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Sample records for centre-to-limb variation nlte

  1. The centre-to-limb variations of solar Fraunhofer lines imprinted upon lunar eclipse spectra. Implications for exoplanet transit observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, F.; Fosbury, R. A. E.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G.; Zhao, G.; Pallé, E.

    2015-02-01

    The atmospheres of exoplanets are commonly studied by observing the transit of the planet passing in front of its parent star. The obscuration of part of the stellar disk during a transit will reveal aspects of its surface structure resulting from general centre-to-limb variations (CLVs). These become apparent when forming the ratio between the stellar light in and out of transit. These phenomena can be seen particularly clearly during the progress of a penumbral lunar eclipse, where the Earth transits the solar disk and masks different regions of the solar disk as the eclipse progresses. When inferring the properties of the planetary atmosphere, it is essential that this effect originating at the star is properly accounted for. Using the data observed from the 2014-April-15 lunar eclipse with the ESPaDOnS spectrograph mounted on the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), we have obtained for the first time a time sequence of the penumbral spectra. These penumbral spectra enable us to study the centre-to-limb variations of solar Fraunhofer lines when the Earth is transiting Sun. The Na i and Ca ii absorption features reported from previous lunar eclipse observations are demonstrated to be CLV features, which dominate the corresponding line profiles and mask possible planetary signal. Detecting atmospheric species in exoplanets via transit spectroscopy must account for the CLV effect.

  2. Centre-to-limb properties of small, photospheric quiet-Sun jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, F.; Solanki, S. K.; Danilovic, S.; Hizberger, J.; Martínez-Pillet, V.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Strongly Doppler-shifted Stokes V profiles have been detected in the quiet Sun with the IMaX instrument on-board the SUNRISE stratospheric balloon-borne telescope. High velocities are required to produce such signals, hence these events have been interpreted as jets, although other sources are also possible. Aims: We aim to characterize the variation of the main properties of these events (occurrence rate, lifetime, size, and velocities) with their position on the solar disk between disk centre and the solar limb. Methods: These events were identified in SUNRISE/IMaX data according to the same objective criteria at all available positions on the solar disk. Their properties were determined using standard techniques. Results: Our study yielded a number of new insights into this phenomenon. Most importantly, the number density of these events is independent of the heliocentric angle, meaning that the investigated supersonic flows are nearly isotropically distributed. Size and lifetime are also nearly independent of the heliocentric angle, while their intensity contrast increases towards the solar limb. The Stokes V jets are associated with upflow velocities deduced from Stokes I, which are stronger towards the limb. Their intensity decreases with time, while their line-of-sight velocity does not display a clear temporal evolution. Their association with linear polarization signals decreases towards the limb. Conclusions: The density of events appears to be independent of heliocentric angle, establishing that they are directed nearly randomly. If these events are jets triggered by magnetic reconnection between emerging magnetic flux and the ambient field, then our results suggest that there is no preferred geometry for the reconnection process.

  3. Advances in NLTE modeling for integrated simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, H. A.; Hansen, S. B.

    2010-01-01

    The last few years have seen significant progress in constructing the atomic models required for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) simulations. Along with this has come an increased understanding of the requirements for accurately modeling the ionization balance, energy content and radiative properties of different atomic species for a wide range of densities and temperatures. Much of this progress is the result of a series of workshops dedicated to comparing the results from different codes and computational approaches applied to a series of test problems. The results of these workshops emphasized the importance of atomic model completeness, especially in doubly-excited states and autoionization transitions, to calculating ionization balance, and the importance of accurate, detailed atomic data to producing reliable spectra. We describe a simple screened-hydrogenic model that calculates NLTE ionization balance with sufficient accuracy, at a low enough computational cost for routine use in radiation-hydrodynamics codes. The model incorporates term splitting, Δ n = 0 transitions, and approximate UTA widths for spectral calculations, with results comparable to those of much more detailed codes. Simulations done with this model have been increasingly successful at matching experimental data for laser-driven systems and hohlraums. Accurate and efficient atomic models are just one requirement for integrated NLTE simulations. Coupling the atomic kinetics to hydrodynamics and radiation transport constrains both discretizations and algorithms to retain energy conservation, accuracy and stability. In particular, the strong coupling between radiation and populations can require either very short time steps or significantly modified radiation transport algorithms to account for NLTE material response. Considerations such as these continue to provide challenges for NLTE simulations.

  4. NLTE4 Plasma Population Kinetics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 159 NLTE4 Plasma Population Kinetics Database (Web database for purchase)   This database contains benchmark results for simulation of plasma population kinetics and emission spectra. The data were contributed by the participants of the 4th Non-LTE Code Comparison Workshop who have unrestricted access to the database. The only limitation for other users is in hidden labeling of the output results. Guest users can proceed to the database entry page without entering userid and password.

  5. NLTE opacities of mid- and high-Z cocktails

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrill, Manolo E; Abdallah, Joseph; Fontes, Christopher J; Kilcrease, David P; Zhang, Honglin

    2009-01-01

    In this work we report on the development of a new method for computing mi- and high-Z NLTE opacities. A study has been performed using this method to assess the EOS and opacity sensitivities to the radiation field for both single species Au and multi-species SnNb and U{sub 3}Au plasma cocktails with an emphasis on moderately to highly ionized systems. Developed as a benchmark tool, this capability will be used to assess both current and future in-line NLTE opacity capabilities.

  6. NLTE Opacities of Mid- and High-Z Cocktails

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrill, Manolo; Abdallah, Joseph; Honglin, Zhang; Fontes, Christopher J; Kilcrease, David P

    2009-01-01

    In this work we report on the development of a new method for computing mid-and high-Z NLTE opacities. A study has been performed using this method to assess the EOS and opacity sensitivities to the radiation field for both single species Au and multi-species SnNb and U{sub 3}Au plasma cocktails with an emphasis on moderately to highly ionized systems. Developed as a benchmark tool to assess both current and future in line NLTE opacity capabilities, we have applied this new approach to assess XSN spectral fidelity for Au at commonly expected NIF hohlraum conditions.

  7. Observations and NLTE modeling of Ellerman bombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlicki, A.; Heinzel, P.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Ellerman bombs (EBs) are short-lived, compact, and spatially well localized emission structures that are observed well in the wings of the hydrogen Hα line. EBs are also observed in the chromospheric CaII lines and in UV continua as bright points located within active regions. Hα line profiles of EBs show a deep absorption at the line center and enhanced emission in the line wings with maxima around ±1 Å from the line center. Similar shapes of the line profiles are observed for the CaII IR line at 8542 Å. In CaII H and K lines the emission peaks are much stronger, and EBs emission is also enhanced in the line center. Aims: It is generally accepted that EBs may be considered as compact microflares located in lower solar atmosphere that contribute to the heating of these low-lying regions, close to the temperature minimum of the atmosphere. However, it is still not clear where exactly the emission of EBs is formed in the solar atmosphere. High-resolution spectrophotometric observations of EBs were used for determining of their physical parameters and construction of semi-empirical models. Obtained models allow us to determine the position of EBs in the solar atmosphere, as well as the vertical structure of the activated EB atmosphere Methods: In our analysis we used observations of EBs obtained in the Hα and CaII H lines with the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT). These one-hour long simultaneous sequences obtained with high temporal and spatial resolution were used to determine the line emissions. To analyze them, we used NLTE numerical codes for the construction of grids of 243 semi-empirical models simulating EBs structures. In this way, the observed emission could be compared with the synthetic line spectra calculated for all such models. Results: For a specific model we found reasonable agreement between the observed and theoretical emission and thus we consider such model as a good approximation to EBs atmospheres. This model is characterized by an

  8. Enhanced NLTE Atomic Kinetics Modeling Capabilities in HYDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mehul V.; Scott, Howard A.; Marinak, Michael M.

    2014-10-01

    In radiation hydrodynamics modeling of ICF targets, an NLTE treatment of atomic kinetics is necessary for modeling high-Z hohlraum wall materials, high-Z dopants mixed in the central gas hotspot, and is potentially needed for accurate modeling of outer layers of the capsule ablator. Over the past several years, the NLTE DCA atomic physics capabilities in the 3D ICF radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA have been significantly enhanced. The underlying atomic models have been improved, additional kinetics options including the ability to run DCA in cells with dynamic mixing of species has been added, and the computational costs have been significantly reduced using OpenMP threading. To illustrate the improved capabilities, we will show higher fidelity results from simulations of ICF hohlraum energetics, laser irradiated sphere experiments, and ICF capsule implosions. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES. II. NLTE EFFECTS IN J-BAND SILICON LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bergemann, Maria; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Wuerl, Matthias; Plez, Bertrand; Davies, Ben; Gazak, Zach E-mail: Matthias.Wuerl@physik.uni-muenchen.de E-mail: zgazak@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: bdavies@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2013-02-20

    Medium-resolution J-band spectroscopy of individual red supergiant stars is a promising tool to investigate the chemical composition of the young stellar population in star-forming galaxies. As a continuation of recent work on iron and titanium, detailed non-LTE (NLTE) calculations are presented to investigate the influence of NLTE on the formation of silicon lines in the J-band spectra of red supergiants. Substantial effects are found resulting in significantly stronger absorption lines of neutral silicon in NLTE. As a consequence, silicon abundances determined in NLTE are significantly smaller than in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) with the NLTE abundance corrections varying smoothly between -0.4 dex and -0.1 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 K and 4400 K. The effects are largest at low metallicity. The physical reasons behind the NLTE effects and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies are discussed.

  10. Sulphur in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Including NLTE corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skúladóttir, Á.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Tolstoy, E.; Hill, V.; Salvadori, S.; Korotin, S. A.; Pettini, M.

    2015-08-01

    In Galactic halo stars, sulphur has been shown to behave like other α-elements, but until now, no comprehensive studies have been done on this element in stars of other galaxies. Here, we use high-resolution ESO VLT/FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectra to determine sulphur abundances for 85 stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, covering the metallicity range -2.5 ≤ [ Fe / H ] ≤ -0.8. The abundances are derived from the S I triplet at 9213, 9228, and 9238 Å. These lines have been shown to be sensitive to departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e. NLTE effects. Therefore, we present new NLTE corrections for a grid of stellar parameters covering those of the target stars. The NLTE-corrected sulphur abundances in Sculptor show the same behaviour as other α-elements in that galaxy (such as Mg, Si, and Ca). At lower metallicities ([ Fe / H ] ≲ -2) the abundances are consistent with a plateau at [ S / Fe ] ≈ + 0.16, similar to what is observed in the Galactic halo, [ S / Fe ] ≈ + 0.2. With increasing [Fe/H], the [S/Fe] ratio declines, reaching negative values at [ Fe / H ] ≳ -1.5. The sample also shows an increase in [S/Mg] with [Fe/H], most probably because of enrichment from Type Ia supernovae. Based on observations made with ESO/VLT/FLAMES at the La Silla Paranal observatory under program ID 089.B-0304(B).Appendix is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. NLTE water lines in Betelgeuse-like atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, J.; Josselin, E.; Ryde, N.; Faure, A.

    2013-05-01

    The interpretation of water lines in red supergiant stellar atmospheres has been much debated over the past decade. The introduction of the so-called MOLspheres to account for near-infrared "extra" absorption has been controversial. We propose that non-LTE effects should be taken into account before considering any extra-photospheric contribution. After a brief introduction on the radiative transfer treatment and the inadequacy of classical treatments in the case of large-scale systems such as molecules, we present a new code, based on preconditioned Krylov subspace methods. Preliminary results suggest that NLTE effects lead to deeper water bands, as well as extra cooling.

  12. TMAP: Tübingen NLTE Model-Atmosphere Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Klaus; Dreizler, Stefan; Rauch, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    The Tübingen NLTE Model-Atmosphere Package (TMAP) is a tool to calculate stellar atmospheres in spherical or plane-parallel geometry in hydrostatic and radiative equilibrium allowing departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) for the population of atomic levels. It is based on the Accelerated Lambda Iteration (ALI) method and is able to account for line blanketing by metals. All elements from hydrogen to nickel may be included in the calculation with model atoms which are tailored for the aims of the user.

  13. A new NLTE model for the OH Meinel bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Martín, Sandra; Martín-Torres, Javier; Zorzano, María-Paz

    2016-04-01

    In our planet, the hydroxyl radical (OH) not only plays a crucial role as an oxidant in the troposphere but also as a main stratospheric gas. However, its high reactivity, short lifetime, low concentrations and the spectral coincidence of its emissions with the much stronger ones from CO2 make it a difficult gas to be detected, specially during daytime. The situation is different in the middle atmosphere, where OH is excited during its formation, mainly after recombination of H and O3. The excited rotational and vibrational states of OH are responsible of the Meinel bands, that dominate the terrestrial nightglow spectrum, in the visible and near-Infrared. The assumption that these states emit according to the Planck function at the local kinetic temperature is no longer valid. Thus Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) models must be used to simulate and analyze them. In this work we describe a new NLTE model for the OH Meinel bands and we compare the results with previous modeling and data analysis.

  14. NLTE in a Hot Hydrogen Star: Auer & Mihalas Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, J.; Rutten, R. J.; Lanz, T.

    2003-01-01

    We pay tribute to two landmark papers published by Auer & Mihalas in 1969. They modeled hot-star NLTE-RE hydrogen-only atmospheres, using two simplified hydrogen atoms: ApJ 156, 157: H I levels 1, 2 and c, Lyman α the only line ApJ 156, 681: H I levels 1, 2, 3 and c, Balmer α the only line and computed LTE and NLTE models with the single line turned on and off. The results were extensively analyzed in the two papers. Any student of stellar line formation should take these beautiful papers to heart. The final exercise in Rutten's lecture notes ``Radiative Transfer in Stellar Atmospheres'' asks the student to work through five pages of questions concerning diagrams from the first paper alone! That exercise led to the present work in which we recompute the Auer-Mihalas hot-hydrogen-star models with TLUSTY, adding results from a complete hydrogen atom for comparison. Our motivation for this Auer-Mihalas re-visitation is twofold: 1. to add diagnostic diagrams to the ones published by Auer & Mihalas, in particular Bν, Jν, Sν graphs to illustrate the role of the radiation field, and radiative heating & cooling graphs to illustrate the radiative energy budget, 2. to see the effect of adding the rest of the hydrogen atom.

  15. NLTE analysis of SUMER filament observations on SOHO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinzel, P.; Schmieder, B.; Vial, J.-C.

    1997-01-01

    The observations of hydrogen Lyman delta, epsilon, six and seven lines are described. These data were acquired by the solar ultraviolet measurement of emitted radiation (SUMER) spectrograph onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). All the spectral lines were calibrated to absolute intensities. The multilevel NLTE code was used to evaluate the theoretical line profiles of the four Lyman lines studied. The line cores of all these lines are good indicators of the temperature structure of the filament. The study showed that the line wings are sensitive to the gas pressure. A steep temperature increase in the prominence-corona transition region seems to be consistent with the observed intensities in the line cores of the Lyman lines.

  16. Impact of NLTE on research of early chemical enrichment of the dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, Lyudmila; Jablonka, Pascale; North, Pierre; Sitnova, Tatyana

    2016-08-01

    Based on high-resolution observed spectra, the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line formation, and precise stellar atmosphere parameters, we present the first complete sample of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) with accurate chemical abundances in the very metal-poor (VMP) regime. The obtained stellar elemental ratios are compared with chemical enrichment models, and we show that NLTE is a major step forward for studies of the dSph and the Milky Way (MW) chemical evolution.

  17. <3D> NLTE line formation in the atmospheres of red supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergemann, M.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Davies, B.; Plez, B.; Gazak, Z.; Chiavassa, A.

    2013-05-01

    Red supergiants with their enormous brightness at J-band are ideal probes of cosmic chemical composition. It is therefore crucial to have realistic models of radiative transfer in their atmospheres, which will permit determination of abundances accurate to 0.15 dex, the precision attainable with future telescope facilities in galaxies as distant as tens of Mpc. Here, we study the effects of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) on the formation of iron, titanium, and silicon lines, which dominate J-band spectra of red supergiants. It is shown that the NLTE radiative transfer models enable accurate derivation of metallicity and effective temperature in the J-band. We also discuss consequences for RSG spectrum synthesis in different spectral windows, including the heavily TiO-blanketed optical region, and atmospheric structure. We then touch upon challenges of NLTE integration with new generation of 3D hydrodynamical RSG models and present the first calculations of NLTE spectra with the mean 3D model of Betelgeuse.

  18. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES: NLTE EFFECTS IN J-BAND IRON AND TITANIUM LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bergemann, Maria; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Lind, Karin; Plez, Bertrand; Davies, Ben; Gazak, Zach E-mail: klind@mpa-garching.mpg.de E-mail: zgazak@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: bdavies@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2012-06-01

    Detailed non-LTE (NLTE) calculations for red supergiant (RSG) stars are presented to investigate the influence of NLTE on the formation of atomic iron and titanium lines in the J band. With their enormous brightness at J band RSG stars are ideal probes of cosmic abundances. Recent LTE studies have found that metallicities accurate to 0.15 dex can be determined from medium-resolution spectroscopy of individual RSGs in galaxies as distant as 10 Mpc. The NLTE results obtained in this investigation support these findings. NLTE abundance corrections for iron are smaller than 0.05 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 K and 4200 K and 0.1 dex at 4400 K. For titanium the NLTE abundance corrections vary smoothly between -0.4 dex and +0.2 dex as a function of effective temperature. For both elements, the corrections also depend on stellar gravity and metallicity. The physical reasons behind the NLTE corrections and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies are discussed.

  19. Multilevel NLTE radiative transfer in isolated atmospheric structures: implementation of the MALI-technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, P.

    1995-07-01

    We have developed and extensively tested a new multilevel NLTE transfer code for isolated solar atmospheric structures (loops, prominences, spicules etc.). The code is based on the MALI approach of Rybicki & Hummer (1991, 1992) to multilevel accelerated lambda iterations. It is demonstrated that this method is fully capable of treating a difficult problem of NLTE hydrogen excitation and ionization equilibrium, provided that we linearize the preconditioned statistical equilibrium equations with respect to atomic level populations and the electron density. With this generalization of the original MALI approach, the numerical code is robust and stable. As compared to the standard linearization method of Auer & Mihalas (1969), the new MALI code designed for 1D slabs is more than one order of magnitude faster and its accuracy is quite satisfactory. We discuss several details of our implementation of the MALI technique to isolated, externally irradiated, 1D structures and finally draw some future prospects.

  20. Impact of NLTE on research of early chemical enrichment of the dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, Lyudmila

    2015-08-01

    The individual stars observed in the dwarf galaxies orbiting the Milky Way are presumably red giants. Their chemical abundances are commonly determined under the classical LTE assumption, despite its validity is questionable for atmospheres of giant, in particular, metal-poor stars. Exactly metal-poor objects are important for understanding the early chemical enrichment processes of the host galaxy and the onset of star formation. We selected a sample of the -4 < [Fe/H] < -2 stars in the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies Sculptor, Sextans, and Fornax and the ultra-faint galaxies Bootes I and Segue I, with the high-resolution observational data available, and revised abundances of up to 12 chemical species based on the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line formation. Stellar parameters taken from the literature were checked through the NLTE analysis of lines of iron observed in the two ionisation stages, Fe I and Fe II. For the Scl, Sex, and Fnx stars, with effective temperatures and surface gravities derived from the photometry and known distance (Jablonka et al. 2015; Tafelmeyer et al. 2010), the Fe I/Fe II ionisation equilibrium was found to be fulfilled, when applying a scaling factor of SH = 0.5 to the Drawinian rates of Fe+H collisions. Pronounced NLTE effects were calculated for lines of Na I and Al I resulting in up to 0.5 dex lower [Na/Fe] ratios and up to 0.65 dex higher [Al/Fe] ratios compared with the corresponding LTE values. For the six Scl stars, the scatter of data on Mg/Na is much smaller in NLTE, with the mean [Mg/Na] = 0.61 +- 0.11, than LTE, where [Mg/Na] = 0.42 +- 0.21. We computed a grid of the NLTE abundance corrections for an extensive list of the Ca I, Ti I-Ti II, and Fe I lines in the MARCS models of cool giants, 4000 K <= Teff <= 4750 K, 0.5 <= log g <= 2.5, -4 <= [M/H] <= 0.

  1. Effect of NLTE emissivity models on NIF ignition hohlraum power requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, L.; Hansen, S.; Rosen, M.; Springer, P.; Callahan, D.

    2008-11-01

    It's well known that the NLTE atomic physics model can significantly affect the power requirements and plasma conditions in ignition hohlraums. This is because the emissivity(Te,ne) is a significant factor in determining the time dependent coronal temperature of the hot blow-off plasma filling ignition hohlraums which, in turn, determines the total energy stored in that coronal plasma at any instant. In this talk we present best estimates of NLTE emissivity using the SCRAM model, including the range of uncertainty, and compare them with the emissivity of the model used to design NIF ignition hohlraums and set the NIF pulse shape. We then present pulse shapes derived from hohlraum simulations using an atomic physics model that approximates the SCRAM emissivities. We discuss the differences in coronal energetics and show how this affects the pulse shape and decreases the peak power requirement. Finally, we present design simulations of potential NIF-commissioning scaling experiments that could distinguish among emissivity models. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. NLTE and LTE Lick Indices for Red Giants from [Fe/H] 0.0 to -6.0 at SDSS and IDS Spectral Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, C. Ian; Young, Mitchell E.; Layden, Nicholas

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the dependence of the complete system of 22 Lick indices on overall metallicity scaled from solar abundances, [{{M}}/{{H}}], from the solar value, 0.0, down to the extremely metal-poor (XMP) value of -6.0, for late-type giant stars (MK luminosity class III, {log}g=2.0) of MK spectral class late-K to late-F (3750\\lt {T}{eff}\\lt 6500 K) of the type that are detected as “fossils” of early galaxy formation in the Galactic halo and in extra-galactic structures. Our investigation is based on synthetic index values, I, derived from atmospheric models and synthetic spectra computed with PHOENIX in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) and Non-LTE (NLTE), where the synthetic spectra have been convolved to the spectral resolution, R, of both IDS and SDSS (and LAMOST) spectroscopy. We identify nine indices, that we designate “Lick-XMP,” that remain both detectable and significantly [{{M}}/{{H}}]-dependent down to [{{M}}/{{H}}] values of at least ˜ -5.0, and down to [{{M}}/{{H}}] ˜ -6.0 in five cases, while also remaining well-behaved (single-valued as a function of [{{M}}/{{H}}] and positive in linear units). For these nine indices, we study the dependence of I on NLTE effects, and on spectral resolution. For our LTE I values for spectra of SDSS resolution, we present the fitted polynomial coefficients, {C}{{n}}, from multi-variate linear regression for I with terms up to third order in the independent variable pairs ({T}{eff}, [{{M}}/{{H}}] ) and (V-K, [{{M}}/{{H}}]), and compare them to the fitted {C}{{n}} values of Worthey et al. at IDS spectral resolution. For this fitted I data-set we present tables of LTE partial derivatives, \\frac{\\partial I}{\\partial {T}{eff}}{| }[{{M}/{{H}}]}, \\frac{\\displaystyle \\partial I}{\\partial [{{M}}/{{H}}]}{| }{T{eff}}, \\frac{\\displaystyle \\partial I}{\\partial (V-K)}{| }[{{M}/{{H}}]}, and \\frac{\\partial I}{\\partial [{{M}}/{{H}}]}{| }(V-K), that can be used to infer the relation between a given

  3. The photospheric solar oxygen project. IV. 3D-NLTE investigation of the 777 nm triplet lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, M.; Prakapavičius, D.; Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Bonifacio, P.; Cayrel, R.; Kučinskas, A.; Livingston, W. C.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The solar photospheric oxygen abundance is still widely debated. Adopting the solar chemical composition based on the "low" oxygen abundance, as determined with the use of three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical model atmospheres, results in a well-known mismatch between theoretical solar models and helioseismic measurements that is so far unresolved. Aims: We carry out an independent redetermination of the solar oxygen abundance by investigating the center-to-limb variation of the O i IR triplet lines at 777 nm in different sets of spectra. Methods: The high-resolution and high signal-to-noise solar center-to-limb spectra are analyzed with the help of detailed synthetic line profiles based on 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres and 3D non-LTE line formation calculations with NLTE3D. The idea is to exploit the information contained in the observations at different limb angles to simultaneously derive the oxygen abundance, A(O), and the scaling factor SH that describes the cross-sections for inelastic collisions with neutral hydrogen relative to the classical Drawin formula. Using the same codes and methods, we compare our 3D results with those obtained from the semi-empirical Holweger-Müller model atmosphere as well as from different one-dimensional (1D) reference models. Results: With the CO5BOLD 3D solar model, the best fit of the center-to-limb variation of the triplet lines is obtained when the collisions by neutral hydrogen atoms are assumed to be efficient, i.e., when the scaling factor SH is between 1.2 and 1.8, depending on the choice of the observed spectrum and the triplet component used in the analysis. The line profile fits achieved with standard 1D model atmospheres (with fixed microturbulence, independent of disk position μ) are clearly of inferior quality compared to the 3D case, and give the best match to the observations when ignoring collisions with neutral hydrogen (SH = 0). The results derived with the Holweger-Müller model are

  4. NLTE spectral analysis of the sdOB primary of the eclipsing binary system LB 3459 (AA Dor)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.

    2000-04-01

    We present a spectral analysis of the sdOB primary star of the binary system LB 3459 based on high-resolution high-S/N optical and UV spectra. The metal abundances are determined by means of state-of-the-art NLTE model atmospheres. We determined Teffw42 and log gw{5.2} within very small error limits. The He (1/125 solar), C (1/265), N (1/33), O (1/12), and Si (1/5) abundances appear strongly depleted while that of Fe and Ni are roughly solar and Mg is strongly enriched by a factor of 6. The spectroscopic distance to LB 3459 is d = 396 pc. The mass of the primary component of LB 3459 is 0.330 M_sun derived from comparisons with theoretical models for sdO stars in the log T_eff - \\log g plane. The mass of the secondary is then 0.066 M_sun derived from the mass function. There remains some disagreement between the radius derived from log g and the above mass, and that derived from analysis of the radial-velocity curve and the eclipse curves. LB 3459 is a close binary system which had experienced a common envelope (CE) phase during its evolution. It fits in the ``low mass case B'' scenario of Iben & Livio (1993) and the secondary is a brown dwarf. The spectroscopically determined rotational velocity of the primary is v_rot = 34 ± 10 km* sec-1. Thus even bound rotation (v_rot = 45.7 km* sec-1) cannot be ruled out. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile (proposals 55.D-0319, 56.C-0165) and on data retrieved from the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Final Archive.

  5. Analysis of helium-rich subdwarf O stars. 1: NLTE models, methods, and fits for 21 Palomar Green survey sdOs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejll, P.; Bauer, F.; Saffer, R.; Liebert, J.; Kunze, D.; Shipman, H. L.

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters for 21 helium-rich hot subdwarf O stars from the Palomar Green survey are found from fits of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) models to optical spectra. About 250 new NLTE models in the parameter range T(sub eff) from 35,000 to 65,000 K, log (g) from 4.0 to 6.5, and epsilon(He) from 50% He to 99% He have been calculated. A fit for each object is presented. Estimated distances and luminosities are calculated, assuming a mass of 0.5 solar masses. Large distances above the Galactic plane are found, and this implies that the majority of the sdO stars belong to a different stellar population than the sdB, planetary nebulae and white dwarf stars. Possibilities may include the halo and a 'thick disk.' Kinematical data from the literature are also discussed in view of the found distances. Five of the stars have been observed, modeled, and analyzed by Dreizler et al., and significant differences exist between their results and ours for these stars. The reason for these differences is not yet known, but the problem does not alter the conclusions about population membership that we present.

  6. Atmospheric NLTE models for the spectroscopic analysis of blue stars with winds. III. X-ray emission from wind-embedded shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, L. P.; Puls, J.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Hoffmann, T. L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and X-ray radiation emitted from wind-embedded shocks in hot, massive stars can affect the ionization balance in their outer atmospheres and can be the mechanism responsible for producing highly ionized atomic species detected in stellar wind UV spectra. Aims: To allow for these processes in the context of spectral analysis, we have implemented the emission from wind-embedded shocks and related physics into our unified, NLTE model atmosphere/spectrum synthesis code FASTWIND. Methods: The shock structure and corresponding emission is calculated as a function of user-supplied parameters (volume filling factor, radial stratification of shock strength, and radial onset of emission). We account for a temperature and density stratification inside the postshock cooling zones, calculated for radiative and adiabatic cooling in the inner and outer wind, respectively. The high-energy absorption of the cool wind is considered by adding important K-shell opacities, and corresponding Auger ionization rates have been included in the NLTE network. To test our implementation and to check the resulting effects, we calculated a comprehensive model grid with a variety of X-ray emission parameters. Results: We tested and verified our implementation carefully against corresponding results from various alternative model atmosphere codes, and studied the effects from shock emission for important ions from He, C, N, O, Si, and P. Surprisingly, dielectronic recombination turned out to play an essential role for the ionization balance of O iv/O v (particularly in dwarfs with Teff~ 45 000 K). Finally, we investigated the frequency dependence and radial behavior of the mass absorption coefficient, κν(r), which is important in the context of X-ray line formation in massive star winds. Conclusions: In almost all of the cases considered, direct ionization is of major influence because of the enhanced EUV radiation field, and Auger ionization only affects N vi

  7. Model studies of the solar limb shape variation with wavelenght within the PICARD project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, Stella M. L.; Thuillier, Gerard; Claudel, Jennyfer; Haberreiter, Margit; Mein, Nicole; Schmutz, Werner; Shapiro, Alexander; Sofia, Sabatino; Short, Christopher I.

    Solar images in the visible wavelength range show that the disk centre is brighter than the limb region. This phenomenon, which is both known as "centre to limb variation (CLV)", or "limb darkening function", is know to depend on wavelength. Since the CLV is determined by the density and temperature stratification, as well as the chemical composition of the so-lar photosphere, its measurement is important to validate theoretical assumption made when building numerical models of the solar atmosphere. The definition of the solar diameter is nor-mally adopted as the separation between two inflection points at opposite ends of a line passing through the center of the solar disk. Therefore, in order to understand long term variability on the solar diameter, it is important to understand what drives the dependence of the position of the inflection point on wavelength. In this paper we use different available solar atmosphere models to study this dependence. The results presented here refer to quiet Sun conditions and encompass the visible and near infra-red spectral regions, which are the regions of interest for the PICARD Satellite Mission. In a first step we utilize the solar atmosphere parameters with a radiative transfer code. This allows for the study of the impact of different factors such as opacities, electron density and temperature from different models on the results. Then, we compare results obtained using each solar atmosphere model. Our results are compared with existent ground based measurements performed by the Pic du Midi telescope, the balloon board measurements with the Solar Disk Sextant experiment, and with the measurements by the Michelson Doppler Imager on board SoHO satellite. The model simulations show that the position of the inflection point is sensitive to the different parameters and model assumptions. Furthermore, our study shows, for the first time, that the position of the inflection point changes dramatically with and outside of

  8. The Virtual Observatory Service TheoSSA: Establishing a Database of Synthetic Stellar Flux Standards I. NLTE Spectral Analysis of the DA-Type White Dwarf G191-B2B *,**,***,****

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Bohlin, R.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen-rich, DA-type white dwarfs are particularly suited as primary standard stars for flux calibration. State-of-the-art NLTE models consider opacities of species up to trans-iron elements and provide reliable synthetic stellar-atmosphere spectra to compare with observations. Aims. We will establish a database of theoretical spectra of stellar flux standards that are easily accessible via a web interface. Methods. In the framework of the Virtual Observatory, the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory developed the registered service TheoSSA. It provides easy access to stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and is intended to ingest SEDs calculated by any model-atmosphere code. In case of the DA white dwarf G191-B2B, we demonstrate that the model reproduces not only its overall continuum shape but also the numerous metal lines exhibited in its ultraviolet spectrum. Results. TheoSSA is in operation and contains presently a variety of SEDs for DA-type white dwarfs. It will be extended in the near future and can host SEDs of all primary and secondary flux standards. The spectral analysis of G191-B2B has shown that our hydrostatic models reproduce the observations best at Teff =60 000 +/- 2000K and log g=7.60 +/- 0.05.We newly identified Fe vi, Ni vi, and Zn iv lines. For the first time, we determined the photospheric zinc abundance with a logarithmic mass fraction of -4.89 (7.5 × solar). The abundances of He (upper limit), C, N, O, Al, Si, O, P, S, Fe, Ni, Ge, and Sn were precisely determined. Upper abundance limits of about 10% solar were derived for Ti, Cr, Mn, and Co. Conclusions. The TheoSSA database of theoretical SEDs of stellar flux standards guarantees that the flux calibration of all astronomical data and cross-calibration between different instruments can be based on the same models and SEDs calculated with different model-atmosphere codes and are easy to compare.

  9. Review of the NLTE-5 kinetics workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Fontes, Christopher J; Abdallah, Jr., Joseph; Bowen, Christopher; Lee, Richard W; Ralchenko, Yuri

    2008-01-01

    We review the 5th non-LTE (non local thermodynamic equilibrium) kinetics code comparison workshop, held in November 2007. Both steady-state and time-dependent cases for elements ranging from carbon to gold were examined in detail. Calculations of radiative power losses and specific spectra were requested in addition to typical plasma quantities such as the ionization balance. Non-Maxwellian electrons, external Planckian radiation and opacity effects in spectra were also included in the comparisons. We discuss the organization of the workshop and present a set of representative results. The particular case of a tungsten plasma at tokamak operating densities was considered for the first time. Due to its importance to the ITER project, more detailed results of these comparisons will be published elsewhere.

  10. NICOLE: NLTE Stokes Synthesis/Inversion Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socas-Navarro, H.

    2015-08-01

    NICOLE, written in Fortran 90, seeks the model atmosphere that provides the best fit to the Stokes profiles (in a least-squares sense) of an arbitrary number of simultaneously-observes spectral lines from solar/stellar atmospheres. The inversion core used for the development of NICOLE is the LORIEN engine (the Lovely Reusable Inversion ENgine), which combines the SVD technique with the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization method to solve the inverse problem.

  11. The virtual observatory service TheoSSA: Establishing a database of synthetic stellar flux standards. I. NLTE spectral analysis of the DA-type white dwarf G191-B2B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Bohlin, R.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Context. Hydrogen-rich, DA-type white dwarfs are particularly suited as primary standard stars for flux calibration. State-of-the-art NLTE models consider opacities of species up to trans-iron elements and provide reliable synthetic stellar-atmosphere spectra to compare with observations. Aims: We will establish a database of theoretical spectra of stellar flux standards that are easily accessible via a web interface. Methods: In the framework of the Virtual Observatory, the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory developed the registered service TheoSSA. It provides easy access to stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and is intended to ingest SEDs calculated by any model-atmosphere code. In case of the DA white dwarf G191-B2B, we demonstrate that the model reproduces not only its overall continuum shape but also the numerous metal lines exhibited in its ultraviolet spectrum. Results: TheoSSA is in operation and contains presently a variety of SEDs for DA-type white dwarfs. It will be extended in the near future and can host SEDs of all primary and secondary flux standards. The spectral analysis of G191-B2B has shown that our hydrostatic models reproduce the observations best at and log g = 7.60 ± 0.05. We newly identified Fe vi, Ni vi, and Zn iv lines. For the first time, we determined the photospheric zinc abundance with a logarithmic mass fraction of -4.89 (7.5 × solar). The abundances of He (upper limit), C, N, O, Al, Si, O, P, S, Fe, Ni, Ge, and Sn were precisely determined. Upper abundance limits of about 10% solar were derived for Ti, Cr, Mn, and Co. Conclusions: The TheoSSA database of theoretical SEDs of stellar flux standards guarantees that the flux calibration of all astronomical data and cross-calibration between different instruments can be based on the same models and SEDs calculated with different model-atmosphere codes and are easy to compare. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope

  12. Jovimagnetic secular variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.

    1982-01-01

    Long term variations of a planetary magnetic field are one of the few observables available in the study of planetary interiors and dynamo theory. While variations of the geomagnetic field were accessible to direct measurement for centuries, knowledge of the secular variations of other planetary dynamos is limited. New limits on Jovimagnetic secular variations were found by comparison of a Jovian internal field model obtained from the Voyager 1 magnetic field observations at epoch 1979.2 with the epoch 1974.9 Pioneer 11 O4 model. No significant secular variation of either the magnitude or position of the Jovidipole is found for the years 1974.9 through 1979.2, although a small Earth-like variation cannot be ruled out.

  13. Variations in Sexual Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juhasz, Anne McCreary

    1983-01-01

    Questions are raised about the difficulty of defining normal and atypical sexual behavior. Variations from normalcy that students, parents, and educators are most likely to encounter are discussed. The importance of dealing with variations in ways that are best for the individual and the group is emphasized. (PP)

  14. Computing NLTE Opacities -- Node Level Parallel Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Daniel

    2015-09-11

    Presentation. The goal: to produce a robust library capable of computing reasonably accurate opacities inline with the assumption of LTE relaxed (non-LTE). Near term: demonstrate acceleration of non-LTE opacity computation. Far term (if funded): connect to application codes with in-line capability and compute opacities. Study science problems. Use efficient algorithms that expose many levels of parallelism and utilize good memory access patterns for use on advanced architectures. Portability to multiple types of hardware including multicore processors, manycore processors such as KNL, GPUs, etc. Easily coupled to radiation hydrodynamics and thermal radiative transfer codes.

  15. Realistic NLTE Radiative Transfer for Modeling Stellar Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Philip D.

    1999-01-01

    This NASA grant supported the development of codes to solve the non-LTE multi-level spherical radiative transfer problem in the presence of velocity fields. Much of this work was done in collaboration with Graham Harper (CASA, University of Colorado). These codes were developed for application to the cool, low-velocity winds of evolved late-type stars. Particular emphasis was placed on modeling the wind of lambda Velorum (K4 lb), the brightest K supergiant in the sky, based on extensive observations of the ultraviolet spectrum with the HST/GHRS from GO program 5307. Several solution techniques were examined, including the Eddington factor Approach described in detail by Bennett & Harper (1997). An Eddington factor variant of Harper's S-MULTI code (Harper 1994) for stationary atmospheres was developed and implemented, although full convergence was not realized. The ratio of wind terminal velocity to turbulent velocity is large (approx. 0.3-0.5) in these cool star winds so this assumption of stationarity provides reasonable starting models. Final models, incorporating specified wind laws, were converged using the comoving CRD S-MULTI code. Details of the solution procedure were published by Bennett & Harper (1997). Our analysis of the wind of lambda Vel, based on wind absorption superimposed on chromospheric emission lines in the ultraviolet, can be found in Carpenter et al. (1999). In this paper, we compare observed wind absorption features to an exact CRD calculation in the comoving frame, and also to a much quicker, but approximate, method using the SEI (Sobolev with Exact Integration) code of Lamers, Cerruti-Sola, & Perinotto (1987). Carpenter et al. (1999) provide detailed comparisons of the exact CRD and approximate SEI results and discuss when SEI is adequate to use for computing wind line profiles. Unfortunately, the observational material is insufficient to unambiguously determine the wind acceleration law for lambda Vel. Relatively few unblended Fe II lines of optical depth sensitive to the wind acceleration region are present in the existing HST/GHRS data set. Most of the Fe II lines are either too optically thick (resulting in a board, black wind absorption profile) or too optically thin (resulting in no wind absorption feature present). Also, most of the ultraviolet spectra obtained from HST GO-5307 was at medium resolution (R approx. 40,000, corresponding to a velocity resolution of 7.5 km/s). This is simply inadequate to resolve the turbulence in the outer wind; a key parameter in theoretical wind models. We can now say that an unambiguous determination of the wind velocity law in lambda Vel will require complete coverage of the ultraviolet spectrum at high dispersion (R approx. 10(exp 5), or 3 km/s). This is now feasible usin, the STIS echelle spectrograph on-board HST.

  16. Human variation databases

    PubMed Central

    Küntzer, Jan; Eggle, Daniela; Klostermann, Stefan; Burtscher, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    More than 100 000 human genetic variations have been described in various genes that are associated with a wide variety of diseases. Such data provides invaluable information for both clinical medicine and basic science. A number of locus-specific databases have been developed to exploit this huge amount of data. However, the scope, format and content of these databases differ strongly and as no standard for variation databases has yet been adopted, the way data is presented varies enormously. This review aims to give an overview of current resources for human variation data in public and commercial resources. PMID:20639550

  17. The Schwinger Variational Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    1995-01-01

    Variational methods have proven invaluable in theoretical physics and chemistry, both for bound state problems and for the study of collision phenomena. For collisional problems they can be grouped into two types: those based on the Schroedinger equation and those based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation. The application of the Schwinger variational (SV) method to e-molecule collisions and photoionization has been reviewed previously. The present chapter discusses the implementation of the SV method as applied to e-molecule collisions.

  18. Generalized quasi variational inequalities

    SciTech Connect

    Noor, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we establish the equivalence between the generalized quasi variational inequalities and the generalized implicit Wiener-Hopf equations using essentially the projection technique. This equivalence is used to suggest and analyze a number of new iterative algorithms for solving generalized quasi variational inequalities and the related complementarity problems. The convergence criteria is also considered. The results proved in this paper represent a significant improvement and refinement of the previously known results.

  19. Chromatic variations suppress suprathreshold brightness variations.

    PubMed

    Kingdom, Frederick A A; Bell, Jason; Gheorghiu, Elena; Malkoc, Gokhan

    2010-01-01

    Most objects in natural scenes are suprathreshold in both color (chromatic) and luminance contrast. How salient is each dimension? We have developed a novel method employing a stimulus similar to that used by B. C. Regan and J. D. Mollon (1997) who studied the relative saliencies of the two chromatic cardinal directions. Our stimuli consist of left- and right-oblique modulations of color and/or luminance defined within a lattice of circles. In the "separated" condition, the two modulations were presented separately as forced-choice pairs, and the task was to indicate which was more salient. In the "combined" condition, the two orthogonal-in-orientation modulations were added, and the task was to indicate the more salient orientation. The ratio of color to luminance contrast at the PSE was calculated for both conditions. Across color directions, 48% more luminance contrast relative to color contrast was required to achieve a PSE in the "combined" compared to the "separated" condition. A second experiment showed that the PSE difference was due to the luminance being masked by the color, rather than due to superior color grouping. We conclude that suprathreshold brightness variations are masked by suprathreshold color variations. PMID:20884478

  20. Variations in genome mass.

    PubMed

    Wachtel, S S; Tiersch, T R

    1993-02-01

    1. Genome size varies considerably among vertebrates, ranging from less than 1 pg to more than 200 pg; the amount of DNA differing among individuals in a population can equal the amount in the entire structural gene complement. 2. Recent technological advances permit evaluation of genome size variation at several levels including sub-chromosomal, chromosomal and cellular. 3. Genome size variation may also be viewed from taxonomic levels, and across evolutionary time frames. 4. As sources of genome size variation are identified and studied, the conundrum of the C-value paradox (lack of correlations among genome size, genomic complexity and phylogenetic status of organisms) may prove to be more apparent than real. 5. For example, the limited and relatively constant genome size of avians may be related to the physiological constraints of flight. PMID:8462275

  1. Essential Variational Poisson Cohomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sole, Alberto; Kac, Victor G.

    2012-08-01

    In our recent paper "The variational Poisson cohomology" (2011) we computed the dimension of the variational Poisson cohomology {{{H}^bullet_K({V})}} for any quasiconstant coefficient ℓ × ℓ matrix differential operator K of order N with invertible leading coefficient, provided that {{{V}}} is a normal algebra of differential functions over a linearly closed differential field. In the present paper we show that, for K skewadjoint, the {{{Z}}} -graded Lie superalgebra {{{H}^bullet_K({V})}} is isomorphic to the finite dimensional Lie superalgebra {{widetilde{H}(Nell,S)}} . We also prove that the subalgebra of "essential" variational Poisson cohomology, consisting of classes vanishing on the Casimirs of K, is zero. This vanishing result has applications to the theory of bi-Hamiltonian structures and their deformations. At the end of the paper we consider also the translation invariant case.

  2. Mediterranean sea level variations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigo, I.; Sánchez Reales, J. M.; García, D.; Chao, B. F.

    2009-04-01

    In this work we report an updated study of the sea level variations for the Mediterranean sea for the period from October 1992 to January 2008. The study addresses two mayor issues: (i)The analysis of the spatial and temporal variability of sea surface height (SSH) from radar altimetry measurements (from TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) + Jason-1, etc.). We use EOF analysis to explain most of its interannual variation, and how the different basins interact. (ii) The analysis of dynamics and balance of water mass transport for the whole period. We estimate the steric SSH by combining the steric SSH estimated from temperature and salt profiles simulated by the ECCO model with time-variable gravity (TVG) data (from GRACE) for the Mediterranean Sea. The estimated steric SSH together with the SSH obtained from altimetry allow for a more realistic estimation of the water mass variations in the Mediterranean for the whole period.

  3. Variation and Linguistic Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Charles-James N.

    This volume presents principles and models for describing language variation, and introduces a time-based, dynamic framework for linguistic description. The book first summarizes some of the problems of grammatical description encountered from Saussure through the present and then outlines possibilities for new descriptions of language which take…

  4. Seasonal Variation in Epidemiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrero, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Seasonality analyses are important in medical research. If the incidence of a disease shows a seasonal pattern, then an environmental factor must be considered in its etiology. We discuss a method for the simultaneous analysis of seasonal variation in multiple groups. The nuts and bolts are explained using simple trigonometry, an elementary…

  5. Variational transition state theory

    SciTech Connect

    Truhlar, D.G.

    1993-12-01

    This research program involves the development of variational transition state theory (VTST) and semiclassical tunneling methods for the calculation of gas-phase reaction rates and selected applications. The applications are selected for their fundamental interest and/or their relevance to combustion.

  6. (Genomic variation in maize)

    SciTech Connect

    Rivin, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    These studies have sought to learn how different DNA sequences and sequence arrangements contribute to genome plasticity in maize. We describe quantitative variation among maize inbred lines for tandemly arrayed and dispersed repeated DNA sequences and gene families, and qualitative variation for sequences homologous to the Mutator family of transposons. The potential of these sequences to undergo unequal crossing over, non-allelic (ectopic) recombination and transposition makes them a source of genome instability. We have found examples of rapid genomic change involving these sequences in Fl hybrids, tissue culture cells and regenerated plants. We describe the repetitive portion of the maize genome as composed primarily of sequences that vary markedly in copy number among different genetic stocks. The most highly variable is the 185 bp repeat associated with the heterochromatic chromosome knobs. Even in lines without visible knobs, there is a considerable quantity of tandemly arrayed repeats. We also found a high degree of variability for the tandemly arrayed 5S and ribosomal DNA repeats. While such variation might be expected as the result of unequal cross-over, we were surprised to find considerable variation among lower copy number, dispersed repeats as well. One highly repeated sequence that showed a complex tandem and dispersed arrangement stood out as showing no detectable variability among the maize lines. In striking contrast to the variability seen between the inbred stocks, individuals within a stock were indistinguishable with regard to their repeated sequence multiplicities.

  7. Sociolinguistic Variation and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudgill, Peter

    This book examines linguistic variation and change. Section 1, "Sociohistorical Linguistics," includes: (1) "British Vernacular Dialects in the Formation of American English: The Case of East Anglian 'Do'"; (2) "'Short o' in East Anglia and New England"; and (3) "Sociohistorical Linguistics and Dialect Survival: A Note on Another Nova Scotian…

  8. Determining Faculty Grading Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demerjian, Marlene D.

    A study was undertaken at the College of the Canyons, in California, to assess the variation of grades given by mathematics instructors teaching intermediate algebra. A sample was drawn from all instructors who taught Math 070 repeatedly from fall 1990 to fall 1994, resulting in the examination of the grades of at least 200 students from classes…

  9. Fluency Variation in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim; Martins, Vanessa De Oliveira

    2007-01-01

    The Speech Fluency Profile of fluent adolescent speakers of Brazilian Portuguese, were examined with respect to gender and neurolinguistic variations. Speech samples of 130 male and female adolescents, aged between 12;0 and 17;11 years were gathered. They were analysed according to type of speech disruption; speech rate; and frequency of speech…

  10. Diurnal variations of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Galand, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Lavvas, P. P.; Mueller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Waite, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    We present our analysis of the diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere (between 1,000 and 1,400 km) based on a sample of Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements in the Open Source Ion (OSI) mode obtained from 8 close encounters of the Cassini spacecraft with Titan. Though there is an overall ion depletion well beyond the terminator, the ion content on Titan's nightside is still appreciable, with a density plateau of ~700 cm-3 below ~1,300 km. Such a plateau is associated with the combination of distinct diurnal variations of light and heavy ions. Light ions (e.g. CH5+, HCNH+, C2H5+) show strong diurnal variation, with clear bite-outs in their nightside distributions. In contrast, heavy ions (e.g. c-C3H3+, C2H3CNH+, C6H7+) present modest diurnal variation, with significant densities observed on the nightside. We propose that the distinctions between light and heavy ions are associated with their different chemical loss pathways, with the former primarily through "fast" ion-neutral chemistry and the latter through "slow" electron dissociative recombination. The INMS data suggest day-to-night transport as an important source of ions on Titan's nightside, to be distinguished from the conventional scenario of auroral ionization by magnetospheric particles as the only ionizing source on the nightside. This is supported by the strong correlation between the observed night-to-day ion density ratios and the associated ion lifetimes. We construct a time-dependent ion chemistry model to investigate the effects of day-to-night transport on the ionospheric structures of Titan. The predicted diurnal variation has similar general characteristics to those observed, with some apparent discrepancies which could be reconciled by imposing fast horizontal thermal winds in Titan's upper atmosphere.

  11. The Schwinger Variational Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    1995-01-01

    Variational methods have proven invaluable in theoretical physics and chemistry, both for bound state problems and for the study of collision phenomena. The application of the Schwinger variational (SV) method to e-molecule collisions and molecular photoionization has been reviewed previously. The present chapter discusses the implementation of the SV method as applied to e-molecule collisions. Since this is not a review of cross section data, cross sections are presented only to server as illustrative examples. In the SV method, the correct boundary condition is automatically incorporated through the use of Green's function. Thus SV calculations can employ basis functions with arbitrary boundary conditions. The iterative Schwinger method has been used extensively to study molecular photoionization. For e-molecule collisions, it is used at the static exchange level to study elastic scattering and coupled with the distorted wave approximation to study electronically inelastic scattering.

  12. Variation, Repetition, And Choice

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Rodrigues, Josele; Lattal, Kennon A; dos Santos, Cristiano V; Matos, Ricardo A

    2005-01-01

    Experiment 1 investigated the controlling properties of variability contingencies on choice between repeated and variable responding. Pigeons were exposed to concurrent-chains schedules with two alternatives. In the REPEAT alternative, reinforcers in the terminal link depended on a single sequence of four responses. In the VARY alternative, a response sequence in the terminal link was reinforced only if it differed from the n previous sequences (lag criterion). The REPEAT contingency generated low, constant levels of sequence variation whereas the VARY contingency produced levels of sequence variation that increased with the lag criterion. Preference for the REPEAT alternative tended to increase directly with the degree of variation required for reinforcement. Experiment 2 examined the potential confounding effects in Experiment 1 of immediacy of reinforcement by yoking the interreinforcer intervals in the REPEAT alternative to those in the VARY alternative. Again, preference for REPEAT was a function of the lag criterion. Choice between varying and repeating behavior is discussed with respect to obtained behavioral variability, probability of reinforcement, delay of reinforcement, and switching within a sequence. PMID:15828592

  13. Cosmic ray biannual variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attolini, M. R.; Cecchini, S.; Cinicastagnoli, G.; Galli, M.

    1985-01-01

    The study of the cosmic ray (CR) power spectrum has revealed a significant variation with a period around 2 yr that cannot be explained as a high order harmonic of the 11 yr solar cycle. Comparative study of the correlation on different time scales between CR intensity and Rz, aa, high speed streams and polar hole size has put in evidence that a high degree of coherency exists between each couple of variables at 1.58 to 1.64 yr, except between CR and Rz. On the other hand cyclic variation on a short time scale, around 26 months, has been claimed to be present in the neutrino flux. Critical tests of this hypothesis are considered and a preliminary result seems to indicate that the hypothesis of the existence of a 1.6 yr periodicity in the neutrino data during the measurement time interval, has a significance or = 99.9%. The possible origin of this variation as due to a contribution either of CR interactions in the upper atmosphere or to the solar dynamics, are discussed.

  14. Canonical variate regression.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chongliang; Liu, Jin; Dey, Dipak K; Chen, Kun

    2016-07-01

    In many fields, multi-view datasets, measuring multiple distinct but interrelated sets of characteristics on the same set of subjects, together with data on certain outcomes or phenotypes, are routinely collected. The objective in such a problem is often two-fold: both to explore the association structures of multiple sets of measurements and to develop a parsimonious model for predicting the future outcomes. We study a unified canonical variate regression framework to tackle the two problems simultaneously. The proposed criterion integrates multiple canonical correlation analysis with predictive modeling, balancing between the association strength of the canonical variates and their joint predictive power on the outcomes. Moreover, the proposed criterion seeks multiple sets of canonical variates simultaneously to enable the examination of their joint effects on the outcomes, and is able to handle multivariate and non-Gaussian outcomes. An efficient algorithm based on variable splitting and Lagrangian multipliers is proposed. Simulation studies show the superior performance of the proposed approach. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in an [Formula: see text] intercross mice study and an alcohol dependence study. PMID:26861909

  15. Variational Approach to SAW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlatsky, Sergei F.; Reinhardt, S.; Lach; Ovchinnikov, Yu.

    1996-03-01

    A new variational technique is used to analyze both analytically and numerically the scaling behavior of Self Avoiding Walks. We present a set of lower bounds for the survival provability (the ratio of total number of self avoiding paths to total number of random paths) which is based on Jensen inequality. This set is generated by the hierarchy of different trial hamiltonians which correspond to: unconstrained random walk, mean field approximation, original Flory model and to a new approach which allows to vary independently the scales of fluctuations, corresponding to different path length scales. The D=2, D=3, and Darrow 4, cases are analyzed separately. The results of analytical variational procedure reproduce classical mean field exponents for small scales and Flory - type critical exponents for large scales, and present new estimates for the chemical potential of SAW. Possible generalizations to branching self avoiding paths are discussed. The numerical algorithm which is based on proposed trial hamiltonian might increase the efficiency with which the chemical potential and scaling properties of chain molecules with a finite number of discrete conformations can be computed. This work was supported in part by ONR Grant N00014-94-0647.

  16. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  17. Anisotropic Total Variation Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Grasmair, Markus; Lenzen, Frank

    2010-12-15

    Total variation regularization and anisotropic filtering have been established as standard methods for image denoising because of their ability to detect and keep prominent edges in the data. Both methods, however, introduce artifacts: In the case of anisotropic filtering, the preservation of edges comes at the cost of the creation of additional structures out of noise; total variation regularization, on the other hand, suffers from the stair-casing effect, which leads to gradual contrast changes in homogeneous objects, especially near curved edges and corners. In order to circumvent these drawbacks, we propose to combine the two regularization techniques. To that end we replace the isotropic TV semi-norm by an anisotropic term that mirrors the directional structure of either the noisy original data or the smoothed image. We provide a detailed existence theory for our regularization method by using the concept of relaxation. The numerical examples concluding the paper show that the proposed introduction of an anisotropy to TV regularization indeed leads to improved denoising: the stair-casing effect is reduced while at the same time the creation of artifacts is suppressed.

  18. Variations in brain DNA

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Jesús; Gómez-Ramos, Alberto; Soriano, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    It is assumed that DNA sequences are conserved in the diverse cell types present in a multicellular organism like the human being. Thus, in order to compare the sequences in the genome of DNA from different individuals, nucleic acid is commonly isolated from a single tissue. In this regard, blood cells are widely used for this purpose because of their availability. Thus blood DNA has been used to study genetic familiar diseases that affect other tissues and organs, such as the liver, heart, and brain. While this approach is valid for the identification of familial diseases in which mutations are present in parental germinal cells and, therefore, in all the cells of a given organism, it is not suitable to identify sporadic diseases in which mutations might occur in specific somatic cells. This review addresses somatic DNA variations in different tissues or cells (mainly in the brain) of single individuals and discusses whether the dogma of DNA invariance between cell types is indeed correct. We will also discuss how single nucleotide somatic variations arise, focusing on the presence of specific DNA mutations in the brain. PMID:25505410

  19. Climatic variation of storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, Ted

    1993-01-01

    Long-term variation of U.S. tornadoes were studied by obtaining the best possible data during the 75 years, 1916-90. The most difficult task was to estimate the number of early tornadoes in 1916-50 when the reporting efficiency was very bad, resulting in undercounting of the incidents. In generating the best possible data, Fujita's Tornado Tape produced at the University of Chicago, the book Significant Tornadoes, 1880-1989, by Thomas P. Grazulis, and the NSSFC Tornado Tape were combined. First, the annual number of tornadoes were smoothed to obtain the smoothed number of annual tornadoes which was normalized to the standard number of tornadoes defined as the mean number in the recent 30 years 1960-89. The normalization factor was obtained by computing the ration of smoothed and standard number. In the early years, the factor was in excess of 7. Thereafter, the normalized number of annual tornadoes was computed and plotted, finding that the results are very satisfactory. In order to visualize the variation of tornado activities, the tornado activity number (TAN) was initiated and computed. The TAN including all annual tornadoes show certain periodicity. For climatological evaluation, the peak-activity day of each year, such as Superoutbreak day, 3 April 1974, Palm Sunday, 11 April 1965 were eliminated. The TAN, excluding peak-day tornadoes, is of extreme interest.

  20. FROG - Fingerprinting Genomic Variation Ontology.

    PubMed

    Abinaya, E; Narang, Pankaj; Bhardwaj, Anshu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variations play a crucial role in differential phenotypic outcomes. Given the complexity in establishing this correlation and the enormous data available today, it is imperative to design machine-readable, efficient methods to store, label, search and analyze this data. A semantic approach, FROG: "FingeRprinting Ontology of Genomic variations" is implemented to label variation data, based on its location, function and interactions. FROG has six levels to describe the variation annotation, namely, chromosome, DNA, RNA, protein, variations and interactions. Each level is a conceptual aggregation of logically connected attributes each of which comprises of various properties for the variant. For example, in chromosome level, one of the attributes is location of variation and which has two properties, allosomes or autosomes. Another attribute is variation kind which has four properties, namely, indel, deletion, insertion, substitution. Likewise, there are 48 attributes and 278 properties to capture the variation annotation across six levels. Each property is then assigned a bit score which in turn leads to generation of a binary fingerprint based on the combination of these properties (mostly taken from existing variation ontologies). FROG is a novel and unique method designed for the purpose of labeling the entire variation data generated till date for efficient storage, search and analysis. A web-based platform is designed as a test case for users to navigate sample datasets and generate fingerprints. The platform is available at http://ab-openlab.csir.res.in/frog. PMID:26244889

  1. Citrullinemia: phenotypic variations.

    PubMed

    Whelan, D T; Brusso, T; Spate, M

    1976-06-01

    An 18-month-old female infant was found to have citrullinemia on routine plasma screening by the Scriver Method at 5 days of age. At 10 days of age, plasma citrulline concentration was 0.704mumol/ml (normal, 0.010 to 0.030mumol/ml) and has remained 60 to 80 times higher than normal. Urine citrulline concentration was markedly elevated. Hyperammonemia occurred at 1 month of age. The serum ammonia concentration was 473mug/100 ml (normal, 50 to 250 mug/100 ml) and rose to 770mug/100 ml at 4 months of age. Dietary protein was restricted to 1.6 gm/kg/day. Without further change in protein intake, the serum ammonia concentration decreased to 280mug/100 ml and, since then, it has returned to normal. The addition of three synthetic L-amino acids was required for a short time during dietary therapy. At 10 months of age, the infant was given a normal diet. At 18 months of age, her physical and mental development is normal. Activity of argininosuccinic acid synthetase measured in skin fibroblasts was 0.0037mumol of radioactive carbon dioxide per milligram of protein per hour. To demonstrate heterozygosity, fasting plasma citrulline concentrations were measured in five members of the family. Comparison of findings in this patient with those reported in the literature suggests phenotypical variation of the disease, probably due to genetic heterogeneity. PMID:934749

  2. Variation of ENSO teleconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenberg, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) drives remote teleconnection patterns that affect weather and climate worldwide. These teleconnections have in turn been used to reconstruct the past variability of ENSO, using sparse observations and ENSO-sensitive proxy records from around the globe. This study examines intrinsic and forced variations of ENSO teleconnections, using simulations from a suite of global coupled GCMs that mimic the observed ENSO teleconnections rather well. Records of various lengths are extracted from a long control run of the GFDL CM2.1 coupled GCM, and anomalies of global surface temperature, rainfall, and 200 hPa heights are regressed onto standard ENSO indices. The resulting teleconnection distributions are characterized in terms of their dependence on record length, season, and ENSO event type, and are then used to assess the detectability of teleconnection changes arising from changes in external forcings or model formulation. The results clarify the uncertainties that arise from calibrating historical and paleoclimate reconstructions to sparse observational records, and shed light on future climate risks tied to ENSO.

  3. Seasonal variations in Soudan 2.

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M. C.; Soudan 2 Collaboration

    1999-06-23

    Seasonal Variations in an underground detector may be a signature for Dark Matter. The Soudan 2 detector searches for nucleon decay and atmospheric neutrinos. The trigger rate is about 0.5 Hertz. It is dominated by approximately equal numbers of atmospheric muons and low level radioactivityy. The muon rate has a seasonal variation of {+-}2%, which is consistent with a similar effect at MACRO. The MACRO effect has been correlated with temperature in the upper atmosphere. Our trigger rate has a seasonal variation of {+-}15% which we believe is due to radon in the mine, and variations in air flow with outside temperature.

  4. Explorations in Regional Variation: A Variational Pragmatic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The present article introduces the Special Issue entitled "A Variational Pragmatic Approach to Regional Variation in Language," a collection of papers which celebrates the work of Klaus P. Schneider (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Germany) on the occasion of his 60th birthday.

  5. Sea level variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Bruce C.

    1992-01-01

    Published values for the long-term, global mean sea level rise determined from tide gauge records range from about one to three mm per year. The scatter of the estimates appears to arise largely from the use of data from gauges located at convergent tectonic plate boundaries where changes of land elevation give fictitious sea level trends, and the effects of large interdecadal and longer sea level variations on short (less than 50+ years) or sappy records. In addition, virtually all gauges undergo subsidence or uplift due to isostatic rebound from the last deglaciation at a rate comparable to or greater than the secular rise of sea level. Modeling rebound by the ICE-3G model of Tushingham and Peltier (1990) and avoiding tide gauge records in areas of converging tectonic plates produces a highly consistent set of long sea level records. A global set of 21 such stations in nine oceanic regions with an average record length of 76 years during the period 1880-1980 yields the global sea level rise value 1.8 mm/year +/- 0.1. Greenhouse warming scenarios commonly forecast an additional acceleration of global sea level in the next 5 or 6+ decades in the range 0.1-0.2 mm/yr2. Because of the large power at low frequencies in the sea level spectrum, very long tide gauge records (75 years minimum) have been examined for past apparent sea level acceleration. For the 80-year period 1905-1985, 23 essentially complete tide gauge records in 10 geographic groups are available for analysis. These yielded the apparent global acceleration -0.011 (+/- 0.012) mm/yr2. A larger, less uniform set of 37 records in the same 10 groups with 92 years average length covering the 141 years from 1850-1991 gave 0.001 (+/- 0.008) mm/yr2. Thus there is no evidence for an apparent acceleration in the past 100+ years that is significant either statistically, or in comparison to values associated with global warming. Unfortunately, the large interdecadal fluctuations of sea level severely affect

  6. Robust Understanding of Statistical Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a framework that captures the complexity of reasoning about variation in ways that are indicative of robust understanding and describes reasoning as a blend of design, data-centric, and modeling perspectives. Robust understanding is indicated by integrated reasoning about variation within each perspective and across…

  7. Classifying Measures of Biological Variation

    PubMed Central

    Gregorius, Hans-Rolf; Gillet, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Biological variation is commonly measured at two basic levels: variation within individual communities, and the distribution of variation over communities or within a metacommunity. We develop a classification for the measurement of biological variation on both levels: Within communities into the categories of dispersion and diversity, and within metacommunities into the categories of compositional differentiation and partitioning of variation. There are essentially two approaches to characterizing the distribution of trait variation over communities in that individuals with the same trait state or type tend to occur in the same community (describes differentiation tendencies), and individuals with different types tend to occur in different communities (describes apportionment tendencies). Both approaches can be viewed from the dual perspectives of trait variation distributed over communities (CT perspective) and community membership distributed over trait states (TC perspective). This classification covers most of the relevant descriptors (qualified measures) of biological variation, as is demonstrated with the help of major families of descriptors. Moreover, the classification is shown to open ways to develop new descriptors that meet current needs. Yet the classification also reveals the misclassification of some prominent and widely applied descriptors: Dispersion is often misclassified as diversity, particularly in cases where dispersion descriptor allow for the computation of effective numbers; the descriptor GST of population genetics is commonly misclassified as compositional differentiation and confused with partitioning-oriented differentiation, whereas it actually measures partitioning-oriented apportionment; descriptors of β-diversity are ambiguous about the differentiation effects they are supposed to represent and therefore require conceptual reconsideration. PMID:25807558

  8. Variational formulation of high performance finite elements: Parametrized variational principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos A.; Militello, Carmello

    1991-01-01

    High performance elements are simple finite elements constructed to deliver engineering accuracy with coarse arbitrary grids. This is part of a series on the variational basis of high-performance elements, with emphasis on those constructed with the free formulation (FF) and assumed natural strain (ANS) methods. Parametrized variational principles that provide a foundation for the FF and ANS methods, as well as for a combination of both are presented.

  9. Statistics, Uncertainty, and Transmitted Variation

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelberger, Joanne Roth

    2014-11-05

    The field of Statistics provides methods for modeling and understanding data and making decisions in the presence of uncertainty. When examining response functions, variation present in the input variables will be transmitted via the response function to the output variables. This phenomenon can potentially have significant impacts on the uncertainty associated with results from subsequent analysis. This presentation will examine the concept of transmitted variation, its impact on designed experiments, and a method for identifying and estimating sources of transmitted variation in certain settings.

  10. Probabilistic Finite Element: Variational Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belytschko, T.; Liu, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of this research is to provide techniques which are cost-effective and enable the engineer to evaluate the effect of uncertainties in complex finite element models. Embedding the probabilistic aspects in a variational formulation is a natural approach. In addition, a variational approach to probabilistic finite elements enables it to be incorporated within standard finite element methodologies. Therefore, once the procedures are developed, they can easily be adapted to existing general purpose programs. Furthermore, the variational basis for these methods enables them to be adapted to a wide variety of structural elements and to provide a consistent basis for incorporating probabilistic features in many aspects of the structural problem. Tasks concluded include the theoretical development of probabilistic variational equations for structural dynamics, the development of efficient numerical algorithms for probabilistic sensitivity displacement and stress analysis, and integration of methodologies into a pilot computer code.

  11. Variational calculus on Banach spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Uglanov, A V

    2000-10-31

    The problem of variational calculus is considered in a (variable) subdomain of a Banach space. Analogues of the basic principles of the finite-dimensional theory are derived: the main formula for variations of a functional, necessary conditions of an extremum, Noether's theorem. All the results obtained are dimension-invariant and become the classical ones in the finite-dimensional setting. The main tool of the analysis is the theory of surface integration in Banach spaces.

  12. Variational integrators for electric circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Ober-Blöbaum, Sina; Tao, Molei; Cheng, Mulin; Owhadi, Houman; Marsden, Jerrold E.

    2013-06-01

    In this contribution, we develop a variational integrator for the simulation of (stochastic and multiscale) electric circuits. When considering the dynamics of an electric circuit, one is faced with three special situations: 1. The system involves external (control) forcing through external (controlled) voltage sources and resistors. 2. The system is constrained via the Kirchhoff current (KCL) and voltage laws (KVL). 3. The Lagrangian is degenerate. Based on a geometric setting, an appropriate variational formulation is presented to model the circuit from which the equations of motion are derived. A time-discrete variational formulation provides an iteration scheme for the simulation of the electric circuit. Dependent on the discretization, the intrinsic degeneracy of the system can be canceled for the discrete variational scheme. In this way, a variational integrator is constructed that gains several advantages compared to standard integration tools for circuits; in particular, a comparison to BDF methods (which are usually the method of choice for the simulation of electric circuits) shows that even for simple LCR circuits, a better energy behavior and frequency spectrum preservation can be observed using the developed variational integrator.

  13. Is there much variation in variation? Revisiting statistics of small area variation in health services research

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, Berta; Librero, Julián; Bernal-Delgado, Enrique; Peiró, Salvador; López-Valcarcel, Beatriz González; Martínez, Natalia; Aizpuru, Felipe

    2009-01-01

    Background The importance of Small Area Variation Analysis for policy-making contrasts with the scarcity of work on the validity of the statistics used in these studies. Our study aims at 1) determining whether variation in utilization rates between health areas is higher than would be expected by chance, 2) estimating the statistical power of the variation statistics; and 3) evaluating the ability of different statistics to compare the variability among different procedures regardless of their rates. Methods Parametric bootstrap techniques were used to derive the empirical distribution for each statistic under the hypothesis of homogeneity across areas. Non-parametric procedures were used to analyze the empirical distribution for the observed statistics and compare the results in six situations (low/medium/high utilization rates and low/high variability). A small scale simulation study was conducted to assess the capacity of each statistic to discriminate between different scenarios with different degrees of variation. Results Bootstrap techniques proved to be good at quantifying the difference between the null hypothesis and the variation observed in each situation, and to construct reliable tests and confidence intervals for each of the variation statistics analyzed. Although the good performance of Systematic Component of Variation (SCV), Empirical Bayes (EB) statistic shows better behaviour under the null hypothesis, it is able to detect variability if present, it is not influenced by the procedure rate and it is best able to discriminate between different degrees of heterogeneity. Conclusion The EB statistics seems to be a good alternative to more conventional statistics used in small-area variation analysis in health service research because of its robustness. PMID:19341469

  14. The Role of Variation in Lexicography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Ceil

    2003-01-01

    Explores the relationship between lexicography and variation in both spoken languages and sign languages. Examines the function of dictionaries and discusses the nature of linguistic variation, using an example of lexical variation in American Sign Language. (Author/VWL)

  15. Variational Lie derivative and cohomology classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palese, Marcella; Winterroth, Ekkehart

    2011-07-01

    We relate cohomology defined by a system of local Lagrangian with the cohomology class of the system of local variational Lie derivative, which is in turn a local variational problem; we show that the latter cohomology class is zero, since the variational Lie derivative `trivializes' cohomology classes defined by variational forms. As a consequence, conservation laws associated with symmetries of the second variational derivative of a local variational problem are globally defined.

  16. Variational Bayesian method for Retinex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqian; Xiao, Liang; Liu, Hongyi; Wei, Zhihui

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a variational Bayesian method for Retinex to simulate and interpret how the human visual system perceives color. To construct a hierarchical Bayesian model, we use the Gibbs distributions as prior distributions for the reflectance and the illumination, and the gamma distributions for the model parameters. By assuming that the reflection function is piecewise continuous and illumination function is spatially smooth, we define the energy functions in the Gibbs distributions as a total variation function and a smooth function for the reflectance and the illumination, respectively. We then apply the variational Bayes approximation to obtain the approximation of the posterior distribution of unknowns so that the unknown images and hyperparameters are estimated simultaneously. Experimental results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method for providing competitive performance without additional information about the unknown parameters, and when prior information is added the proposed method outperforms the non-Bayesian-based Retinex methods we compared. PMID:24846606

  17. Solar flux and its variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. V. P.; Gottlieb, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    Data are presented on the solar irradiance as derived from a number of sources. An attempt was made to bring these data onto a uniform scale. Summation of fluxes at all wavelengths yields a figure of 1357.826 for the solar constant. Estimates are made of the solar flux variations due to flares, active regions (slowly varying component), 27-day period, and the 11-yr cycle. Solar activity does not produce a significant variation in the value of the solar constant. Variations in the X-ray and EUV portions of the solar flux may be several orders of magnitude during solar activity, especially at times of major flares. It is established that these short wavelength flux enhancements cause significant changes in the terrestrial ionosphere.

  18. Patterned variation in prehistoric chiefdoms

    PubMed Central

    Drennan, Robert D.; Peterson, Christian E.

    2006-01-01

    Comparative study of early complex societies (chiefdoms) conjures visions of a cultural evolutionary emphasis on similarities and societal typology. Variation within the group has not been as systematically examined but offers an even more productive avenue of approach to fundamental principles of organization and change. Three widely separated trajectories of early chiefdom development are compared here: the Valley of Oaxaca (Mexico), the Alto Magdalena (Colombia), and Northeast China. Archaeological data from all three regions are analyzed with the same tools to reveal variation in human activities, relationships, and interactions as these change in the emergence of chiefly communities. Patterning in this variation suggests the operation of underlying general principles, which are offered as hypotheses that merit further investigation and evaluation in comparative study of a much larger number of cases. PMID:16473941

  19. Diurnal variation of mesospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, G.

    1982-03-01

    Four Petrel rockets were flown from South Uist on October 2, 1979, to investigate the ozone concentration variation predicted by photochemical models between day and night in the mesosphere by means of interference filters that defined an approximately 10 nm bandwidth. The first two rockets contained photometers with wavebands centered at 265 and 290 nm, while the last two employed a single waveband at 265 nm. Results show significant diurnal variation above 54 km, which exceeds a factor of 2 above 65 km and reaches a factor of 10 between night and sunrise at 90 km.

  20. Head Start Planned Variation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Jenny

    There is little agreement concerning which methods of preschool intervention are most effective. In order to evaluate several approaches to early childhood education, Project Head Start, in conjunction with Project Follow Through, has initiated the Planned Variation program. This year only a pilot project is underway with eight schools…

  1. Forecasts of geomagnetic secular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardinski, Ingo

    2014-05-01

    We attempt to forecast the geomagnetic secular variation based on stochastic models, non-parametric regression and singular spectrum analysis of the observed past field changes. Although this modelling approach is meant to be phenomenological, it may provide some insight into the mechanisms underlying typical time scales of geomagnetic field changes. We follow two strategies to forecast secular variation: Firstly, by applying time series models, and secondly, by using time-dependent kinematic models of the advected secular variation. These forecasts can span decades, to longer periods. This depends on the length of the past observations used as input, with different input models leading to different details in the forecasts. These forecasts become more uncertain over longer forecasting periods. One appealing reason is the disregard of magnetic diffusion in the kinematic modelling. But also the interactions of unobservable small scale core field with core flow at all scale unsettle the kinematic forecasting scheme. A further (obvious) reason is that geomagnetic secular variation can not be mimicked by linear time series models as the dynamo action itself is highly non-linear. Whether the dynamo action can be represented by a simple low-dimensional system requires further analysis.

  2. Modeling Natural Variation through Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrer, Richard; Schauble, Leona

    2004-01-01

    This design study tracks the development of student thinking about natural variation as late elementary grade students learned about distribution in the context of modeling plant growth at the population level. The data-modeling approach assisted children in coordinating their understanding of particular cases with an evolving notion of data as an…

  3. Tense Variation in Indirect Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pufahl, Ingrid

    A study of the extent to which the sequence-of-tenses rule (STR) is used in television news reporting in the United States is presented. The study examines which tenses are shifted most frequently and explains the uses and functions of tense variation. It is argued that STR is not always a semantically and pragmatically unmarked form as proposed…

  4. Compositional variations within scoria cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Mel; Wolff, John

    2003-02-01

    Basaltic to andesitic monogenic scoria cones from the southern Cascades exhibit large chemical variations within the products of single eruptions. Two types of chemical variations occur within cones. First, there are several instances where the chemistry of the late-stage lava flow is significantly different from that of the scoria. The two magma types cannot be related to each other by fractional crystallization, and instead seem to be derived from different sources. Second, chemical variations occur within the scoria, most easily recognized in ratios of large ion lithophile elements to high field strength elements. Repeatedly, an ocean-island basalt like component has erupted contemporaneously with the dominant calc-alkaline compositions, requiring two distinct mantle sources (one ocean-island basalt source and one mid-ocean-ridge basalt source) as well as the variable addition of slab-derived fluids. Such variations within the scoria suggest that either magma chambers do not exist and the melt migrates from the source through dike-like structures without homogenization, or that magma chambers are inefficient in their ability to mix liquids. Small volumes of basalt, which may normally be thermally challenged to reach the surface, might ascend through the crust through pathways recently traveled by previous melt batches, causing pairs of magmas to erupt at each vent.

  5. Strain variation in corrugated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuanye; Tantiwanichapan, Khwanchai; Christopher, Jason; Paiella, Roberto; Swan, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful non-destructive technique for analyzing strain in graphene. Recently there has been interest in making corrugated graphene devices with varying spatial wavelengths Λ for plasmonic and THz applications. Transferring graphene onto corrugated substrates introduces strain, which if there was perfect clamping (high fraction) would cause a periodic strain variation. However, the strain variation for pattern size smaller than the diffraction limit λ makes it hard to precisely model the strain distribution. Here we present a detailed study on how strain varies in corrugated graphene with sub-diffraction limit periodicity Λ < λ. Mechanically exfoliated graphene was deposited onto sinusoidal shape silicon dioxide gratings with Λ=400 nm period using the pick and place transfer technique. We observed that the graphene is not rigidly clamped, but partially slides to relieve the strain. We model the linewidth variation to extract the local strain variation as well as the sliding in the presence of charge puddling in graphene. The method gives us a better understanding on graphene slippage and strain distribution in graphene on a corrugated substrate with sub-diffraction limit spatial period.

  6. Vectorial total variation-based regularization for variational image registration.

    PubMed

    Chumchob, Noppadol

    2013-11-01

    To use interdependence between the primary components of the deformation field for smooth and non-smooth registration problems, the channel-by-channel total variation- or standard vectorial total variation (SVTV)-based regularization has been extended to a more flexible and efficient technique, allowing high quality regularization procedures. Based on this method, this paper proposes a fast nonlinear multigrid (NMG) method for solving the underlying Euler-Lagrange system of two coupled second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. Numerical experiments using both synthetic and realistic images not only confirm that the recommended VTV-based regularization yields better registration qualities for a wide range of applications than those of the SVTV-based regularization, but also that the proposed NMG method is fast, accurate, and reliable in delivering visually-pleasing registration results. PMID:23893729

  7. Geometric constrained variational calculus. III: The second variation (Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Enrico; Luria, Gianvittorio; Pagani, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    The problem of minimality for constrained variational calculus is analyzed within the class of piecewise differentiable extremaloids. A fully covariant representation of the second variation of the action functional based on a family of local gauge transformations of the original Lagrangian is proposed. The necessity of pursuing a local adaptation process, rather than the global one described in [1] is seen to depend on the value of certain scalar attributes of the extremaloid, here called the corners’ strengths. On this basis, both the necessary and the sufficient conditions for minimality are worked out. In the discussion, a crucial role is played by an analysis of the prolongability of the Jacobi fields across the corners. Eventually, in the appendix, an alternative approach to the concept of strength of a corner, more closely related to Pontryagin’s maximum principle, is presented.

  8. Variation of Parameters in Differential Equations (A Variation in Making Sense of Variation of Parameters)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Terry; Rai, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The method of variation of parameters can be found in most undergraduate textbooks on differential equations. The method leads to solutions of the non-homogeneous equation of the form y = u[subscript 1]y[subscript 1] + u[subscript 2]y[subscript 2], a sum of function products using solutions to the homogeneous equation y[subscript 1] and…

  9. Coastal eutrophication and temperature variation

    SciTech Connect

    Ganoulis, J.; Rafailidis, S.; Bogardi, I.; Duckstein, L.; Matyasovszky, I.

    1994-12-31

    A 3-D hydroecological model has been developed to simulate the impact of climate-change-induced daily temperature variation on coastal water quality and eutrophication. Historical daily temperature time series over a thirty-year period have been used to link local meteorological variables to large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns (CPs). Then, CPs generated under a 2{times}CO{sub 2} scenario have been used to simulate climate-change-induced local daily temperature variations. Both historical and climate-change-induced temperature time series have been introduced as inputs into the hydroecological model to simulate coastal water quality and eutrophication. Subject to model validation with available data, a case study in the bay of Thessaloniki (N. Greece) indicates a risk of increasing eutrophication and oxygen depletion in coastal areas due to possible climate change.

  10. Clinical Interpretation of Genomic Variations.

    PubMed

    Sayitoğlu, Müge

    2016-09-01

    Novel high-throughput sequencing technologies generate large-scale genomic data and are used extensively for disease mapping of monogenic and/or complex disorders, personalized treatment, and pharmacogenomics. Next-generation sequencing is rapidly becoming routine tool for diagnosis and molecular monitoring of patients to evaluate therapeutic efficiency. The next-generation sequencing platforms generate huge amounts of genetic variation data and it remains a challenge to interpret the variations that are identified. Such data interpretation needs close collaboration among bioinformaticians, clinicians, and geneticists. There are several problems that must be addressed, such as the generation of new algorithms for mapping and annotation, harmonization of the terminology, correct use of nomenclature, reference genomes for different populations, rare disease variant databases, and clinical reports. PMID:27507302

  11. Communication variations and aircrew performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Greaud, Valerie A.; Irwin, Cheryl M.

    1989-01-01

    Crew-related communication variations and their effects on performance are examined. The communication analysis involves evaluating the performance of 18 pilots to a high-fidelity full-mission simulation. Initiating speech consists of four categories: commands, questions, observations, and dysfluencies. Response speech is coded as: reply, acknowledgements, and zero response. A standard form of communication has been adopted which should aid in the coordination process and enhance crew performance.

  12. Global Stress Variation over Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, H.; Lu, Z.; Wen, L.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how stress changes over time is important as it is related to studies of earthquake triggering and mantle rheology. We calculate stress variation at the Earth's surface on the global scale from 2003 to 2014, resultant from several major physical forces acting on the Earth. The physical forces we considered include the surface loading due to terrestrial water storage (TWS), force associated with post-glacial rebound (PGR) and tidal loading (including solid tide and ocean tide). The stress change associated with TWS is calculated in this way: we infer TWS from monthly gravity field of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), in which gravity variation associated with PGR has been removed; we then estimate stress change at the Earth's surface as the elastic response of the GRACE-inferred TWS change. The stress change associated with PGR is calculated as the rate of viscoelastic stress change responding to ice loading from ICE-5G model. And, tidal stress is calculated as the elastic response of the Earth to the traction forces of the Sun and the Moon (solid tide) and to the loading of ocean tide. The total stress change is the sum of the stress changes associated with these three types of forces. As first result, in the study period from 2003 to 2014, the radial normal stress variation exhibits a prominent decreasing trend in southern Africa and Queen Maud Land of Antarctica, an increasing trend in Alaska of the US (United States), Greenland and Marie Byrd Land of Antarctica, and strong annual cycles in southern Africa and Alaska of the US. We will present the geographical distribution of global stress variation from 2003 to 2014 and discuss its possible implications.

  13. Compositional variations in lunar spinels.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E.

    1971-01-01

    Electron probe data for spinels from Apollo 11, 12, and 14 are presented and analyzed. A modified Johnstone spinel prism showing the data distribution is given. Three projections of this prism are then presented which illustrate the variations of simple ratios that are present in the prism and permit three different perspectives of the data. The results are summarized as fO2 isobars on the spinel prism.

  14. Variational integrators for reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Michael; Tassi, Emanuele; Grasso, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics is a simplified set of magnetohydrodynamics equations with applications to both fusion and astrophysical plasmas, possessing a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure and consequently a number of conserved functionals. We propose a new discretisation strategy for these equations based on a discrete variational principle applied to a formal Lagrangian. The resulting integrator preserves important quantities like the total energy, magnetic helicity and cross helicity exactly (up to machine precision). As the integrator is free of numerical resistivity, spurious reconnection along current sheets is absent in the ideal case. If effects of electron inertia are added, reconnection of magnetic field lines is allowed, although the resulting model still possesses a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure. After reviewing the conservation laws of the model equations, the adopted variational principle with the related conservation laws is described both at the continuous and discrete level. We verify the favourable properties of the variational integrator in particular with respect to the preservation of the invariants of the models under consideration and compare with results from the literature and those of a pseudo-spectral code.

  15. Phase variation of hadronic amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Dedonder, J.-P.; Gibbs, W. R.; Nuseirat, Mutazz

    2008-04-15

    The phase variation with angle of hadronic amplitudes is studied with a view to understanding the underlying physical quantities that control it and how well it can be determined in free space. We find that unitarity forces a moderately accurate determination of the phase in standard amplitude analyses but that the nucleon-nucleon analyses done to date do not give the phase variation needed to achieve a good representation of the data in multiple scattering calculations. Models are examined that suggest its behavior near forward angles is related to the radii of the real and absorptive parts of the interaction. The dependence of this phase on model parameters is such that if these radii are modified in the nuclear medium (in combination with the change due to the shift in energy of the effective amplitude in the medium) then the larger magnitudes of the phase needed to fit the data might be attainable but only for negative values of the phase variation parameter.

  16. Copy number variation and mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Brian; Weidner, Jacob; Wabick, Kevin

    2009-11-01

    Until very recently, the standard model of DNA included two genes for each trait. This dated model has given way to a model that includes copies of some genes well in excess of the canonical two. Copy number variations in the human genome play critical roles in causing or aggravating a number of syndromes and diseases while providing increased resistance to others. We explore the role of mutation, crossover, inversion, and reproduction in determining copy number variations in a numerical simulation of a population. The numerical model consists of a population of individuals, where each individual is represented by a single strand of DNA with the same number of genes. Each gene is initially assigned to one of two traits. Fitness of the individual is determined by the two most fit genes for trait one, and trait two genetic material is treated as a reservoir of junk DNA. After a sufficient number of generations, during which the genetic distribution is allowed to reach a steady-state, the mean numberof genes per trait and the copy number variation are recorded. Here, we focus on the role of mutation and compare simulation results to theory.

  17. Longitudinal Variations in Jupiter's Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Gierasch, P. J.; Tierney, G.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term studies of Jupiter's zonal wind field revealed temporal variations on the order of 20 to 40 m/s at many latitudes, greater than the typical data uncertainties of 1 to 10 m/s. No definitive periodicities were evident, however, though some latitudinally-confined signals did appear at periods relevant to the Quasi- Quadrennial Oscillation (Simon-Miller & Gierasch, Icarus, in press). As the QQO appears, from vertical temperature profiles, to propagate downward, it is unclear why a signal is not more obvious, unless other processes dominate over possibly weaker forcing from the QQO. An additional complication is that zonal wind profiles represent an average over some particular set of longitudes for an image pair and most data sets do not offer global wind coverage. Lien avoiding known features, such as the large anticyclonic vortices especially prevalent in the south, there can be distinct variations in longitude. We present results on the full wind field from Voyager and Cassini data, showing apparent longitudinal variations of up to 60 m/s or more. These are particularly obvious near disruptions such as the South Equatorial Disturbance, even when the feature itself is not clearly visible. These two dates represent very different states of the planet for comparison: Voyagers 1 & 2 flew by Jupiter shortly after a global upheaval, while many regions were in a disturbed state, while the Cassini view is typical of a more quiescent period present during much of the 1990s and early 2000s.

  18. Stratospheric conductivity variations over thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzworth, R. H.; Norville, K. W.; Kintner, P. M.; Powell, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports the first in-situ observation of variations in the electrical conductivity over thunderstorms at 26 km altitude. The vector electric field, positive and negative polar conductivity, and optical lightning power/flash were measured by payloads on superpressure balloons in the Southern Hemisphere in early 1984. It is found that in 72 percent of the thunderstorm periods observed (or in 23 of 32 periods) there were clear cases of conductivity variations while the balloons were over the thunderstorms. Examples from two separate balloons at widely separated dates and locations showing both daytime and nighttime events are presented. The conductivity measurements are made with the relaxation technique, and the vector field measurements are based on the double Langmuir probe high-impedance method. It is found that the positive and negative conductivity measurements vary independently and have a different temporal profile than the dc electric field. The polar conductivity variations can exceed a factor of 2 at this altitude. In seven of the nine most intense thunderstorm events the total conductivity increased, while in only one of these nine events did it decrease (one event had no change). Implications of these observations for global current patterns are discussed.

  19. Diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Galand, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Lavvas, P. P.; Müller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Cravens, T. E.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Waite, J. H.

    2009-06-01

    We present our analysis of the diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere (between 1000 and 1300 km) based on a sample of Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements in the Open Source Ion (OSI) mode obtained from eight close encounters of the Cassini spacecraft with Titan. Although there is an overall ion depletion well beyond the terminator, the ion content on Titan's nightside is still appreciable, with a density plateau of ˜700 cm-3 below ˜1300 km. Such a plateau is a combined result of significant depletion of light ions and modest depletion of heavy ones on Titan's nightside. We propose that the distinctions between the diurnal variations of light and heavy ions are associated with their different chemical loss pathways, with the former primarily through “fast” ion-neutral chemistry and the latter through “slow” electron dissociative recombination. The strong correlation between the observed night-to-day ion density ratios and the associated ion lifetimes suggests a scenario in which the ions created on Titan's dayside may survive well to the nightside. The observed asymmetry between the dawn and dusk ion density profiles also supports such an interpretation. We construct a time-dependent ion chemistry model to investigate the effect of ion survival associated with solid body rotation alone as well as superrotating horizontal winds. For long-lived ions, the predicted diurnal variations have similar general characteristics to those observed. However, for short-lived ions, the model densities on the nightside are significantly lower than the observed values. This implies that electron precipitation from Saturn's magnetosphere may be an additional and important contributor to the densities of the short-lived ions observed on Titan's nightside.

  20. Variation in Atmospheric Helium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabry, J. C.; Marty, B.; Burnard, P.; Blard, P.

    2010-12-01

    Anthropogenic activity such as oil and gas exploitation releases crustal helium, which has excess 4He compared to atmospheric helium. This may give rise to both spatial and temporal variations in the atmospheric 3He/4He. Helium is present in trace quantities in the air (5 ppm) and has a very low ratio (3He/4Heair = 1.38 x 10-6), consequently high precision measurements of atmospheric He presents a significant analytical challenge. Recent work by Sano et al. [1] has endeavored to experimentally quantify these potential variations in the atmospheric 3He/4He by measuring the helium isotopes from air samples collected around the globe and from samples of ancient trapped atmosphere. Their results indicate an increase in the atmospheric 3He/4He from northern to southern latitudes of the order 2 - 4 ‰, which they attribute to greater use of fossil fuels in the northern hemisphere. However, since most of their data points overlap at the 2-3 ‰ (2σ) level, additional measurements (with increased precision if possible) are needed. We have constructed an automated extraction line dedicated to measuring He in samples of air which can rapidly switch between measuring aliquots of sample with standards. It additionally features an adjustable bellows on the sample aliquot volume that enables us to adjust the size of a sample aliquot to precisely match the standard, eliminating biases arising from nonlinear pressure effects in the mass spectrometer. The measurements are made using a Helix SFT multi-collector mass spectrometer. At present, repeat measurements of 3He/4He from our standard (purified air) have a reproducibility of 2‰ (2σ), while measurements of local (Nancy, France) air samples have a reproducibility of 3He/4He of 3‰ (2σ), which are at a similar level to the uncertainties reported by Sano. Modifications are underway to improve 3He measurements which are the principal source of error. We have collected atmospheric samples from around the globe over a wide

  1. Neodymium isotopic variations in seawater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepgras, D. J.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    Direct measurement of the isotopic composition of Nd in the Atlantic agree with the Nd content in ferromanganese sediments and differ from the observed amounts in the Pacific samples. These data indicate the existence of distinctive differences in the isotopic composition of Nd in the waters of major oceans; the average values determined from seawater and ferromanganese sediments are considerably lower than in sources with oceanic mantle affinities showing that the REE in the oceans is dominated by continental sources. The Nd isotopic variations in seawater are applied to relate the residence time of Nd and mixing rates between the oceans.

  2. Genetic variation and human longevity.

    PubMed

    Soerensen, Mette

    2012-05-01

    The overall aim of the PhD project was to elucidate the association of human longevity with genetic variation in major candidate genes and pathways of longevity. Based on a thorough literature and database search we chose to apply a pathway approach; to explore variation in genes composing the DNA damage signaling, DNA repair, GH/IGF-1/insulin signaling and pro-/antioxidant pathways. In addition, 16 genes which did not belong to the core of either pathway, however recurrently regarded as candidate genes of longevity (e.g. APOE), were included. In this way a total of 168 genes were selected for investigation. We decided to explore the genetic variation in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), a highly investigated type of genetic variation. SNPs having potential functional impact (e.g. affecting binding of transcription factors) were identified, so were specific SNPs in the candidate genes previously published to be associated with human longevity. To cover the majority of the common genetic variation in the 168 gene regions (encoding regions plus 5,000 bp upstream and 1,000 downstream) we applied the tagging SNP approach via the HapMap Consortium. Consequently 1,536 SNPs were selected. The majority of the previous publications on genetic variation and human longevity had employed a case-control study design, e.g. comparing centenarians to middle-aged controls. This type of study design is somehow prone to bias introduced by for instance cohort effects, i.e. differences in characteristics of cases and controls, a kind of bias which is avoided when a prospective cohort is under study. Therefore, we chose to investigate 1,200 individuals of the Danish 1905 birth cohort, which have been followed since 1998 when the members were 92-93 years old. The genetic contribution to human longevity has been estimated to be most profound during the late part of life, thus these oldest-old individuals are excellent for investigating such effect. The follow-up survival

  3. Sources of variation in phonetograms.

    PubMed

    Coleman, R F

    1993-03-01

    Despite the growing popularity of the phonetogram or F0-SPL Profile in the United States and its continuing use in Europe, it is generally acknowledge that a wide range of results are obtained by different investigators using the technique. Nonuniformity of results calls into question the basic validity of the method as a descriptor of vocal function limits. This article reviews some of the more common diversities in methods among investigators and suggests that variation of results in voice profiles may be as much an indication of nonstandardization of technique as in the inherent variability of subjects. PMID:8353615

  4. Systematic variations in divergence angle.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Takuya

    2012-11-21

    Practical methods for quantitative analysis of radial and angular coordinates of leafy organs of vascular plants are presented and applied to published phyllotactic patterns of various real systems from young leaves on a shoot tip to florets on a flower head. The constancy of divergence angle is borne out with accuracy of less than a degree. It is shown that apparent fluctuations in divergence angle are in large part systematic variations caused by the invalid assumption of a fixed center and/or by secondary deformations, while random fluctuations are of minor importance. PMID:22906592

  5. Period variations in SZ ARIETIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, R. K.

    1990-06-01

    Results are presented of a detailed period study of the eclipsing binary system SZ Arietis, based on up-to-date collection of minima. A new period (P = 1.7175405 d) of the SZ Ari was found, and the period changes (with the new period) in different portions of the O-C diagram were estimated. The average period change (leaving out an unusual value) was estimated to be about 0.00006 d. The O-C diagram displayed a sinusoidal variation, indicating that the SZ Ari system may be a three-body system, having a period of nearly 66 years.

  6. World Climates and Food Supply Variations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, James E.; Pickett, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    This article contains an outline of the major variations in the world's climates and suggestions for taking these variations into account in any plans made to improve world food production and supply. (PEB)

  7. Racial variations in obstetric practice.

    PubMed

    Cauchi, M N

    1986-05-01

    This study involves a retrospective analysis of 453 pregnant persons, with the aim of comparing certain disorders of pregnancy as well as infant and placental parameters in various racial groups within the same community. Significant variations were seen in the mean age of the patients, age at first pregnancy, frequency distribution of first pregnancy, infant weight as well as gravida: parity ratio. There was a 3-fold increase in incidence of preeclampsia in the Australian-born population compared to other racial groups. Mild anaemias (haemoglobin less than 11.5 g/dl) were found in up to 61% of the Australian-born population compared to 32% of the other racial groups; however, more significant degrees of anaemia were more commonly found in certain ethnic groups (e.g. Greek 16%, Italian 15%, Australian-born 6%). These studies emphasize that overall incidence studies in a polyglot population can have very limited meaning, and that greater attention must be paid to the actual racial variations within a population. PMID:3464247

  8. Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Horn, David

    2014-01-01

    Studies on Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) and antigenic variation in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, have yielded a remarkable range of novel and important insights. The features first identified in T. brucei extend from unique to conserved-among-trypanosomatids to conserved-among-eukaryotes. Consequently, much of what we now know about trypanosomatid biology and much of the technology available has its origin in studies related to VSGs. T. brucei is now probably the most advanced early branched eukaryote in terms of experimental tractability and can be approached as a pathogen, as a model for studies on fundamental processes, as a model for studies on eukaryotic evolution or often all of the above. In terms of antigenic variation itself, substantial progress has been made in understanding the expression and switching of the VSG coat, while outstanding questions continue to stimulate innovative new approaches. There are large numbers of VSG genes in the genome but only one is expressed at a time, always immediately adjacent to a telomere. DNA repair processes allow a new VSG to be copied into the single transcribed locus. A coordinated transcriptional switch can also allow a new VSG gene to be activated without any detectable change in the DNA sequence, thereby maintaining singular expression, also known as allelic exclusion. I review the story behind VSGs; the genes, their expression and switching, their central role in T. brucei virulence, the discoveries that emerged along the way and the persistent questions relating to allelic exclusion in particular. PMID:24859277

  9. Talker variation and word learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollich, George; Jusczyk, Peter; Brent, Michael

    2002-05-01

    While infants must go beyond talker-specific information in recognizing a given word, regardless of the talker, they must also process talker-specific information in order to extract meaning from a particular sound source. Otherwise, for example, they could never recognize whether [hct] referred to a talker's pronunciation of hot, hut, or even hat. This poster suggests that not only do infants process talker-specific information, but they also make use of it both to extract invariant properties in learning a new word and in recognizing talker-specific tokens faster. Using the splitscreen preferential looking paradigm, two studies were conducted that examined how talker-specific properties and variation among talkers could facilitate word learning. Results of study 1 indicated that word learning was facilitated in the case where infants heard different talkers. Thus, talker variation is critical for the extraction of invariant properties of a word. However, the results of study 2 indicated that talker-specific properties were encoded and used to help these infants recognize and learn the referents of these words. Given this evidence, it is suggested that infants appear to be using talker-specific information to form abstract representations of the invariant properties of words.

  10. 45 CFR 156.420 - Plan variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Sharing Reductions § 156.420 Plan variations. (a) Submission of silver plan variations. For each of its silver health plans that an issuer offers, or intends to offer in the individual market on an Exchange... standard silver plan and three variations of the standard silver plan, as follows— (1) For...

  11. 45 CFR 156.420 - Plan variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Sharing Reductions § 156.420 Plan variations. (a) Submission of silver plan variations. For each of its silver health plans that an issuer offers, or intends to offer in the individual market on an Exchange... standard silver plan and three variations of the standard silver plan, as follows— (1) For...

  12. Non-differentiable variational principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresson, Jacky

    2005-07-01

    We develop a calculus of variations for functionals which are defined on a set of non-differentiable curves. We first extend the classical differential calculus in a quantum calculus, which allows us to define a complex operator, called the scale derivative, which is the non-differentiable analogue of the classical derivative. We then define the notion of extremals for our functionals and obtain a characterization in term of a generalized Euler-Lagrange equation. We finally prove that solutions of the Schrödinger equation can be obtained as extremals of a non-differentiable variational principle, leading to an extended Hamilton's principle of least action for quantum mechanics. We compare this approach with the scale relativity theory of Nottale, which assumes a fractal structure of space-time.Résumé (Principes variationnels non différentiable). Nous développons un calcul des variations pour des fonctionnelles définies sur un ensemble de courbes non différentiables. Pour cela, nous étendons le calcul différentiel classique, en calcul appelé calcul quantique, qui nous permet de définir un opérateur à valeur complexes, appelé dérivée d'échelle, qui est l'analogue non différentiable de la dérivée usuelle. On définit alors la notion d'extremale pour ces fonctionnelles pour lesquelles nous obtenons une caractérisation via une équation d'Euler-Lagrange généralisée. On prouve enfin que les solutions de l'équation de Schrödinger peuvent s'obtenir comme solution d'un problème variationnel non différentiable, étendant ainsi le principe de moindre action de Hamilton au cadre de la mécanique quantique. On discute enfin la connexion entre ce travail et la théorie de la relativité d'échelle développée par Nottale, et qui suppose une structure fractale de l'espace-temps.

  13. Communication variations and aircrew performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Folk, Valerie G.; Irwin, Cheryl M.

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between communication variations and aircrew performance (high-error vs low-error performances) was investigated by analyzing the coded verbal transcripts derived from the videotape records of 18 two-person air transport crews who participated in a high-fidelity, full-mission flight simulation. The flight scenario included a task which involved abnormal operations and required the coordinated efforts of all crew members. It was found that the best-performing crews were characterized by nearly identical patterns of communication, whereas the midrange and poorer performing crews showed a great deal of heterogeneity in their speech patterns. Although some specific speech sequences can be interpreted as being more or less facilitative to the crew-coordination process, predictability appears to be the key ingredient for enhancing crew performance. Crews communicating in highly standard (hence predictable) ways were better able to coordinate their task, whereas crews characterized by multiple, nonstandard communication profiles were less effective in their performance.

  14. Variational identities and Hamiltonian structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Wenxiu

    2010-03-08

    This report is concerned with Hamiltonian structures of classical and super soliton hierarchies. In the classical case, basic tools are variational identities associated with continuous and discrete matrix spectral problems, targeted to soliton equations derived from zero curvature equations over general Lie algebras, both semisimple and non-semisimple. In the super case, a supertrace identity is presented for constructing Hamiltonian structures of super soliton equations associated with Lie superalgebras. We illustrate the general theories by the KdV hierarchy, the Volterra lattice hierarchy, the super AKNS hierarchy, and two hierarchies of dark KdV equations and dark Volterra lattices. The resulting Hamiltonian structures show the commutativity of each hierarchy discussed and thus the existence of infinitely many commuting symmetries and conservation laws.

  15. Detecting Density Variations and Nanovoids

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Longstreth-Spoor, L.; Kelton, K. F.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of simulated and experimental data has been used to investigate the size range of nanovoids that can be detected in atom probe tomography data. Simulated atom probe tomography data have revealed that nanovoids as small as 1 nm in diameter can be detected in atom probe tomography data with the use of iso-density surfaces. Iso-density surfaces may be used to quantify the size, morphology and number density of nanovoids and other variations in density in atom probe tomography data. Experimental data from an aluminum-yttrium-iron metallic glass ribbon have revealed the effectiveness of this approach. Combining iso-density surfaces with atom maps also permits the segregation of solute to the nanovoids to be investigated. Field ion microscopy and thin section atom maps have also been used to detect pores and larger voids.

  16. Horizontal variations in thermospheric composition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. S.

    1973-01-01

    Constant boundary conditions at 120 km have been so widely and successfully used in atmospheric modeling and in fitting atmospheric density data obtained from satellite drag to models that attention has been diverted from the variations that occur at 120 km, especially in composition. Atomic oxygen concentrations vary by factors as large as 4, with highest concentrations occurring in the winter hemisphere but at midlatitudes rather than over the polar region. A substantial additional degree of variability occurs that is especially associated with geomagnetic activity. The helium concentration varies by about an order of magnitude between poles, with the maximum concentration occurring at high winter latitudes and a secondary minimum occurring over the winter pole.

  17. Variational approach and deformed derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weberszpil, J.; Helayël-Neto, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that there exists a possible relationship between q-deformed algebras in two different contexts of Statistical Mechanics, namely, the Tsallis' framework and the Kaniadakis' scenario, with a local form of fractional-derivative operators for fractal media, the so-called Hausdorff derivatives, mapped into a continuous medium with a fractal measure. Here, in this paper, we present an extension of the traditional calculus of variations for systems containing deformed-derivatives embedded into the Lagrangian and the Lagrangian densities for classical and field systems. The results extend the classical Euler-Lagrange equations and the Hamiltonian formalism. The resulting dynamical equations seem to be compatible with those found in the literature, specially with mass-dependent and with nonlinear equations for systems in classical and quantum mechanics. Examples are presented to illustrate applications of the formulation. Also, the conserved ​Noether current is worked out.

  18. Children's perception of dialect variation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Laura; Clopper, Cynthia G; Pate, John K

    2014-09-01

    A speaker's regional dialect is a rich source of information about that person. Two studies examined five- to six-year-old children's perception of regional dialect: Can they perceive differences among dialects? Have they made meaningful social connections to specific dialects? Experiment 1 asked children to categorize speakers into groups based on their accent; Experiment 2 asked them to match speakers to (un)familiar cultural items. Each child was tested with two of the following: the child's Home dialect, a Regional variant of that dialect, and a Second-Language variant. Results showed that children could successfully categorize only with a Home vs. Second-Language dialect contrast, but could reliably link cultural items with either a Home vs. Second-Language or a Regional vs. Second-Language dialect contrast. These results demonstrate five- to six-year-old children's developing perceptual skill with dialect, and suggest that they have a gradient representation of dialect variation. PMID:23985300

  19. MDCT evaluation of sternal variations: Pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Duraikannu, Chary; Noronha, Olma V; Sundarrajan, Pushparajan

    2016-01-01

    Sternal variations and anomalies have been identified in the past during autopsy or cadaveric studies. Recently, an increasing number of minor sternal variations have been reported with the advent of multidetector computed tomography (CT). Although there are many sternal variations that occur with varying appearance and prevalence, most of them are not recognized or are underreported during routine imaging of thorax. Identification of sternal variations is important to differentiate from pathological conditions and to prevent fatal complications prior to sternal interventions like marrow aspiration or acupuncture. This article aims to describe the minor and asymptomatic sternal variations by multidetector CT and their clinical significance. PMID:27413263

  20. Variational methods for field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Menahem, S.

    1986-09-01

    Four field theory models are studied: Periodic Quantum Electrodynamics (PQED) in (2 + 1) dimensions, free scalar field theory in (1 + 1) dimensions, the Quantum XY model in (1 + 1) dimensions, and the (1 + 1) dimensional Ising model in a transverse magnetic field. The last three parts deal exclusively with variational methods; the PQED part involves mainly the path-integral approach. The PQED calculation results in a better understanding of the connection between electric confinement through monopole screening, and confinement through tunneling between degenerate vacua. This includes a better quantitative agreement for the string tensions in the two approaches. Free field theory is used as a laboratory for a new variational blocking-truncation approximation, in which the high-frequency modes in a block are truncated to wave functions that depend on the slower background modes (Boron-Oppenheimer approximation). This ''adiabatic truncation'' method gives very accurate results for ground-state energy density and correlation functions. Various adiabatic schemes, with one variable kept per site and then two variables per site, are used. For the XY model, several trial wave functions for the ground state are explored, with an emphasis on the periodic Gaussian. A connection is established with the vortex Coulomb gas of the Euclidean path integral approach. The approximations used are taken from the realms of statistical mechanics (mean field approximation, transfer-matrix methods) and of quantum mechanics (iterative blocking schemes). In developing blocking schemes based on continuous variables, problems due to the periodicity of the model were solved. Our results exhibit an order-disorder phase transition. The transfer-matrix method is used to find a good (non-blocking) trial ground state for the Ising model in a transverse magnetic field in (1 + 1) dimensions.

  1. Environmental variation, stochastic extinction, and competitive coexistence.

    PubMed

    Adler, Peter B; Drake, John M

    2008-11-01

    Understanding how environmental fluctuations affect population persistence is essential for predicting the ecological impacts of expected future increases in climate variability. However, two bodies of theory make opposite predictions about the effect of environmental variation on persistence. Single-species theory, common in conservation biology and population viability analyses, suggests that environmental variation increases the risk of stochastic extinction. By contrast, coexistence theory has shown that environmental variation can buffer inferior competitors against competitive exclusion through a storage effect. We reconcile these two perspectives by showing that in the presence of demographic stochasticity, environmental variation can increase the chance of extinction while simultaneously stabilizing coexistence. Our stochastic simulations of a two-species storage effect model reveal a unimodal relationship between environmental variation and coexistence time, implying maximum coexistence at intermediate levels of environmental variation. The unimodal pattern reflects the fact that the stabilizing influence of the storage effect accumulates rapidly at low levels of environmental variation, whereas the risk of extinction due to the combined effects of environmental variation and demographic stochasticity increases most rapidly at higher levels of variation. Future increases in environmental variation could either increase or decrease an inferior competitor's expected persistence time, depending on the distance between the present level of environmental variation and the optimal level anticipated by this theory. PMID:18817458

  2. Accommodating variation: dialects, idiolects, and speech processing.

    PubMed

    Kraljic, Tanya; Brennan, Susan E; Samuel, Arthur G

    2008-04-01

    Listeners are faced with enormous variation in pronunciation, yet they rarely have difficulty understanding speech. Although much research has been devoted to figuring out how listeners deal with variability, virtually none (outside of sociolinguistics) has focused on the source of the variation itself. The current experiments explore whether different kinds of variation lead to different cognitive and behavioral adjustments. Specifically, we compare adjustments to the same acoustic consequence when it is due to context-independent variation (resulting from articulatory properties unique to a speaker) versus context-conditioned variation (resulting from common articulatory properties of speakers who share a dialect). The contrasting results for these two cases show that the source of a particular acoustic-phonetic variation affects how that variation is handled by the perceptual system. We also show that changes in perceptual representations do not necessarily lead to changes in production. PMID:17803986

  3. Accommodating Variation: Dialects, Idiolects, and Speech Processing

    PubMed Central

    Kraljic, Tanya; Brennan, Susan E.; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2008-01-01

    Listeners are faced with enormous variation in pronunciation, yet they rarely have difficulty understanding speech. Although much research has been devoted to figuring out how listeners deal with variability, virtually none (outside of sociolinguistics) has focused on the source of the variation itself. The current experiments explore whether different kinds of variation lead to different cognitive and behavioral adjustments. Specifically, we compare adjustments to the same acoustic consequence when it is due to context-independent variation (resulting from articulatory properties unique to a speaker) versus context-conditioned variation (resulting from common articulatory properties of speakers who share a dialect). The contrasting results for these two cases show that the source of a particular acoustic-phonetic variation affects how that variation is handled by the perceptual system. We also show that changes in perceptual representations do not necessarily lead to changes in production. PMID:17803986

  4. Pervasive gene content variation and copy number variation in maize and its undomesticated progenitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different individuals of the same species are generally thought to have very similar genomes. However, there is growing evidence that structural variation in the form of copy number variation (CNV) and presence-absence variation (PAV) can lead to variation in the genome content of individuals withi...

  5. Global Color Variations on Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Jupiter's icy moon Callisto is shown in approximate natural color (left) and in false color to enhance subtle color variations (right). This image of Callisto's Jupiter-facing hemisphere shows the ancient, multi-ring impact structure Valhalla just above the center of the image. Valhalla, possibly created by a large asteroid or comet which impacted Callisto, is the largest surface feature on this icy moon. Valhalla consists of a bright inner region, about 600 kilometers (360 miles) in diameter surrounded by concentric rings 3000 to 4000 kilometers (1800-2500 miles) in diameter. The bright central plains were possibly created by the excavation and ejection of 'cleaner' ice from beneath the surface, with a fluid-like mass (impact melt) filling the crater bowl after impact. The concentric rings are fractures in the crust resulting from the impact.

    The false color in the right image shows new information, including ejecta from relatively recent craters, which are often not apparent in the natural color image. The color also reveals a gradual variation across the moon's hemisphere, perhaps due to implantation of materials onto the surface from space.

    These color images were obtained with the 1 micrometer (infrared), green, and violet filters of the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The false color is created from ratios of infrared/violet and its inverse (violet/infrared) which are then combined so the infrared/violet, green, and violet/infrared are assigned to red, green, and blue in a composite product.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from near the center, in the same way a full moon is seen from Earth when illuminated by the sun. The image, centered at 0.5 degrees south latitude and 56.3 degrees longitude, covers an area about 4800 by 4800 kilometers. The resolution is 14 kilometers per picture element. The images were taken on November 5, 1997 at a range of 68,400 kilometers (41,000 miles

  6. How variation between individuals affects species coexistence.

    PubMed

    Hart, Simon P; Schreiber, Sebastian J; Levine, Jonathan M

    2016-08-01

    Although the effects of variation between individuals within species are traditionally ignored in studies of species coexistence, the magnitude of intraspecific variation in nature is forcing ecologists to reconsider. Compelling intuitive arguments suggest that individual variation may provide a previously unrecognised route to diversity maintenance by blurring species-level competitive differences or substituting for species-level niche differences. These arguments, which are motivating a large body of empirical work, have rarely been evaluated with quantitative theory. Here we incorporate intraspecific variation into a common model of competition and identify three pathways by which this variation affects coexistence: (1) changes in competitive dynamics because of nonlinear averaging, (2) changes in species' mean interaction strengths because of variation in underlying traits (also via nonlinear averaging) and (3) effects on stochastic demography. As a consequence of the first two mechanisms, we find that intraspecific variation in competitive ability increases the dominance of superior competitors, and intraspecific niche variation reduces species-level niche differentiation, both of which make coexistence more difficult. In addition, individual variation can exacerbate the effects of demographic stochasticity, and this further destabilises coexistence. Our work provides a theoretical foundation for emerging empirical interests in the effects of intraspecific variation on species diversity. PMID:27250037

  7. Worldwide variations in artificial skyglow.

    PubMed

    Kyba, Christopher C M; Tong, Kai Pong; Bennie, Jonathan; Birriel, Ignacio; Birriel, Jennifer J; Cool, Andrew; Danielsen, Arne; Davies, Thomas W; Outer, Peter N den; Edwards, William; Ehlert, Rainer; Falchi, Fabio; Fischer, Jürgen; Giacomelli, Andrea; Giubbilini, Francesco; Haaima, Marty; Hesse, Claudia; Heygster, Georg; Hölker, Franz; Inger, Richard; Jensen, Linsey J; Kuechly, Helga U; Kuehn, John; Langill, Phil; Lolkema, Dorien E; Nagy, Matthew; Nievas, Miguel; Ochi, Nobuaki; Popow, Emil; Posch, Thomas; Puschnig, Johannes; Ruhtz, Thomas; Schmidt, Wim; Schwarz, Robert; Schwope, Axel; Spoelstra, Henk; Tekatch, Anthony; Trueblood, Mark; Walker, Constance E; Weber, Michael; Welch, Douglas L; Zamorano, Jaime; Gaston, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Despite constituting a widespread and significant environmental change, understanding of artificial nighttime skyglow is extremely limited. Until now, published monitoring studies have been local or regional in scope, and typically of short duration. In this first major international compilation of monitoring data we answer several key questions about skyglow properties. Skyglow is observed to vary over four orders of magnitude, a range hundreds of times larger than was the case before artificial light. Nearly all of the study sites were polluted by artificial light. A non-linear relationship is observed between the sky brightness on clear and overcast nights, with a change in behavior near the rural to urban landuse transition. Overcast skies ranged from a third darker to almost 18 times brighter than clear. Clear sky radiances estimated by the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness were found to be overestimated by ~25%; our dataset will play an important role in the calibration and ground truthing of future skyglow models. Most of the brightly lit sites darkened as the night progressed, typically by ~5% per hour. The great variation in skyglow radiance observed from site-to-site and with changing meteorological conditions underlines the need for a long-term international monitoring program. PMID:25673335

  8. Random Copolymer: Gaussian Variational Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalenko, A.; Kuznetsov, Yu. A.; Dawson, K. A.

    1997-03-01

    We study the phase transitions of a random copolymer chain with quenched disorder. We calculate the average over the quenched disorder in replica space and apply a Gaussian variational approach based on a generic quadratic trial Hamiltonian in terms of the correlation functions of monomer Fourier coordinates. This has the advantage that it allows us to incorporate fluctuations of the density, determined self-consistently, and to study collapse, phase separation transitions and the onset of the freezing transition within the same mean field theory. The effective free energy of the system is derived analytically and analyzed numerically in the one-step Parisi scheme. Such quantities as the radius of gyration, end-to-end distance or the average value of the overlap between different replicas are treated as observables and evaluated by introducing appropriate external fields to the Hamiltonian. As a result we obtain the phase diagram in terms of model parameters, scaling for the freezing transition and the dependence of correlation functions on the chain index.

  9. Mesoscale Variations of Tropospheric Aerosols(.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Theodore L.; Charlson, Robert J.; Winker, David M.; Ogren, John A.; Holmén, Kim

    2003-01-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are calculated to cause global-scale changes in the earth's heat balance, but these forcings are space/time integrals over highly variable quantities. Accurate quantification of these forcings will require an unprecedented synergy among satellite, airborne, and surface-based observations, as well as models. This study considers one aspect of achieving this synergy-the need to treat aerosol variability in a consistent and realistic way. This need creates a requirement to rationalize the differences in spatiotemporal resolution and coverage among the various observational and modeling approaches. It is shown, based on aerosol optical data from diverse regions, that mesoscale variability (specifically, for horizontal scales of 40-400 km and temporal scales of 2-48 h) is a common and perhaps universal feature of lower-tropospheric aerosol light extinction. Such variation is below the traditional synoptic or `airmass' scale (where the aerosol is often assumed to be essentially homogeneous except for plumes from point sources) and below the scales that are readily resolved by chemical transport models. The present study focuses on documenting this variability. Possible physical causes and practical implications for coordinated observational strategies are also discussed.

  10. Variational Dirichlet Blur Kernel Estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xu; Mateos, Javier; Zhou, Fugen; Molina, Rafael; Katsaggelos, Aggelos K

    2015-12-01

    Blind image deconvolution involves two key objectives: 1) latent image and 2) blur estimation. For latent image estimation, we propose a fast deconvolution algorithm, which uses an image prior of nondimensional Gaussianity measure to enforce sparsity and an undetermined boundary condition methodology to reduce boundary artifacts. For blur estimation, a linear inverse problem with normalization and nonnegative constraints must be solved. However, the normalization constraint is ignored in many blind image deblurring methods, mainly because it makes the problem less tractable. In this paper, we show that the normalization constraint can be very naturally incorporated into the estimation process by using a Dirichlet distribution to approximate the posterior distribution of the blur. Making use of variational Dirichlet approximation, we provide a blur posterior approximation that considers the uncertainty of the estimate and removes noise in the estimated kernel. Experiments with synthetic and real data demonstrate that the proposed method is very competitive to the state-of-the-art blind image restoration methods. PMID:26390458

  11. Temporal Variations in Jupiter's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Chanover, N. J.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Hammel, H. B.; dePater, I.; Noll, K.; Wong, M.; Clarke, J.; Sanchez-Levega, A.; Orton, G. S.; Gonzaga, S.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, Jupiter has undergone many atmospheric changes from storms turning red to global. cloud upheavals, and most recently, a cornet or asteroid impact. Yet, on top of these seemingly random changes events there are also periodic phenomena, analogous to observed Earth and Saturn atmospheric oscillations. We will present 15 years of Hubble data, from 1994 to 2009, to show how the equatorial tropospheric cloud deck and winds have varied over that time, focusing on the F953N, F41 ON and F255W filters. These filters give leverage on wind speeds plus cloud opacity, cloud height and tropospheric haze thickness, and stratospheric haze, respectively. The wind data consistently show a periodic oscillation near 7-8 S latitude. We will discuss the potential for variations with longitude and cloud height, within the calibration limits of those filters. Finally, we will discuss the role that large atmospheric events, such as the impacts in 1994 and 2009, and the global upheaval of 2007, have on temporal studies, This work was supported by a grant from the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program. HST observational support was provided by NASA through grants from Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under contract NAS5-26555.

  12. Variations on the Zilch Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, P.-M.; Tanoue, C. K. S.

    2013-10-01

    Thermo dynamic cycles in introductory physics courses are usually made up from a small number of permutations of isothermal, adiabatic, and constant-pressure and volume quasistatic strokes, with the working fluid usually being an ideal gas. Among them we find the Carnot, Stirling, Otto, Diesel, and Joule-Brayton cycles; in more advanced courses, steam cycles and refrigerators based on real working fluids are often introduced. Any additional cycles made up from the same simple strokes, and any extended analysis of known cycles, are welcome additions to the teaching repertory, as they provide more opportunities for practice and discussion. Our purpose in this note is to extend the analysis of the zilch cycle, introduced in Ref. 1, by presenting its TS diagram and by proposing several variations that do not contain adiabatic strokes, thus allowing a simpler mathematical treatment. As a bonus, we also provide results that make it possible to represent practically any elementary ideal-gas cycle in a TS diagram.

  13. Worldwide variations in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Center, Melissa M; Jemal, Ahmedin; Smith, Robert A; Ward, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have documented significant international variations in colorectal cancer rates. However, these studies were limited because they were based on old data or examined only incidence or mortality data. In this article, the colorectal cancer burden and patterns worldwide are described using the most recently updated cancer incidence and mortality data available from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The authors provide 5-year (1998-2002), age-standardized colorectal cancer incidence rates for select cancer registries in IARC's Cancer Incidence in Five Continents, and trends in age-standardized death rates by single calendar year for select countries in the World Health Organization mortality database. In addition, available information regarding worldwide colorectal cancer screening initiatives are presented. The highest colorectal cancer incidence rates in 1998-2002 were observed in registries from North America, Oceania, and Europe, including Eastern European countries. These high rates are most likely the result of increases in risk factors associated with "Westernization," such as obesity and physical inactivity. In contrast, the lowest colorectal cancer incidence rates were observed from registries in Asia, Africa, and South America. Colorectal cancer mortality rates have declined in many longstanding as well as newly economically developed countries; however, they continue to increase in some low-resource countries of South America and Eastern Europe. Various screening options for colorectal cancer are available and further international consideration of targeted screening programs and/or recommendations could help alleviate the burden of colorectal cancer worldwide. PMID:19897840

  14. Quarkonia with a variational method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Deus, Jorge Dias; Henriques, Alfredo B.; Pulido, João M. R.

    1981-06-01

    A variational method, based in independent minimization of energy levels, is applied to quantum mechanical quarkonium systems. A discussion is presented of the method, with emphasis on quark mass dependence of energy levels (Feynman-Hellman theorem), on the behaviour of wave functions at the origin (Martin's theorem) and on the ordering of energy levels. The potential used in the applications is the Coulomb (4-vector) + Linear (4-scalar) potentials, the fine and hyperfine splittings being included by means of the Fermi-Breit hamiltonian. An attempt is made for an overall treatment of the known splittings (radial s-wave, hyperfine and fine splittings) for all quarkonium systems, using an approximately flavour independent potential. The p-wave splittings, as well as the hyperfine splittings, are shown to be particularly sensitive to the nature and mass dependence of the potential. In particular, asymptotic freedom can be more easily tested there. On the other hand, radial excitations provide the place where the set up of short range potential effects should be first detected. Some results concerning the ordinary mesons are presented, and it is specifically pointed out that strong restrictions exist for the masses of the ρ' and the A 1. Predictions for the toponium family are also presented.

  15. Variational approach to stochastic nonlinear problems

    SciTech Connect

    Phythian, R.; Curtis, W.D.

    1986-03-01

    A variational principle is formulated which enables the mean value and higher moments of the solution of a stochastic nonlinear differential equation to be expressed as stationary values of certain quantities. Approximations are generated by using suitable trial functions in this variational principle and some of these are investigated numerically for the case of a Bernoulli oscillator driven by white noise. Comparison with exact data available for this system show that the variational approach to such problems can be quite effective.

  16. The structure of irregular mesospheric variations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    The daily difference method developed by Woodrum and Justus (1968) has been used to analyze the existing data in the height range from 50 to 200 km for irregular variations which could be due to gravity waves. The results presented establish the magnitude as well as the vertical and latitudinal structure of the irregular atmospheric variations. It is pointed out that results obtained by Theon et al. (1969) indicate strong seasonal variation in the magnitude of upper atmospheric waves at high latitudes.

  17. Influence of Design Variations on Systems Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Irem Y.; Stone, Robert B.; Huff, Edward M.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    High-risk aerospace components have to meet very stringent quality, performance, and safety requirements. Any source of variation is a concern, as it may result in scrap or rework. poor performance, and potentially unsafe flying conditions. The sources of variation during product development, including design, manufacturing, and assembly, and during operation are shown. Sources of static and dynamic variation during development need to be detected accurately in order to prevent failure when the components are placed in operation. The Systems' Health and Safety (SHAS) research at the NASA Ames Research Center addresses the problem of detecting and evaluating the statistical variation in helicopter transmissions. In this work, we focus on the variations caused by design, manufacturing, and assembly of these components, prior to being placed in operation (DMV). In particular, we aim to understand and represent the failure and variation information, and their correlation to performance and safety and feed this information back into the development cycle at an early stage. The feedback of such critical information will assure the development of more reliable components with less rework and scrap. Variations during design and manufacturing are a common source of concern in the development and production of such components. Accounting for these variations, especially those that have the potential to affect performance, is accomplished in a variety ways, including Taguchi methods, FMEA, quality control, statistical process control, and variation risk management. In this work, we start with the assumption that any of these variations can be represented mathematically, and accounted for by using analytical tools incorporating these mathematical representations. In this paper, we concentrate on variations that are introduced during design. Variations introduced during manufacturing are investigated in parallel work.

  18. Tooth Size Variation in Pinniped Dentitions

    PubMed Central

    Wolsan, Mieczyslaw; Suzuki, Satoshi; Asahara, Masakazu; Motokawa, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    It is contentious whether size variation among mammalian teeth is heterogeneous or homogeneous, whether the coefficient of variation is reliable, and whether the standard deviation of log-transformed data and the residual of standard deviation on mean variable size are useful replacements for the coefficient of variation. Most studies of tooth size variation have been on mammals with complex-crowned teeth, with relatively little attention paid to taxa with simple-crowned teeth, such as Pinnipedia. To fill this gap in knowledge and to resolve the existing controversies, we explored the variation of linear size variables (length and width) for all teeth from complete permanent dentitions of four pinniped species, two phocids (Histriophoca fasciata, Phoca largha) and two otariids (Callorhinus ursinus, Eumetopias jubatus). Size variation among these teeth was mostly heterogeneous both along the toothrow and among species. The incisors, canines, and mesial and distal postcanines were often relatively highly variable. The levels of overall dental size variation ranged from relatively low as in land carnivorans (Phoca largha and both otariids) to high (Histriophoca fasciata). Sexual size dimorphism varied among teeth and among species, with teeth being, on average, larger in males than in females. This dimorphism was more pronounced, and the canines were larger and more dimorphic relative to other teeth in the otariids than in the phocids. The coefficient of variation quantified variation reliably in most cases. The standard deviation of log-transformed data was redundant with the coefficient of variation. The residual of standard deviation on mean variable size was inaccurate when size variation was considerably heterogeneous among the compared variables, and was incomparable between species and between sexes. The existing hypotheses invoking developmental fields, occlusal complexity, and the relative timing of tooth formation and sexually dimorphic hormonal activity do

  19. Cytoplasmic genetic variation and extensive cytonuclear interactions influence natural variation in the metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Bindu; Corwin, Jason A; Li, Baohua; Atwell, Suzi; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Understanding genome to phenotype linkages has been greatly enabled by genomic sequencing. However, most genome analysis is typically confined to the nuclear genome. We conducted a metabolomic QTL analysis on a reciprocal RIL population structured to examine how variation in the organelle genomes affects phenotypic variation. This showed that the cytoplasmic variation had effects similar to, if not larger than, the largest individual nuclear locus. Inclusion of cytoplasmic variation into the genetic model greatly increased the explained phenotypic variation. Cytoplasmic genetic variation was a central hub in the epistatic network controlling the plant metabolome. This epistatic influence manifested such that the cytoplasmic background could alter or hide pairwise epistasis between nuclear loci. Thus, cytoplasmic genetic variation plays a central role in controlling natural variation in metabolomic networks. This suggests that cytoplasmic genomes must be included in any future analysis of natural variation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00776.001 PMID:24150750

  20. Factors influencing variation in dentist service rates.

    PubMed

    Grembowski, D; Milgrom, P; Fiset, L

    1990-01-01

    In the previous article, we calculated dentist service rates for 200 general dentists based on a homogeneous, well-educated, upper-middle-class population of patients. Wide variations in the rates were detected. In this analysis, factors influencing variation in the rates were identified. Variation in rates for categories of dental services was explained by practice characteristics, patient exposure to fluoridated water supplies, and non-price competition in the dental market. Rates were greatest in large, busy practices in markets with high fees. Older practices consistently had lower rates across services. As a whole, these variables explained between 5 and 30 percent of the variation in the rates. PMID:2118182

  1. Equations of motion for variational electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Jayme

    2016-04-01

    We extend the variational problem of Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics by generalizing the electromagnetic functional to a local space of absolutely continuous trajectories possessing a derivative (velocities) of bounded variation. We show here that the Gateaux derivative of the generalized functional defines two partial Lagrangians for variations in our generalized local space, one for each particle. We prove that the critical-point conditions of the generalized variational problem are: (i) the Euler-Lagrange equations must hold Lebesgue-almost-everywhere and (ii) the momentum of each partial Lagrangian and the Legendre transform of each partial Lagrangian must be absolutely continuous functions, generalizing the Weierstrass-Erdmann conditions.

  2. The stochastic radiative transfer equation: quantum damping, Kirchoff's law and NLTE

    SciTech Connect

    Graziani, F R

    2005-01-24

    A method is presented based on the theory of quantum damping, for deriving a self consistent but approximate form of the quantum transport for photons interacting with fully ionized electron plasma. Specifically, we propose in this paper a technique of approximately including the effects of background plasma on a photon distribution function without directly solving any kinetic equations for the plasma itself. The result is a quantum Langevin equation for the photon number operator; the quantum radiative transfer equation. A dissipation term appears which is the imaginary part of the dielectric function for an electron gas with photon mediated electron-electron interactions due to absorption and re-emission. It depends only on the initial state of the plasma. A quantum noise operator also appears as a result of spontaneous emission of photons from the electron plasma. The thermal expectation value of this noise operator yields the emissivity which is exactly of the form of the Kirchoff-Planck relation. This non-zero thermal expectation value is a direct consequence of a fluctuation-dissipation relation (FDR).

  3. Predictability of seasonal atmospheric variations

    SciTech Connect

    Brankovic, C. ); Palmer, T.N.; Ferranti, L. )

    1994-02-01

    Results from a set of 120-day ensemble integrations of a T63L19 version of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model are described. The integrations used observed global sea surface temperature (SST) as a lower boundary condition. The ensembles were analyzed over the last 90 days of the integration period, corresponding to conventional calendar seasons. Interannual variations in the atmosphere for the period 1986 to 1990 were studied. the sign and magnitude of tropical Pacific SST anomalies were chosen to define an El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index. In general, the skill of the ensemble difference fields was higher for the strong ENSO-index years than for the weak ones, both in the tropics and the extratropics. In the northern extratropics, the skill of the ensemble mean tended to be highest in the spring season and the internal spread of the ensemble tended to be smallest in spring. Differences in zonally averaged zonal mean wind revealed that in the tropical and subtropical troposphere, the model simulations were quite accurate. For both strong and weak ENSO-index years, the model correctly simulated differences in the tropical stratosphere associated with the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). From wind differences and analysis of changes to regime residence frequencies, it was concluded that while the SST anomalies associated with strong ENSO-index years had a significant influence on the extratropical circulation (including both North America and Europe), there was considerable intra-ensemble variability affecting tropical Pacific area. Intraensemble variability was also shown to be substantial in parts of the tropics associated with the summer monsoons over India and Southeast Asia. By contrast, rainfall over sub-Saharan Africa was more stable. 23 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Transit Polarimetry of Exoplanetary System HD 189733

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostogryz, N. M.; Berdyugina, S. V.; Yakobchuk, T. M.

    2015-01-01

    We present and discuss a polarimetric effect caused by a planet transiting the stellar disk thus breaking the symmetry of the light distribution and resulting in linear polarization of the partially eclipsed star. Estimates of this effect for transiting planets have been made only recently. In particular, we demonstrate that the maximum polarization during transits depends strongly on the centre-to-limb variation of the linear polarization of the host star. However, observational and theoretical studies of the limb polarization have largely concentrated on the Sun. Here we solve the radiative transfer problem for polarized light and calculate the centre-to-limb polarization for one of the brightest transiting planet host HD 189733 taking into account various opacities. Using that we simulate the transit effect and estimate the variations of the flux and the linear polarization for HD 189733 during the event. As the spots on the stellar disk also break the limb polarization symmetry we simulate the flux and polarization variation due to the spots on the stellar disk.

  5. Variational Pragmatics in the Foreign Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Situational variation has long been an accepted form of intra-lingual variation in speech act realisations. The effect of macro-social factors, such as region, ethnic background, age, social status and gender, on intra-lingual pragmatic conventions has, however, received comparatively little attention in the study of pragmatics to date [Kasper,…

  6. Lexical Variation in Mexican Sign Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickford, J. Albert

    A study of dialectal variation in Mexican Sign Language (MSL), the primary language for a large segment of Mexico's deaf community, is presented. Signs used by nine different sources representing various locations, ages, and social groups are compared. The first section reviews a number of previous informal assessments of dialectal variation in…

  7. Item versus System Learning: Explaining Free Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Rod

    1999-01-01

    Provides an explanation for the existence of free variation in learner language. Argues that interlanguage is best conceptualized as sets of loose lexical networks that are gradually reorganized into a system or systems. Free variation arises when learners add items to those they have already acquired and before they analyze these items and…

  8. Size variation in Middle Pleistocene humans.

    PubMed

    Arsuaga, J L; Carretero, J M; Lorenzo, C; Gracia, A; Martínez, I; Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Carbonell, E

    1997-08-22

    It has been suggested that European Middle Pleistocene humans, Neandertals, and prehistoric modern humans had a greater sexual dimorphism than modern humans. Analysis of body size variation and cranial capacity variation in the large sample from the Sima de los Huesos site in Spain showed instead that the sexual dimorphism is comparable in Middle Pleistocene and modern populations. PMID:9262474

  9. Variation in animal response to different toxicants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    The variation in response of different lots of male Swiss albino mice to pyrolysis effluents from surgical cotton and from bisphenol A polycarbonate, and to pure carbon monoxide, is discussed. The variation appeared to be less with the pyrolysis gases from polycarbonate than with pure carbon monoxide.

  10. Variational bayesian method of estimating variance components.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Aisaku; Taniguchi, Masaaki; Hayashi, Takeshi; Mikawa, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    We developed a Bayesian analysis approach by using a variational inference method, a so-called variational Bayesian method, to determine the posterior distributions of variance components. This variational Bayesian method and an alternative Bayesian method using Gibbs sampling were compared in estimating genetic and residual variance components from both simulated data and publically available real pig data. In the simulated data set, we observed strong bias toward overestimation of genetic variance for the variational Bayesian method in the case of low heritability and low population size, and less bias was detected with larger population sizes in both methods examined. The differences in the estimates of variance components between the variational Bayesian and the Gibbs sampling were not found in the real pig data. However, the posterior distributions of the variance components obtained with the variational Bayesian method had shorter tails than those obtained with the Gibbs sampling. Consequently, the posterior standard deviations of the genetic and residual variances of the variational Bayesian method were lower than those of the method using Gibbs sampling. The computing time required was much shorter with the variational Bayesian method than with the method using Gibbs sampling. PMID:26877207

  11. A Language Variation Model for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nugent, Harold E.; Burgess, Carol

    This paper focuses on a language variation model that incorporates a number of concepts from linguistic and rhetorical studies. The model views language variation as a product of two correlating causes: one, the user and his or her personal, regional, and social dialect; and the other, the user's use of the language in terms of such discourse…

  12. Exploring Duopoly Markets with Conjectural Variations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julien, Ludovic A.; Musy, Olivier; Saïdi, Aurélien W.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors investigate competitive firm behaviors in a two-firm environment assuming linear cost and demand functions. By introducing conjectural variations, they capture the different market structures as specific configurations of a more general model. Conjectural variations are based on the assumption that each firm believes…

  13. Isozyme variation in wild and cultivated pineapple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isozyme variation was studied in 161 accessions of pineapple including four species of Ananas and one of Pseudananas. Six enzyme systems (ADH, GPI, PGM, SKDH, TPI, UGPP) involving seven putative loci revealed 35 electromorphs . Considerable variation exists within and between species of Ananas. Sixt...

  14. Variation for canopy morphology in little bluestem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little bluestem, Schizachyrium scoparium (Michx.) Nash, is a native grass that has been shown to have high level of genetic variation for traits such as; biomass yield, disease resistance, plant height, leafiness, maturity, seed yield, and seed yield components. If high levels of genetic variation ...

  15. Variational Theory of Hot Dense Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukherjee, Abhishek

    2009-01-01

    We develop a variational theory of hot nuclear matter in neutron stars and supernovae. It can also be used to study charged, hot nuclear matter which may be produced in heavy-ion collisions. This theory is a generalization of the variational theory of cold nuclear and neutron star matter based on realistic models of nuclear forces and pair…

  16. Anatomy, Medical Education, and Human Ancestral Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strkalj, Goran; Spocter, Muhammad A.; Wilkinson, A. Tracey

    2011-01-01

    It is argued in this article that the human body both in health and disease cannot be fully understood without adequately accounting for the different levels of human variation. The article focuses on variation due to ancestry, arguing that the inclusion of information pertaining to ancestry in human anatomy teaching materials and courses should…

  17. Variation tolerant SoC design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhikkottu, Vivek J.

    The scaling of integrated circuits into the nanometer regime has led to variations emerging as a primary concern for designers of integrated circuits. Variations are an inevitable consequence of the semiconductor manufacturing process, and also arise due to the side-effects of operation of integrated circuits (voltage, temperature, and aging). Conventional design approaches, which are based on design corners or worst-case scenarios, leave designers with an undesirable choice between the considerable overheads associated with over-design and significantly reduced manufacturing yield. Techniques for variation-tolerant design at the logic, circuit and layout levels of the design process have been developed and are in commercial use. However, with the incessant increase in variations due to technology scaling and design trends such as near-threshold computing, these techniques are no longer sufficient to contain the effects of variations, and there is a need to address variations at all stages of design. This thesis addresses the problem of variation-tolerant design at the earliest stages of the design process, where the system-level design decisions that are made can have a very significant impact. There are two key aspects to making system-level design variation-aware. First, analysis techniques must be developed to project the impact of variations on system-level metrics such as application performance and energy. Second, variation-tolerant design techniques need to be developed to absorb the residual impact of variations (that cannot be contained through lower-level techniques). In this thesis, we address both these facets by developing robust and scalable variation-aware analysis and variation mitigation techniques at the system level. The first contribution of this thesis is a variation-aware system-level performance analysis framework. We address the key challenge of translating the per-component clock frequency distributions into a system-level application

  18. Language Variation and Score Variation in the Testing of English Language Learners, Native Spanish Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solano-Flores, Guillermo; Li, Min

    2009-01-01

    We investigated language variation and score variation in the testing of English language learners, native Spanish speakers. We gave students the same set of National Assessment of Educational Progress mathematics items in both their first language and their second language. We examined the amount of score variation due to the main and interaction…

  19. Micro-scale environmental variation amplifies physiological variation among individual mussels.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Jayawardene, Sarah; Alves, Shaina; Dallmer, Jeremiah; Dowd, W Wesley

    2015-12-01

    The contributions of temporal and spatial environmental variation to physiological variation remain poorly resolved. Rocky intertidal zone populations are subjected to thermal variation over the tidal cycle, superimposed with micro-scale variation in individuals' body temperatures. Using the sea mussel (Mytilus californianus), we assessed the consequences of this micro-scale environmental variation for physiological variation among individuals, first by examining the latter in field-acclimatized animals, second by abolishing micro-scale environmental variation via common garden acclimation, and third by restoring this variation using a reciprocal outplant approach. Common garden acclimation reduced the magnitude of variation in tissue-level antioxidant capacities by approximately 30% among mussels from a wave-protected (warm) site, but it had no effect on antioxidant variation among mussels from a wave-exposed (cool) site. The field-acclimatized level of antioxidant variation was restored only when protected-site mussels were outplanted to a high, thermally stressful site. Variation in organismal oxygen consumption rates reflected antioxidant patterns, decreasing dramatically among protected-site mussels after common gardening. These results suggest a highly plastic relationship between individuals' genotypes and their physiological phenotypes that depends on recent environmental experience. Corresponding context-dependent changes in the physiological mean-variance relationships within populations complicate prediction of responses to shifts in environmental variability that are anticipated with global change. PMID:26645201

  20. Temporal variations of the anomalous oxygen component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, A. C.; Webber, W. R.

    1983-01-01

    Data from the cosmic ray experiment on Voyagers 1 and 2 was used to examine anomalous oxygen in the time period from launch in 1977 to the end of 1981. Several time periods were found where large periodic (typically 26 day) temporal variations of the oxygen intensity between approximately 5 - 15 MeV/nuc are present. Variations in intensity by up to a factor of 10 are observed during these periods. Several characteristics of these variations indicate that they are not higher energy extensions of the low energy particle (approximately 1 MeV/nuc) increases found in many corotating interaction regions (CIR's). Many of these periodic temporal variations are correlated with similar, but much smaller, recurrent variations in the 75 MeV proton rate. Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 counting rates were compared to estimate the local radial gradient for both the protons and the oxygen. The proton gradients during periods of both maximum and minumum fluxes are consistent with the overall positive radial gradients reported by others from Pioneer and near-Earth observations, supporting the view that these variations are due to local modulation of a source outside the radial range of project measurements. In contrast, the oxygen gradients during periods of maximum proton flux differ in sign from those during minimum proton fluxes, suggesting that the origin of the oxygen variations is different from that of the protons.

  1. Seasonal variations of cancer incidence and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Moan, Johan; Bruland, Øyvind; Juzeniene, Asta

    2010-01-01

    The overall death rates are highest in the winter season in many countries at high latitudes. In some but not all countries, this is also true for more specific diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases and influenza. For internal cancers we find no consistent, significant seasonal variation, neither of incidence nor of death rates. On the other hand, we find a significant seasonal variation of cancer prognosis with season of diagnosis in Norway. Best prognosis is found for summer and autumn diagnosis; i.e., for the seasons of the best status of vitamin D in the population. There were no corresponding seasonal variations, neither of the rates of diagnosis, nor of the rates of death which could explain the variations of prognosis. The most likely reason for this variation is that the vitamin D status in Norway is significantly better in summer and autumn than in winter and spring. Earlier, seasonal variations have been explained by circannual variations of certain hormones, but the data are not consistent. PMID:21547098

  2. August Weismann on germ-plasm variation.

    PubMed

    Winther, R G

    2001-01-01

    August Weismann is famous for having argued against the inheritance of acquired characters. However, an analysis of his work indicates that Weismann always held that changes in external conditions, acting during development, were the necessary causes of variation in the hereditary material. For much of his career he held that acquired germ-plasm variation was inherited. An irony, which is in tension with much of the standard twentieth-century history of biology, thus exists - Weismann was not a Weismannian. I distinguish three claims regarding the germ-plasm: (1) its continuity, (2) its morphological sequestration, and (3) its variational sequestration. With respect to changes in Weismann's views on the cause of variation, I divide his career into four stages. For each stage I analyze his beliefs on the relative importance of changes in external conditions and sexual reproduction as causes of variation in the hereditary material. Weissmann believed, and Weismannism denies, that variation, heredity, and development were deeply intertwined processes. This article is part of a larger project comparing commitments regarding variation during the latter half of the nineteenth century. PMID:11859887

  3. Solar cycle variations in IMF intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Annual averages of logarithms of hourly interplanetary magnetic field intensities, obtained from geocentric spacecraft between November 1963 and December 1977, reveal the following solar cycle variation. For 2 to 3 years at each solar minimum period, the IMF intensity is depressed by 10-15 percent relative to its mean value realized during a broad nine-year period centered at solar maximum. No systematic variations occur during this nine-year period. The solar minimum decrease, although small relative to variations in some other solar wind parameters, is both statistically and physically significant.

  4. Solar cycle variations in IMF intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Annual averages of logarithms of hourly interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) intensities, obtained from geocentric spacecraft between November 1963 and December 1977, reveal the following solar cycle variation. For 2-3 years at each solar minimum period, the IMF intensity is depressed by 10-15% relative to its mean value realized during a broad 9-year period centered at solar maximum. No systematic variations occur during this 9-year period. The solar minimum decrease, although small in relation to variations in some other solar wind parameters, is both statistically and physically significant.

  5. Accounting for population variation in targeted proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Grant M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Rodriguez, Larissa M.; Wu, Chaochao; MacLean, Brendan; Smith, Richard D.; MacCoss, Michael; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-01-03

    Individual proteomes typically differ from the reference human proteome at ~10,000 single amino acid variants. When viewed at the population scale, this individual variation results in a wide variety of protein sequences. In targeted proteomics experiments, such variability would confound accurate protein quantification. To facilitate researchers in identifying target peptides with high variability within the human population we have created the Population Variation plug-in for Skyline, which provides easy access to the polymorphisms stored in dbSNP. Given a set of peptides, the tool reports minor allele frequency for common polymorphisms. We highlight the importance of considering genetic variation by applying the tool to public datasets.

  6. Variations of biorhythm composition in healthy people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aptikaeva, O. I.; Gamburtsev, A. G.; Stepanova, S. I.

    2010-12-01

    We have investigated variations in the spectral composition of some physiological characteristics (heart rate, sublingual temperature, potassium renal excretion, and respiratory rate). It has been shown that, in regular social and domestic conditions, the human responses to permanently changing external influences are different and depend on their individual adaptation ability. Some test subjects show a prevalence of the major circadian rhythm in the rhythmic composition of physiological characteristics, which stays almost unchanged under significant variations in external factors; other test subjects are characterized by a rapid change in the rhythmic composition following variations, for example, of solar activity; for a third type of test subject, this change occurs with a significant time delay.

  7. NO TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS IN WASP-4

    SciTech Connect

    Petrucci, R.; Schwartz, M.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Jofré, E.; Cúneo, V.; Gómez, M.; Martínez, C.

    2013-12-20

    We present six new transits of the system WASP-4. Together with 28 light curves published in the literature, we perform a homogeneous study of its parameters and search for variations in the transits' central times. The final values agree with those previously reported, except for a slightly lower inclination. We find no significant long-term variations in i or R{sub P} /R {sub *}. The O-C mid-transit times do not show signs of transit timing variations greater than 54 s.

  8. Along-shore variations of offshore flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Erin; Mahrt, L.

    2003-02-01

    Using eddy correlation data collected by the LongEZ research aircraft, the adjustment of atmospheric flow downstream from a coastline is examined. Along-shore variation of the turbulence over the water is generated by the varying width of the upstream land strip between the sea and inland water. Over the coastal zone, the turbulence is strongest downstream from the widest part of land. The along-shore variation of the turbulence decreases with increasing sea fetch due to horizontal mixing. In other terms, the footprint of the flux farther offshore includes a larger width of upstream land. Beyond 5 km sea fetch, the along-shore variation becomes small.

  9. Onsager's Variational Principle in Soft Matter Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Masao

    2012-02-01

    It is shown that Onsager's variational principle gives us a unified frame-work in discussing various dynamics of soft matter such as diffusion, rheology and their coupling. The variational principle gives kinetic equations which satisfy Onsager's reciprocal relation. With many examples, it is shown that the kinetic equations are usually written as non-linear partial differential equations for state variables and can describe various non-linear and non-equilibrium phenomena in soft matter. The physics underlying the variational principle is discussed.

  10. Genetic sources of population epigenomic variation.

    PubMed

    Taudt, Aaron; Colomé-Tatché, Maria; Johannes, Frank

    2016-06-01

    The field of epigenomics has rapidly progressed from the study of individual reference epigenomes to surveying epigenomic variation in populations. Recent studies in a number of species, from yeast to humans, have begun to dissect the cis- and trans-regulatory genetic mechanisms that shape patterns of population epigenomic variation at the level of single epigenetic marks, as well as at the level of integrated chromatin state maps. We show that this information is paving the way towards a more complete understanding of the heritable basis underlying population epigenomic variation. We also highlight important conceptual challenges when interpreting results from these genetic studies, particularly in plants, in which epigenomic variation can be determined both by genetic and epigenetic inheritance. PMID:27156976

  11. Solution of two-level variational inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Kalashnikov, V.V.; Kalashnikova, N.I.

    1995-03-01

    The mathematical programming problem with variational inequality constraints, or the complementary problem, often arises in the analysis of physical and socio-economic systems. At present, such problems are mostly solved by heuristic methods. In a recent paper, Harker and Choi described an approach based on external penalty functions, which is applied after restating the variational inequality constraint in optimization form. An alternative approach to the solution of the problem conversely involves restating its optimization part in the form of an appropriate variational inequality, whose solution is then sought on the set of feasible vectors that satisfy the original inequality constraint. In this paper, we propose a penalty technique for solving the resulting problem, which is accordingly reduced to a one-level variational inequality dependent on a penalty parameter.

  12. Variational Method for Two-Electron Atoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, M. K.; Bhaduri, R. K.

    1977-01-01

    Proposes a simple two-parameter trial wave function for the helium atom and helium-like ions. Shows that a variational calculation for the ground-state energy yields better results than the usual one-parameter example. (MLH)

  13. Nucleosomal promoter variation generates gene expression noise

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher R.; Boeger, Hinrich

    2014-01-01

    Gene product molecule numbers fluctuate over time and between cells, confounding deterministic expectations. The molecular origins of this noise of gene expression remain unknown. Recent EM analysis of single PHO5 gene molecules of yeast indicated that promoter molecules stochastically assume alternative nucleosome configurations at steady state, including the fully nucleosomal and nucleosome-free configuration. Given that distinct configurations are unequally conducive to transcription, the nucleosomal variation of promoter molecules may constitute a source of gene expression noise. This notion, however, implies an untested conjecture, namely that the nucleosomal variation arises de novo or intrinsically (i.e., that it cannot be explained as the result of the promoter’s deterministic response to variation in its molecular surroundings). Here, we show—by microscopically analyzing the nucleosome configurations of two juxtaposed physically linked PHO5 promoter copies—that the configurational variation, indeed, is intrinsically stochastic and thus, a cause of gene expression noise rather than its effect. PMID:25468975

  14. Solar cycle variations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, John W.; Lopez, Ramon E.

    1986-01-01

    The solar cycle variations of various solar wind parameters are reviewed. It is shown that there is a gradual decrease in the duration of high-speed streams from the declining phase of solar cycle 20 through the ascending phase of cycle 21 and a corresponding decrease in the annual average of the proton speed toward solar maximum. Beta, the ratio of the proton thermal pressure to magnetic pressure, undergoes a significant solar cycle variation, as expected from the variation in the IMF. Individual hourly averages of beta often exceed unity with 20 cases exceeding 10 and one case as high as 25. The Alfven Mach number shows a solar cycle variation similar to beta, lower aboard solar maximum. High-speed streams can be seen clearly in epsilon and the y component of the interplanetary magnetic field.

  15. Density variations and anomalies in palladium compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Back, D.; Jones, T.; Ransick, M.; Walburg, T.; Werkmeister, D.

    1992-05-14

    Low-density compacts of palladium powder have relative densities of about 30{plus_minus}10% TD. The variations in density are of concern for operations such as chemical/hydrogen pump systems because heat, mass, and momentum transport properties can be affected. Variations in density result from the inherent nature and interacting forces of UASA compaction of powder in cylinders. In addition to these expected variations, discontinuous density anomalies, such as cracks or high density ridges, are also found. An anomaly of particular concern was found to resemble a ``steer`s head.`` it is a symmetrical region of low density located at or near the center of a compact. Typically, this region is surrounded by a band of high density, compacted palladium that sometimes exceeds the density of the surrounding compact matrix by a factor of three. This report examines these density variations and anomalies both theoretically and empirically.

  16. Density variations and anomalies in palladium compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Back, D.; Jones, T.; Ransick, M.; Walburg, T.; Werkmeister, D.

    1992-05-14

    Low-density compacts of palladium powder have relative densities of about 30{plus minus}10% TD. The variations in density are of concern for operations such as chemical/hydrogen pump systems because heat, mass, and momentum transport properties can be affected. Variations in density result from the inherent nature and interacting forces of UASA compaction of powder in cylinders. In addition to these expected variations, discontinuous density anomalies, such as cracks or high density ridges, are also found. An anomaly of particular concern was found to resemble a steer's head.'' it is a symmetrical region of low density located at or near the center of a compact. Typically, this region is surrounded by a band of high density, compacted palladium that sometimes exceeds the density of the surrounding compact matrix by a factor of three. This report examines these density variations and anomalies both theoretically and empirically.

  17. Optical spectrum variations of IL Cep A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismailov, N. Z.; Khalilov, O. V.; Bakhaddinova, G. R.

    2016-02-01

    The results of many-year uniform spectroscopic observations of the Herbig Ae/Be star IL Cep A are presented. Its Hα line has either a single or a barely resolved two-component emission profile. The H β emission line is clearly divided into two components with a deep central absorption. Smooth variations of the observed parameters of individual spectral lines over nine years are observed. The He I λ5876 Å line has a complex absorption profile, probably with superposed emission components. The NaI D1, D2 doublet exhibits weak changes due to variations in the circumstellar envelope. The variations observed in the stellar spectrum can be explained by either binarity or variations of the magnetic field in the stellar disk. Difficulties associated with both these possibilities are discussed.

  18. Varying alpha: New constraints from seasonal variations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, John D.; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2008-09-15

    We analyze the constraints obtained from new atomic clock data on the possible time variation of the fine structure 'constant' and the electron-proton mass ratio, and show how they are strengthened when the seasonal variation of the Sun's gravitational field at the Earth's surface is taken into account. We compare these bounds with those obtainable from tests of the weak equivalence principle and high redshift observations of quasar absorption spectra.

  19. Titanium oxide variations in II Pegasi

    SciTech Connect

    Huenemoerder, D.P.; Ramsey, L.W.; Buzasi, D.L. High Altitude Observatory, Boulder, CO )

    1989-12-01

    TiO 8860 A band variations were detected in the RS CVn star II Pegasi during the fall of 1988. UBV photometry shows that the variations are correlated with the star's brightness. The TiO is stronger when the star is fainter. The results are used to estimate cool photospheric spot sizes of 2030 deg, with equivalent spectral types similar to an M4 to M6 star. 32 refs.

  20. Titanium oxide variations in II Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Buzasi, Derek L.

    1989-12-01

    TiO 8860 A band variations were detected in the RS CVn star II Pegasi during the fall of 1988. UBV photometry shows that the variations are correlated with the star's brightness. The TiO is stronger when the star is fainter. The results are used to estimate cool photospheric spot sizes of 2030 deg, with equivalent spectral types similar to an M4 to M6 star.

  1. Evolutionary problems driven by variational inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenhai; Zeng, Shengda; Motreanu, Dumitru

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we introduce the differential system obtained by mixing an evolution equation and a variational inequality ((EEVI), for short). First, by using KKM theorem and monotonicity arguments, we prove the superpositional measurability and upper semicontinuity for the solution set of a general variational inequality. Then we establish that the solution set of (EEVI) is nonempty and compact. Our approach is based on the theory of semigroups, Filippov implicit function lemma and fixed point theory for set-valued mappings.

  2. Beach profile variation on Hawaiian carbonate beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, A.E.; Richmond, B.M.; Fletcher, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    Beach profiles from selected Oahu and Maui beaches quantitatively document beach volume variation and change between 1994 and 1999. Along exposed, high-energy beaches, large fluctuations in beach volume, characterized primarily by the formation and erosion of extensive berms, dominate the seasonal changes. Beaches along more protected stretches of coastline show much less variation in profile morphology. Beaches on the west (leeward) coast of Oahu experienced the most seasonal variation in profile volume, followed by the north shore, east (windward) shore, and south shore. Similar to Oahu, beaches along the west coast of Maui showed the greatest overall profile variation. However, the mean variation for profiles along a single coastal reach showed little difference compared to other coastal segments. Although some beaches showed net gain or loss during the study period, most beaches remained relatively stable with change limited to a finite envelope. No island-wide trends in beach erosion or accretion were observed during the study period. However, no extreme events, such as tropical storms or hurricanes, directly influenced the Hawaiian Islands during the study period. This data set should therefore be considered as representative of typical annual beach activity. Greater variation and possible long-term change would be expected during extreme events.

  3. Exploring subdomain variation in biomedical language

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Applications of Natural Language Processing (NLP) technology to biomedical texts have generated significant interest in recent years. In this paper we identify and investigate the phenomenon of linguistic subdomain variation within the biomedical domain, i.e., the extent to which different subject areas of biomedicine are characterised by different linguistic behaviour. While variation at a coarser domain level such as between newswire and biomedical text is well-studied and known to affect the portability of NLP systems, we are the first to conduct an extensive investigation into more fine-grained levels of variation. Results Using the large OpenPMC text corpus, which spans the many subdomains of biomedicine, we investigate variation across a number of lexical, syntactic, semantic and discourse-related dimensions. These dimensions are chosen for their relevance to the performance of NLP systems. We use clustering techniques to analyse commonalities and distinctions among the subdomains. Conclusions We find that while patterns of inter-subdomain variation differ somewhat from one feature set to another, robust clusters can be identified that correspond to intuitive distinctions such as that between clinical and laboratory subjects. In particular, subdomains relating to genetics and molecular biology, which are the most common sources of material for training and evaluating biomedical NLP tools, are not representative of all biomedical subdomains. We conclude that an awareness of subdomain variation is important when considering the practical use of language processing applications by biomedical researchers. PMID:21619603

  4. Networks of spatial genetic variation across species

    PubMed Central

    Fortuna, Miguel A.; Albaladejo, Rafael G.; Fernández, Laura; Aparicio, Abelardo; Bascompte, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    Spatial patterns of genetic variation provide information central to many ecological, evolutionary, and conservation questions. This spatial variability has traditionally been analyzed through summary statistics between pairs of populations, therefore missing the simultaneous influence of all populations. More recently, a network approach has been advocated to overcome these limitations. This network approach has been applied to a few cases limited to a single species at a time. The question remains whether similar patterns of spatial genetic variation and similar functional roles for specific patches are obtained for different species. Here we study the networks of genetic variation of four Mediterranean woody plant species inhabiting the same habitat patches in a highly fragmented forest mosaic in Southern Spain. Three of the four species show a similar pattern of genetic variation with well-defined modules or groups of patches holding genetically similar populations. These modules can be thought of as the long-sought-after, evolutionarily significant units or management units. The importance of each patch for the cohesion of the entire network, though, is quite different across species. This variation creates a tremendous challenge for the prioritization of patches to conserve the genetic variation of multispecies assemblages. PMID:19861546

  5. Variational time integrators in computational solid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, Adrian Jose

    This thesis develops the theory and implementation of variational integrators for computational solid mechanics problems, and to some extent, for fluid mechanics problems as well. Variational integrators for finite dimensional mechanical systems are succinctly reviewed, and used as the foundations for the extension to continuum systems. The latter is accomplished by way of a space-tune formulation for Lagrangian continuum mechanics that unifies the derivation of tyre balance of linear momentum, energy and configurational forces, all of there as Euler-Lagrange equations of an extended Hamilton's principle. In this formulation, energy conservation and the path independence of the J- and L-integrals are conserved quantities emanating from Noether's theorem. Variational integrators for continuum mechanics are constructed by mimicking this variational structure, and a discrete Noether's theorem for rather general space-tune discretizations is presented. Additionally, the algorithms are automatically (multi)symplectic, and the (multi)symplectic form is uniquely defined by the theory. For instance, in nonlinear elastodynamics the algorithms exactly preserve linear and angular momenta, whenever the continuous system does. A class of variational algorithms is constructed, termed asynchronous variational integrators (AVI), which permit: the selection of independent time steps in each element of a finite element mesh, and the local time steps need riot bear an integral relation to each other. The conservation properties of both synchronous and asynchronous variational integrators are discussed in detail. In particular, AVI are found to nearly conserve energy both locally and globally, a distinguishing feature of variational integrators. The possibility of adapting the elemental time step to exactly satisfy the local energy balance equation, obtained from the extended variational principle, is analyzed. The AVI are also extended to include dissipative systems. The excellent

  6. Environmental Variation Generates Environmental Opportunist Pathogen Outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Anttila, Jani; Kaitala, Veijo; Laakso, Jouni; Ruokolainen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Many socio-economically important pathogens persist and grow in the outside host environment and opportunistically invade host individuals. The environmental growth and opportunistic nature of these pathogens has received only little attention in epidemiology. Environmental reservoirs are, however, an important source of novel diseases. Thus, attempts to control these diseases require different approaches than in traditional epidemiology focusing on obligatory parasites. Conditions in the outside-host environment are prone to fluctuate over time. This variation is a potentially important driver of epidemiological dynamics and affect the evolution of novel diseases. Using a modelling approach combining the traditional SIRS models to environmental opportunist pathogens and environmental variability, we show that epidemiological dynamics of opportunist diseases are profoundly driven by the quality of environmental variability, such as the long-term predictability and magnitude of fluctuations. When comparing periodic and stochastic environmental factors, for a given variance, stochastic variation is more likely to cause outbreaks than periodic variation. This is due to the extreme values being further away from the mean. Moreover, the effects of variability depend on the underlying biology of the epidemiological system, and which part of the system is being affected. Variation in host susceptibility leads to more severe pathogen outbreaks than variation in pathogen growth rate in the environment. Positive correlation in variation on both targets can cancel the effect of variation altogether. Moreover, the severity of outbreaks is significantly reduced by increase in the duration of immunity. Uncovering these issues helps in understanding and controlling diseases caused by environmental pathogens. PMID:26710238

  7. Environmental Variation Generates Environmental Opportunist Pathogen Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Anttila, Jani; Kaitala, Veijo; Laakso, Jouni; Ruokolainen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Many socio-economically important pathogens persist and grow in the outside host environment and opportunistically invade host individuals. The environmental growth and opportunistic nature of these pathogens has received only little attention in epidemiology. Environmental reservoirs are, however, an important source of novel diseases. Thus, attempts to control these diseases require different approaches than in traditional epidemiology focusing on obligatory parasites. Conditions in the outside-host environment are prone to fluctuate over time. This variation is a potentially important driver of epidemiological dynamics and affect the evolution of novel diseases. Using a modelling approach combining the traditional SIRS models to environmental opportunist pathogens and environmental variability, we show that epidemiological dynamics of opportunist diseases are profoundly driven by the quality of environmental variability, such as the long-term predictability and magnitude of fluctuations. When comparing periodic and stochastic environmental factors, for a given variance, stochastic variation is more likely to cause outbreaks than periodic variation. This is due to the extreme values being further away from the mean. Moreover, the effects of variability depend on the underlying biology of the epidemiological system, and which part of the system is being affected. Variation in host susceptibility leads to more severe pathogen outbreaks than variation in pathogen growth rate in the environment. Positive correlation in variation on both targets can cancel the effect of variation altogether. Moreover, the severity of outbreaks is significantly reduced by increase in the duration of immunity. Uncovering these issues helps in understanding and controlling diseases caused by environmental pathogens. PMID:26710238

  8. Intrapopulation Genome Size Variation in D. melanogaster Reflects Life History Variation and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Lisa L.; Huang, Wen; Quinn, Andrew M.; Ahuja, Astha; Alfrejd, Ben; Gomez, Francisco E.; Hjelmen, Carl E.; Moore, Kristi L.; Mackay, Trudy F. C.; Johnston, J. Spencer; Tarone, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    We determined female genome sizes using flow cytometry for 211 Drosophila melanogaster sequenced inbred strains from the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, and found significant conspecific and intrapopulation variation in genome size. We also compared several life history traits for 25 lines with large and 25 lines with small genomes in three thermal environments, and found that genome size as well as genome size by temperature interactions significantly correlated with survival to pupation and adulthood, time to pupation, female pupal mass, and female eclosion rates. Genome size accounted for up to 23% of the variation in developmental phenotypes, but the contribution of genome size to variation in life history traits was plastic and varied according to the thermal environment. Expression data implicate differences in metabolism that correspond to genome size variation. These results indicate that significant genome size variation exists within D. melanogaster and this variation may impact the evolutionary ecology of the species. Genome size variation accounts for a significant portion of life history variation in an environmentally dependent manner, suggesting that potential fitness effects associated with genome size variation also depend on environmental conditions. PMID:25057905

  9. Cycle-to-Cycle Variations in the Diurnal Variation of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Simon; Owen, Chris; Owens, Matt; Lockwood, Mike

    2016-04-01

    We examine mean profiles of the diurnal variations in galactic cosmic ray flux using a number of neutron monitors at different magnetic latitudes and longitudes. By splitting all of the hourly neutron monitor data by the solar magnetic polarity and analysing the mean normalised neutron monitor count rates between these, we see that the diurnal variation changes phase by 1-2 hours between the two polarity states for the majority of non-polar neutron monitors. The intensity and variability of a heliospheric magnetic field is analysed for every day and found not to be the cause of the phase change. Some polar neutron monitors, however, show different, smaller amplitude variations in phase between polarity cycles. Time series of the time of the maximum in the diurnal variation are presented between 1965 and 2013. Our results agree with previous work by confirming the presence of a 22-year variation in the peak time of the diurnal variation and a 11-year variation in the amplitude, but also show that not all neutron monitors show the same trend. An analysis of the magnetic latitude dependence of the diurnal variation shows that the time-of-day of the peak and trough of this variation gives opposing changes to the amplitude of the 22-year change. We suggest that this could be due to changes in the configeration of the heliospheric magnetic field for consecutive cycles.

  10. Anatomic variation and orgasm: Could variations in anatomy explain differences in orgasmic success?

    PubMed

    Emhardt, E; Siegel, J; Hoffman, L

    2016-07-01

    Though the public consciousness is typically focused on factors such as psychology, penis size, and the presence of the "G-spot," there are other anatomical and neuro-anatomic differences that could play an equal, or more important, role in the frequency and intensity of orgasms. Discovering these variations could direct further medical or procedural management to improve sexual satisfaction. The aim of this study is to review the available literature of anatomical sexual variation and to explain why this variation may predispose some patients toward a particular sexual experience. In this review, we explored the available literature on sexual anatomy and neuro-anatomy. We used PubMed and OVID Medline for search terms, including orgasm, penile size variation, clitoral variation, Grafenberg spot, and benefits of orgasm. First we review the basic anatomy and innervation of the reproductive organs. Then we describe several anatomical variations that likely play a superior role to popular known variation (penis size, presence of g-spot, etc). For males, the delicate play between the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems is vital to achieve orgasm. For females, the autonomic component is more complex. The clitoris is the primary anatomical feature for female orgasm, including its migration toward the anterior vaginal wall. In conclusions, orgasms are complex phenomena involving psychological, physiological, and anatomic variation. While these variations predispose people to certain sexual function, future research should explore how to surgically or medically alter these. Clin. Anat. 29:665-672, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26916103

  11. Prostate Contouring Variation: Can It Be Fixed?

    SciTech Connect

    Khoo, Eric L.H.; Schick, Karlissa; Plank, Ashley W.; Poulsen, Michael; Wong, Winnie W.G.; Middleton, Mark; Martin, Jarad M.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess whether an education program on CT and MRI prostate anatomy would reduce inter- and intraobserver prostate contouring variation among experienced radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Three patient CT and MRI datasets were selected. Five radiation oncologists contoured the prostate for each patient on CT first, then MRI, and again between 2 and 4 weeks later. Three education sessions were then conducted. The same contouring process was then repeated with the same datasets and oncologists. The observer variation was assessed according to changes in the ratio of the encompassing volume to intersecting volume (volume ratio [VR]), across sets of target volumes. Results: For interobserver variation, there was a 15% reduction in mean VR with CT, from 2.74 to 2.33, and a 40% reduction in mean VR with MRI, from 2.38 to 1.41 after education. A similar trend was found for intraobserver variation, with a mean VR reduction for CT and MRI of 9% (from 1.51 to 1.38) and 16% (from 1.37 to 1.15), respectively. Conclusion: A well-structured education program has reduced both inter- and intraobserver prostate contouring variations. The impact was greater on MRI than on CT. With the ongoing incorporation of new technologies into routine practice, education programs for target contouring should be incorporated as part of the continuing medical education of radiation oncologists.

  12. DNA methylation contributes to natural human variation

    PubMed Central

    Heyn, Holger; Moran, Sebastian; Hernando-Herraez, Irene; Sayols, Sergi; Gomez, Antonio; Sandoval, Juan; Monk, Dave; Hata, Kenichiro; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Wang, Liewei; Esteller, Manel

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns are important for establishing cell, tissue, and organism phenotypes, but little is known about their contribution to natural human variation. To determine their contribution to variability, we have generated genome-scale DNA methylation profiles of three human populations (Caucasian-American, African-American, and Han Chinese-American) and examined the differentially methylated CpG sites. The distinctly methylated genes identified suggest an influence of DNA methylation on phenotype differences, such as susceptibility to certain diseases and pathogens, and response to drugs and environmental agents. DNA methylation differences can be partially traced back to genetic variation, suggesting that differentially methylated CpG sites serve as evolutionarily established mediators between the genetic code and phenotypic variability. Notably, one-third of the DNA methylation differences were not associated with any genetic variation, suggesting that variation in population-specific sites takes place at the genetic and epigenetic levels, highlighting the contribution of epigenetic modification to natural human variation. PMID:23908385

  13. Seismic noise level variation in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, D.; Shin, J.

    2008-12-01

    The variations of seismic background noise in South Korea have been investigated by means of power spectral analysis. The Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and the Korea Meteorological Administation (KMA) have national wide seismic networks in South Korea, and, in the end of 2007, there are 30 broadband stations which have been operating for more than a year. In this study, we have estimated the power spectral density of seismic noise for 30 broadband stations from 2005 to 2007. Since we estimate PSDs from a large dataset of continuous waveform in this study, a robust PSD estimate of McNamara and Buland (2004) is used. In the frequency range 1-5 Hz, the diurnal variations of noise are observed at most of stations, which are especially larger at coastal stations and at insular than at inland. Some stations shows daily difference of diurnal variations, which represents that cultural activities contribute to the noise level of a station. The variation of number of triggered stations, however, shows that cultural noise has little influence on the detection capability of seismic network in South Korea. Seasonal variations are observed well in the range 0.1-0.5 Hz, while much less found in the frequency range 1-5 Hz. We observed that strong peaks in the range 0.1-0.5 Hz occur at the summer when Pacific typhoons are close to the Korean Peninsula.

  14. Nonautosomal genetic variation in carotenoid coloration.

    PubMed

    Evans, Simon R; Schielzeth, Holger; Forstmeier, Wolfgang; Sheldon, Ben C; Husby, Arild

    2014-09-01

    Carotenoid-based coloration plays an important role in signaling, is often sexually dimorphic, and is potentially subject to directional and/or sex-specific selection. To understand the evolutionary dynamics of such color traits, it is essential to quantify patterns of inheritance, yet nonautosomal sources of genetic variation are easily overlooked by classical heritability analyses. Carotenoid metabolism has recently been linked to mitochondria, highlighting the potential for color variation to be explained by cytoplasmically inherited factors. In this study, we used quantitative genetic animal models to estimate the importance of mitochondrial and sex chromosome-linked sources of genetic variation in coloration in two songbird populations in which dietary carotenoids are either unmodified (great tit plumage) or metabolized into alternative color forms (zebra finch beak). We found no significant Z-linked genetic variance in great tit plumage coloration, while zebra finch beak coloration exhibited significant W linkage and cytoplasmic inheritance. Our results support cytoplasmic inheritance of color in the zebra finch, a trait based on endogenously metabolized carotenoids, and demonstrate the potential for nonautosomal sources to account for a considerable share of genetic variation in coloration. Although often overlooked, such nonautosomal genetic variation exhibits sex-dependent patterns of inheritance and potentially influences the evolution of sexual dichromatism. PMID:25141146

  15. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  16. Variation in CR imaging plate readers.

    PubMed

    Fauber, Terri L; Legg, Jeffrey S; Quinn, Megan

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated computed radiography (CR) image processing to determine whether variation exists within and among CR imaging plate readers. Photostimulable imaging plates were exposed using a phantom test tool and processed in 4 CR readers located in diverse settings in an urban academic medical center. Research results indicate daily variation of S-numbers within individual CR readers did not exceed tolerance limits, although over the 3-week study period, evidence of S-number variation within individual CR readers was mixed. In addition, S-number variability among multiple CR readers was found to be statistically significant. Although the cause of the variability remains unknown, evidence of variability among multiple CR readers indicates a need for systematic quality control. PMID:12362532

  17. Variations in the rotation of the earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, W. E.; Robertson, D. S.; Pettey, J. E.; Tapley, B. D.; Schutz, B. E.; Eanes, R. J.; Miao, L.

    Variations in the earth's rotation (UTI) and length of day have been tracked at the submillisecond level by astronomical radio interferometry and laser ranging to the LAGEOS satellite. Three years of regular measurements reveal complex patterns of variations including UTI fluctuations as large as 5 milliseconds in a few weeks. Comparison of the observed changes in length of day with variations in the global atmospheric angular momentum indicates that the dominant cause of changes in the earth's spin rate, on time scales from a week to several years, is the exchange of angular momentum between the atmosphere and the mantle. The unusually intense El Nino of 1982-1983 was marked by a strong peak in the length of day.

  18. Heterogeneous treatment in the variational nodal method

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, T.H.; Palmiotti, G.

    1995-06-01

    The variational nodal transport method is reduced to its diffusion form and generalized for the treatment of heterogeneous nodes while maintaining nodal balances. Adapting variational methods to heterogeneous nodes requires the ability to integrate over a node with discontinuous cross sections. In this work, integrals are evaluated using composite gaussian quadrature rules, which permit accurate integration while minimizing computing time. Allowing structure within a nodal solution scheme avoids some of the necessity of cross section homogenization, and more accurately defines the intra-nodal flux shape. Ideally, any desired heterogeneity can be constructed within the node; but in reality, the finite set of basis functions limits the practical resolution to which fine detail can be defined within the node. Preliminary comparison tests show that the heterogeneous variational nodal method provides satisfactory results even if some improvements are needed for very difficult, configurations.

  19. A global reference for human genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Auton, Adam; Brooks, Lisa D; Durbin, Richard M; Garrison, Erik P; Kang, Hyun Min; Korbel, Jan O; Marchini, Jonathan L; McCarthy, Shane; McVean, Gil A; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2015-10-01

    The 1000 Genomes Project set out to provide a comprehensive description of common human genetic variation by applying whole-genome sequencing to a diverse set of individuals from multiple populations. Here we report completion of the project, having reconstructed the genomes of 2,504 individuals from 26 populations using a combination of low-coverage whole-genome sequencing, deep exome sequencing, and dense microarray genotyping. We characterized a broad spectrum of genetic variation, in total over 88 million variants (84.7 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 3.6 million short insertions/deletions (indels), and 60,000 structural variants), all phased onto high-quality haplotypes. This resource includes >99% of SNP variants with a frequency of >1% for a variety of ancestries. We describe the distribution of genetic variation across the global sample, and discuss the implications for common disease studies. PMID:26432245

  20. Seasonal variation of febrile convulsion in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, T; Okada, S

    1984-05-01

    The 6-year incidence rates of febrile convulsions in all 3-year-old children in Fuchu (covering 95% of children, number examined 17,044) was 8.2%. The incidence was higher in boys than in girls (9.0%: 7.5%, P less than 0.001). The incidence rates varied with the month and year of birth, but the variations observed were slight. Two peak appearances of seasonal variation of the first febrile convulsion were found in November-January and in June-August. The former could be interpreted as a tendency to winter virus infection of the upper respiratory tract in children. The other peak in summer could be explained as a tendency to gastrointestinal infection. Liability to febrile convulsion was influenced by the age of children and by the seasonal variations of febrile illness, but not by the season of birth. PMID:6464667

  1. A global reference for human genetic variation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The 1000 Genomes Project set out to provide a comprehensive description of common human genetic variation by applying whole-genome sequencing to a diverse set of individuals from multiple populations. Here we report completion of the project, having reconstructed the genomes of 2,504 individuals from 26 populations using a combination of low-coverage whole-genome sequencing, deep exome sequencing, and dense microarray genotyping. We characterized a broad spectrum of genetic variation, in total over 88 million variants (84.7 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 3.6 million short insertions/deletions (indels), and 60,000 structural variants), all phased onto high-quality haplotypes. This resource includes >99% of SNP variants with a frequency of >1% for a variety of ancestries. We describe the distribution of genetic variation across the global sample, and discuss the implications for common disease studies. PMID:26432245

  2. Equatorial thermospheric composition and its variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, G. P.; Pelz, D. T.; Kasprzak, W. T.

    1972-01-01

    The neutral atmospheric composition experiment on the San Marco - 3 satellite has measured the composition of the equatorial atmosphere from 29 April to 29 November 1971. Preliminary results on the diurnal variation of atmospheric composition from 19 May to 30 June at 225 km. altitude are presented. The diurnal variation of helium is seen to reach its maximum near 0800 hours and its minimum in the late afternoon in contrast to the behavior of molecular nitrogen and argon. The atomic oxygen densities show smaller variations than the other gases. The mass densities calculated from the composition data agree well with those determined from the in situ drag force measurements and from orbital decay measurements.

  3. Equatorial thermospheric composition and its variations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, G. P.; Pelz, D. T.; Kasprzak, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    The neutral atmospheric composition experiment on the San Marco 3 satellite has measured the composition of the equatorial atmosphere from Apr. 29 to Nov. 29, 1971. Preliminary results on the diurnal variation of atmospheric composition from May 19 to June 30 at 225 km altitude are presented. The diurnal variation of helium is seen to reach its maximum near 0800 hours and its minimum in the late afternoon, in contrast to the behavior of molecular nitrogen and argon. The atomic oxygen densities show smaller variations than those of the other gases. The mass densities calculated from the composition data agree well with those determined from the in situ drag force measurements and from orbital decay measurements.

  4. A note on variational Bayesian factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-hua; Yu, Philip L H

    2009-09-01

    Existing works on variational bayesian (VB) treatment for factor analysis (FA) model such as [Ghahramani, Z., & Beal, M. (2000). Variational inference for Bayesian mixture of factor analysers. In Advances in neural information proceeding systems. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press; Nielsen, F. B. (2004). Variational approach to factor analysis and related models. Master's thesis, The Institute of Informatics and Mathematical Modelling, Technical University of Denmark.] are found theoretically and empirically to suffer two problems: (1) penalize the model more heavily than BIC and (2) perform unsatisfactorily in low noise cases as redundant factors can not be effectively suppressed. A novel VB treatment is proposed in this paper to resolve the two problems and a simulation study is conducted to testify its improved performance over existing treatments. PMID:19135337

  5. Thunderstorm related variations in stratospheric conductivity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Hua; Holzworth, Robert H.; Li, Ya QI

    1989-01-01

    The vector electric field and polar conductivities were measured by zero-pressure balloon-borne payloads launched from Wallops Island, Virgina during the summers of 1987 and 1988. Data were collected over thunderstorms (or electrified clouds) during 6-hour flights at altitudes near 30 km. The vector electric field measurements were made with the double Langmuir probe high-impedance method, and the direct conductivity measurements were obtained with the relaxation technique. Evidence is presented for conductivity variations over thunderstorms (or electrified clouds). It is found that both positive and negative polar conductivity data do show variations of up to a factor of 2 from ambient values associated with the disturbed periods. Some ideas for possible physical mechanisms which may be responsible for the conductivity variations over thunderstorms are also discussed in this paper.

  6. Seasonal variation in leisure time physical activity.

    PubMed

    Uitenbroek, D G

    1993-06-01

    In this paper seasonal variation in leisure time physical activity for exercise is studied and quantified with regard to several popular exercise activities and taking the respondents gender, occupational status, and age into consideration. The analysis concerns data collected by telephone in Scotland between January 1989 and March 1992. Data from 7,202 male and 9,284 female respondents is used in the analysis; cosinor analysis using GLIM is applied. Considerable seasonal variation was found affecting both outdoor and indoor activities. During the peak phase in July, 32% of the respondents reported exercising for at least 20 min three or more times during the previous week, in the winter period this decreased to 23%. Older respondents were found to exercise more later in the year and also showed seasonal variation to a larger extent than younger respondents. This is particularly so for those respondents who exercise at a relatively high frequency. PMID:8321115

  7. Diurnal and Semidiurnal Variations in Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, T.

    1993-01-01

    During the last decade there has been an unprecedented improvement in both the accuracy, the temporal resolution of Earth's rotation measurements. Determination of the position of the Earth's rotation axis both in inertial space and with respect to the crust with accuracies of about 0.3 milliarcseconds (mas) are now routine. In recent years, there has been and emphasis on the determination of short-period (daily and less) variations in Earth rotation. Two space based geodetic systems, very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and the global positioning system (GPS) have proved to be very successful in this endeavor. Results for the tidally coherent part of the subdaily Earth rotation variations determined from the analysis of VLBI data are discussed. The magnitude of other subdaily variations are also considered.

  8. Return current in encephalography. Variational principles.

    PubMed

    Heller, L

    1990-03-01

    The encephalographic problem of finding the electric potential V and the return current associated with any assumed primary current, Jp, is put in the form of a variational principle. With Jp and the conductivity specified, the correct V is one which makes an integral quantity P[V] a maximum. The terms in P[V] are related to the rates at which work is done by the electric field on the primary and return currents. It is shown that there is a unique solution for the electric field, and it satisfies the conservation of energy; this condition can serve as a check on any numerical solution. With the conductivity a different constant in different regions, the variational principle is recast in terms of the charge density on the surfaces of discontinuity. An iteration-variation method for finding the solution is outlined, and possible computational advantages over other approaches are discussed. PMID:2306503

  9. Observing System Variations Effect on Reanalyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Chen, Junye; Robertson, Franklin R.; da Silva, Arlindo

    2010-01-01

    Reanalyses integrate multitudes of satellite and conventional observations data assimilation and numerical weather prediction. The result is that many disparate observation platforms, discontinuous in space and time, lead to complete and consistent representations the state of the weather. The component also provides physical fields rarely or never observed. However, the numerical model bias is continuously being corrected by the observational analysis, and this bias changes as variations in the observations occur. NASA's Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) sensitivity to variations in the observing systems are explored. Specifically, we will evaluate the water budget and transport processes as they relate to the advent of SSM/I and AMSU-A radiance assimilation, and an additional case of radiosonde station that exhibits a dramatic shift in mean water states. The MERRA input observation data, now available online, is used to explore these variations.

  10. Polarization and position measurements of Type III bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, S.; Sheridan, K. V.; Dulk, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The positional and polarization characteristics of Type III bursts in the range 24-220 MHz as measured by the Culgoora radioheliograph, spectrograph and spectropolarimeter are reported. The study includes 997 bursts which are of two classes: fundamental-harmonic (F-H) pairs and 'structureless' bursts with no visible F-H structure, and concentrates on the polarization of the bursts and the variation of polarization from centre to limb. The observed centre-to-limb decrease in polarization approximately follows a cosine law. This decrease is not as predicted by simple theory but is consistent with other observations which imply that open field lines from an active region diverge strongly. The observed o-mode polarization of harmonic radiation implies that the wave vectors of Langmuir waves are always parallel, within about 20 deg, to the magnetic field, while the constancy of H polarization with frequency implies that the ratio of gyromagnetic to plasma frequency, the Alfven speed and the plasma beta are constant with height on the open field lines above an active region. Finally, it is inferred that some factor, in addition to the magnetic field strength, controls the polarization of F radiation.

  11. Explained variation for recurrent event data.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Refah; Fiaccone, Rosemeire; Henderson, Robin; Stare, Janez

    2015-07-01

    Although there are many suggested measures of explained variation for single-event survival data, there has been little attention to explained variation for recurrent event data. We describe an existing rank-based measure and we investigate a new statistic based on observed and expected event count processes. Both methods can be used for all models. Adjustments for missing data are proposed and demonstrated through simulation to be effective. We compare the population values of the two statistics and illustrate their use in comparing an array of non-nested models for data on recurrent episodes of infant diarrhoea. PMID:25899247

  12. Rocket thrust variation with foamed liquid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, G

    1957-01-01

    An analysis is presented on a method for varying rocket thrust by varying the bulk density of the propellants. This density variation was accomplished by uniformly dispersing an inert, insoluble gas in the liquid propellants. Only qualitative agreement with theory was obtained from preliminary experiments with a 1000-pound-thrust ammonia - nitric acid rocket engine; the required experimental gas-flow rates were two to six times greater than those predicted by theory. It was demonstrated, however, that this method of rocket-thrust variation is feasible.

  13. Nucleosynthesis and the variation of fundamental couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Christian M.; Schaefer, Gregor; Wetterich, Christof

    2004-10-15

    We determine the influence of a variation of the fundamental 'constants' on the predicted helium abundance in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. The analytic estimate is performed in two parts: the first step determines the dependence of the helium abundance on the nuclear physics parameters, while the second step relates those parameters to the fundamental couplings of particle physics. This procedure can incorporate in a flexible way the time variation of several couplings within a grand unified theory while keeping the nuclear physics computation separate from any GUT model dependence.

  14. Copernicus observations of Iota Herculis velocity variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, J. B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of Iota Her at 109.61-109.67 nm obtained with the U1 channel of the Copernicus spectrophotometer at resolution 5 pm during 3.6 days in May, 1979, are reported. Radial-velocity variations are detected and analyzed as the sum of two sinusoids with frequencies 0.660 and 0.618 cycles/day and amplitudes 9.18 and 8.11 km/s, respectively. Weak evidence supporting the 13.9-h periodicity seen in line-profile variations by Smith (1978) is found.

  15. The orbit and variations of δ Sagittae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, T.; Gray, David F.; Griffin, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    Radial-velocity observations spanning more than a century are used to produce a reliable orbit of the δ Sagittae system. We find an orbital period of 3703.7 ± 1.5 d and a semi-amplitude of 7.73 ± 0.05 km s-1. In addition, we find quasi-periodic variations with time-scales in the range of 550-750 d and a typical amplitude of 1 km s-1. The phase and amplitude are both irregular, sometimes changing very abruptly. We consider pulsation, rotational modulation and convection as possible causes of the variations, finally favouring convection.

  16. The variational subspace valence bond method

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Graham D.

    2015-04-07

    The variational subspace valence bond (VSVB) method based on overlapping orbitals is introduced. VSVB provides variational support against collapse for the optimization of overlapping linear combinations of atomic orbitals (OLCAOs) using modified orbital expansions, without recourse to orthogonalization. OLCAO have the advantage of being naturally localized, chemically intuitive (to individually model bonds and lone pairs, for example), and transferrable between different molecular systems. Such features are exploited to avoid key computational bottlenecks. Since the OLCAO can be doubly occupied, VSVB can access very large problems, and calculations on systems with several hundred atoms are presented.

  17. A probabilistic Hu-Washizu variational principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. K.; Belytschko, T.; Besterfield, G. H.

    1987-01-01

    A Probabilistic Hu-Washizu Variational Principle (PHWVP) for the Probabilistic Finite Element Method (PFEM) is presented. This formulation is developed for both linear and nonlinear elasticity. The PHWVP allows incorporation of the probabilistic distributions for the constitutive law, compatibility condition, equilibrium, domain and boundary conditions into the PFEM. Thus, a complete probabilistic analysis can be performed where all aspects of the problem are treated as random variables and/or fields. The Hu-Washizu variational formulation is available in many conventional finite element codes thereby enabling the straightforward inclusion of the probabilistic features into present codes.

  18. A variational proof of Thomson's theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiolhais, Miguel C. N.; Essén, Hanno; Gouveia, Tomé M.

    2016-08-01

    Thomson's theorem of electrostatics, which states the electric charge on a set of conductors distributes itself on the conductor surfaces to minimize the electrostatic energy, is reviewed in this letter. The proof of Thomson's theorem, based on a variational principle, is derived for a set of normal charged conductors, with and without the presence of external electric fields produced by fixed charge distributions. In this novel approach, the variations are performed on both the charge densities and electric potentials, by means of a local Lagrange multiplier associated with Poisson's equation, constraining the two variables.

  19. Lateral variations in lower mantle seismic velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Thomas S.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    To obtain a theoretical model which provides a rationale for the observed high values of velocity variations, the effect of a 0.1 to 0.2 percent partially molten volatile-rich material in various geometries which are heterogeneously dispersed in the lower mantle is examined. Data obtained indicate that, depending on aspect ratio and geometry, 0.1-0.2 percent partial melting in conjunction with about 100 K thermal anomalies can explain the seismic variations provided the compressibility of the melt differs by less than about 20 percent from the surrounding solid.

  20. Do key dimensions of seed and seedling functional trait variation capture variation in recruitment probability?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Plant functional traits provide a mechanistic basis for understanding ecological variation among plant species and the implications of this variation for species distribution, community assembly and restoration. 2. The bulk of our functional trait understanding, however, is centered on traits rel...

  1. Connection between variations of the atmosphere temperature profile and variations of the meson component intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blokh, Y. L.; Rogovaya, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of temperature effects on intensity variations of the cosmic ray meson component were studied. The connection between the temperature variation delta T and the intensity variation delta I was established by using the temperature coefficient density technique. To realize how many devices are needed on the Earth for predicting the temperature variation of the atmosphere profile with a reasonable accuracy, IO isobaric levels and IO were calculated. The set of initial elements of the cosmic ray mesons are varied and it is shown that the matrix of the coefficients B sub ij is rather sensitive to their choice. It is found that if for the calculations of the atmospheric temperature variations the model is used, the number of meson components, essentially exceeding 3, should be considered.

  2. Language Variation, Language Change and Perceptual Dialectology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessinger, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Subjective and objective language data collected in a research project on language variation in north Germany not only reveal information on current linguistic trends in north Germany; they also show how language change in this region is represented in the consciousness of the speakers themselves and described in comments by them. This diachronic…

  3. Variational Algorithms for Test Particle Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, C. Leland; Finn, John M.; Qin, Hong; Tang, William M.

    2015-11-01

    The theory of variational integration provides a novel framework for constructing conservative numerical methods for magnetized test particle dynamics. The retention of conservation laws in the numerical time advance captures the correct qualitative behavior of the long time dynamics. For modeling the Lorentz force system, new variational integrators have been developed that are both symplectic and electromagnetically gauge invariant. For guiding center test particle dynamics, discretization of the phase-space action principle yields multistep variational algorithms, in general. Obtaining the desired long-term numerical fidelity requires mitigation of the multistep method's parasitic modes or applying a discretization scheme that possesses a discrete degeneracy to yield a one-step method. Dissipative effects may be modeled using Lagrange-D'Alembert variational principles. Numerical results will be presented using a new numerical platform that interfaces with popular equilibrium codes and utilizes parallel hardware to achieve reduced times to solution. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  4. Teaching Medical Students About Observer Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koran, Lorrin M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    To fully develop their diagnostic skills, medical students must recognize the limited reliability of the observations on which diagnoses are based. Study of 36 second-year students shows multiple sources of observer variation in readings of systolic and diastolic blood pressures. (LBH)

  5. Memory Development: Sources of the Age Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Eye, Alexander; Hussy, Walter

    Research has not clearly determined whether memory development in childhood and adulthood can be accounted for by the age variation of cognitive processes other than memory. To examine this issue, a study was conducted based on a model of structures and processes in complex information processing. Subjects (N=162) were presented with two lists of…

  6. Numeral Variation in New Zealand Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, David; McKee, Rachel; Major, George

    2011-01-01

    Lexical variation abounds in New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) and is commonly associated with the introduction of the Australasian Signed English lexicon into Deaf education in 1979, before NZSL was acknowledged as a language. Evidence from dictionaries of NZSL collated between 1986 and 1997 reveal many coexisting variants for the numbers from one…

  7. Earth orbital variations and vertebrate bioevolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, Dewey M.

    1988-01-01

    Cause of the Pleistocene-Holocene transition mammalian extinctions at the end of the last age is the subject of debate between those advocating human predation and climate change. Identification of an ambient air temperature (AAT)-uterine blood flow (UBF) coupling phenomenon supports climate change as a factor in the extinctions, and couples the extinctions to earth orbital variations that drive ice age climatology. The AAT-UBF phenomenon couples mammalian bioevolution directly to climate change via effects of environmental heat upon blood flow to the female uterus and damage to developing embryos. Extinctions were in progress during climatic warming before the Younger Dryas event, and after, at times when the AAT-UBF couple would have been operative; however, impact of a sudden short-term cooling on mammals in the process of adapting to smaller size and relatively larger S/V would have been severe. Variations in earth's orbit, and orbital forcing of atmospheric CO2 concentrations, were causes of the succession of Pleistocene ice ages. Coincidence of mammalian extinctions with terminations of the more intense cold stages links mammalian bioevolution to variations in earth's orbit. Earth orbital variations are a driving source of vertebrate bioevolution.

  8. Copy Number Variation in the Cattle Genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are gains and losses of genomic sequence greater than 50 bp between two individuals of a species. While single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are more frequent, CNVs impact a higher percentage of genomic sequence and have potentially greater effects, including the chan...

  9. The landscape of human STR variation

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Thomas; Gymrek, Melissa; Highnam, Gareth; Mittelman, David

    2014-01-01

    Short tandem repeats are among the most polymorphic loci in the human genome. These loci play a role in the etiology of a range of genetic diseases and have been frequently utilized in forensics, population genetics, and genetic genealogy. Despite this plethora of applications, little is known about the variation of most STRs in the human population. Here, we report the largest-scale analysis of human STR variation to date. We collected information for nearly 700,000 STR loci across more than 1000 individuals in Phase 1 of the 1000 Genomes Project. Extensive quality controls show that reliable allelic spectra can be obtained for close to 90% of the STR loci in the genome. We utilize this call set to analyze determinants of STR variation, assess the human reference genome’s representation of STR alleles, find STR loci with common loss-of-function alleles, and obtain initial estimates of the linkage disequilibrium between STRs and common SNPs. Overall, these analyses further elucidate the scale of genetic variation beyond classical point mutations. PMID:25135957

  10. On variational features of vortex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdichevsky, V. L.

    2008-09-01

    Ideal incompressible fluid is a Hamiltonian system which possesses an infinite number of integrals, the circulations of velocity over closed fluid contours. This allows one to split all the degrees of freedom into the driving ones and the “slave” ones, the latter to be determined by the integrals of motions. The “slave” degrees of freedom correspond to “potential part” of motion, which is driven by vorticity. Elimination of the “slave” degrees of freedom from equations of ideal incompressible fluid yields a closed system of equations for dynamics of vortex lines. This system is also Hamiltonian. The variational principle for this system was found recently (Berdichevsky in Thermodynamics of chaos and order, Addison-Wesly-Longman, Reading, 1997; Kuznetsov and Ruban in JETP Lett 67, 1076 1081, 1998). It looks striking, however. In particular, the fluid motion is set to be compressible, while in the least action principle of fluid mechanics the incompressibility of motion is a built-in property. This striking feature is explained in the paper, and a link between the variational principle of vortex line dynamics and the least action principle is established. Other points made in this paper are concerned with steady motions. Two new variational principles are proposed for steady vortex flows. Their relation to Arnold’s variational principle of steady vortex motion is discussed.

  11. Introductions in Research Articles: Variation across Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samraj, B.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on an analysis of research article introductions from two related fields, Wildlife Behavior and Conservation Biology, using Swales' (1990), "Genre Analysis. English in Academic and Research Settings." Results of the analysis reveal disciplinary variation in the structure of this genre, which has important pedagogical implications.…

  12. Variational Inference for Watson Mixture Model.

    PubMed

    Taghia, Jalil; Leijon, Arne

    2016-09-01

    This paper addresses modelling data using the Watson distribution. The Watson distribution is one of the simplest distributions for analyzing axially symmetric data. This distribution has gained some attention in recent years due to its modeling capability. However, its Bayesian inference is fairly understudied due to difficulty in handling the normalization factor. Recent development of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods can be applied for this purpose. However, these methods can be prohibitively slow for practical applications. A deterministic alternative is provided by variational methods that convert inference problems into optimization problems. In this paper, we present a variational inference for Watson mixture models. First, the variational framework is used to side-step the intractability arising from the coupling of latent states and parameters. Second, the variational free energy is further lower bounded in order to avoid intractable moment computation. The proposed approach provides a lower bound on the log marginal likelihood and retains distributional information over all parameters. Moreover, we show that it can regulate its own complexity by pruning unnecessary mixture components while avoiding over-fitting. We discuss potential applications of the modeling with Watson distributions in the problem of blind source separation, and clustering gene expression data sets. PMID:26571512

  13. Spatial variation of organic sulfur in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, C.A.; Tseng, B.H.; Hsieh, K.C.; Buckentin, M.; Ge, Y.P.

    1987-01-01

    Spatial variation of organic sulfur concentration in coals has been generally known for years. The high resolution of the transmission electron microscope permits that variation to be measured more precisely than is possible by bulk techniques; variations may be measured over distances less than 1 /mu/m. Measurement of organic sulfur content using the transmission electron microscope requires use of ultra thin films or very fine powders. We typically use foils less than 1 /mu/m thickness or powders ground to a few /mu/m. The organic sulfur content is proportional to the ratio of the count rate for the sulfur K/alpha/ line to the count rate for the background radiation measured over some convenient energy interval. The proportionality constant is determined using sulfur standards. The technique is highly reliable for sulfur, as is shown in earlier publications. The PIXE method for heavier elements also utilizes the background radiation to permit absolute numerical concentrations to be derived. This paper reports a particular application of the TEM method to determination of the spatial variation of organic sulfur, both within a given maceral and among maceral types. Some of the observations report measurements on powdered specimens, others on foil specimens prepared from bulk coal.

  14. Cultural Variation in Implicit Mental Illness Stigma

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Bobby K.; Chiao, Joan Y.

    2013-01-01

    Culture shapes how individuals perceive and respond to others with mental illness. Prior studies have suggested that Asians and Asian Americans typically endorse greater stigma of mental illness compared to Westerners (White Europeans and Americans). However, whether these differences in stigma arise from cultural variations in automatic affective reactions or deliberative concerns of the appropriateness of one’s reactions to mental illness remains unknown. Here we compared implicit and explicit attitudes toward mental illness among Asian and Caucasian Americans. Asian Americans showed stronger negative implicit attitudes toward mental illness relative to Caucasian Americans, suggesting that cultural variation in stigma of mental illness can be observed even when concerns regarding the validity and appropriateness of one’s attitudes toward mental illness are minimized. Asian Americans also explicitly endorsed greater desire for social distance from mental illness relative to Caucasian Americans. These findings suggest that cultural variations in mental illness stigma may arise from cultural differences in automatic reactions to mental illness, though cultural variations in deliberative processing may further shape differences in these immediate reactions to mental illness. PMID:24311820

  15. Neighborhood Disadvantage and Variations in Blood Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cathorall, Michelle L.; Xin, Huaibo; Peachey, Andrew; Bibeau, Daniel L.; Schulz, Mark; Aronson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the extent to which neighborhood disadvantage accounts for variation in blood pressure. Methods: Demographic, biometric, and self-reported data from 19,261 health screenings were used. Addresses of participants were geocoded and located within census block groups (n = 14,510, 75.3%). Three hierarchical linear models were…

  16. Socially Determined Variation in Ancient Rome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Brian D.; Wallace, Rex E.

    1992-01-01

    Social implications of phonological and morphological variation in Classical Latin is examined. Arguments for the social factor are instances of hypercorrection, private and domestic instances of certain datives and Augustus' use of rural "domos" for "domus." It is understood in terms of the model of urbanization. (35 references) (Author/LB)

  17. Solar generated quasi-biennial geomagnetic variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Poros, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The existence of highly correlated quasi-biennial variations in the geomagnetic field and in solar activity is demonstrated. The analysis uses a numerical filter technique applied to monthly averages of the geomagnetic horizontal component and of the Zurich relative sunspot number. Striking correlations are found between the quasi-biennial geomagnetic variations determined from several magnetic observatories located at widely different longitudes, indicating a worldwide nature of the obtained variation. The correlation coefficient between the filtered Dst index and the filtered relative sunspot number is found to be -0.79 at confidence level greater than 99% with a time-lag of 4 months, with solar activity preceding the Dst variation. The correlation between the unfiltered data of Dst and of the sunspot number is also high with a similar time-lag. Such a timelag has not been discussed in the literature, and a further study is required to establish the mode of sun-earth relationship that gives this time delay.

  18. Color variations of asteroids during rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, H. J.; Schroll, A.

    Published rotational-color-variation data on 49 asteroids are compiled and listed in a table. Light-curve amplitudes, polarization measurements, and additional color indices are included whenever available. Ten objects are found to exhibit evidence of surface spots: 3 Juno, 4 Vesta, 6 Hebe, 25 Phocaea, 39 Laetitia, 42 Doris, 71 Niobe, 201 Penelope, 349 Dembowska, and 944 Hidalgo.

  19. Allophonic Variation in the Spanish Sibilant Fricative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Alison

    2013-01-01

    In Spanish, the phoneme /s/ has two variants: [z] occurs in the coda when preceding a voiced consonant, and [s] occurs elsewhere. However, recent research has revealed irregular voicing patterns with regards to this phone. This dissertation examines two of these allophonic variations. It first investigates how speech rate and speech formality…

  20. Continuous measurement of nontidal variations of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodkind, John M.

    1986-01-01

    Records from seven superconducting gravimeters operated at five different locations in California and one in Boulder, CO, are examined after removal of tides and the gravitational attraction of the atmosphere. Fluctuations over periods between a few days and several months were observed at all sites with peak amplitudes of order 10 microgal. By contrast, a 640-day record obtained with one of the instruments in Germany showed peak fluctuations of only 2 microgal. In most of the records the causes of these aperiodic variations were not determined so that they serve to set limits on the vertical motion or displacement of mass at the respective locations. However, at The Geysers geothermal field, much of the gravity variation is correlated with seismic activity, reinjection rate, and rainfall. Measurements of this type were not possible prior to the development of the superconducting device. Consequently, these results provide the first evidence for the existence of gravity variations on the time scale and of the magnitude described here. Vertical crustal motion, motion related to seismic events, and hydrological phenomena can lead to variations on this scale. Unambiguous identification of causal relationships will require either special circumstances such as found at The Geysers or operation of the instruments in pairs.

  1. Variations of the Solar Constant. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, S. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The variations in data received from rocket-borne and balloon-borne instruments are discussed. Indirect techniques to measure and monitor the solar constant are presented. Emphasis is placed on the correlation of data from the Solar Maximum Mission and the Nimbus 7 satellites.

  2. [Genomic variation in maize]. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Rivin, C.J.

    1991-12-31

    These studies have sought to learn how different DNA sequences and sequence arrangements contribute to genome plasticity in maize. We describe quantitative variation among maize inbred lines for tandemly arrayed and dispersed repeated DNA sequences and gene families, and qualitative variation for sequences homologous to the Mutator family of transposons. The potential of these sequences to undergo unequal crossing over, non-allelic (ectopic) recombination and transposition makes them a source of genome instability. We have found examples of rapid genomic change involving these sequences in Fl hybrids, tissue culture cells and regenerated plants. We describe the repetitive portion of the maize genome as composed primarily of sequences that vary markedly in copy number among different genetic stocks. The most highly variable is the 185 bp repeat associated with the heterochromatic chromosome knobs. Even in lines without visible knobs, there is a considerable quantity of tandemly arrayed repeats. We also found a high degree of variability for the tandemly arrayed 5S and ribosomal DNA repeats. While such variation might be expected as the result of unequal cross-over, we were surprised to find considerable variation among lower copy number, dispersed repeats as well. One highly repeated sequence that showed a complex tandem and dispersed arrangement stood out as showing no detectable variability among the maize lines. In striking contrast to the variability seen between the inbred stocks, individuals within a stock were indistinguishable with regard to their repeated sequence multiplicities.

  3. Spatial and temporal variation in evapotranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatial and temporal variation in evapotranspiration occurs at multiple scales as the result of several different spatial and temporal patterns in precipitation, soil water holding capacity, cloudiness (available energy), types of crops, and residue and tillage management practices. We have often as...

  4. The Known Mix: A Taste of Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canada, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    To create an environment in which all students have opportunities to notice, describe, and wonder about variability, this article takes a context familiar to many teacher--sampling colored chips from a jar--and shows how this context was used to explicitly focus on variation in the classroom. The sampling activity includes physical as well as…

  5. The Dual Gap Function for Variational Inequalities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jianzhong Wan Changyu; Xiu Naihua

    2003-08-15

    In this paper we further study the dual gap function G, which was introduced by Marcotte and Zhu, for the variational inequality problem (VIP). We characterize the directional derivative and subdifferential of G. Based on these, we get a better understanding of the concepts of a global error bound, weak sharpness, and minimum principle sufficiency property for the pseudo-monotone.

  6. Variational method for lattice spectroscopy with ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, Tommy; Hagen, Christian; Gattringer, Christof; Glozman, Leonid Ya.; Lang, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the variational method used in lattice spectroscopy calculations. In particular we address the role of ghost contributions which appear in quenched or partially quenched simulations and have a nonstandard euclidean time dependence. We show that the ghosts can be separated from the physical states. Our result is illustrated with numerical data for the scalar meson.

  7. Seasonal variation in soil organic carbon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic carbon in soil is most often measured at a single point in time, under the assumption that the major pools of organic carbon change so slowly that variation over weeks or months will be insignificant. The validity of this assumption has implications for accurate comparison of soil carbon bet...

  8. Quantifying pressure variations from petrographic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.; Podladchikov, Yuri Y.

    2015-04-01

    The existence of grain scale pressure variations has been established over the last decennia. Mineral reactions are often accompanied by volume and shape changes in a system where much heterogeneity in material properties exists. This gives rise to internal stresses and pressure variation during metamorphic reactions. The residual pressure in inclusions can be measured by Raman spectroscopy, but is restricted to a narrow range of minerals that (potentially) have a well calibrated Raman shift with pressure. Several alternative methods to quantify pressure variations from petrographic observations are presented. We distinguish equilibrium and non-equilibrium methods. Equilibrium methods are based on a newly developed method to predict phase equilibria and composition under a given pressure gradient. The pressure gradient can be found by iteratively matching predicted phase assemblages and composition with petrographic observations. Non-equilibrium methods involve the estimation of pressure variation in initial stages of reaction in which the system may still be isochoric. It then results in the potential pressure buildup for a given unreacted rock for example in the initial stages of dehydration of serpentinite in subduction settings.

  9. Icehouse-greenhouse variations in marine denitrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algeo, T. J.; Meyers, P. A.; Robinson, R. S.; Rowe, H.; Jiang, G. Q.

    2014-02-01

    Long-term secular variation in the isotopic composition of seawater fixed nitrogen (N) is poorly known. Here, we document variation in the N-isotopic composition of marine sediments (δ15Nsed) since 660 Ma (million years ago) in order to understand major changes in the marine N cycle through time and their relationship to first-order climate variation. During the Phanerozoic, greenhouse climate modes were characterized by low δ15Nsed (˜-2 to +2‰) and icehouse climate modes by high δ15Nsed (˜+4 to +8‰). Shifts toward higher δ15Nsed occurred rapidly during the early stages of icehouse modes, prior to the development of major continental glaciation, suggesting a potentially important role for the marine N cycle in long-term climate change. Reservoir box modeling of the marine N cycle demonstrates that secular variation in δ15Nsed was likely due to changes in the dominant locus of denitrification, with a shift in favor of sedimentary denitrification during greenhouse modes owing to higher eustatic (global sea-level) elevations and greater on-shelf burial of organic matter, and a shift in favor of water-column denitrification during icehouse modes owing to lower eustatic elevations, enhanced organic carbon sinking fluxes, and expanded oceanic oxygen-minimum zones. The results of this study provide new insights into operation of the marine N cycle, its relationship to the global carbon cycle, and its potential role in modulating climate change at multimillion-year timescales.

  10. Conceptual Variation and Coordination in Probability Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsson, Per

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates students' conceptual variation and coordination among theoretical and experimental interpretations of probability. In the analysis we follow how Swedish students (12-13 years old) interact with a dice game, specifically designed to offer the students opportunities to elaborate on the logic of sample space,…

  11. Kappa Cygnid rate variations over 41 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendtel, J.; Arlt, R.

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced rates of the kappa Cygnids in 2007 and 2014 had been considered as a hint at periodic rate/flux enhancement. Here we use an extended data set of visual observations covering the 41-year period 1975-2015. Applying a wavelet analysis to the data series yields no periodic ZHR variations in the given period and the optical meteor magnitude range.

  12. Genomic characteristics of cattle copy number variations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We performed a systematic analysis of cattle copy number variations (CNVs) using the Bovine HapMap SNP genotyping data, including 539 animals of 21 modern cattle breeds and 6 outgroups. After correcting genomic waves and considering the trio information, we identified 682 candidate CNV regions (CNVR...

  13. Sources of Variation in Creep Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, William S.; Ellis, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Creep rupture is an important material characteristic for the design of rocket engines. It was observed during the characterization of GRCop-84 that the complete data set had nearly 4 orders of magnitude of scatter. This scatter likely confounded attempts to determine how creep performance was influenced by manufacturing. It was unclear if this variation was from the testing, the material, or both. Sources of variation were examined by conducting tests on identically processed specimens at the same specified stresses and temperatures. Significant differences existed between the five constant-load creep frames. The specimen temperature was higher than the desired temperature by as much as 43 C. It was also observed that the temperature gradient was up to 44 C. Improved specimen temperature control minimized temperature variations. The data from additional tests demonstrated that the results from all five frames were comparable. The variation decreased to 1/2 order of magnitude from 2 orders of magnitude for the baseline data set. Independent determination of creep rates in a reference load frame closely matched the creep rates determined after the modifications. Testing in helium tended to decrease the sample temperature gradient, but helium was not a significant improvement over vacuum.

  14. A New Look at Solar Irradiance Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foukal, Peter

    2012-08-01

    We compare total solar irradiance (TSI) and ultraviolet ( F uv) irradiance variation reconstructed using Ca K facular areas since 1915, with previous values based on less direct proxies. Our annual means for 1925 - 1945 reach values 30 - 50 % higher than those presently used in IPCC climate studies. A high facula/sunspot area ratio in spot cycles 16 and 17 seems to be responsible. New evidence from solar photometry increases the likelihood of greater seventeenth century solar dimming than expected from the disappearance of magnetic active regions alone. But the large additional brightening in the early twentieth century claimed from some recent models requires complete disappearance of the magnetic network. The network is clearly visible in Ca K spectroheliograms obtained since the 1890s, so these models cannot be correct. Changes in photospheric effective temperature invoked in other models would be powerfully damped by the thermal inertia of the convection zone. Thus, there is presently no support for twentieth century irradiance variation besides that arising from active regions. The mid-twentieth century irradiance peak arising from these active regions extends 20 years beyond the early 1940s peak in global temperature. This failure of correlation, together with the low amplitude of TSI variation and the relatively weak effect of Fuv driving on tropospheric temperature, limits the role of solar irradiance variation in twentieth century global warming.

  15. Variation and Commonality in Phenomenographic Research Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akerlind, Gerlese S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on the data analysis stage of phenomenographic research, elucidating what is involved in terms of both commonality and variation in accepted practice. The analysis stage of phenomenographic research is often not well understood. This paper helps to clarify the process, initially by collecting together in one location the more…

  16. Variation and Commonality in Phenomenographic Research Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akerlind, Gerlese S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the data analysis stage of phenomenographic research, elucidating what is involved in terms of both commonality and variation in accepted practice. The analysis stage of phenomenographic research is often not well understood. This paper helps to clarify the process, initially by collecting together in one location the more…

  17. Eliminating Unpredictable Variation through Iterated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kenny; Wonnacott, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Human languages may be shaped not only by the (individual psychological) processes of language acquisition, but also by population-level processes arising from repeated language learning and use. One prevalent feature of natural languages is that they avoid unpredictable variation. The current work explores whether linguistic predictability might…

  18. The landscape of human STR variation.

    PubMed

    Willems, Thomas; Gymrek, Melissa; Highnam, Gareth; Mittelman, David; Erlich, Yaniv

    2014-11-01

    Short tandem repeats are among the most polymorphic loci in the human genome. These loci play a role in the etiology of a range of genetic diseases and have been frequently utilized in forensics, population genetics, and genetic genealogy. Despite this plethora of applications, little is known about the variation of most STRs in the human population. Here, we report the largest-scale analysis of human STR variation to date. We collected information for nearly 700,000 STR loci across more than 1000 individuals in Phase 1 of the 1000 Genomes Project. Extensive quality controls show that reliable allelic spectra can be obtained for close to 90% of the STR loci in the genome. We utilize this call set to analyze determinants of STR variation, assess the human reference genome's representation of STR alleles, find STR loci with common loss-of-function alleles, and obtain initial estimates of the linkage disequilibrium between STRs and common SNPs. Overall, these analyses further elucidate the scale of genetic variation beyond classical point mutations. PMID:25135957

  19. Pathogenic variation of Phakopsora pachyrhizi in Nigeria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) is endemic to soybean growing areas in Nigeria. To determine the pathogenic variation, infected leaves were collected from 85 locations in the Derived Savanna, Southern Guinea Savanna, Northern Guinea Savanna and Mid-Altitude agroecological zones. A total of 116 ...

  20. Seasonal variations of haematological parameters in athletes.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Giuseppe; Lundby, Carsten; Robach, Paul; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The influence of training and competition workloads is crucial for evaluation of longitudinal haematological data in athletes. There are only a few papers on the variation of haematological parameters during long-lasting periods and, especially, during an entire competitive season. We summarized that some haematological parameters can be influenced by long-term training and competition periods. Haemoglobin (Hb) and haematocrit (Ht) are decreased during the more intense periods of training, throughout the season. In different sport disciplines, the decline of Hb ranges from 3 to 8% during the competition season, while the range of reticulocytes (Ret%) varies from 5 to 21%. Reticulocytes are also decreased after long periods of training and competitions, but their variation is not necessarily associated with that of Hb. The qualitative variations (trend of modifications) of haematological parameters are roughly independent of the sport discipline, but quantitatively (amount of modifications) dependent on sport discipline. The modifications are more evident in cycling, running, swimming than they are in football and rugby. The variations of haematological parameters within the same sport discipline are qualitatively concordant and quantitatively different among separate but consecutive competitive seasons. These findings are described in aerobic and team sports sportsmen. The definition of reliable reference ranges in sportsmen would only be possible by following the best laboratory practices. For antidoping purposes more studies investigating haematological modifications during the season are advisable. PMID:20842374

  1. 45 CFR 156.255 - Rating variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rating variations. 156.255 Section 156.255 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE ISSUER STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT, INCLUDING STANDARDS RELATED TO EXCHANGES Qualified Health Plan Minimum...

  2. Long-term Variation of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.; Xie, G. Z.; Adam, G.; Copin, Y.; Lin, R. G.; Bai, J. M.; Quin, Y. P.

    In this paper we will present the long-term variation in the optical and the infrared bands for some selected AGNs. 1. Some new optical data observed by us have been presented for BL Lacertae (1995-1996) and OJ 287 (1994-1995), and new infrared data are presented for OJ 287 (Nov=2E 1995), which corresponds to the second optical peak (Sillanpaa et al. 1996; Takalo et al. 1996) and during last outburst. 2. For objects with long term observations, the Jurkevich's method has been used to analyses the long-term variation period. It is interesting that the reported periods of AGNs are of the similar value of about 10 years: 3C 345 11.4 years (Webb et al. 1988), 3C 120 15 years (Belokon et al. 1987; Hagen-Thorn et al. 1997), ON 231 13.6 years (Liu et al. 1995), OJ 287 12 years (Sillanpaa et al. 1988; Kidger et al. 1992), PKS 0735+178 14 years (Fan et al. 1997), NGC 4151 15 years (Fan et al. 1998a), BL Lacertae 14.0 years (Fan et al. 1998b). Is the mechanism for the long-term variation the same for different AGNs? 3. The DCF method has been adopted to analysis the variation correlation in the optical and infrared bands for BL Lac object OJ 287, the results show that these two bands are strongly correlated, which suggest that the emission mechanism in the two bands is the same. 4. For the optical and infrared bands, the maximum variations are correlated.

  3. VariOtator, a Software Tool for Variation Annotation with the Variation Ontology.

    PubMed

    Schaafsma, Gerard C P; Vihinen, Mauno

    2016-04-01

    The Variation Ontology (VariO) is used for describing and annotating types, effects, consequences, and mechanisms of variations. To facilitate easy and consistent annotations, the online application VariOtator was developed. For variation type annotations, VariOtator is fully automated, accepting variant descriptions in Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) format, and generating VariO terms, either with or without full lineage, that is, all parent terms. When a coding DNA variant description with a reference sequence is provided, VariOtator checks the description first with Mutalyzer and then generates the predicted RNA and protein descriptions with their respective VariO annotations. For the other sublevels, function, structure, and property, annotations cannot be automated, and VariOtator generates annotation based on provided details. For VariO terms relating to structure and property, one can use attribute terms as modifiers and evidence code terms for annotating experimental evidence. There is an online batch version, and stand-alone batch versions to be used with a Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD) download file. A SOAP Web service allows client programs to access VariOtator programmatically. Thus, systematic variation effect and type annotations can be efficiently generated to allow easy use and integration of variations and their consequences. PMID:26773573

  4. SHORT TIMESCALE VARIATIONS IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF ANTARES A

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, T.; Gray, David F.

    2013-11-01

    We analyze three years of high-resolution spectroscopic data and find radial velocity variations with a characteristic timescale of 100 ± 6 days that are nearly sinusoidal. Simultaneous variations in line-depth ratios imply temperature variations of up to 100 K. No photometric variation is seen on a 100 day timescale. The timescale of the variation and its resonant nature suggest solar-like oscillations driven by large-scale convection.

  5. Comprehensive variation discovery in single human genomes

    PubMed Central

    Weisenfeld, Neil I.; Yin, Shuangye; Sharpe, Ted; Lau, Bayo; Hegarty, Ryan; Holmes, Laurie; Sogoloff, Brian; Tabbaa, Diana; Williams, Louise; Russ, Carsten; Nusbaum, Chad; Lander, Eric S.; MacCallum, Iain; Jaffe, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Complete knowledge of the genetic variation in individual human genomes is a crucial foundation for understanding the etiology of disease. Genetic variation is typically characterized by sequencing individual genomes and comparing reads to a reference. Existing methods do an excellent job of detecting variants in approximately 90% of the human genome, however calling variants in the remaining 10% of the genome (largely low-complexity sequence and segmental duplications) is challenging. To improve variant calling, we developed a new algorithm, DISCOVAR, and examined its performance on improved, low-cost sequence data. Using a newly created reference set of variants from finished sequence of 103 randomly chosen Fosmids, we find that some standard variant call sets miss up to 25% of variants. We show that the combination of new methods and improved data increases sensitivity several-fold, with the greatest impact in challenging regions of the human genome. PMID:25326702

  6. IDR muon capture front end and variations

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David; Prior, Gersende; Rogers, Christopher; Snopok, Pavel; Yoshikawa, Cary; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2010-12-01

    The (International Design Report) IDR neutrino factory scenario for capture, bunching, phase-energy rotation and initial cooling of {mu}'s produced from a proton source target is explored. It requires a drift section from the target, a bunching section and a {phi}-{delta}E rotation section leading into the cooling channel. The rf frequency changes along the bunching and rotation transport in order to form the {mu}'s into a train of equal-energy bunches suitable for cooling and acceleration. Optimization and variations are discussed. An important concern is rf limitations within the focusing magnetic fields; mitigation procedures are described. The method can be extended to provide muons for a {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} Collider; variations toward optimizing that extension are discussed.

  7. Seasonal variations of volcanic eruption frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    Do volcanic eruptions have a tendency to occur more frequently in the months of May and June? Some past evidence suggests that they do. The present study, based on the new eruption catalog of Simkin et al.(1981), investigates the monthly statistics of the largest eruptions, grouped according to explosive magnitude, geographical latitude, and year. At the 2-delta level, no month-to-month variations in eruption frequency are found to be statistically significant. Examination of previously published month-to-month variations suggests that they, too, are not statistically significant. It is concluded that volcanism, at least averaged over large portions of the globe, is probably not periodic on a seasonal or annual time scale.

  8. Geographic variation in marine turtle fibropapillomatosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenblatt, R.J.; Work, T.M.; Dutton, P.; Sutton, C.A.; Spraker, T.R.; Casey, R.N.; Diez, C.E.; Parker, Dana C.; St. Ledger, J.; Balazs, G.H.; Casey, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    We document three examples of fibropapillomatosis by histology, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and sequence analysis from three different geographic areas. Tumors compatible in morphology with fibropapillomatosis were seen in green turtles from Puerto Rico and San Diego (California) and in a hybrid loggerhead/ hawksbill turtle from Florida Bay (Florida). Tumors were confirmed as fibropapillomas on histology, although severity of disease varied between cases. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses revealed infection with the fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus (FPTHV) in all cases, albeit at highly variable copy numbers per cell. Alignment of a portion of the polymerase gene from each fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus isolate demonstrated geographic variation in sequence. These cases illustrate geographic variation in both the pathology and the virology of fibropapillomatosis.

  9. Generalized Higher Degree Total Variation (HDTV) Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yue; Ongie, Greg; Ramani, Sathish; Jacob, Mathews

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a family of novel image regularization penalties called generalized higher degree total variation (HDTV). These penalties further extend our previously introduced HDTV penalties, which generalize the popular total variation (TV) penalty to incorporate higher degree image derivatives. We show that many of the proposed second degree extensions of TV are special cases or are closely approximated by a generalized HDTV penalty. Additionally, we propose a novel fast alternating minimization algorithm for solving image recovery problems with HDTV and generalized HDTV regularization. The new algorithm enjoys a ten-fold speed up compared to the iteratively reweighted majorize minimize algorithm proposed in a previous work. Numerical experiments on 3D magnetic resonance images and 3D microscopy images show that HDTV and generalized HDTV improve the image quality significantly compared with TV. PMID:24710832

  10. Variational approach for nonpolar solvation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhan; Zhao, Shan; Chun, Jaehun; Thomas, Dennis G.; Baker, Nathan A.; Bates, Peter W.; Wei, G. W.

    2012-01-01

    Solvation analysis is one of the most important tasks in chemical and biological modeling. Implicit solvent models are some of the most popular approaches. However, commonly used implicit solvent models rely on unphysical definitions of solvent-solute boundaries. Based on differential geometry, the present work defines the solvent-solute boundary via the variation of the nonpolar solvation free energy. The solvation free energy functional of the system is constructed based on a continuum description of the solvent and the discrete description of the solute, which are dynamically coupled by the solvent-solute boundaries via van der Waals interactions. The first variation of the energy functional gives rise to the governing Laplace-Beltrami equation. The present model predictions of the nonpolar solvation energies are in an excellent agreement with experimental data, which supports the validity of the proposed nonpolar solvation model. PMID:22938212

  11. Total variation projection with first order schemes.

    PubMed

    Fadili, Jalal M; Peyre, Gabriel

    2011-03-01

    This article proposes a new algorithm to compute the projection on the set of images whose total variation is bounded by a constant. The projection is computed through a dual formulation that is solved by first order non-smooth optimization methods. This yields an iterative algorithm that applies iterative soft thresholding to the dual vector field, and for which we establish convergence rate on the primal iterates. This projection algorithm can then be used as a building block in a variety of applications such as solving inverse problems under a total variation constraint, or for texture synthesis. Numerical results are reported to illustrate the usefulness and potential applicability of our TV projection algorithm on various examples including denoising, texture synthesis, inpainting, deconvolution and tomography problems. We also show that our projection algorithm competes favorably with state-of-the-art TV projection methods in terms of convergence speed. PMID:20876024

  12. 222Rn variations in Mystery Cave, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Krafthefer, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    222Rn concentrations and meteorological parameters were measured at 4- h intervals over a 2-y period in Mystery Cave, southeastern Minnesota. Continuous radon monitors and meteorological sensors connected to data loggers were installed at several locations along commercial tour routes. 222Rn concentrations ranged as high as 25 kBq m-3 in summer and 20 kBq m-3 in winter. Average winter concentrations were lower than summer by at least a factor of two. Seasonal radon variations were correlative with outside air temperatures. During the winter, radon concentrations were observed to fluctuate periodically by factors of 20 or more in under 24 h. Both the long- and short-term variations are correlative with temperature- induced mixing of cave air with surface air.

  13. Origin and Variation of Tunicate Secondary Metabolites⊥

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Eric W.; Donia, Mohamed S.; McIntosh, John A.; Fricke, W. Florian; Ravel, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Ascidians (tunicates) are rich sources of structurally elegant, pharmaceutically potent secondary metabolites and more recently, potential biofuels. It has been demonstrated that some of these compounds are made by symbiotic bacteria and not by the animals themselves, and for a few other compounds evidence exists supporting a symbiotic origin. In didemnid ascidians, compounds are highly variable even in apparently identical animals. Recently, we have explained this variation at the genomic and metagenomic levels and have applied the basic scientific findings to drug discovery and development. This review discusses what is currently known about the origin and variation of symbiotically derived metabolites in ascidians, focusing on Family Didemnidae, where most research has occurred. Applications of our basic studies are also described. PMID:22233390

  14. Obliquity Variations of a Moonless Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Barnes, J. W.; Chambers, J. E.

    2011-05-01

    We numerically explore the obliquity (axial tilt) variations of a hypothetical moonless Earth. Previous work has shown that the Earth's Moon stabilizes Earth's obliquity such that it remains within a narrow range, between 22.1° and 24.5°. Without lunar influence, a frequency map analysis by Laskar et al. (1993 Nature 361, 615) showed that the obliquity could vary between 0° and 85°. Using a modified version of the orbital integrator mercury, we calculate the obliquity evolution for moonless Earths with various initial conditions for up to 4 billion years. We find many configurations in which obliquity variations are small. This implies that moonless extrasolar planets may well have the climate stability thought to be required for the development of advanced life.

  15. Earth Rotational Variations Excited by Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Modern space geodetic measurement of Earth rotation variations, particularly by means of the VLBI technique, has over the years allowed studies of Earth rotation dynamics to advance in ever-increasing precision, accuracy, and temporal resolution. A review will be presented on our understanding of the geophysical and climatic causes, or "excitations". for length-of-day change, polar motion, and nutations. These excitations sources come from mass transports that constantly take place in the Earth system comprised of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, lithosphere, mantle, and the cores. In this sense, together with other space geodetic measurements of time-variable gravity and geocenter motion, Earth rotation variations become a remote-sensing tool for the integral of all mass transports, providing valuable information about the latter on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Future prospects with respect to geophysical studies with even higher accuracy and resolution will be discussed.

  16. Diurnal variations of tropical cyclone precipitationin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Using 15 years of satellite-measured precipitation data and tropical cyclone (TC) information, this study estimates the diurnal variations of TC precipitation in its inner core and outer rainbands. It is found that for both weak (tropical storms to category 1 TCs) and strong (categories 2-5 TCs) storms over all six TC basins, the TC precipitation reaches its daily maximum in the morning, but the mean rain rate and diurnal variations are larger in the inner core than in the outer rainbands. With increasing radial distance from the TC center, the diurnal amplitude of precipitation decreases, and the peak time appears progressively later. The outward propagation of diurnal signals from the TC center dominates as an internal structure of the TC convective systems. For all basins examined, the diurnal precipitation maximum within the inner core of a strong storm occurs earlier than the maximum observed in non-TC precipitation; the same result is not found for the outer rainbands.

  17. Stellar luminosity variations and global warming.

    PubMed

    Foukal, P

    1994-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that variation in the sun's luminosity is less than that observed in many other stars of similar magnetic activity. Current findings also indicate that in more active stars, the attenuation by faculae of sunspot luminosity modulation is less effective than in the sun at present. The sun could thus become photometrically more variable (and dimmer) if its magnetic activity exceeded present levels. But the levels of solar activity required for this to occur are not observed in carbon-14 and beryllium-10 records over the past several millennia, which indicates that such an increase in amplitude of surface magnetism-driven variations in solar luminosity is unlikely in the present epoch. PMID:17749020

  18. IDR Muon Capture Front End and Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuffer, D.; Prior, G.; Rogers, C.; Snopok, P.; Yoshikawa, C.

    2011-10-01

    The (International Design Report) IDR neutrino factory scenario for capture, bunching, phase-energy rotation and initial cooling of μ's produced from a proton source target is explored. It requires a drift section from the target, a bunching section and a φ-δE rotation section leading into the cooling channel. The rf frequency changes along the bunching and rotation transport in order to form the 's into a train of equal-energy bunches suitable for cooling and acceleration. Optimization and variations are discussed. An important concern is rf limitations within the focusing magnetic fields; mitigation procedures are described. The method can be extended to provide muons for a μ+-μ- Collider; variations toward optimizing that extension are discussed.

  19. Climatic changes and variations: a geophysical problem

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, R. E.; Chiu, L. S.

    1980-01-01

    The morphology of, and the physical factors that control, the seasonal changes in global free air temperature and sea surface temperature are discussed. Non-seasonal tropical free air temperature changes are related to preceeding changes in tropical sea surface temperature and to volcanic aerosol while the tropical sea surface temperature itself is related to changes in surface pressure which characterize the Southern Oscillation. Zonal wind variations at low latitudes accompany the latter variations. The main variability in tropospheric temperature at high latitudes is characterized by the Greenland seesaw. The injection of volcanic aerosol by the eruption of Mt. Agung in March 1963 into the stratosphere gives rise to temperature increases of up to 5/sup 0/C in the stratosphere and cooling of 1/sup 0/C in the troposphere. The third major climatic signal in the recent record - the so called Biennial oscillation - is also briefly reviewed.

  20. Our Gods: Variation in Supernatural Minds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purzycki, Benjamin G.; Sosis, Richard

    In this chapter we examine variation in the contents of supernatural minds across cultures and the social correlates of this variation. We first provide a sketch of how humans are capable of representing supernatural minds and emphasize the significance of the types of knowledge attributed to supernatural agents. We then argue that the contents of supernatural minds as represented cross-culturally will primarily rest on or between two poles: knowledge of people's moral behavior and knowledge of people's ritualized costly behavior. Communities which endorse omniscient supernatural agents that are highly concerned with moral behavior will emphasize the importance of shared beliefs (cultural consensus), whereas communities which possess supernatural agents with limited social knowledge who are concerned with ritual actions will emphasize shared behavioral patterns (social consensus).We conclude with a brief discussion about the contexts in which these patterns occur.

  1. Plant responses to climatic extremes: within-species variation equals among-species variation.

    PubMed

    Malyshev, Andrey V; Arfin Khan, Mohammed A S; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Steinbauer, Manuel J; Henry, Hugh A L; Jentsch, Anke; Dengler, Jürgen; Willner, Evelin; Kreyling, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Within-species and among-species differences in growth responses to a changing climate have been well documented, yet the relative magnitude of within-species vs. among-species variation has remained largely unexplored. This missing comparison impedes our ability to make general predictions of biodiversity change and to project future species distributions using models. We present a direct comparison of among- versus within-species variation in response to three of the main stresses anticipated with climate change: drought, warming, and frost. Two earlier experiments had experimentally induced (i) summer drought and (ii) spring frost for four common European grass species and their ecotypes from across Europe. To supplement existing data, a third experiment was carried out, to compare variation among species from different functional groups to within-species variation. Here, we simulated (iii) winter warming plus frost for four grasses, two nonleguminous, and two leguminous forbs, in addition to eleven European ecotypes of the widespread grass Arrhenatherum elatius. For each experiment, we measured: (i) C/N ratio and biomass, (ii) chlorophyll content and biomass, and (iii) plant greenness, root (15) N uptake, and live and dead tissue mass. Using coefficients of variation (CVs) for each experiment and response parameter, a total of 156 within- vs. among-species comparisons were conducted, comparing within-species variation in each of four species with among-species variation for each seed origin (five countries). Of the six significant differences, within-species CVs were higher than among-species CVs in four cases. Partitioning of variance within each treatment in two of the three experiments showed that within-species variability (ecotypes) could explain an additional 9% of response variation after accounting for the among-species variation. Our observation that within-species variation was generally as high as among-species variation emphasizes the importance of

  2. Variational approach to the modulational instability.

    PubMed

    Rapti, Z; Kevrekidis, P G; Smerzi, A; Bishop, A R

    2004-01-01

    We study the modulational stability of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation using a time-dependent variational approach. Within this framework, we derive ordinary differential equations (ODE's) for the time evolution of the amplitude and phase of modulational perturbations. Analyzing the ensuing ODE's, we rederive the classical modulational instability criterion. The case (relevant to applications in optics and Bose-Einstein condensation) where the coefficients of the equation are time dependent, is also examined. PMID:14995759

  3. Variational algorithms for nonlinear smoothing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, R. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A variational approach is presented for solving a nonlinear, fixed-interval smoothing problem with application to offline processing of noisy data for trajectory reconstruction and parameter estimation. The nonlinear problem is solved as a sequence of linear two-point boundary value problems. Second-order convergence properties are demonstrated. Algorithms for both continuous and discrete versions of the problem are given, and example solutions are provided.

  4. Ethnic Variation in Inflammatory Profile in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Coussens, Anna K.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Elkington, Paul T.; Hanifa, Yasmeen; Islam, Kamrul; Timms, Peter M.; Bothamley, Graham H.; Claxton, Alleyna P.; Packe, Geoffrey E.; Darmalingam, Mathina; Davidson, Robert N.; Milburn, Heather J.; Baker, Lucy V.; Barker, Richard D.; Drobniewski, Francis A.; Mein, Charles A.; Bhaw-Rosun, Leena; Nuamah, Rosamond A.; Griffiths, Christopher J.; Martineau, Adrian R.

    2013-01-01

    Distinct phylogenetic lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) cause disease in patients of particular genetic ancestry, and elicit different patterns of cytokine and chemokine secretion when cultured with human macrophages in vitro. Circulating and antigen-stimulated concentrations of these inflammatory mediators might therefore be expected to vary significantly between tuberculosis patients of different ethnic origin. Studies to characterise such variation, and to determine whether it relates to host or bacillary factors, have not been conducted. We therefore compared circulating and antigen-stimulated concentrations of 43 inflammatory mediators and 14 haematological parameters (inflammatory profile) in 45 pulmonary tuberculosis patients of African ancestry vs. 83 patients of Eurasian ancestry in London, UK, and investigated the influence of bacillary and host genotype on these profiles. Despite having similar demographic and clinical characteristics, patients of differing ancestry exhibited distinct inflammatory profiles at presentation: those of African ancestry had lower neutrophil counts, lower serum concentrations of CCL2, CCL11 and vitamin D binding protein (DBP) but higher serum CCL5 concentrations and higher antigen-stimulated IL-1 receptor antagonist and IL-12 secretion. These differences associated with ethnic variation in host DBP genotype, but not with ethnic variation in MTB strain. Ethnic differences in inflammatory profile became more marked following initiation of antimicrobial therapy, and immunological correlates of speed of elimination of MTB from the sputum differed between patients of African vs. Eurasian ancestry. Our study demonstrates a hitherto unappreciated degree of ethnic heterogeneity in inflammatory profile in tuberculosis patients that associates primarily with ethnic variation in host, rather than bacillary, genotype. Candidate immunodiagnostics and immunological biomarkers of response to antimicrobial therapy should be derived

  5. Optimal Control of Evolution Mixed Variational Inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Alduncin, Gonzalo

    2013-12-15

    Optimal control problems of primal and dual evolution mixed variational inclusions, in reflexive Banach spaces, are studied. The solvability analysis of the mixed state systems is established via duality principles. The optimality analysis is performed in terms of perturbation conjugate duality methods, and proximation penalty-duality algorithms to mixed optimality conditions are further presented. Applications to nonlinear diffusion constrained problems as well as quasistatic elastoviscoplastic bilateral contact problems exemplify the theory.

  6. Variational method for adaptive grid generation

    SciTech Connect

    Brackbill, J.U.

    1983-01-01

    A variational method for generating adaptive meshes is described. Functionals measuring smoothness, skewness, orientation, and the Jacobian are minimized to generate a mapping from a rectilinear domain in natural coordinate to an arbitrary domain in physical coordinates. From the mapping, a mesh is easily constructed. In using the method to adaptively zone computational problems, as few as one third the number of mesh points are required in each coordinate direction compared with a uniformly zoned mesh.

  7. Variation in subglottic size in children.

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    The incidence of variation in the subglottic size was investigated in 3304 infants and children. A mild degree of congenital subglottic stenosis was found in 0.91% and a moderate degree of stenosis in 0.06% of the patients. A mild degree of congenital subglottic enlargement was noted in 0.7% and moderate enlargement in 0.06% of the patients. PMID:1005455

  8. IDR Neutrino Factory Front End and Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Alekou, A.; Rogers, C.; Snopok, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    The International Design Report (IDR) neutrino factory scenario for capture, bunching, phase-energy rotation and initial cooling of {mu}'s produced from a proton source target is explored. It requires a drift section from the target, a bunching section and a {phi}-{delta}E rotation section leading into the cooling channel. Optimization and variations are discussed. Important concerns are rf limitations within the focusing magnetic fields and large losses in the transport.

  9. Looking at variation through a quality lens.

    PubMed

    Allegretto, Steve; Michelson, Dan

    2014-12-01

    Collaboration between finance and clinical leaders will become increasingly critical as healthcare organizations transition to value-based payment. Using metrics called quality variation indicators to translate negative quality outcomes into measurable costs, organizations can create a basis for communication on improving quality and reducing costs. Such initiatives often require clinical redesign, which is possible only with engaged physician and nursing leaders who are supported by sophisticated financial tools and timely cost and quality data. PMID:25647928

  10. Geographic variation in gorilla limb bones.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Rebecca S; Pearman, Tessa L

    2016-06-01

    Gorilla systematics has received increased attention over recent decades from primatologists, conservationists, and paleontologists. Studies of geographic variation in DNA, skulls, and teeth have led to new taxonomic proposals, such as recognition of two gorilla species, Gorilla gorilla (western gorilla) and Gorilla beringei (eastern gorilla). Postcranial differences between mountain gorillas (G. beringei beringei) and western lowland gorillas (G. g. gorilla) have a long history of study, but differences between the limb bones of the eastern and western species have not yet been examined with an emphasis on geographic variation within each species. In addition, proposals for recognition of the Cross River gorilla as Gorilla gorilla diehli and gorillas from Tshiaberimu and Kahuzi as G. b. rex-pymaeorum have not been evaluated in the context of geographic variation in the forelimb and hindlimb skeletons. Forty-three linear measurements were collected from limb bones of 266 adult gorillas representing populations of G. b. beringei, Gorilla beringei graueri, G. g. gorilla, and G. g. diehli in order to investigate geographic diversity. Skeletal elements included the humerus, radius, third metacarpal, third proximal hand phalanx, femur, tibia, calcaneus, first metatarsal, third metatarsal, and third proximal foot phalanx. Comparisons of means and principal components analyses clearly differentiate eastern and western gorillas, indicating that eastern gorillas have absolutely and relatively smaller hands and feet, among other differences. Gorilla subspecies and populations cluster consistently by species, although G. g. diehli may be similar to the eastern gorillas in having small hands and feet. The subspecies of G. beringei are distinguished less strongly and by different variables than the two gorilla species. Populations of G. b. graueri are variable, and Kahuzi and Tshiaberimu specimens do not cluster together. Results support the possible influence of

  11. The rice mitochondrial genomes and their variations.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiangjun; Zheng, Jing; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2006-02-01

    Based on highly redundant and high-quality sequences, we assembled rice (Oryza sativa) mitochondrial genomes for two cultivars, 93-11 (an indica variety) and PA64S (an indica-like variety with maternal origin of japonica), which are paternal and maternal strains of an elite superhybrid rice Liang-You-Pei-Jiu (LYP-9), respectively. Following up with a previous analysis on rice chloroplast genomes, we divided mitochondrial sequence variations into two basic categories, intravarietal and intersubspecific. Intravarietal polymorphisms are variations within mitochondrial genomes of an individual variety. Intersubspecific polymorphisms are variations between subspecies among their major genotypes. In this study, we identified 96 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 25 indels, and three segmental sequence variations as intersubspecific polymorphisms. A signature sequence fragment unique to indica varieties was confirmed experimentally and found in two wild rice samples, but absent in japonica varieties. The intersubspecific polymorphism rate for mitochondrial genomes is 0.02% for SNPs and 0.006% for indels, nearly 2.5 and 3 times lower than that of their chloroplast counterparts and 21 and 38 times lower than corresponding rates of the rice nuclear genome, respectively. The intravarietal polymorphism rates among analyzed mitochondrial genomes, such as 93-11 and PA64S, are 1.26% and 1.38% for SNPs and 1.13% and 1.09% for indels, respectively. Based on the total number of SNPs between the two mitochondrial genomes, we estimate that the divergence of indica and japonica mitochondrial genomes occurred approximately 45,000 to 250,000 years ago. PMID:16384910

  12. The secular variation of cometary magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D. W.; Daniels, P. A.

    1983-03-01

    This paper calculates the mean variation in absolute magnitude per perihelion passage, ΔH10, for short-period comets from the data of Vsekhsvyatskii and finds a value of 0.30 ± 0.06. Other mechanisms used for estimating cometary decay are reviewed an it is concluded that a more probable value for ΔH10 is about 0.002. Reasons for the discrepancy between these two values are given.

  13. Temporal variation of hemispheric solar rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jing-Lan; Shi, Xiang-Jun; Xu, Jing-Chen

    2012-02-01

    The daily sunspot numbers of the whole disk as well as the northern and southern hemispheres from 1945 January 1 to 2010 December 31 are used to investigate the temporal variation of rotational cycle length through the continuous wavelet transformation analysis method. Auto-correlation function analysis of daily hemispheric sunspot numbers shows that the southern hemisphere rotates faster than the northern hemisphere. The results obtained from the wavelet transformation analysis are that no direct relationship exists between the variation trend of the rotational cycle length and the solar activity in the two hemispheres and that the rotational cycle length of both hemispheres has no significant period appearing at 11yr, but has a significant period of about 7.6 yr. Analysis concerning the solar cycle dependence of the rotational cycle length shows that acceleration seems to appear before the minimum time of solar activity in the whole disk and the northern hemisphere, respectively. Furthermore, the cross-correlation study indicates that the rotational cycle length of the two hemispheres has different phases, and that the rotational cycle length of the whole disk as well as the northern and southern hemispheres, also has phase shifts with corresponding solar activity. In addition, the temporal variation of the north-south (N-S) asymmetry of the rotational cycle length is also studied. This displays the same variation trend as the N-S asymmetry of solar activity in a solar cycle, as well as in the considered time interval, and has two significant periods of 7.7 and 17.5 yr. Moreover, the rotational cycle length and the N-S asymmetry of solar activity are highly correlated. It is inferred that the northern hemisphere should rotate faster at the beginning of solar cycle 24.

  14. Intraspecific variation of recombination rate in maize

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In sexually reproducing organisms, meiotic crossovers ensure the proper segregation of chromosomes and contribute to genetic diversity by shuffling allelic combinations. Such genetic reassortment is exploited in breeding to combine favorable alleles, and in genetic research to identify genetic factors underlying traits of interest via linkage or association-based approaches. Crossover numbers and distributions along chromosomes vary between species, but little is known about their intraspecies variation. Results Here, we report on the variation of recombination rates between 22 European maize inbred lines that belong to the Dent and Flint gene pools. We genotype 23 doubled-haploid populations derived from crosses between these lines with a 50 k-SNP array and construct high-density genetic maps, showing good correspondence with the maize B73 genome sequence assembly. By aligning each genetic map to the B73 sequence, we obtain the recombination rates along chromosomes specific to each population. We identify significant differences in recombination rates at the genome-wide, chromosome, and intrachromosomal levels between populations, as well as significant variation for genome-wide recombination rates among maize lines. Crossover interference analysis using a two-pathway modeling framework reveals a negative association between recombination rate and interference strength. Conclusions To our knowledge, the present work provides the most comprehensive study on intraspecific variation of recombination rates and crossover interference strength in eukaryotes. Differences found in recombination rates will allow for selection of high or low recombining lines in crossing programs. Our methodology should pave the way for precise identification of genes controlling recombination rates in maize and other organisms. PMID:24050704

  15. Solar luminosity variations in solar cycle 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Richard C.; Hudson, H. S.

    1988-01-01

    Long-term variations in the solar total irradiance found in the ACRIM I experiment on the SMM satellite have revealed a downward trend during the declining phase of solar cycle 21 of the sunspot cycle, a flat period between mid-1095 and mid-1987, and an upturn in late 1987 which suggests a direct correlation of luminosity and solar active region population. If the upturn continues into the activity maximum of solar cycle 22, a relation between solar activity and luminosity of possible climatological significance could be ascertained. The best-fit relationship for the variation of total irradiance S with sunspot number Rz and 10-cm flux F(10) are S = 1366.82 + 7.71 x 10 to the -3rd Rz and S = 1366.27 + 8.98 x 10 to the -3rd F(10)(W/sq m). These findings could be used to approximate total irradiance variations over the periods for which these indices have been compiled.

  16. Sea water temperature variation east of Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Fuh

    Temperature, wave and wind data over two years off Ho Peng, Shi Ti and Jang Yuan of east Taiwan are analyzed to study their seasonal variations. A model for predicting the mixed layer thickness is developed by use of wave data. The vertical profile of temperature indicates that there are basically three layers; mixed layer, thermocline layer and deep cold layer. The surface mixed layer appears in winter and disappears in summer. While surface water is warmer in summer than in winter, water at a depth of 50 m is warmer in winter than in summer. The seasonal variation in the deep cold layer is weak. The sea surface temperature is generally higher offshore than nearshore. The surface temperature off east Taiwan is almost equal to that in Taiwan Strait in summer, but in winter it is about 4°C warmer off northeast Taiwan than in the northeast of the Taiwan Strait, if compared at the same latitude. This is an effect of the seasonal variation of the Kuroshio. A model is developed for predicting the mixed layer thickness in terms of the input wave energy. The model successfully accounts for the observed features.

  17. Variational Infinite Hidden Conditional Random Fields.

    PubMed

    Bousmalis, Konstantinos; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Morency, Louis-Philippe; Pantic, Maja; Ghahramani, Zoubin

    2015-09-01

    Hidden conditional random fields (HCRFs) are discriminative latent variable models which have been shown to successfully learn the hidden structure of a given classification problem. An Infinite hidden conditional random field is a hidden conditional random field with a countably infinite number of hidden states, which rids us not only of the necessity to specify a priori a fixed number of hidden states available but also of the problem of overfitting. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling algorithms are often employed for inference in such models. However, convergence of such algorithms is rather difficult to verify, and as the complexity of the task at hand increases the computational cost of such algorithms often becomes prohibitive. These limitations can be overcome by variational techniques. In this paper, we present a generalized framework for infinite HCRF models, and a novel variational inference approach on a model based on coupled Dirichlet Process Mixtures, the HCRF-DPM. We show that the variational HCRF-DPM is able to converge to a correct number of represented hidden states, and performs as well as the best parametric HCRFs-chosen via cross-validation-for the difficult tasks of recognizing instances of agreement, disagreement, and pain in audiovisual sequences. PMID:26353136

  18. Seasonal Variation in Human Gut Microbiome Composition

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Emily R.; Mizrahi-Man, Orna; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B.; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the human gut microbiome is influenced by many environmental factors. Diet is thought to be one of the most important determinants, though we have limited understanding of the extent to which dietary fluctuations alter variation in the gut microbiome between individuals. In this study, we examined variation in gut microbiome composition between winter and summer over the course of one year in 60 members of a founder population, the Hutterites. Because of their communal lifestyle, Hutterite diets are similar across individuals and remarkably stable throughout the year, with the exception that fresh produce is primarily served during the summer and autumn months. Our data indicate that despite overall gut microbiome stability within individuals over time, there are consistent and significant population-wide shifts in microbiome composition across seasons. We found seasonal differences in both (i) the abundance of particular taxa (false discovery rate <0.05), including highly abundant phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, and (ii) overall gut microbiome diversity (by Shannon diversity; P = 0.001). It is likely that the dietary fluctuations between seasons with respect to produce availability explain, at least in part, these differences in microbiome composition. For example, high levels of produce containing complex carbohydrates consumed during the summer months might explain increased abundance of Bacteroidetes, which contain complex carbohydrate digesters, and decreased levels of Actinobacteria, which have been negatively correlated to fiber content in food questionnaires. Our observations demonstrate the plastic nature of the human gut microbiome in response to variation in diet. PMID:24618913

  19. Cryptic Genetic Variation in Evolutionary Developmental Genetics.

    PubMed

    Paaby, Annalise B; Gibson, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary developmental genetics has traditionally been conducted by two groups: Molecular evolutionists who emphasize divergence between species or higher taxa, and quantitative geneticists who study variation within species. Neither approach really comes to grips with the complexities of evolutionary transitions, particularly in light of the realization from genome-wide association studies that most complex traits fit an infinitesimal architecture, being influenced by thousands of loci. This paper discusses robustness, plasticity and lability, phenomena that we argue potentiate major evolutionary changes and provide a bridge between the conceptual treatments of macro- and micro-evolution. We offer cryptic genetic variation and conditional neutrality as mechanisms by which standing genetic variation can lead to developmental system drift and, sheltered within canalized processes, may facilitate developmental transitions and the evolution of novelty. Synthesis of the two dominant perspectives will require recognition that adaptation, divergence, drift and stability all depend on similar underlying quantitative genetic processes-processes that cannot be fully observed in continuously varying visible traits. PMID:27304973

  20. Epigenetic variation in asexually reproducing organisms.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Koen J F; Preite, Veronica

    2014-03-01

    The role that epigenetic inheritance can play in adaptation may differ between sexuals and asexuals because (1) the dynamics of adaptation differ under sexual and asexual reproduction and the opportunities offered by epigenetic inheritance may affect these dynamics differently; and (2) in asexual reproduction epigenetic reprogramming mechanisms that are associated with meiosis can be bypassed, which could promote the buildup of epigenetic variation in asexuals. Here, we evaluate current evidence for an epigenetic contribution to adaptation in asexuals. We argue that two aspects of epigenetic variation should have particular relevance for asexuals, namely epigenetics-mediated phenotypic plasticity within and between generations, and heritable variation via stochastic epimutations. An evaluation of epigenetic reprogramming mechanisms suggests that some, but not all, forms of asexual reproduction enhance the likelihood of stable transmission of epigenetic marks across generations compared to sexual reproduction. However, direct tests of these predicted sexual-asexual differences are virtually lacking. Stable transmission of DNA methylation, transcriptomes, and phenotypes from parent to clonal offspring are demonstrated in various asexual species, and clonal genotypes from natural populations show habitat-specific DNA methylation. We discuss how these initial observations can be extended to demonstrate an epigenetic contribution to adaptation. PMID:24274255

  1. Variation of patient dose in head CT.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Shah, G A; Kron, T

    1998-12-01

    CT dose varies with both equipment related and operator dependent factors. Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) was employed in two phantoms to investigate the variation in absorbed dose for head CT scans, using a cylindrical head CT dose phantom. Dose profiles were plotted and the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) calculated for a single 10 mm thick slice on 14 CT scanners. An anthropomorphic head phantom was also scanned from the base-of-skull to the vertex using 10/10 mm slices. The absorbed dose measured at the centre of the scan series is reported (Dmid). The mean CTDIw for the 14 scanners was 60.0 mGy, while the mean Dmid was 45.8 mGy. Dmid better represents the absorbed dose in human tissues. The CTDIw and Dmid normalized to mAs varied by up to a factor of 2.2 for the different scanners. Equipment related factors contribute to such variations. However, variations due to operator dependent factors such as the choice of exposure factors, scanning protocol and positioning technique must also be considered. When such factors are taken into account the absorbed dose received by the patient can vary considerably, by as much as 16.2 for lens dose. Increased awareness of the factors influencing CT dose and the standardization of scanning protocols is recommended. PMID:10319004

  2. Titan's Length-of-Day Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folonier, Hugo Alberto; Ferraz-Mello, Sylvio

    2015-11-01

    The Cassini radar observation of Titan over several years show that the rotation period is slightly faster than the synchronous motion (Lorenz et al. 2008; Stiles et al. 2008 and 2011; Meriggiola 2012). The seasonal variation in the mean and zonal wind speed and direction in Titan’s lower troposphere causes the exchange of a substantial amount of angular momentum between the surface and the atmosphere (Tokano and Neubauer, 2005; Richard et al. 2014). The rotation variation is affected by the influence of the atmosphere when we assume that Titan is a differentiated body and the atmosphere interacts only with the outer layer.In this work, we calculate variations of Titan’s length-of-day when the body is formed by two independent rotating parts and assuming that friction occurs at the interface of them. The tides are considered using the extension of two different theories -- the Darwin tide theory and Ferraz-Mello’s creep tide theory -- to the case of one body formed by two homogeneous parts. The results are compared and their differences are discussed.

  3. Cryptic Genetic Variation in Evolutionary Developmental Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Paaby, Annalise B.; Gibson, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary developmental genetics has traditionally been conducted by two groups: Molecular evolutionists who emphasize divergence between species or higher taxa, and quantitative geneticists who study variation within species. Neither approach really comes to grips with the complexities of evolutionary transitions, particularly in light of the realization from genome-wide association studies that most complex traits fit an infinitesimal architecture, being influenced by thousands of loci. This paper discusses robustness, plasticity and lability, phenomena that we argue potentiate major evolutionary changes and provide a bridge between the conceptual treatments of macro- and micro-evolution. We offer cryptic genetic variation and conditional neutrality as mechanisms by which standing genetic variation can lead to developmental system drift and, sheltered within canalized processes, may facilitate developmental transitions and the evolution of novelty. Synthesis of the two dominant perspectives will require recognition that adaptation, divergence, drift and stability all depend on similar underlying quantitative genetic processes—processes that cannot be fully observed in continuously varying visible traits. PMID:27304973

  4. Variational modelling of nonlinear water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogirou, Anna; Bokhove, Onno

    2015-11-01

    Mathematical modelling of water waves is demonstrated by investigating variational methods. A potential flow water wave model is derived using variational techniques and extented to include explicit time-dependence, leading to non-autonomous dynamics. As a first example, we consider the problem of a soliton splash in a long wave channel with a contraction at its end, resulting after a sluice gate is removed at a finite time. The removal of the sluice gate is included in the variational principle through a time-dependent gravitational potential. A second example involving non-autonomous dynamics concerns the motion of a free surface in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell. Explicit time-dependence now enters the model through a linear damping term due to the effect of wall friction and a term representing the motion of an artificially driven wave pump. In both cases, the model is solved numerically using a Galerkin FEM and the numerical results are compared to wave structures observed in experiments. The water wave model is also adapted to accommodate nonlinear ship dynamics. The novelty is this case is the coupling between the water wave dynamics, the ship dynamics and water line dynamics on the ship. For simplicity, we consider a simple ship structure consisting of V-shaped cross-sections.

  5. Determination of Bulk Dimensional Variation in Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. James F. Cuttino Dr. Edward P. Morse

    2005-04-14

    The purpose of this work is to improve the efficiency of green sand foundries so that they may continue to compete as the most cost-effective method of fabrication while meeting tightening constraints on near-net shape manufacturing. In order to achieve this objective, the study is divided into two major components. The first component concentrated on identifying which processes control surface finish on the castings and which provide potential reductions in variations. The second component identified metrological methods that effectively discern between the geometry of bulk material versus surface finish in order to more accurately determine the quality of a part. The research resulted in the determination of an empirical relationship relating pouring parameters to dimensional variation, with an R2 value of greater than 0.79. A significant difference in variations obtained from vertical vs. horizontal molding machines was also noticed. When analyzed separately, however, the resulting empirical relationships for horizontal and vertical machines had reduced R2 values, probably due to the reduced data sets. Significant parameters when considering vertical and horizontal molding machines together included surface roughness, pattern type, iron type, pouring rate, copper content, amount of Western Bentonite, and permeability.

  6. Sunspot random walk and 22-year variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, E. Joshua

    2012-01-01

    We examine two stochastic models for consistency with observed long-term secular trends in sunspot number and a faint, but semi-persistent, 22-yr signal: (1) a null hypothesis, a simple one-parameter random-walk model of sunspot-number cycle-to-cycle change, and, (2) an alternative hypothesis, a two-parameter random-walk model with an imposed 22-yr alternating amplitude. The observed secular trend in sunspots, seen from solar cycle 5 to 23, would not be an unlikely result of the accumulation of multiple random-walk steps. Statistical tests show that a 22-yr signal can be resolved in historical sunspot data; that is, the probability is low that it would be realized from random data. On the other hand, the 22-yr signal has a small amplitude compared to random variation, and so it has a relatively small effect on sunspot predictions. Many published predictions for cycle 24 sunspots fall within the dispersion of previous cycle-to-cycle sunspot differences. The probability is low that the Sun will, with the accumulation of random steps over the next few cycles, walk down to a Dalton-like minimum. Our models support published interpretations of sunspot secular variation and 22-yr variation resulting from cycle-to-cycle accumulation of dynamo-generated magnetic energy.

  7. Normal Genetic Variation, Cognition, and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, P. M.; Parasuraman, Raja

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the modulation of cognitive function by normal genetic variation. Although the heritability of “g” is well established, the genes that modulate specific cognitive functions are largely unidentified. Application of the allelic association approach to individual differences in cognition has begun to reveal the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms on specific and general cognitive functions. This article proposes a framework for relating genotype to cognitive phenotype by considering the effect of genetic variation on the protein product of specific genes within the context of the neural basis of particular cognitive domains. Specificity of effects is considered, from genes controlling part of one receptor type to genes controlling agents of neuronal repair, and evidence is reviewed of cognitive modulation by polymorphisms in dopaminergic and cholinergic receptor genes, dopaminergic enzyme genes, and neurotrophic genes. Although allelic variation in certain genes can be reliably linked to cognition—specifically to components of attention, working memory, and executive function in healthy adults—the specificity, generality, and replicability of the effects are not fully known. PMID:15006290

  8. Sunspot random walk and 22-year variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, E. Joshua

    2012-05-01

    We examine two stochastic models for consistency with observed long-term secular trends in sunspot number and a faint, but semi-persistent, 22-yr signal: (1) a null hypothesis, a simple one-parameter log-normal random-walk model of sunspot-number cycle-to-cycle change, and, (2) an alternative hypothesis, a two-parameter random-walk model with an imposed 22-yr alternating amplitude. The observed secular trend in sunspots, seen from solar cycle 5 to 23, would not be an unlikely result of the accumulation of multiple random-walk steps. Statistical tests show that a 22-yr signal can be resolved in historical sunspot data; that is, the probability is low that it would be realized from random data. On the other hand, the 22-yr signal has a small amplitude compared to random variation, and so it has a relatively small effect on sunspot predictions. Many published predictions for cycle 24 sunspots fall within the dispersion of previous cycle-to-cycle sunspot differences. The probability is low that the Sun will, with the accumulation of random steps over the next few cycles, walk down to a Dalton-like minimum. Our models support published interpretations of sunspot secular variation and 22-yr variation resulting from cycle-to-cycle accumulation of dynamo-generated magnetic energy.

  9. Variation and the response to variation as a basis for successful cooperation

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, John M.; Leimar, Olof

    2010-01-01

    In applying game theory to problems in biology, differences between individuals are often ignored. In particular, when analysing the evolution of cooperation it is often implicitly assumed that ignoring variation will produce predictions that approximate the solution when differences are included. This need not be true. As we demonstrate, differences are not innocuous noise, but can fundamentally change the nature of a game. Even small amounts of variability can stabilize cooperation by, for example, maintaining the need to deal with cheaters. Differences promote the need to learn about others in an interaction, leading to contingent behaviour that can reduce conflict, and to negotiated outcomes that may or may not be more cooperative than unconditional actions. Once there are mechanisms such as mutation and environmental influences that maintain variation within populations, whether cooperation evolves may depend on the variation in the cooperativeness trait. Variation means that it may be worth taking a chance that a partner is cooperative by being cooperative. When there are markets, so that individuals can break off interactions to seek a better partner, variation promotes choosiness and hence penalizes those uncooperative individuals, who are rejected. Variation promotes the need to monitor the previous behaviour of others, and once this social sensitivity exists, the need to maintain a good reputation can promote cooperation. PMID:20679107

  10. Intraspecific variation in social organization by genetic variation, developmental plasticity, social flexibility or entirely extrinsic factors

    PubMed Central

    Schradin, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it was widely believed that each species has a specific social organization, but we know now that many species show intraspecific variation in their social organization. Four different processes can lead to intraspecific variation in social organization: (i) genetic variation between individuals owing to local adaptation (between populations) or evolutionarily stable strategies within populations; (ii) developmental plasticity evolved in long-term (more than one generation) unpredictable and short-term (one generation) predictable environments, which is mediated by organizational physiological effects during early ontogeny; (iii) social flexibility evolved in highly unpredictable environments, which is mediated by activational physiological effects in adults; (iv) entirely extrinsic factors such as the death of a dominant breeder. Variation in social behaviour occurs between individuals in the case of genetic variation and developmental plasticity, but within individuals in the case of social flexibility. It is important to study intraspecific variation in social organization to understand the social systems of species because it reveals the mechanisms by which species can adapt to changing environments, offers a useful tool to study the ultimate and proximate causes of sociality, and is an interesting phenomenon by itself that needs scientific explanation. PMID:23569294

  11. Variational multiscale models for charge transport

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo-Wei; Zheng, Qiong; Chen, Zhan; Xia, Kelin

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a few variational multiscale models for charge transport in complex physical, chemical and biological systems and engineering devices, such as fuel cells, solar cells, battery cells, nanofluidics, transistors and ion channels. An essential ingredient of the present models, introduced in an earlier paper (Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, 72, 1562-1622, 2010), is the use of differential geometry theory of surfaces as a natural means to geometrically separate the macroscopic domain from the microscopic domain, meanwhile, dynamically couple discrete and continuum descriptions. Our main strategy is to construct the total energy functional of a charge transport system to encompass the polar and nonpolar free energies of solvation, and chemical potential related energy. By using the Euler-Lagrange variation, coupled Laplace-Beltrami and Poisson-Nernst-Planck (LB-PNP) equations are derived. The solution of the LB-PNP equations leads to the minimization of the total free energy, and explicit profiles of electrostatic potential and densities of charge species. To further reduce the computational complexity, the Boltzmann distribution obtained from the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation is utilized to represent the densities of certain charge species so as to avoid the computationally expensive solution of some Nernst-Planck (NP) equations. Consequently, the coupled Laplace-Beltrami and Poisson-Boltzmann-Nernst-Planck (LB-PBNP) equations are proposed for charge transport in heterogeneous systems. A major emphasis of the present formulation is the consistency between equilibrium LB-PB theory and non-equilibrium LB-PNP theory at equilibrium. Another major emphasis is the capability of the reduced LB-PBNP model to fully recover the prediction of the LB-PNP model at non-equilibrium settings. To account for the fluid impact on the charge transport, we derive coupled Laplace-Beltrami, Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier-Stokes equations from the variational principle

  12. Why intraspecific trait variation matters in community ecology

    PubMed Central

    Bolnick, Daniel I.; Amarasekare, Priyanga; Araújo, Márcio S.; Bürger, Reinhard; Levine, Jonathan M.; Novak, Mark; Rudolf, Volker H.W.; Schreiber, Sebastian J.; Urban, Mark C.; Vasseur, David

    2011-01-01

    Natural populations consist of phenotypically diverse individuals that exhibit variation in their demographic parameters and intra- and interspecific interactions. Recent experimental work suggests that such variation can have significant ecological effects. However, ecological models typically disregard this variation and focus instead on trait means and total population density. Under what situations is this simplification appropriate? Why might intraspecific variation alter ecological dynamics? In this review, we synthesize recent theory, identifying six general mechanisms by which trait variation changes the outcome of ecological interactions. These include several direct effects of trait variation per se, and indirect effects arising from genetic variation’s role in trait evolution. PMID:21367482

  13. Early universe constraints on time variation of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, Susana J.; Mosquera, Mercedes E.; Scoccola, Claudia G.; Vucetich, Hector

    2008-10-15

    We study the time variation of fundamental constants in the early Universe. Using data from primordial light nuclei abundances, cosmic microwave background, and the 2dFGRS power spectrum, we put constraints on the time variation of the fine structure constant {alpha} and the Higgs vacuum expectation value without assuming any theoretical framework. A variation in leads to a variation in the electron mass, among other effects. Along the same line, we study the variation of {alpha} and the electron mass m{sub e}. In a purely phenomenological fashion, we derive a relationship between both variations.

  14. Brachial plexus variations during the fetal period.

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Jowita; Kędzia, Alicja; Dudek, Krzysztof

    2012-12-01

    The brachial plexus is an important nervous system structure. It can be injured during the perinatal period and by postnatal damage. The goal of this study was to assess human fetal brachial plexus variability. A total of 220 brachial plexuses were surgically prepared from 110 human fetuses aged 14-32 weeks of fetal life (50 females and 60 males) ranging in CRL from 80 to 233 mm. The study incorporated the following methods: dissectional and anthropological, digital image acquisition, digital image processing using Image J and GIMP software, and statistical methods (Statistica 9.0). Symmetry and sexual dimorphism were examined. Anomalies of the brachial plexuses were observed in 117 (53.18 %) cases. No sexual dimorphism was found. It was observed that cord variations occurred more often on the left side. Division variants (33.64 %) occurred most often, but also cords (18.18 %) as well as root nerves and terminal ramifications (15.90 %) were found. Trunk anomalies were rare and occurred in only 5.45 % of plexuses. Three height types of median nerve roots in combination with the nerve were distinguished. In one-third of cases, median nerve root connections were found below the axillary fossa and even half in the proximal part of the humerus. In conclusion, the brachial plexus was characterized for anatomical structural variability. Most often division and cord variations were observed. Anomalies occurred regardless of sex or body side except for cord variants. Brachial plexus variation recognition is significant from the neurosurgical and traumatological point of view. PMID:22945314

  15. Variational description of multifluid hydrodynamics: Uncharged fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prix, Reinhard

    2004-02-01

    We present a formalism for Newtonian multifluid hydrodynamics derived from an unconstrained variational principle. This approach provides a natural way of obtaining the general equations of motion for a wide range of hydrodynamic systems containing an arbitrary number of interacting fluids and superfluids. In addition to spatial variations we use “time shifts” in the variational principle, which allows us to describe dissipative processes with entropy creation, such as chemical reactions, friction or the effects of external non-conservative forces. The resulting framework incorporates the generalization of the entrainment effect originally discussed in the case of the mixture of two superfluids by Andreev and Bashkin. In addition to the conservation of energy and momentum, we derive the generalized conservation laws of vorticity and helicity, and the special case of Ertel’s theorem for the single perfect fluid. We explicitly discuss the application of this framework to thermally conducting fluids, superfluids, and superfluid neutron star matter. The equations governing thermally conducting fluids are found to be more general than the standard description, as the effect of entrainment usually seems to be overlooked in this context. In the case of superfluid 4He we recover the Landau-Khalatnikov equations of the two-fluid model via a translation to the “orthodox” framework of superfluidity, which is based on a rather awkward choice of variables. Our two-fluid model for superfluid neutron star matter allows for dissipation via mutual friction and also “transfusion” via β reactions between the neutron fluid and the proton-electron fluid.

  16. What is integrability of discrete variational systems?

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Raphael; Petrera, Matteo; Suris, Yuri B.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a notion of a pluri-Lagrangian problem, which should be understood as an analogue of multi-dimensional consistency for variational systems. This is a development along the line of research of discrete integrable Lagrangian systems initiated in 2009 by Lobb and Nijhoff, however, having its more remote roots in the theory of pluriharmonic functions, in the Z-invariant models of statistical mechanics and their quasiclassical limit, as well as in the theory of variational symmetries going back to Noether. A d-dimensional pluri-Lagrangian problem can be described as follows: given a d-form on an m-dimensional space (called multi-time, m>d), whose coefficients depend on a sought-after function x of m independent variables (called field), find those fields x which deliver critical points to the action functionals for any d-dimensional manifold Σ in the multi-time. We derive the main building blocks of the multi-time Euler–Lagrange equations for a discrete pluri-Lagrangian problem with d=2, the so-called corner equations, and discuss the notion of consistency of the system of corner equations. We analyse the system of corner equations for a special class of three-point two-forms, corresponding to integrable quad-equations of the ABS list. This allows us to close a conceptual gap of the work by Lobb and Nijhoff by showing that the corresponding two-forms are closed not only on solutions of (non-variational) quad-equations, but also on general solutions of the corresponding corner equations. We also find an example of a pluri-Lagrangian system not coming from a multi-dimensionally consistent system of quad-equations. PMID:24511254

  17. Interdecadal Variations in the Alaska Gyre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagerloef, Gary S.E.

    1995-01-01

    Climatic dynamic topography variations in the Alaska gyre during the period 1968-1990 are described with an objective analysis of more than 12000 STD and XBT stations, and COADS wind stress data Interannual the dynamic height and SST variations were correlated and were consistent with recently described large-scale climatic shifts in the North Pacific. The gyre was centered more to the east, circulation appeared stronger, and SST was lower during the early to mid-1970s than during the 1980s. The Aleutian low (NP and PNA indices) intensified during the interim, but the response did not appear as a gyre spinup. Instead, the associated wind stress anomalies forced a slowly varying dynamic height anomaly across the eastern and northern part of the gyre through Ekman convergence, which had the effect of displacing the gyre's low somewhat to the WSW in the 1980s. The wind curl spectrum was white, and the slow oceanic response was modeled as stochastic-forced climate variability with a simple first-order Markov autoregression process. Forcing was assumed to be Ekman pumping of the pycnocline, and the damping coefficient was estimated from the data to be approx. 1 yr. A hindcast with observed winds gave estimated dynamic height patterns similar to those observed, with a canonical correlation of 0.79 at 99% confidence. This response was weak in the western half of the gyre, where slow baroclinic variability may have been influenced by long Rossby wave propagation. A simple autoregression simulation using artificial white noise forcing shows the evolution of decadal variations similar in nature to those observed. This result, along with the low frequency correlation between dynamic height and SST, suggests that the upper-ocean climatic variability in this region is primarily wind forced.

  18. GFVO: the Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology.

    PubMed

    Baran, Joachim; Durgahee, Bibi Sehnaaz Begum; Eilbeck, Karen; Antezana, Erick; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Falling costs in genomic laboratory experiments have led to a steady increase of genomic feature and variation data. Multiple genomic data formats exist for sharing these data, and whilst they are similar, they are addressing slightly different data viewpoints and are consequently not fully compatible with each other. The fragmentation of data format specifications makes it hard to integrate and interpret data for further analysis with information from multiple data providers. As a solution, a new ontology is presented here for annotating and representing genomic feature and variation dataset contents. The Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology (GFVO) specifically addresses genomic data as it is regularly shared using the GFF3 (incl. FASTA), GTF, GVF and VCF file formats. GFVO simplifies data integration and enables linking of genomic annotations across datasets through common semantics of genomic types and relations. Availability and implementation. The latest stable release of the ontology is available via its base URI; previous and development versions are available at the ontology's GitHub repository: https://github.com/BioInterchange/Ontologies; versions of the ontology are indexed through BioPortal (without external class-/property-equivalences due to BioPortal release 4.10 limitations); examples and reference documentation is provided on a separate web-page: http://www.biointerchange.org/ontologies.html. GFVO version 1.0.2 is licensed under the CC0 1.0 Universal license (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0) and therefore de facto within the public domain; the ontology can be appropriated without attribution for commercial and non-commercial use. PMID:26019997

  19. GFVO: the Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Durgahee, Bibi Sehnaaz Begum; Eilbeck, Karen; Antezana, Erick; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Falling costs in genomic laboratory experiments have led to a steady increase of genomic feature and variation data. Multiple genomic data formats exist for sharing these data, and whilst they are similar, they are addressing slightly different data viewpoints and are consequently not fully compatible with each other. The fragmentation of data format specifications makes it hard to integrate and interpret data for further analysis with information from multiple data providers. As a solution, a new ontology is presented here for annotating and representing genomic feature and variation dataset contents. The Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology (GFVO) specifically addresses genomic data as it is regularly shared using the GFF3 (incl. FASTA), GTF, GVF and VCF file formats. GFVO simplifies data integration and enables linking of genomic annotations across datasets through common semantics of genomic types and relations. Availability and implementation. The latest stable release of the ontology is available via its base URI; previous and development versions are available at the ontology’s GitHub repository: https://github.com/BioInterchange/Ontologies; versions of the ontology are indexed through BioPortal (without external class-/property-equivalences due to BioPortal release 4.10 limitations); examples and reference documentation is provided on a separate web-page: http://www.biointerchange.org/ontologies.html. GFVO version 1.0.2 is licensed under the CC0 1.0 Universal license (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0) and therefore de facto within the public domain; the ontology can be appropriated without attribution for commercial and non-commercial use. PMID:26019997

  20. Identifying environmental correlates of intraspecific genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Harrisson, K A; Yen, J D L; Pavlova, A; Rourke, M L; Gilligan, D; Ingram, B A; Lyon, J; Tonkin, Z; Sunnucks, P

    2016-09-01

    Genetic variation is critical to the persistence of populations and their capacity to adapt to environmental change. The distribution of genetic variation across a species' range can reveal critical information that is not necessarily represented in species occurrence or abundance patterns. We identified environmental factors associated with the amount of intraspecific, individual-based genetic variation across the range of a widespread freshwater fish species, the Murray cod Maccullochella peelii. We used two different approaches to statistically quantify the relative importance of predictor variables, allowing for nonlinear relationships: a random forest model and a Bayesian approach. The latter also accounted for population history. Both approaches identified associations between homozygosity by locus and both disturbance to the natural flow regime and mean annual flow. Homozygosity by locus was negatively associated with disturbance to the natural flow regime, suggesting that river reaches with more disturbed flow regimes may support larger, more genetically diverse populations. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that artificially induced perennial flows in regulated channels may provide greater and more consistent habitat and reduce the frequency of population bottlenecks that can occur frequently under the highly variable and unpredictable natural flow regime of the system. Although extensive river regulation across eastern Australia has not had an overall positive effect on Murray cod numbers over the past century, regulation may not represent the primary threat to Murray cod survival. Instead, pressures other than flow regulation may be more critical to the persistence of Murray cod (for example, reduced frequency of large floods, overfishing and chemical pollution). PMID:27273322

  1. Controlling variation in the comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Andrew R.; El Yamani, Naouale; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Brunborg, Gunnar; Azqueta, Amaya

    2014-01-01

    Variability of the comet assay is a serious issue, whether it occurs from experiment to experiment in the same laboratory, or between different laboratories analysing identical samples. Do we have to live with high variability, just because the comet assay is a biological assay rather than analytical chemistry? Numerous attempts have been made to limit variability by standardizing the assay protocol, and the critical steps in the assay have been identified; agarose concentration, duration of alkaline incubation, and electrophoresis conditions (time, temperature, and voltage gradient) are particularly important. Even when these are controlled, variation seems to be inevitable. It is helpful to include in experiments reference standards, i.e., cells with a known amount of specific damage to the DNA. They can be aliquots frozen from a single large batch of cells, either untreated (negative controls) or treated with, for example, H2O2 or X-rays to induce strand breaks (positive control for the basic assay), or photosensitiser plus light to oxidize guanine (positive control for Fpg- or OGG1-sensitive sites). Reference standards are especially valuable when performing a series of experiments over a long period—for example, analysing samples of white blood cells from a large human biomonitoring trial—to check that the assay is performing consistently, and to identify anomalous results necessitating a repeat experiment. The reference values of tail intensity can also be used to iron out small variations occurring from day to day. We present examples of the use of reference standards in human trials, both within one laboratory and between different laboratories, and describe procedures that can be used to control variation. PMID:25368630

  2. Small area variations in health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Wennberg, J; Gittelsohn

    1973-12-14

    Health information about total populations is a prerequisite for sound decision-making and planning in the health care field. Experience with a population-based health data system in Vermont reveals that there are wide variations in resource input, utilization of services, and expenditures among neighboring communities. Results show prima facie inequalities in the input of resources that are associated with income transfer from areas of lower expenditure to areas of higher expenditure. Variations in utilization indicate that there is considerable uncertainty about the effectiveness of different levels of aggregate, as well as specific kinds of, health services. Informed choices in the public regulation of the health care sector require knowledge of the relation between medical care systems and the population groups being served, and they should take into account the effect of regulation on equality and effectiveness. When population-based data on small areas are available, decisions to expand hospitals, currently based on institutional pressures, can take into account a community's regional ranking in regard to bed input and utilization rates. Proposals by hospitals for unit price increases and the regulation of the actuarial rate of insurance programs can be evaluated in terms of per capita expenditures and income transfer between geographically defined populations. The PSRO's can evaluate the wide variations in level of services among residents of different communities. Coordinated exercise of the authority vested in these regulatory programs may lead to explicit strategies to deal directly with inequality and uncertainty concerning the effectiveness of health care delivery. Population-based health information systems, because they can provide information on the performance of health care systems and regulatory agencies, are an important step in the development of rational public policy for health. PMID:4750608

  3. Spatial variation as a tool for inferring temporal variation and diagnosing types of mechanisms in ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Matthew P; Kolasa, Jurek

    2014-01-01

    Ecological processes, like the rise and fall of populations, leave an imprint of their dynamics as a pattern in space. Mining this spatial record for insight into temporal change underlies many applications, including using spatial snapshots to infer trends in communities, rates of species spread across boundaries, likelihood of chaotic dynamics, and proximity to regime shifts. However, these approaches rely on an inherent but undefined link between spatial and temporal variation. We present a quantitative link between a variable's spatial and temporal variation based on established variance-partitioning techniques, and test it for predictive and diagnostic applications. A strong link existed between spatial and regional temporal variation (estimated as Coefficients of Variation or CV's) in 136 variables from three aquatic ecosystems. This association suggests a basis for substituting one for the other, either quantitatively or qualitatively, when long time series are lacking. We further show that weak substitution of temporal for spatial CV results from distortion by specific spatiotemporal patterns (e.g., inter-patch synchrony). Where spatial and temporal CV's do not match, we pinpoint the spatiotemporal causes of deviation in the dynamics of variables and suggest ways that may control for them. In turn, we demonstrate the use of this framework for describing spatiotemporal patterns in multiple ecosystem variables and attributing them to types of mechanisms. Linking spatial and temporal variability makes quantitative the hitherto inexact practice of space-for-time substitution and may thus point to new opportunities for navigating the complex variation of ecosystems. PMID:24586627

  4. Modeling Interannual Variations of Summer Monsoons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, T. N.; Brankovi, .; Viterbo, P.; Miller, M. J.

    1992-05-01

    Results from a set of 90-day integrations, made with a T42 version of the ECMWF model and forced with a variety of specified sea surface temperature (SST) datasets, are discussed. Most of the integrations started from data for 1 June 1987 and 1 June 1988. During the summer of 1987, both the Indian and African monsoons were weak, in contrast with the summer of 1988 when both monsoons were much stronger. With observed SSTs, the model is able to simulate the interannual variations in the global-scale velocity potential and stream-function fields on seasonal time scales. On a regional basis, rainfall over the Sahel and, to a lesser extent, India showed the correct sense of interannual variation, though in absolute terms the model appears to have an overall dry bias in these areas.Additional integrations were made to study the impact of the observed SST anomalies in individual oceans. Much of the interannual variation in both Indian and African rainfall can be accounted for by the remote effect of the tropical Pacific SST anomalies only. By comparison with the effect of the Pacific, interannual variability in Indian Ocean, tropical Atlantic Ocean, or extratropical SSTs had a relatively modest influence on tropical large-scale flow or rainfall in the areas studied.Integrations run with identical SSTs but different initial conditions indicated that for large-scale circulation diagnostics, the impact of anomalous ocean forcing dominated the possible impact of variations in initial conditions. In terms of local rainfall amounts, on the other hand, the impact of initial conditions is comparable with that of SST anomaly over parts of India and Southeast Asia, less so over the Sahel. While this may suggest that a nonnegligible fraction of the variance of month-to-seasonal mean rainfall on the regional scale in the tropics may not be dynanamically predictable, it is also quite possible that the disparity in the apparent predictability of rainfall and circulation anomalies is a

  5. Seasonal Variation of Cistus ladanifer L. Diterpenes

    PubMed Central

    Alías, Juan Carlos; Sosa, Teresa; Valares, Cristina; Escudero, José Carlos; Chaves, Natividad

    2012-01-01

    The exudate of Cistus ladanifer L. consists mainly of two families of secondary metabolites: flavonoids and diterpenes. The amount of flavonoids present in the leaves has a marked seasonal variation, being maximum in summer and minimum in winter. In the present study, we demonstrate that the amount of diterpenes varies seasonally, but with a different pattern: maximum concentration in winter and minimum in spring-summer. The experiments under controlled conditions have shown that temperature influences diterpene production, and in particular, low temperatures. Given this pattern, the functions that these compounds perform in C. ladanifer are probably different. PMID:27137636

  6. Total-variation regularization with bound constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Chartrand, Rick; Wohlberg, Brendt

    2009-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for bound-constrained total-variation (TV) regularization that in comparison with its predecessors is simple, fast, and flexible. We use a splitting approach to decouple TV minimization from enforcing the constraints. Consequently, existing TV solvers can be employed with minimal alteration. This also makes the approach straightforward to generalize to any situation where TV can be applied. We consider deblurring of images with Gaussian or salt-and-pepper noise, as well as Abel inversion of radiographs with Poisson noise. We incorporate previous iterative reweighting algorithms to solve the TV portion.

  7. Global color and albedo variations on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, Alfred S.

    1988-01-01

    The present Voyager imaging data multispectral mosaics of Io include global mosaics from each of the Voyager 1 and 2 data sets and a high-resolution mosaic of the region centered on the Ra Patera volcano. The constancy of the disk-integrated color and albedo of Io over recent decades despite volcanic activity may be due to the regular occurrence of large Pele-type plumes with relatively dark, red deposits. Io's intrinsic spectral variability involves continuous variation among three major spectral end members. Attention is given to the mapping of the data into five spectral units for the purposes of comparison with laboratory measurements of Io surface material candidates.

  8. Intradiscal pressure variation under spontaneous ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roriz, Paulo; Ferreira, J.; Potes, J. C.; Oliveira, M. T.; Santos, J. L.; Simões, J. A.; Frazão, O.

    2014-05-01

    The pressure measured in the intervertebral discs is a response to the loads acting on the spine. External loads, such as the reaction forces resulting from locomotion, manual handling and collisions are probably the most relevant in studying spine trauma. However, the physiological functions such as breathing and hearth rate also participate in subtle variations of intradiscal pressure that can be observed only in vivo at resting. Present work is an effort to measure the effect of breathing on intradiscal pressure of an anesthetized sheep.

  9. Within-family variation in obesity.

    PubMed

    Price, Joseph; Swigert, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    We use data from the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 to document the degree to which childhood obesity varies among siblings. We find considerable differences in body weight between siblings with over half of the siblings differing by more than 20 age-specific percentiles in terms of the body mass index. Even among identical twins, there is an average BMI difference of 12 percentiles. This variation is important for the use of econometric approaches that involve sibling comparisons. PMID:22640530

  10. Abundance variations in solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Reames, D. V.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1991-01-01

    Abundance variations are examined in a large number of events including smaller nonimpulsive events not previously considered. Whereas a comparison at equal energy per nucleon is appropriate for heavy ions this is not the case when including H. The best representation is either in terms of rigidity or energy per charge depending on the type of event under consideration. For the majority of large events, where particles are primarily accelerated at interplanetary shocks, if abundances relative to H are evaluated at equal energy per charge then abundance ratios are compatible with solar wind values and spectral shapes agree. Furthermore the behavior of H is then compatible with that of other high FIP elements.

  11. Lanczos steps to improve variational wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becca, Federico; Hu, Wen-Jun; Iqbal, Yasir; Parola, Alberto; Poilblanc, Didier; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-09-01

    Gutzwiller-projected fermionic states can be efficiently implemented within quantum Monte Carlo calculations to define extremely accurate variational wave functions for Heisenberg models on frustrated two-dimensional lattices, not only for the ground state but also for low-energy excitations. The application of few Lanczos steps on top of these states further improves their accuracy, allowing calculations on large clusters. In addition, by computing both the energy and its variance, it is possible to obtain reliable estimations of exact results. Here, we report the cases of the frustrated Heisenberg models on square and Kagome lattices.

  12. Plasmaspheric hiss intensity variations during magnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Frandsen, A. M. A.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Thorne, R. M.; Chan, K. W.

    1974-01-01

    The storm time intensity variations of ELF electromagnetic emissions have been studied by using the Ogo 6 search coil magnetometer. Low-latitude signals exhibit a sharp low-frequency cutoff and are identified as plasmaspheric hiss. Such waves show pronounced intensification during the recovery phase of magnetic storms but remain close to background levels during the storm main phase. This behavior is consistent with cyclotron resonant generation within the plasmasphere as the latter expands into the intensified belt of outer zone electrons during the storm recovery.

  13. Complementary Variational Theorems for inhomogeneous superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, T. C.

    1997-03-01

    Complementary variational theorems are derived for an inhomogeneous London (local) superconductor in which both the magnetic permeability μ(r) and the London penetration length λ_L(r) vary randomly in space (T.C. Choy, Physical Review B (1997) (to appear)). An essential feature is the close coupling between magnetic and supercurrent polarisation effects, developed self-consistently in this work. Using these theorems and a suitable ansatz for the single particle polarisabilities, we obtained complementary bounds for a composite superconductor near Tc and T=0^circ K. Our results may be important for the empirical study of systems containing magnetic (normal) and superconducting mixtures, including the high Tc oxide superconductors.

  14. Denoising Medical Images using Calculus of Variations

    PubMed Central

    Kohan, Mahdi Nakhaie; Behnam, Hamid

    2011-01-01

    We propose a method for medical image denoising using calculus of variations and local variance estimation by shaped windows. This method reduces any additive noise and preserves small patterns and edges of images. A pyramid structure-texture decomposition of images is used to separate noise and texture components based on local variance measures. The experimental results show that the proposed method has visual improvement as well as a better SNR, RMSE and PSNR than common medical image denoising methods. Experimental results in denoising a sample Magnetic Resonance image show that SNR, PSNR and RMSE have been improved by 19, 9 and 21 percents respectively. PMID:22606674

  15. Time variation of galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Time variations in the flux of galactic cosmic rays are the result of changing conditions in the solar wind. Maximum cosmic ray fluxes, which occur when solar activity is at a minimum, are well defined. Reductions from this maximum level are typically systematic and predictable but on occasion are rapid and unexpected. Models relating the flux level at lower energy to that at neutron monitor energy are typically accurate to 20 percent of the total excursion at that energy. Other models, relating flux to observables such as sunspot number, flare frequency, and current sheet tilt are phenomenological but nevertheless can be quite accurate.

  16. Seasonal variation in human reproduction: environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Bronson, F H

    1995-06-01

    Almost all human populations exhibit seasonal variation in births, owing mostly to seasonal variation in the frequency of conception. This review focuses on the degree to which environmental factors like nutrition, temperature and photoperiod contribute to these seasonal patterns by acting directly on the reproductive axis. The reproductive strategy of humans is basically that of the apes: Humans have the capacity to reproduce continuously, albeit slowly, unless inhibited by environmental influences. Two, and perhaps three, environmental factors probably act routinely as seasonal inhibitors in some human populations. First, it seems likely that ovulation is regulated seasonally in populations experiencing seasonal variation in food availability. More specifically, it seems likely that inadequate food intake or the increased energy expenditure required to obtain food, or both, can delay menarche, suppress the frequency of ovulation in the nonlactating adult, and prolong lactational amenorrhea in these populations on a seasonal basis. This action is most easily seen in tropical subsistence societies where food availability often varies greatly owing to seasonal variation in rainfall; hence births in these populations often correlate with rainfall. Second, it seems likely that seasonally high temperatures suppress spermatogenesis enough to influence the incidence of fertilization in hotter latitudes, but possibly only in males wearing clothing that diminishes scrotal cooling. Since most of our knowledge about this phenomenon comes from temperate latitudes, the sensitivity of spermatogenesis in both human and nonhuman primates to heat in the tropics needs further study. It is quite possible that high temperatures suppress ovulation and early embryo survival seasonally in some of these same populations. Since we know less than desired about the effect of heat stress on ovulation and early pregnancy in nonhuman mammals, and nothing at all about it in humans or any of the

  17. Do variations in leaf phenology affect radial growth variations in Fagus sylvatica?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čufar, Katarina; De Luis, Martin; Prislan, Peter; Gričar, Jožica; Črepinšek, Zalika; Merela, Maks; Kajfež-Bogataj, Lučka

    2015-08-01

    We used a dendrochronological and leaf phenology network of European beech ( Fagus sylvatica) in Slovenia, a transitional area between Mediterranean, Alpine and continental climatic regimes, for the period 1955-2007 to test whether year to year variations in leaf unfolding and canopy duration (i.e. time between leaf unfolding and colouring) influence radial growth (annual xylem production and tree ring widths) and if such influences are more pronounced at higher altitudes. We showed that variability in leaf phenology has no significant effect on variations in radial growth. The results are consistent in the entire region, irrespective of the climatic regime or altitude, although previous studies have shown that leaf phenology and tree ring variation depend on altitude. The lack of relationship between year to year variability in leaf phenology and radial growth may suggest that earlier leaf unfolding—as observed in a previous study—probably does not cause increased tree growth rates in beech in Slovenia.

  18. Solar UV radiation variations and their stratospheric and climatic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnelly, R. F.; Heath, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    Nimbus-7 SBUV measurements of the short-term solar UV variations caused by solar rotation and active-region evolution have determined the amplitude and wavelength dependence for the active-region component of solar UV variations. Intermediate-term variations lasting several months are associated with rounds of major new active regions. The UV flux stays near the peak value during the current solar cycle variation for more than two years and peaks about two years later than the sunspot number. Nimbus-7 measurements have observed the concurrent stratospheric ozone variations caused by solar UV variations. There is now no doubt that solar UV variations are an important cause of short- and long-term stratospheric variations, but the strength of the coupling to the troposphere and to climate has not yet been proven.

  19. Common celiaco-mesenterico-phrenic trunk and renal vascular variations.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Satheesha

    2006-12-01

    The knowledge of vascular variations like other anatomical variations, is important during the operative, diagnostic, and endovascular procedures in abdomen. This report describes multiple variations in the upper abdominal vessels as found during the routine dissection in a 60-year-old male cadaver. The variations found were; presence of a celiaco-mesenterico-phrenic trunk, a common inferior phrenic trunk, 2 right renal arteries originating from abdominal aorta, 2 suprarenal arteries originating from the lower right renal artery, 3 right renal veins opening separately into inferior vena cava, and termination of right testicular vein into the lowest vein among the 3 right renal veins. The existence of a celiaco-mesenterico-phrenic trunk has not been reported yet. Although, other variations reported in this case exist as individual variations, a concomitant variation of them has not been reported yet. The knowledge of such variations is quite useful in planning any upper abdominal surgery. PMID:17143371

  20. QUANTIFYING ASSAY VARIATION IN NUTRIENT ANALYSIS OF FEEDSTUFFS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical results from different laboratories have greater variation than those from a single laboratory, and this variation differs by nutrient. Objectives of this presentation are to describe methods for quantifying the analytical reproducibility among and repeatability within laboratories, estim...

  1. Recent Progress in Modeling Variations in TSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G.; Cookson, A.; Dobias, J.; Preminger, D.; Walton, S.

    Sunspots and faculae/network are known to be associated with variations in the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI). A major astrophysical question is whether there is another component to TSI variations. In order to answer this question it is necessary to account for the effects of magnetic activity as accurately as possible. As part of this effort, daily full-disk photometric images continue to be obtained at the San Fernando Observatory (SFO). A recent comparison of SFO photometric data with TSI measurements from the TIM experiment on the SORCE satellite has been carried out. For an eight-month interval, June 2003 through January 2004, a multiple regression has given an R^2 of 0.9754 (N = 136) and a quiet Sun irradiance, S_0 of 1361.35 ± 0.11 W/m^2. Corrections for detector degradation and interpolation to the SFO observation times are expected to offer slight improvements to these results. The SFO data are being combined with those from the Precision Solar Photometric Telescope (PSPT) to create a more complete set of ground-based photometry. This work has been partly supported by grants from NASA and NSF.

  2. Sidereal variations deep underground in Tasmania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humble, J. E.; Fenton, K. B.; Fenton, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    Data from the deep underground vertically directed muon telescopes at Poatina, Tasmania, have been used since 1972 for a number of investigations, including the daily intensity variations, atmospheric influences, and checking for possible effects due to the interplanetary magnetic field. These telescopes have a total sensitive area of only 3 square meters, with the result that the counting rate is low (about 1680 events per hour) and the statistical errors on the results are rather large. Consequently, it was decided several years ago to construct larger detectors for this station. The first of these telescopes has been in operation for two complete years, and the results from it are presented. Results from the new, more stable equipment at Poatina appear to confirm the existence of a first harmonic in the daily variations in sidereal time reported earlier, and are consistent with small or non-existent first harmonics in solar and anti-sidereal time. All the second harmonics appear to be small, if not zero at these energies.

  3. Transit Timing Variations In Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansone, Eric; Haghighipour, N.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the effect of a stellar companion on the transit timing variations (TTV) of a planetary system. The purpose of our study is to determine the ranges of the orbital elements of a secondary star for which the amplitude of a currently existing TTV is enhanced. We chose the system of Kepler 9 as this system represents the first planetary system detected by the transit timing variation method, and studied its TTVs by considering a hypothetical secondary star in this system. By varying the mass, semi-major axis, and eccentricity of the fictitious binary companion, we tested the stability of the known planets Kepler-9c and Kepler-9b and identified the region of the parameter-space for which the binary planetary system would be stable. We calculated TTVs for the two planets of the system for different values of the orbital elements of the secondary star and calculated its difference with the system's already existing TTVs. Results of our study indicate that the effect of the binary companion is significant only when the secondary star is in a highly eccentric orbit and/or the planets of the system are within the range of Super-Earth or terrestrial sizes. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation in the form of a Research Experience for Undergraduates program at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

  4. Cryptic genetic variation and paraphyly in ravens.

    PubMed Central

    Omland, K E; Tarr, C L; Boarma, W I; Marzluff, J M; Fleischer, R C

    2000-01-01

    Widespread species that are morphologically uniform may be likely to harbour cryptic genetic variation. Common ravens (Corvus corax) have an extensive range covering nearly the entire Northern Hemisphere, but show little discrete phenotypic variation. We obtained tissue samples from throughout much of this range and collected mitochondrial sequence and nuclear microsatellite data. Our study revealed a deep genetic break between ravens from the western United States and ravens from throughout the rest of the world. These two groups, the 'California clade' and the 'Holarctic clade' are well supported and over 4% divergent in mitochondrial coding sequence. Microsatellites also reveal significant differentiation between these two groups. Ravens from Minnesota, Maine and Alaska are more similar to ravens from Asia and Europe than they are to ravens from California. The two clades come in contact over a huge area of the western United States, with mixtures of the two mitochondrial groups present in Washington, Idaho and California. In addition, the restricted range Chihuahuan raven (Corvus cryptoleucus) of the south-west United States and Mexico is genetically nested within the paraphyletic common raven. Our findings suggest that the common raven may have formerly consisted of two allopatric groups that may be in the process of remerging. PMID:11197122

  5. REGIONAL VARIATIONS IN CHILD MARRIAGE IN BANGLADESH.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Kamrul; Haque, Md Rabiul; Hossain, Mohammad Bellal

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the regional variations in the prevalence of child marriage in Bangladesh with a view to providing recommendations for division-specific policy interventions. Data from the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey were analysed using multivariate logistic regression. Substantial regional variations in child marriage were found in Bangladesh. Rangpur and Khulna had more than four times higher odds of child marriage than Sylhet (4.57 and 4.11 times, respectively). Barisal and Rajshahi had more than three times higher odds of child marriage than Sylhet (3.70 and 3.48 times, respectively). Chittagong and Dhaka had about two times odds of child marriage than Sylhet (1.98 and 2.67 times, respectively), even after controlling for selected socio-demographic, economic and cultural characteristics. Respondent's education, employment status, husband's education and wealth index were inversely associated with the prevalence of child marriage. The policy implications of these findings are discussed in the context of Bangladesh. PMID:27076200

  6. Variation in lunar neutron dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Slaba, Tony C; Blattnig, Steve R; Clowdsley, Martha S

    2011-12-01

    The radiation environment on the Moon includes albedo neutrons produced by primary particles interacting with the lunar surface. In this work, HZETRN2010 is used to calculate the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose as a function of shielding thickness for four different space radiation environments and to determine to what extent various factors affect such estimates. First, albedo neutron spectra computed with HZETRN2010 are compared to Monte Carlo results in various radiation environments. Next, the impact of lunar regolith composition on the albedo neutron spectrum is examined, and the variation on effective dose caused by neutron fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients is studied. A methodology for computing effective dose in detailed human phantoms using HZETRN2010 is also discussed and compared. Finally, the combined variation caused by environmental models, shielding materials, shielding thickness, regolith composition and conversion coefficients on the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose is determined. It is shown that a single percentage number for characterizing the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose can be misleading. In general, the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose is found to vary between 1-32%, with the environmental model, shielding material and shielding thickness being the driving factors that determine the exact contribution. It is also shown that polyethylene or other hydrogen-rich materials may be used to mitigate the albedo neutron exposure. PMID:21859325

  7. Copy variations in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lachman, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of copy number variations (CNVs) is an emerging tool for identifying genetic factors underlying complex traits. In this chapter I will review studies that have been carried out showing that CNVs play a role in the development of two such complex traits; schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). There are two aspects to consider regarding the role of copy variations in these conditions. One is gene discovery in which DNA from patients is analyzed for the purpose of identifying rare, patient-specific CNVs that may be informative to a larger population of affected individuals. The model for this concept is based on the emergence of DISC1 as a SZ candidate gene, which was discovered in a single informative family with a rare chromosomal translocation. Another aspect revolves around the idea that polymorphic CNVs found in the general population, many of which appear to disrupt previously identified SZ and BD candidate genes, contribute to disease pathogenesis. Here, gene-disrupting CNVs are viewed in the same manner as functional SNPs and analyzed for involvement in disease susceptibility using genetic association. Although the analysis of CNVs in patients with psychiatric disorders is in its infancy, informative new findings have already been made, suggesting that this is a very promising line of research. PMID:19287136

  8. Variational exemplar-based image colorization.

    PubMed

    Bugeau, Aurélie; Ta, Vinh-Thong; Papadakis, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of recovering a color image from a grayscale one. The input color data comes from a source image considered as a reference image. Reconstructing the missing color of a grayscale pixel is here viewed as the problem of automatically selecting the best color among a set of color candidates while simultaneously ensuring the local spatial coherency of the reconstructed color information. To solve this problem, we propose a variational approach where a specific energy is designed to model the color selection and the spatial constraint problems simultaneously. The contributions of this paper are twofold. First, we introduce a variational formulation modeling the color selection problem under spatial constraints and propose a minimization scheme, which computes a local minima of the defined nonconvex energy. Second, we combine different patch-based features and distances in order to construct a consistent set of possible color candidates. This set is used as input data and our energy minimization automatically selectsthe best color to transfer for each pixel of the grayscale image. Finally, the experiments illustrate the potentiality of our simple methodology and show that our results are very competitive with respect to the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:24235307

  9. Characteristic variations in reflectance of surface soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Surface soil samples from a wide range of naturally occurring soils were obtained for the purpose of studying the characteristic variations in soil reflectance as these variations relate to other soil properties and soil classification. A total 485 soil samples from the U.S. and Brazil representing 30 suborders of the 10 orders of 'Soil Taxonomy' was examined. The spectral bidirectional reflectance factor was measured on uniformly moist soils over the 0.52 to 2.32 micron wavelength range with a spectroradiometer adapted for indoor use. Five distinct soil spectral reflectance curve forms were identified according to curve shape, the presence or absence of absorption bands, and the predominance of soil organic matter and iron oxide composition. These curve forms were further characterized according to generically homogeneous soil properties in a manner similar to the subdivisions at the suborder level of 'Soil Taxonomy'. Results indicate that spectroradiometric measurements of soil spectral bidirectional reflectance factor can be used to characterize soil reflectance in terms that are meaningful to soil classification, genesis, and survey.

  10. Deterministic prediction of surface wind speed variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drisya, G. V.; Kiplangat, D. C.; Asokan, K.; Satheesh Kumar, K.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate prediction of wind speed is an important aspect of various tasks related to wind energy management such as wind turbine predictive control and wind power scheduling. The most typical characteristic of wind speed data is its persistent temporal variations. Most of the techniques reported in the literature for prediction of wind speed and power are based on statistical methods or probabilistic distribution of wind speed data. In this paper we demonstrate that deterministic forecasting methods can make accurate short-term predictions of wind speed using past data, at locations where the wind dynamics exhibit chaotic behaviour. The predictions are remarkably accurate up to 1 h with a normalised RMSE (root mean square error) of less than 0.02 and reasonably accurate up to 3 h with an error of less than 0.06. Repeated application of these methods at 234 different geographical locations for predicting wind speeds at 30-day intervals for 3 years reveals that the accuracy of prediction is more or less the same across all locations and time periods. Comparison of the results with f-ARIMA model predictions shows that the deterministic models with suitable parameters are capable of returning improved prediction accuracy and capturing the dynamical variations of the actual time series more faithfully. These methods are simple and computationally efficient and require only records of past data for making short-term wind speed forecasts within practically tolerable margin of errors.

  11. [CYCLIC VARIATIONS OF LARYNGOTRACHEITIS IN CHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Stanislavchuk, L M

    2015-01-01

    It was analyzed the incidences of laryngotracheitis (LT) in children aged 0 to 14 years in Vinnytsya between 1995 and 2008. It was studied seasonal and circadian rhythms of LT in children. The seasonal variations of LT are characterized by two-wave curve with peaks in October and March, and with a significant decrease in July and August. The incidences of LT in October and March exceed the incidences of LT in July and August in 2.6 times. Circadian variation of LT is characterized by peak at night. The incidences of LT at night exceed the incidences in the morning in 2.6 times. The total number of the incidences of LT in the evening and at night exceed the total number of the incidences of LT in the morning and in the afternoon in 1.7 times. The maximum of incidences of LT to minimum of incidences of LT per hour ratio is 5:1 in girls compared to 4:1 in boys. PMID:26827443

  12. Predicting global variation in infectious disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Per M.; De Fine Licht, Henrik H.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Understanding the underlying causes for the variation in case-fatality-ratios (CFR) is important for assessing the mechanism governing global disparity in the burden of infectious diseases. Variation in CFR is likely to be driven by factors such as population genetics, demography, transmission patterns and general health status. We present data here that support the hypothsis that changes in CFRs for specific diseases may be the result of serial passage through different hosts. For example passage through adults may lead to lower CFR, whereas passage through children may have the opposite effect. Accordingly changes in CFR may occur in parallel with demographic transitions. Methodology: We explored the predictability of CFR using data obtained from the World Health Organization (WHO) disease databases for four human diseases: mumps, malaria, tuberculosis and leptospirosis and assessed these for association with a range of population characteristics, such as crude birth and death rates, median age of the population, mean body mass index, proportion living in urban areas and tuberculosis vaccine coverage. We then tested this predictive model on Danish historical demographic and population data. Results: Birth rates were the best predictor for mumps and malaria CFR. For tuberculosis CFR death rates were the best predictor and for leptospirosis population density was a significant predictor. Conclusions and implications: CFR predictors differed among diseases according to their biology. We suggest that the overall result reflects an interaction between the forces driving demographic change and the virulence of human-to-human transmitted diseases. PMID:26884415

  13. Insolation driven variations of Mercury's lithospheric strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jean-Pierre; Ruiz, Javier; Rosenburg, Margaret A.; Aharonson, Oded; Phillips, Roger J.

    2011-01-01

    Mercury's coupled 3:2 spin-orbit resonance in conjunction with its relatively high eccentricity of ˜0.2 and near-zero obliquity results in both a latitudinal and longitudinal variation in annual average solar insolation and thus equatorial hot and cold regions. This results in an asymmetric temperature distribution in the lithosphere and a long wavelength lateral variation in lithosphere structure and strength that mirrors the insolation pattern. We employ a thermal evolution model for Mercury generating strength envelopes of the lithosphere to demonstrate and quantify the possible effects the insolation pattern has on Mercury's lithosphere. We find the heterogeneity in lithosphere strength is substantial and increases with time. We also find that a crust thicker than that of the Moon or Mars and dry rheologies for the crust and mantle are favorable when compared with estimates of brittle-ductile transition depths derived from lobate scarps. Regions of stronger and weaker compressive strength imply that the accommodation of radial contraction of Mercury as its interior cooled, manifest as lobate scarps, may not be isotropic, imparting a preferential orientation and distribution to the lobate scarps.

  14. Solar cycle variations of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.

    1983-01-01

    Throughout the course of the past one and a half solar cycles, solar wind parameters measured near the ecliptic plane at 1 AU varied in the following way: speed and proton temperature have maxima during the declining phase and minima at solar minimum and are approximately anti-correlated with number density and electron temperature, while magnetic field magnitude and relative abundance of helium roughly follow the sunspot cycle. These variations are described in terms of the solar cycle variations of coronal holes, streamers, and transients. The solar wind signatures of the three features are discussed in turn, with special emphasis on the signature of transients, which is still in the process of being defined. It is proposed that magnetic clouds be identified with helium abundance enhancements and that they form the head of a transient surrounded by streamer like plasma, with an optional shock front. It is stressed that relative values of a parameter through a solar cycle should be compared beginning with the declining phase, especially in the case of magnetic field magnitude.

  15. Parallel geographic variation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Josie A; Kolaczkowski, Bryan; Jones, Corbin D; Begun, David J; Kern, Andrew D

    2014-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster, an ancestrally African species, has recently spread throughout the world, associated with human activity. The species has served as the focus of many studies investigating local adaptation relating to latitudinal variation in non-African populations, especially those from the United States and Australia. These studies have documented the existence of shared, genetically determined phenotypic clines for several life history and morphological traits. However, there are no studies designed to formally address the degree of shared latitudinal differentiation at the genomic level. Here we present our comparative analysis of such differentiation. Not surprisingly, we find evidence of substantial, shared selection responses on the two continents, probably resulting from selection on standing ancestral variation. The polymorphic inversion In(3R)P has an important effect on this pattern, but considerable parallelism is also observed across the genome in regions not associated with inversion polymorphism. Interestingly, parallel latitudinal differentiation is observed even for variants that are not particularly strongly differentiated, which suggests that very large numbers of polymorphisms are targets of spatially varying selection in this species. PMID:24610860

  16. Endogenous sources of variation in language acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chung-hye; Musolino, Julien

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental question in the study of human language acquisition centers around apportioning explanatory force between the experience of the learner and the core knowledge that allows learners to represent that experience. We provide a previously unidentified kind of data identifying children’s contribution to language acquisition. We identify one aspect of grammar that varies unpredictably across a population of speakers of what is ostensibly a single language. We further demonstrate that the grammatical knowledge of parents and their children is independent. The combination of unpredictable variation and parent–child independence suggests that the relevant structural feature is supplied by each learner independent of experience with the language. This structural feature is abstract because it controls variation in more than one construction. The particular case we examine is the position of the verb in the clause structure of Korean. Because Korean is a head-final language, evidence for the syntactic position of the verb is both rare and indirect. We show that (i) Korean speakers exhibit substantial variability regarding this aspect of the grammar, (ii) this variability is attested between speakers but not within a speaker, (iii) this variability controls interpretation in two surface constructions, and (iv) it is independent in parents and children. According to our findings, when the exposure language is compatible with multiple grammars, learners acquire a single systematic grammar. Our observation that children and their parents vary independently suggests that the choice of grammar is driven in part by a process operating internal to individual learners. PMID:26755580

  17. Endogenous sources of variation in language acquisition.

    PubMed

    Han, Chung-Hye; Musolino, Julien; Lidz, Jeffrey

    2016-01-26

    A fundamental question in the study of human language acquisition centers around apportioning explanatory force between the experience of the learner and the core knowledge that allows learners to represent that experience. We provide a previously unidentified kind of data identifying children's contribution to language acquisition. We identify one aspect of grammar that varies unpredictably across a population of speakers of what is ostensibly a single language. We further demonstrate that the grammatical knowledge of parents and their children is independent. The combination of unpredictable variation and parent-child independence suggests that the relevant structural feature is supplied by each learner independent of experience with the language. This structural feature is abstract because it controls variation in more than one construction. The particular case we examine is the position of the verb in the clause structure of Korean. Because Korean is a head-final language, evidence for the syntactic position of the verb is both rare and indirect. We show that (i) Korean speakers exhibit substantial variability regarding this aspect of the grammar, (ii) this variability is attested between speakers but not within a speaker, (iii) this variability controls interpretation in two surface constructions, and (iv) it is independent in parents and children. According to our findings, when the exposure language is compatible with multiple grammars, learners acquire a single systematic grammar. Our observation that children and their parents vary independently suggests that the choice of grammar is driven in part by a process operating internal to individual learners. PMID:26755580

  18. Day night variation of cohesive sediment stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friend, P. L.; Lucas, C. H.; Rossington, S. K.

    2005-08-01

    Surface sediment properties related to cohesive sediment stability were measured over 8 consecutive day- and night-time emersion periods at three upper intertidal sites on a mudflat in August 2003, during the transition from spring to neap tides. Significant differences between day- and night-time critical erosion shear stress ( τc) and chlorophyll a were found. A high degree of temporal and spatial variability existed between the sediment properties. During the first half of the study period, a rhythmic day-night variation occurred between τc, chl a, colloidal-S- and EDTA-extracted carbohydrate. During the second part of the study, the magnitude of variation of these parameters diminished. Results showed that sediments were more stable during the day than at night. Differences between day- and night-time sediment stability were related not only to diatom migration, but also to wave energy during preceding immersion periods. No significant relationships existed between τc and either chl a, or colloidal-S- or EDTA-extracted carbohydrate sediment content. It is suggested that tidal phasing, in terms of both the time during the day at which low water spring and neap tides occur, as well as the duration of the emersion period, control the biomass dynamics. The tidal phasing effect is expected to be more pronounced on a cohesive intertidal flat where low water spring tides occur at noon and midnight. The results of this study will be of use in time-dependent estuarine models.

  19. Variational principles for stochastic fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Darryl D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper derives stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) for fluid dynamics from a stochastic variational principle (SVP). The paper proceeds by taking variations in the SVP to derive stochastic Stratonovich fluid equations; writing their Itô representation; and then investigating the properties of these stochastic fluid models in comparison with each other, and with the corresponding deterministic fluid models. The circulation properties of the stochastic Stratonovich fluid equations are found to closely mimic those of the deterministic ideal fluid models. As with deterministic ideal flows, motion along the stochastic Stratonovich paths also preserves the helicity of the vortex field lines in incompressible stochastic flows. However, these Stratonovich properties are not apparent in the equivalent Itô representation, because they are disguised by the quadratic covariation drift term arising in the Stratonovich to Itô transformation. This term is a geometric generalization of the quadratic covariation drift term already found for scalar densities in Stratonovich's famous 1966 paper. The paper also derives motion equations for two examples of stochastic geophysical fluid dynamics; namely, the Euler–Boussinesq and quasi-geostropic approximations.

  20. Vertical variations of coral reef drag forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Shai; Niewerth, Stephan; Koll, Katinka; Shavit, Uri

    2016-05-01

    Modeling flow in a coral reef requires a closure model that links the local drag force to the local mean velocity. However, the spatial flow variations make it difficult to predict the distribution of the local drag. Here we report on vertical profiles of measured drag and velocity in a laboratory reef that was made of 81 Pocillopora Meandrina colony skeletons, densely arranged along a tilted flume. Two corals were CT-scanned, sliced horizontally, and printed using a 3-D printer. Drag was measured as a function of height above the bottom by connecting the slices to drag sensors. Profiles of velocity were measured in-between the coral branches and above the reef. Measured drag of whole colonies shows an excellent agreement with previous field and laboratory studies; however, these studies never showed how drag varies vertically. The vertical distribution of drag is reported as a function of flow rate and water level. When the water level is the same as the reef height, Reynolds stresses are negligible and the drag force per unit fluid mass is nearly constant. However, when the water depth is larger, Reynolds stress gradients become significant and drag increases with height. An excellent agreement was found between the drag calculated by a momentum budget and the measured drag of the individual printed slices. Finally, we propose a modified formulation of the drag coefficient that includes the normal dispersive stress term and results in reduced variations of the drag coefficient at the cost of introducing an additional coefficient.

  1. Variational calculations of positronium scattering with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Denton

    Positronium-hydrogen (Ps-H) scattering is of interest, as it is a fundamental four-body Coulomb problem. We have investigated low-energy Ps-H scattering below the Ps(n=2) excitation threshold using the Kohn variational method and variants of the method with a trial wavefunction that includes highly correlated Hylleraas-type short-range terms. We give an elegant formalism that combines all Kohn-type variational methods into a single form. Along with this, we have also developed a general formalism for Kohn-type matrix elements that allows us to evaluate arbitrary partial waves with a single codebase. Computational strategies we have developed and use in this work will also be discussed. With these methods, we have computed phase shifts for the first six partial waves for both the singlet and triplet states. The 1S and 1P phase shifts are highly accurate results and could potentially be viewed as benchmark results. Resonance positions and widths for the 1S-, 1P-, 1D-, and 1F-waves have been calculated. We present elastic integrated, elastic differential, and momentum transfer cross sections using all six partial waves and note interesting features of each. We use multiple effective range theories, including several that explicitly take into account the long-range van der Waals interaction, to investigate scattering lengths for the 1,3S and 1,3P partial waves and effective ranges for the 1,3S-wave.

  2. Scanner-based macroscopic color variation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chunghui; Lai, Di; Zeise, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Flatbed scanners have been adopted successfully in the measurement of microscopic image artifacts, such as granularity and mottle, in print samples because of their capability of providing full color, high resolution images. Accurate macroscopic color measurement relies on the use of colorimeters or spectrophotometers to provide a surrogate for human vision. The very different color response characteristics of flatbed scanners from any standard colorimetric response limits the utility of a flatbed scanner as a macroscopic color measuring device. This metamerism constraint can be significantly relaxed if our objective is mainly to quantify the color variations within a printed page or between pages where a small bias in measured colors can be tolerated as long as the color distributions relative to the individual mean values is similar. Two scenarios when converting color from the device RGB color space to a standardized color space such as CIELab are studied in this paper, blind and semi-blind color transformation, depending on the availability of the black channel information. We will show that both approaches offer satisfactory results in quantifying macroscopic color variation across pages while the semi-blind color transformation further provides fairly accurate color prediction capability.

  3. Diurnal variations in optical depth at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, D. S.; Pollack, J. B.; Haberle, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    Viking lander camera images of the Sun were used to compute atmospheric optical depth at two sites over a period of 1 to 1/3 martian years. The complete set of 1044 optical depth determinations is presented in graphical and tabular form. Error estimates are presented in detail. Otpical depths in the morning (AM) are generally larger than in the afternoon (PM). The AM-PM differences are ascribed to condensation of water vapor into atmospheric ice aerosols at night and their evaporation in midday. A smoothed time series of these differences shows several seasonal peaks. These are simulated using a one-dimensional radiative convective model which predicts martial atmospheric temperature profiles. A calculation combinig these profiles with water vapor measurements from the Mars Atmospheric Water Detector is used to predict when the diurnal variations of water condensation should occur. The model reproduces a majority of the observed peaks and shows the factors influencing the process. Diurnal variation of condensation is shown to peak when the latitude and season combine to warm the atmosphere to the optimum temperature, cool enough to condense vapor at night and warm enough to cause evaporation at midday.

  4. Solar cycle variation of network magnetic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. X.; Jin, C. L.

    With the unique database from Michelson Doppler Imager aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in an interval embodying solar cycle 23, the cyclic behavior of solar small-scale magnetic elements is studied. More than 13 million solar network magnetic elements are selected, and the following results are discussed. (1) With increasing flux per element, the number variation of the network elements shows a three-fold scenario: no-correlation, anti-correlation, and correlation with sunspots, respectively. The anti-correlated elements cover flux range of (2.9 - 32.0)× 10^{18} Mx, and occupy 77.2% of total network elements. (2) The latitude distribution of the correlated elements follows the sunspot butterfly diagram in the solar cycle but has wider latitude distribution than sunspots. Furthermore, the anti-correlated elements also show much broad latitude distribution, but a moderate migration toward equator during the solar maximum which was clearly out of phase with sunspots. These results shed new light in understanding anti-correlated variations of small-scale solar activity, e.g., X-ray coronal bright points, and the origin of the Sun's small-scale magnetism.

  5. Seasonal variation in muscle sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Muller, Matthew D; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-08-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest there are seasonal variations in the incidence of severe cardiac events with peak levels being evident in the winter. Whether autonomic indices including muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) vary with season remains unclear. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that resting MSNA varies with the seasons of the year with peak levels evident in the winter. We analyzed the supine resting MSNA in 60 healthy subjects. Each subject was studied during two, three, or four seasons (total 237 visits). MSNA burst rate in the winter (21.0 ± 6.8 burst/min, mean ± SD) was significantly greater than in the summer (13.5 ± 5.8 burst/min, P < 0.001), the spring (17.1 ± 9.0 burst/min, P = 0.03), and the fall (17.9 ± 7.7 burst/min, P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in MSNA for other seasonal comparisons. The results suggest that resting sympathetic nerve activity varies along the seasons, with peak levels evident in the winter. We speculate that the seasonal changes in sympathetic activity may be a contribution to the previously observed seasonal variations in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26265752

  6. Seasonal variation in muscle sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Muller, Matthew D; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest there are seasonal variations in the incidence of severe cardiac events with peak levels being evident in the winter. Whether autonomic indices including muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) vary with season remains unclear. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that resting MSNA varies with the seasons of the year with peak levels evident in the winter. We analyzed the supine resting MSNA in 60 healthy subjects. Each subject was studied during two, three, or four seasons (total 237 visits). MSNA burst rate in the winter (21.0 ± 6.8 burst/min, mean ± SD) was significantly greater than in the summer (13.5 ± 5.8 burst/min, P < 0.001), the spring (17.1 ± 9.0 burst/min, P = 0.03), and the fall (17.9 ± 7.7 burst/min, P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in MSNA for other seasonal comparisons. The results suggest that resting sympathetic nerve activity varies along the seasons, with peak levels evident in the winter. We speculate that the seasonal changes in sympathetic activity may be a contribution to the previously observed seasonal variations in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26265752

  7. Habiline variation: a new approach using STET.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Wolpoff, Milford H

    2005-08-01

    The problem of whether the hominid fossil sample of habiline specimens is comprised of more than one species has received much attention in paleoanthropology. The core of this debate has critical implications about when and how variation can be explained by taxonomy. In this paper, we examine the problem of whether the observed variation in habiline samples reflects species differences. We test the null hypothesis of no difference by examining the degree of variability in habiline sample in comparison with other single-species early hominid fossil samples from Sterkfontein and Swartkrans (Sterkfontein is earlier than the habiline sample, Swartkrans may be within the habiline time span). We developed a new method for this examination, which we call STandard Error Test of the null hypothesis of no difference (STET). Our sampling statistic is based on the standard error of the slope of regressions between pairs of specimens, relating all of the homologous measurements that each pair shares. We show that the null hypothesis for the habiline sample cannot be rejected. The similarities of specimen pairs within the habiline sample are not more than those observed between the specimens in the australopithecine samples we analyzed. PMID:17046346

  8. Variational elliptic solver for atmospheric applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smolarkiewicz, P.K.; Margolin, L.G.

    1994-03-01

    We discuss a conjugate gradient type method -- the conjugate residual -- suitable for solving linear elliptic equations that result from discretization of complex atmospheric dynamical problems. Rotation and irregular boundaries typically lead to nonself-adjoint elliptic operators whose matrix representation on the grid is definite but not symmetric. On the other hand, most established methods for solving large sparse matrix equations depend on the symmetry and definiteness of the matrix. Furthermore, the explicit construction of the matrix can be both difficult and computationally expensive. An attractive feature of conjugate gradient methods in general is that they do not require any knowledge of the matrix; and in particular, convergence of conjugate residual algorithms do not rely on symmetry for definite operators. We begin by reviewing some basic concepts of variational algorithms from the perspective of a physical analogy to the damped wave equation, which is a simple alternative to the traditional abstract framework of the Krylov subspace methods. We derive two conjugate residual schemes from variational principles, and prove that either definiteness or symmetry ensures their convergence. We discuss issues related to computational efficiency and illustrate our theoretical considerations with a test problem of the potential flow of a Boussinesq fluid flow past a steep, three-dimensional obstacle.

  9. Adjoint Function: Physical Basis of Variational & Perturbation Theory in Transport

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-07-27

    Version 00 Dr. J.D. Lewins has now released the following legacy book for free distribution: Importance: The Adjoint Function: The Physical Basis of Variational and Perturbation Theory in Transport and Diffusion Problems, North-Holland Publishing Company - Amsterdam, 582 pages, 1966 Introduction: Continuous Systems and the Variational Principle 1. The Fundamental Variational Principle 2. The Importance Function 3. Adjoint Equations 4. Variational Methods 5. Perturbation and Iterative Methods 6. Non-Linear Theory

  10. Diurnal variations from muon data at Takeyama underground station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, K.; Imai, K.; Imai, T.; Kudo, S.; Wada, M.

    1985-01-01

    An underground station, Takeyama, is introduced, and some results of the solar diurnal and semi-diurnal variations for the period between 1967 and 1984 are presented. There are clear tendencies of double and single solar cycle variations in the daily variations which are in good accord with those detected by other underground and neutron monitor observations.

  11. 46 CFR 111.01-17 - Voltage and frequency variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Voltage and frequency variations. 111.01-17 Section 111... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-17 Voltage and frequency variations. Unless otherwise stated, electrical equipment must function at variations of at least ±5 percent of rated...

  12. 20 CFR 416.2030 - Optional supplementation: Variations in payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... State may elect up to six variations in recognition of the different needs which result from various living arrangements. If a State elects six payment level variations based on differences in living arrangements, one of these six variations must apply only to individuals in Medicaid facilities, that...

  13. Analysis of copy number variations among cattle breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic structural variation is an important and abundant source of genetic and phenotypic variation. Here we describe the first systematic and genome-wide analysis of copy number variations (CNVs) in the modern domesticated cattle using array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and quanti...

  14. Variation in sexual communication of the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Females of the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens (F.), exhibit distinct geographical and temporal variation in sex pheromone composition, but the causes and significance of this variation are largely unexplored. Here we assessed whether 1) female pheromone variation was related to the host pla...

  15. Interdecadal variations of annual precipitation in the central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hu, Q.; Woodruff, C.M.; Mudrick, S.E.

    1998-01-01

    Century-long annual precipitation time series at 168 stations in the central United States are analyzed with special attention given to interdecadal variations. The results show statistically significant precipitation variations of interdecadal timescales in the region. In particular, one variation has a quasi 20-yr period, and another one possesses a quasi 12-yr period.

  16. Studies of the observed and theoretical variations of atmospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Julius

    1990-01-01

    The four related topics covered include: (1) distributions of total and upper atmospheric ozone and their time and space variations; (2) observed and theoretical models of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) ozone variation; (3) radiative processes in the upper atmosphere; and (4) relations between ozone and solar variations. The results of these studies are presented. They come from twenty-three published papers.

  17. Using the Screened Coulomb Potential to Illustrate the Variational Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuniga, Jose; Bastida, Adolfo; Requena, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The screened Coulomb potential, or Yukawa potential, is used to illustrate the application of the single and linear variational methods. The trial variational functions are expressed in terms of Slater-type functions, for which the integrals needed to carry out the variational calculations are easily evaluated in closed form. The variational…

  18. 48 CFR 52.211-18 - Variation in Estimated Quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Variation in Estimated....211-18 Variation in Estimated Quantity. As prescribed in 11.703(c), insert the following clause in... in the estimated quantity of unit-priced items: Variation in Estimated Quantity (APR 1984) If...

  19. Analysis of copy number variations reveals differences among cattle breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic structural variation is an important and abundant source of genetic and phenotypic variation. Here we describe the first systematic and genome-wide analysis of copy number variations (CNVs) in the modern domesticated cattle using array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and quanti...

  20. Center Variation in Cost and Outcomes for Congenital Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pasquali, Sara K.; Gaies, Michael G.; Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Gaynor, J. William; Jacobs, Marshall L.

    2013-01-01

    While overall outcomes for children undergoing heart surgery have improved, significant variation in outcome across hospitals remains. This review discusses variation in cost and outcomes across centers performing congenital heart surgery, potential underlying mechanisms, and efforts to reduce variation and improve outcome. PMID:23331604

  1. Detecting short period variations in lava flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Pinkerton, H.

    2009-04-01

    Although the underpinning processes that govern the flow of lava have been recognized for some time, modeling the evolution of lava flow fields remains problematic due to the difficulties in fully constraining inputs to flow models. One of the main parameters controlling the evolution of individual flows is effusion rate, and long period effusion rate changes, such as flow-waning prior to the cessation of an eruption, can now be routinely incorporated in simulations. However, effusion rates commonly vary over a wide range of timescales (from years to minutes) and, for short period changes, neither the cause nor the effects are well understood. Nevertheless, short period changes can result in inaccuracies in the input data for simulations and can be responsible for altering flow directions by either building or breaching flow levees. Hence, understanding the processes involved in such changes is important for flow modeling and, furthermore, could eventually provide insight into flow instabilities within the conduit or variability within degassing processes. Observations of short period (e.g. <1 hr) variations in lava flux have been made previously in the field but associated changes cannot be identified in effusion rate data because of the generally low sampling frequency of such data. During the last week of July 2008, trail cameras were used to obtain dense time series imagery of the active lava flow at Mount Etna, Sicily. The trail cameras were modified to capture timelapse imagery by adding an interval timer which triggered image capture every 10 minutes. During daylight, the cameras collected 5 M-pixel colour images and, during nighttime, they automatically switched to a 2 M-pixel camera which collected (uncalibrated) black and white infrared images. For the color images, haze, cloud and sunglare combined with the low contrast between the active lava and its surroundings, prevented useful analysis. However, the infrared images captured at night clearly

  2. Magma rheology variation in sheet intrusions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, C.; O'Driscoll, B.; Petronis, M. S.; Stevenson, C.

    2013-12-01

    The rheology of magma fundamentally controls igneous intrusion style as well as the explosivity and type of volcanic eruptions. Importantly, the dynamic interplay between the viscosity of magma and other processes active during intrusion (e.g., crystallisation, magma mixing, assimilation of crystal mushes and/or xenolith entrainment) will likely bear an influence on the temporal variation of magma rheology. Constraining the timing of rheological changes during magma transit therefore plays an important role in understanding the nuances of volcanic systems. However, the rheological evolution of actively emplacing igneous intrusions cannot be directly studied. While significant advances have been made via experimental modelling and analysis of lava flows, how these findings relate to intruding magma remains unclear. This has led to an increasing number of studies that analyse various characteristics of fully crystallised intrusions in an attempt to ';back-out' the rheological conditions governing emplacement. For example, it has long been known that crystallinity affects the rheology and, consequently, the velocity of intruding magma. This means that quantitative textural analysis of crystal populations (e.g., crystal size distribution; CSD) used to elucidate crystallinity at different stages of emplacement can provide insights into magma rheology. Similarly, methods that measure flow-related fabrics (e.g., anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility; AMS) can be used to discern velocity profiles, a potential proxy for the magma rheology. To illustrate these ideas, we present an integrated AMS and petrological study of several sheet intrusions located within the Ardnamurchan Central Complex, NW Scotland. We focus on the entrainment and transport dynamics of gabbroic inclusions that were infiltrated by the host magma upon entrainment. Importantly, groundmass magnetic fabrics within and external to these inclusions are coaxial. This implies that a deviatoric stress was

  3. Population genetic variation in gene expression is associated withphenotypic variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, Justin C.; McCullough, Heather L.; Sniegowski, Paul D.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-02-25

    The relationship between genetic variation in gene expression and phenotypic variation observable in nature is not well understood. Identifying how many phenotypes are associated with differences in gene expression and how many gene-expression differences are associated with a phenotype is important to understanding the molecular basis and evolution of complex traits. Results: We compared levels of gene expression among nine natural isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown either in the presence or absence of copper sulfate. Of the nine strains, two show a reduced growth rate and two others are rust colored in the presence of copper sulfate. We identified 633 genes that show significant differences in expression among strains. Of these genes,20 were correlated with resistance to copper sulfate and 24 were correlated with rust coloration. The function of these genes in combination with their expression pattern suggests the presence of both correlative and causative expression differences. But the majority of differentially expressed genes were not correlated with either phenotype and showed the same expression pattern both in the presence and absence of copper sulfate. To determine whether these expression differences may contribute to phenotypic variation under other environmental conditions, we examined one phenotype, freeze tolerance, predicted by the differential expression of the aquaporin gene AQY2. We found freeze tolerance is associated with the expression of AQY2. Conclusions: Gene expression differences provide substantial insight into the molecular basis of naturally occurring traits and can be used to predict environment dependent phenotypic variation.

  4. Human genetic variation database, a reference database of genetic variations in the Japanese population

    PubMed Central

    Higasa, Koichiro; Miyake, Noriko; Yoshimura, Jun; Okamura, Kohji; Niihori, Tetsuya; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Doi, Koichiro; Shimizu, Masakazu; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Aoki, Yoko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Morishita, Shinichi; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Migita, Osuke; Nakayama, Keiko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Mitsui, Jun; Narahara, Maiko; Hayashi, Keiko; Funayama, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Ko, Wen-Ya; Hata, Kenichiro; Nagashima, Takeshi; Yamada, Ryo; Matsubara, Yoichi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Tsuji, Shoji; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome and -exome resequencing using next-generation sequencers is a powerful approach for identifying genomic variations that are associated with diseases. However, systematic strategies for prioritizing causative variants from many candidates to explain the disease phenotype are still far from being established, because the population-specific frequency spectrum of genetic variation has not been characterized. Here, we have collected exomic genetic variation from 1208 Japanese individuals through a collaborative effort, and aggregated the data into a prevailing catalog. In total, we identified 156 622 previously unreported variants. The allele frequencies for the majority (88.8%) were lower than 0.5% in allele frequency and predicted to be functionally deleterious. In addition, we have constructed a Japanese-specific major allele reference genome by which the number of unique mapping of the short reads in our data has increased 0.045% on average. Our results illustrate the importance of constructing an ethnicity-specific reference genome for identifying rare variants. All the collected data were centralized to a newly developed database to serve as useful resources for exploring pathogenic variations. Public access to the database is available at http://www.genome.med.kyoto-u.ac.jp/SnpDB/. PMID:26911352

  5. Frequency variations of discrete cranial traits in major human populations. I. Supernumerary ossicle variations

    PubMed Central

    HANIHARA, TSUNEHIKO; ISHIDA, HAJIME

    2001-01-01

    Four supernumerary ossicle variations—the ossicle at the lambda, the parietal notch bone, the asterionic bone, and the occipitomastoid bone—were examined for laterality differences, intertrait correlations, sex differences, and between group variations in the samples from around the world. Significant laterality differences were not detected in almost all samples. In some pairs of traits, significant association of occurrence were found. Several geographic samples were sexually dimorphic with respect to the asterionic bone and to a lesser extent for the parietal notch bone. East/Northeast Asians including the Arctic populations in general had lower frequencies of the 4 accessory ossicles. Australians, Melanesians and the majority of the New World peoples, on the other hand, generally had high frequencies. In the western hemisphere of the Old World, Subsaharan Africans had relatively high frequencies. Except for the ossicle at the lambda, the distribution pattern in incidence showed clinal variation from south to north. Any identifiable adaptive value related to environmental or subsistence factors may be expressed in such clinal variation. This may allow us to hypothesise that not only mechanical factors but a founder effect, genetic drift, and population structure could have been the underlying causes for interregional variation and possible clines in the incidences of the accessory ossicles. PMID:11465862

  6. Frictional granular mechanics: A variational approach

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, R.; Silin, D.B.; Patzek, T.W.

    2009-10-16

    The mechanical properties of a cohesionless granular material are evaluated from grain-scale simulations. Intergranular interactions, including friction and sliding, are modeled by a set of contact rules based on the theories of Hertz, Mindlin, and Deresiewicz. A computer generated, three-dimensional, irregular pack of spherical grains is loaded by incremental displacement of its boundaries. Deformation is described by a sequence of static equilibrium configurations of the pack. A variational approach is employed to find the equilibrium configurations by minimizing the total work against the intergranular loads. Effective elastic moduli are evaluated from the intergranular forces and the deformation of the pack. Good agreement between the computed and measured moduli, achieved with no adjustment of material parameters, establishes the physical soundness of the proposed model.

  7. Rotating swings—a theme with variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Rotating swing rides can be found in many amusement parks, in many different versions. The ‘wave swinger’ ride, which introduces a wave motion by tilting the roof, is among the classical amusement rides that are found in many different parks, in different sizes, from a number of different makes and names, and varying thematization. The ‘StarFlyer’ is a more recent version, adding the thrill of lifting the riders 60 m or more over the ground. These rotating swing rides involve beautiful physics, often surprising, but easily observed, when brought to attention. The rides can be used for student worksheet tasks and assignments of different degrees of difficulty, across many math and physics topics. This paper presents a number of variations of student tasks relating to the theme of rotating swing rides.

  8. Seasonal Variations in Mercury's Dayside Calcium Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Cassidy, Timothy A.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer on the MESSENGER spacecraft has observed calcium emission in Mercury's exosphere on a near-daily basis since March 2011. During MESSENGER's primary and first extended missions (March 2011 - March 2013) the dayside calcium exosphere was measured over eight Mercury years. We have simulated these data with a Monte Carlo model of exospheric source processes to show that (a) there is a persistent source of energetic calcium located in the dawn equatorial region, (b) there is a seasonal dependence in the calcium source rate, and (c) there are no obvious year-to-year variations in the near-surface dayside calcium exosphere. Although the precise mechanism responsible for ejecting the calcium has not yet been determined, the most likely process is the dissociation of Ca-bearing molecules produced in micrometeoroid impact plumes to form energetic, escaping calcium atoms.

  9. Seasonal variations of snow depth on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Neumann, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    Using topography collected over one martian year from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, we have measured temporal changes in the elevation of the martian surface that correlate with the seasonal cycle of carbon dioxide exchange between the surface and atmosphere. The greatest elevation change (1.5 to 2 meters) occurs at high latitudes ( above 80 degrees ), whereas the bulk of the mass exchange occurs at lower latitudes (below 75 degrees N and below 73 degrees S). An unexpected period of sublimation was observed during northern hemisphere autumn, coincident with dust storms in the southern hemisphere. Analysis of MGS Doppler tracking residuals revealed temporal variations in the flattening of Mars that correlate with elevation changes. The combined changes in gravity and elevation constrain the average density of seasonally deposited carbon dioxide to be 910 +/- 230 kilograms per cubic meter, which is considerably denser than terrestrial snow.

  10. Stochastic variational learning in recurrent spiking networks

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Rezende, Danilo; Gerstner, Wulfram

    2014-01-01

    The ability to learn and perform statistical inference with biologically plausible recurrent networks of spiking neurons is an important step toward understanding perception and reasoning. Here we derive and investigate a new learning rule for recurrent spiking networks with hidden neurons, combining principles from variational learning and reinforcement learning. Our network defines a generative model over spike train histories and the derived learning rule has the form of a local Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity rule modulated by global factors (neuromodulators) conveying information about “novelty” on a statistically rigorous ground. Simulations show that our model is able to learn both stationary and non-stationary patterns of spike trains. We also propose one experiment that could potentially be performed with animals in order to test the dynamics of the predicted novelty signal. PMID:24772078

  11. Periodic amplitude variations in Jovian continuum radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1986-12-01

    An analysis of periodic variations in the amplitude of continuum radiation near 3 kHz trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere shows structure with periods near both 5 and 10 horus. Contrary to a plausible initial idea, the continuum amplitudes are not organized by the position of the observer relative to the dense plasma sheet. Instead, there seem to be perferred orientations of system III longitude with respect to the direction to the sun which account for the peaks. This implies a clocklike modulation of the continuum radiation intensity as opposed to a searchlight effect. The importance of the dipole longitude solar wind alignment to the amplitude of the continuum radiation implies that the source region of the radiation is near the magnetopause and may indirectly tie the generation of the radio waves to the clocklike modulation of energetic electron fluxes from Jupiter.

  12. Death rate variation in US subpopulations.

    PubMed Central

    Kindig, David A.; Seplaki, Christopher L.; Libby, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To account for variations in death rates in population subgroups of the USA. METHODS: Factors associated with age-adjusted death rates in 366 metropolitan and non- metropolitan areas of the United States were examined for 1990-92. The rates ranged from 690 to 1108 per 100 000 population (mean = 885 +/- 78 per 100 000). FINDINGS: Least squares regression analysis explained 71% of this variance. Factors with the strongest independent positive association were ethnicity (African-American), less than a high school education, high Medicare expenditures, and location in western or southern regions. Factors with the strongest independent negative associations were employment in agriculture and forestry, ethnicity (Hispanic) and per capita income. CONCLUSION: Additional research at the individual level is needed to determine if these associations are causal, since some of the factors with the strongest associations, such as education, have long latency periods. PMID:11884968

  13. Copy Number Variation across European Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanting; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Vitart, Veronique; Knott, Sara; Wild, Sarah H.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Porteous, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Genome analysis provides a powerful approach to test for evidence of genetic variation within and between geographical regions and local populations. Copy number variants which comprise insertions, deletions and duplications of genomic sequence provide one such convenient and informative source. Here, we investigate copy number variants from genome wide scans of single nucleotide polymorphisms in three European population isolates, the island of Vis in Croatia, the islands of Orkney in Scotland and the South Tyrol in Italy. We show that whereas the overall copy number variant frequencies are similar between populations, their distribution is highly specific to the population of origin, a finding which is supported by evidence for increased kinship correlation for specific copy number variants within populations. PMID:21829696

  14. Voice quality variations in English sentences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Melissa

    2002-05-01

    This study examines the predictability of changes in voice quality at the sentence level in English. Sentence-level effects can only be isolated once the effects of linguistic factors (e.g., glottalization before a glottalized consonant), social or dialectal, and individual factors have been eliminated. In this study, these effects were controlled by obtaining a baseline value for each measurement for each word of the corpus. Voice quality variations were tracked using quantitative measurements derived from the LF model of the glottal source, and also qualitative descriptions of the waveforms. Preliminary results indicate that there are consistent voice quality differences at the sentence level and that pitch contours and sentence accent also produce predictable effects on voice quality.

  15. Seasonal variations of snow depth on Mars.

    PubMed

    Smith, D E; Zuber, M T; Neumann, G A

    2001-12-01

    Using topography collected over one martian year from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, we have measured temporal changes in the elevation of the martian surface that correlate with the seasonal cycle of carbon dioxide exchange between the surface and atmosphere. The greatest elevation change (1.5 to 2 meters) occurs at high latitudes ( above 80 degrees ), whereas the bulk of the mass exchange occurs at lower latitudes (below 75 degrees N and below 73 degrees S). An unexpected period of sublimation was observed during northern hemisphere autumn, coincident with dust storms in the southern hemisphere. Analysis of MGS Doppler tracking residuals revealed temporal variations in the flattening of Mars that correlate with elevation changes. The combined changes in gravity and elevation constrain the average density of seasonally deposited carbon dioxide to be 910 +/- 230 kilograms per cubic meter, which is considerably denser than terrestrial snow. PMID:11739951

  16. New Variational Formulations of Hybrid Stress Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.; Sumihara, K.; Kang, D.

    1984-01-01

    In the variational formulations of finite elements by the Hu-Washizu and Hellinger-Reissner principles the stress equilibrium condition is maintained by the inclusion of internal displacements which function as the Lagrange multipliers for the constraints. These versions permit the use of natural coordinates and the relaxation of the equilibrium conditions and render considerable improvements in the assumed stress hybrid elements. These include the derivation of invariant hybrid elements which possess the ideal qualities such as minimum sensitivity to geometric distortions, minimum number of independent stress parameters, rank sufficient, and ability to represent constant strain states and bending moments. Another application is the formulation of semiLoof thin shell elements which can yield excellent results for many severe test cases because the rigid body nodes, the momentless membrane strains, and the inextensional bending modes are all represented.

  17. Balance Systems and the Variational Bicomplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Serge

    2011-07-01

    In this work we show that the systems of balance equations (balance systems) of continuum thermodynamics occupy a natural place in the variational bicomplex formalism. We apply the vertical homotopy decomposition to get a local splitting (in a convenient domain) of a general balance system as the sum of a Lagrangian part and a complemental ''pure non-Lagrangian'' balance system. In the case when derivatives of the dynamical fields do not enter the constitutive relations of the balance system, the ''pure non-Lagrangian'' systems coincide with the systems introduced by S. Godunov [Soviet Math. Dokl. 2 (1961), 947-948] and, later, asserted as the canonical hyperbolic form of balance systems in [Müller I., Ruggeri T., Rational extended thermodynamics, 2nd ed., Springer Tracts in Natural Philosophy, Vol. 37, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1998].

  18. Gravity Variations in the Austrian Central Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruess, D. R.

    2003-04-01

    Gravity measurements have been carried out in the Oetztaler Alpen in Tyrol, Austria twice a year since 1987 using the JILAg-6 free fall absolute gravimeter. An Increasing g-value has been detected in the order of about 25 μGals (250 nm/s^2). The observation station is situated in an area of postulated uplift of ˜1,5 mm/year which should have effected a decreasing gravity of ˜5 μGals over 15 years. There also a seasonal effect can be seen in the gravity graph. The increasing gravity will be explained by ablation of the surrounding glaciers and the seasonal variations may be traced back to the compounded precipitation (snow) during the winter time.

  19. Latitudinal Variation of Solar Wind Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthakrishnan, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Janardhan, P.

    1995-04-01

    Single station solar wind velocity measurements using the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) in India (operating at 327 MHz) are reported for the period August 1992 to August 1993. Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations on a large number of compact radio sources covering a latitudinal range of ±80° were used to derive solar wind velocities using the method of fitting a power law model to the observed IPS spectra. The data shows a velocity versus heliographic latitude pattern which is similar to that reported by Rickett and Coles (1991) for the 1981 1982 period. However, the average of the measured equatorial velocities are higher, being about 470 km s-1 compared to their value of 400 km s-1. The distribution of electron density variations (ΔN e ) between 50R⊙ and 90R⊙ was also determined and it was found that ΔN e was about 30% less at the poles as compared to the equator.

  20. Petrologic variations in Apollo 16 surface soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, K. J.

    1982-01-01

    Source rock, maturation history and intrasite variation data are derived for the Apollo 16 regolith by comparing modal analyses of 15 surface soils with rake and rock sample data. Triangular source rock component plots show that Apollo 16 soils have similar source rocks that are well homogenized throughout the site. The site can be divided into three soil petrographic provinces. Central site soils are mature, well homogenized, and enriched in glass. They are probably the most typical Cayley Plains materials present. North Ray soils are immature to submature, containing North Ray ejecta. South Ray soils are mature, but contain small amounts of fresh impact melts and plagioclase, due perhaps to the breakdown of blocky South Ray ejecta. The different compositions and physical properties of North and South Ray ejecta support the hypothesis that the latter event excavated Cayley material, while the former excavated Descartes materials.

  1. Thermospheric composition. [latitudinal, seasonal and diurnal variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carignan, G. R.

    1975-01-01

    The global view of the atmosphere provided by satellite observations and radar backscatter measurements has shown a pattern of composition variability resulting largely from dynamic processes. Important progress has been made in defining composition variability at 120 km, which has greatly improved models which previously had fixed boundary conditions at that altitude. The discovery of the early morning maximum in helium abundance and the better definition of diurnal variation in relative composition have provided a basis for more sophisticated dynamical models. Similarly, models of meridional wind systems have been developed which can account for the better-defined winter enhancements in helium and atomic oxygen. Finally, composition variability has indicated the presence of a high-latitude heat source which during periods of magnetic activity profoundly modifies the state of the atmosphere.

  2. Parametric variations of ion transport in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, S.D.; Barnes, C.W.; Ernst, D.

    1993-03-18

    This paper is divided into three roughly independent sections. The first is a historical review of the twenty year history of experimental ion heat transport measurements from many tokamaks. The second is a study of ion heat transport in Ohmic TFTR plasmas which shows that {chi}i {approximately} {chi}e {approx} 15{chi}i{sup neo}. Thus, ion heat transport is demonstrated to be strongly anomalous even the absence of auxiliary heating. The third section describes the variation of {chi}i with local ion temperature in TFTR during auxiliary heating, with emphasis on characterizing the differecens between transport in the L-mode and supershot regimes. The results are consistent with the conjecture that improved ion energy confinement in supershot plasmas is caused by a high ratio of T{sub 1}/T{sub e}.

  3. Invariant Higher-Order Variational Problems II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay-Balmaz, François; Holm, Darryl D.; Meier, David M.; Ratiu, Tudor S.; Vialard, François-Xavier

    2012-08-01

    Motivated by applications in computational anatomy, we consider a second-order problem in the calculus of variations on object manifolds that are acted upon by Lie groups of smooth invertible transformations. This problem leads to solution curves known as Riemannian cubics on object manifolds that are endowed with normal metrics. The prime examples of such object manifolds are the symmetric spaces. We characterize the class of cubics on object manifolds that can be lifted horizontally to cubics on the group of transformations. Conversely, we show that certain types of non-horizontal geodesic on the group of transformations project to cubics. Finally, we apply second-order Lagrange-Poincaré reduction to the problem of Riemannian cubics on the group of transformations. This leads to a reduced form of the equations that reveals the obstruction for the projection of a cubic on a transformation group to again be a cubic on its object manifold.

  4. Variational principle for the Pareto power law.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Anirban; Patriarca, Marco

    2009-11-27

    A mechanism is proposed for the appearance of power-law distributions in various complex systems. It is shown that in a conservative mechanical system composed of subsystems with different numbers of degrees of freedom a robust power-law tail can appear in the equilibrium distribution of energy as a result of certain superpositions of the canonical equilibrium energy densities of the subsystems. The derivation only uses a variational principle based on the Boltzmann entropy, without assumptions outside the framework of canonical equilibrium statistical mechanics. Two examples are discussed, free diffusion on a complex network and a kinetic model of wealth exchange. The mechanism is illustrated in the general case through an exactly solvable mechanical model of a dimensionally heterogeneous system. PMID:20366128

  5. Modeling TSI Variations from SORCE/TIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Gary A.; Cookson, A.; Preminger, D.

    2011-05-01

    Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements have been available from the TIM instrument on the SORCE spacecraft since 2003. We compare TSI data with photometric indices from red and K-line images obtained on a daily basis at the San Fernando Observatory (SFO). For 1375 days of data from 2003 March 02 to 2010 May 05 we compare the data in linear multiple regression analyses. The best results come from using only two photometric indices, the red and K-line photometric sums, and SORCE TSI 6-hour averages interpolated to the SFO time of observation. For this case, we obtain a coefficient of multiple correlation, R2, of 0.94798 and a quiet-Sun irradiance, So = 1360.778 ± 0.004 W/m2. These results provide tighter contstraints than before on hypotheses linking TSI variations with assumed changes in the quiet Sun. This research has been partially supported by NSF Grant ATM-0848518.

  6. Variational approach for static mirror structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, E. A.; Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.; Ruban, V. P.

    2015-04-15

    Anisotropic static plasma equilibria where the parallel and perpendicular pressures are only functions of the amplitude of the local magnetic field are shown to be amenable to a variational principle with a free energy density given by the parallel tension. This approach is used to demonstrate that two-dimensional small-amplitude static magnetic holes constructed from a Grad-Shafranov type equation slightly below the (subcritical) mirror instability threshold identify with lump solitons of KPII equation, but turn out to be unstable. Differently, large-amplitude magnetic structures, which are stable as they realize a minimum of the free energy, are computed using a gradient method within two-dimensional numerical simulations where the regularizing effect of finite Larmor radius corrections is retained. Interestingly, these structures transform from stripes to bubbles when the angle of the magnetic field with the coordinate plane is increased.

  7. Variational Principle for the Pareto Power Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Anirban; Patriarca, Marco

    2009-11-01

    A mechanism is proposed for the appearance of power-law distributions in various complex systems. It is shown that in a conservative mechanical system composed of subsystems with different numbers of degrees of freedom a robust power-law tail can appear in the equilibrium distribution of energy as a result of certain superpositions of the canonical equilibrium energy densities of the subsystems. The derivation only uses a variational principle based on the Boltzmann entropy, without assumptions outside the framework of canonical equilibrium statistical mechanics. Two examples are discussed, free diffusion on a complex network and a kinetic model of wealth exchange. The mechanism is illustrated in the general case through an exactly solvable mechanical model of a dimensionally heterogeneous system.

  8. UPRE method for total variation parameter selection

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlberg, Brendt; Lin, Youzuo

    2008-01-01

    Total Variation (TV) Regularization is an important method for solving a wide variety of inverse problems in image processing. In order to optimize the reconstructed image, it is important to choose the optimal regularization parameter. The Unbiased Predictive Risk Estimator (UPRE) has been shown to give a very good estimate of this parameter for Tikhonov Regularization. In this paper we propose an approach to extend UPRE method to the TV problem. However, applying the extended UPRE is impractical in the case of inverse problems such as de blurring, due to the large scale of the associated linear problem. We also propose an approach to reducing the large scale problem to a small problem, significantly reducing computational requirements while providing a good approximation to the original problem.

  9. Radon variations and microearthquakes in western Syria.

    PubMed

    al-Hilal, M; Sbeinati, M R; Darawcheh, R

    1998-01-01

    Groundwater radon data were recorded at monthly intervals from two selected monitoring sites of the northern extension of the Dead Sea Fault System in western Syria during 1993 and 1994. This set of data was utilized to estimate the basic radon background content and the range of its normal variations in groundwater along the fault zone. The results suggest that the establishment of such range is important when attempting to separate the usual groundwater radon fluctuations from other anomalous or earthquake related values. In addition, the seismic activity in the study region was statistically analyzed, and the completeness of the earthquake catalogue during the given time-window was estimated to be at magnitude M > or = 3.5. PMID:9467839

  10. Variations of nuclear binding with quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Serrano, M. E.; Cloët, I. C.; Tsushima, K.; Thomas, A. W.; Afnan, I. R.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the variation with light quark mass of the mass of the nucleon as well as the masses of the mesons commonly used in a one-boson-exchange model of the nucleon-nucleon force. Care is taken to evaluate the meson mass shifts at the kinematic point relevant to that problem. Using these results, we evaluate the corresponding changes in the energy of the 1S0 antibound state and the binding energies of the deuteron, triton, and selected finite nuclei by using a one-boson exchange model. The results are discussed in the context of possible corrections to the standard scenario for Big Bang nucleosynthesis in the case where, as suggested by recent observations of quasar absorption spectra, the quark masses may have changed over the age of the Universe.

  11. Origin and Chemical Variation of Brazilian Propolis

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Propolis is a hive product containing chiefly beeswax and plant-derived substances such as resin and volatile compounds. Propolis has been used as an antiseptic and wound healer since ancient times and interest for the product has increased recently. Probably few plant species contribute as major resin sources. Green propolis derives mainly from vegetative apices of Baccharis dracunculifolia (alecrim plants). However, wide variation detected in the chemical composition suggests contributions from alternative resin plant sources. Predominant components of the resin of green propolis are cinnamic acids, chiefly compounds bearing prenyl groups. Terpenoid compounds, such as sesqui, di and pentacyclic triterpenoids, have been detected in many, but not all, samples investigated. Propolis research has uncovered potentialities of substances previously isolated from plants and has detected constituents of plant origin that would hardly be known otherwise. PMID:15841276

  12. Obliquity Variations of a Rapidly Rotating Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, Billy L.; Barnes, Jason W.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Chambers, John E.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2016-05-01

    Venus clearly differs from Earth in terms of its spin and atmospheric composition, where the former is controlled by solid-body and atmospheric thermal tides. However, this may have been different during earlier stages of planetary evolution, when the Sun was fainter and the Venusian atmosphere was less massive. We investigate how the axial tilt, or obliquity, would have varied during this epoch considering a rapidly rotating Venus. Through numerical simulation of an ensemble of hypothetical Early Venuses, we find the obliquity variation to be simpler than a Moonless Earth (Lissauer et al., 2012). Most low-obliquity Venuses show very low total obliquity variability comparable to that of the real Moon-influenced Earth.

  13. Long-period cosmic ray variations and their altitude dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belov, A. V.; Gushchina, R. T.; Dorman, L. I.; Sirotina, I. V.

    1985-01-01

    Long-period variations were studied from the data of ground-based cosmic ray (CR) observations. In spite of a large value of an 2-year variation, it is more difficult to obtain its spectrum than the spectrum of a solar diurnal variation. Serious obstacles are caused by changes in individual detectors and in the whole world wide network of CR detectors, by the absence of continuity and uniformity of data series, by various apparatus variations. In discrimination and investigation of long-period variations an important and determining point is preparation and preliminary analysis of data.

  14. Epigenetic heredity: RNA-mediated modes of phenotypic variation.

    PubMed

    Rassoulzadegan, Minoo; Cuzin, François

    2015-04-01

    In addition to the Mendelian mutations, several instances of heritable phenotypic variation have been reported. We have observed, in mice, a role for sperm RNAs in the induction of such stable phenotypic variation. When experimentally transferred by RNA microinjection into fertilized mouse eggs, the noncoding RNAs homologous in sequence to the target locus are efficient inducers of variation at the transcriptional level. Transmission of the phenotypic variation to progeny is highly efficient and independent of gender. Here, we have summarized these finding and how they relate to other reports of epigenetic variation. PMID:25726734

  15. The Measurement of Local Variation in Shape

    PubMed Central

    Cabeen, Ryan; Woods, Roger P.; Houle, David

    2012-01-01

    Geometric morphometrics comprises tools for measuring and analyzing shape as captured by an entire set of landmark configurations. Many interesting questions in evolutionary, genetic, and developmental research, however, are only meaningful at a local level, where a focus on “parts” or “traits” takes priority over properties of wholes. To study variational properties of such traits, current approaches partition configurations into subsets of landmarks which are then studied separately. This approach is unable to fully capture both variational and spatial characteristics of these subsets because interpretability of shape differences is context-dependent. Landmarks omitted from a partition usually contain information about that partition’s shape. We present an interpolation-based approach that can be used to model shape differences at a local, infinitesimal level as a function of information available globally. This approach belongs in a large family of methods that see shape differences as continuous “fields” spanning an entire structure, for which landmarks serve as reference parameters rather than as data. We show, via analyses of simulated and real data, how interpolation models provide a more accurate representation of regional shapes than partitioned data. A key difference of this interpolation approach from current morphometric practice is that one must assume an explicit interpolation model, which in turn implies a particular kind of behavior of the regions between landmarks. This choice presents novel methodological challenges, but also an opportunity to incorporate and test biomechanical models that have sought to explain tissue-level processes underlying the generation of morphological shape. PMID:23180896

  16. Variation and constraint in Hox gene evolution.

    PubMed

    Heffer, Alison; Xiang, Jie; Pick, Leslie

    2013-02-01

    Despite enormous body plan variation, genes regulating embryonic development are highly conserved. Here, we probe the mechanisms that predispose ancient regulatory genes to reutilization and diversification rather than evolutionary loss. The Hox gene fushi tarazu (ftz) arose as a homeotic gene but functions as a pair-rule segmentation gene in Drosophila. ftz shows extensive variation in expression and protein coding regions but has managed to elude loss from arthropod genomes. We asked what properties prevent this loss by testing the importance of different protein motifs and partners in the developing CNS, where ftz expression is conserved. Drosophila Ftz proteins with mutated protein motifs were expressed under the control of a neurogenic-specific ftz cis-regulatory element (CRE) in a ftz mutant background rescued for segmentation defects. Ftz CNS function did not require the variable motifs that mediate differential cofactor interactions involved in homeosis or segmentation, which vary in arthropods. Rather, CNS function did require the shared DNA-binding homeodomain, which plays less of a role in Ftz segmentation activity. The Antennapedia homeodomain substituted for Ftz homeodomain function in the Drosophila CNS, but full-length Antennapedia did not rescue CNS defects. These results suggest that a core CNS function retains ftz in arthropod genomes. Acquisition of a neurogenic CRE led to ftz expression in unique CNS cells, differentiating its role from neighboring Hox genes, rendering it nonredundant. The inherent flexibility of modular CREs and protein domains allows for stepwise acquisition of new functions, explaining broad retention of regulatory genes during animal evolution. PMID:23341600

  17. Imaging crustal structure variation across southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Tkalčić, Hrvoje; Kennett, Brian L. N.

    2013-01-01

    A broad-band seismic network of 28 three-component seismometers was deployed in southeastern Australia to examine variations in crustal thickness across the transition between Precambrian and Phanerozoic lithosphere. Receiver function observations and modelling of P-to-S conversions at the Mohorovičić discontinuity (Moho) have been employed to investigate: (i) the variations in the Moho depth across southeastern Australia, and (ii) the nature of the transition between crust and mantle. Data from temporary deployments were used together with data from the few permanent broad-band stations in the region. The extraction of P-receiver functions from high-quality seismic data recorded on these stations has enabled the determination of the crustal thickness across the region. The crustal thicknesses lie in the range 28-48 km. The Moho depth is generally well correlated with the Earth surface elevation in the southeastern Australia. The Moho estimates from receiver functions are in good agreement with results from reflection profiling. The average crustal thickness is found to be around 39 km beneath the Precambrian area in the west and even thicker beneath the Lachlan Orogen in the east (~ 43 km). The average crustal thickness in between, beneath the Murray Basin is thinner ~ 32 km. Interestingly, the crust in the Mount Gambier volcanic area is rather thick ~ 41 km, suggesting that the limit between the Delamerian and western Lachlan orogens is located east of Mount Gambier. Our results favour a position for the Tasman Line generally consistent with the interpretation by Direen and Crawford (2003) and thus to the east of the location favoured by many authors. The broader crust-mantle transition and thicker crust beneath the Lachlan Orogen suggest the presence of magmatic underplating at the base of the lower crust. The intermediate nature of the crust-mantle transition also suggests magmatic underplating beneath the Gawler Craton and the Curnamona Province.

  18. Spatial Variations in Vitreous Oxygen Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Murali, Karthik; Kang, Dongyang; Nazari, Hossein; Scianmarello, Nicholas; Cadenas, Enrique; Tai, Yu-Chong; Kashani, Amir; Humayun, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the spatial variation of vitreous oxygen consumption in enucleated porcine eyes. A custom made oxygen source was fabricated that could be localized to either the mid or posterior vitreous cavity and steady state vitreous oxygen tension was measured as a function of distance from the source using a commercially available probe. The reaction rate constant of ascorbate oxidation was estimated ex vivo by measuring the change in oxygen tension over time using vitreous harvested from porcine eyes. Vitreous ascorbate from mid and posterior vitreous was measured spectrophotometrically. When the oxygen source was placed in either the mid-vitreous (N = 6) or the posterior vitreous (N = 6), we measured a statistically significant decrease in vitreous oxygen tension as a function of distance from the oxygen source when compared to control experiments without an oxygen source; (p<0.005 for mid-vitreous and p<0.018 for posterior vitreous at all distances). The mid-vitreous oxygen tension change was significantly different from the posterior vitreous oxygen tension change at 2 and 3mm distances from the respective oxygen source (p<0.001). We also found a statistically significant lower concentration of ascorbate in the mid-vitreous as compared to posterior vitreous (p = 0.02). We determined the reaction rate constant, k = 1.61 M-1s-1 ± 0.708 M-1s-1 (SE), of the oxidation of ascorbate which was modeled following a second order rate equation. Our data demonstrates that vitreous oxygen consumption is higher in the posterior vitreous compared to the mid-vitreous. We also show spatial variations in vitreous ascorbate concentration. PMID:26930281

  19. Interfractional Target Variations for Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ahunbay, Ergun E.; Robbins, Jared; Christian, Robert; Godley, Andrew; White, Julia; Li, X. Allen

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: In this work, we quantify the interfractional variations in the shape of the clinical target volume (CTV) by analyzing the daily CT data acquired during CT-guided partial breast irradiation (PBI) and compare the effectiveness of various repositioning alignment strategies considered to account for the variations. Methods and Materials: The daily CT data for 13 breast cancer patients treated with PBI in either prone (10 patients) or supine (3 patients) with daily kV CT guidance using CT on Rails (CTVision, Siemens, Malvern, PA) were analyzed. For approximately 25 points on the surface of the CTV, deformation vectors were calculated by means of deformable image registration and verified by visual inspection. These were used to calculate the distances along surface normals (DSN), which directly related to the required margin expansions for each point. The DSN values were determined for seven alignment methods based on volumetric imaging and also two-dimensional projections (portal imaging). Results: The margin expansion necessary to cover 99% of all points for all days was 2.7 mm when utilizing the alignment method based on deformation field data (the best alignment method). The center-of-mass based alignment yielded slightly worse results (a margin of 4.0 mm), and shifts obtained by operator placement (7.9 mm), two-dimensional-based methods (7.0-10.1 mm), and skin marks (13.9 mm) required even larger margin expansions. Target shrinkage was evident for most days by the negative values of DSN. Even with the best alignment, the range of DSN values could be as high as 7 mm, resulting in a large amount of normal tissue irradiation, unless adaptive replanning is employed. Conclusion: The appropriate alignment method is important to minimize the margin requirement to cover the significant interfractional target deformations observed during PBI. The amount of normal tissue unnecessarily irradiated is still not insignificant, and can be minimized if adaptive

  20. Clock gene variation in Tachycineta swallows

    PubMed Central

    Dor, Roi; Cooper, Caren B; Lovette, Irby J; Massoni, Viviana; Bulit, Flor; Liljesthrom, Marcela; Winkler, David W

    2012-01-01

    Many animals use photoperiod cues to synchronize reproduction with environmental conditions and thereby improve their reproductive success. The circadian clock, which creates endogenous behavioral and physiological rhythms typically entrained to photoperiod, is well characterized at the molecular level. Recent work provided evidence for an association between Clock poly-Q length polymorphism and latitude and, within a population, an association with the date of laying and the length of the incubation period. Despite relatively high overall breeding synchrony, the timing of clutch initiation has a large impact on the fitness of swallows in the genus Tachycineta. We compared length polymorphism in the Clock poly-Q region among five populations from five different Tachycineta species that breed across a hemisphere-wide latitudinal gradient (Fig. 1). Clock poly-Q variation was not associated with latitude; however, there was an association between Clock poly-Q allele diversity and the degree of clutch size decline within breeding seasons. We did not find evidence for an association between Clock poly-Q variation and date of clutch initiation in for any of the five Tachycineta species, nor did we found a relationship between incubation duration and Clock genotype. Thus, there is no general association between latitude, breeding phenology, and Clock polymorphism in this clade of closely related birds. Figure 1 Photos of Tachycineta swallows that were used in this study: A) T. bicolor from Ithaca, New York, B) T. leucorrhoa from Chascomús, Argentina, C) T. albilinea from Hill Bank, Belize, D) T. meyeni from Puerto Varas, Chile, and E) T. thalassina from Mono Lake, California, Photographers: B: Valentina Ferretti; A, C-E: David Winkler. PMID:22408729

  1. 832 Karin: Absence of rotational spectral variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernazza, Pierre; Rossi, Alessandro; Birlan, Mirel; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Nedelcu, Alin; Dotto, Elisabetta

    2007-11-01

    832 Karin is the largest member of the young Karin cluster that formed 5.75±0.05 Myr ago in the outer main belt. Surprisingly, recent near-IR spectroscopy measurements [Sasaki, T., Sasaki, S., Watanabe, J., Sekiguchi, T., Yoshida, F., Kawakita, H., Fuse, T., Takato, N., Dermawan, B., Ito, T., 2004. Astrophys. J. 615 (2), L161-L164] revealed that Karin's surface shows different colors as a function of rotational phase. It was interpreted that 832 Karin shows us the reddish space-weathered exterior surface of the parent body as well as an interior face, which has not had time to become space-weathered. This result is at odds with recent results including seismic and geomorphic modeling, modeling of the Karin cluster formation and measurements of the space weathering rate. Consequently, we aimed to confirm/infirm this surprising result by sampling Karin's spectrum well throughout its rotation. Here, we present new visible (0.45-0.95 μm) and near-infrared (0.7-2.5 μm) spectroscopic observations of 832 Karin obtained in January and April 2006, covering most of Karin's longitudes. In the visible range, we find that Karin shows no rotational spectral variations. Similarly, we find that Karin exhibits very little (to none) spectral variations with rotation in the near-IR range. Our results imply that 832 Karin has a homogeneous surface, in terms of composition and surface age. Our results also imply that the impact that generated the family refreshed entirely Karin's surface, and probably the surfaces of all members.

  2. Density Variations Observable by Precision Satellite Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, C. A.; Lechtenberg, T.; Hiatt, A.

    2008-12-01

    This research uses precision satellite orbits from the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) satellite to produce a new data source for studying density changes that occur on time scales less than a day. Precision orbit derived density is compared to accelerometer derived density. In addition, the precision orbit derived densities are used to examine density variations that have been observed with accelerometer data to see if they are observable. In particular, the research will examine the observability of geomagnetic storm time changes and polar cusp features that have been observed in accelerometer data. Currently highly accurate density data is available from three satellites with accelerometers and much lower accuracy data is available from hundreds of satellites for which two-line element sets are available from the Air Force. This paper explores a new data source that is more accurate and has better temporal resolution than the two-line element sets, and provides better spatial coverage than satellites with accelerometers. This data source will be valuable for studying atmospheric phenomena over short periods, for long term studies of the atmosphere, and for validating and improving complex coupled models that include neutral density. The precision orbit derived densities are very similar to the accelerometer derived densities, but the accelerometer can observe features with shorter temporal variations. This research will quantify the time scales observable by precision orbit derived density. The technique for estimating density is optimal orbit determination. The estimates are optimal in the least squares or minimum variance sense. Precision orbit data from CHAMP is used as measurements in a sequential measurement processing and filtering scheme. The atmospheric density is estimated as a correction to an atmospheric model.

  3. Water Detection Based on Color Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, Arturo L.

    2012-01-01

    This software has been designed to detect water bodies that are out in the open on cross-country terrain at close range (out to 30 meters), using imagery acquired from a stereo pair of color cameras mounted on a terrestrial, unmanned ground vehicle (UGV). This detector exploits the fact that the color variation across water bodies is generally larger and more uniform than that of other naturally occurring types of terrain, such as soil and vegetation. Non-traversable water bodies, such as large puddles, ponds, and lakes, are detected based on color variation, image intensity variance, image intensity gradient, size, and shape. At ranges beyond 20 meters, water bodies out in the open can be indirectly detected by detecting reflections of the sky below the horizon in color imagery. But at closer range, the color coming out of a water body dominates sky reflections, and the water cue from sky reflections is of marginal use. Since there may be times during UGV autonomous navigation when a water body does not come into a perception system s field of view until it is at close range, the ability to detect water bodies at close range is critical. Factors that influence the perceived color of a water body at close range are the amount and type of sediment in the water, the water s depth, and the angle of incidence to the water body. Developing a single model of the mixture ratio of light reflected off the water surface (to the camera) to light coming out of the water body (to the camera) for all water bodies would be fairly difficult. Instead, this software detects close water bodies based on local terrain features and the natural, uniform change in color that occurs across the surface from the leading edge to the trailing edge.

  4. Genetic variation of St. Louis encephalitis virus

    PubMed Central

    May, Fiona J.; Li, Li; Zhang, Shuliu; Guzman, Hilda; Beasley, David W. C.; Tesh, Robert B.; Higgs, Stephen; Raj, Pushker; Bueno, Rudy; Randle, Yvonne; Chandler, Laura; Barrett, Alan D. T.

    2008-01-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) has been regularly isolated throughout the Americas since 1933. Previous phylogenetic studies involving 62 isolates have defined seven major lineages (I–VII), further divided into 14 clades. In this study, 28 strains isolated in Texas in 1991 and 2001–2003, and three older, previously unsequenced strains from Jamaica and California were sequenced over the envelope protein gene. The inclusion of these new sequences, and others published since 2001, has allowed better delineation of the previously published SLEV lineages, in particular the clades of lineage II. Phylogenetic analysis of 106 isolates identified 13 clades. All 1991 and 2001–2003 isolates from Nueces, Jefferson and Harris Counties (Texas Gulf Coast) group in clade IIB with other isolates from these counties isolated during the 1980s and 1990s. This lack of evidence for introduction of novel strains into the Texas Gulf Coast over a long period of time is consistent with overwintering of SLEV in this region. Two El Paso isolates, both from 2002, group in clade VA with recent Californian isolates from 1998–2001 and some South American strains with a broad temporal range. Overall, these data are consistent with multiple introductions of SLEV from South America into North America, and provide support for the hypothesis that in most situations, SLEV circulates within a locality, with occasional incursions from other areas. Finally, SLEV has much lower nucleotide (10.1 %) and amino acid variation (2.8 %) than other members of the Japanese encephalitis virus complex (maximum variation 24.6 % nucleotide and 11.8 % amino acid). PMID:18632961

  5. Spatial Variation as a Tool for Inferring Temporal Variation and Diagnosing Types of Mechanisms in Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Matthew P.; Kolasa, Jurek

    2014-01-01

    Ecological processes, like the rise and fall of populations, leave an imprint of their dynamics as a pattern in space. Mining this spatial record for insight into temporal change underlies many applications, including using spatial snapshots to infer trends in communities, rates of species spread across boundaries, likelihood of chaotic dynamics, and proximity to regime shifts. However, these approaches rely on an inherent but undefined link between spatial and temporal variation. We present a quantitative link between a variable’s spatial and temporal variation based on established variance-partitioning techniques, and test it for predictive and diagnostic applications. A strong link existed between spatial and regional temporal variation (estimated as Coefficients of Variation or CV’s) in 136 variables from three aquatic ecosystems. This association suggests a basis for substituting one for the other, either quantitatively or qualitatively, when long time series are lacking. We further show that weak substitution of temporal for spatial CV results from distortion by specific spatiotemporal patterns (e.g., inter-patch synchrony). Where spatial and temporal CV’s do not match, we pinpoint the spatiotemporal causes of deviation in the dynamics of variables and suggest ways that may control for them. In turn, we demonstrate the use of this framework for describing spatiotemporal patterns in multiple ecosystem variables and attributing them to types of mechanisms. Linking spatial and temporal variability makes quantitative the hitherto inexact practice of space-for-time substitution and may thus point to new opportunities for navigating the complex variation of ecosystems. PMID:24586627

  6. Variation in Plant Traits Explains Global Biogeographic Variation in the Abundance of Major Forest Functional Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Contrasting leaf types (needle vs. broadleaf) with different lifespans (annual vs. perennial) represent different adaptive strategies of plants under different environmental conditions. Previous studies explained adaptive advantages of different strategies using empirical models but cannot adequately explain the co-dominance of multiple plant functional types (PFTs) as observed in many parts of the world. Here we used a process-based model to explore whether observed inter- and intra-PFT variation in key plant traits can explain global biogeographic variation in co-dominance of major forest functional types. Using a parameter screening method, we identified the four most important plant traits for simulating annual net primary production (NPP) using the Australian Community Atmosphere-Biosphere-Land Exchange model (CABLE). Using ensemble CABLE simulations, we estimated the fraction of global land cover attributed to each PFT by comparing the simulated NPP for all three PFTs at each land point, globally. Our results were consistent with land area cover fractions of major forest types estimated from remote sensing data products; i.e., evergreen needle-leaf forests dominate in boreal regions, evergreen broadleaf forests dominate in tropical regions, and deciduous broadleaf forests are distributed widely across a broad range of environmental conditions. More importantly our approach successfully explained a paradox that has puzzled ecologists for over a century: why evergreen leaf types dominate in both boreal and tropical regions. We conclude that variation in and co-variation between key plant traits can explain significant fractions of global biogeographic variation of three major forest types, and should be taken into account when simulating global vegetation dynamics.

  7. Y-Chromosome Variation in Hominids: Intraspecific Variation Is Limited to the Polygamous Chimpanzee

    PubMed Central

    Greve, Gabriele; Alechine, Evguenia; Pasantes, Juan J.; Hodler, Christine; Rietschel, Wolfram; Robinson, Terence J.; Schempp, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Background We have previously demonstrated that the Y-specific ampliconic fertility genes DAZ (deleted in azoospermia) and CDY (chromodomain protein Y) varied with respect to copy number and position among chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). In comparison, seven Y-chromosomal lineages of the bonobo (Pan paniscus), the chimpanzee's closest living relative, showed no variation. We extend our earlier comparative investigation to include an analysis of the intraspecific variation of these genes in gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) and orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus), and examine the resulting patterns in the light of the species' markedly different social and mating behaviors. Methodology/Principal Findings Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH) of DAZ and CDY in 12 Y-chromosomal lineages of western lowland gorilla (G. gorilla gorilla) and a single lineage of the eastern lowland gorilla (G. beringei graueri) showed no variation among lineages. Similar findings were noted for the 10 Y-chromosomal lineages examined in the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus), and 11 Y-chromosomal lineages of the Sumatran orangutan (P. abelii). We validated the contrasting DAZ and CDY patterns using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in chimpanzee and bonobo. Conclusion/Significance High intraspecific variation in copy number and position of the DAZ and CDY genes is seen only in the chimpanzee. We hypothesize that this is best explained by sperm competition that results in the variant DAZ and CDY haplotypes detected in this species. In contrast, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans—species that are not subject to sperm competition—showed no intraspecific variation in DAZ and CDY suggesting that monoandry in gorillas, and preferential female mate choice in bonobos and orangutans, probably permitted the fixation of a single Y variant in each taxon. These data support the notion that the evolutionary history of a primate Y chromosome is not simply encrypted in its DNA

  8. Pilin gene variation in Neisseria gonorrhoeae: reassessing the old paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Stuart A.; Davies, John K.

    2009-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae displays considerable potential for antigenic variation as shown in human experimental studies. Various surface antigens can change either by antigenic variation using RecA-dependent recombination schemes (e.g., PilE antigenic variation), or, alternatively, through phase variation (on/off switching) in a RecA-independent fashion (e.g., Opa and LOS phase variation). PilE antigenic variation has been well documented over the years. However, with the availability of the Nesseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 genome sequence, considerable genetic advances have recently been made regarding the mechanistic considerations of the gene conversion event leading to an altered PilE protein. This review will compare the various models that have been presented and will highlight potential mechanistic problems that may constrain any genetic model for pilE gene variation. PMID:19396954

  9. Causes and significance of variation in mammalian basal metabolism.

    PubMed

    Raichlen, David A; Gordon, Adam D; Muchlinski, Magdalena N; Snodgrass, J Josh

    2010-02-01

    Mammalian basal metabolic rates (BMR) increase with body mass, whichs explains approximately 95% of the variation in BMR. However, at a given mass, there remains a large amount of variation in BMR. While many researchers suggest that the overall scaling of BMR with body mass is due to physiological constraints, variation at a given body mass may provide clues as to how selection acts on BMR. Here, we examine this variation in BMR in a broad sample of mammals and we test the hypothesis that, across mammals, body composition explains differences in BMR at a given body mass. Variation in BMR is strongly correlated with variation in muscle mass, and both of these variables are correlated with latitude and ambient temperature. These results suggest that selection alters BMR in response to thermoregulatory pressures, and that selection uses muscle mass as a means to generate this variation. PMID:19730868

  10. Modeling monthly mean variation of the solar global irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vindel, J. M.; Polo, J.; Zarzalejo, L. F.

    2015-01-01

    The monthly mean variation of the solar global reaching the Earth's surface has been characterized at a global level by a regression model. This model considers the monthly variation itself (to different horizons and even the maximum annual variation) as the study variable, and it is applied without using data corresponding to measured meteorological variable. Two explicative variables have been used, the variation of the extraterrestrial irradiation and the variation of the clear sky global horizontal irradiation. The work has been carried out from datasets including average global daily solar irradiation for each month of the year measured on the ground. The model quality has been proven to be very dependent of the temporal variation considered, in such a way that higher variations, that is to say, higher distances between months, lead to an improvement in the model outcomes.

  11. Geophysical mapping of variations in soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioane, Dumitru; Scradeanu, Daniel; Chitea, Florina; Garbacea, George

    2010-05-01

    The geophysical investigation of soil characteristics is a matter of great actuality for agricultural, hydrogeological, geotechnical or archaeological purposes. The geophysical mapping of soil quality is subject of a recently started scientific project in Romania: "Soil investigation and monitoring techniques - modern tools for implementing the precision agriculture in Romania - CNCSIS 998/2009". One of the first studied soil parameter is moisture content, in irrigated or non-irrigated agricultural areas. The geophysical techniques employed in two areas located within the Romanian Plain, Prahova and Buzau counties, are the following: - electromagnetic (EM), using the EM38B (Geonics) conductivity meter for getting areal distribution of electric conductivity and magnetic susceptibility; - electric resistivity tomography (ERT), using the SuperSting (AGI) multi-electrode instrument for getting in-depth distribution of electric resistivity. The electric conductivity mapping was carried out on irrigated cultivated land in a vegetable farm in the Buzau county, the distribution of conductivity being closely related to the soil water content due to irrigation works. The soil profile is represented by a chernozem with the following structure: Am (0 - 40 cm), Bt (40-150 cm), Bt/C (150-170 cm), C (starting at 170 cm). The electromagnetic measurements showed large variations of this geophysical parameter within different cultivated sectors, ranging from 40 mS/m to 85 mS/m. The close association between conductivity and water content in this area is illustrated by such geophysical measurements on profiles situated at ca 50 m on non-irrigated land, displaying a mean value of 15 mS/m. This low conductivity is due to quite long time interval, of about three weeks, without precipitations. The ERT measurements using multi-electrode acquisition systems for 2D and 3D results, showed by means of electric resistivity variations, the penetration of water along the cultivated rows from the

  12. Spatial and temporal variations of fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshakov, S. A.; Agafonova, I. I.; Molaro, P.; Reimers, D.

    2010-11-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in the electron-to-proton mass ratio, μ, and in the fine-structure constant, α, are not present in the Standard Model of particle physics but they arise quite naturally in grant unification theories, multidimensional theories and in general when a coupling of light scalar fields to baryonic matter is considered. The light scalar fields are usually attributed to a negative pressure substance permeating the entire visible Universe and known as dark energy. This substance is thought to be responsible for a cosmic acceleration at low redshifts, z < 1. A strong dependence of μ and α on the ambient matter density is predicted by chameleon-like scalar field models. Calculations of atomic and molecular spectra show that different transitions have different sensitivities to changes in fundamental constants. Thus, measuring the relative line positions, Δ V, between such transitions one can probe the hypothetical variability of physical constants. In particular, interstellar molecular clouds can be used to test the matter density dependence of μ, since gas density in these clouds is ~15 orders of magnitude lower than that in terrestrial environment. We use the best quality radio spectra of the inversion transition of NH3 (J,K)=(1,1) and rotational transitions of other molecules to estimate the radial velocity offsets, Δ V ≡ Vrot - Vinv. The obtained value of Δ V shows a statistically significant positive shift of 23±4stat±3sys m s-1 (1σ). Being interpreted in terms of the electron-to-proton mass ratio variation, this gives Δμ/μ = (22±4stat±3sys)×10-9. A strong constraint on variation of the quantity F = α2/μ in the Milky Way is found from comparison of the fine-structure transition J=1-0 in atomic carbon C i with the low-J rotational lines in carbon monoxide 13CO arising in the interstellar molecular clouds: |Δ F/F| < 3×10-7. This yields |Δ α/α| < 1.5×10-7 at z = 0. Since extragalactic absorbers have gas densities

  13. Seasonal variations in Pluto's atmospheric tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Richard G.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Hansen, Candice J.; Young, Leslie A.; Sicardy, Bruno; Dias-Oliveira, Alex; Guzewich, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Pluto's tenuous atmosphere exhibits remarkable seasonal change as a result of the planet's substantial obliquity and highly eccentric orbit. Over the past two decades, occultations have revealed that the atmospheric pressure on Pluto has increased substantially, perhaps by a factor as large as 2 to 4, as the planet has moved from equinox towards solstice conditions. These data have also shown variations in the strength of the dynamical activity in the atmosphere, as revealed by the varying abundance and amplitude of spikes in the occultation light curves resulting from refractive focussing by atmospheric waves. Toigo et al. (Toigo et al. [2010]. Icarus, 208, 402-411) explored the possibility that these waves are caused by solar-induced sublimation and diurnal deposition from N2 frost patches, driven by weak vertical winds resulting from the rising and sinking gas as it is released from or deposited onto the surface. Here, we extend this model to account explicitly for seasonal variations in average insolation and for the significant damping of vertical wave propagation by kinematic viscosity and thermal diffusivity (Hubbard et al. [2009]. Icarus, 204, 284-289). Damping is extremely effective in suppressing vertical propagation of waves with vertical wavelengths of a few kilometers or less, and the dominant surviving tidal modes have characteristic vertical wavelengths λ ∼ 10-13 km . We estimate the expected strength and regional characteristics of atmospheric tides over the course of Pluto's orbit for a variety of assumed spatial distributions of surface frost and atmospheric surface pressure. We compute the predicted strength of tide-induced wave activity based on the actual frost distribution observed on Pluto from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations (Stern et al. [1997]. Astron. J., 113, 827; Buie et al. [2010]. Astron. J., 139, 1128-1143), and compare the results to calculations for volatile transport models of Young (Young [2013]. Astrophys. J., 766

  14. Atlas of temporal variations - interdisciplinary scientific work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamburtsev, A. G.; Oleinik, O. V.

    2003-04-01

    The year 2002 will culminate in the publication of the third volume of the fundamental interdisciplinary work "Atlas of Temporal Variations in Natural, Anthropogenic and Social Processes", which now will comprise three volumes (1994, 1998, 2002). The Atlas has pooled the information on the main peculiarities of processes' behaviour in various natural and humanitarian spheres over the widest temporal and spatial range. The main scientific goal of the work consists in discovering the behaviour pattern of natural, anthropogenic and social processes and the cause and effect links between them. Thus, the Atlas contains extensive comparative generalisation from the vastly different data. For one thing, it is a fundamental work on the law-governed nature of evolution in natural and social spheres; for another, it can be used as a reference book and valuable source of information for research in different directions. The authors seek to treat every piece of information as part of an integrated whole. When analysing the data, we operate on the premise that surrounding nature, society and their elements are open dynamic systems. Systems of this kind exhibit non-linear characteristics and a tendency towards ordered and chaotic behaviour. These features are revealed in the course of the analysis of time series. The data processing procedures applied are unified, all processes being generally expressed in terms of their time series and time-spectral diagrams. The technique is aimed at determination of investigated parameters' rhythms and the analysis of their evolution. This approach enables us to show the dynamics of processes occurring in absolutely dissimilar objects and performs their comparative analysis, with particular emphasis placed on rhythms and trends. As a result successions of illustrations are obtained and formed the basis of the Atlas. The Atlas covers processes that occur in objects belonging to the lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and social sphere as well

  15. An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamazaki, Y.; Yumoto, K.; Cardinal, M.G.; Fraser, B.J.; Hattori, P.; Kakinami, Y.; Liu, J.Y.; Lynn, K.J.W.; Marshall, R.; McNamara, D.; Nagatsuma, T.; Nikiforov, V.M.; Otadoy, R.E.; Ruhimat, M.; Shevtsov, B.M.; Shiokawa, K.; Abe, S.; Uozumi, T.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2011-01-01

    An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation has been constructed based on geomagnetic data obtained from 21 stations along the 210 Magnetic Meridian of the Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (CPMN) from 1996 to 2007. Using the least squares fitting method for geomagnetically quiet days (Kp ??? 2+), the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation at each station was described as a function of solar activity SA, day of year DOY, lunar age LA, and local time LT. After interpolation in latitude, the model can describe solar-activity dependence and seasonal dependence of solar quiet daily variations (S) and lunar quiet daily variations (L). We performed a spherical harmonic analysis (SHA) on these S and L variations to examine average characteristics of the equivalent external current systems. We found three particularly noteworthy results. First, the total current intensity of the S current system is largely controlled by solar activity while its focus position is not significantly affected by solar activity. Second, we found that seasonal variations of the S current intensity exhibit north-south asymmetry; the current intensity of the northern vortex shows a prominent annual variation while the southern vortex shows a clear semi-annual variation as well as annual variation. Thirdly, we found that the total intensity of the L current system changes depending on solar activity and season; seasonal variations of the L current intensity show an enhancement during the December solstice, independent of the level of solar activity. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Y.; Yumoto, K.; Cardinal, M. G.; Fraser, B. J.; Hattori, P.; Kakinami, Y.; Liu, J. Y.; Lynn, K. J. W.; Marshall, R.; McNamara, D.; Nagatsuma, T.; Nikiforov, V. M.; Otadoy, R. E.; Ruhimat, M.; Shevtsov, B. M.; Shiokawa, K.; Abe, S.; Uozumi, T.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2011-10-01

    An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation has been constructed based on geomagnetic data obtained from 21 stations along the 210 Magnetic Meridian of the Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (CPMN) from 1996 to 2007. Using the least squares fitting method for geomagnetically quiet days (Kp ≤ 2+), the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation at each station was described as a function of solar activity SA, day of year DOY, lunar age LA, and local time LT. After interpolation in latitude, the model can describe solar-activity dependence and seasonal dependence of solar quiet daily variations (S) and lunar quiet daily variations (L). We performed a spherical harmonic analysis (SHA) on these S and L variations to examine average characteristics of the equivalent external current systems. We found three particularly noteworthy results. First, the total current intensity of the S current system is largely controlled by solar activity while its focus position is not significantly affected by solar activity. Second, we found that seasonal variations of the S current intensity exhibit north-south asymmetry; the current intensity of the northern vortex shows a prominent annual variation while the southern vortex shows a clear semi-annual variation as well as annual variation. Thirdly, we found that the total intensity of the L current system changes depending on solar activity and season; seasonal variations of the L current intensity show an enhancement during the December solstice, independent of the level of solar activity.

  17. Variation in habitat suitability does not always relate to variation in species' plant functional traits

    PubMed Central

    Thuiller, Wilfried; Albert, Cécile H.; Dubuis, Anne; Randin, Christophe; Guisan, Antoine

    2010-01-01

    Habitat suitability models, which relate species occurrences to environmental variables, are assumed to predict suitable conditions for a given species. If these models are reliable, they should relate to change in plant growth and function. In this paper, we ask the question whether habitat suitability models are able to predict variation in plant functional traits, often assumed to be a good surrogate for a species' overall health and vigour. Using a thorough sampling design, we show a tight link between variation in plant functional traits and habitat suitability for some species, but not for others. Our contrasting results pave the way towards a better understanding of how species cope with varying habitat conditions and demonstrate that habitat suitability models can provide meaningful descriptions of the functional niche in some cases, but not in others. PMID:19793738

  18. Spatio-temporal variation of methane over Indian region: Seasonal and inter-annual variation .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, K.; Nair, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane (CH4) has an important role in the radiation budget and chemistry in the lower and middle atmosphere as a greenhouse and reactive trace gas. The rapid developments in the agriculture and industry over India have lead to the emission of many pollutants like CO, O3, CH4, CO2, SO2 etc into the atmosphere. However, their sources, sinks and concentration levels are poorly understood because of the lack of systematic sampling and monitoring. The advent of satellite remote sensing has helped to analyze the chemical composition of atmosphere with good spatial coverage especially over tropical region which was poorly sampled with the existing surface network. This work attempts an analysis of spatial distribution, seasonal cycle and inter annual variation of CH4 over Indian region during 2003-2009 using SCIAMACHY data onboard ENVISAT. Column CH4 varies from 1740-1890 ppbv over Indian region with distinct spatial and temporal features. We observed a dependence of seasonal CH4 variation on rice cultivation, convective activities and changes in boundary layer characteristics. The comparative study using satellite, aircraft and surface measurement shown CH4 has non-homogeneity in its distribution and seasonal variation in different layers of atmosphere. A comparative study of CH4 at different hot spot regions over the globe was carried out which showed prominent hemispherical variations. Large spread in column CH4 was observed at India and Chinese region compared to other regions with a significant seasonal variability. This study points to the blending of satellite, aircraft and surface measurements for the realization of regional distribution of CH4.

  19. Genetic variations and miRNA-target interactions contribute to natural phenotypic variations in Populus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhui; Xie, Jianbo; Chen, Beibei; Quan, Mingyang; Li, Ying; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-10-01

    Variation in regulatory factors, including microRNAs (miRNAs), contributes to variation in quantitative and complex traits. However, in plants, variants in miRNAs and their target genes that contribute to natural phenotypic variation, and the underlying regulatory networks, remain poorly characterized. We investigated the associations and interactions of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNAs and their target genes with phenotypes in 435 individuals from a natural population of Populus. We used RNA-seq to identify 217 miRNAs differentially expressed in a tension wood system, and identified 1196 candidate target genes; degradome sequencing confirmed 60 of the target sites. In addition, 72 miRNA-target pairs showed significant co-expression. Gene ontology (GO) term analysis showed that most of the genes in the co-regulated pairs participate in biological regulation. Genome resequencing found 5383 common SNPs (frequency ≥ 0.05) in 139 miRNAs and 31 037 SNPs in 819 target genes. Single-SNP association analyses identified 232 significant associations between wood traits (P ≤ 0.05) and SNPs in 102 miRNAs and 1387 associations with 478 target genes. Among these, 102 miRNA-target pairs associated with the same traits. Multi-SNP associations found 102 epistatic pairs associated with traits. Furthermore, a reconstructed regulatory network contained 12 significantly co-expressed pairs, including eight miRNAs and nine targets associated with traits. Lastly, both expression and genetic association showed that miR156i, miR156j, miR396a and miR6445b were involved in the formation of tension wood. This study shows that variants in miRNAs and target genes contribute to natural phenotypic variation and annotated roles and interactions of miRNAs and their target genes by genetic association analysis. PMID:27265357

  20. Phenotypic Variation in Infants, Not Adults, Reflects Genotypic Variation among Chimpanzees and Bonobos

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Naoki; Ponce de León, Marcia S.; Zollikofer, Christoph P. E.

    2014-01-01

    Studies comparing phenotypic variation with neutral genetic variation in modern humans have shown that genetic drift is a main factor of evolutionary diversification among populations. The genetic population history of our closest living relatives, the chimpanzees and bonobos, is now equally well documented, but phenotypic variation among these taxa remains relatively unexplored, and phenotype-genotype correlations are not yet documented. Also, while the adult phenotype is typically used as a reference, it remains to be investigated how phenotype-genotye correlations change during development. Here we address these questions by analyzing phenotypic evolutionary and developmental diversification in the species and subspecies of the genus Pan. Our analyses focus on the morphology of the femoral diaphysis, which represents a functionally constrained element of the locomotor system. Results show that during infancy phenotypic distances between taxa are largely congruent with non-coding (neutral) genotypic distances. Later during ontogeny, however, phenotypic distances deviate from genotypic distances, mainly as an effect of heterochronic shifts between taxon-specific developmental programs. Early phenotypic differences between Pan taxa are thus likely brought about by genetic drift while late differences reflect taxon-specific adaptations. PMID:25013970

  1. Do key dimensions of seed and seedling functional trait variation capture variation in recruitment probability?

    PubMed

    Larson, Julie E; Sheley, Roger L; Hardegree, Stuart P; Doescher, Paul S; James, Jeremy J

    2016-05-01

    Seedling recruitment is a critical driver of population dynamics and community assembly, yet we know little about functional traits that define different recruitment strategies. For the first time, we examined whether trait relatedness across germination and seedling stages allows the identification of general recruitment strategies which share core functional attributes and also correspond to recruitment outcomes in applied settings. We measured six seed and eight seedling traits (lab- and field-collected, respectively) for 47 varieties of dryland grasses and used principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis to identify major dimensions of trait variation and to isolate trait-based recruitment groups, respectively. PCA highlighted some links between seed and seedling traits, suggesting that relative growth rate and root elongation rate are simultaneously but independently associated with seed mass and initial root mass (first axis), and with leaf dry matter content, specific leaf area, coleoptile tissue density and germination rate (second axis). Third and fourth axes captured separate tradeoffs between hydrothermal time and base water potential for germination, and between specific root length and root mass ratio, respectively. Cluster analysis separated six recruitment types along dimensions of germination and growth rates, but classifications did not correspond to patterns of germination, emergence or recruitment in the field under either of two watering treatments. Thus, while we have begun to identify major threads of functional variation across seed and seedling stages, our understanding of how this variation influences demographic processes-particularly germination and emergence-remains a key gap in functional ecology. PMID:26337610

  2. Space Use Variation in Co-Occurring Sister Species: Response to Environmental Variation or Competition?

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Claire M. S.; Meynard, Christine; Watson, Johan; Rioux, Camille; Benhamou, Simon; Perez, Julie; du Plessis, Jurie J.; Avenant, Nico; Pillay, Neville; Ganem, Guila

    2015-01-01

    Coexistence often involves niche differentiation either as the result of environmental divergence, or in response to competition. Disentangling the causes of such divergence requires that environmental variation across space is taken into account, which is rarely done in empirical studies. We address the role of environmental variation versus competition in coexistence between two rodent species: Rhabdomys bechuanae (bechuanae) and Rhabdomys dilectus dilectus (dilectus) comparing their habitat preference and home range (HR) size in areas with similar climates, where their distributions abut (allopatry) or overlap (sympatry). Using Outlying Mean Index analyses, we test whether habitat characteristics of the species deviate significantly from a random sample of available habitats. In allopatry, results suggest habitat selection: dilectus preferring grasslands with little bare soil while bechuanae occurring in open shrublands. In sympatry, shrubland type habitats dominate and differences are less marked, yet dilectus selects habitats with more cover than bechuanae. Interestingly, bechuanae shows larger HRs than dilectus, and both species display larger HRs in sympatry. Further, HR overlaps between species are lower than expected. We discuss our results in light of data on the phylogeography of the genus and propose that evolution in allopatry resulted in adaptation leading to different habitat preferences, even at their distribution margins, a divergence expected to facilitate coexistence. However, since sympatry occurs in sites where environmental characteristics do not allow complete species separation, competition may explain reduced inter-species overlap and character displacement in HR size. This study reveals that both environmental variation and competition may shape species coexistence. PMID:25693176

  3. Phenotypic variation in infants, not adults, reflects genotypic variation among chimpanzees and bonobos.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Naoki; Ponce de León, Marcia S; Zollikofer, Christoph P E

    2014-01-01

    Studies comparing phenotypic variation with neutral genetic variation in modern humans have shown that genetic drift is a main factor of evolutionary diversification among populations. The genetic population history of our closest living relatives, the chimpanzees and bonobos, is now equally well documented, but phenotypic variation among these taxa remains relatively unexplored, and phenotype-genotype correlations are not yet documented. Also, while the adult phenotype is typically used as a reference, it remains to be investigated how phenotype-genotye correlations change during development. Here we address these questions by analyzing phenotypic evolutionary and developmental diversification in the species and subspecies of the genus Pan. Our analyses focus on the morphology of the femoral diaphysis, which represents a functionally constrained element of the locomotor system. Results show that during infancy phenotypic distances between taxa are largely congruent with non-coding (neutral) genotypic distances. Later during ontogeny, however, phenotypic distances deviate from genotypic distances, mainly as an effect of heterochronic shifts between taxon-specific developmental programs. Early phenotypic differences between Pan taxa are thus likely brought about by genetic drift while late differences reflect taxon-specific adaptations. PMID:25013970

  4. Space use variation in co-occurring sister species: response to environmental variation or competition?

    PubMed

    Dufour, Claire M S; Meynard, Christine; Watson, Johan; Rioux, Camille; Benhamou, Simon; Perez, Julie; du Plessis, Jurie J; Avenant, Nico; Pillay, Neville; Ganem, Guila

    2015-01-01

    Coexistence often involves niche differentiation either as the result of environmental divergence, or in response to competition. Disentangling the causes of such divergence requires that environmental variation across space is taken into account, which is rarely done in empirical studies. We address the role of environmental variation versus competition in coexistence between two rodent species: Rhabdomys bechuanae (bechuanae) and Rhabdomys dilectus dilectus (dilectus) comparing their habitat preference and home range (HR) size in areas with similar climates, where their distributions abut (allopatry) or overlap (sympatry). Using Outlying Mean Index analyses, we test whether habitat characteristics of the species deviate significantly from a random sample of available habitats. In allopatry, results suggest habitat selection: dilectus preferring grasslands with little bare soil while bechuanae occurring in open shrublands. In sympatry, shrubland type habitats dominate and differences are less marked, yet dilectus selects habitats with more cover than bechuanae. Interestingly, bechuanae shows larger HRs than dilectus, and both species display larger HRs in sympatry. Further, HR overlaps between species are lower than expected. We discuss our results in light of data on the phylogeography of the genus and propose that evolution in allopatry resulted in adaptation leading to different habitat preferences, even at their distribution margins, a divergence expected to facilitate coexistence. However, since sympatry occurs in sites where environmental characteristics do not allow complete species separation, competition may explain reduced inter-species overlap and character displacement in HR size. This study reveals that both environmental variation and competition may shape species coexistence. PMID:25693176

  5. Seasonal variation in microhabitat of salamanders: environmental variation or shift of habitat selection?

    PubMed

    Lunghi, Enrico; Manenti, Raoul; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Relationships between species and their habitats are not always constant. Different processes may determine changes in species-habitat association: individuals may prefer different habitat typologies in different periods, or they may be forced to occupy a different habitat in order to follow the changing environment. The aim of our study was to assess whether cave salamanders change their habitat association pattern through the year, and to test whether such changes are determined by environmental changes or by changes in preferences. We monitored multiple caves in Central Italy through one year, and monthly measured biotic and abiotic features of microhabitat and recorded Italian cave salamanders distribution. We used mixed models and niche similarity tests to assess whether species-habitat relationships remain constant through the year. Microhabitat showed strong seasonal variation, with the highest variability in the superficial sectors. Salamanders were associated to relatively cold and humid sectors in summer, but not during winter. Such apparent shift in habitat preferences mostly occurred because the environmental gradient changed through the year, while individuals generally selected similar conditions. Nevertheless, juveniles were more tolerant to dry sectors during late winter, when food demand was highest. This suggests that tolerance for suboptimal abiotic conditions may change through time, depending on the required resources. Differences in habitat use are jointly determined by environmental variation through time, and by changes in the preferred habitat. The trade-offs between tolerance and resources requirement are major determinant of such variation. PMID:26290788

  6. Genome-Scale Variation of Tubeworm Symbionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robidart, J.; Felbeck, H.

    2005-12-01

    Hydrothermal vent tubeworms are completely dependent on their bacterial symbionts for nutrition. Despite this dependency, many studies have concluded that bacterial symbionts are acquired anew from the environment, every generation rather than the more reliable mode of symbiont transmission from parent directly to offspring. Ribosomal 16S sequences have shown little variation of symbiont phylogeny from worm to worm, but higher resolution genome-scale analyses have found that there is genomic heterogeneity between symbionts from worms in different environments. What genes can be "spared," while resulting in an intact symbiosis? Have symbionts from one environment gained physiological capabilities that make them more fit in that environment? In order to answer these questions, subtractive hybridization was used on symbionts of Riftia pachyptila tubeworms from different environments to gain insight into which genes are present in one symbiont and absent in the other. Many genes were found to be unique to each symbiont and these results will be presented. This technique will be applied to answer many fundamental questions regarding microbial symbiont evolution to a specific physico-chemical environment, to a different host species, and more.

  7. Genetic Basis of Metabolome Variation in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Breunig, Jeffrey S.; Hackett, Sean R.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism, the conversion of nutrients into usable energy and biochemical building blocks, is an essential feature of all cells. The genetic factors responsible for inter-individual metabolic variability remain poorly understood. To investigate genetic causes of metabolome variation, we measured the concentrations of 74 metabolites across 100 segregants from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cross by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We found 52 quantitative trait loci for 34 metabolites. These included linkages due to overt changes in metabolic genes, e.g., linking pyrimidine intermediates to the deletion of ura3. They also included linkages not directly related to metabolic enzymes, such as those for five central carbon metabolites to ira2, a Ras/PKA pathway regulator, and for the metabolites, S-adenosyl-methionine and S-adenosyl-homocysteine to slt2, a MAP kinase involved in cell wall integrity. The variant of ira2 that elevates metabolite levels also increases glucose uptake and ethanol secretion. These results highlight specific examples of genetic variability, including in genes without prior known metabolic regulatory function, that impact yeast metabolism. PMID:24603560

  8. IRI and GPS Variations Over Ilorin Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okonkwo, Perpetua; Okoh, Daniel

    Abstract Diurnal and day-to-day variations of Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) over an equatorial region (Ilorin, Nigeria; Geographic 8.500N, 4.550E; Geomagnetic 10.600N, 78.410E) is presented in this paper using data from the IRI model and from the AFRL-SCINDA (Air Force Research Laboratory - Scintillation Network Decision Aid) GPS receiver installed at the Ilorin station. A comparison between VTEC data from the two sources is also presented since a major concern in the work is to use available GPS-TEC data for year 2010 to evaluate the performance of the IRI model in TEC prediction over the region, and to therefore inform a proposed use of the IRI model in TEC modeling over the African region. Our results show generally good comparisons between the IRI TEC predictions and the GPS TEC measurements, results from the comparisons on diurnal basis were, as expected, better than those on day-to-day basis. The work also indicated that the lower TEC thresholds of the IRI predictions for the days observed occurred at around 04:00 UT while for the GPS measurements they occurred at around 05:00 UT.

  9. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.

  10. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; et al

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population andmore » functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.« less

  11. Motor Task Variation Induces Structural Learning

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Daniel A.; Aertsen, Ad; Wolpert, Daniel M.; Mehring, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Summary When we have learned a motor skill, such as cycling or ice-skating, we can rapidly generalize to novel tasks, such as motorcycling or rollerblading [1–8]. Such facilitation of learning could arise through two distinct mechanisms by which the motor system might adjust its control parameters. First, fast learning could simply be a consequence of the proximity of the original and final settings of the control parameters. Second, by structural learning [9–14], the motor system could constrain the parameter adjustments to conform to the control parameters' covariance structure. Thus, facilitation of learning would rely on the novel task parameters' lying on the structure of a lower-dimensional subspace that can be explored more efficiently. To test between these two hypotheses, we exposed subjects to randomly varying visuomotor tasks of fixed structure. Although such randomly varying tasks are thought to prevent learning, we show that when subsequently presented with novel tasks, subjects exhibit three key features of structural learning: facilitated learning of tasks with the same structure, strong reduction in interference normally observed when switching between tasks that require opposite control strategies, and preferential exploration along the learned structure. These results suggest that skill generalization relies on task variation and structural learning. PMID:19217296

  12. Obliquity Variations of Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Chambers, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A planet's obliquity, which is the angle between its orbital angular momentum and its rotational angular momentum, is an important factor in determining its climate and habitability. For small obliquities, as well as obliquities close to 180 degrees, the planet receives more radiant energy from its star at equatorial latitudes than near its poles, whereas the poles are heated the most for obliquities near 90 degrees. Jacques Laskar has analyzed possible obliquity variations of the planets in our Solar System. His study also considers the same planets with different rotational periods, and the Earth without the Moon. He finds, using frequency map analysis, that the obliquity of the Earth is stabilized by the Moon, and can vary by at most a few degrees. In contrast, the obliquity of Mars can range from 0 to 60 degrees, and a hypothetical moonless Earth's axial tilt could be close to 0 degrees or as large as 85 degrees. Numerical integrations by Laskar and others have shown that Mars' obliquity indeed varies over most of its permitted range on time scales of tens of millions of years. In contrast, our analysis shows that the obliquity of a moonless Earth appears to be confined to the range of approximately 12 - 38 degrees over time scales of 100 million years. Results of ongoing longer integrations will be presented, and their implications discussed.

  13. Microsatellite variation in the Australian dingo.

    PubMed

    Wilton, A N; Steward, D J; Zafiris, K

    1999-01-01

    The dingo is thought to have arrived in Australia from Asia about 5,000 years ago. It is currently in danger because of interbreeding with domestic dogs. Several morphological, behavioral, and reproductive characteristics distinguish dingoes from domestic dog. Skull morphometrics are currently used to try to classify wild canids as pure dingo, dog, or hybrid. Molecular techniques based on diagnostic DNA differences between dogs and dingoes would make a much more reliable and practical test. A small number of markers (about 10) would allow detection of animals with domestic dog in their ancestry several generations back. We have typed 16 dingoes and 16 dogs of mixed breed for 14 microsatellites. The amount of variation in the Australian dingo is much less than in domestic dogs. The size distributions of microsatellites in the two groups usually overlap. The number of alleles in the dingo is much smaller in all cases. One dinucleotide repeat locus shows a size difference of 1 bp in allele classes between dog and dingo. This locus may be diagnostic for dog or dingo ancestry. The differences in distributions of alleles at other loci can also be used to classify animals using a likelihood method. PMID:9987915

  14. Intensity Variation of Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2011-01-01

    This paper updates the influence of environmental and source factors of shocks driven by corona) mass ejections (CMEs) that are likely to influence the intensity of solar energetic particle (SEP) events. The intensity variation due to CME interaction reported in Gopalswamy et al. (2004, JGR 109, Al2105) is confirmed by expanding the investigation to all the large SEP events of solar cycle 23. The large SEP events are separated into two groups, one associated with CMEs running into other CMEs, and the other with CMEs running into the ambient solar wind. SEP events with CME interaction generally have a higher intensity. New possibilities such as the influence of corona) holes on the SEP intensity are also discussed. For example, the presence of a large coronal hole between a well-connected eruption and the solar disk center may render the shock poorly connected because of the interaction between the CME and the coronal hole. This point is illustrated using the 2004 December 3 SEP event delayed by about 12 hours from the onset of the associated CME. There is no other event at the Sun that can be associated with the SEP onset. This event is consistent with the possibility that the coronal hole interaction influences the connectivity of the CMEs that produce SEPs, and hence the intensity of the SEP event.

  15. Photospheric Temperature Variations near the Solar Limb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fivian, Martin; Hudson, H. S.; Lin, R. P.; Zahid, H. J.

    2010-05-01

    We use observations from the solar aspect sensor of RHESSI to characterize the latitude dependence of the temperature of the photosphere near the solar limb. Previous observations had suggested the presence of a polar temperature excess as large as 1.5 K. The RHESSI observations, made with a rotating telescope in space, have great advantages in the rejection of systematic errors in the very precise photometry required for such an observation. This photometry is differential, i.e. relative to a mean limb-darkening function. The data base consists of about 1,000 images per day from linear CCDs with 1.73 arc sec square pixels, observing a narrow band (12nm FWHM) at 670 nm. Each image shows a chord crossing the disk at a different location as the spacecraft rotates and precesses around its average solar pointing. We fit an average limb-darkening function and reassemble the residuals into synoptic maps of differential intensity variations as a function of position angle. We further mask these images against SOHO/EIT 284A images in order to eliminate magnetic regions. The analysis establishes a limit on the quadrupole dependence of temperature (brightness) on position angle of order 0.04 K, with a comparable uncertainty.

  16. Circadian variation in unexpected postoperative death.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, J; Pedersen, M H; Ramsing, T; Kehlet, H

    1992-12-01

    Unexpected deaths still occur following major surgical procedures. The cause is often unknown but may be cardiac or thromboembolic in nature. Postoperative ischaemia, infarction and sudden cardiac death may be triggered by episodic or constant arterial hypoxaemia, which increases during the night. This study examined the circadian variation of sudden unexpected death following abdominal surgery between 1985 and 1989 inclusive. Deaths were divided into those occurring during the day (08.00-16.00 hours), evening (16.00-24.00 hours) and night (24.00-08.00 hours). Twenty-three deaths were considered to have been totally unexpected. Of 16 such patients undergoing autopsy, pulmonary embolism was the cause of death in five. In the remaining 11 patients, death occurred at night in eight (P < 0.005). Five of the seven patients without an autopsy died at night (P < 0.04); overall, 13 of 18 unexpected deaths occurred at night-time. These results suggest a need for further studies of sleep- and respiration-related effects on postoperative nocturnal cardiac function. The efficacy of monitoring during this apparent high-risk period should be evaluated. PMID:1486424

  17. Seasonal variation of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Douglas, A Stuart

    2002-01-01

    During the 18-year period 1980-1997, 1103 patients were treated as in-patients for slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) in Scottish hospitals. This paper reports a significant seasonal variation, especially in male patients, with an excess admitted in the autumn. Examining the physiological seasonality of the monthly increment of growth in height and weight in childhood, we hypothesised that these physiological rhythms, while not pathogenetic, may be responsible for the timing of the seasonal features of SCFE. Previously published studies suggest that the average time between first symptoms and diagnosis is 3 to 5 months. The condition may start with the spring peak in growth and become more symptomatic with the autumn peak in weight. In conclusion, we report a new epidemiological finding, but, in accordance with other studies, we cannot provide a certain aetiological explanation. The timing, but not the pathogenesis, of admission to hospital for a SCFE might be related to the timing in the year of seasonal increments of height in spring and weight in autumn. It is tempting to draw attention to associations with environmental features. For example, in autumn there is the most rapid annual fall in temperature, and the hours of darkness are increasing from the autumn equinox to the winter solstice. However, there is no reason to conclude that these associations have anything to do with aetiology. PMID:11866078

  18. Variational collision integrator for polymer chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyendecker, Sigrid; Hartmann, Carsten; Koch, Michael

    2012-05-01

    The numerical simulation of many-particle systems (e.g. in molecular dynamics) often involves constraints of various forms. We present a symplectic integrator for mechanical systems with holonomic (bilateral) and unilateral contact constraints, the latter being in the form of a non-penetration condition. The scheme is based on a discrete variant of Hamilton's principle in which both the discrete trajectory and the unknown collision time are varied (cf. [R. Fetecau, J. Marsden, M. Ortiz, M. West, Nonsmooth Lagrangian mechanics and variational collision integrators, SIAM J. Appl. Dyn. Syst. 2 (2003) 381-416]). As a consequence, the collision event enters the discrete equations of motion as an unknown that has to be computed on-the-fly whenever a collision is imminent. The additional bilateral constraints are efficiently dealt with employing a discrete null space reduction (including a projection and a local reparametrisation step) which considerably reduces the number of unknowns and improves the condition number during each time-step as compared to a standard treatment with Lagrange multipliers. We illustrate the numerical scheme with a simple example from polymer dynamics, a linear chain of beads, and test it against other standard numerical schemes for collision problems.

  19. Dust Reddening Variation in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Albert; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Green, Gregory; Ford Schlafly, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Various studies of dust extinction have shown that reddening curves vary from cloud to cloud. However, most of these results use relatively small numbers of stars in limited regions of interest. We describe a generalized technique for estimating the angular variation in the reddening law across the Milky Way at mid-to-high galactic latitudes, inferred from the photometry of millions of stars from Pan-STARRS 1. We find pixels where stars are primarily extinguished by a single dust-cloud, and determine a most likely de-reddening vector from shifts of the stellar locus in color space. We present maps for some target clouds, and compare a variety of reddening laws with our results.The maps should help us better understand the general properties of dust in the Milky Way, as well as provide more accurate extinction correction in the relevant regions. The stellar locus fitting technique can also corroborate detailed studies of reddening based on APOGEE spectra (Schlafly et al.) and more rigorous analyses of the line-of-sight extinction (Green et al.)

  20. Compositional variation in the Hadley Apennine region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, P. E.; Hawke, B. R.

    1982-01-01

    Orbital geochemical data in the Hadley Apennine region are related to typical rock compositions and used in determining the distribution of soils derived from the rock types found in this region. Orbital XRF Mg/Si and Al/Si intensities are the orbital data that are used primarily. These data are corrected for spurious interorbit variation using a modification of a previously developed method. The corrected values are than converted to % MgO and % Al2O3, respectively, from theoretical considerations, and as such are compared with similar concentrations for typical lunar rocks and soils of the Apollo 15 landing site. The relationship of the XRF values to Fe, Ti, and Th concentrations, derived from gamma-ray observations, is also considered. It is established that the orbital geochemistry data for this region are consistent with the presence of a mixture of ANT suite and Fra Mauro basalt components frequently dominated by a KREEP basalt component toward the west and by a mafic pyroclastic component toward the east.

  1. Color Variations in the Sky at Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of the martian sunset from Sol 24 shows much more color variation than had previously been seen. The blue color near the Sun is not caused by clouds of water ice, but by the martian dust itself. The dust in the atmosphere absorbs blue light, giving the sky its red color, but it also scatters some of the blue light into the area just around the Sun because of its size. The blue color only becomes apparent near sunrise and sunset, when the light has to pass through the largest amount of dust. This image was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  2. Solar irradiance variations due to active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, L.; Schatten, K.H.; Sofia, S.

    1982-05-15

    We have been able to reproduce the variations of the solar irradiance observed by ACRIM to an accuracy of better than +- 0.4 W m/sup -2/, assuming that during the 6 month observation period in 1980 the solar luminosity was constant. The improvement over previous attempts is primarily due to the inclusion of faculae. The reproduction scheme uses simple geometrical data on spot and facula areas, and conventional parameters for the respective fluxes and angular dependencies. The quality of reproduction is not very sensitive to most of the details of these parameters; nevertheless, there conventional parameters cannot be very different from their actual values in the solar atmosphere. It is interesting that the time average of the integrated excess emission (over directions) of the faculae cancels out the integrated deficit produced by the spots, within an accuracy of about 10%. If this behavior were maintained over longer periods of time, say, on the order of an activity cycle, active regions could be viewed as a kind of lighthouse where the energy deficit near the normal direction, associated with the spots, is primarily reemitted close to the tangential directions by the faculae. The currently available data suggest that energy ''storage'' associated with the redirection of flux near active regions on the Sun is comparable to the lifetime of the faculae.

  3. Anthropometric variation in west-central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A F

    2001-06-01

    Anthropometric data from five indigenous Mexican groups, collected by Carlos and Manuel Basauri in 1933, were reanalyzed and compared with serological and cranial non-metric data. Ten cranial and 14 postcranial measurements were used, both separately and together. Bias-corrected r0 and FST values were slightly higher for the postcranial analysis (0.033) than for the cranial analysis (0.024). Given the degree of linguistic differentiation among the Mexican populations, not to mention the different histories of the communities sampled, this result is surprisingly low. The two groups which were closest linguistically and geographically, the Cora and Huichol, were also close biologically. The other three groups, Tarascan, Aztecan, and Otomi, were not closely related to each other or to the Cora-Huichol pair. More interesting than the relationship between populations in this case are those within them. The Aztecas of Tuxpan, Jalisco, exhibit high rii values and lower-than-expected phenotypic variance, suggesting the pronounced action of genetic drift. The Otomi of Ixmiquilpan and Cora of the Sierra de Nayarit, despite their very different histories, both exhibit low rii values and higher-than-expected phenotypic variance, indicating a high level of gene flow. Despite the phenotypic similarities between the Cora and Huichol, their residual variance is very different; this mirrors serological investigations of relative admixture. Over all, recent population history, and especially non-indigenous admixture, are at least as explicative of the observed biological variation as historical linguistic ties are. PMID:11441457

  4. Spatiotemporal Floral Scent Variation of Penstemon digitalis.

    PubMed

    Burdon, Rosalie C F; Raguso, Robert A; Kessler, André; Parachnowitsch, Amy L

    2015-07-01

    Variability in floral volatile emissions can occur temporally through floral development, during diel cycles, as well as spatially within a flower. These spatiotemporal patterns are hypothesized to provide additional information to floral visitors, but they are rarely measured, and their attendant hypotheses are even more rarely tested. In Penstemon digitalis, a plant whose floral scent has been shown to be under strong phenotypic selection for seed fitness, we investigated spatiotemporal variation in floral scent by using dynamic headspace collection, respectively solid-phase microextraction, and analyzed the volatile samples by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Total volatile emission was greatest during flowering and peak pollinator activity hours, suggesting its importance in mediating ecological interactions. We also detected tissue and reward-specific compounds, consistent with the hypothesis that complexity in floral scent composition reflects several ecological functions. In particular, we found tissue-specific scents for the stigma, stamens, and staminode (a modified sterile stamen common to all Penstemons). Our findings emphasize the dynamic nature of floral scents and highlight a need for greater understanding of ecological and physiological mechanisms driving spatiotemporal patterns in scent production. PMID:26133675

  5. Interannual variation of global atmospheric angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tsing-Chang; Yen, Ming-Cheng; Tribbia, J.J.

    1996-10-01

    The relative atmospheric angular momentum (RAM) integrated over the globe is an explicit variable representing the state of the atmospheric general circulation. After removing the annual, semiannual, and higher-frequency components, the filtered global RAM time series for the past 14 years (1979-92) is highly correlated with both the Southern Oscillation index and the tropical Pacific sea surface temperature averaged over Area NINO-3 (5{degrees}S-5{degrees}N, 150{degrees}W-90{degrees}W). The interannual variation of global RAM is coherent with the poleward propagation of RAM anomalies. The global RAM anomalies reach their minimum values when westerly anomalies emerge in the Tropics and higher latitudes during a cold El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event. On the other hand, global RAM anomalies attain their maximum values when westerly anomalies arrive at the subtropics of both hemispheres during a warm ENSO event. It is demonstrated that the poleward propagation of RAM anomalies results from the flip-flop oscillation of the anomalous circulation between cold and warm ENSO events. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Slimplectic Integrators: Variational Integrators for Nonconservative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, David

    2016-05-01

    Symplectic integrators are widely used for long-term integration of conservative astrophysical problems due to their ability to preserve the constants of motion; however, they cannot in general be applied in the presence of nonconservative interactions. Here we present the “slimplectic” integrator, a new type of numerical integrator that shares many of the benefits of traditional symplectic integrators yet is applicable to general nonconservative systems. We utilize a fixed-time-step variational integrator formalism applied to a newly developed principle of stationary nonconservative action (Galley, 2013, Galley et al 2014). As a result, the generalized momenta and energy (Noether current) evolutions are well-tracked. We discuss several example systems, including damped harmonic oscillators, Poynting–Robertson drag, and gravitational radiation reaction, by utilizing our new publicly available code to demonstrate the slimplectic integrator algorithm. Slimplectic integrators are well-suited for integrations of systems where nonconservative effects play an important role in the long-term dynamical evolution. As such they are particularly appropriate for cosmological or celestial N-body dynamics problems where nonconservative interactions, e.g., gas interactions or dissipative tides, can play an important role.

  7. Slimplectic Integrators: Variational Integrators for Nonconservative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, David

    2016-01-01

    Symplectic integrators are widely used for long-term integration of conservative astrophysical problems due to their ability to preserve the constants of motion; however, they cannot in general be applied in the presence of nonconservative interactions. In this Letter, we develop the "slimplectic" integrator, a new type of numerical integrator that shares many of the benefits of traditional symplectic integrators yet is applicable to general nonconservative systems. We utilize a fixed-time-step variational integrator formalism applied to the principle of stationary nonconservative action developed in Galley et al. As a result, the generalized momenta and energy (Noether current) evolutions are well-tracked. We discuss several example systems, including damped harmonic oscillators, Poynting-Robertson drag, and gravitational radiation reaction, by utilizing our new publicly available code to demonstrate the slimplectic integrator algorithm. Slimplectic integrators are well-suited for integrations of systems where nonconservative effects play an important role in the long-term dynamical evolution. As such they are particularly appropriate for cosmological or celestial N-body dynamics problems where nonconservative interactions, e.g., gas interactions or dissipative tides, can play an important role.

  8. Phytoplankton niche generation by interspecific stoichiometric variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GöThlich, L.; Oschlies, A.

    2012-06-01

    For marine biogeochemical models used in simulations of climate change scenarios, the ability to account for adaptability of marine ecosystems to environmental change becomes a concern. The potential for adaptation is expected to be larger for a diverse ecosystem compared to a monoculture of a single type of (model) algae, such as typically included in biogeochemical models. Recent attempts to simulate phytoplankton diversity in global marine ecosystem models display remarkable qualitative agreement with observed patterns of species distributions. However, modeled species diversity tends to be systematically lower than observed and, in many regions, is smaller than the number of potentially limiting nutrients. According to resource competition theory, the maximum number of coexisting species at equilibrium equals the number of limiting resources. By simulating phytoplankton communities in a chemostat model and in a global circulation model, we show here that a systematic underestimate of phytoplankton diversity may result from the standard modeling assumption of identical stoichiometry for the different phytoplankton types. Implementing stoichiometric variation among the different marine algae types in the models allows species to generate different resource supply niches via their own ecological impact. This is shown to increase the level of phytoplankton coexistence both in a chemostat model and in a global self-assembling ecosystem model.

  9. Strain Variation in Mycobacterium marinum Fish Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ucko, M.; Colorni, A.; Kvitt, H.; Diamant, A.; Zlotkin, A.; Knibb, W. R.

    2002-01-01

    A molecular characterization of two Mycobacterium marinum genes, 16S rRNA and hsp65, was carried out with a total of 21 isolates from various species of fish from both marine and freshwater environments of Israel, Europe, and the Far East. The nucleotide sequences of both genes revealed that all M. marinum isolates from fish in Israel belonged to two different strains, one infecting marine (cultured and wild) fish and the other infecting freshwater (cultured) fish. A restriction enzyme map based on the nucleotide sequences of both genes confirmed the divergence of the Israeli marine isolates from the freshwater isolates and differentiated the Israeli isolates from the foreign isolates, with the exception of one of three Greek isolates from marine fish which was identical to the Israeli marine isolates. The second isolate from Greece exhibited a single base alteration in the 16S rRNA sequence, whereas the third isolate was most likely a new Mycobacterium species. Isolates from Denmark and Thailand shared high sequence homology to complete identity with reference strain ATCC 927. Combined analysis of the two gene sequences increased the detection of intraspecific variations and was thus of importance in studying the taxonomy and epidemiology of this aquatic pathogen. Whether the Israeli M. marinum strain infecting marine fish is endemic to the Red Sea and found extremely susceptible hosts in the exotic species imported for aquaculture or rather was accidentally introduced with occasional imports of fingerlings from the Mediterranean Sea could not be determined. PMID:12406715

  10. Density variations in the Earth's magnetospheric cusps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, B. M.; Niehof, J.; Collier, M. R.; Welling, D. T.; Sibeck, D. G.; Mozer, F. S.; Fritz, T. A.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2016-03-01

    Seven years of measurements from the Polar spacecraft are surveyed to monitor the variations of plasma density within the magnetospheric cusps. The spacecraft's orbital precession from 1998 through 2005 allows for coverage of both the northern and southern cusps from low altitude out to the magnetopause. In the mid- and high- altitude cusps, plasma density scales well with the solar wind density (ncusp/nsw˜0.8). This trend is fairly steady for radial distances greater then 4 RE. At low altitudes (r < 4RE) the density increases with decreasing altitude and even exceeds the solar wind density due to contributions from the ionosphere. The density of high charge state oxygen (O>+2) also displays a positive trend with solar wind density within the cusp. A multifluid simulation with the Block-Adaptive-Tree Solar Wind Roe-Type Upwind Scheme MHD model was run to monitor the relative contributions of the ionosphere and solar wind plasma within the cusp. The simulation provides similar results to the statistical measurements from Polar and confirms the presence of ionospheric plasma at low altitudes.

  11. Proteome variation among Filifactor alocis strains

    PubMed Central

    Aruni, A. Wilson; Roy, Francis; Sandberg, Lawrence; Fletcher, Hansel M.

    2015-01-01

    Filifactor alocis, a Gram-positive anaerobic rod, is now considered one of the marker organisms associated with periodontal disease. Although there was heterogeneity in its virulence potential, this bacterium was shown to have virulence properties that may enhance its ability to survive and persist in the periodontal pocket. To gain further insight into a possible mechanism(s) of pathogenesis, the proteome of F. alocis strains was evaluated. Proteins including several proteases, neutrophil-activating protein A and calcium-binding acid repeat protein, were identified in F. alocis. During the invasion of HeLa cells, there was increased expression of several of the genes encoding these proteins in the potentially more virulent F. alocis D-62D compared to F. alocis ATCC 35896, the type strain. A comparative protein in silico analysis of the proteome revealed more cell wall anchoring proteins in the F. alocis D-62D compared to F. alocis ATCC 35896. Their expression was enhanced by coinfection with Porphyromonas gingivalis. Taken together, the variation in the pathogenic potential of the F. alocis strains may be related to the differential expression of several putative virulence factors. PMID:23008013

  12. Retroviral DNA Transposition: Themes and Variations

    PubMed Central

    Skalka, Anna Marie

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Retroviruses and LTR retrotransposons are transposable elements that encapsidate the RNAs that are intermediates in the transposition of DNA copies of their genomes (proviruses), from one cell (or one locus) to another. Mechanistic similarities in DNA transposase enzymes and retroviral/retrotransposon integrases underscore the close evolutionary relationship among these elements. The retroviruses are very ancient infectious agents, presumed to have evolved from Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons (1), and DNA copies of their sequences can be found embedded in the genomes of most, if not all, members of the tree of life. All retroviruses share a specific gene arrangement and similar replication strategies. However, given their ancestries and occupation of diverse evolutionary niches, it should not be surprising that unique sequences have been acquired in some retroviral genomes and that the details of the mechanism by which their transposition is accomplished can vary. While every step in the retrovirus lifecycle is, in some sense, relevant to transposition, this Chapter focuses mainly on the early phase of retroviral replication, during which viral DNA is synthesized and integrated into its host genome. Some of the initial studies that set the stage for current understanding are highlighted, as well as more recent findings obtained through use of an ever-expanding technological toolbox including genomics, proteomics, and siRNA screening. Persistence in the area of structural biology has provided new insight into conserved mechanisms as well as variations in detail among retroviruses, which can also be instructive. PMID:25844274

  13. Variational wave functions for homogenous Bose systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sueto, Andras; Szepfalusy, Peter

    2008-02-15

    We study variational wave functions of the product form, factorizing according to the wave vectors k, for the ground state of a system of bosons interacting via positive pair interactions with a positive Fourier transform. Our trial functions are members of different orthonormal bases in Fock space. Each basis contains a quasiparticle vacuum state and states with an arbitrary finite number of quasiparticles. One of the bases is that of Valatin and Butler (VB), introduced fifty years ago and parametrized by an infinite set of variables determining Bogoliubov's canonical transformation for each k. In another case, inspired by Nozieres and Saint James the canonical transformation for k=0 is replaced by a shift in the creation/annihilation operators. For the VB basis we prove that the lowest energy is obtained in a state with {approx}{radical}(volume) quasiparticles in the zero mode. The number of k=0 physical particles is of the order of the volume and its fluctuation is anomalously large, resulting in an excess energy. The same fluctuation is normal in the second type of optimized bases, the minimum energy is smaller and is attained in a vacuum state. Associated quasiparticle theories and questions about the gap in their spectrum are also discussed.

  14. Dynamics and Transit Variations of Resonant Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David

    2016-06-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) are deviations of the measured midtransit times from the exact periodicity. One of the most interesting causes of TTVs is the gravitational interaction between planets. Here we consider a case of two planets in a mean motion resonance (orbital periods in a ratio of small integers). This case is important because the resonant interaction can amplify the TTV effect and allow planets to be detected more easily. We develop an analytic model of the resonant dynamics valid for small orbital eccentricities and use it to derive the principal TTV terms. We find that a resonant system should show TTV terms with two basic periods (and their harmonics). The resonant TTV period is proportional (m/M *)‑2/3, where m and M * are the planetary and stellar masses. For m = 10‑4 M *, for example, the TTV period exceeds the orbital period by about two orders of magnitude. The amplitude of the resonant TTV terms scales linearly with the libration amplitude. The ratio of the TTV amplitudes of two resonant planets is inversely proportional to the ratio of their masses. These and other relationships discussed in the main text can be used to aid the interpretation of TTV observations.

  15. Biological variation in Trichinella species and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Bolas-Fernández, F

    2003-06-01

    At present, the genus Trichinella comprises seven species of which five have encapsulated muscle larvae (T. spiralis, T. nativa, T. britovi, T. nelsoni and T. murrelli) and two do not (T. pseudospiralis and T. papuae) plus three genotypes of non-specific status (T6, T8 and T9). The diagnostic characteristics of these species are based on biological, biochemical and genetic criteria. Of biological significance is variation observed among species and isolates in parameters such as infectivity and immunogenicity. Infectivity of Trichinella species or isolates is determined, among other considerations, by the immune status of the host in response to species- or isolate-specific antigens. Common and particular antigens determine the extent of protective responses against homologous or heterologous challenge. The kinetics of isotype, cytokine and inflammatory responses against T. spiralis infections are isolate-dependent. Trichinella spiralis and T. pseudospiralis induce different dose-dependent T-cell polarizations in the early host response, with T. spiralis initially preferentially promoting Th1-type responses before switching to Th2 and T. pseudospiralis driving Th2-type responses from the outset. PMID:12756064

  16. Inverse Variational Problem for Nonstandard Lagrangians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, A.; Talukdar, B.

    2014-06-01

    In the mathematical physics literature the nonstandard Lagrangians (NSLs) were introduced in an ad hoc fashion rather than being derived from the solution of the inverse problem of variational calculus. We begin with the first integral of the equation of motion and solve the associated inverse problem to obtain some of the existing results for NSLs. In addition, we provide a number of alternative Lagrangian representations. The case studies envisaged by us include (i) the usual modified Emden-type equation, (ii) Emden-type equation with dissipative term quadratic in velocity, (iii) Lotka-Volterra model and (vi) a number of the generic equations for dissipative-like dynamical systems. Our method works for nonstandard Lagrangians corresponding to the usual action integral of mechanical systems but requires modification for those associated with the modified actions like S =∫abe L(x ,x˙ , t) dt and S =∫abL 1 - γ(x ,x˙ , t) dt because in the latter case one cannot construct expressions for the Jacobi integrals.

  17. The genome and variation of Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Keim, Paul; Gruendike, Jeffrey M; Klevytska, Alexandra M; Schupp, James M; Challacombe, Jean; Okinaka, Richard

    2009-12-01

    The Bacillus anthracis genome reflects its close genetic ties to Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis but has been shaped by its own unique biology and evolutionary forces. The genome is comprised of a chromosome and two large virulence plasmids, pXO1 and pXO2. The chromosome is mostly co-linear among B. anthracis strains and even with the closest near neighbor strains. An exception to this pattern has been observed in a large inversion in an attenuated strain suggesting that chromosome co-linearity is important to the natural biology of this pathogen. In general, there are few polymorphic nucleotides among B. anthracis strains reflecting the short evolutionary time since its derivation from a B. cereus-like ancestor. The exceptions to this lack of diversity are the variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci that exist in genic and non genic regions of the chromosome and both plasmids. Their variation is associated with high mutability that is driven by rapid insertion and deletion of the repeats within an array. A notable example is found in the vrrC locus which is homologous to known DNA translocase genes from other bacteria. PMID:19729033

  18. Variation and Control of Process Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlicki, Todd Whitaker, Matthew

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to highlight the importance of controlling process variability for successful quality assurance (QA). We describe the method of statistical process control for characterizing and controlling a process. Traditionally, QA has been performed by comparing some important measurement (e.g., linear accelerator output) against a corresponding specification. Although useful in determining the fitness of a particular measurement, this approach does not provide information about the underlying process behavior over time. A modern view of QA is to consider the time-ordered behavior of a process. Every process displays characteristic behaviors that are independent of the specifications imposed on it. The goal of modern QA is, not only to ensure that a process is on-target, but that it is also operating with minimal variation. This is accomplished by way of a data-driven approach using process behavior charts. The development of process behavior charts, historically known as control charts, and process behavior (action) limits are described. The effect these concepts have on quality management is also discussed.

  19. A variational problem on Stiefel manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Anthony M.; Crouch, Peter E.; Sanyal, Amit K.

    2006-10-01

    In their paper on discrete analogues of some classical systems such as the rigid body and the geodesic flow on an ellipsoid, Moser and Veselov introduced their analysis in the general context of flows on Stiefel manifolds. We consider here a general class of continuous time, quadratic cost, optimal control problems on Stiefel manifolds, which in the extreme dimensions again yield these classical physical geodesic flows. We have already shown that this optimal control setting gives a new symmetric representation of the rigid body flow and in this paper we extend this representation to the geodesic flow on the ellipsoid and the more general Stiefel manifold case. The metric we choose on the Stiefel manifolds is the same as that used in the symmetric representation of the rigid body flow and that used by Moser and Veselov. In the extreme cases of the ellipsoid and the rigid body, the geodesic flows are known to be integrable. We obtain the extremal flows using both variational and optimal control approaches and elucidate the structure of the flows on general Stiefel manifolds.

  20. Variation in trajectories of women's marital quality.

    PubMed

    James, Spencer L

    2015-01-01

    I examine variation in trajectories of women's marital quality across the life course. The analysis improves upon earlier research in three ways: (1) the analysis uses a sequential cohort design and data from the first 35years of marriage; (2) I analyze rich data from a national sample; (3) I examine multiple dimensions of marital quality. Latent class growth analyses estimated on data from women in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-1979 (N=2604) suggest multiple trajectories for each of three dimensions of marital quality, including two trajectories of marital happiness, two trajectories of marital communication, and three trajectories of marital conflict. Socioeconomic and demographic covariates are then used to illustrate how factors such as income, cohabitation, and race-ethnicity set individuals at risk of poor marital quality throughout the life course by differentiating between high and low trajectories of marital quality. Women on low marital quality trajectories are, as expected, at much greater risk of divorce. Taken together, these findings show how fundamental socioeconomic and demographic characteristics contribute to subsequent marital outcomes via their influence on trajectories of marital quality as well as providing a better picture of the complexity in contemporary patterns of marital quality. PMID:25432600

  1. Variations in Antioxidant Genes and Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bolan; Huang, Zhaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from both endogenous and environmental resources, which in turn may cause defective spermatogenesis and male infertility. Antioxidant genes, which include catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione S-transferase (GST), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), play important roles in spermatogenesis and normal sperm function. In this review, we discuss the association between variations in major antioxidant genes and male infertility. Numerous studies have suggested that genetic disruption or functional polymorphisms in these antioxidant genes are associated with a higher risk for male infertility, which include low sperm quality, oligoasthenoteratozoospermia, oligozoospermia, and subfertility. The synergistic effects of environmental ROS and functional polymorphisms on antioxidant genes that result in male infertility have also been reported. Therefore, variants in antioxidant genes, which independently or synergistically occur with environmental ROS, affect spermatogenesis and contribute to the occurrence of male infertility. Large cohort and multiple center-based population studies to identify new antioxidant genetic variants that increase susceptibility to male infertility as well as validate its potential as genetic markers for diagnosis and risk assessment for male infertility for precise clinical approaches are warranted. PMID:26618172

  2. Variation of Taiwanese tones in conversation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Pei-Yu; Tsay, Jane

    2001-05-01

    In laboratory research on tonal coarticulation in Taiwanese, one study [H.-B, Lin, Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Connecticut (1988)] reported a perseveratory effect but no anticipatory effect, while another [S.-H. Peng, J. Phonetics 25, 371-400 (1997)] found a significant anticipatory effect. Peng also found tonal variation due to prosodic positions. Unlike these previous laboratory studies, this study attempts to investigate tonal coarticulation and prosodic effects on Taiwanese tones using natural conversations from the Taiwanese Spoken Corpus (Tsay and Myers, 2004), of which 56 min of recorded conversations were analyzed. Consistent with Lin, the results showed that tone is more affected by the preceding tone than by the following tone. The slope is more influenced by the preceding tone as well. As for prosodic effects, the results confirmed Peng, showing that F0 is the lowest in utterance-final position, while in other phrase-final positions it is slightly lower than in non-phrase-final position. This study thus demonstrates the results obtained in the laboratory do indeed carry over into actual conversation.

  3. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  4. Variations on the Davenport Gyroscope Calibration Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welter, G.; Boia, J.; Gakenheimer, M.; Kimmer, E.; Channell, D.; Hallock, L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a number of variations on the Davenport algorithm for in-flight gyroscope recalibration, or first order initial calibration, specifically tailored for use with a minimum of satellite telemetry data. Central to one of the techniques described is the use of onboard integration of gyroscope data together with a detailed model of scheduled satellite slew profiles. Methods are presented for determining adjustments to either parameters for the standard linear model (i.e., a drift rate bias vector and/or a scale factor/alignment transformation matrix) or individual gyroscope scale parameters, both linear and nonlinear, in cases where the alignments are well known. The results of applying the methods in an analysis of the temporal evolution and nonlinear response of the gyroscopes installed on the Hubble Space Telescope following its first servicing mission are discussed. The two effects, when working coherently, have been found to result in slew errors of almost 1 arcsecond per degree. Procedures for selecting optimal operational gyroscope parameters subject to the constraint of using a linear model are discussed.

  5. Variation in contributions to teaching by meerkats.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Alex

    2008-08-01

    Recent evidence from cooperative insect, bird and mammal societies has challenged the assumption that teaching is restricted to humans. However, little is known about the factors affecting the degree to which individuals in such societies contribute to teaching. Here, I examine variation in contributions to teaching in meerkats, where older group members teach pups to handle difficult prey. I show that investment in teaching varies with characteristics of pups, helpers, groups and ecological conditions. Although prior experience in caring for pups did not significantly influence teaching behaviour, younger helpers, which were still investing in growth, contributed less to teaching than older individuals. This suggests that, in common with other cooperative activities, contributions to teaching vary with the costs experienced by individual group members. However, in contrast to other forms of helping in meerkats, I detected no effects of nutritional state on teaching, suggesting that it carries relatively low costs. In species where individuals can potentially gain direct or indirect fitness benefits from facilitating learning in others, low costs divided among multiple group members may help tip the balance towards selection for teaching. PMID:18445555

  6. Effects of temperature variation on MOSFET dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Tsang; Butson, Martin J; Yu, Peter K N

    2004-07-01

    This note investigates temperature effects on dosimetry using a metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) for radiotherapy x-ray treatment. This was performed by analysing the dose response and threshold voltage outputs for MOSFET dosimeters as a function of ambient temperature. Results have shown that the clinical semiconductor dosimetry system (CSDS) MOSFET provides stable dose measurements with temperatures varying from 15 degrees C up to 40 degrees C. Thus standard irradiations performed at room temperature can be directly compared to in vivo dose assessments performed at near body temperature without a temperature correction function. The MOSFET dosimeter threshold voltage varies with temperature and this level is dependent on the dose history of the MOSFET dosimeter. However, the variation can be accounted for in the measurement method. For accurate dosimetry, the detector should be placed for approximately 60 s on a patient to allow thermal equilibrium before measurements are taken with the final reading performed whilst still attached to the patient or conversely left for approximately 120 s after removal from the patient if initial readout was measured at room temperature to allow temperature equilibrium to be established. PMID:15285264

  7. Variational Principles, Occam Razor and Simplicity Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    2004-05-01

    Variational minimum principles (VMP) refer to energy (statics, Thomson and Earnshaw theorems in electrostatics), action (Maupertuis, Euler, Lagrange, Hamilton), light (Fermat), quantum paths (Feynman), etc. Historically, VMP appeal to some economy in nature, similarly to Occam Razor Parsimony (ORP) principle. Version of ORP are "best world" (Leibniz), Panglossianism (Voltaire), and "most interesting world" (Dyson). Conceptually, VMP exemplify curious fact that infinite set is often simpler than its subsets (e.g., set of all integers is simpler than set of primes). Algorithmically very simple number 0.1234567... (Champernowne constant) contains Library of Babel of "all books" (Borges) and codes (infinitely many times) everything countably possible. Likewise, full Megaverse (Everett, Deutsch, Guth, Linde) is simpler than our specific ("Big Bang") universe. Dynamically, VMP imply memory effects akin to hysteresis. Similar ideas are "water memory" (Benveniste, Josephson) and isotopic biology (Berezin). Paradoxically, while ORP calls for economy (simplicity), unfolding of ORP in VMP seemingly works in the opposite direction allowing for complexity emergence (e.g., symmetry breaking in Jahn-Teller effect). Metaphysical extrapolation of this complimentarity may lead to "it-from-bit" (Wheeler) reflection of why there is something rather than nothing.

  8. Characterization of the Variation Potential in Sunflower.

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, B.; Zawadzki, T.; Davies, E.

    1997-01-01

    A major candidate for intercellular signaling in higher plants is the stimulus-induced systemic change in membrane potential known as variation potential (VP). We investigated the mechanism of occurrence and long-distance propagation of VP in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants. Here we present evidence of the relationship among injury-induced changes in xylem tension, turgor pressure, and electrical potential. Although locally applied wounding did trigger a change in membrane potential, it evoked even faster changes in tissue deformation, apparently resulting from pressure surges rapidly transmitted through the xylem and experienced throughout the plant. Externally applied pressure mimicked flame wounding by triggering an electrical response resembling VP. Our findings suggest that VP in sunflower is not a propagating change in electrical potential and not the consequence of chemicals transmitted via the xylem, affecting ligand-modulated ion channels. Instead, VP appears to result from the surge in pressure in the xylem causing a change in activity of mechanosensitive, stretch-responsive ion channels or pumps in adjacent, living cells. The ensuing ion flux evokes local plasma membrane depolarization, which is monitored extracellularly as VP. PMID:12223859

  9. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; De Masi, Leon; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S; Fraser, George P; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W Florian; Edwards, Robert A; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R; Rankin, Shelley C; Schifferli, Dieter M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  10. Variational modeling of ionic polymer plate structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buechler, Miles A.; Leo, Donald J.

    2006-03-01

    Ionomeric polymers are a promising class of intelligent material which exhibit electromechanical coupling similar to that of piezoelectric bimorphs. Ionomeric polymers are much more compliant than piezoelectric ceramics or polymers and have been shown to produce actuation strain on the order of 5% at operating voltages between 1 V and 5 V. This performance indicates the potential for self-actuating devices manufactured from ionomeric polymers, such as deformable mirrors or low pressure pump diaphragms. This paper presents a variational approach to the dynamic modeling of ionic polymer plates in rectangular coordinates. A linear matrix equation, which relates displacement and charge to applied forces and voltage, is developed to determine the response of the structure to applied forces and applied potentials. The modeling method is based on the incorporation of empirically determined material properties, which have been shown to be highly frequency dependent. The matrices are calculated at discrete frequencies and solved frequency-by-frequency to determine the response of the ionomeric plate structures. A model of a thin rectangular plate is developed and validated experimentally. Simulated frequency response functions are compared to experimental results for several locations on the plate. The response of the plate at certain frequencies is computed and compared to experimentally-determined response shapes. The results demonstrate the validity of the modeling approach in predicting the dynamic response of the ionomeric plate structure. These spatial solutions are also compared to experimentally determined response shapes.

  11. Cosmic ray intensity variations in connection with the level of precipitation and ground temperature variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. I.; Pustil'Nik, L. A.

    If cosmic ray ionization of lower atmosphere influenced on cloudiness covering, we will expect also some correllation of cosmic ray intensity with the level of precipitation and ground temperature variations: with increasing of cosmic ray intensity will be increase cloudiness covering, so we will expect increasing of the level of precipitation and decreasing of the ground temperature. We compare observed during many years on many meteorological stations in former USSR and later in Russia, as well as in Israel and other countries available data on time variations of the level of precipitation and ground temperature variations with cosmic ray data on cosmic ray variations from many stations of worldwide network and determined the regression and correlation coefficients. We discuss the obtained results in the frame of the problem of possible cosmic ray influence on processes in the atmosphere, on weather and climate change experiments effects of atmospheric electric field in cosmic rays. On the basis of cosmic ray and atmospheric electric field one minute data obtained by NM and EFS of Emilio Segre' Observatory (hight 2025 m above s.l., cosmic ray cut-off rigidity for vertical direction 10.8 GV) we determine the atmospheric electric field effect in CR for total neutron intensity and for multiplicities m ≥ 1, m ≥ 2, m ≥ 3, m ≥ 4, m ≥ 5, m ≥ 6, m ≥ 7, and m ≥ 8, as well as for m = 1, m = 2, m = 3, m = 4, m = 5, m = 6, and m = 7. For comparison and excluding primary CR variations we use also one minute data on neutron multiplicities obtained by NM in Rome and other cosmic ray stations. According to the theoretical calculations of Dorman and Dorman (2004) the electric field effect in the NM counting rate must be caused mainly by captchuring of slow negative muons by lead nucleus with escaping few neutrons. As it was shown in Dorman and Dorman (2004), the biggest electric field effect is expected in the multiplicity m = 1, much smaller in m = 2 and

  12. Variation is function: Are single cell differences functionally important?

    PubMed Central

    Dueck, Hannah; Eberwine, James

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation of the extent of transcriptome variation across individual cells of the same cell type. While expression variation may be a byproduct of, for example, dynamic or homeostatic processes, here we consider whether single‐cell molecular variation per se might be crucial for population‐level function. Under this hypothesis, molecular variation indicates a diversity of hidden functional capacities within an ensemble of “identical” cells, and this functional diversity facilitates collective behavior that would be inaccessible to a homogenous population. In reviewing this topic, we explore possible functions that might be carried by a heterogeneous ensemble of cells; however, this question has proven difficult to test, both because methods to manipulate molecular variation are limited and because it is complicated to define, and measure, population‐level function. We consider several possible methods to further pursue the hypothesis that “variation is function” through the use of comparative analysis and novel experimental techniques. PMID:26625861

  13. Second order total generalized variation (TGV) for MRI.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Florian; Bredies, Kristian; Pock, Thomas; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2011-02-01

    Total variation was recently introduced in many different magnetic resonance imaging applications. The assumption of total variation is that images consist of areas, which are piecewise constant. However, in many practical magnetic resonance imaging situations, this assumption is not valid due to the inhomogeneities of the exciting B1 field and the receive coils. This work introduces the new concept of total generalized variation for magnetic resonance imaging, a new mathematical framework, which is a generalization of the total variation theory and which eliminates these restrictions. Two important applications are considered in this article, image denoising and image reconstruction from undersampled radial data sets with multiple coils. Apart from simulations, experimental results from in vivo measurements are presented where total generalized variation yielded improved image quality over conventional total variation in all cases. PMID:21264937

  14. Individual Variation in Life History Characteristics Can Influence Extinction Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, H I

    2001-01-01

    The white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) shows great individual variation in the age at maturation. This study examines the consequences of model assumptions about individual variation in the age at maturation on predicted population viability. I considered: (1) the effects of variation in age at maturation alone; (2) the effects of heritability; and (3) the influence of a stable and an altered selective regime. Two selective regimes represented conditions before and after the impoundment of a river, blocking access of anadromous white sturgeon populations to the ocean. In contrast to previous simulation studies, I found that increased individual variation in the age at maturity did not necessarily lead to a higher likelihood of persistence. Individual variation increased the simulated likelihood of persistence when the variation was heritable and the selective regime had changed such that the mean age at maturity was no longer optimal.

  15. Simulations of airglow variations induced by the CO2 increase and solar cycle variation from 1980 to 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tai-Yin

    2016-09-01

    Airglow intensity and Volume Emission Rate (VER) variations induced by the increase of CO2 gas concentration and F10.7 variation (used as a proxy for the 11-year solar cycle variation) were investigated for the period from 1980 to 1991, encompassing a full solar cycle. Two airglow models are used to simulate the induced variations of O(1S) greenline, O2(0,1) atmospheric band , and OH(8,3) airglow for this study. The results show that both the airglow intensities and peak VERs correlate positively with the F10.7 solar cycle variation and display a small linear trend due to the increase of CO2 gas concentration. The solar-cycle induced airglow intensity variations show that O(1S) greenline has the largest variation (~26%) followed by the O2(0,1) atmospheric band (~23%) and then OH(8,3) airglow (~8%) over the 11 year timespan. The magnitudes of the induced airglow intensity variations by the increase of CO2 gas concentration are about an order of magnitude smaller than those by the F10.7 solar cycle variation. In general, the F10.7 solar cycle variation and CO2 increase do not seem to systematically alter the VER peak altitude of the airglow emissions, though the OH(8,3) VER peak altitude moves up slightly during the years when the F10.7 value falls under 100 SFU.

  16. Simulation of the interannual variations of aerosols in China: role of variations in meteorological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Q.; Liao, H.

    2014-09-01

    We used the nested grid version of the global three-dimensional Goddard Earth Observing System chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to examine the interannual variations (IAVs) of aerosols over heavily polluted regions in China for years 2004-2012. The role of variations in meteorological parameters was quantified by a simulation with fixed anthropogenic emissions at year 2006 levels and changes in meteorological parameters over 2004-2012. Simulated PM2.5 (particles with a diameter of 2.5 μm or less) aerosol concentrations exhibited large IAVs in North China (NC; 32-42° N, 110-120° E), with regionally averaged absolute percent departure from the mean (APDM) values of 17, 14, 14, and 11% in December-January-February (DJF), March-April-May (MAM), June-July-August (JJA), and September-October-November (SON), respectively. Over South China (SC; 22-32° N, 110-120° E), the IAVs in PM2.5 were found to be the largest in JJA, with the regional mean APDM values of 14% in JJA and of about 9% in other seasons. The concentrations of PM2.5 over the Sichuan Basin (SCB; 27-33° N, 102-110° E) were simulated to have the smallest IAVs among the polluted regions examined in this work, with APDM values of 8-9% in all seasons. All aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, and organic carbon) were simulated to have the largest IAVs over NC in DJF, corresponding to the large variations in meteorological parameters over NC in this season. Process analyses were performed to identify the key meteorological parameters that determined the IAVs of different aerosol species in different regions. While the variations in temperature and specific humidity, which influenced the gas-phase formation of sulfate, jointly determined the IAVs of sulfate over NC in both DJF and JJA, wind (or convergence of wind) in DJF and precipitation in JJA were the dominant meteorological factors to influence IAVs of sulfate over SC and the SCB. The IAVs in temperature and specific humidity

  17. Variational formulations of guiding-center Vlasov-Maxwell theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizard, Alain J.; Tronci, Cesare

    2016-06-01

    The variational formulations of guiding-center Vlasov-Maxwell theory based on Lagrange, Euler, and Euler-Poincaré variational principles are presented. Each variational principle yields a different approach to deriving guiding-center polarization and magnetization effects into the guiding-center Maxwell equations. The conservation laws of energy, momentum, and angular momentum are also derived by Noether method, where the guiding-center stress tensor is now shown to be explicitly symmetric.

  18. Reexamination of the variational Bose-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Jan; Łącki, Mateusz; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2014-04-01

    For strongly interacting bosons in optical lattices, the standard description using the Bose-Hubbard model becomes questionable. The role of excited bands becomes important. In such a situation, we compare results of simulations using the multiband Bose-Hubbard model with a recent proposition based on a time-dependent variational approach. It is shown that the latter, in its original formulation, uses a too small variational space, often leading to spurious effects. Possible expansion of the variational approach is discussed.

  19. The central Onodi cell: A previously unreported anatomic variation

    PubMed Central

    Cherla, Deepa V.; Tomovic, Senja; Liu, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative recognition of the Onodi cell is necessary to avoid injury to closely associated structures, including the internal carotid artery and the optic nerve. This article describes the central Onodi cell, a variation in which a posterior ethmoid cell lies superior to the sphenoid sinus in a midline position with at least one optic canal bulge. To our knowledge, this anatomic variation has not been previously reported in the literature. Radiographic and endoscopic imaging of this unique variation is provided. PMID:23772328

  20. On the correspondence between quantum and classical variational principles

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, D. E.; Dodin, I. Y.

    2015-06-10

    Here, classical variational principles can be deduced from quantum variational principles via formal reparameterization of the latter. It is shown that such reparameterization is possible without invoking any assumptions other than classicality and without appealing to dynamical equations. As examples, first principle variational formulations of classical point-particle and cold-fluid motion are derived from their quantum counterparts for Schrodinger, Pauli, and Klein-Gordon particles.