound for inflationary fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Dodelson, Scott; Hui, Lam

    2003-09-26

    We demonstrate that the gravity wave background amplitude implies a robust upper bound on the wavelength-to-horizon ratio at the end of inflation: lambda/H(-1) less than or approximately equal e(60), as long as the cosmic energy density does not drop faster than radiation subsequent to inflation. This limit implies that N, the number of e-folds between horizon exit and the end of inflation for wave modes of interest, is less, similar 60 plus a model-dependent factor-for vast classes of slow-roll models, N less than or approximately equal 67. As an example, this bound solidifies the tension between observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and chaotic inflation with a phi(4) potential by closing the escape hatch of large N (<62). PMID:14525296

  16. Isotopic ratio measurements with ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, G.P. III; Bazan, J.M.

    1986-06-03

    An inductively-coupled-plasma source mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) has been used to measure the isotopic composition of U, Pb, Os, and B standards. Particular emphasis has been placed on uranium because of its nuclear and environmental interest and because of the availability of a well-characterized set of standards with a wide range of isotopic compositions. The precision and accuracy obtainable in isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS depend on many factors including background, interferences, dead time, mass fractionation (bias), abundance sensitivity, and counting statistics. Which, if any, of these factors controls accuracy and precision depends on the type of sample being analyzed and the characteristics of the mass spectrometer. These issues are discussed in detail.

  17. Electronic branching ratio of the. tau. lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; Romero, V.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, P.; Zoeller, M.M.; Crawford, G.; Fulton, R.; Gan, K.K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Sung, M.K.; Whitmore, J.; Wilson, P.; Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Lambrecht, M.; Skubic, P.; Snow, J.; Wang, P.; Bortoletto, D.; Brown, D.N.; Dominick, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Shibata, E.I.; Schaffner, S.F.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Kroha, H.; Roberts, S.; Sparks, K.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.; Stroynowski, R.; Artuso, M.; Goldberg, M.; Haupt, T.; Horwitz, N.; Kennett, R.; Moneti, G.C.; Playfer, S.; Rozen, Y.; Rubin, P.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Thulasidas, M.; Yao, W.; Zhu, G.; Barnes, A.V.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Jain, V.; Letson, T.; Mestayer, M.D.; Akerib, D.S.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.

    1992-06-01

    Using data accumulated by the CLEO I detector operating at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have measured the ratio {ital R}={Gamma}({tau}{r arrow}{ital e}{bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Gamma}{sub 1}, where {Gamma}{sub 1} is the {tau} decay rate to final states with one charged particle. We find {ital R}=0.2231{plus minus}0.0044{plus minus}0.0073 where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. Together with the measured topological one-charged-particle branching fraction, this yields the branching fraction of the {tau} lepton to electrons, {ital B}{sub {ital e}}=0.192{plus minus}0.004{plus minus}0.006.

  18. High resolution color band pyrometer ratioing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, Donald B. (Inventor); Henry, Paul K. (Inventor); LoGiurato, D. Daniel (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The sensing head of a two-color band ratioing pyrometer of a known type using a fiber optic cable to couple radiation to dual detector photodiodes is improved to have high spatial resolution by focusing the radiation received through an objective lens (i.e., by focusing the image of a target area) onto an opaque sheet spaced in front of the input end of the fiber optic cable. A two-mil hole in that sheet then passes radiation to the input end of the cable. The detector has two channels, one for each color band, with an electronic-chopper stabilized current amplifier as the input stage followed by an electronic-chopper stabilized voltage amplifier.

  19. Laser spectroscopic measurement of helium isotope ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.-B.; Mueller, P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Sano, Y.; Sturchio, N.; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2003-06-13

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 10{sup -7}--10{sup -5}. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable {sup 3}He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of {sup 4}He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3{sigma} detection limit of {sup 3}He in helium is 4 x 10{sup -9}. This demonstration required a 200 {mu}L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  20. Golden Ratio Controlled Chaos in Supersymmetric Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübsch, Tristan; Katona, Gregory A.

    2013-12-01

    We construct supersymmetric Lagrangians for the recently constructed off-shell worldline N = 3 supermultiplet YI/(iD_I{ X}) for I = 1, 2, 3, where YI and X are standard, Salam-Strathdee superfields: YI fermionic and X bosonic. Already the Lagrangian bilinear in component fields exhibits a total of thirteen free parameters, seven of which specify Zeeman-like coupling to external (magnetic) fluxes. All but special subsets of this parameter space describe aperiodic oscillatory response, some of which are controlled by the "golden ratio," φ≈1.61803. We also show that all of these Lagrangians admit an N = 3 →4 supersymmetry extension, while a subset admits two inequivalent such extensions.

  1. Hardness ratios of different neutron spectra.

    PubMed

    Tommasino, L; Tripathy, S P

    2004-01-01

    Extensive data have been gathered in the past on the response of different detectors, based on the registration of neutron-induced fissions in bismuth, gold, tantalum and thorium by the spark-replica counter and the thin film breakdown counter. These detectors make it possible to exploit the excellent characteristics of the fission reactions for the measurements of high-energy neutrons. Most of the investigations have been carried out at the quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam facility at The Svedberg Laboratory-TSL of the Uppsala University in cooperation with the Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI). The responses of different fission detectors in the neutron energy range 35-180 MeV have been evaluated: a region where the predictive power of available nuclear reaction models and codes is not reliable yet. For neutron energy >200 MeV, the fission-detector responses have been derived from the data of the proton fission cross sections. By using the ratio of the responses of these detectors, a simple and accurate way to evaluate the spectrum hardness can be obtained, thus providing a tool to obtain spectral information needed for neutron dosimetry without the need to know the entire spectrum. Extensive data have been already obtained for the high-energy neutron spectrum from the CERN concrete facility. In the present paper, the measured values of the response ratios for different fissile detectors exposed at the CERN facility are compared with those calculated for the spectra from the same facility and from different altitudes in the atmosphere, respectively. PMID:15353650

  2. Classification of particle effective shape ratios in cirrus clouds based on the lidar depolarization ratio.

    PubMed

    Noel, Vincent; Chepfer, Helene; Ledanois, Guy; Delaval, Arnaud; Flamant, Pierre H

    2002-07-20

    A shape classification technique for cirrus clouds that could be applied to future spaceborne lidars is presented. A ray-tracing code has been developed to simulate backscattered and depolarized lidar signals from cirrus clouds made of hexagonal-based crystals with various compositions and optical depth, taking into account multiple scattering. This code was used first to study the sensitivity of the linear depolarization rate to cloud optical and microphysical properties, then to classify particle shapes in cirrus clouds based on depolarization ratio measurements. As an example this technique has been applied to lidar measurements from 15 mid-latitude cirrus cloud cases taken in Palaiseau, France. Results show a majority of near-unity shape ratios as well as a strong correlation between shape ratios and temperature: The lowest temperatures lead to high shape ratios. The application of this technique to space-borne measurements would allow a large-scale classification of shape ratios in cirrus clouds, leading to better knowledge of the vertical variability of shapes, their dependence on temperature, and the formation processes of clouds. PMID:12148751

  3. Comparison of discrete ratios by rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Drucker, Caroline B; Rossa, Marley A; Brannon, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Perceiving and comparing ratios are crucial skills for humans. Little is known about whether other animals can compare ratios. We trained two rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to choose arrays that contained the greater ratio of positive to negative stimuli, regardless of the absolute number of stimuli in each of the two choice arrays. Subjects learned this task, and their performance generalized to novel ratios. Moreover, performance was modulated by the ratio between ratios; subjects responded more quickly and accurately when the ratio between ratios was higher. Control conditions ruled out the possibility that subjects were relying on surface area, although the ratio between ratios of surface area did seem to influence their choices. Our results demonstrate that rhesus monkeys can compare discrete ratios, demonstrating not only proportional reasoning ability but also the ability to reason about relations between relations. PMID:26286201

  4. Multi-factorial influences on sex ratio: a spatio-temporal investigation of endocrine disruptor pollution and neighborhood stress

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Ewan; Watterson, Andrew; Tyler, Andrew N; McArthur, John; Scott, E Marion

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is suggested the declining male birth proportion in some industrialized countries is linked to ubiquitous endocrine disruptor exposure. Stress and advanced parental age are determinants which frequently present positive findings. Multi-factorial influences on population sex ratio are rarely explored or tested in research. Objectives: To test the hypothesis that dual factors of pollution and population stress affects sex proportion at birth through geographical analysis of Central Scotland. Methods: The study incorporates the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tools to overlay modeled point source endocrine disruptor air emissions with “small-area” data on multiple deprivation (a proxy measurement of stress) and birth sex. Historical review of regional sex ratio trends presents additional data on sex ratio in Scotland to consider. Results: There was no overall concentration in Central Scotland of low sex ratio neighborhoods with areas where endocrine disruptor air pollution and deprivation or economic stress were high. Historical regional trends in Scotland (from 1973), however, do show significantly lower sex ratio values for populations where industrial air pollution is highest (i.e. Eastern Central Scotland). Conclusions: Use of small area data sets and pollution inventories is a potential new method of inquiry for reproductive environmental and health protection monitoring and has produced interesting findings. PMID:25000111

  5. Effects of a Signaled Delay to Reinforcement in the Previous and Upcoming Ratios on Between-Ratio Pausing in Fixed-Ratio Schedules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Aimee; Foster, T. Mary; Levine, Joshua; Temple, William

    2012-01-01

    Domestic hens responded under multiple fixed-ratio fixed-ratio schedules with equal fixed ratios. One component provided immediate reinforcement and the other provided reinforcement after a delay, signaled by the offset of the key light. The components were presented quasi-randomly so that all four possible transitions occurred in each session.…

  6. Coverage centralities for temporal networks*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Yano, Yosuke; Yoshida, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    Structure of real networked systems, such as social relationship, can be modeled as temporal networks in which each edge appears only at the prescribed time. Understanding the structure of temporal networks requires quantifying the importance of a temporal vertex, which is a pair of vertex index and time. In this paper, we define two centrality measures of a temporal vertex based on the fastest temporal paths which use the temporal vertex. The definition is free from parameters and robust against the change in time scale on which we focus. In addition, we can efficiently compute these centrality values for all temporal vertices. Using the two centrality measures, we reveal that distributions of these centrality values of real-world temporal networks are heterogeneous. For various datasets, we also demonstrate that a majority of the highly central temporal vertices are located within a narrow time window around a particular time. In other words, there is a bottleneck time at which most information sent in the temporal network passes through a small number of temporal vertices, which suggests an important role of these temporal vertices in spreading phenomena. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Temporal Network Theory and Applications", edited by Petter Holme.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-60498-7

  7. Isotope Ratios of Cellulose from Plants Having Different Photosynthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Leonel O.; Deniro, Michael J.; Johnson, Hyrum B.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate and oxygen isotope ratios of cellulose from C3, C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants were determined for plants growing within a small area in Val Verde County, Texas. Plants having CAM had distinctly higher deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios than plants having C3 and C4 metabolism. When hydrogen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, each photosynthetic mode separates into a distinct cluster of points. C4 plants had many D/H ratios similar to those of C3 plants, so that hydrogen isotope ratios cannot be used to distinguish between these two photosynthetic modes. Portulaca mundula, which may have a modified photosynthetic mode between C4 and CAM, had a hydrogen isotope ratio between those of the C4 and CAM plants. When oxygen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, no distinct clustering of the C4 and CAM plants occurs. Thus, oxygen isotope ratios are not useful in distinguishing between these metabolic modes. A plot of hydrogen isotope ratios versus oxygen isotope ratios for this sample set shows considerable overlap between oxygen isotope ratios of the different photosynthetic modes without a concomitant overlap in the hydrogen isotope ratios of CAM and the other two photosynthetic modes. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that higher D/H ratios in CAM plants relative to C3 and C4 plants are due to isotopic fractionations occurring during biochemical reactions. PMID:16663460

  8. 26 CFR 26.2642-5 - Finality of inclusion ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Finality of inclusion ratio. 26.2642-5 Section...-5 Finality of inclusion ratio. (a) Direct skips. The inclusion ratio applicable to a direct skip...) Other GSTs. With respect to taxable distributions and taxable terminations, the inclusion ratio for...

  9. 10 CFR 436.21 - Savings-to-investment ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.21 Savings-to-investment ratio. The savings-to-investment ratio is the ratio of the present value savings to the present value costs of an energy or water conservation measure. The numerator of the ratio is the present value of net savings in energy or water and...

  10. 10 CFR 436.21 - Savings-to-investment ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.21 Savings-to-investment ratio. The savings-to-investment ratio is the ratio of the present value savings to the present value costs of an energy or water conservation measure. The numerator of the ratio is the present value of net savings in energy or water and...

  11. 10 CFR 436.21 - Savings-to-investment ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.21 Savings-to-investment ratio. The savings-to-investment ratio is the ratio of the present value savings to the present value costs of an energy or water conservation measure. The numerator of the ratio is the present value of net savings in energy or water and...

  12. 10 CFR 436.21 - Savings-to-investment ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.21 Savings-to-investment ratio. The savings-to-investment ratio is the ratio of the present value savings to the present value costs of an energy or water conservation measure. The numerator of the ratio is the present value of net savings in energy or water and...

  13. 10 CFR 436.21 - Savings-to-investment ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.21 Savings-to-investment ratio. The savings-to-investment ratio is the ratio of the present value savings to the present value costs of an energy or water conservation measure. The numerator of the ratio is the present value of net savings in energy or water and...

  14. Cereal Production Ratio and NDVI in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saa-Requejo, Antonio; Recuero, Laura; Palacios, Alicia; Díaz-Ambrona, Carlos G. H.; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2014-05-01

    Droughts are long-term phenomena affecting large regions causing significant damages both in human lives and economic losses. The use of remote sensing has proved to be very important in monitoring the growth of agricultural crops and trying to asses weather impact on crop loss. Several indices has been developed based in remote sensing data being one of them the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). In this study we have focus to know the correlation between NDVI data and the looses of rain fed cereal in the Spanish area where this crop is majority. For this propose data from drought damage in cereal come from the pool of agricultural insurance in Spain (AGROSEGURO) including 2007/2008 to 2011/2012 (five agricultural campaigns). This data is given as a ratio between drought party claims against the insured value of production aggregated at the agrarian region level. Medium resolution (500x500 m2) MODIS images were used during the same campaigns to estimate the eight-day composites NDVI at these locations. The NDVI values are accumulated following the normal cycle of the cereal taking in account the sowing date at different sites. At the same time, CORINE Land Cover (2006) was used to classify the pixels belonging to rain fed cereal use including a set of conditions such as pixels showing dry during summer, area in which there has been no change of use. Fallow presence is studied with particular attention as it imposes an inter annual variation between crop and bare soil and causes decreases in greenness in a pixel and mix both situations. This is more complex in the situation in which the avoid fallow and a continuous monoculture is performed. The results shown that around 40% of the area is subject to the regime of fallow while 60% have growing every year. In addition, another variation is detected if the year is humid (decrease of fallow) or dry (increase of fallow). The level of correlation between the drought damage ratios and cumulative NDVI for the cereal campaign obtained are classified according to their level of significance at 99, 95, 90 and 85%. Approximately half of the regions with high surface assurance have meaningful relationships. In the regions where no significant relationships are achieved several situations are discussed such as extreme situations in critical phenological periods that could have great influence on the final yields. Acknowledgements. This work was partially supported by ENESA under project P10 0220C-823.

  15. Centralization or decentralization of facial structures in Korean young adults.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ja-Young; Kim, Jeong-Nam; Shin, Kang-Jae; Kim, Soon-Heum; Choi, Hyun-Gon; Jeon, Hyun-Soo; Koh, Ki-Seok; Song, Wu-Chul

    2013-05-01

    It is well known that facial beauty is dictated by facial type, and harmony between the eyes, nose, and mouth. Furthermore, facial impression is judged according to the overall facial contour and the relationship between the facial structures. The aims of the present study were to determine the optimal criteria for the assessment of gathering or separation of the facial structures and to define standardized ratios for centralization or decentralization of the facial structures.Four different lengths were measured, and 2 indexes were calculated from standardized photographs of 551 volunteers. Centralization and decentralization were assessed using the width index (interpupillary distance / facial width) and height index (eyes-mouth distance / facial height). The mean ranges of the width index and height index were 42.0 to 45.0 and 36.0 to 39.0, respectively. The width index did not differ with sex, but males had more decentralized faces, and females had more centralized faces, vertically. The incidence rate of decentralized faces among the men was 30.3%, and that of centralized faces among the women was 25.2%.The mean ranges in width and height indexes have been determined in a Korean population. Faces with width and height index scores under and over the median ranges are determined to be "centralized" and "decentralized," respectively. PMID:23714934

  16. Star Formation in the Central Regions of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Mengchun

    2015-08-01

    The galactic central region connects the galactic nucleus to the host galaxy. If the central black hole co-evolved with the host galaxies, there should be some evidence left in the central region. We use the environmental properties in the central regions such as star-forming activity, stellar population and molecular abundance to figure out a possible scenario of the evolution of galaxies. In this thesis at first we investigated the properties of the central regions in the host galaxies of active and normal galaxies. We used radio emission around the nuclei of the host galaxies to represent activity of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and used infrared ray (IR) emission to represent the star-forming activity and stellar population of the host galaxies. We determined that active galaxies have higher stellar masses (SMs) within the central kiloparsec radius than normal galaxies do independent of the Hubble types of the host galaxies; but both active and normal galaxies exhibit similar specific star formation rates (SSFRs). We also discovered that certain AGNs exhibit substantial inner stellar structures in the IR images; most of the AGNs with inner structures are Seyferts, whereas only a few LINERs exhibit inner structures. We note that the AGNs with inner structures show a positive correlation between the radio activity of the AGNs and the SFRs of the host galaxies, but the sources without inner structures show a negative correlation between the radio power and the SFRs. These results might be explained with a scenario of starburst-AGN evolution. In this scenario, AGN activities are triggered following a nuclear starburst; during the evolution, AGN activities are accompanied by SF activity in the inner regions of the host galaxies; at the final stage of the evolution, the AGNs might transform into LINERs, exhibiting weak SF activity in the central regions of the host galaxies. For further investigation about the inner structure, we choose the most nearby and luminous Seyfert galaxy with inner structure as an example. In this thesis, we present CO(3-2) interferometric observations of the central region of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC1068 using the Submillimeter Array, together with CO(1-0) data taken with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory Millimeter Array. Both the CO(3-2) and CO(1-0) emission lines are mainly distributed within ~5 arcsec of the nucleus and along the spiral arms, but the intensity distributions show differences; the CO(3-2) map peaks in the nucleus, while the CO(1-0) emission is mainly located along the spiral arms. The CO(3-2)/CO(1-0) ratio is about 3.1 in the nucleus, which is four times as large as the average line ratio in the spiral arms, suggesting that the molecular gas there must be affected by the radiation arising from the AGN. On the other hand, the line ratios in the spiral arms vary over a wide range from 0.24 to 2.34 with a average value around 0.75, which is similar to the line ratios of star-formation regions, indicating that the molecular gas is affected by star formation. Besides, we see a tight correlation between CO(3-2)/(1-0) ratios in the spiral arms and star formation rate surface densities derived from Spitzer 8 micron dust flux densities. We also compare the CO(3-2)/(1-0) ratio and the star formation rate at different positions within the spiral arms; both are found to decrease as the radius from the nucleus increases.

  17. CENTRAL NEUROENDOCRINE MECHANISMS OF GASTROPROTECTION.

    PubMed

    Gyires, Klára

    2014-03-30

    Selye recognized the importance of activation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during stress and the connection between central nervous system and neuroendocrine regulation. This concept basically contributed to initiation of the studies, which revealed the importance of brain gut axis in regulation of gastric mucosal integrity. Several neuropeptides, such as thyreotrop releasing hormones, adrenomedullin, peptide YY, amylin, opioid peptides, nociceptin, nocisatin, substance P, ghrelin, leptin, orexin-A, angiotensin II were shown to induce gastroprotective effect injected centrally. Though the involvement of dorsal vagal complex and vagal nerves in conveying the central action to the periphery has been well documented, additional mechanisms have also been raised. The interaction between neuropeptides further component that may modify the gastric mucosal resistance to noxious stimulus. PMID:26118250

  18. Effects of Ratio Strategies Intervention on Knowledge of Ratio Equivalence for Students with Learning Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Jessica H.; Vasquez, Eleazar, III

    2014-01-01

    Students with mathematics learning disabilities have a weak understanding of mathematical concepts that underlie success in Algebra I, such as ratios and proportional reasoning. In this study, researchers used a multiple baseline across participants design to evaluate the effects of a intervention based on a instructional trajectory of how

  19. Effects of Ratio Strategies Intervention on Knowledge of Ratio Equivalence for Students with Learning Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Jessica H.; Vasquez, Eleazar, III

    2014-01-01

    Students with mathematics learning disabilities have a weak understanding of mathematical concepts that underlie success in Algebra I, such as ratios and proportional reasoning. In this study, researchers used a multiple baseline across participants design to evaluate the effects of a intervention based on a instructional trajectory of how…

  20. INTERSPECIES COMPARISONS OF A/D RATIOS: A/D RATIOS ARE NOT CONSTANT ACROSS SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hypothesis that the ratio of the adult (A) and developmental (D) toxicity of a chemical is constant across animal species has been proposed as the basis for identifying developmental hazards, both from traditional developmental toxicity screens using laboratory mammals and fr...

  1. Zenith polarization and color ratio during twilight.

    PubMed

    Volz, F E

    1981-12-15

    The excellent data of zenith polarization and color ratio (CR) during twilight obtained by Coulson at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii are subjected to a reinterpretation, especially with regard to the frequent deviations from the clear average. It is shown that a moderate lift of the earth's shadow by distant clouds (or by low level haze) will reduce the red/green CR, while greater lift shifts the CR peak to a smaller solar depression. The effect on zenith polarization at wavelengths >/=0.6 microm is seen to correspond to a slight reduction of overall polarization for a moderate lift, and for a large lift to a shift of the polarization minimum (depolarization by stratospheric aerosol) from 4 degrees solar depression angle to 2 degrees . A generally high level of polarization, but with a barely noticeable 4 degrees minimum, had also been observed earlier in Germany by Steinhorst when the stratospheric aerosol load was very small. The difference is explained by a higher and stronger aerosol layer in the tropics combined with a higher and cleaner troposphere. PMID:20372348

  2. Low concentration ratio solar array structural configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalbandian, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    The design and structural properties of a low concentration ratio solar array are discussed. The assembled module consists of six interconnected containers which are compactly stowed in a volume of 3.24 m(3) for delivery to orbit by the shuttle. The containers deploy in accordian fashion into a rectangular area of 19.4 x 68 meters and can be attached to the user spacecraft along the longitudinal centerline of the end container housing. Five rotary incremental actuators requiring about 8 watts each will execute the 180-degree rotation at each joint. Deployable masts (three per side) are used to extend endcaps from the housing in both directions. Each direction is extended by three masts requiring about 780 watts for about 27 minutes. Concentrator elements are extended by the endcaps and are supported by cable systems that are connected between the housings and endcaps. These power generating elements contain reflector panels which concentrate light onto the solar panels consisting of an aluminum radiator with solar cells positioned within the element base formed by the reflectors. A flat wire harness collects the power output of individual elements for transfer to the module container housing harnesses.

  3. Carbon to oxygen ratios in extrasolar planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David J.; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Farihi, Jay; Koester, Detlev

    2016-04-01

    Observations of small extrasolar planets with a wide range of densities imply a variety of planetary compositions and structures. Currently, the only technique to measure the bulk composition of extrasolar planetary systems is the analysis of planetary debris accreting onto white dwarfs, analogous to abundance studies of meteorites. We present measurements of the carbon and oxygen abundances in the debris of planetesimals at ten white dwarfs observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, along with C/O ratios of debris in six systems with previously reported abundances. We find no evidence for carbon-rich planetesimals, with C/O <0.8 by number in all 16 systems. Our results place an upper limit on the occurrence of carbon-rich systems at <17 percent with a 2 σ confidence level. The range of C/O of the planetesimals is consistent with that found in the Solar System, and appears to follow a bimodal distribution: a group similar to the CI chondrites, with log ( < C/O > ) = -0.92, and oxygen-rich objects with C/O less than or equal to that of the bulk Earth. The latter group may have a higher mass fraction of water than the Earth, increasing their relative oxygen abundance.

  4. C/O ratios in extrasolar planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David John; Gaensicke, Boris; Farihi, Jay; Koester, Detlev

    2015-12-01

    The wide range of densities found in small exoplanets imply a variety of possible compositions and interior structures. In particular, some models predict that protoplanetary discs with C/O>0.8 may form carbon-dominated planets. The only way to directly test such predictions are studies of evolved planetary systems at white dwarfs. Analysis of planetesimal debris in white dwarf atmospheres provides a unique insight into the chemical compositions of extrasolar planets, which cannot be observed at main-sequence systems. Thus far, such studies have predominantly focused on individual objects. However, the growing sample of abundance studies now allows conclusions to be derived regarding the overall chemical abundances of (solid) exoplanet precursors in a statistically significant sample of systems. Here, we present measurements of the C/O ratio in the debris of planetesimals at 16 white dwarfs observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. These data allow us to constrain the occurrence frequency of carbon-dominated planets. We find no evidence for such carbon planets, with C/O<0.8 by number in all 16 systems.

  5. High-aspect-ratio integrated force arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbio, Stephen M.; Smith, Stephen W.; Zara, Jason M.; Goodwin-Johansson, Scott H.; Gentry, Kenneth L.; Hudak, John A.; Kerns, Matthew; Elliott, Paul C.; Rouse, Buchanan J.; Borno, R. T.

    2001-08-01

    The Integrated Force Array (IFA) is a metallized polyimide actuator made up of a large array of capacitive cells that deform when voltage is applied. The deformations of the individual cells add to produce an overall muscle-like compression of the array. In previously reported work deformations of up to 30% have been realized and the IFAs have been used as mechanical scanners in ultrasound imaging systems. The gaps of the capacitive cells are etched directly into the polyimide and oriented perpendicular to the plane of the array. Metal is deposited on the sidewalls of the etched features in order to form the plates of each capacitor. The force associated with the IFA motion is directly proportional to the height of the sidewall metal and thus to the thickness of the membrane. Until now, the thickness has been 2μm with gap widths of 1μm. In recent work, much higher aspect ratio IFAs (thicker but with the same gap width) have been fabricated in order to produce devices that operate with greater force and are much more robust devices.

  6. Geothermal activities in Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Whetten, J.T.; Hanold, R.J.

    1985-09-11

    The Agency for International Development is funding a new program in energy and minerals for Central America. Geothermal energy is an important component. A country-wide geothermal assessment has started in Honduras, and other assessment activities are in progress or planned for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Panama. Instrumentation for well logging has been provided to Costa Rica, and a self-contained logging truck will be made available for use throughout Central America. An important objective of this program is to involve the private sector in resource development. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  7. MRDIS Standalone Central Alarm Station

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-12

    The MRDIS Standalone Central Alarm Station(MRDIS-CAS} is a software system for receiving, storing, and reviewing radiation data collected by the Mobile Radiation Detection and Identification System (MRDIS}, a mobile radiation scanning system developed for use in foreign ports for the DOE Megaports Initiative. It is designed to run on one of the on board computers in the MRDIS cab. It will collect, store, and display data from the MRDIS without the need for wireless communications or centralized server technology. It is intended to be a lightweight replacement for a distributed Megaports communication system in ports where the necessary communications infrastructure does not exist for a full Megaports communications system.

  8. Central tongue reduction for macroglossia.

    PubMed

    Mixter, R C; Ewanowski, S J; Carson, L V

    1993-05-01

    Unhappy with our postoperative results from standard tongue reduction methods, we have developed a central tongue reduction technique. This technique allows for alteration of the tongue base as well as tongue height and width while minimizing postoperative scarring. Although the technique and its associated surgical complications are in some ways comparable with the standard tongue reduction methods, our postoperative polysomnographic and tongue functioning results are improved. It is noteworthy that none of our patients had worse speech postoperatively and that our one Down syndrome patient had improved speech. Our indication for central tongue reduction is macroglossia of any sort in appropriate patients. PMID:8479986

  9. Centrality scaling in large networks.

    PubMed

    Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária; Toroczkai, Zoltán

    2010-07-16

    Betweenness centrality lies at the core of both transport and structural vulnerability properties of complex networks; however, it is computationally costly, and its measurement for networks with millions of nodes is nearly impossible. By introducing a multiscale decomposition of shortest paths, we show that the contributions to betweenness coming from geodesics not longer than L obey a characteristic scaling versus L, which can be used to predict the distribution of the full centralities. The method is also illustrated on a real-world social network of 5.5 × 10(6) nodes and 2.7 × 10(7) links. PMID:20867816

  10. A transition in circumbinary accretion discs at a binary mass ratio of 1:25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orazio, Daniel J.; Haiman, Zoltán; Duffell, Paul; MacFadyen, Andrew; Farris, Brian

    2016-04-01

    We study circumbinary accretion discs in the framework of the restricted three-body problem (R3Bp) and via numerically solving the height-integrated equations of viscous hydrodynamics. Varying the mass ratio of the binary, we find a pronounced change in the behaviour of the disc near mass ratio q ≡ Ms/Mp ˜ 0.04. For mass ratios above q = 0.04, solutions for the hydrodynamic flow transition from steady, to strongly-fluctuating; a narrow annular gap in the surface density around the secondary's orbit changes to a hollow central cavity; and a spatial symmetry is lost, resulting in a lopsided disc. This phase transition is coincident with the mass ratio above which stable orbits do not exist around the L4 and L5 equilibrium points of the R3B problem. Using the DISCO code, we find that for thin discs, for which a gap or cavity can remain open, the mass ratio of the transition is relatively insensitive to disc viscosity and pressure. The q = 0.04 transition has relevance for the evolution of massive black hole binary+disc systems at the centers of galactic nuclei, as well as for young stellar binaries and possibly planets around brown dwarfs.

  11. Numerical Estimation of the Spent Fuel Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Lindgren, Eric R.; Durbin, Samuel; Wilke, Jason; Margraf, J.; Dunn, T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Sabotage of spent nuclear fuel casks remains a concern nearly forty years after attacks against shipment casks were first analyzed and has a renewed relevance in the post-9/11 environment. A limited number of full-scale tests and supporting efforts using surrogate materials, typically depleted uranium dioxide (DUO 2 ), have been conducted in the interim to more definitively determine the source term from these postulated events. However, the validity of these large- scale results remain in question due to the lack of a defensible spent fuel ratio (SFR), defined as the amount of respirable aerosol generated by an attack on a mass of spent fuel compared to that of an otherwise identical surrogate. Previous attempts to define the SFR in the 1980's have resulted in estimates ranging from 0.42 to 12 and include suboptimal experimental techniques and data comparisons. Because of the large uncertainty surrounding the SFR, estimates of releases from security-related events may be unnecessarily conservative. Credible arguments exist that the SFR does not exceed a value of unity. A defensible determination of the SFR in this lower range would greatly reduce the calculated risk associated with the transport and storage of spent nuclear fuel in dry cask systems. In the present work, the shock physics codes CTH and ALE3D were used to simulate spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and DUO 2 targets impacted by a high-velocity jet at an ambient temperature condition. These preliminary results are used to illustrate an approach to estimate the respirable release fraction for each type of material and ultimately, an estimate of the SFR. This page intentionally blank

  12. Fluorescence Ratio Imaging Of Dynamic Intracellular Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harootunian, Alec T.; Kao, J. P.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    1989-12-01

    Traditional biochemical assays of cellular messengers require grinding up thousands or millions of cells for each data point. Such destructive measurements use up large amounts of tissue, have poor time resolution, and cannot assess heterogeneity between individual cells or dynamic spatial localizations. Recent technical advances now enable important ionic signals to be continuously imaged inside individual living cells with micron spatial resolution and subsecond time resolution. This methodology relies on the molecular engineering of indicator dyes whose fluorescence is strong and highly sensitive to ions such as Ca2+, H+, or Na+. Binding of these ions shifts the fluorescence excitation spectrum of the corresponding indicator. The ratio of excitation amplitudes at two wavelengths measures the free ion concentration while canceling out intensity variations due to nonuniform cell thickness or dye content. By rapidly alternating between the two ion-sensitive excitation wavelengths, a fluorescence microscope equipped with a low-light television camera and digital image processor can produce dynamic images of intracellular messenger levels. In many populations of cells traditionally assumed to be homogeneous, we find that neighboring individual cells can differ enormously in their cytosolic Ca2+ response to agonist stimulation, some ignoring the stimulus, others raising cytosolic Ca2+ transiently, others showing oscillations. Oscillations have been speculated to be important as a basis for frequency-coding of oscillations. Oscillations have been speculated to be important as a basis for frequency-coding of graded inputs; we are investigating the mechanism of their generation using light flashes to generate pulses of intracellular messengers. Spatial gradients of cytosolic Ca t+ within single cells have been observed in embryos during fertilization and development, neurons exposed to electrical or drug stimulation and in cytotoxic T lymphocytes during killing of target cells. Variations of cytosolic pH and free Na+ are especially interesting in epithelia and in cells undergoing mitogenic or oncogenic activation.

  13. Oxidative ratio (OR) of UK peats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, G. D.; Worrall, F.; Masiello, C. A.

    2012-04-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) is the amount of CO2 sequestered in the terrestrial biosphere for each mol of O2 produced. The OR governs the effectiveness of a terrestrial biome to mitigate the impact of anthropogenic CO2 emissions and it has been used to calculate the balance of terrestrial and oceanic carbon sinks across the globe. However, few studies have investigated the controls of the variability in OR. What factors affect OR - climate? Soil type? Vegetation type? N deposition? Land use? Land use change? Small shifts in OR could have important implications in the global partitioning of CO2 between the atmosphere, biosphere, and oceans. This study looks at peat soils (Histosols) from a series of sites representing a climatic transect across the UK. Duplicate peat cores were taken, along with samples of above-ground vegetation and litter, from sites in northern Scotland (Forsinard), southern Scotland (Auchencorth), northern England (Moor House; Thorne Moor) through the Welsh borders (Whixhall Moss) and Somerset levels (Westhay Moor) to Dartmoor and Bodmin Moor in the south west of England. Sub-samples of the cores were analysed for their CHNO concentrations using a Costech ECS 4010 Elemental combustion system. Using the method of Masiello et al. (2008), OR values could be calculated from these elemental concentrations. Initial results show that OR values of UK peats varied between 0.94 and 1.1 with a median value of 1.05 which similar to the median value of World soils but the range is at the more reduced end. There was significant variation between peat cores, even between peat cores on the same site and the peat showed significant reduction in OR with depth in the core.

  14. Effect of contact ratio on spur gear dynamic load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Chuen-Huei; Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1992-01-01

    A computer simulation is presented which shows how the gear contact ratio affects the dynamic load on a spur gear transmission. The contact ratio can be affected by the tooth addendum, the pressure angle, the tooth size (diametral pitch), and the center distance. The analysis presented was performed using the NASA gear dynamics code, DANST. In the analysis, the contact ratio was varied over the range 1.20 to 2.40 by changing the length of the tooth addendum. In order to simplify the analysis, other parameters related to contact ratio were held constant. The contact ratio was found to have a significant influence on gear dynamics. Over a wide range of operating speeds, a contact ratio close to 2.0 minimized dynamic load. For low contact ratio gears (contact ratio less than 2.0), increasing the contact ratio reduced the gear dynamic load. For high contact ratio gears (contact ratio = or greater than 2.0), the selection of contact ratio should take into consideration the intended operating speeds. In general, high contact ratio gears minimized dynamic load better than low contact ratio gears.

  15. Investing in the Central Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne

    2010-01-01

    Benchmarking against similar districts, ideally higher-performing ones, can be a valuable tool for determining the appropriate level of central-office investment. Unfortunately, reliable benchmarks on district spending in teaching and learning support are not readily available. This should not preclude districts from using this valuable method to…

  16. Central Corneal Thickness in Children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report the central corneal thickness (CCT) in healthy white, African-American, and Hispanic children from birth to 17 years of age. Design Prospective observational multicenter study. Central corneal thickness was measured with a hand-held contact pachymeter. Results Two thousand seventy-nine children were included in the study, with ages ranging from day of birth to 17 years. Included were 807 white, 494 Hispanic, and 474 African-American individuals, in addition to Asian, unknown and mixed race individuals. African-American children had thinner corneas on average than that of both white (p< .001) and Hispanic children (p< .001) by approximately 20 micrometers. Thicker median CCT was observed with each successive year of age from age 1 to 11 years, with year-to-year differences steadily decreasing and reaching a plateau after age 11 at 573 micrometers in white and Hispanic children and 551 micrometers in African-American children. For every 100 micrometers of thicker CCT measured, the intraocular pressure was 1.5 mmHg higher on average (p< 0.001). For every diopter of increased myopic refractive error (p< 0.001) CCT was 1 micrometer thinner on average. Conclusions Median CCT increases with age from 1 to 11 years with the greatest increase present in the youngest age groups. African-American children on average have thinner central corneas than white and Hispanic children, while white and Hispanic children demonstrate similar central corneal thickness. PMID:21911662

  17. Central New York's New Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for an Urban Future, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Conducted in late 2008 in partnership with the Greater Syracuse Chamber of Commerce and the Mohawk Valley Chamber of Commerce, this is the largest survey ever taken of Central New York businesses regarding the English language skills of the area workforce. The online survey was emailed to several hundred local businesses; 126 responses were…

  18. Pathology of Central American Refugees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molesky, Jean

    1986-01-01

    The rapidly increasing numbers of Central American refugees in the United States include many whose sufferings have led to severe psychological problems. The article attempts to lay a foundation for assisting them by discussing the following: (1) origins of disorders; (2) culture shock and stress; (3) prevalence of symptoms; and (4) suggestions

  19. Conference Summary: The Central Parsecs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townes, C. H.; Stolovy, S. R.; Falcke, H.

    1999-06-01

    This is an edited transcript of the summary talk of the Galactic Center conference ``The Central Parsecs'' in Tucson, Arizona, Sep. 7-11, 1998, given by C. Townes. The talk was taped, transcribed, and finally edited by editors who are listed as co-authors.

  20. The Centrality of Ethical Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrich, Lisa C.; Harris, Jessica; Klenowski, Val; Smeed, Judy; Spina, Nerida

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The central argument in this paper is that ethical school leadership is imperative in a context of increasing performance-driven accountability. The purpose of this paper is to focus on school principals' perceptions of how they understand ethical leadership and how they lead the ethical use of data. Design/Methodology/Approach: This

  1. Central America: A Regional Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowry, George; Lacy, Ann

    This lesson is a series of activities and multi-media presentations designed to enable students to understand the historic and geographic roots of some of the problems that Central American nations have faced. Geography, history, writing, and storytelling are used as ways of understanding a multicultural world. Creative thinking and participation

  2. The Kordofan earthquakes, central Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. A.; Browne, S. E.

    Geophysical studies have revealed extensive rift systems throughout Central Africa, among them the White Nile Rift runnng SE-NW across central Sudan. Few earthquakes have been detected teleseismically in areas of Sudan away from the East African or Red Sea Rift systems. Relocations presented here confirm three earthquakes to have occurred at shallow depth at the NW extreme of the White Nile Rift, around Jebel Dumbeir, Kordofan province. Ambiguity in a teleseismic P-wave first-motion solution for the 9 October 1966 0648GMT event is resolved by use of the P/pP/sP relative amplitude method. The fault plane is near-vertical, striking to 005-025° with a downthrow to the SE and a minor sinistral strike-slip component. This is consistent with ground deformation and location of an aftershock. Its downthrow direction appears to reflect subsidence of the White Nile Rift and central Sudan. Its strike is common with present-day activity in the Ethiopian Rift, suggesting that a near ESE-WSW stress regime persists across central and southern Sudan.

  3. Georgiaites: Tektites in Central Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albin, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    Information is provided about the origin, the features, and the availability of tektites which are odd and very rare types of transparent glass theorized to be from a common, yet unknown, origin. The basis for this article is the Howard collection of tektites found in a small region of central Georgia. (seven references) (JJK)

  4. The Centrality of Vocational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, John

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the concept of the "vocational" in contemporary educational discourses, and argues for the centrality of vocational aspects of learning in making meaning. The existing tensions are seen to lie between discourses that place the vocational at the bottom of a hierarchy of knowledge and value, and discourses concerning…

  5. Earth Works Central. [Educational Packet].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kids for Saving Earth Worldwide, Minneapolis, MN.

    Earth Works Central is an educational curriculum tool designed to provide environmental education support for the classroom. It features environmental materials for science, geography, history, art, music, dramatics, and physical education. It includes information on creating an environmental center where kids can learn and become empowered to…

  6. The Centrality of Ethical Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrich, Lisa C.; Harris, Jessica; Klenowski, Val; Smeed, Judy; Spina, Nerida

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The central argument in this paper is that ethical school leadership is imperative in a context of increasing performance-driven accountability. The purpose of this paper is to focus on school principals' perceptions of how they understand ethical leadership and how they lead the ethical use of data. Design/Methodology/Approach: This…

  7. Central Statistical Libraries in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Lisa

    The paper tries to clarify the position special governmental libraries hold in the system of libraries of today by investigating only one specific type of library mainly from a formal and historical point of view. Central statistical libraries in Europe were first regarded as administrative and archival libraries. Their early holdings of foreign…

  8. Central Data/Decentralized Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gossett, Cathy L.; Neil, Elizabeth N.

    1987-01-01

    The study and implementation of an online facilities management system at Clemson University that was designed with distributed processing in mind is described. The system provides for centralized data, assignment of data responsibility, increased data accessibility, and audit trail. Security considerations and mini- and microapplications are…

  9. Central Bureau Status and Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilan, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    The Central Bureau continues to promote the IGS organization, data and data products as setting the world standard for GPS/GNSS geodetic applications as outlined in the IGS Strategic Plan. The Central Bureau was responsible for the organization of the strategic planning process, preparation of all documents, and the editing and publication of the plan. This was a major activity and the Board s consensus on the plan is a significant milestone in the evolution of the IGS. The Central Bureau is responsible for the day-to-day management of the Service. With 200 organizations in over 80 countries and a ground network of approx. 350 stations, this requires daily interfaces on many different levels globally. The separate summary of the IGS Network Coordinator is included in this annual report and demonstrates the vital technical tasks of the Central Bureau. The CB is also responsible to arrange and organize all Board activities and is involved in the supporting the planning and logistics of all IGS workshops and meetings.

  10. Central American geologic map project

    SciTech Connect

    Dengo, G.

    1986-07-01

    During the Northeast Quadrant Panel meeting of the Circum-Pacific Map Project held in Mexico City, February 1985, Central American panel members proposed and adopted plans for compiling a geologic map of Central America, probably at a scale of 1:500,000. A local group with participants from each country was organized and coordinated by Rolando Castillo, director, Central American School of Geology, University of Costa Rica, for the geologic aspects, and Fernando Rudin, director, Geographic Institute of Costa Rica, for the topographic base. In 1956, the US Geological Survey published a geologic map of the region at a scale of 1:1 million. Subsequent topographic and geologic mapping projects have provided a large amount of new data. The entire area is now covered by topographic maps at a scale of 1:50,000, and these maps have been used in several countries as a base for geologic mapping. Another regional map, the Metallogenic Map of Central America (scale = 1:2 million), was published in 1969 by the Central American Research Institute for Industry (ICAITI) with a generalized but updated geologic base map. Between 1969 and 1980, maps for each country were published by local institutions: Guatemala-Belize at 1:500,000, Honduras at 1:500,000, El Salvador at 1:100,000, Nicaragua at 1:1 million, Costa Rica at 1:200,000, and Panama at 1:1 million. This information, in addition to that of newly mapped areas, served as the base for the Central American part of the Geologic-Tectonic Map of the Caribbean Region (scale = 1:2.5 million), published by the US Geological Survey in 1980, and also fro the Northeast Quadrant Maps of the Circum-Pacific Region. The new project also involves bathymetric and geologic mapping of the Pacific and Caribbean margins of the Central American Isthmus. A substantial amount of new information of the Middle America Trench has been acquired through DSDP Legs 67 and 84.

  11. Ratios of heavy baryons to heavy mesons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2009-04-01

    Heavy baryon/meson ratios Λc/D0 and Λb/ Bmacr 0 in relativistic heavy ion collisions are studied in the quark coalescence model. For heavy baryons, we include production from coalescence of heavy quarks with free light quarks as well as with bounded light diquarks that might exist in the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma produced in these collisions. Including the contribution from decays of heavy hadron resonances and also that due to fragmentation of heavy quarks that are left in the system after coalescence, the resulting Λc/D0 and Λb/ Bmacr 0 ratios in midrapidity (|y|⩽0.5) from central Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV are about a factor of five and ten, respectively, larger than those given by the thermal model, and about a factor of ten and twelve, respectively, larger than corresponding ratios in the PYTHIA model for pp collisions. These ratios are reduced by a factor of about 1.6 if there are no diquarks in the quark-gluon plasma. The transverse momentum dependence of the heavy baryon/meson ratios is found to be sensitive to the heavy quark mass, with the Λb/ Bmacr 0 ratio being much flatter than the Λc/D0 ratio. The latter peaks at the transverse momentum pT≃0.8 GeV but the peak shifts to pT≃2 GeV in the absence of diquarks.

  12. Ratios of heavy baryons to heavy mesons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2009-04-15

    Heavy baryon/meson ratios {lambda}{sub c}/D{sup 0} and {lambda}{sub b}/B{sup 0} in relativistic heavy ion collisions are studied in the quark coalescence model. For heavy baryons, we include production from coalescence of heavy quarks with free light quarks as well as with bounded light diquarks that might exist in the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma produced in these collisions. Including the contribution from decays of heavy hadron resonances and also that due to fragmentation of heavy quarks that are left in the system after coalescence, the resulting {lambda}{sub c}/D{sup 0} and {lambda}{sub b}/B{sup 0} ratios in midrapidity (|y|{<=}0.5) from central Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV are about a factor of five and ten, respectively, larger than those given by the thermal model, and about a factor of ten and twelve, respectively, larger than corresponding ratios in the PYTHIA model for pp collisions. These ratios are reduced by a factor of about 1.6 if there are no diquarks in the quark-gluon plasma. The transverse momentum dependence of the heavy baryon/meson ratios is found to be sensitive to the heavy quark mass, with the {lambda}{sub b}/B{sup 0} ratio being much flatter than the {lambda}{sub c}/D{sup 0} ratio. The latter peaks at the transverse momentum p{sub T}{approx_equal}0.8 GeV but the peak shifts to p{sub T}{approx_equal}2 GeV in the absence of diquarks.

  13. Radiographic assessment of clinical root-crown ratios of permanent teeth in a healthy Korean population

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hee-Jung; Jeong, Jin-Sun; Pang, Nan-Sim; Kwon, Il-Keun

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine the absolute value of the root/crown ratio (R/C ratio) using panoramic radiographs (PRGs) in a healthy Korean population. MATERIALS AND METHODS In total, 99 patient radiographs (of 50 males and 49 females subjects; aged 16 to 24 years old) were examined, and 2,770 teeth were analyzed. Crown lengths and root lengths were measured with modified Lind's measurements using PACS tools by two examiners in two separate sessions two months apart. All data were analyzed using SPSS. The independent t-test was used to assess for gender differences, and the paired t-test was used to compare both arches with a significance level of P<.05. RESULTS The mean R/C ratios varied from 1.29 to 1.89 (male: 1.28-1.84; females: 1.31-1.94). The highest R/C ratios were recorded for the mandibular canines (1.89), followed by the maxillary canines (1.79). The lowest R/C ratios were recorded for the maxillary second molars (1.31). In comparison with the maxillary teeth (1.29-1.78), the mandibular teeth yielded the higher R/C ratio (1.47-1.89), and this difference was significant in the females (P<.05). The difference between the genders was not statistically significant, except for the maxillary central incisors, mandibular canines and mandibular first premolars. CONCLUSION These data may enhance the understanding of the clinical R/C ratio as a useful guideline for determining the status of teeth and the ethnic difference. PMID:25006380

  14. Carbohydrate to protein ratio in food and cognitive performance in the morning.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Karina; Colombani, Paolo C; Langhans, Wolfgang; Wenk, Caspar

    2002-03-01

    The effect of different carbohydrate to protein ratios in food on cognitive functions and the relation between postprandial metabolic and cognitive changes were studied in 15 healthy male students. Subjects were tested in three sessions, separated by 1 week, for short-term changes in mood states, objective cognitive functions, blood parameters, and indirect calorimetry using a repeated-measures, counterbalanced cross-over design. Measurements were made after an overnight fast before and hourly during 3.5 h after test meal ingestion. The isoenergetic (1670 kJ) test meals consisted of three carbohydrate to protein ratios, i.e. a carbohydrate-rich (CHO[4:1]), balanced (BAL[1:1]), and protein-rich (PRO[1:4]) meal, respectively. Overall accuracy in short-term memory was best after the PRO[1:4] meal concomitant to the least variation in glucose metabolism and glucagon to insulin ratio (GIR). Related to changes in glucose metabolism and/or in the ratios of large neutral amino acids (LNAA), respectively, attention and decision times were transiently improved within the first hour after the CHO[4:1] meal, whereas after the first hour the BAL[1:1] and PRO[1:4] meal resulted in improved performance. Overall reaction times of a central task were fastest after the BAL[1:1] meal concomitant to the highest overall tyrosine (Tyr) to LNAA ratio. Our findings suggest that the carbohydrate to protein ratio in food specifically influences higher cognitive functions in the morning. Except for a transient positive effect of rising blood glucose after a carbohydrate-rich meal, a protein-rich or balanced meal seems to result in better overall cognitive performance presumably because of less variation in glucose metabolism and/or higher modulation in LNAA ratios indicated by the overall GIR. PMID:11897269

  15. Selenium/mercury molar ratios in freshwater, marine, and commercial fish from the USA: variation, risk, and health management.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Fish provide healthy protein as well as recreational and cultural benefits, but can also contain mercury (Hg), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other contaminants that have adverse effects on humans and other organisms, particularly developing fetuses. Recently, some authors have suggested that a molar excess of selenium (Se) [e.g., selenium/mercury (Se/Hg) molar ratio >1] confers protection from Hg toxicity derived from fish consumption. Herein, we review our studies of Hg and Se in freshwater, marine, and commercial fish (mainly marine), examining the following: (1) whether and how Se/Hg molar ratios vary among species; (2) whether and how the molar ratios vary within species; (3) whether the molar ratios differ between freshwater and saltwater fish; (4) whether mean molar ratio values provide a reliable indication of potential risk to fish consumers; and (5) whether mean Se/Hg molar ratios are sufficiently constant (e.g., low variation) to allow for use in risk assessment, risk management, or risk communication. In saltwater fish, mean Se/Hg molar ratios varied from 0.3 in mako shark to 68.1 in whiting. For freshwater fish, the mean ratios varied from 0.68 in bowfin to 20.8 in black crappie. Commercial seafood (mainly saltwater) showed great variation in ratios; shrimp and scallops had very high ratios. There was somewhat less variability in the ratios for freshwater fish compared with the fish from saltwater, but there was no overall predictable difference in variation in Se/Hg molar ratios. For both saltwater and freshwater fish, some species with mean molar ratios above 1 had a significant proportion of individual fish with molar ratios below 1. Overall, this indicates great variation in measures of central tendencies and in measures of dispersion. We suggest that relying on the Se/Hg molar ratio as a method of predicting reduced risk from Hg toxicity is problematic because of the great variation among and within fish species, and the variation is not predictable because Hg varies by season, size of the fish, and location of the fish (which is not available for commercial fish). With the high variation in ratios, and low predictability, the ratios are currently not useful for risk assessment and risk management, and vulnerable individuals cannot rely on mean Se/Hg molar ratios for protection from Hg toxicity. PMID:24192499

  16. Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio and Platelet-to-Lymphocyte Ratio are Predictors of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Durmus, Erdal; Kivrak, Tarik; Gerin, Fethullah; Sunbul, Murat; Sari, Ibrahim; Erdogan, Okan

    2015-01-01

    Background Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) are inflammatory markers used as prognostic factors in various diseases. The aims of this study were to compare the PLR and the NLR of heart failure (HF) patients with those of age-sex matched controls, to evaluate the predictive value of those markers in detecting HF, and to demonstrate the effect of NLR and PLR on mortality in HF patients during follow-up. Methods This study included 56 HF patients and 40 controls without HF. All subjects underwent transthoracic echocardiography to evaluate cardiac functions. The NLR and the PLR were calculated as the ratio of neutrophil count to lymphocyte count and as the ratio of platelet count to lymphocyte count, respectively. All HF patients were followed after their discharge from the hospital to evaluate mortality, cerebrovascular events, and re-hospitalization. Results The NLR and the PLR of HF patients were significantly higher compared to those of the controls (p < 0.01). There was an inverse correlation between the NLR and the left ventricular ejection fraction of the study population (r: -0.409, p < 0.001). The best cut-off value of NLR to predict HF was 3.0, with 86.3% sensitivity and 77.5% specificity, and the best cut-off value of PLR to predict HF was 137.3, with 70% sensitivity and 60% specificity. Only NLR was an independent predictor of mortality in HF patients. A cut-off value of 5.1 for NLR can predict death in HF patients with 75% sensitivity and 62% specificity during a 12.8-month follow-up period on average. Conclusion NLR and PLR were higher in HF patients than in age-sex matched controls. However, NLR and PLR were not sufficient to establish a diagnosis of HF. NLR can be used to predict mortality during the follow-up of HF patients. PMID:26536980

  17. Enantiomer Ratios of Meteoritic Sugar Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George

    2012-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites contain a diverse suite of soluble organic compounds. Studies of these compounds reveal the Solar System's earliest organic chemistry. Among the classes of organic compounds found in meteorites are keto acids (pyruvic acid, etc.), hydroxy tricarboxylic acids (1), amino acids, amides, purines and pyrimidines. The Murchison and Murray meteorites are the most studied for soluble and insoluble organic compounds and organic carbon phases. The majority of (indigenous) meteoritic compounds are racemic, (i.e., their D/L enantiomer ratios are 50:50). However, some of the more unusual (non-protein) amino acids contain slightly more of one enantiomer (usually the L) than the other. This presentation focuses on the enantiomer analyses of three to six-carbon (3C to 6C) meteoritic sugar acids. The molecular and enantiomer analysis of corresponding sugar alcohols will also be discussed. Detailed analytical procedures for sugar-acid enantiomers have been described. Results of several meteorite analyses show that glyceric acid is consistently racemic (or nearly so) as expected of non-biological mechanisms of synthesis. Also racemic are 4-C deoxy sugar acids: 2-methyl glyceric acid; 2,4-dihydroxybutyric acid; 2,3-dihydroxybutyric acid (two diastereomers); and 3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid. However, a 4C acid, threonic acid, has never been observed as racemic, i.e., it possesses a large D excess. In several samples of Murchison and one of GRA 95229 (possibly the most pristine carbonaceous meteorite yet analyzed) threonic acid has nearly the same D enrichment. In Murchison, preliminary isotopic measurements of individual threonic acid enantiomers point towards extraterrestrial sources of the D enrichment. Enantiomer analyses of the 5C mono-sugar acids, ribonic, arabinonic, xylonic, and lyxonic also show large D excesses. It is worth noting that all four of these acids (all of the possible straight-chained 5C sugar acids) are present in meteorites, including the rare lyxonic acid, and their relative abundances are in equilibrium proportions. In addition (in contrast to the above D-only excesses), some of the above acids are found in biology as the L enantiomer. Whether rare are common, all of the 6C sugar acids that are present in sufficient amounts to allow enantiomer analysis (Mannonic, gluconic, altronic, talonic, idonic, gulonic, and galactonic) also, apparently, possess significant D excesses.

  18. Reinforcing Effects of d-Amphetamine: Influence of Novel Ratios on a Progressive-Ratio Schedule

    PubMed Central

    Sevak, Rajkumar J.; Stoops, William W.; Glaser, Paul E.A.; Hays, Lon R.; Rush, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Progressive-ratio schedules are useful for studying reinforcing effects of drugs. Previous human laboratory studies showed that d-amphetamine significantly increased break points relative to placebo levels. However, the magnitude of the increase was modest, which may be attributable to rather high levels of placebo responding. We utilized novel response requirements under the modified progressive-ratio schedule and hypothesized that the altered range of response requirements would decrease responding for placebo and increase responding for d-amphetamine. Eight participants completed the study. The participants first sampled oral doses of d-amphetamine (0, 8, 16 and 24 mg). In subsequent sessions, participants were offered the opportunity to work for the sampled dose on a modified progressive-ratio procedure with response requirements ranging from 400 to 1800 mouse clicks. A battery of participant-rated drug-effect questionnaires, a performance measure and cardiovascular measures were included in orderto characterize more fully the effects of d-amphetamine. Placebo maintained low levels of responding. The intermediate dose of d-amphetamine increased responding significantly above placebo levels. d-Amphetamine produced prototypical subject-rated effects that were an orderly function of dose. The present data suggest that the modified response requirements resulted in lower levels of placebo taking and a larger separation between number of placebo and d-amphetamine capsules earned. PMID:20944503

  19. Deep, Low Mass Ratio Overcontact Binary Systems. V. The Lowest Mass Ratio Binary V857 Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.-B.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Soonthornthum, B.; Yuan, J.-Z.; Yang, Y.-G.; He, J.-J.

    2005-09-01

    Charge-coupled device (CCD) photometric light curves in the B, V, and R bands of the complete eclipsing binary star V857 Her are presented. It is shown that the light curves of the W UMa-type binary are symmetric and of A type according to Binnendijk's classification. Our four epochs of light minimum along with others compiled from the literature were used to revise the period and study the period change. Weak evidence indicates that the orbital period of V857 Her may show a continuous increase at a rate of dP/dt=+2.90×10-7 days yr-1. The photometric parameters of the system were determined with the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney code. It is shown that V857 Her is a deep overcontact binary system with f=83.8%+/-5.1%. The derived mass ratio of q=0.06532+/-0.0002 suggests that it has the lowest mass ratio among overcontact binary systems. As the orbital period increases, the decrease of the mass ratio will cause it to evolve into a single rapidly rotating star when it meets the more familiar criterion that the orbital angular momentum be less than 3 times the total spin angular momentum. To understand the evolutionary state of the system, long-term photometric monitoring and spectroscopic observations will be required.

  20. Prediction of Central Burst Defects in Copper Wire Drawing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, G.; Haddi, A.; Imad, A.

    2011-01-17

    In this study, the prediction of chevron cracks (central bursts) in copper wire drawing process is investigated using experimental and numerical approaches. The conditions of the chevron cracks creation along the wire axis depend on (i) the die angle, the friction coefficient between the die and the wire, (ii) the reduction in crosssectional area of the wire, (iii) the material properties and (iv) the drawing velocity or strain rate. Under various drawing conditions, a numerical simulation for the prediction of central burst defects is presented using an axisymmetric finite element model. This model is based on the application of the Cockcroft and Latham fracture criterion. This criterion was used as the damage value to estimate if and where defects will occur during the copper wire drawing. The critical damage value of the material is obtained from a uniaxial tensile test. The results show that the die angle and the reduction ratio have a significant effect on the stress distribution and the maximum damage value. The central bursts are expected to occur when the die angle and reduction ratio reach a critical value. Numerical predictions are compared with experimental observations.

  1. Processes affecting oxygen isotope ratios of atmospheric and ecosystem sulfate in two contrasting forest catchments in Central Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Novak; Myron J. Mitchell; Iva Jackova; Frantisek Buzek; Jana Schweigstillova; Lucie Erbanova; Richard Prikryl; Daniela Fottova

    2007-02-15

    Sulfate aerosols are harmful as respirable particles. They also play a role as cloud condensation nuclei and have radiative effects on global climate. A combination of {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} data with catchment sulfur mass balances was used to constrain processes affecting S cycling in the atmosphere and spruce forests of the Czech Republic. Extremely high S fluxes via spruce throughfall and runoff were measured at Jezeri (49 and 80 kg S ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, respectively). The second catchment, Na Lizu, was 10 times less polluted. In both catchments, {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} decreased in the following order: open-area precipitation {gt} throughfall {gt} runoff. The 180-SO{sub 4} values of throughfall exhibited a seasonal pattern at both sites, with maxima in summer and minima in winter. This seasonal pattern paralleled {delta}{sup 18}O-H{sub 2}O values, which were offset by -18{per_thousand}. Sulfate in throughfall was predominantly formed by heterogeneous (aqueous) oxidation of SO{sub 2}. Wet-deposited sulfate in an open area did not show systematic {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} trends, suggesting formation by homogeneous (gaseous) oxidation and/or transport from large distances. The percentage of incoming S that is organically cycled in soil was similar under the high and the low pollution. High-temperature {sup 18}O-rich sulfate was not detected, which contrasts with North American industrial sites. 29 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. The effect of a reciprocal peat transplant between two contrasting Central European sites on C cycling and C isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, M.; Zemanova, L.; Buzek, F.; Jackova, I.; Adamova, M.; Komarek, A.; Vile, M. A.; Kelman Wieder, R.; Stepanova, M.

    2010-03-01

    An 18-month reciprocal peat transplant experiment was conducted between two peatlands in the Czech Republic. Both sites were 100% Sphagnum-covered, with no vascular plants, and no hummocks and hollows. Atmospheric depositions of sulfur were up to 10 times higher at the northern site Velke jerabi jezero (VJJ), compared to the southern site Cervene blato (CB). Forty-cm deep peat cores, 10-cm in diameter, were used as transplants and controls in five replicates. Our objective was to evaluate whether CO2 and CH4 emissions from Sphagnum peat bogs are governed mainly by organic matter quality in the substrate, or by environmental conditions. Emission rates and δ13C values of CO2 and CH4 were measured in the laboratory at time t=18 months. All measured parameters converged to those of the host site, indicating that, at least in the short-term perspective, environmental conditions were a more important control of greenhouse gas emissions than organic carbon quality in the substrate. Since sulfate reducers outcompete methanogens, we hypothesized that the S-polluted site VJJ should have lower methane emissions than CB. In fact, the opposite was true, with significantly (p<0.01) higher methane emissions from VJJ. Additionally, as a first step in an effort to link C isotope composition of emitted gases and residual peat substrate, we determined whether multiple vertical δ13C profiles in peat agree. A high degree of within-site homogeneity in δ13C was found. When a specific vertical δ13C trend was seen in one peat core, the same trend was also seen in all the remaining peat cores from the wetland. The δ13C value increased downcore at both CB and VJJ. At VJJ, however, 20 cm below surface, a reversal to lower δ13C downcore was seen. Based on 210Pb dating, peat at 20-cm depth at VJJ was only 15 years old. Increasing δ13C values in VJJ peat accumulated between 1880-1990 could not be caused by assimilation of atmospheric CO2 gradually enriched in the light isotope 12C due to fossil fuel burning. Rather they were a result of a combination of isotope fractionations accompanying assimilation and mineralization of Sphagnum C. These isotope fractionations may record information about past changes in C storage in wetlands.

  3. Renalase regulates peripheral and central dopaminergic activities

    PubMed Central

    Serrão, Maria Paula; Soares-Silva, Isabel; Fernandes-Cerqueira, Cátia; Simões-Silva, Liliana; Pinho, Maria João; Remião, Fernando; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Desir, Gary V.; Pestana, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Renalase is a recently identified FAD/NADH-dependent amine oxidase mainly expressed in kidney that is secreted into blood and urine where it was suggested to metabolize catecholamines. The present study evaluated central and peripheral dopaminergic activities in the renalase knockout (KO) mouse model and examined the changes induced by recombinant renalase (RR) administration on plasma and urine catecholamine levels. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, KO mice presented increased plasma levels of epinephrine (Epi), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA) that were accompanied by increases in the urinary excretion of Epi, NE, DA. In addition, the KO mice presented an increase in urinary DA-to-l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) ratios without changes in renal tubular aromatic-l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) activity. By contrast, the in vivo administration of RR (1.5 mg/kg sc) to KO mice was accompanied by significant decreases in plasma levels of Epi, DA, and l-DOPA as well as in urinary excretion of Epi, DA, and DA-to-l-DOPA ratios notwithstanding the accompanied increase in renal AADC activity. In addition, the increase in renal DA output observed in renalase KO mice was accompanied by an increase in the expression of the L-type amino acid transporter like (LAT) 1 that is reversed by the administration of RR in these animals. These results suggest that the overexpression of LAT1 in the renal cortex of the renalase KO mice might contribute to the enhanced l-DOPA availability/uptake and consequently to the activation of the renal dopaminergic system in the presence of renalase deficiency. PMID:25411385

  4. Abyssal benthos of the central Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parulekar, A. H.; Harkantra, S. N.; Ansari, Z. A.; Matondkar, S. G. P.

    1982-12-01

    Quantitative studies of the abyssal benthos (3600 to 5300 m) of the central Indian Ocean show a rich fauna and high standing crops. Density of 3 meiofaunal and 12 macrofaunal taxa are large (2175 to 15233; x = 6441 m -2) Polychaetes (41.6%), peracarid crustaceans (31.7%), ophiuroids (12.2%), echiuroid-bryozoa (9.7%), molluscs (4.8%), and agglutinating rhizopod protozoans form the macrofauna. Meiofaunal taxa are nematodes (69.4%), harpacticoid copepods (26.6%), and ostracods (4%). Meiofauna abundances are positively correlated with distance from shore, whereas the distribution and abundance of macrofauna are independent of variations in depth and distance from the shore. Ratio of macro to meiofauna in the total population is 1 to 31. The benthic standing crop is uniformly high (0.54 to 13.73 g m -2; x = 2.70 g m -2) and many times larger than previously reported for comparable depths in other oceans and from the same region. Biomass values are significantly related to distance from shore and the type of substratum. Contribution of macro and meiofauna to the total standing crop was in the ratio of 31 to 1. High benthic biomass and rich fauna are consequences of high organic production in the euphotic zone. The correlation between biomass of the total oxidizable organic matter in the water column and the benthic standing crop is statistically significant ( r = -0.64) at the P < 0.05 level. Rich fauna and high standing crop were associated with the occurrence of polymetallic nodules.

  5. Is Central Asia really exsiccating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizen, V. B.; Aizen, E. M.; Surazakov, A. B.

    2008-12-01

    At the end of 20th and the beginning of 21st century central Asia oases suffered from serious drought caused lack of water for agriculture, economy growth and population increase. However, people of this region always experienced lack of water for irrigation and fought a war over the rights to control river streams. The drying up of central Asian rivers is not a new phenomenon according to the ancient manuscripts. Thus, lets see about what has happened with the past century climate and water resources of central Asia using the long-term observational data. We analyzed data from more than 200 meteorological stations and stream gauges over the central Asia in elevation range from 25 m. b.s.l. to 4,000 m. a.s.l. to understand the last 100 years variability in climate and water resources, examining changes in the extreme and mean monthly air temperatures, precipitation and river runoff. The evaluation of seasonal snow and glacier's covered areas between 1970th and 2007th in central Asia derived from AVHRR, MODIS, Hexagon KH-9, Landsat ETM and ASTER data exhibit 15% reduction of the seasonal snow covered area and 10.1% of the glacier area. It has been found that during last twenty years the duration of snowmelt, from the date of maximum snow cover to date of its disappearance, reduced by 30 days and in 2007 was equal to 138 days in the central Asian mountains. The decrease of seasonal snow cover is not a linear process. The further decrease may be accelerated due to increase of rainfall instead of snowfall in early spring months at high elevations, and consequently a lesser heat expenditure for the snowmelt. The growth in summer air temperatures, especially observable since the 1970th, accompanied by increase of evapotranspiration and precipitation, notably in summer and autumn, and at high elevations over 3,000 m, and at the western peripheral mountain ridges. Average difference in the means of annual air temperatures for the two thirty-year periods before and after 1972 was 0.68C and is attributed to summer seasons. The maximum growth in air temperature observed since 70th at low elevations and northern regions of central Asia. The share of glacier melt water in total river runoff at upper river reaches has increased as result of air temperature growth. The glacier's intensified melt and retreat created numerous new moraine lakes. Strengthening in the melt of glaciers and even insignificant increase in spring and summer precipitation promotes growth of Issik Kul Lake level and others interior lakes of central Asia. While the central Asia glacier area decreases continuously, for the last two decades the annual river runoff and water storing in lakes are growing, mainly due to precipitation increase. The simulation of river runoff, based on observed tendency of continuous growth in air temperature and precipitation, exposits that river runoff may reach up to 1.25 of the current level by 2050. However, the possible changes in river runoff indicated non-linear system response caused mainly by non-linearly response of evapotranspiration to air temperature and precipitation changes.

  6. Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: 24-Hour Urine Protein; Urine Total Protein; Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio; ...

  7. Quasi-helical symmetry at finite aspect ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Nuehrenberg, C.; Mikhailov, M. I.; Nuehrenberg, J.; Shafranov, V. D.

    2010-07-15

    Computational stellarator optimization is used to create a configuration which is quasi-helically symmetric at finite aspect ratio. For the aspect ratio per period chosen ({approx}2), this procedure results in benign properties throughout the plasma volume.

  8. Describing behavior with ratios of count and time

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, J. M.; Hodge, Clyde W.

    1989-01-01

    Describing behavior with ratios of count and time is a popular measurement tactic in the field of behavior analysis. The paper examines some count and time ratios in order to determine what about behavior each describes and why one ratio may sometimes be more useful than another. In addition, the paper briefly considers some terminological issues, derived quantities, dimensional analysis, some advantages and disadvantages of ratios, and selection of useful quantities for measurement. PMID:22478031

  9. Central Flash Analysis of the 29 June 2015 Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Person, Michael J.; Bosh, A. S.; Sickafoose, A. A.; Zuluaga, C. A.; Levine, S. E.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; Dunham, E. W.; McLean, I.; Wolf, J.; Abe, F.; Becklin, E.; Bida, T. A.; Bright, L. P.; Brothers, T. C.; Christie, G.; Collins, P. L.; Durst, R. F.; Gilmore, A. C.; Hamilton, R.; Harris, H. C.; Johnson, C.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kosiarek, M. R.; Leppik, K.; Logsdon, S. E.; Lucas, R.; Mathers, S.; Morley, C. J. K.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, P.; Ngan, H.; Pfueller, E.; Roeser, H.-P.; Sallum, S.; Savage, M.; Seeger, C. H.; Siu, H.; Stockdale, C.; Suzuki, D.; Thanathibodee, T.; Tilleman, T.; Tristram, P. J.; Van Cleeve, J.; Varughese, C.; Weisenbach, L. W.; Widen, E.; Wiedemann, M.

    2015-11-01

    After an extensive prediction effort, the 29 June 2015 occultation by Pluto was observed from both airborne (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy - SOFIA) and numerous ground-based telescopes (Bosh et al. - this meeting). Real-time prediction updates allowed placement of the SOFIA telescope with its four detectors deep within the central-flash region of the atmospheric occultation. Fortuitously, the Mount John University Observatory (Lake Tekapo, New Zealand) was also within the central-flash region (Pasachoff et al. - this meeting). This happenstance resulted in multiple central-flash detections in several colors from each facility allowing direct comparison of different areas of the central-flash evolute.Here we examine and discuss the central-flash signatures from the highest signal-to-noise light curves from each facility. The relative orientations and asymmetries in the central flashes allow us to use them to tightly constrain the lower atmospheric ellipticity and orientation of likely winds with respect to Pluto’s figure. The ratio of the two separate central flashes is also a strong constraint on the geometric solution for the full occultation data set, and the absolute height of the central flashes with respect to those expected for a clear isothermal atmosphere places constraints on haze densities and thermal gradients in Pluto’s lower atmosphere. We can also compare the central-flash signatures in several colors (similar to Sickafoose et. al - this meeting) to establish bounds on haze-particle sizes in the lower atmosphere.SOFIA is jointly operated by the Universities Space Research Association, Inc. (USRA), under NASA contract NAS2-97001, and the Deutsches SOFIA Institut (DSI) under DLR contract 50 OK 0901 to the University of Stuttgart. Support for this work was provided, in part, by NASA grants SSO NNX15AJ82G (Lowell Observatory), PA NNX10AB27G (MIT), and PA NNX12AJ29G (Williams College), as well as the National Research Foundation of South Africa, and the NASA SOFIA Cycle 3 grant NAS2-97001 issued by USRA.

  10. A centralized audio presentation manager

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, A.L. III; Blattner, M.M.

    1994-05-16

    The centralized audio presentation manager addresses the problems which occur when multiple programs running simultaneously attempt to use the audio output of a computer system. Time dependence of sound means that certain auditory messages must be scheduled simultaneously, which can lead to perceptual problems due to psychoacoustic phenomena. Furthermore, the combination of speech and nonspeech audio is examined; each presents its own problems of perceptibility in an acoustic environment composed of multiple auditory streams. The centralized audio presentation manager receives abstract parameterized message requests from the currently running programs, and attempts to create and present a sonic representation in the most perceptible manner through the use of a theoretically and empirically designed rule set.

  11. A Randomized Central Limit Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2010-05-01

    The Central Limit Theorem (CLT), one of the most elemental pillars of Probability Theory and Statistical Physics, asserts that: the universal probability law of large aggregates of independent and identically distributed random summands with zero mean and finite variance, scaled by the square root of the aggregate-size (√{n}), is Gaussian. The scaling scheme of the CLT is deterministic and uniform - scaling all aggregate-summands by the common and deterministic factor √{n}. This Letter considers scaling schemes which are stochastic and non-uniform, and presents a "Randomized Central Limit Theorem" (RCLT): we establish a class of random scaling schemes which yields universal probability laws of large aggregates of independent and identically distributed random summands. The RCLT universal probability laws, in turn, are the one-sided and the symmetric Lévy laws.

  12. The Central Valley Hydrologic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faunt, C.; Belitz, K.; Hanson, R. T.

    2009-12-01

    Historically, California’s Central Valley has been one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. The Central Valley also is rapidly becoming an important area for California’s expanding urban population. In response to this competition for water, a number of water-related issues have gained prominence: conjunctive use, artificial recharge, hydrologic implications of land-use change, subsidence, and effects of climate variability. To provide information to stakeholders addressing these issues, the USGS made a detailed assessment of the Central Valley aquifer system that includes the present status of water resources and how these resources have changed over time. The principal product of this assessment is a tool, referred to as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM), that simulates surface-water flows, groundwater flows, and land subsidence in response to stresses from human uses and from climate variability throughout the entire Central Valley. The CVHM utilizes MODFLOW combined with a new tool called “Farm Process” to simulate groundwater and surface-water flow, irrigated agriculture, land subsidence, and other key processes in the Central Valley on a monthly basis. This model was discretized horizontally into 20,000 1-mi2 cells and vertically into 10 layers ranging in thickness from 50 feet at the land surface to 750 feet at depth. A texture model constructed by using data from more than 8,500 drillers’ logs was used to estimate hydraulic properties. Unmetered pumpage and surface-water deliveries for 21 water-balance regions were simulated with the Farm Process. Model results indicate that human activities, predominately surface-water deliveries and groundwater pumping for irrigated agriculture, have dramatically influenced the hydrology of the Central Valley. These human activities have increased flow though the aquifer system by about a factor of six compared to pre-development conditions. The simulated hydrology reflects spatial and temporal variability in climate, land-use changes, and available surface-water deliveries. For example, the droughts of 1976-77 and 1987-92 led to reduced streamflow and surface-water deliveries and increased evapotranspiration and groundwater pumpage throughout most of the valley, resulting in a decrease in groundwater storage. Since the mid-1990s, annual surface-water deliveries generally have exceeded groundwater pumpage, resulting in an increase or no change in groundwater storage throughout most of the valley. However, groundwater is still being removed from storage during most years in the southern part of the Central Valley. The CVHM is designed to be coupled with Global Climate Models to forecast the potential supply of surface-water deliveries, demand for groundwater pumpage, potential subsidence, and changes in groundwater storage in response to different climate-change scenarios. The detailed database on texture properties coupled with CVHM's ability to simulate the combined effects of recharge and discharge make CVHM particularly useful for assessing water-management plans, such as conjunctive water use, conservation of agriculture land, and land-use change. In the future, the CVHM could be used in conjunction with optimization models to help evaluate water-management alternatives to effectively utilize the available water resources.

  13. Central exclusive production at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, Leszek; Guryn, Włodek; Turnau, Jacek

    2014-11-10

    The present status and future plans of the physics program of Central Exclusive Production (CEP) at RHIC are described. The measurements are based on the detection of the forward protons from the Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) process in the Roman Pot system and of the recoil system of charged particles from the DPE process measured in the STAR experiment’s Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The data described here were taken using polarized proton-proton collisions at ps = 200 GeV. The preliminary spectra of two pion and four pion invariant mass reconstructed by STAR TPC in central region of pseudo-rapidity |#17;| < 1, are presented. Near future plans to take data with the current system at center-of-mass energy ps = 200 GeV and plans to upgrade the forward proton tagging sys- tem are presented. Also a possible addition of the Roman Pots to the sPHENIX detector is discussed.

  14. MRDIS Standalone Central Alarm Station

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-09-12

    The MRDIS Standalone Central Alarm Station(MRDIS-CAS} is a software system for receiving, storing, and reviewing radiation data collected by the Mobile Radiation Detection and Identification System (MRDIS}, a mobile radiation scanning system developed for use in foreign ports for the DOE Megaports Initiative. It is designed to run on one of the on board computers in the MRDIS cab. It will collect, store, and display data from the MRDIS without the need for wireless communicationsmore » or centralized server technology. It is intended to be a lightweight replacement for a distributed Megaports communication system in ports where the necessary communications infrastructure does not exist for a full Megaports communications system.« less

  15. Statistical model predictions for particle ratios at {radical}(s{sub NN})=5.5 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Cleymans, J.; Kraus, I.; Oeschler, H.; Redlich, K.; Wheaton, S.

    2006-09-15

    Particle production in central Pb-Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is discussed in the context of the statistical model. Predictions of various particle ratios are presented with the corresponding choice of model parameters made according to the systematics extracted from heavy-ion collisions at lower energies. The sensitivities of several ratios to the temperature and baryon chemical potential are studied in detail, and some of them, which are particularly appropriate to determining the chemical freeze-out point experimentally, are indicated. We show that the p/p ratio is most suitable for determining the baryon chemical potential, while the {omega}{sup -}/K{sup -} and {omega}{sup -}/{pi}{sup -} ratios are best for determining the temperature at chemical freeze-out.

  16. Auditory Discrimination of Frequency Ratios: The Octave Singularity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnard, Damien; Micheyl, Christophe; Semal, Catherine; Dauman, Rene; Demany, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Sensitivity to frequency ratios is essential for the perceptual processing of complex sounds and the appreciation of music. This study assessed the effect of ratio simplicity on ratio discrimination for pure tones presented either simultaneously or sequentially. Each stimulus consisted of four 100-ms pure tones, equally spaced in terms of…

  17. 26 CFR 1.72-4 - Exclusion ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exclusion ratio. 1.72-4 Section 1.72-4 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Included in Gross Income § 1.72-4 Exclusion ratio. (a) General rule... annuities described in section 72(o) and § 1.122-1), an exclusion ratio is to be determined for...

  18. Isotope yield ratios of fragments from heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Deak, F.; Kiss, A. ); Seres, Z. ); Galonsky, A.; Heilbronn, L. )

    1991-05-01

    Isotope yield ratios produced in collisions of 35 MeV/nucleon {sup 14}N with targets of C, Ni, Ag, and Ho have an exponential dependence on total neutron-to-proton ratio. A statistical multifragmentation model including particle emission from excited fragments predicted such behavior for yield ratios measured earlier at the higher energy of 84 MeV/nucleon.

  19. 12 CFR 615.5330 - Minimum surplus ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum surplus ratios. 615.5330 Section 615... POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Surplus and Collateral Requirements § 615.5330 Minimum surplus ratios. (a) Total surplus. (1) Each institution shall achieve and at all times maintain a ratio...

  20. 12 CFR 615.5330 - Minimum surplus ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum surplus ratios. 615.5330 Section 615... POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Surplus and Collateral Requirements § 615.5330 Minimum surplus ratios. (a) Total surplus. (1) Each institution shall achieve and at all times maintain a ratio...

  1. 12 CFR 615.5206 - Permanent capital ratio computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permanent capital ratio computation. 615.5206 Section 615.5206 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL... capital ratio computation. (a) The institution's permanent capital ratio is determined on the basis of...

  2. Auditory Discrimination of Frequency Ratios: The Octave Singularity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnard, Damien; Micheyl, Christophe; Semal, Catherine; Dauman, Rene; Demany, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Sensitivity to frequency ratios is essential for the perceptual processing of complex sounds and the appreciation of music. This study assessed the effect of ratio simplicity on ratio discrimination for pure tones presented either simultaneously or sequentially. Each stimulus consisted of four 100-ms pure tones, equally spaced in terms of

  3. Inferences about ungulate population dynamics derived from age ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, N.C.; Kauffman, M.J.; Mills, L.S.

    2008-01-01

    Age ratios (e.g., calf:cow for elk and fawn:doe for deer) are used regularly to monitor ungulate populations. However, it remains unclear what inferences are appropriate from this index because multiple vital rate changes can influence the observed ratio. We used modeling based on elk (Cervus elaphus) life-history to evaluate both how age ratios are influenced by stage-specific fecundity and survival and how well age ratios track population dynamics. Although all vital rates have the potential to influence calf:adult female ratios (i.e., calf:xow ratios), calf survival explained the vast majority of variation in calf:adult female ratios due to its temporal variation compared to other vital rates. Calf:adult female ratios were positively correlated with population growth rate (??) and often successfully indicated population trajectories. However, calf:adult female ratios performed poorly at detecting imposed declines in calf survival, suggesting that only the most severe declines would be rapidly detected. Our analyses clarify that managers can use accurate, unbiased age ratios to monitor arguably the most important components contributing to sustainable ungulate populations, survival rate of young and ??. However, age ratios are not useful for detecting gradual declines in survival of young or making inferences about fecundity or adult survival in ungulate populations. Therefore, age ratios coupled with independent estimates of population growth or population size are necessary to monitor ungulate population demography and dynamics closely through time.

  4. 26 CFR 26.2642-1 - Inclusion ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Inclusion ratio. 26.2642-1 Section 26.2642-1... GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1986 § 26.2642-1 Inclusion ratio. (a) In general. Except as otherwise provided in this section, the inclusion ratio is determined...

  5. Retrospective analysis of selection applied to a ratio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of ratios to adjust one correlated trait for another is fairly commonplace. However, there are statistical arguments that restrict the appropriate use of ratios to certain circumstances. The ratio of a calf’s weaning weight to that of its dam has been used as an indicator of cow efficiency and a...

  6. X-ray intensity ratios for microprobes and PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieber, K.; Mohammedein, A. M. M.; Musiol, G.; Reiche, I.; Zschornack, G.

    1992-05-01

    Experimental and theoretical radiative transition-rate ratios for K and L series are examined for their use in microprobe and PIXE X-ray analysis. Graphical representations of different ratios as a function of atomic number should provide conclusions about the significance of the used data. A new theoretical approach allows to calculate ratios closer to the experiment than other literature values.

  7. Variations in the HCN/HNC abundance ratio in the Orion molecular cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, P.F.; Irvine, W.M.; Hjalmarson, A.; Ellder, J.

    1986-11-01

    Observations of the rare isotopes of HCN and HNC have been used to determine the relative abundance of these two chemical isomers along the central ridge of the Orion molecular cloud. The abundance ratio HCN/HNC decreases by more than an order of magnitude from the relatively warm plateau and hot core sources toward the KL nebula to the colder, more quiescent clouds to the north and south. Even in the cooler regions, however, the ratio is an order of magnitude larger than that found in previous investigations of cold dark clouds. The kinetic temperature in the regions studied is determined from new observations of methylacetylene (CH3CCH), together with other recent estimates of the gas temperature near KL. The results suggest that the warmer portions of the cloud are dominated by different chemical pathways that those in the general instellar cloud material. 22 references.

  8. Variations in the HCN/HNC abundance ratio in the Orion molecular cloud.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Goldsmith PF; Irvine WM; Hjalmarson A; Elldér J

    1986-11-01

    We have used observations of the rare isotopes of HCN and HNC to determine the relative abundance of these two chemical isomers along the central ridge of the Orion molecular cloud. The abundance ratio [HCN]/[HNC] decreases by more than an order of magnitude from the relatively warm plateau and hot core sources toward the KL nebula to the colder, more quiescent clouds to the north and south. Even in the cooler regions, however, the ratio is an order of magnitude larger than that found in previous investigations of cold dark clouds. We determine the kinetic temperature in the regions we have studied from new observations of methylacetylene (CH3CCH), together with other recent estimates of the gas temperature near KL. The results suggest that the warmer portions of the cloud are dominated by different chemical pathways than those in the general interstellar cloud material.

  9. Variations in the HCN/HNC abundance ratio in the Orion molecular cloud.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, P F; Irvine, W M; Hjalmarson, A; Elldér, J

    1986-11-01

    We have used observations of the rare isotopes of HCN and HNC to determine the relative abundance of these two chemical isomers along the central ridge of the Orion molecular cloud. The abundance ratio [HCN]/[HNC] decreases by more than an order of magnitude from the relatively warm plateau and hot core sources toward the KL nebula to the colder, more quiescent clouds to the north and south. Even in the cooler regions, however, the ratio is an order of magnitude larger than that found in previous investigations of cold dark clouds. We determine the kinetic temperature in the regions we have studied from new observations of methylacetylene (CH3CCH), together with other recent estimates of the gas temperature near KL. The results suggest that the warmer portions of the cloud are dominated by different chemical pathways than those in the general interstellar cloud material. PMID:11539669

  10. Measurement of the branching ratio for β-delayed α decay of 16N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsgaard, J.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Dijck, E. A.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Lund, M. V.; Portela, M. N.; Raabe, R.; Randisi, G.; Renzi, F.; Sambi, S.; Sytema, A.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2016-01-01

    While the 12C(α , γ) 16 O reaction plays a central role in nuclear astrophysics, the cross section at energies relevant to hydrostatic helium burning is too small to be directly measured in the laboratory. The β-delayed α spectrum of 16N can be used to constrain the extrapolation of the E1 component of the S-factor; however, with this approach the resulting S-factor becomes strongly correlated with the assumed βα branching ratio. We have remeasured the βα branching ratio by implanting 16N ions in a segmented Si detector and counting the number of βα decays relative to the number of implantations. Our result, 1.49 (5) ×10-5, represents a 24% increase compared to the accepted value and implies an increase of ≈ 10% in the extrapolated S-factor.

  11. Fluctuations of the K/{pi} ratio in nucleus-nucleus collisions: Statistical and transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Gorenstein, M. I.; Hauer, M.; Konchakovski, V. P.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.

    2009-02-15

    Event-by-event fluctuations of the kaon to pion number ratio in nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied within the statistical hadron-resonance gas model (SM) for different statistical ensembles and in the hadron-string-dynamics (HSD) transport approach. We find that the HSD model can qualitatively reproduce the measured excitation function for the K/{pi} ratio fluctuations in central Au+Au (or Pb+Pb) collisions from low Super Proton Synchrotron up to top Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energies. Substantial differences in the HSD and SM results are found for the fluctuations and correlations of the kaon and pion numbers. These predictions impose a challenge for future experiments.

  12. Variations in the HCN/HNC abundance ratio in the Orion molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Irvine, William M.; Hjalmarson, Ake; Ellder, Joel

    1986-01-01

    Observations of the rare isotopes of HCN and HNC have been used to determine the relative abundance of these two chemical isomers along the central ridge of the Orion molecular cloud. The abundance ratio HCN/HNC decreases by more than an order of magnitude from the relatively warm plateau and hot core sources toward the KL nebula to the colder, more quiescent clouds to the north and south. Even in the cooler regions, however, the ratio is an order of magnitude larger than that found in previous investigations of cold dark clouds. The kinetic temperature in the regions studied is determined from new observations of methylacetylene (CH3CCH), together with other recent estimates of the gas temperature near KL. The results suggest that the warmer portions of the cloud are dominated by different chemical pathways that those in the general instellar cloud material.

  13. Surgical intervention for treating an extensive internal resorption with unfavorable crown-to-root ratio

    PubMed Central

    Ashouri, Rezvan; Rekabi, Ali R; Parirokh, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    Internal resorption is a rare lesion in permanent teeth. Managing perforating internal resorption is a great challenge for dentists. This report presents a successful surgical treatment of a maxillary central incisor that had extensive root perforation due to internal resorption. After unsuccessful nonsurgical approach, during surgical intervention apical part of the resorption defect was removed and the coronal part was filled with mineral trioxide aggregate. Three years later the tooth was symptom free with normal mobility and pocket depth despite unfavorable crown-to-root ratio. This case report have shown that surgical intervention and using mineral trioxide aggregate as root canal filling material in a tooth with extensive internal resorption and unfavorable crown-to-root ratio can be considered as a treatment option. PMID:23112490

  14. Use of 35-mm color aerial photography to acquire mallard sex ratio data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferguson, E.L.; Jorde, D.G.; Sease, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    A conventional 35-mm camera equipped with an f2.8 135-mm lens and ASA 64 color film was used to acquire sex ratio data on mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) wintering in the Platte River Valley of south-central Nebraska. Prelight focusing for a distance of 30.5 metres and setting of shutter speed at 1/2000 of a second eliminated focusing and reduced image motion problems and resulted in high-resolution, large-scale aerial photography of small targets. This technique has broad application to the problem of determining sex ratios of various species of waterfowl concentrated on wintering and staging areas. The aerial photographic method was cheaper than the ground ocular method when costs were compared on a per-100 bird basis.

  15. Central Nucleon-Nucleon Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robilotta, M. R.

    2001-12-01

    The outer region of the NN interactions is dominated by the one pion exchange potential (OPEP), followed by the two-pion exchange potential (TPEP). Chiral calculations of the TPEP have been performed using either heavy baryon1 (HB) or relativistic2 perturbation theories. We compare the predictions from these two approaches for the dominant central interaction and show that they fail to agree by 25% ...

  16. Tectonics of the central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, Arthur L.; Isacks, Bryan L.; Fielding, Eric J.; Fox, Andrew N.; Gubbels, Timothy L.

    1989-01-01

    Acquisition of nearly complete coverage of Thematic Mapper data for the central Andes between about 15 to 34 degrees S has stimulated a comprehensive and unprecedented study of the interaction of tectonics and climate in a young and actively developing major continental mountain belt. The current state of the synoptic mapping of key physiographic, tectonic, and climatic indicators of the dynamics of the mountain/climate system are briefly reviewed.

  17. Central collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

  18. Central hypoventilation and brainstem dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Armangue, Thais; Macaya, Alfons; Vazquez, Elida; Jurado, Maria José; Roig-Quilis, Manuel

    2012-04-01

    We report on a newborn with congenital hypotonia, unilateral facial palsy, sucking and swallowing difficulties, velopalatine incoordination, and unilateral impairment of the auditory brainstem responses, attributable to brainstem dysgenesis. On follow-up, the child manifested developmental delay and central hypoventilation syndrome during sleep. The ventilation abnormality during sleep with insensitivity to hypercapnia, associated with unilateral facial paralysis, indicates a pontine lesion, including the parafacial respiratory group. PMID:22490775

  19. Central auditory testing and dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Welsh, L W; Welsh, J J; Healy, M P

    1980-06-01

    A group of dyslexic pupils with normal end organ function was studied by a central auditory battery to determine whether a hearing disability existed. The clinical features of dyslexia are presented with emphasis on the psychological developmental and functional disorders associated with this reading problem. The central battery of Willeford was selected as the test medium and the results of the 77 dyslexic students were compared to the normative data. The model proposed by Sparks, et al., is accepted as the mechanism for dichotic audition. Reference is made to the organic basis of reading disorders from lesion in the calcarine area to the angular gyrus. The competing sentence test, binaural fusion, rapidly alternating speech perception, and filtered speech are described in detail and are organic foundation for the study. The authors indentified a high rate of failure in this investigation. Over 50% of the dyslexic students failed two of the four tests, and each of the 77 failed at least one component. The most sensitive tests were binaural fusion and filtered speech with less variation from the norm in the remaining two components. The effect of maturation in central audition was measured in each of the four tests. The data suggest: 1. the scores are lower in the early ages in each test; 2. that rapidly alternating speech and competing sentences approach the normal range albeit somewhat delayed; and 3. that binaural fusion and filtered speech improve in score somewhat but rather moderately and never approach the normal range. Based upon the central auditory data and in conjunction with the anatomical pathways of vision, the authors suggest the site of lesion to be in the temporo-parietal cortex and the association fibers. PMID:7382713

  20. Central Cascadia subduction zone creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzle, Gina M.; McCaffrey, Robert; Creager, Kenneth C.

    2014-04-01

    Cascadia between 43°N and 46°N has reduced interseismic uplift observed in geodetic data and coseismic subsidence seen in multiple thrust earthquakes, suggesting elevated persistent fault creep in this section of the subduction zone. We estimate subduction thrust "decade-scale" locking and crustal block rotations from three-component continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) time series from 1997 to 2013, as well as 80 year tide gauge and leveling-derived uplift rates. Geodetic observations indicate coastal central Oregon is rising at a slower rate than coastal Washington, southern Oregon and northern California. Modeled locking distributions suggest a wide locking transition zone that extends inland under central Oregon. Paleoseismic records of multiple great earthquakes along Cascadia indicate less subsidence in central Oregon. The Cascade thrust under central Oregon may be partially creeping for at least 6500 years (the length of the paleoseismic record) reducing interseismic uplift and resulting in reduced coseismic subsidence. Large accretions of Eocene age basalt (Siletzia terrane) between 43°N and 46°N may be less permeable compared to surrounding terranes, potentially increasing pore fluid pressures along the fault interface resulting in a wide zone of persistent fault creep. In a separate inversion, three-component GPS time series from 1 July 2005 to 1 January 2011 are used to estimate upper plate deformation, locking between slow-slip events (SSEs), slip from 16 SSEs and an earthquake mechanism. Cumulative SSEs and tectonic tremor are weakest between 43°N and 46°N where partial fault creep is increased and Siletzia terrane is thick, suggesting that surrounding rock properties may influence the mode of slip.

  1. Central Asia Active Fault Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah

    2014-05-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive database for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available database for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The database is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the database include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late Pleistocene landforms observed near the fault trace.

  2. Central Cholinesterase Inhibition Enhances Glutamatergic Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kozhemyakin, Maxim; Rajasekaran, Karthik

    2010-01-01

    Central cholinergic overstimulation results in prolonged seizures of status epilepticus in humans and experimental animals. Cellular mechanisms of underlying seizures caused by cholinergic stimulation remain uncertain, but enhanced glutamatergic transmission is a potential mechanism. Paraoxon, an organophosphate cholinesterase inhibitor, enhanced glutamatergic transmission on hippocampal granule cells synapses by increasing the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in a concentration-dependent fashion. The amplitude of mEPSCs was not increased, which suggested the possibility of enhanced action potential-dependent release. Analysis of EPSCs evoked by minimal stimulation revealed reduced failures and increased amplitude of evoked responses. The ratio of amplitudes of EPSCs evoked by paired stimuli was also altered. The effect of paraoxon on glutamatergic transmission was blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine and partially mimicked by carbachol. The nicotinic receptor antagonist α -bungarotoxin did not block the effects of paraoxon; however, nicotine enhanced glutamatergic transmission. These studies suggested that cholinergic overstimulation enhances glutamatergic transmission by enhancing neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals. PMID:20107127

  3. Subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puziewicz, Jacek; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Grégoire, Michel; Kukuła, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Mantle xenoliths in Oligocene-Miocene alkaline lavas in Lower Silesia (SW Poland) and adjacent part of Upper Lusatia (SE Germany) are samples of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle at the time of culmination of rifting in the Eger Rift (Bohemian Massif, Central Europe). The xenoliths come from the spinel mantle facies and show that two major lithologies occur in the area: A—highly magnesian (olivine Fo 90.5-92.0) harzburgites, and B—less magnesian (olivine Fo 84.0-90.0) harzburgites. The protolith of group A was clinopyroxene-free harzburgite being the residue after extensive melting. It was affected by chromatographic carbonatite/silicate melt metasomatism, with the carbonatite metasomatism only recorded in distal parts of the chromatographic systems. The B harzburgites were penetratively metasomatised by percolating alkaline silicate melts at the time of volcanism. That metasomatism was mostly anhydrous and typically cryptic; it lowered the Mg/(Mg + Fe) ratio of olivine and orthopyroxene in the peridotites subjected to melt percolation and led in places to dissolution of clinopyroxene. The mostly harzburgitic subcontinental mantle lithospheric domain beneath Lower Silesia and Upper Lusatia differs from the lherzolitic/harzburgitic ones located to W and SW beneath other parts of European Variscan orogen.

  4. Hyperhomocysteinemia: a new risk factor for central retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed Central

    Vine, A K

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Previous studies have documented that an elevated plasma homocysteine level is a risk factor for vascular disease. The purpose of this study is to determine whether hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for central retinal vein occlusion. METHODS: This case-controlled study involved reassessment of 74 patients with documented central retinal vein occlusion. Control subjects consisted of individuals referred to the same clinic for assessment of a nonretinal vascular disease. Hyperhomocysteinemia was defined as a total plasma homocysteine level above the 95th percentile in the control group. RESULTS: The mean total plasma homocysteine level was 11.58 mumol/L for cases and 9.49 mumol/L for controls. Of the 74 patients with a central retinal vein occlusion, 21.6% had total plasma homocysteine levels above the 95th percentile in the control group (odds ratio, 6.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.81 to 23.50, P = .003). Hyperhomocysteinemia was present in 55% of cases with bilateral disease, 30% of ischemic cases, and 31% of cases with severe visual loss. CONCLUSION: Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for central retinal vein occlusion. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:11190038

  5. Analysis of consequences of non-synonymous SNP in feed conversion ratio associated TGF-? receptor type 3 gene in chicken

    PubMed Central

    Rasal, Kiran D.; Shah, Tejas M.; Vaidya, Megha; Jakhesara, Subhash J.; Joshi, Chaitanya G.

    2015-01-01

    The recent advances in high throughput sequencing technology accelerate possible ways for the study of genome wide variation in several organisms and associated consequences. In the present study, mutations in TGFBR3 showing significant association with FCR trait in chicken during exome sequencing were further analyzed. Out of four SNPs, one nsSNP p.Val451Leu was found in the coding region of TGFBR3. In silico tools such as SnpSift and PANTHER predicted it as deleterious (0.04) and to be tolerated, respectively, while I-Mutant revealed that protein stability decreased. The TGFBR3 I-TASSER model has a C-score of 0.85, which was validated using PROCHECK. Based on MD simulation, mutant protein structure deviated from native with RMSD 0.08 due to change in the H-bonding distances of mutant residue. The docking of TGFBR3 with interacting TGFBR2 inferred that mutant required more global energy. Therefore, the present study will provide useful information about functional SNPs that have an impact on FCR traits. PMID:25941634

  6. Standardizing central line safety: lessons learned for physician leaders.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jeff T; Wright, Alan J; Fedraw, Leslie A; Murad, M Hassan; Brown, Daniel R; Thompson, Kristine M; Flick, Randall; Seville, Maria Teresa A; Huskins, W Charles

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive central venous catheter (CVC) safety program reduces mechanical and infectious complications and requires an integrated multidisciplinary effort. A multistate health care system implemented a discovery and diffusion project addressing CVC insertion, maintenance, and removal. Process and outcome measures were collected before and after the intervention. The project was completed in 12 months. It was associated with statistically significant improvement in 6 process measures and reduction in the rate of ICU central line-associated bloodstream infection (from 1.16 to 0.80 infections/1000 catheter days; incidence rate ratio = 0.69; 95% confidence interval = 0.51, 0.93). A comprehensive CVC standardization project increased compliance with several established best practices, was associated with improved outcomes, produced a refined definition of discovery and diffusion project components, and identified several discrete leadership principles that can be applied to future clinical improvement initiatives. PMID:23880777

  7. Single and Central Diffractive Higgs Production at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Ducati, M. B. Gay; Machado, M. M.; Silveira, G. G.

    2011-07-15

    The single and central diffractive production of the Standard Model Higgs boson is computed using the diffractive factorization formalism, taking into account a parametrization for the Pomeron structure function provided by the H1 Collaboration. We compute the cross sections at NLO accuracy for the gluon fusion process, since it is the leading mechanism for the Higgs boson production. The gap survival probability is also introduced to include the rescattering corrections due to spectator particles present in the interaction. The diffractive ratios are predicted for proton-proton collisions at the LHC, since the beam luminosity is favorable to the Higgs boson detection. These results provide updated estimations for the fraction of single and central diffractive events in the LHC kinematical regime.

  8. Activity ratios of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase accurately reflect carbamylation ratios. [Phaseolus vulgaris, Spinacla oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Butz, N.D.; Sharkey, T.D. )

    1989-03-01

    Activity ratios and carbamylation ratios of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) were determined for leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris and Spinacia oleracea exposed to a variety of partial pressures of CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} and photon flux densities (PFD). It was found that activity ratios accurately predicted carbamylation ratios except in extracts from leaves held in low PFD. In particular, it was confirmed that the loss of FuBPCase activity in low partial pressure of O{sub 2} and high PFD results from reduced carbamylation. Activity ratios of RuBPCase were lower than carbamylation ratios for Phaseolus leaves sampled in low PFD, presumably because of the presence of 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate. Spinacia leaves sampled in darkness also exhibited lower activity ratios than carbamylation ratios indicating that this species may also have an RuBPCase inhibitor even though carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate has not been detected in this species in the past.

  9. Does the maxillary anterior ratio in Korean adults follow the Golden Proportion?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of changes in the horizontal plane angle on the mesiodistal width ratios of the maxillary anterior teeth during the acquisition of frontal view photographs, derive these ratios for Korean adults on the basis of the data obtained, and analyze them using the Golden Proportion as a reference. MATERIALS AND METHODS In experiment I, 30 plaster casts were mounted on an articulator and positioned on the angle-measuring device with a center setting of 0°. The device was rotated to 10° in 1° increments in a counterclockwise direction. At each angle, photographs were obtained and analyzed. Experiment II was based on 60 patients who visited the Department of Prosthodontics at Kyungpook National University Dental Hospital from February 2012 to February 2015. The patients were divided into three groups [Male (M), Female (F), Total (M + F)]. Frontal views were obtained for all groups and analyzed. RESULTS From 1° to 10°, the relative mesiodistal width ratios for the maxillary anterior teeth showed no significant differences from those at 0°. In all three groups, the relative width ratio of the maxillary central incisor was smaller than that specified in the Golden Proportion; the opposite was true for the canine. CONCLUSION Our results suggest that the mesiodistal width ratios of the maxillary anterior teeth do not follow the Golden Proportion in Korean adults, and that a change in the horizontal plane angle from 1° to 10° during frontal photography does not affect these ratios. PMID:27141256

  10. What Is the Optimal Value of the g-Ratio for Myelinated Fibers in the Rat CNS? A Theoretical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chomiak, Taylor; Hu, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Background The biological process underlying axonal myelination is complex and often prone to injury and disease. The ratio of the inner axonal diameter to the total outer diameter or g-ratio is widely utilized as a functional and structural index of optimal axonal myelination. Based on the speed of fiber conduction, Rushton was the first to derive a theoretical estimate of the optimal g-ratio of 0.6 [1]. This theoretical limit nicely explains the experimental data for myelinated axons obtained for some peripheral fibers but appears significantly lower than that found for CNS fibers. This is, however, hardly surprising given that in the CNS, axonal myelination must achieve multiple goals including reducing conduction delays, promoting conduction fidelity, lowering energy costs, and saving space. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we explore the notion that a balanced set-point can be achieved at a functional level as the micro-structure of individual axons becomes optimized, particularly for the central system where axons tend to be smaller and their myelin sheath thinner. We used an intuitive yet novel theoretical approach based on the fundamental biophysical properties describing axonal structure and function to show that an optimal g-ratio can be defined for the central nervous system (≈0.77). Furthermore, by reducing the influence of volume constraints on structural design by about 40%, this approach can also predict the g-ratio observed in some peripheral fibers (≈0.6). Conclusions/Significance These results support the notion of optimization theory in nervous system design and construction and may also help explain why the central and peripheral systems have evolved different g-ratios as a result of volume constraints. PMID:19915661

  11. Ultrafast Bessel beams for high aspect ratio taper free micromachining of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, M. K.; Courvoisier, F.; Lacourt, P.-A.; Jacquot, M.; Furfaro, L.; Withford, M. J.; Dudley, J. M.

    2010-06-01

    Although ultrafast lasers have demonstrated much success in structuring and ablating dielectrics on the micrometer scale and below, high aspect ratio structuring remains a challenge. Specifically, microfluidics or lab-on-chip DNA sequencing systems require high aspect ratio sub-10 μm wide channels with no taper. Micro-dicing also requires machining with vertical walls. Backside water assisted ultrafast laser processing with Gaussian beams allows the production of high aspect ratio microchannels but requires sub-micron sample positioning and precise control of translation velocity. In this context, we propose a new approach based on Bessel beams that exhibit a focal range exceeding the Rayleigh range by over one order of magnitude. An SLM-based setup allows us to produce a Bessel beam with central core diameter of 1.5 μm FWHM extending over a longitudinal range of 150 μm. A working window in the parameter space has been identified that allows the reliable production of high aspect ratio taper-free microchannels without sample translation. We report a systematic investigation of the damage morphology dependence on focusing geometry and energy per pulse.

  12. Income replacement ratios in the Health and Retirement Study.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the income replacement ratio as a measure of retirement income adequacy and identifies several issues analysts must consider when calculating a replacement ratio. The article presents the income replacement ratios experienced by participants in the original sample cohort of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), who were born between 1931 and 1941. Replacement ratios are shown by the respondent's birth cohort, age when first classified as retired in the HRS, and preretirement income quartile. Median replacement ratios fall as the retirement period grows longer. PMID:23113428

  13. Elevated sacroilac joint uptake ratios in systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.; Mahmood, T.; Robinson, R.G.; Lindsley, H.B.

    1984-08-01

    Sacroiliac joint radiographs and radionuclide sacroiliac joint uptake ratios were obtained on 14 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus. Elevated joint ratios were found unilaterally in two patients and bilaterally in seven patients when their lupus was active. In patients whose disease became quiescent, the uptake ratios returned to normal. Two patients had persistently elevated ratios with continued clinical and laboratory evidence of active lupus. Mild sacroiliac joint sclerosis and erosions were detected on pelvic radiographs in these same two patients. Elevated quantitative sacroiliac joint uptake ratios may occur as a manifestation of active systemic lupus erythematosus.

  14. Evidence for Central Regulation of Glucose Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Michelle; Kehlenbrink, Sylvia; Hawkins, Meredith

    2013-01-01

    Evidence for central regulation of glucose homeostasis is accumulating from both animal and human studies. Central nutrient and hormone sensing in the hypothalamus appears to coordinate regulation of whole body metabolism. Central signals activate ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, thereby down-regulating glucose production, likely through vagal efferent signals. Recent human studies are consistent with this hypothesis. The contributions of direct and central inputs to metabolic regulation are likely of comparable magnitude, with somewhat delayed central effects and more rapid peripheral effects. Understanding central regulation of glucose metabolism could promote the development of novel therapeutic approaches for such metabolic conditions as diabetes mellitus. PMID:24142701

  15. How the oxygen isotope ratio of rain water influences the isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Gregory; Grimes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The stable oxygen isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate was analysed from chicken eggs laid under free range, and organic farming regimes from across the UK. The eggshell carbonate oxygen isotope data shows a clear depletion in delta18O distribution from the southwest to the northeast. Although consistently offset by around 1 permil, the same isotopic distribution as that seen in eggshell carbonate is observed in the delta18O ratio of rainfall and groundwater from across the UK. This distribution is related to the Rayleigh distillation of rainfall driven by westerly winds across the UK landmass. The clear relationship observed between eggshell delta18O values and that of rainwater presumably reflects the nature of free range chickens which must be drinking locally derived rainwater and supplementing their diet and water intake with locally derived food. These results suggest that the oxygen isotope value of chicken eggshells can be used as a forensic tool to identify the locality that free range and organic eggs were laid within the UK. Furthermore, if suitable material is preserved in the archaeological and geological record then such a relationship can potentially be used to establish the oxygen isotope value of rainwater from which ancient and / or ancestral birds lived.

  16. Consistent sex ratio bias of individual female dragon lizards

    PubMed Central

    Uller, Tobias; Mott, Beth; Odierna, Gaetano; Olsson, Mats

    2006-01-01

    Sex ratio evolution relies on genetic variation in either the phenotypic traits that influence sex ratios or sex-determining mechanisms. However, consistent variation among females in offspring sex ratio is rarely investigated. Here, we show that female painted dragons (Ctenophorus pictus) have highly repeatable sex ratios among clutches within years. A consistent effect of female identity could represent stable phenotypic differences among females or genetic variation in sex-determining mechanisms. Sex ratios were not correlated with female size, body condition or coloration. Furthermore, sex ratios were not influenced by incubation temperature. However, the variation among females resulted in female-biased mean population sex ratios at hatching both within and among years. PMID:17148290

  17. 12 CFR 234.4 - Standards for central securities depositories and central counterparties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (REGULATION HH) § 234.4 Standards for central securities depositories and central counterparties. (a) A... accurately the risks and costs associated with using its services. (10) The central securities depository...

  18. Comparison of Event Detection Methods for Centralized Sensor Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauvageon, Julien; Agogiono, Alice M.; Farhang, Ali; Tumer, Irem Y.

    2006-01-01

    The development of an Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) for space vehicles has become a great concern. Smart Sensor Networks is one of the promising technologies that are catching a lot of attention. In this paper, we propose to a qualitative comparison of several local event (hot spot) detection algorithms in centralized redundant sensor networks. The algorithms are compared regarding their ability to locate and evaluate the event under noise and sensor failures. The purpose of this study is to check if the ratio performance/computational power of the Mote Fuzzy Validation and Fusion algorithm is relevant compare to simpler methods.

  19. Evolution of the differential transverse momentum correlation function with centrality in Au + Au collisions at s=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    STAR Collaboration; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Beavis, D. R.; Behera, N. K.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Davila Leyva, A.; de Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Geurts, F.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kizka, V.; Knospe, A. G.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Lukashov, E. V.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nayak, T. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Souza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Steadman, S. G.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Witzke, W.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, W.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2011-10-01

    We present first measurements of the evolution of the differential transverse momentum correlation function, C, with collision centrality in Au + Au interactions at s=200 GeV. This observable exhibits a strong dependence on collision centrality that is qualitatively similar to that of number correlations previously reported. We use the observed longitudinal broadening of the near-side peak of C with increasing centrality to estimate the ratio of the shear viscosity to entropy density, η/s, of the matter formed in central Au + Au interactions. We obtain an upper limit estimate of η/s that suggests that the produced medium has a small viscosity per unit entropy.

  20. Relationship between intraindividual variation of the saliva/plasma- and of the arteriovenous concentration ratio as demonstrated by the administration of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Haeckel, R

    1990-05-01

    The use of saliva instead of venous blood for monitoring drugs has many advantages. Its usefulness has, however, been questioned, because of the variability of the intraindividual saliva/plasma ratio. Among other reasons, this variability can result from the fluctuation of the arteriovenous blood concentration ratio. The present work represents a detailed investigation of this phenomenon, using caffeine as an example. This phenomenon is observed when the concentration of free diffusible substances differs in the central and peripheral compartment, depending on the pharmacokinetic phase. In such cases, the salivary concentration more closely reflects the cellular concentration in organs of the central compartment than that of peripheral venous blood. PMID:2380663