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Sample records for centrifugal blood pump

  1. [Hemodynamic analysis of a centrifugal blood pump].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Ming; Xu, Zihao; Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Li, Qilei; Xu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This paper built the mathematical model of a centrifugal blood pump, which was designed by ourselves, combined it with that of the human cardiovascular system and simulated the coupling system using Matlab. Then we set up the experiment platform, linked the blood pump to mock human cardiovascular system in case of three-stage heart failure, and measured aortic pressure and flow under different speed. The comparison between experiment results and simulation results not only indicates the coupling model is correct and the blood pump works well, but also shows that with the increase of blood pump speed, the pulsation of aortic pressure and flow will be reduced, this situation will affect the structure and function of blood vessels. PMID:26027287

  2. A multiple disk centrifugal pump as a blood flow device.

    PubMed

    Miller, G E; Etter, B D; Dorsi, J M

    1990-02-01

    A multiple disk, shear force, valveless centrifugal pump was studied to determine its suitability as a blood flow device. A pulsatile version of the Tesla viscous flow turbine was designed by modifying the original steady flow pump concept to produce physiological pressures and flows with the aid of controlling circuitry. Pressures and flows from this pump were compared to a Harvard Apparatus pulsatile piston pump. Both pumps were connected to an artificial circulatory system. Frequency and systolic duration were varied over a range of physiological conditions for both pumps. The results indicated that the Tesla pump, operating in a pulsatile mode, is capable of producing physiologic pressures and flows similar to the Harvard pump and other pulsatile blood pumps. PMID:2312140

  3. A magnetically suspended and hydrostatically stabilized centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Hart, R M; Filipenco, V G; Kung, R T

    1996-06-01

    A magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump intended for application as a long-term implantable ventricular assist device has been built and tested. The rotor is freely suspended in the blood by magnetic and hydrostatic restoring forces. This design obviates the need for bearings and shaft seals, and eliminates the problems of reliability and thrombogenicity associated with them. The positional stability and hydrodynamic performance of the pump has been characterized in vitro at flows of up to 10 L/min at physiologic pressures. Radial position control is realized by an analog electronic feedback control system. The pressure distribution in the fluid surrounding the rotor provides dynamic control in the axial direction with no active feedback. Rotor excursion is less than 50 microns (mu) when the housing receives an impulse peaking at an acceleration of 40 g or upon sudden blockage of the flow. In vitro blood measurements indicate an acceptable level of hemolysis compared with that of a standard centrifugal pump. PMID:8817962

  4. Modified fabrication techniques lead to improved centrifugal blood pump performance.

    PubMed

    Pacella, J J; Goldstein, A H; Magovern, G J; Clark, R F

    1994-01-01

    The authors are developing an implantable centrifugal blood pump for short- and medium-term (1-6 months) left ventricular assist. They hypothesized that the application of result dependent modifications to this pump would lead to overall improved performance in long-term implantation studies. Essential requirements for pump operation, such as durability and resistance to clot formation, have been achieved through specialized fabrication techniques. The antithrombogenic character of the pump has been improved through coating at the cannula-housing interfaces and the baffle seal, and through changing the impeller blade material from polysulfone to pyrolytic carbon. The electronic components of the pump have been sealed for implantable use through specialized processes of dipping and potting, and the surfaces of the internal pump components have been treated to increase durability. The device has demonstrated efficacy in five chronic sheep implantation studies of 14, 10, 28, 35, and 154 day duration. Post mortem findings from the 14 day experiment showed stable fibrin entangled around the impeller shaft and blades. After pump modification, autopsy findings of the 10 day study showed no evidence of clot. Additionally, the results of the 28 day experiment showed only a small (2.0 mm) ring of fibrin at the shaft-seal interface. In the 35 and 154 day experiments, redesign of the stators have resulted in improved motor corrosion resistance. The 35 day study showed a small, 0.5 mm wide fibrin deposit at the lip seal, but no motor failure. In the 154 day experiment, the motor failed because of stator fluid corrosion, while the explanted pump was devoid of thrombus. Based on these findings, the authors believe that these pump refinements have contributed significantly to improvements in durability and resistance to clot formation. PMID:8555619

  5. Magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with an axially levitated motor.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ezoe, Shiroh; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Okada, Yohji

    2003-07-01

    The longevity of a rotary blood pump is mainly determined by the durability of its wearing mechanical parts such as bearings and seals. Magnetic suspension techniques can be used to eliminate these mechanical parts altogether. This article describes a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump using an axially levitated motor. The motor comprises an upper stator, a bottom stator, and a levitated rotor-impeller between the stators. The upper stator has permanent magnets to generate an attractive axial bias force on the rotor and electric magnets to control the inclination of the rotor. The bottom stator has electric magnets to generate attractive forces and rotating torque to control the axial displacement and rotation of the rotor. The radial displacement of the rotor is restricted by passive stability. A shrouded impeller is integrated within the rotor. The performance of the magnetic suspension and pump were evaluated in a closed mock loop circuit filled with water. The maximum amplitude of the rotor displacement in the axial direction was only 0.06 mm. The maximum possible rotational speed during levitation was 1,600 rpm. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 120 mm Hg and 7 L/min, respectively. The pump shows promise as a ventricular assist device. PMID:12823418

  6. In vivo evaluation of centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass-Spiral Pump.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cibele; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Leme, Juliana; Uebelhart, Beatriz; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas; Biscegli, José F; Andrade, Aron; Zavaglia, Cecília

    2013-11-01

    The Spiral Pump (SP), a centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), has been developed at the Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology/Adib Jatene Foundation laboratories, with support from Sintegra Company (Pompeia, Brazil). The SP is a disposable pump with an internal rotor-a conically shaped fuse with double entrance threads. This rotor is supported by two ball bearings, attached to a stainless steel shaft fixed to the housing base. Worm gears provide axial motion to the blood column, and the rotational motion of the conically shaped impeller generates a centrifugal pumping effect, improving pump efficiency without increasing hemolysis. In vitro tests were performed to evaluate the SP's hydrodynamic performance, and in vivo experiments were performed to evaluate hemodynamic impact during usual CPB. A commercially available centrifugal blood pump was used as reference. In vivo experiments were conducted in six male pigs weighing between 60 and 90 kg, placed on CPB for 6 h each. Blood samples were collected just before CPB (T0) and after every hour of CPB (T1-T6) for hemolysis determination and laboratory tests (hematological and biochemical). Values of blood pressure, mean flow, pump rotational speed, and corporeal temperature were recorded. Also, ergonomic conditions were recorded: presence of noise, difficulty in removing air bubbles, trouble in installing the pump in the drive module (console), and difficulties in mounting the CPB circuit. Comparing the laboratory and hemolysis results for the SP with those of the reference pump, we can conclude that there is no significant difference between the two devices. In addition, reports made by medical staff and perfusionists described a close similarity between the two devices. During in vivo experiments, the SP maintained blood flow and pressure at physiological levels, consistent with those applied in cardiac surgery with CPB, without presenting any malfunction. Also, the SP needed lower rotational

  7. Concept designs of nonrotating-type centrifugal blood pump and basic study on output characteristics of the oscillating disk-type centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Kabei, N; Tuichiya, K; Sakurai, Y

    1994-09-01

    When designing a turbo-type blood pump as an artificial heart, the gap between a rotating shaft and a pump housing should be perfectly sealed to prevent any leakage or contamination through a seal. In addition, blood coagulation in a blood chamber must be avoided. To overcome these problems, we proposed five different nonrotating-type turbo pumps: a caudal-fin-type axial-flow pump, a caudal-fin-type centrifugal pump, a nutating-column-type centrifugal pump, a nutating-collapsible-tube-type centrifugal pump, and an oscillating-disk-type centrifugal pump. We selected and developed the oscillating-disk-type centrifugal pump that consists of a disk, a driving rod, a seal, an oscillation mechanism, and a pump housing. The disk is mounted on the end of the rod, which is connected to a high-speed DC motor through an oscillation mechanism. The rod and the disk do not rotate, but they oscillate in the pump housing. This movement of the disk generates forward fluid flow around the axis (i.e., the rotational fluid flow). Centrifugal force due to fluid rotation supports the pressure difference between the outlet and the inlet. The diameter of the disk is 39 mm, the maximum inner diameter of the pump housing is 40 mm, and the volume of the blood chamber for 25 degrees' oscillation is 16.9 ml. The performance of the pump was tested in a mock circulatory system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7998882

  8. Magnetic drive system for a new centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Andrew; Tansley, Geoff

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to design a novel magnetic drive and bearing system for a new centrifugal rotary blood pump (CRBP). The drive system consists of two components: (i) permanent magnets within the impeller of the CRBP; and (ii) the driving electromagnets. Orientation of the magnets varies from axial through to 60 degrees included out-lean (conical configuration). Permanent magnets replace the electromagnet drive to allow easier characterization. The performance characteristics tested were the axial force of attraction between the stator and rotor at angles of rotational alignment, Ø, and the corresponding torque at those angles. The drive components were tested for various magnetic cone angles, theta. The test was repeated for three backing conditions: (i) non-backed; (ii) steel-cupped; and (iii) steel plate back-iron, performed on an Instron tensile testing machine. Experimental results were expanded upon through finite element and boundary element analysis (BEM). The force/torque characteristics were maximal for a 12-magnet configuration at 0 degree cone angle with steel-back iron (axial force = 60 N, torque = 0.375 Nm). BEM showed how introducing a cone angle increases the radial restoring force threefold while not compromising axial bearing force. Magnets in the drive system may be orientated not only to provide adequate coupling to drive the CRBP, but to provide significant axial and radial bearing forces capable of withstanding over 100 m/s(2) shock excitation on the impeller. Although the 12 magnet 0 degree (theta) configuration yielded the greatest force/torque characteristic, this was seen as potentially unattractive as this magnetic cone angle yielded poor radial restoring force characteristics. PMID:18959665

  9. [Numerical assessment of impeller features of centrifugal blood pump based on fast hemolysis approximation model].

    PubMed

    Shou, Chen; Guo, Yongjun; Su, Lei; Li, Yongqian

    2014-12-01

    The impeller profile, which is one of the most important factors, determines the creation of shear stress which leads to blood hemolysis in the internal flow of centrifugal blood pump. The investigation of the internal flow field in centrifugal blood pump and the estimation of the hemolysis within different impeller profiles will provide information to improve the performance of centrifugal blood pump. The SST kappa-omega with low Reynolds correction was used in our laboratory to study the internal flow fields for four kinds of impellers of centrifugal blood pump. The flow fields included distributions of pressure field, velocity field and shear stress field. In addition, a fast numerical hemolysis approximation was adopted to calculate the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH). The results indicated that the pressure field distribution in all kinds of blood pump were reasonable, but for the log spiral impeller pump, the vortex and backflow were much lower than those of the other pumps, and the high shear stress zone was just about 0.004%, and the NIH was 0.0089. PMID:25868241

  10. Design optimization of flow channel and performance analysis for a new-type centrifugal blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, J. J.; Luo, X. W.; Y Wu, Q.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a new-type centrifugal blood pump, whose impeller is suspended inside a pump chamber with hydraulic bearings, is presented. In order to improve the hydraulic performance of the pump, an internal flow simulation is conducted to compare the effects of different geometrical parameters of pump flow passage. Based on the numerical results, the pumps can satisfy the operation parameters and be free of hemolysis. It is noted that for the pump with a column-type supporter at its inlet, the pump head and hydraulic efficiency decreases compared to the pump with a step-type support structure. The performance drop is caused by the disturbed flow upstream impeller inlet. Further, the unfavorable flow features such as reverse flow and low velocity in the pump may increases the possibility of thrombus. It is also confirmed that the casing shape can little influence pump performance. Those results are helpful for design optimization in blood pump development.

  11. Numerical analysis of the internal flow field in screw centrifugal blood pump based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W.; Han, B. X.; Y Wang, H.; Shen, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    As to the impeller blood pump, the high speed of the impeller, the local high shear force of the flow field and the flow dead region are the main reasons for blood damage. The screw centrifugal pump can effectively alleviate the problems of the high speed and the high shear stress for the impeller. The softness and non-destructiveness during the transfer process can effectively reduce the extent of the damage. By using CFD software, the characteristics of internal flow are analyzed in the screw centrifugal pump by exploring the distribution rules of the velocity, pressure and shear deformation rate of the blood when it flows through the impeller and the destructive effects of spiral blades on blood. The results show that: the design of magnetic levitation solves the sealing problems; the design of regurgitation holes solves the problem of the flow dead zone; the magnetic levitated microcirculation screw centrifugal pump can effectively avoid the vortex, turbulence and high shear forces generated while the blood is flowing through the pump. Since the distribution rules in the velocity field, pressure field and shear deformation rate of the blood in the blood pump are comparatively uniform and the gradient change is comparatively small, the blood damage is effectively reduced.

  12. [Study on optimal selection of structure of vaneless centrifugal blood pump with constraints on blood perfusion and on blood damage indexes].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhaoyan; Pan, Youlian; Chen, Zhenglong; Zhang, Tianyi; Lu, Lijun

    2012-12-01

    This paper is aimed to study the optimal selection of structure of vaneless centrifugal blood pump. The optimal objective is determined according to requirements of clinical use. Possible schemes are generally worked out based on structural feature of vaneless centrifugal blood pump. The optimal structure is selected from possible schemes with constraints on blood perfusion and blood damage indexes. Using an optimal selection method one can find the optimum structure scheme from possible schemes effectively. The results of numerical simulation of optimal blood pump showed that the method of constraints of blood perfusion and blood damage is competent for the requirements of selection of the optimal blood pumps. PMID:23469557

  13. Pediatric ECMO outcomes: comparison of centrifugal versus roller blood pumps using propensity score matching.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Cindy S; Jaggers, James J; Cook, E Francis; Graham, Dionne A; Yarlagadda, Vasmi V; Teele, Sarah A; Almond, Christopher S; Bratton, Susan L; Seeger, John D; Dalton, Heidi J; Rycus, Peter T; Laussen, Peter C; Thiagarajan, Ravi R

    2013-01-01

    Centrifugal blood pumps are being increasingly utilized in children supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Our aim was to determine if survival and ECMO-related morbidities in children supported with venoarterial (VA) ECMO differed by blood pump type.Children aged less than 18 years who underwent VA ECMO support from 2007 to 2009 and reported to the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization registry were propensity score matched (Greedy 1:1 matching) using pre-ECMO characteristics.A total of 2,656 (centrifugal = 2,231, roller = 425) patients were identified and 548 patients (274 per pump type) were included in the propensity score-matched cohort. Children supported with centrifugal pumps had increased odds of hemolysis (odds ratio [OR], 4.03 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.37-6.87), hyperbilirubinemia (OR, 5.48; 95% CI, 2.62-11.49), need for inotropic support during ECMO (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.09-2.17), metabolic alkalosis (blood pH > 7.6) during ECMO (OR, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.49-6.54), and acute renal failure (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.10-2.39). Survival to hospital discharge did not differ by pump type.In a propensity score-matched cohort of pediatric ECMO patients, children supported with centrifugal pumps had increased odds of ECMO-related complications. There was no difference in survival between groups. PMID:23438777

  14. Experimental and computational studies of the relative flow field in a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Ng, B T; Chan, W K; Yu, S C; Li, H D

    2000-01-01

    The relative flow field within the impeller passage of a centrifugal blood pump had been examined using flow visualization technique and computational fluid dynamics. It was found that for a seven-blade radial impeller design, the required flow rate and static pressure rise across the pump could be achieved but the flow field within the blades was highly undesirable. Two vortices were observed near the suction side and these could lead to thrombus formation. Preliminary results presented in this article are part of our overall effort to minimize undesirable flow patterns such flow separation and high shear stress regions within the centrifugal blood pump. This will facilitate the future progress in developing a long-term clinically effective blood pump. PMID:10999375

  15. Evaluation of erythrocyte flow at a bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulatory support. In the blood pump, a spiral groove bearing was adopted for a thrust bearing. In the spiral groove bearing, separation of erythrocytes and plasma by plasma skimming has been postulated to occur. However, it is not clarified that plasma skimming occurs in a spiral groove bearing. The purpose of this study is to verify whether plasma skimming occurs in the spiral groove bearing of a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. For evaluation of plasma skimming in the spiral groove bearing, an impeller levitation performance test using a laser focus displacement meter and a microscopic visualization test of erythrocyte flow using a high-speed microscope were conducted. Bovine blood diluted with autologous plasma to adjust hematocrit to 1.0% was used as a working fluid. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the spiral groove bearing was estimated using image analysis. As a result, hematocrits on the ridge region with gaps of 45 μm, 31 μm, and 25 μm were calculated as 1.0%, 0.6%, and 0.3%, respectively. Maximum skimming efficiency in this study was calculated as 70% with a gap of 25 μm. We confirmed that separation of erythrocyte and plasma occurred in the spiral groove bearing with decrease in bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. PMID:26736252

  16. Numerical investigation of the effect of blade geometry on blood trauma in a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chan, W K; Wong, Y W; Ding, Y; Chua, L P; Yu, S C M

    2002-09-01

    Fluid dynamic forces in centrifugal blood pump impellers are of key importance in destruction of red blood cells (RBCs) because high rotational speed leads to strong interaction between the impeller and the RBCs. In this paper, three-dimensional models of five different blade geometries are investigated numerically using the commercial software CFX-TASCflow, and the streaklines of RBCs are obtained using the Lagrangian particle tracking method. In reality, RBCs pass through the pump along complicated paths resulting in a highly irregular loading condition for each RBC. In order to enable the prediction of blood damage under the action of these complex-loading conditions, a cumulative damage model for RBCs was adopted in this paper. The numerically simulated percent hemoglobin (%HB) released as RBCs traversed the impeller and volute was examined. It was observed that the residence time of particles in the blade passage is a critical factor in determining hemolytic effects. This, in turn, is a function of the blade geometry. In addition, it was observed that the volute profile is an important influence on the computed HB% released. PMID:12197935

  17. Numerical study of a centrifugal blood pump with different impeller profiles.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoliang; Chua, Leok Poh; Lim, Tau Meng

    2010-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations of the Kyoto-NTN magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with 16 forward-bending blades (16FB), 16 straight blades (16SB), and eight backward-bending blades (8BB) impellers were performed in this study. Commercial CFD software package FLUENT were used as the solver. The purpose of this study is to find out how the impeller blade profiles affect the inner flow and the performance of the centrifugal blood pump. The simulations were carried out with the same impeller rotating speed of 2,000 rpm and pump flow rate of 5 L/min to compare the three pump models. It was found that the 16SB impeller can produce higher pressure head than the 16FB and 8BB impellers under the same impeller rotating speed and pump flow rate. The flow particle tracing was carried out to estimate the blood damage level caused by the three different impeller profiles. It was found that the 16FB and 8BB models have caused the highest and lowest blood damage, respectively. The 16SB is recommended among the three pumps because it can generate the highest pressure head and induce mild blood damage index, although it was higher than that of the 8BB model. PMID:20019595

  18. Development of a compact, sealless, tripod supported, magnetically driven centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yuhki, A; Nogawa, M; Takatani, S

    2000-06-01

    In this study, a tripod supported sealless centrifugal blood pump was designed and fabricated for implantable application using a specially designed DC brushless motor. The tripod structure consists of 3 ceramic balls mounted at the bottom surface of the impeller moving in a polyethylene groove incorporated at the bottom pump casing. The follower magnet inside the impeller is coupled to the driver magnet of the motor outside the bottom pump casing, thus allowing the impeller to slide-rotate in the polyethylene groove as the motor turns. The pump driver has a weight of 230 g and a diameter of 60 mm. The acrylic pump housing has a weight of 220 g with the priming volume of 25 ml. At the pump rpm of 1,000 to 2,200, the generated head pressure ranged from 30 to 150 mm Hg with the maximum system efficiency being 12%. When the prototype pump was used in the pulsatile mock loop to assist the ventricle from its apex to the aorta, a strong correlation was obtained between the motor current and bypass flow waveforms. The waveform deformation index (WDI), defined as the ratio of the fundamental to the higher order harmonics of the motor current power spectral density, was computed to possibly detect the suction occurring inside the ventricle due to the prototype centrifugal pump. When the WDI was kept under the value of 0.20 by adjusting the motor rpm, it was successful in suppressing the suction due to the centrifugal pump in the ventricle. The prototype sealless, centrifugal pump together with the control method based on the motor current waveform analysis may offer an intermediate support of the failing left or right ventricle bridging to heart transplantation. PMID:10886073

  19. Study of a centrifugal blood pump in a mock loop system.

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Beatriz; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Fonseca, Jeison; Bock, Eduardo; Leme, Juliana; da Silva, Cibele; Leão, Tarcísio; Andrade, Aron

    2013-11-01

    An implantable centrifugal blood pump (ICBP) is being developed to be used as a ventricular assist device (VAD) in patients with severe cardiovascular diseases. The ICBP system is composed of a centrifugal pump, a motor, a controller, and a power supply. The electricity source provides power to the controller and to a motor that moves the pump's rotor through magnetic coupling. The centrifugal pump is composed of four parts: external conical house, external base, impeller, and impeller base. The rotor is supported by a pivot bearing system, and its impeller base is responsible for sheltering four permanent magnets. A hybrid cardiovascular simulator (HCS) was used to evaluate the ICBP's performance. A heart failure (HF) (when the heart increases beat frequency to compensate for decrease in blood flow) was simulated in the HCS. The main objective of this work is to analyze changes in physiological parameters such as cardiac output, blood pressure, and heart rate in three situations: healthy heart, HF, and HF with left circulatory assistance by ICBP. The results showed that parameters such as aortic pressure and cardiac output affected by the HF situation returned to normal values when the ICBP was connected to the HCS. In conclusion, the test results showed satisfactory performance for the ICBP as a VAD. PMID:24237361

  20. A new design for a compact centrifugal blood pump with a magnetically levitated rotor.

    PubMed

    Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2004-01-01

    A compact centrifugal blood pump has been developed using a radial magnetic bearing with a two-degree of freedom active control. The proposed magnetic bearing exhibits high stiffness, even in passively controlled directions, and low power consumption because a permanent magnet, incorporated with the rotor, suspends its weight. The rotor is driven by a Lorentz force type of built-in motor, avoiding mechanical friction and material wear. The built-in motor is designed to generate only rotational torque, without radial and axial attractive forces on the rotor, leading to low power consumption by the magnetic bearing. The fabricated centrifugal pump measured 65 mm in diameter and 45 mm in height and weighed 0.36 kg. In the closed loop circuit filled with water, the pump provided a flow rate of 4.5 L/min at 2,400 rpm against a pressure head of 100 mm Hg. Total power consumption at that point was 18 W, including 2 W required for magnetic levitation, with a total efficiency of 5.7%. The experimental results showed that the design of the compact magnetic bearing was feasible and effective for use in a centrifugal blood pump. PMID:15672787

  1. Numerical study of a bio-centrifugal blood pump with straight impeller blade profiles.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoliang; Chua, Leok Poh; Lim, Tau Meng

    2010-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations of the flow in the Kyoto-NTN (Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with a 16-straight-bladed impeller were performed in the present study. The flow in the pump was assumed as unsteady and turbulent, and blood was treated as a Newtonian fluid. At the impeller rotating speed of 2000 rpm and flow rate of 5 L/min, the pump produces a pressure head of 113.5 mm Hg according to the simulation. It was found that the double volute of the pump has caused symmetrical pressure distribution in the volute passages and subsequently caused symmetrical flow patterns in the blade channels. Due to the tangentially increasing pressure in the volute passages, the flow through the blade channels initially increases at the low-pressure region and then decreases due to the increased pressure. The reverse flow and vortices have been identified in the impeller blade channels. The high shear stress of the flow in the pump mainly occurred at the inlet and outlet of the blade channels, the beginning of the volute passages and the regions around the tips of the cutwater and splitter plate. Higher shear stress is obtained when the tips of the cutwater and splitter plate are located at the impeller blade trailing edges than when they are located at the middle of the impeller blade channel. It was found that the blood damage index assessed based on the blood corpuscle path tracing of the present pump was about 0.94%, which has the same order of magnitude as those of the clinical centrifugal pumps reported in the literature. PMID:19817732

  2. An implantable centrifugal blood pump with a recirculating purge system (Cool-Seal system).

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Litwak, P; Tagusari, O; Mori, T; Kono, K; Kameneva, M; Watach, M; Gordon, L; Miyagishima, M; Tomioka, J; Umezu, M; Outa, E; Antaki, J F; Kormos, R L; Koyanagi, H; Griffith, B P

    1998-06-01

    A compact centrifugal blood pump has been developed as an implantable left ventricular assist system. The impeller diameter is 40 mm, and pump dimensions are 55 x 64 mm. This first prototype, fabricated from titanium alloy, resulted in a pump weight of 400 g including a brushless DC motor. The weight of a second prototype pump was reduced to 280 g. The entire blood contacting surface is coated with diamond like carbon (DLC) to improve blood compatibility. Flow rates of over 7 L/min against 100 mm Hg pressure at 2,500 rpm with 9 W total power consumption have been measured. A newly designed mechanical seal with a recirculating purge system (Cool-Seal) is used for the shaft seal. In this seal system, the seal temperature is kept under 40 degrees C to prevent heat denaturation of blood proteins. Purge fluid also cools the pump motor coil and journal bearing. Purge fluid is continuously purified and sterilized by an ultrafiltration unit which is incorporated in the paracorporeal drive console. In vitro experiments with bovine blood demonstrated an acceptably low hemolysis rate (normalized index of hemolysis = 0.005 +/- 0.002 g/100 L). In vivo experiments are currently ongoing using calves. Via left thoracotomy, left ventricular (LV) apex descending aorta bypass was performed utilizing an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) vascular graft with the pump placed in the left thoracic cavity. In 2 in vivo experiments, the pump flow rate was maintained at 5-9 L/min, and pump power consumption remained stable at 9-10 W. All plasma free Hb levels were measured at less than 15 mg/dl. The seal system has demonstrated good seal capability with negligible purge fluid consumption (<0.5 ml/day). In both calves, the pumps demonstrated trouble free continuous function over 6 month (200 days and 222 days). PMID:9650667

  3. Twenty-four hour left ventricular bypass with a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed Central

    Berstein, E F; DeLaria, G A; Johansen, K H; Shuman, R L; Stasz, P; Reich, S

    1975-01-01

    A new centrifugal blood pump system has been developed for left ventricular bypass by the addition of non-thrombogenic blood surface materials and an ultrathin-walled cannula for the retrograde cannulation of the left ventricle. Partial LV bypass at 3 to 6 L/min was undertaken in 55 calves without thoracotomy. In 20 it was continued for 24 hours, with 13 survivors who were eventually sacrificed. Eleven of the last 14 experiments were completed without mishap. Heparin was employed only during pump insertion. Hematologic changes were limited to moderate platelet depression, and tolerable hemolysis (average serum level 21 mg% in the last 13 experiments). Normal clotting parameters and the absence of significant fibrin split product formation correlated with the absence of gross thrombosis and few minor renal emboli observed at autopsy. This pump system appears to have several advantages over previously described equipment for LV bypass. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1130859

  4. Development of a Compact Maglev Centrifugal Blood Pump Enclosed in a Titanium Housing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Chi Nan; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Asama, Junichi; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    A compact centrifugal blood pump consisting of a controlled two-degrees-of-freedom radial magnetic bearing and a brushless DC motor enclosed in a titanium housing has been developed for use as an implantable ventricular assist device. The magnetic bearing also supports axial and angular motions of the impeller via a magnetic coupling. The top housing is made of pure titanium, while the impeller and the stator are coated with pure titanium and Ti-6Al-7Nb, respectively, to improve the biocompatibility of the pump. The combination of pure titanium and titanium alloy was chosen because of the sensitivity of eddy current type displacement sensors through the intervening conducting wall. The dimensions of the pump are 69.0 mm in diameter and 28.5 mm in height. During a pump performance test, axial shifting of the impeller due to hydraulic forces led to variations in the rotational positioning signal, causing loss of control of the rotational speed. This problem was solved by conditioning the rotational positioning signal. With a flow rate of 5 l/min against a head pressure of 100 mmHg, the power consumption and efficiency of the pump were 5.5 W and 20%, respectively. Furthermore, the hemolysis of the blood pump was 43.6% lower when compared to that of a commercially available pump.

  5. Centrifugal blood pump for temporary ventricular assist devices with low priming and ceramic bearings.

    PubMed

    Leme, Juliana; da Silva, Cibele; Fonseca, Jeison; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Uebelhart, Beatriz; Biscegli, José F; Andrade, Aron

    2013-11-01

    A new model of centrifugal blood pump for temporary ventricular assist devices has been developed and evaluated. The design of the device is based on centrifugal pumping principles and the usage of ceramic bearings, resulting in a pump with reduced priming (35 ± 2 mL) that can be applied for up to 30 days. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis is an efficient tool to optimize flow path geometry, maximize hydraulic performance, and minimize shear stress, consequently decreasing hemolysis. Initial studies were conducted by analyzing flow behavior with different impellers, aiming to determine the best impeller design. After CFD studies, rapid prototyping technology was used for production of pump prototypes with three different impellers. In vitro experiments were performed with those prototypes, using a mock loop system composed of Tygon tubes, oxygenator, digital flow meter, pressure monitor, electronic driver, and adjustable clamp for flow control, filled with a solution (1/3 water, 1/3 glycerin, 1/3 alcohol) simulating blood viscosity and density. Flow-versus-pressure curves were obtained for rotational speeds of 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 rpm. As the next step, the CFD analysis and hydrodynamic performance results will be compared with the results of flow visualization studies and hemolysis tests. PMID:24219168

  6. Disposable magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump: design and in vitro performance.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hideo; Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Makoto; Mizuno, Tomohiro; Arai, Hirokuni; Shimokohbe, Akira; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-07-01

    A magnetically levitated (MagLev) centrifugal blood pump (CBP) with a disposable pump head has been designed to realize a safe, easy-to-handle, reliable, and low-cost extracorporeal blood pump system. It consisted of a radial magnetic-coupled driver with a magnetic bearing having a two-degree freedom control and a disposable pump head unit with a priming volume of 24 mL. The easy on-off disposable pump head unit was made into a three-piece system consisting of the top and bottom housings, and the impeller-rotor assembly. The size and weight of the disposable pump unit were 75 mm x 45 mm and 100 g, respectively. Because the structure of the pump head unit is easily attachable and removable, the gap between the electromagnets of the stator and the target material in the rotor increased to 1.8 mm in comparison to the original integrated bearing system of 1.0 mm. The pump performance, power requirements, and controllability of the magnetic bearing revealed that from 1400 to 2400 rpm, the pump performance remained fairly unchanged. The amplitudes of the X- and Y-axis rotor oscillation increased to +/- 24 microm. The axial displacement of the rotor, 0.4 mm, toward the top housing was also observed at the pump rpm between 1400 and 2400. The axial and rotational stiffness of the bearing were 15.9 N/mm and 4.4 Nm/rad, respectively. The MagLev power was within 0.7 Watts. This study demonstrated the feasibility of a disposable, magnetically suspended CBP as the safe, reliable, easy-to-handle, low-cost extracorporeal circulation support device. PMID:15982279

  7. Fault-tolerant strategies for an implantable centrifugal blood pump using a radially controlled magnetic bearing.

    PubMed

    Pai, Chi Nan; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2011-10-01

    In our laboratory, an implantable centrifugal blood pump (CBP) with a two degrees-of-freedom radially controlled magnetic bearing (MB) to support the impeller without contact has been developed to assist the pumping function of the weakened heart ventricle. In order to maintain the function of the CBP after damage to the electromagnets (EMs) of the MB, fault-tolerant strategies for the CBP are proposed in this study. Using a redundant MB design, magnetic levitation of the impeller was maintained with damage to up to two out of a total of four EMs of the MB; with damage to three EMs, contact-free support of the impeller was achieved using hydrodynamic and electromagnetic forces; and with damage to all four EMs, the pump operating point, of 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, was achieved using the motor for rotation of the impeller, with contact between the impeller and the stator. PMID:21382738

  8. PIV measurements of flow in a centrifugal blood pump: time-varying flow.

    PubMed

    Day, Steven W; McDaniel, James C

    2005-04-01

    Measurements of the time-varying flow in a centrifugal blood pump operating as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are presented. This includes changes in both the pump flow rate as a function of the left ventricle contraction and the interaction of the rotating impeller and fixed exit volute. When operating with a pulsing ventricle, the flow rate through the LVAD varies from 0-11 L/min during each cycle of the heartbeat. Phase-averaged measurements of mean velocity and some turbulence statistics within several regions of the pump, including the inlet, blade passage, exit volute, and diffuser, are reported at 20 phases of the cardiac cycle. The transient flow fields are compared to the constant flow rate condition that was reported previously in order to investigate the transient effects within the pump. It is shown that the quasi-steady assumption is a fair treatment of the time varying flow field in all regions of this representative pump, which greatly simplifies the comprehension and modeling of this flow field. The measurements are further interpreted to identify the effects that the transient nature of the flow field will have on blood damage. Although regions of recirculation and stagnant flow exist at some phases of the cardiac cycle, there is no location where flow is stagnant during the entire heartbeat. PMID:15971703

  9. Microhaemodynamics within the blade tip clearance of a centrifugal turbodynamic blood pump.

    PubMed

    Antaki, J F; Diao, C-G; Shu, F-J; Wu, J-C; Zhao, R; Kameneva, M V

    2008-05-01

    A persistent challenge facing the quantitative design of turbodynamic blood pumps is the great disparity of spatial scales between the primary and auxiliary flow paths. Fluid passages within journals and adjacent to the blade tips are often on the scale of several blood cells, confounding the application of macroscopic continuum models. Yet, precisely in these regions there exists the highest shear stress, which is most likely to cause cellular trauma. This disparity has motivated these microscopic studies to visualize the kinematics of the blood cells within the small clearances of a miniature turbodynamic blood pump. A transparent model of a miniature centrifugal pump having an adjustable tip clearance (50-200 microm) was prepared for direct optical visualization of the region between the impeller blade tip and the stationary housing. Synchronized images of the blood cells were obtained by a microscopic visualization system, consisting of an inverted microscope fitted with long-working-distance objective lens (40x), mercury lamp, and high-resolution charge-coupled device camera electronically triggered by the rotation of the impeller. Experiments with 7 microm fluorescent particles revealed the influence of the gap dimension on the trajectory across the blade thickness. The lateral component of velocity (perpendicular to the blade) was dramatically enhanced in the 50 microm gap compared with the 200 microm gap, thereby reducing the exposure time. Studies with diluted bovine blood (Ht = 0.5 per cent) showed that the concentration of cells traversing the gap is also reduced dramatically (30 per cent) as the blade tip clearance is reduced from 200 microm to 50 microm. These results motivate further investigation into the microfluidic phenomena responsible for cellular trauma within turbodynamic blood pumps. PMID:18595366

  10. Testing of a centrifugal blood pump with a high efficiency hybrid magnetic bearing.

    PubMed

    Locke, Dennis H; Swanson, Erik S; Walton, James F; Willis, John P; Heshmat, Hooshang

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present test results for a second generation, high efficiency, nonpulsatile centrifugal blood pump that is being developed for use as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The LVAD pump uses a hybrid passive-active magnetic bearing support system that exhibits extremely low power loss, low vibration, and high reliability under transient conditions and varying pump orientations. A unique feature of the second generation design configuration is the very simple and direct flow path for both main and washing blood flows. The pump was tested in both vertical and horizontal orientations using a standard flow loop to demonstrate the performance and durability of the second generation LVAD. Steady state and transient orientation pump operating characteristics including pressure, flow, speed, temperatures, vibration, and rotor orientation were measured. During the tests, pump performance was mapped at several operating conditions including points above and below the nominal design of 5 L/min at 100 mm Hg pressure rise. Flow rates from 2 to 7 L/min and pressure rises from 50 to 150 mm Hg were measured. Pump speeds were varied during these tests from 2,500 to 3,500 rpm. The nominal design flow of 5 L/min at 100 mm Hg pressure rise was successfully achieved at the design speed of 3,000 rpm. After LVAD performance testing, both 28 day continuous duty and 5 day transient orientation durability tests were completed without incident. A hydrodynamic backup bearing design feasibility study was also conducted. Results from this design study indicate that an integral hydrodynamic backup bearing may be readily incorporated into the second generation LVAD and other magnetically levitated pump rotors. PMID:14655745

  11. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a centrifugal blood pump with washout holes.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Y; Ito, K; Sawairi, T; Konishi, Y; Yamane, T; Nishida, M; Masuzawa, T; Tsukiya, T; Endo, S; Taenaka, Y

    2000-08-01

    The authors studied avoidance of coagulation occurrence using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis from the fluid dynamical point of view. Concerning centrifugal pumps, blood coagulation sometimes occurs at the region behind the impeller where the flow is generally stagnant. Therefore, we conducted a thorough study with the specimen pump with and without washout holes, mocking up the Nikkiso HPM-15. As the result, the model with washout holes indicated that the fluid rotates rapidly at the vicinity of the shaft and generates washout effects near the stationary rear casing. On the other hand, the model without washout holes showed that fluid cannot be quickly shipped out of the area behind the impeller and rotates mildly around the shaft. To clarify the moving relations between the impeller and the fluid, validation studies by comparing the results of CFD analysis and flow visualization experiments are ongoing; thus far, the studies show that CFD results are similar to the results from flow visualization experiments. PMID:10971255

  12. PIV measurements of flow in a centrifugal blood pump: steady flow.

    PubMed

    Day, Steven W; McDaniel, James C

    2005-04-01

    Magnetically suspended left ventricular assist devices have only one moving part, the impeller. The impeller has absolutely no contact with any of the fixed parts, thus greatly reducing the regions of stagnant or high shear stress that surround a mechanical or fluid bearing. Measurements of the mean flow patterns as well as viscous and turbulent stresses were made in a shaft-driven prototype of a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump at several constant flow rates (3-9 L/min) using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The chosen range of flow rates is representative of the range over which the pump may operate while implanted. Measurements on a three-dimensional measurement grid within several regions of the pump, including the inlet, blade passage, exit volute, and diffuser are reported. The measurements are used to identify regions of potential blood damage due to high shear stress and/or stagnation of the blood, both of which have been associated with blood damage within artificial heart valves and diaphragm-type pumps. Levels of turbulence intensity and Reynolds stresses that are comparable to those in artificial heart valves are reported. At the design flow rate (6 L/min), the flow is generally well behaved (no recirculation or stagnant flow) and stress levels are below levels that would be expected to contribute to hemolysis or thrombosis. The flow at both high (9 L/min) and low (3 L/min) flow rates introduces anomalies into the flow, such as recirculation, stagnation, and high stress regions. Levels of viscous and Reynolds shear stresses everywhere within the pump are below reported threshold values for damage to red cells over the entire range of flow rates investigated; however, at both high and low flow rate conditions, the flow field may promote activation of the clotting cascade due to regions of elevated shear stress adjacent to separated or stagnant flow. PMID:15971702

  13. Seal-less centrifugal blood pump with magnetically suspended rotor: rot-a-flot.

    PubMed

    Mendler, N; Podechtl, F; Feil, G; Hiltmann, P; Sebening, F

    1995-07-01

    Limitations of current centrifugal blood pumps are related to heat generation of bearings and leakage of seals, to dead water zones, and to poor efficiency. A new concept is proposed in this paper to ameliorate these problems based on a miniaturized magnetic drive, and a prototype is introduced. The pump rotor is suspended and driven by a radial permanent magnetic field that stabilizes the impeller in 4 of the 6 spatial degrees of freedom and allows it to be top-spun on a single blood-flushed pivot bearing with minimal load and friction. A shrouded impeller with an open center and 4 logarithmically curved channels is run inside a cone-and-plate-type housing with a spiral volute chamber. In vitro testing was performed comparing this design with the BioMedicus, St. Jude, and Sarns pumps. The prototype is demonstrated to have the smallest internal volume (35 ml), surface (190 qcm), and passage time (0.5 s at 4 L/min), as well as the highest hydraulic efficiency (up to 0.4) of all devices studied. PMID:8572962

  14. A compact highly efficient and low hemolytic centrifugal blood pump with a magnetically levitated impeller.

    PubMed

    Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2006-03-01

    A magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump (CBP), intended for use as a ventricular assist device, needs to be highly durable and reliable for long-term use without any mechanical failure. Furthermore, maglev CBPs should be small enough to be implanted into patients of various size and weight. We have developed a compact maglev CBP employing a two-degree-of-freedom controlled magnetic bearing, with a magnetically suspended impeller directly driven by an internal brushless direct current (DC) motor. The magnetic bearing actively controls the radial motion of the impeller and passively supports axial and angular motions using a permanent magnet embedded in the impeller. The overall dimensions of the maglev CBP are 65 mm in diameter and 40 mm in height. The total power consumption and pump efficiency for pumping 6 L/min against a head pressure of 105 mm Hg were 6.5 W and 21%, respectively. To evaluate the characteristics of the maglev CBP when subjected to a disturbance, excitation of the base, simulating the movement of the patient in various directions, and the sudden interception of the outlet tube connected with the pump in a mock circulatory loop, simulating an unexpected kink and emergent clamp during a heart surgery, were tested by monitoring the five-degree-of-freedom motion of the impeller. Furthermore, the hemolytic characteristics of the maglev CBP were compared with those of the Medtronic Biomedicus BPX-80, which demonstrated the superiority of the maglev CBP. PMID:16480390

  15. Left ventricular volume unloading with axial and centrifugal rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Koenig, Steven C; Soucy, Kevin G; Choi, Young; Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Bartoli, Carlo R; Monreal, Gretel; Sobieski, Michael A; Schumer, Erin; Cheng, Allen; Slaughter, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Axial (AX) and centrifugal (CFG) rotary blood pumps have gained clinical acceptance for the treatment of advanced heart failure. Differences between AX and CFG designs and mechanism of blood flow delivery may offer clinical advantages. In this study, pump characteristics, and acute physiologic responses during support with AX (HeartMate II) and CFG (HVAD) left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) were investigated in mock loop and chronic ischemic heart failure bovine models. In the mock loop model, pump performance was characterized over a range of pump speeds (HeartMate II: 7,000-11,000 rpm, HVAD: 2,000-3,600 rpm) and fluid viscosities (2.7 cP, 3.2 cP, 3.7 cP). In the ischemic heart failure bovine model, hemodynamics, echocardiography, and end-organ perfusion were investigated. CFG LVAD had a flatter HQ curve, required less power, and had a more linear flow estimation relation than AX LVAD. The flow estimation error for the AX LVAD (±0.9 L/min at 2.7 cP, ±0.7 L/min at 3.2 cP, ±0.8 L/min at 3.7 cP) was higher than the CFG LVAD (±0.5 L/min at 2.7 cP, ±0.2 L/min at 3.2 cP, ±0.5 L/min at 3.7 cP). No differences in acute hemodynamics, echocardiography, or end-organ perfusion between AX and CFG LVAD over a wide range of support were statistically discernible. These findings suggest no pronounced acute differences in LV volume unloading between AX and CFG LVAD. PMID:25635936

  16. A novel design of spiral groove bearing in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Han, Qing; Zou, Jun; Ruan, Xiaodong; Fu, Xin; Yang, Huayong

    2012-08-01

    Good washout is very important in spiral groove bearing (SGB) designs when applied to blood pumps due to the micrometer scales of lubrication films and groove depths. To improve washout, flow rate or leakage through SGBs should be as large as possible. However, this special goal violates conventional SGB designs in which no leakage is desired as the leakage would decrease load-carrying capacity significantly. So, a design concept is formed fulfilling the two goals of high load-carrying capacity and large flow rate: let groove width decrease along flow path and the mating surface of the rotor rotate with a direction facilitating the flow through the grooves. Under this concept, a novel SGB is designed, contrary to conventional ones, with groove width decreasing with increasing spiral radius. This SGB is mounted on the motionless upper plate of our designed centrifugal blood pump, with the mating surface of rotor rotating with a direction facilitating the outward flow. To assess SGB designs, a characteristic plane is originally presented relating to pressure-normalized load-carrying capacity and flow rate. Comparisons between various kinds of SGB designs are made, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results are plotted in this characteristic plane from which load/flow performances can be directly read out. CFD and comparison results show that the new designs have superior load/flow characteristics. However, the impact of SGB designs upon hemolysis/thrombus formation is still to be verified according to the concept presented. PMID:22747897

  17. In vitro study to estimate particle release from a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Takami, Yoshiyuki

    2006-05-01

    Centrifugal pumps have been increasingly used in clinical settings. Like roller pumps, centrifugal pumps can cause debris release due to mechanical stress. The objectives of this study were to evaluate in vitro the particle release from a centrifugal pump, Gyro Pump (Japan Medical Materials Co., Osaka, Japan), which is a pivot-bearing supported pump clinically used in Japan, and to identify the released particles. In the clean room Class 10,000, the pump was operated for 24 h at 4000 rpm and 6 L/min in a mock loop filled with lactated Ringer's solution. After 24 h, the sample fluid and a blank were filtered with a 0.45-microm membrane filter for microscopic counting, followed by observation with a scanning electron microscope and element analysis with an X-ray spectrometer. Microscopic countings were 128 +/- 42 in the test samples (n = 10) of the Gyro Pump and 98 +/- 42 in the blank samples (n = 10) (P = 0.12). The oxygen/carbon atomic ratio of the particles in the test samples was 0.32 +/- 0.06, which was similar to the ratio of the particles in the blank sample (0.34 +/- 0.06). The profiles of elements with an X-ray spectrometer showed that the released particles from the Gyro Pump were not derived from the pump materials. In conclusion, an in vitro test system has been established for estimation of particle release from a centrifugal pump. Based upon the results with the system, the Gyro Pump with a pivot-bearing system has little risk to release debris particles even in a severe condition. PMID:16683955

  18. Bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yoshida, Fumihiko; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate a bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level. The impeller levitates axially by balancing a gravitational force, buoyancy, a magnetic force, and hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. To adjust the levitation position of the impeller, the balance of acting forces on the impeller was adjusted by changing the shroud area on the bottom impeller. Three pumps having various shroud area were prepared as tested models: 817 mm(2) (HH-S), 875 mm(2) (HH-M) and 931 mm(2) (HH-L). First, for evaluating the bearing gap adjustment, the bearing gap was estimated by calculating a balancing position of the acting forces on the impeller. We actually measured the gravitational force, buoyancy and the magnetic force, and numerically analyzed hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. Second, to verify accuracy of the estimated bearing gap, the measurement test of the bearing gap was performed. Finally, an in-vitro hemolysis test was performed to evaluate a hemolysis level of the pump. As a result, bottom bearing gaps were estimated as 40 μm (HH-S), 60 μm (HH-M) and 238 μm (HH-L). In the measurement test, bottom bearing gaps were measured as 63 μm (HH-S), 219 μm (HH-M), and 231 μm (HH-L). The estimated bearing gaps had positively correlated with the measured bearing gaps in relation to the shroud area on the impeller. In the hemolysis test, hemolysis level in every model was almost equivalent to that of BPX-80, when the bearing gap was adjusted greater than 60 μm. We could adjust the bearing gap by changing the shroud area on the impeller for improvement of levitation performance to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level. PMID:26736996

  19. The flow patterns within the impeller passages of a centrifugal blood pump model.

    PubMed

    Yu, S C; Ng, B T; Chan, W K; Chua, L P

    2000-07-01

    The effects of impeller geometry on the performance of a centrifugal blood pump model [the MSCBP design of Akamatsu and Tsukiya (The Seventh Asian Congress of Fluid Mechanics (1997), 7-10) at a 1:1 scale] have been investigated both experimentally and computationally. Four impeller designs were tested for pump hydraulic performance at the operating point (i.e. 2000 rpm), using blood analog as the working fluid. Each impeller has seven blades with different configurations including the radial straight blade and backward swept blade designs. The results show that both designs can achieve a stable head of about 100 mm Hg at the operating point. Subsequent investigations involved the visualization of the relative flow field within the impeller passages via the image de-rotation system coupled with a 2.5 W argon ion laser. Flow structures in all sectors of each impeller were examined and discussed. To further quantify the possible effects of blade geometry to thrombus formation and hemolysis, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to simulate a simplified two-dimensional blade-to-blade flow analysis so as to estimate the shear stress levels. The results indicate that the stress levels found within the blade passages are generally below the threshold level of 150 N/m(2) for extensive erythrocyte damage to occur. There are some localized regions near the leading edge of the blades where the stress levels are 60% above the threshold level. However, given such a short residence time for the fluid particles to go through these high shear stress regions, their effects appear to be insignificant. PMID:11086249

  20. Shaft/shaft-seal interface characteristics of a multiple disk centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Manning, K B; Miller, G E

    1999-06-01

    A multiple disk centrifugal pump (MDCP) is under investigation as a potential left ventricular assist device. As is the case with most shaft driven pumps, leakage problems around the shaft/shaft seal interface are of major interest. If leakage were to occur during or after implantation, potential events such as blood loss, clotting, blood damage, and/or infections might result in adverse effects for the patient. Because these effects could be quite disastrous, potential shaft and shaft seal materials have been investigated to determine the most appropriate course to limit these effects. Teflon and nylon shaft seals were analyzed as potential candidates along with a stainless steel shaft and a Melonite coated shaft. The materials and shafts were evaluated under various time durations (15, 30, 45, and 60 min), motor speeds (800, 1,000, 1,200, and 1,400 rpm), and outer diameters (1/2 and 3/4 inches). The motor speed and geometrical configurations were typical for the MDCP under normal physiologic conditions. An air and water study was conducted to analyze the inner diameter wear, the inner temperature values, and the outer temperature values. Statistical comparisons were computed for the shaft seal materials, the shafts, and the outer diameters along with the inner and outer temperatures. The conclusions made from the results indicate that both the tested shaft seal materials and shaft materials are not ideal candidates to be used for the MDCP. Teflon experienced a significant amount of wear in air and water studies. Nylon did experience little wear, but heat generation was an evident problem. A water study on nylon was not conducted because of its molecular structure. PMID:10392284

  1. [Research on magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump control based on a self-tuning fuzzy PI algorithm].

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Yang, Ming; Xu, Zihao; Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Haibo; Han, Lu; Xu, Liang

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the research and design of control system of magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump in our laboratory, and to briefly describe the structure of the magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump and principles of the body circulation model. The performance of blood pump is not only related to materials and structure, but also depends on the control algorithm. We studied the algorithm about motor current double-loop control for brushless DC motor. In order to make the algorithm adjust parameter change in different situations, we used the self-tuning fuzzy PI control algorithm and gave the details about how to design fuzzy rules. We mainly used Matlab Simulink to simulate the motor control system to test the performance of algorithm, and briefly introduced how to implement these algorithms in hardware system. Finally, by building the platform and conducting experiments, we proved that self-tuning fuzzy PI control algorithm could greatly improve both dynamic and static performance of blood pump and make the motor speed and the blood pump flow stable and adjustable. PMID:25764720

  2. Design analysis and performance assessment of hybrid magnetic bearings for a rotary centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhaohui; Jahanmir, Said; Heshmat, Hooshang; Hunsberger, Andrew Z; Walton, James F

    2009-01-01

    A hybrid magnetic bearing system was designed for a rotary centrifugal blood pump being developed to provide long-term circulatory support for heart failure patients. This design consists of two compact bearings to suspend the rotor in five degrees-of-freedom with single axis active control. Permanent magnets are used to provide passive radial support and electromagnets to maintain axial stability of the rotor. Characteristics of the passive radial and active thrust magnetic bearing system were evaluated by the electromagnetic finite element analysis. A proportional-integral-derivative controller with force balance algorithm was implemented for closed loop control of the magnetic thrust bearing. The control position is continuously adjusted based on the electrical energy in the bearing coils, and thus passive magnetic forces carry static thrust loads to minimize the bearing current. Performance of the magnetic bearing system with associated control algorithm was evaluated at different operating conditions. The bearing current was significantly reduced with the force balance control method and the power consumption was below 0.5 W under various thrust loads. The bearing parameters predicted by the analysis were validated by the experimental data. PMID:19381082

  3. A cost-effective extracorporeal magnetically-levitated centrifugal blood pump employing a disposable magnet-free impeller.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, W; Mamiya, T; Shinshi, T; Takatani, S

    2011-12-01

    In the field of rotary blood pumps, contactless support of the impeller by a magnetic bearing has been identified as a promising method to reduce blood damage and enhance durability. The authors developed a two-degrees-of-freedom radial controlled magnetic bearing system without a permanent magnet in the impeller in order that a low-cost disposable pump-head for an extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump could be manufactured more easily. Stable levitation and contactless rotation of the 'magnet-free' impeller were realized for a prototype blood-pump that made use of this magnetic bearing. The run-out of the impeller position at between 1000 r/min and 3000 r/min was less than 40 microm in the radial-controlled directions. The total power consumption of the magnetic bearing was less than 1 W at the same rotational speeds. When the pump was operated, a flow rate of 5 l/min against a head pressure of 78.66 kPa was achieved at a rotational speed of 4000 r/min, which is sufficient for extracorporeal circulation support. The proposed technology offers the advantage of low-cost mass production of disposable pump heads. PMID:22320054

  4. Geometric optimization of a step bearing for a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yada, Toru; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    A hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller has been developed for mechanical circulatory assistance. However, a narrow bearing gap has the potential to cause hemolysis. The purpose of the present study is to optimize the geometric configuration of the hydrodynamic step bearing in order to reduce hemolysis by expansion of the bearing gap. First, a numerical analysis of the step bearing, based on lubrication theory, was performed to determine the optimal design. Second, in order to assess the accuracy of the numerical analysis, the hydrodynamic forces calculated in the numerical analysis were compared with those obtained in an actual measurement test using impellers having step lengths of 0%, 33%, and 67% of the vane length. Finally, a bearing gap measurement test and a hemolysis test were performed. As a result, the numerical analysis revealed that the hydrodynamic force was the largest when the step length was approximately 70%. The hydrodynamic force calculated in the numerical analysis was approximately equivalent to that obtained in the measurement test. In the measurement test and the hemolysis test, the blood pump having a step length of 67% achieved the maximum bearing gap and reduced hemolysis, as compared with the pumps having step lengths of 0% and 33%. It was confirmed that the numerical analysis of the step bearing was effective, and the developed blood pump having a step length of approximately 70% was found to be a suitable configuration for the reduction of hemolysis. PMID:23834855

  5. A computational study of the effects of inlet guide vanes on the performance of a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chan, W K; Wong, Y W; Yu, S C M; Chua, L P

    2002-06-01

    This article presents computational studies on the effects of inlet guide vanes (IGVs) on the flow pattern and shear stress in a centrifugal blood pump. The effect of IGVs is to introduce a pre-swirl to fluid particles entering the impeller with the intention that the fluid particles will travel along the blade profile. Currently, most commercial centrifugal blood pumps employ straight radial impeller blades that are not hydrodynamically ideal for a good flow pattern within the blade passage. Flow separation and formation of vortices within the blade passage are believed to increase the degree of hemolysis and thrombosis. These are causes for blood clotting that will lead to malfunctioning of ventricular assist devices. Four IGVs of different geometrical profiles have been numerically investigated using a commercial software program CFX-Tascflow. The pump is operated at 2,000 rpm, and the results revealed that the relative flow patterns in the blade passage have been dramatically altered. The size of the vortices was reduced, and the pressure contours indicated a gradual rise from the impeller leading edge to the trailing edge. However, inclusion of IGV causes a drop in the pressure head generated. Higher frictional losses are incurred as fluid particles passed through the IGV. In addition, the IGV modifies the inlet velocity triangles, and this also contributes to a drop in the pressure head generated that is consistent with Euler's pump theory. The change in the flow patterns and the gradual variation of the pressure contours have led to lower shear stress within the blade passages as compared to the case without IGVs. PMID:12072110

  6. Estimation of the radial force using a disturbance force observer for a magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Pai, C N; Shinshi, T; Shimokohbe, A

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the hydraulic forces in a magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump is important from the point of view of the magnetic bearing design. Direct measurement is difficult due to the absence of a rotor shaft, and computational fluid dynamic analysis demands considerable computational resource and time. To solve this problem, disturbance force observers were developed, using the radial controlled magnetic bearing of a centrifugal blood pump, to estimate the radial forces on the maglev impeller. In order to design the disturbance observer, the radial dynamic characteristics of a maglev impeller were evaluated under different working conditions. It was observed that the working fluid affects the additional mass and damping, while the rotational speed affects the damping and stiffness of the maglev system. Based on these results, disturbance force observers were designed and implemented. The designed disturbance force observers present a bandwidth of 45 Hz. In non-pulsatile conditions, the magnitude of the estimated radial thrust increases in proportion to the flowrate, and the rotational speed has little effect on the force direction. At 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, the estimated radial thrust is 0.95 N. In pulsatile conditions, this method was capable of estimating the pulsatile radial thrust with good response. PMID:20839658

  7. Improvement of hemocompatibility in centrifugal blood pump with hydrodynamic bearings and semi-open impeller: in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Yada, Toru; Saito, Sakae; Hirai, Shusaku; Yamane, Takashi

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a noncontact-type centrifugal blood pump with hydrodynamic bearings and a semi-open impeller for mechanical circulatory assist. The impeller is levitated by an original spiral-groove thrust bearing and a herringbone-groove journal bearing, without any additional displacement-sensing module or additional complex control circuits. The pump was improved by optimizing the groove direction of the spiral-groove thrust bearing and the pull-up magnetic force between the rotor magnet and the stator coil against the impeller. To evaluate hemocompatibility, we conducted a levitation performance test and in vitro hemocompatibility tests by means of a mock-up circulation loop. In the hemolysis test, the normalized index of hemolysis was reduced from 0.721 to 0.0335 g/100 L corresponding to an expansion of the bearing gap from 1.1 to 56.1 microm. In the in vitro antithrombogenic test, blood pumps with a wide thrust bearing gap were effective in preventing thrombus formation. Through in vitro evaluation tests, we confirmed that hemocompatibility was improved by balancing the hydrodynamic fluid dynamics and magnetic forces. PMID:19681836

  8. Disposable MagLev centrifugal blood pump utilizing a cone-shaped impeller.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Wataru; Sobajima, Hideo; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Nagamine, Yasuyuki; Wada, Suguru; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2010-08-01

    To enhance the durability and reduce the blood trauma of a conventional blood pump with a cone-shaped impeller, a magnetically levitated (MagLev) technology has been applied to the BioPump BPX-80 (Medtronic Biomedicus, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA), whose impeller is supported by a mechanical bearing. The MagLev BioPump (MagLev BP), which we have developed, has a cone-shaped impeller, the same as that used in the BPX-80. The suspension and driving system, which is comprised of two degrees of freedom, radial-controlled magnetic bearing, and a simply structured magnetic coupling, eliminates any physical contact between the impeller and the housing. To reduce both oscillation of the impeller and current in the coils, the magnetic bearing system utilizes repetitive and zero-power compensators. In this article, we present the design of the MagLev mechanism, measure the levitational accuracy of the impeller and pressure-flow curves (head-quantity [HQ] characteristics), and describe in vitro experiments designed to measure hemolysis. For the flow-induced hemolysis of the initial design to be reduced, the blood damage index was estimated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Stable rotation of the impeller in a prototype MagLev BP from 0 to 2750 rpm was obtained, yielding a flow rate of 5 L/min against a head pressure in excess of 250 mm Hg. Because the impeller of the prototype MagLev BP is levitated without contact, the normalized index of hemolysis was 10% less than the equivalent value with the BPX-80. The results of the CFD analysis showed that the shape of the outlet and the width of the fluid clearances have a large effect on blood damage. The prototype MagLev BP satisfied the required HQ characteristics (5 L/min, 250 mm Hg) for extracorporeal circulation support with stable levitation of the impeller and showed an acceptable level of hemolysis. The simulation results of the CFD analysis indicated the possibility of further reducing the blood damage of

  9. Centrifugal pumps for rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. E.; Farquhar, J.

    1974-01-01

    The use of centrifugal pumps for rocket engines is described in terms of general requirements of operational and planned systems. Hydrodynamic and mechanical design considerations and techniques and test procedures are summarized. Some of the pump development experiences, in terms of both problems and solutions, are highlighted.

  10. Evaluation of a Spiral Groove Geometry for Improvement of Hemolysis Level in a Hydrodynamically Levitated Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a spiral groove geometry for a thrust bearing to improve the hemolysis level in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. We compared three geometric models: (i) the groove width is the same as the ridge width at any given polar coordinate (conventional model); (ii) the groove width contracts inward from 9.7 to 0.5 mm (contraction model); and (iii) the groove width expands inward from 0.5 to 4.2 mm (expansion model). To evaluate the hemolysis level, an impeller levitation performance test and in vitro hemolysis test were conducted using a mock circulation loop. In these tests, the driving conditions were set at a pressure head of 200 mm Hg and a flow rate of 4.0 L/min. As a result of the impeller levitation performance test, the bottom bearing gaps of the contraction and conventional models were 88 and 25 μm, respectively. The impeller of the expansion model touched the bottom housing. In the hemolysis test, the relative normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) ratios of the contraction model in comparison with BPX-80 and HPM-15 were 0.6 and 0.9, respectively. In contrast, the relative NIH ratios of the conventional model in comparison with BPX-80 and HPM-15 were 9.6 and 13.7, respectively. We confirmed that the contraction model achieved a large bearing gap and improved the hemolysis level in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. PMID:26146791

  11. Optimal bearing gap of a multiarc radial bearing in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yasui, Kazuya; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal pump as a bridge-to-decision device. The purpose of the present study is to determine the optimal bearing gap of a multiarc radial bearing in the developed blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis. We prepared eight pump models having bearing gaps of 20, 30, 40, 80, 90, 100, 180, and 250 μm. The driving conditions were set to a pressure head of 200 mm Hg and a flow rate of 4 L/min. First, the orbital radius of the impeller was measured for the evaluation of the impeller stability. Second, the hemolytic property was evaluated in an in vitro hemolysis test. As a result, the orbital radius was not greater than 15 μm when the bearing gap was between 20 and 100 μm. The relative normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) ratios in comparison with BPX-80 were 37.67 (gap: 20 μm), 0.95 (gap: 30 μm), 0.96 (gap: 40 μm), 0.82 (gap: 80 μm), 0.77 (gap: 90 μm), 0.92 (gap: 100 μm), 2.76 (gap: 180 μm), and 2.78 (gap: 250 μm). The hemolysis tended to increase at bearing gaps of greater than 100 μm due to impeller instability. When the bearing gap decreased from 30 to 20 μm, the relative NIH ratios increased significantly from 0.95 to 37.67 times (P < 0.01) due to high shear stress. We confirmed that the optimal bearing gap was determined between 30 and 100 μm in the developed blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis. PMID:25234763

  12. When to maintain centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Karassik, I.J.

    1993-04-01

    Centrifugal pumps comprise critical maintenance equipment. The rationale of when to maintain them relates to a spreading tendency to contain costs in the face of tight money. Plant managers are thus entitled to a thorough analysis of whether reduced expenditures truly lower costs or actually hinder maintenance and increase costs. Absence of such an analysis hides the fact that proper and timely maintenance has a double effect: it not only reduces power consumption but also extends equipment life, and thus reduces the frequency of labor and material expenditures for scheduled or crisis maintenance. Centrifugal pump maintenance can demonstrate well the validity of this observation. The paper discusses: restoring internal clearances; real cost of renewing clearances; and monitoring clearances and pump performance.

  13. Estimation of changes in dynamic hydraulic force in a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with transient computational fluid dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ohta, Akiko; Tanaka, Nobuatu; Qian, Yi; Tsukiya, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the hydraulic force on magnetically levitated (maglev) pumps should be studied carefully to improve the suspension performance and the reliability of the pumps. A maglev centrifugal pump, developed at Ibaraki University, was modeled with 926 376 hexahedral elements for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. The pump has a fully open six-vane impeller with a diameter of 72.5 mm. A self-bearing motor suspends the impeller in the radial direction. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 250 mmHg and 14 l/min, respectively. First, a steady-state analysis was performed using commercial code STAR-CD to confirm the model's suitability by comparing the results with the real pump performance. Second, transient analysis was performed to estimate the hydraulic force on the levitated impeller. The impeller was rotated in steps of 1 degrees using a sliding mesh. The force around the impeller was integrated at every step. The transient analysis revealed that the direction of the radial force changed dynamically as the vane's position changed relative to the outlet port during one circulation, and the magnitude of this force was about 1 N. The current maglev pump has sufficient performance to counteract this hydraulic force. Transient CFD analysis is not only useful for observing dynamic flow conditions in a centrifugal pump but is also effective for obtaining information about the levitation dynamics of a maglev pump. PMID:19894088

  14. Effect of a bearing gap on hemolytic property in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Imachi, Kou; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller for long-term circulatory assist. The pump uses hydrodynamic bearings to enhance durability and reliability without additional displacement-sensors or control circuits. However, a narrow bearing gap of the pump has a potential for hemolysis. The purpose of this study is to develop the hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller, and to evaluate the effect of a bearing gap on hemolytic property. The impeller levitates using a spiral-groove type thrust bearing, and a herringbone-groove type radial bearing. The pump design was improved by adopting a step type thrust bearing and optimizing the pull-up magnetic force. The pump performance was evaluated by a levitation performance test, a hemolysis test and an animal experiment. In these tests, the bearing gap increased from 1 to 63 μm. In addition, the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) improved from 0.415 to 0.005 g/100 l, corresponding to the expansion of the bearing gap. In the animal experiment for 24 h, the plasma-free hemoglobin remained within normal ranges (<4.0 mg/dl). We confirmed that the hemolytic property of the pump was improved to the acceptable level by expanding the bearing gap greater than 60 μm. PMID:23442235

  15. Engineering Aspects in Blood Pump Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golding, Leonard; Veres, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    NASA turbomachinery computer codes assisted in the design of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation's centrifugal bladed blood pump. The codes were originally developed for the aerospace industry, but are applicable to the blood pump because of a high degree of synergy with this application. Traditional turbomachinery design criteria were used in the design of the blood pump centrifugal impeller and volute casing. The fluid dynamic performance of the blood pump is meeting the engineering design goals of flow rate and pressure rise.

  16. Effect of Impeller Geometry on Lift-Off Characteristics and Rotational Attitude in a Monopivot Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kento; Sakota, Daisuke; Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Kuwana, Katsuyuki; Yamane, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    The effect of the flow path geometry of the impeller on the lift-off and tilt of the rotational axis of the impeller against the hydrodynamic force was investigated in a centrifugal blood pump with an impeller supported by a single-contact pivot bearing. Four types of impeller were compared: the FR model with the flow path having both front and rear cutouts on the tip, the F model with the flow path having only a front cutout, the R model with only a rear cutout, and the N model with a straight flow path. First, the axial thrust and the movement about the pivot point, which was loaded on the surface of the impeller, were calculated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Next, the lift-off point and the tilt of the rotational axis of the impeller were measured experimentally. The CFD analysis showed that the axial thrust increased gently in the FR and R models as the flow rate increased, whereas it increased drastically in the F and N models. This difference in axial thrust was likely from the higher pressure caused by the smaller circumferential velocity in the gap between the top surface of the impeller and the casing in the FR and R models than in the F and N models, which was caused by the rear cutout. These results corresponded with the experimental results showing that the impellers lifted off in the F and N models as the flow rate increased, whereas it did not in the FR and R models. Conversely, the movement about the pivot point increased in the direction opposite the side with the pump outlet as the flow rate increased. However, the tilt of the rotational axis of the impeller, which oriented away from the pump outlet, was less than 0.8° in any model under any conditions, and was considered to negligibly affect the rotational attitude of the impeller. These results confirm that a rear cutout prevents lift-off of the impeller caused by a decrease in the axial thrust. PMID:27097844

  17. Real-Time Observation of Thrombus Growth Process in an Impeller of a Hydrodynamically Levitated Centrifugal Blood Pump by Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the thrombus formation in cardiovascular devices such as rotary blood pumps is the most important issue in developing more hemocompatible devices. The objective of this study was to develop a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) method to visualize the thrombus growth process within a rotary blood pump and investigate the optical properties of the thrombus. An in vitro thrombogenic test was conducted using fresh porcine blood and a specially designed hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a transparent bottom. The pump rotating at 3000 rpm circulated the blood at 1.0 L/min. The bottom surface of the pump was illuminated with white light pulsed at the same frequency as the pump rotation, and the backward-scattered light was imaged using the HSI system. Using stroboscopic HSI and an image construction algorithm, dynamic spectral imaging at wavelengths ranging from 608 to 752 nm within the rotating pump was achieved. After completing the experiment, we collected the red thrombus formed in the pump impeller and quantified the thrombus hemoglobin concentration (Hbthrombus ). The spectrum changed around the center of the impeller, and the area of change expanded toward the impeller flow path. The shape corresponded approximately to the shape of the thrombus. The spectrum change indicated that the light scattering derived from red blood cells decreased. The Hbthrombus was 4.7 ± 1.3 g/dL versus a total hemoglobin of 13 ± 0.87 g/dL. The study revealed that Hbthrombus was reduced by the surrounding blood flow. PMID:26234451

  18. Effect of stationary guiding vanes on improvement of the washout behind the rotor in centrifugal blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Schima, H; Huber, L; Melvin, D; Trubel, W; Prodinger, A; Losert, U; Thoma, H; Wolner, E

    1992-01-01

    In centrifugal pumps, there always exists an area of stagnation between the rear of the rotor and the rear housing wall that promotes thrombus formation around the axle. Some current devices overcome the problem by using holes in the rotor plane, leading to increased hydrodynamic losses and shear stress. In this study, a simple apparatus was developed to overcome this problem. Guiding vanes were fixed to the rear housing wall. These vanes decrease the tangential velocity of the fluid and thus the centrifugal force, leading to an increased secondary flow toward the axle. The effect of such vanes was studied in videographic and ultrasound studies. An increase of washout and mixing between the flow layers could be demonstrated (stay time < 200 msec versus several seconds without vanes). In the first animal experiment using nonoptimized vanes, there was no thrombus at the back plane or the seal, and only a small thrombus at the transition between axle and rotor. Hemolysis was slightly elevated (3.2 mg/dl versus 2.5 mg/dl in control experiments). In conclusion, it is highly likely that this simple system will improve the flow characteristics in centrifugal pumps. PMID:1457852

  19. Development of a disposable maglev centrifugal blood pump intended for one-month support in bridge-to-bridge applications: in vitro and initial in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Someya, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Mariko; Waguri, Satoshi; Ushiyama, Tomohiro; Nagaoka, Eiki; Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2009-09-01

    MedTech Dispo, a disposable maglev centrifugal blood pump with two degrees of freedom magnetic suspension and radial magnetic coupling rotation, has been developed for 1-month extracorporeal circulatory support. As the first stage of a two-stage in vivo evaluation, 2-week evaluation of a prototype MedTech Dispo was conducted. In in vitro study, the pump could produce 5 L/min against 800 mm Hg and the normalized index of hemolysis was 0.0054 +/- 0.0008 g/100 L. In in vivo study, the pump, with its blood-contacting surface coated with biocompatible 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer, was implanted in seven calves in left heart bypass. Pump performance was stable with a mean flow of 4.49 +/- 0.38 L/min at a mean speed of 2072.1 +/- 64.5 rpm. The maglev control revealed its stability in rotor position during normal activity by the calves. During 2 weeks of operation in two calves which survived the intended study period, no thrombus formation was seen inside the pump and levels of plasma free hemoglobin were maintained below 4 mg/dL. Although further experiments are required, the pump demonstrated the potential for sufficient and reliable performance and biocompatibility in meeting the requirements for cardiopulmonary bypass and 1-week circulatory support. PMID:19775262

  20. Avoid self-priming centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    The self-priming horizontal centrifugal pump becomes known to its operator either as a good pump or a bad pump. The latter is usually replaced by another type of pump, even though a properly specified self-priming centrifugal pump might have been a good choice. Use of the guidelines described in this article are intended to help in the purchase and installation of a good pump. Self-priming centrifugal pumps are used for removing liquids from below grade sumps or pits that may also contain solids, fibers and/or muck. Alternate pumps for this service include submersible pumps, vertical turbine pumps and positive displacement pumps. These alternate pumps do not pass solid particles as large as self-priming pumps do without damage. Positive displacement pumps are not normally cost-effective when pumping liquid at rates in excess of 500 gallons per minute in low-head applications. Vertical and submersible pumps must be removed when cleaning of the pump is required. Self-priming pumps are easily cleaned by opening the access plates without moving the pump; and they cost less than the other types.

  1. 3. Interior view of centrifugal pump house showing pumps and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Interior view of centrifugal pump house showing pumps and engines, looking W. - Laurel Valley Sugar Plantation, Drainage Plant, 2 Miles South of Thibodaux on State Route 308, Thibodaux, Lafourche Parish, LA

  2. Preventing cavitation in high energy centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Garbers, A.W.F.; Wasfi, A.K. Ltd. )

    1990-07-01

    Large-eye impellers for high energy centrifugal pumps were developed to meet the specification of reduced NPSH{sub r} at rated flow conditions. Unfortunately, this improved NPSH performance was not without adverse tradeoffs because an abnormal increase in noise, vibration and cavitation erosion were experienced at low flows. Centrifugal pumps are often used under widely varying and adverse conditions, and in the case of high energy and large-eye impeller pumps, these conditions should be evaluated very carefully. At petrochemical complexes in Secunda in the Republic of South Africa, a centrifugal pump application for lean carbonate solution experienced frequent failures. An investigation and literature survey indicated the cause was low flow cavitation. The purpose of this article is but to give design guidelines as obtained from literature and experience.

  3. Optimum design for LRE centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zuchao; Zhang, Guoqian; Sun, Jiren

    1995-05-01

    We set up a mathematical model to predict low specific speed liquid rocket engine (LRE) centrifugal pump unit performance. Using the model in question, performance predictions were carried out for 10 types of LRE centrifugal pumps. Relative errors between experimental values and predicted values associated with efficiency and lift were all within 4%. Using the model in question, design optimization with efficiency as the target function was carried out on AM-7H and O pumps as well as AM-1R pumps and AM-50 pumps. Results clearly show that, with a presupposition of surety systems possessing high vapor corrosion characteristics, the efficiencies of these four types of pumps can be respectively raised 6.5%, 5.22%, 5.2%, and 4.41%.

  4. Vibration analysis of large centrifugal pump rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Zhao, W.; Ge, J. G.; Ma, D.; Li, C. M.; Bao, S. B.

    2013-12-01

    Through the critical speed of centrifugal pumps, internal flow field and the force of the impeller, we analyze centrifugal pump vibration. Using finite element analysis software ANSYS to calculate the natural frequency of the rotor system and the critical speed; with the help of the Fluent software to simulate pump internal flow field, we conclude that speed increase will not cause intense vibration of the fluid in the pump. Using unsteady numerical simulation we discovered that in an impeller suffering transient radial force cyclical change periodically, as well as the frequency size determined by the product of the impeller speed and number of blades, resonance phenomena should make impeller to transient radial force frequency. If wanting to avoid pump resonance when it is running away, the transient radial force frequency should avoid the frequency range which can cause resonance.

  5. Centrifugal Force Based Magnetic Micro-Pump Driven by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Hashi, S.; Ishiyama, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a centrifugal force based magnetic micro-pump for the pumping of blood. Most blood pumps are driven by an electrical motor with wired control. To develop a wireless and battery-free blood pump, the proposed pump is controlled by external rotating magnetic fields with a synchronized impeller. Synchronization occurs because the rotor is divided into multi-stage impeller parts and NdFeB permanent magnet. Finally, liquid is discharged by the centrifugal force of multi-stage impeller. The proposed pump length is 30 mm long and19 mm in diameter which much smaller than currently pumps; however, its pumping ability satisfies the requirement for a blood pump. The maximum pressure is 120 mmHg and the maximum flow rate is 5000ml/min at 100 Hz. The advantage of the proposed pump is that the general mechanical problems of a normal blood pump are eliminated by the proposed driving mechanism.

  6. At 1050 Gallery, Block 12, two centrifugal pumps, Buffalo Pumps, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    At 1050 Gallery, Block 12, two centrifugal pumps, Buffalo Pumps, Buffalo, NY, driven by Allis Chalmers motors (size 3 HSO, head 230, 120 cpm, 1750, rpm, Impulse dia. 15) installed in the 1960s and used for water-cooling system for 230-kv cable; the cables have been removed and the pumps are not currently used. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  7. Centrifugal Pump Experiment for Chemical Engineering Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderslice, Nicholas; Oberto, Richard; Marrero, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a Centrifugal Pump Experiment that provided an experiential learning experience to chemical engineering undergraduates at the University of Missouri in the spring of 2010 in the Unit Operations Laboratory course. Lab equipment was used by senior students with computer-based data and control technology. In…

  8. Protect centrifugal pumps from low flows

    SciTech Connect

    Woodside, O.

    1995-06-01

    Operation of centrifugal pumps below their minimum flow requirements is the primary cause of premature pump failure. Hydraulic instability occurs at low flows, causing cavitation, surging, and excessive vibration in the pump. This instability is more restrictive in setting the minimum allowable flow than using the temperature rise, which was used in the past. If you are the system design engineer, you should consider providing a protective system during the preparation of the piping and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs). Not all pumps require a protective system. Your problem is to determine which pumps do and which do not, and decide the type of system to employ. This decision must be made as early as possible in the development of the P and IDs to avoid costly rework. This article gives guidelines on when to provide a protective system and offers examples of appropriate designs.

  9. Hydrodynamic performance and heat generation by centrifugal pumps.

    PubMed

    Ganushchak, Y; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W; van der Nagel, T; de Jong, D S

    2006-11-01

    For over a century, centrifugal pumps (CP) have been used in various applications, from large industrial pumps to flow pumps for aquariums. However, the use of CP as blood pumps has a rather short history. Consequently, the hydraulic performance data for a blood CP are limited. The aim of our investigation was to study the hydraulic performance and the heat generation of three commercially available CP: Bio-Medicus Bio-Pump BP80 (Medtronic), Rotaflow (Jostra Medizintechnik), and DeltaStream DP2 (MEDOS Medizintechnik AQ). The study was performed using a circuit primed with a water-glycerin mixture with a dynamic viscosity of 0.00272 pa/s. Pressure-flow curves were obtained by a stepwise stagnation of the pump outlet or inlet. The temperature changes were observed using ThermaCAM SC2000 (Flir Systems). The pumps' performance in close to clinical conditions ('operating region') was analysed in this report. The 'operating region' in the case of the BP80 is positioned around the pressure-flow curve at a pump speed of 3000 rpm. In the case of the Rotaflow, the 'operating region' was between the pump pressure-flow curves at a speed of 3000 and 4000 rpm, and the DP2 was found between 7000 and 8000 rpm. The standard deviation of mean pressure through the pump was used to characterise the stability of the pump. In experiments with outlet stagnation, the BP80 demonstrated high negative association between flow and pressure variability (r = -0.68, p < 0.001). In experiments with the DP2, this association was positive (r = 0.68, p < 0.001). All pumps demonstrated significantly higher variability of pressure in experiments with inlet stagnation in comparison to the experiments with outlet stagnation. The rise of relative temperature in the inlet of a pump was closely related to the flow rate. The heating of fluid was more pronounced in the 'zero-flow' mode, especially in experiments with inlet stagnation. In summary, (1) the 'zero-flow' regime, which is described in the manuals

  10. Flow Analysis of the Cleveland Clinic Centrifugal Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Golding, Leonard A. R.; Smith, William A.; Horvath, David; Medvedev, Alexander

    1997-01-01

    An implantable ventricular assist rotordynamic blood pump is being developed by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in cooperation with the NASA Lewis Research Center. At the nominal design condition, the pump provides blood flow at the rate of 5 liters per minute at a pressure rise of 100 mm of mercury and a rotative speed of 3000 RPM. Bench testing of the centrifugal pump in a water/glycerin mixture has provided flow and pressure data at several rotative speeds. A one-dimensional empirical based pump flow analysis computer code developed at NASA Lewis Research Center has been used in the design process to simulate the flow in the primary centrifugal pump stage. The computer model was used to size key impeller and volute geometric parameters that influence pressure rise and flow. Input requirements to the computer model include a simple representation of the pump geometry. The model estimates the flow conditions at the design and at off-design operating conditions at the impeller leading and trailing edges and the volute inlet and exit. The output from the computer model is compared to flow and pressure data obtained from bench testing.

  11. Potential flow through centrifugal pumps and turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, E

    1941-01-01

    The methods of conformal transformation up to the present have been applied to the potential flows in the rotation of solid bodies only to a limited extent. This report deals with aspects of centrifugal pumps and turbines such as: the complex potential for rotation, potential for the flow due to the blade rotation, velocities at the blade tip, comparison with "infinite number of blades," and a variable number of blades.

  12. 23. TEMPORARY CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. NOTE CHAPMAN HYDRAULICOPERATED VALVE FOR LATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. TEMPORARY CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. NOTE CHAPMAN HYDRAULIC-OPERATED VALVE FOR LATER CONNECTION OF ENGINE PUMP ENG TO DISCHARGE HEADER. - Lakeview Pumping Station, Clarendon & Montrose Avenues, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  13. Hemodynamic effects of pressure-volume relation in the atrial contraction model on the total artificial heart using centrifugal blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Takuya; Kuroda, Takehito; Tsuboko, Yusuke; Miura, Hidekazu; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    Hemodynamic effects of atrial contraction with centrifugal pump type total artificial heart is unknown. In this study, we simulated an atrial contraction in a mock model. By the driving condition with higher pressure in the mock atrial model, the load during atrial contraction increased. Based on these findings, we examined atrial contraction in the animal using adult goats. Prior to the measurement, we installed a centrifugal-type ventricular assist device (VADs), and then clamped both ventricles. We measured the hemodynamic data without ventricular contractile functions in order to obtain the effect of atrial contraction on hemodynamics under the condition of the total artificial heart (TAH) circulatory support model. We could estimate the heart rate by revolution number and voltage of pumps. There might be a possibility that we could regulate autonomic nervous response with the control of cardiac output. PMID:24110062

  14. Centrifugal pumps: which suction specific speeds are acceptable

    SciTech Connect

    Hallam, J.L.

    1982-04-01

    Suction specific speed is an important consideration when purchasing or analyzing centrifugal pumps. There is a direct correlation between this parameter, pump reliability and maintenance expenses. This article demonstrates that in a large Gulf Coast oil refinery, centrifugal pumps with a suction specific speed greater than 11,000 failed at a frequency nearly twice that of centrifugal pumps with suction specific speed less than 11,000. This study consisted primarily of hydrocarbon pumps with an average horsepower of 150 hp. Results may vary some from those found if high energy water pumps are studied. 5 refs.

  15. Development of a centrifugal pump with thick blades.

    PubMed

    Kim, W G; Chung, C H; Yang, W S; Park, Y N; Kim, H I; Kim, H C; Kang, S H

    2000-02-01

    We have developed a centrifugal blood pump with thick impeller blades (60% of pitch) to obtain a small tip clearance. An unshrouded impeller with 6 backward curved thick blades was used to reduce the dead zone between the shroud and upper casing. A streamline angle in volute was uniform in circumferential direction by continuity and angular momentum conservation. To prove the effectiveness of small tip clearance, performance and hemolysis tests were conducted on pumps with a tip clearance of 0.5, 1.5, and 2.0 mm at exit with the blade thickness of 60% of pitch, and with that of 1.0, 2.0, and 2.5 mm at exit with the thickness of 40% of pitch. The results showed that the smaller the tip clearance, the better the hydrodynamic and hemolytic performance. The best result was seen in the pump with tip clearance of 0.5 mm with a blade thickness of 60% of pitch. These results suggest that a centrifugal pump with thick blades and a small tip clearance can be a promising alternative as a cardiopulmonary bypass pump. PMID:10718771

  16. Rotary blood pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Greg S. (Inventor); Vandamm, George A. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A rotary blood pump is presented. The pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial, and radial clearances of the blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion, and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with crosslinked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  17. Two-phase flow centrifugal pump performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisely, Eugene Andras

    The performance of centrifugal pumps subjected to a liquid-gas-mixture flow is a significant concern to manufacturers and to some users such as Chemical, Nuclear Power Plants, and Gas-Oil Industries. Particularly in the nuclear power industry, the prediction of performance degradation under the two-phase flow conditions occurring in a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) is a significant part of the overall analysis of that accident. In this experimental work, the pressure distribution was measured in a rotating, partially shrouded, open, radial impeller and volute under a wide range of air-water two-phase flow conditions. To obtain these pressure measurements, small-diameter pressure-tap holes were drilled through the casing of the radial pump. High speed photography was used to determine the flow regime of the air-water mixture through the vane and in the volute. An analytical model was developed to predict the radial pump single- and two-phase flow pressure distribution. This distribution was compared with the test data for different suction void fractions. The physical mechanism responsible for pump performance degradation was also investigated.

  18. Rotary Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George A. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  19. Rotary blood pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor); Kiris, Cetin (Inventor); Kwak, Dochan (Inventor); Rosenbaum, Bernard J. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); DeBakey, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A blood pump that comprises a pump housing having a blood flow path therethrough, a blood inlet, and a blood outlet; a stator mounted to the pump housing, the stator having a stator field winding for producing a stator magnetic field; a flow straightener located within the pump housing, and comprising a flow straightener hub and at least one flow straightener blade attached to the flow straightener hub; a rotor mounted within the pump housing for rotation in response to the stator magnetic field, the rotor comprising an inducer and an impeller; the inducer being located downstream of the flow straightener, and comprising an inducer hub and at least one inducer blade attached to the inducer hub; the impeller being located downstream of the inducer, and comprising an impeller hub and at least one impeller blade attached to the impeller hub; and preferably also comprising a diffuser downstream of the impeller, the diffuser comprising a diffuser hub and at least one diffuser blade. Blood flow stagnation and clot formation within the pump are minimized by, among other things, providing the inducer hub with a diameter greater than the diameter of the flow straightener hub; by optimizing the axial spacing between the flow straightener hub and the inducer hub, and between the impeller hub and the diffuser hub; by optimizing the inlet angle of the diffuser blades; and by providing fillets or curved transitions between the upstream end of the inducer hub and the shaft mounted therein, and between the impeller hub and the shaft mounted therein.

  20. Design Method for Single-Blade Centrifugal Pump Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Yasuyuki; Fujiwara, Ryota; Fukutomi, Junichiro

    The sewage pumps are demanded a high pump efficiency and a performance in passing foreign bodies. Therefore, the impeller used by these usages requires the large passed particle size (minimum particle size in the pump). However, because conventional design method of pump impeller results in small impeller exit width, it is difficult to be applied to the design of single-blade centrifugal pump impeller which is used as a sewage pump. This paper proposes a design method for single-blade centrifugal pump impeller. As a result, the head curve of the impeller designed by the proposed design method satisfied design specifications, and pump efficiency was over 62% more than conventional single-blade centrifugal pump impeller. By comparing design values with CFD analysis values, the suction velocity ratio of the design parameter agreed well with each other, but the relative velocity ratio did not agree due to the influence of the backflow of the impeller entrance.

  1. Prediction of performance of centrifugal pumps during starts under pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1969-01-01

    Method which calculates start-up characteristics of centrifugal pumps reveals a capacity to predict pressure drop characteristics of pumps with vaned diffusers. Calculations are based on pump geometry, design-point flow, speed, and pressure rise, and the pump characteristic within range of approximately ten percent of the design-point flow.

  2. Rotordynamic forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, R.; Arndt, N.; Caughey, T. K.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    The asymmetric flow around an impeller in a volute exerts a force upon the impeller. To study the rotordynamic force on an impeller which is vibrating around its machine axis of rotation, the impeller, mounted on a dynamometer, is made to whirl in a circular orbit within the volute. The measured force is expressed as the sum of a steady radial force and an unsteady force due to the eccentric motion of the impeller. These forces were measured in separate tests on a centrifugal pump with radically increased shroud clearance, a two-dimensional impeller, and an impeller with an inducer, the impeller of the HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine). In each case, a destabilizing force was observed over a region of positive whirl.

  3. The CentriMag centrifugal blood pump as a benchmark for in vitro testing of hemocompatibility in implantable ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chris H H; Pieper, Ina Laura; Hambly, Rebecca; Radley, Gemma; Jones, Alyssa; Friedmann, Yasmin; Hawkins, Karl M; Westaby, Stephen; Foster, Graham; Thornton, Catherine A

    2015-02-01

    Implantable ventricular assist devices (VADs) have proven efficient in advanced heart failure patients as a bridge-to-transplant or destination therapy. However, VAD usage often leads to infection, bleeding, and thrombosis, side effects attributable to the damage to blood cells and plasma proteins. Measuring hemolysis alone does not provide sufficient information to understand total blood damage, and research exploring the impact of currently available pumps on a wider range of blood cell types and plasma proteins such as von Willebrand factor (vWF) is required to further our understanding of safer pump design. The extracorporeal CentriMag (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA, USA) has a hemolysis profile within published standards of normalized index of hemolysis levels of less than 0.01 g/100 L at 100 mm Hg but the effect on leukocytes, vWF multimers, and platelets is unknown. Here, the CentriMag was tested using bovine blood (n = 15) under constant hemodynamic conditions in comparison with a static control for total blood cell counts, hemolysis, leukocyte death, vWF multimers, microparticles, platelet activation, and apoptosis. The CentriMag decreased the levels of healthy leukocytes (P < 0.006), induced leukocyte microparticles (P < 10(-5) ), and the level of high molecular weight of vWF multimers was significantly reduced in the CentriMag (P < 10(-5) ) all compared with the static treatment after 6 h in vitro testing. Despite the leukocyte damage, microparticle formation, and cleavage of vWF multimers, these results show that the CentriMag is a hemocompatible pump which could be used as a standard in blood damage assays to inform the design of new implantable blood pumps. PMID:25066768

  4. Performance analysis of mini centrifugal pump with splitter blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigemitsu, T.; Fukutomi, J.; Wada, T.; Shinohara, H.

    2013-12-01

    Design method for a mini centrifugal pump is not established because the internal flow condition for these small-sized fluid machines is not clarified and conventional theory is not suitable for small-sized pumps. Then, a semi-open impeller for the mini centrifugal pump with 55mm impeller diameter is adopted in this research to take simplicity and maintenance into consideration. Splitter blades are adopted in this research to improve the performance and internal flow condition of mini centrifugal pump having large blade outlet angle. The performance tests are conducted with these rotors in order to investigate the effect of the splitter blades on the performance and internal flow condition of the mini centrifugal pump. A three dimensional steady numerical flow analysis is conducted to analyze rotor, volute efficiency and loss caused by a vortex. It is clarified from the experimental results that the performance of the mini centrifugal pump is improved by the effect of the splitter blades. Flow condition at outlet of the rotor becomes uniform and back flow regions are suppressed in the case with the splitter blades. Further, the volute efficiency increases and the vortex loss decreases. In the present paper, the performance of the mini centrifugal pump is shown and the flow condition is clarified with the results of the experiment and the numerical flow analysis. Furthermore, the performance analyses of the mini centrifugal pumps with and without the splitter blades are conducted.

  5. Design of a Bearingless Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barletta, Natale; Schoeb, Reto

    1996-01-01

    In the field of open heart surgery, centrifugal blood pumps have major advantages over roller pumps. The main drawbacks to centrifugal pumps are however problems with the bearings and with the sealing of the rotor shaft. In this paper we present a concept for a simple, compact and cost effective solution for a blood pump with a totally magnetically suspended impeller. It is based on the new technology of the 'Bearingless Motor' and is therefore called the 'Bearingless Blood Pump.' A single bearingless slice motor is at the same time a motor and a bearing system and is able to stabilize the six degrees of freedom of the pump impeller in a very simple way. Three degrees of freedom are stabilized actively (the rotation and the radial displacement of the motor slice). The axial and the angular displacement are stabilized passively. The pump itself (without the motor-stator and the control electronics) is built very simply. It consists of two parts only: the impeller with the integrated machine rotor and the housing. So the part which gets in contact with blood and has therefore to be disposable, is cheap. Fabricated in quantities, it will cost less than $10 and will therefore be affordable for the use in a heart-lung-machine.

  6. Computational simulation of flows in an entire centrifugal heart pump.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Yano, K

    1999-06-01

    A prototype computational code to numerically simulate the blood flows in an entire centrifugal heart pump has been developed. The unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved on a parallel computer, the Cray T3E. By domain decomposition, the whole flow space is decomposed to a number of subdomains for each of which a structured algebraic grid is assigned. The grids for the inlet eye and blade regions are on the rotating frame while grids for other regions are on the nonrotating frame, and the edge of the rotating grids slides over the edge of the nonrotating frame, and the edge of the rotating grids slides over the edge of the nonrotating grids. The code is able to simulate the flows in the rotor, volute, and diffuser as well as to find pump performance indicators. The present paper presents an overview of the code and describes a study on the effect of volute width. PMID:10392287

  7. Latex micro-balloon pumping in centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Aeinehvand, Mohammad Mahdi; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Kazemzadeh, Amin; Madou, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Centrifugal microfluidic platforms have emerged as point-of-care diagnostic tools. However, the unidirectional nature of the centrifugal force limits the available space for multi-step processes on a single microfluidic disc. To overcome this limitation, a passive pneumatic pumping method actuated at high rotational speeds has been previously proposed to pump liquid against the centrifugal force. In this paper, a novel micro-balloon pumping method that relies on elastic energy stored in a latex membrane is introduced. It operates at low rotational speeds and pumps a larger volume of liquid towards the centre of the disc. Two different micro-balloon pumping mechanisms have been designed to study the pump performance at a range of rotational frequencies from 0 to 1500 rpm. The behaviour of the micro-balloon pump on the centrifugal microfluidic platforms has been theoretically analysed and compared with the experimental data. The experimental data show that the developed pumping method dramatically decreases the required rotational speed to pump liquid compared to the previously developed pneumatic pumping methods. It also shows that within a range of rotational speed, a desirable volume of liquid can be stored and pumped by adjusting the size of the micro-balloon. PMID:24441792

  8. Latex Micro-balloon Pumping in Centrifugal Microfluidic Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Aeinehvand, Mohammad Mahdi; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Kazemzadeh, Amin; Wadi harun, Sulaiman; Madou, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Centrifugal microfluidic platforms have emerged as point-of-care diagnostic tools. However, the unidirectional nature of the centrifugal force limits the available space for multi-stepped processes on a single microfluidics disc. To overcome this limitation, a passive pneumatic pumping method actuated at high rotational speeds has been previously proposed to pump liquid against the centrifugal force. In this paper, a novel micro-balloon pumping method that relies on elastic energy stored in a latex membrane is introduced. It operates at low rotational speeds and pumps a larger volume of liquid towards the centre of the disc. Two different micro-balloon pumping designs have been developed to study the pump performance and capacity at a range of rotational frequencies from 0 to 1500 rpm. The behaviour of the micro-balloon pump on the centrifugal microfluidic platforms has been theoretically analysed and compared with the experimental data. The experimental data shows that, the developed pumping method dramatically decreases the required rotational speed to pump liquid compared to the previously developed pneumatic pumping methods. It also shows that within a range of rotational speed, desirable volume of liquid can be stored and pumped by adjusting the size of the micro-balloon. PMID:24441792

  9. Investigation of Flow in a Centrifugal Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Karl

    1946-01-01

    The investigation of the flow in a centrifugal pump indicated that the flow patterns in frictional fluid are fundamentally different from those in frictionless fluid. In particular, the dead air space adhering to the section side undoubtedly causes a reduction of the theoretically possible delivery head. The velocity distribution over a parallel circle is also subjected to a noticeable change as a result of the incomplete filling of the passages. The relative velocity on the pressure side of the vane, which for passages completely filled with active flow would differ little from zero even at comparatively lower than normal delivery volume, is increased, so that no rapid reverse flow occurs on the pressure side of the vane even for smaller delivery volume. It was established, further, that the flow ceases to be stationary for very small quantities of water. The inflow to the impeller can be regarded as radial for the operating range an question. The velocity triangles at the exit are subjected to a significant alteration in shape ae a result of the increased peripheral velocity, which may be of particular importance in the determination of the guide vane entrance angle.

  10. 2. View of centrifugal pump house sitting at edge of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of centrifugal pump house sitting at edge of drainage canal, looking E. - Laurel Valley Sugar Plantation, Drainage Plant, 2 Miles South of Thibodaux on State Route 308, Thibodaux, Lafourche Parish, LA

  11. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term highspeed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the Ir shaft to support big speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  12. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term high-speed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the shaft to support high speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  13. Parametric performance evaluation of a hydraulic centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, M. W.; Y Kim, K.; Ma, S. B.; Yoo, I. S.; Choi, W. C.; Kim, J. H.; Choi, Y. S.

    2014-03-01

    Parametric study of a hydraulic centrifugal pump with backward curved blades has been performed numerically using three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The shear stress transport turbulence model was used for analysis of turbulence. The finite volume method and an unstructured grid system were used for the numerical solution. The optimal grid system in the computational domain was selected through a grid dependency test. Tested parameters were related to the geometry of the impeller and volute: seven variables defining the hub and shroud contours and the blades angle of impeller, and two variables defining the inlet width and expansion angle of volute. The effects of these parameters on the hydrodynamic performance of the centrifugal pump have been investigated. It was found that the centrifugal water pump with the twisted blades has the enhancing efficiency compared to the straight blades pump.

  14. A centrifugal pump concept designed for multiple use in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlich, E.; Wulz, H. G.

    A centrifugal pump concept was elaborated for a multiple application in future spacecrafts. Based on this concept a prototype of a small centrifugal pump was manufactured and comprehensively tested. The model pump has been approved in different test series with the fluids liquid ammonia and demineralized water. The design of the model pump was driven by strict requirements of COLUMBUS, namely long life, noiseless operation, minimum mass and low energy consumption. Because of its modular design and as a result of selected materials of multiple compatibility, this pump is suited for the delivery of various further fluids, such as freons, hydrocarbons, propellants (hydrazine) etc.. It is also capable of pumping corrosive or toxic fluids for laboratory processes in space. The wide speed range from about 1,00 to 20,000 rpm which corresponds to a flow from about 1 to 20 l/min, permits an energy saving adaption and flow control.

  15. [Temporary use of centrifugal pump for pump thrombosis in patients with paracorporeal ventricular assist device].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mitsutoshi; Kinoshita, Osamu; Nawata, Kan; Yamauchi, Haruo; Itoda, Yoshifumi; Hoshino, Yasuhiro; Kashiwa, Koichi; Kubo, Hitoshi; Kurosawa, Hideo; Takahashi, Mai; Koga, Sayaka; Ono, Minoru

    2015-05-01

    Nipro paracorporeal ventricular assist device( VAD) is often associated with pump thrombosis which causes severe complications such as brain infarction, often requiring pump change. However, Nipro VAD pump is an expensive device and it is difficult to change pumps frequently at a short interval. We have temporarily used Rotaflow centrifugal pump for recurrent pump thrombosis in patients with Nipro VADs. From January 2012 through December 2013, 19 patients underwent Nipro VADs implantation at our institution, and 9 of them underwent pump change from Nipro pumps to Rotaflow centrifugal pumps. A total of 25 Rotaflow centrifugal pumps were used in these 9 patients, with the total circulatory support duration of 526 days. The median support period was 15 days (range;2-128 days). There were 2 cerebrovascular accidents and 1 Rotaflow pump circuit thrombosis during this period. Change from Rotaflow to Nipro VAD pump resulted in decrease in hematocrit by about 3 point. There was no difference in liver or renal function between before and after the pump change. Our results suggest that temporary use of Rotaflow centrifugal pump for recurrent pump thrombosis in patients with Nipro VADs may be a promising alternative. PMID:25963778

  16. Postoperative mechanical circulatory support with Biomedicus centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Mert, Murat; Akcevin, Atif; Yildiz, Cenk E; Suzer, Kaya

    2005-03-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques, myocardial protection, and management protocols, approximately 1% of patients undergoing open heart operations still need mechanical circulatory support for severe cardiac dysfunction. The Biomedicus centrifugal pump, available in most cardiovascular centers, is a highly effective and relatively inexpensive system compared to other more sophisticated devices for the same purpose. Of 10 patients aged 5 to 61 years who were supported for 22 to 168 hours with a Biomedicus centrifugal pump, 7 (70%) were weaned from support, there was one hospital death, and 6 patients were discharged from hospital. Two sudden deaths occurred in the first 8 months after discharge. Four patients (40%) were still alive after follow-up of 11-55 months, with no restriction in their daily activities. The centrifugal pump is a very cost-effective support system with survival rates comparable to those of more sophisticated devices in short-term ventricular assistance. PMID:15793049

  17. Small centrifugal pumps for low thrust rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulbrandsen, N. C.; Furst, R. B.; Burgess, R. M.; Scheer, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a combined analytical and experimental investigation of low specific speed pumps for potential use as components of propellant feed systems for low thrust rocket engines. Shrouded impellers and open face impellers were tested in volute type and vaned diffuser type pumps. Full- and partial-emission diffusers and full- and partial-admission impellers were tested. Axial and radial loads, head and efficiency versus flow, and cavitation tests were conducted. Predicted performance of two pumps are compared when pumping water and liquid hydrogen. Detailed pressure loss and parasitic power values are presented for two pump configurations. Partial-emission diffusers were found to permit use of larger impeller and diffuser passages with a minimal performance penalty. Normal manufacturing tolerances were found to result in substantial power requirement variation with only a small pressure rise change. Impeller wear ring leakage was found to reduce pump pressure rise to an increasing degree as the pump flowrate was decreased.

  18. The effect of gas fraction on centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z. T.; Wang, Y.; Zhao, L. F.; Ning, C.; Xie, S. F.; Liu, Z. C.

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the multiphase flow field in M125 centrifugal pump, three-dimensional modeling was used for internal flow through three-dimensional software Pro/E. Then based on SST turbulence model combining with Rayleigh-Plesset cavitation model, and structured grid to simulate the hydraulic characteristics of volute and impeller within different gas conditions. The velocity, pressure and gas volume fraction distributions of the interior flow field of volute and impeller were obtained and analyzed, which revealed the effect of gas fractions on the flow characteristic of the centrifugal pump.

  19. Try magnetic gear pumps instead of sealless centrifugals

    SciTech Connect

    Nasr, A.M.

    1996-03-01

    Rotating equipment specialists often specify sealed centrifugal pumps since they are readily available, efficient, economical, and adaptable to changes in system pressure. Centrifugals have always been preferred for processing chemicals, while the niche for gear pumps has historically been for either viscous liquids in low-flow high-head applications or metering. However, rotating equipment specialists are becoming increasingly aware that when magnetic drives or canned motor pumps are required, gear pumps have advantages over centrifugals for some applications. These advantages are both in performance and cost. General selection guidelines are as follows. A sealless pump is needed when: the liquid has a viscosity over 10 cP at the range of differential pressures normal for ANSI centrifugals; the liquid has a viscosity of 0.8--5 cP at a differential pressure below 40--50 psi (100 ft); the liquid has a viscosity greater than 5 cP and the differential pressure is above 50 psi; and flow rates are below 40 gpm.

  20. Characterization of a centrifugal pump in He II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisend, J. G., II; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1988-01-01

    As part of an effort to determine the feasibility of helium transfer in space, a centrifugal pump was tested in He II at a variety of flow rates, pump speeds, and fluid temperatures. The pump, which has a straight bladed impeller 6.86 cm in diameter, generated a maximum pressure rise of 15 kPa and a maximum flow rate of 22 g/s for the conditions of the test. Pump performance seems to be independent of fluid temperature and is in good agreement with the values predicted by the manufacturer. Over the range of flow coefficients, the measured maximum efficiency is around 50 percent. Cavitation is observed in the pump and is thought to be highly dependent on the local heating of the helium in the pump. Preliminary measurements of the noise spectra of the pump suggest a possible mechanism to predict the onset of cavitation.

  1. Axial and centrifugal pump meanline performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    1994-01-01

    A meanline pump flow modeling method has been developed to provide a fast capability for modeling pumps of cryogenic rocket engines. Based on this method, a meanline pump flow code (PUMPA) has been written that can predict the performance of pumps at off-design operating conditions, given the loss of the diffusion system at the design point. The design point rotor efficiency is obtained from empirically derived correlations of loss to rotor specific speed. The rapid input setup and computer run time for the meanline pump flow code makes it an effective analysis and conceptual design tool. The map generation capabilities of the PUMPA code provide the information needed for interfacing with a rocket engine system modeling code.

  2. Use minimum flow data to prolong centrifugal pump life

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.A.

    1996-03-01

    Environmental and safety concerns and, in the US, the consequences of failing of meet EPA regulations are intensifying efforts to improve the reliability of pumping equipment. A critical step toward achieving this goal is eliminating cavitation, and the resulting impeller and shaft vibrations, which, ultimately, cause seal and bearing failure. In centrifugal pumps, cavitation results when they run at very low flow rates, as can happen during unplanned upsets or interruptions. This particularly true since many centrifugal pumps are now controlled by automatic valves in their discharge lines. The problem can be prevented by providing a small bypass line to the pump`s suction source, to control temperature rise in the pump. Usually, the minimum flow is so low that the bypass loop can be kept open without detracting from the pump`s efficiency. It needn`t require a flow control valve or any special instrumentation, but will let the pump run at a comfortable flow, even with the control valve closed. This paper describes a method to determine minimum thermal flow to prevent cavitation.

  3. Measurements of the rotordynamic shroud forces for centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinzburg, A.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.; Caughey, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    An experiment was designed to measure the rotordynamic shroud forces on a centrifugal pump impeller. The measurements were done for various whirl/impeller speed ratios and for different flow rates. A destabilizing tangential force was measured for small positive whirl ratios and this force decreased with increasing flow rate.

  4. A small centrifugal pump for circulating cryogenic helium

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, W.; Sixsmith, H.

    1982-01-01

    A small centrifugal pump is described which has been developed to circulate supercritical helium through a test loop for superconducting magnets. The pump has a fully enclosed warm and which contains the adjustable speed brushless DC drive motor and self-acting bearings operating in helium gas. The drive and bearing system is designed to minimize contaimination to the circulating supercritical helium in the test loop. The performance data which have been obtained show that the pump operates very close to its design specifications. Additional tests are planned to provide a more complete range of performance data for the pump. Subsequent record discussion concerned the pump shaft and the efficiency of the heat leak to the heat station. Efficiency of at least 65% is attainable with this pump, including all heat leak.

  5. Experiment of a centrifugal pump during changing speed operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H. J.; Shao, J.; Wu, Y. L.; Liu, S. H.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, a method of changing rotational speed of impeller periodically as the pulsatile working condition is developed to realize pulse outputs both of flow discharge and of head for a centrifugal pump through experiment. The performance of the centrifugal pump under pulsatile working operation condition is measured which indicates this model pump could produce desired pulse flow under such condition. Flow patterns at four testing points under pulsatile conditions are obtained by means of the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technology both with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) particles and refractive index matched (RIM) fluid. Results of PIV measurement show the distributions of velocity, streamlines, and the principal Reynolds normal stress (PRNS). Under the design flow rate condition, the relative velocity in the blade channel distributes smoothly and decreases from inlet to exit. And at the impeller exit, the relative velocity is lower close to suction side than that near pressure side of blade in most of blade channels.

  6. Optimization of centrifugal pump cavitation performance based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S. F.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. C.; Zhu, Z. T.; Ning, C.; Zhao, L. F.

    2015-01-01

    In order to further improve the cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump, slots on impeller blade near inlet were studied and six groups of hydraulic model were designed. Base on cavitating flow feature inside a centrifugal pump, bubble growth and implosion are calculated from the Rayleigh-Plesset equation which describes the dynamic behavior of spherical bubble and RNG κ-epsilon model was employed to simulate and analyze the internal two-phase flow of the model pump under the same conditions. The simulation results show that slots on blade near inlet could improve the cavitation performance and cavitation performance improvement of the second group was more obvious. Under the same conditions, the pressure on the back of blade near inlet was higher than the pressure on the back of unmodified blade near inlet, and energy distribution in the flow channel between the two blades was more uniform with a small change of head.

  7. Development of a magnetically suspended centrifugal pump as a cardiac assist device for long-term application.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, K; Park, C H; Akamatsu, T; Yamada, T; Ban, T

    1996-01-01

    To overcome problems with the shaft seal in conventional centrifugal pumps, the authors have been developing a magnetically suspended centrifugal pump (MSCP) that operates as a valveless, sealless, and bearingless pump. The prototype of the MSCP was modified with respect to size of the volute diffuser and impeller blade profiles. A hemolysis test in vitro using a new version of the MSCP was performed in comparison with a commercially available centrifugal pump. The test circuit for the hemolysis test comprised a blood reservoir, a pump, and polyvinyl tubes, and was filled with fresh heparinized bovine blood. The pumping conditions were a flow rate of 5 L/min and a pump head afterload of 100 mmHg. The index of hemolysis in the MSCP was significantly lower than that in the Biomedicus pump (0.0035 +/- 0.0025 versus 0.0097 +/- 0.0056 g/100 L, p < 0.05). Reduction in the platelet count during pumping also was lower in the MSCP compared with the Biomedicus pump at both 6 hrs and 12 hrs of pumping (p < 0.01). This MSCP may be advantageous for extended use of assist devices, not only from the theoretical point of view, but in a practical sense after the results of the current hemolysis test. PMID:8808462

  8. Rotating and positive-displacement pumps for low-thrust rocket engines. Volume 1: Pump Evaluation and design. [of centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macgregor, C.; Csomor, A.

    1974-01-01

    Rotating and positive displacement pumps of various types were studied for pumping liquid fluorine for low-thrust, high-performance rocket engines. Included in the analysis were: centrifugal, pitot, Barske, Tesla, drag, gear, vane, axial piston, radial piston, diaphragm, and helirotor pump concepts. The centrifugal pump and the gear pump were selected and these were carried through detailed design and fabrication. Mechanical difficulties were encountered with the gear pump during the preliminary tests in Freon-12. Further testing and development was therefore limited to the centrifugal pump. Tests on the centrifugal pump were conducted in Freon-12 to determine the hydrodynamic performance and in liquid fluorine to demonstrate chemical compatibility.

  9. Mechanical drive for blood pump

    DOEpatents

    Bifano, N.J.; Pouchot, W.D.

    1975-07-29

    This patent relates to a highly efficient blood pump to be used as a replacement for a ventricle of the human heart to restore people disabled by heart disease. The mechanical drive of the present invention is designed to operate in conjunction with a thermoelectric converter power source. The mechanical drive system essentially converts the output of a rotary power into pulsatile motion so that the power demand from the thermoelectric converter remains essentially constant while the blood pump output is pulsed. (auth)

  10. Gyro-effect stabilizes unstable permanent maglev centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kun-Xi

    2007-03-01

    According to Earnshaw's Theorem (1839), the passive maglev cannot achieve stable equilibrium and thus an extra coil is needed to make the rotor electrically levitated in a heart pump. The author had developed a permanent maglev centrifugal pump utilizing only passive magnetic bearings, to keep the advantages but to avoid the disadvantages of the electric maglev pumps. The equilibrium stability was achieved by use of so-called "gyro-effect": a rotating body with certain high speed can maintain its rotation stably. This pump consisted of a rotor (driven magnets and an impeller), and a stator with motor coil and pump housing. Two passive magnetic bearings between rotor and stator were devised to counteract the attractive force between the motor coil iron core and the rotor driven magnets. Bench testing with saline demonstrated a levitated rotor under preconditions of higher than 3,250 rpm rotation and more than 1 l/min pumping flow. Rotor levitation was demonstrated by 4 Hall sensors on the stator, with evidence of reduced maximal eccentric distance from 0.15 mm to 0.07 mm. The maximal rotor vibration amplitude was 0.06 mm in a gap of 0.15 mm between rotor and stator. It concluded that Gyro-effect can help passive maglev bearings to achieve stabilization of permanent maglev pump; and that high flow rate indicates good hydraulic property of the pump, which helps also the stability of passive maglev pump. PMID:17380386

  11. Inverse design and CFD investigation of blood pump impeller.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Chan, W K

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional inverse design method using mean swirl specification is applied to the design of centrifugal blood pump impeller blades. CFD investigation of the passage flows is carried out to analyze the flow field and pressure generated across the blade. The results show that the possibility of blood cells' damage may not be increased when the pressure developed is increased. This technique can provide designers valuable insight on the development of efficient blood pump with reduced risk of blood traumatization. PMID:10999368

  12. Analysis of the reliability of submersible centrifugal electric pumping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shilyaev, V.A.; Solodovnikov, G.G.; Vikhman, R.G.; Koshelev, V.A.; Zhitina, G.S.; Chirkova, N.I.

    1987-01-01

    A modern submersible centrifugal electric pumping system (SCEPS) for oil production consists of a submersible part which includes a centrifugal pump, an electric motor, a hydroprotection arrangement, a cable line, and an aboveground part that includes a control station and a transformer. The author discusses the mean service life of the submersible part of the SCEPS as the most important parameter of reliability of the SCEPS. The effect of the operating factors is assessed by calculating the mean service life of the submersible part of the typical SCEPS, making allowance for failures resulting from all causes. The mean operating time until failure of the submersible part of the new SCEPS due to design and technological error was determined.

  13. Influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Tan, L.; Cao, S. L.; Wang, Y. C.; Meng, G.; Qu, W. S.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performance of centrifugal pumps is analysed in the present paper. Three sets of blade angle distribution along leading edge for three blade inlet angles are chosen to design nine centrifugal pump impellers. The RNG k-epsilon turbulence model and the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model are employed to simulate the cavitation flows in centrifugal pumps with different impellers and the same volute. The numerical results are compared with the experimental data, and the comparison proves that the numerical simulation can accurately predict the cavitation performance of centrifugal pumps. On the basis of the numerical simulations, the pump head variations with pump inlet pressure, and the flow details in centrifugal pump are revealed to demonstrate the influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performances of centrifugal pumps.

  14. Development of a centrifugal pump with improved antithrombogenicity and hemolytic property for chronic circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Taenaka, Y; Wakisaka, Y; Masuzawa, T; Tatsumi, E; Toda, K; Miyazaki, K; Eya, K; Baba, Y; Nakatani, T; Ohno, T; Nishimura, T; Takano, H

    1996-06-01

    A centrifugal pump with a unique structure has been developed for chronic support. The pump is driven by a magnetic coupling and has no rotating shaft, no seal around the rotating part, and a balancing hole at the center of the impeller and the thrust bearing. The pump was improved in stepwise fashion to realize good antithrombogenicity and low hemolysis. The first pump, the National Cardiovascular Center (NCVC)-0, had an impeller with 4 rectangular and curved vanes; 6 triangularly shaped curved vanes were employed in the second model, the NCVC-1, to reduce trauma to the blood. In the third design, the NCVC-2, the central hole was enlarged, and the thrust bearing shoulder was rounded so that blood washing was enhanced around the impeller; stream lines also were smoothed for improved antithrombogenicity. The hemolytic property of the device was evaluated in vitro with heparinized fresh goat blood; hemolysis indexes of the NCVC-0, -1, and -2 were 0.05, 0.01, and 0.006 g per 100 L, respectively. Antithrombogenicity of the pumps was examined in animal experiments as a left heart bypass device in goals weighing 52-75 kg. Six NCVC-0 pumps were driven for 14 to 33 (22.0 +/- 7.6) days in goats receiving the antiplatelet drug cilostazol orally. Four NCVC-1 pumps ran for 1 to 80 (28.5 +/- 30.6) days with the same drug regimen in 2 cases and with no anticoagulation therapy in 2 cases. After 3 preliminary 1-week tests of NCVC-2 pumps in animals, the pump was installed in 3 goats; 2 pumps were still running on the 182nd and 58th pumping day. Intracorporeal implantation also was attempted successfully. The results indicate that this pump has promising features for chronic support although longer term and additional evaluations are necessary. PMID:8817945

  15. Modelling of flow with cavitation in centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homa, D.; Wróblewski, W.

    2014-08-01

    The paper concerns flow modelling in centrifugal pump with special consideration of cavitation phenomena. Cavitation occurs when local pressure drops below the saturation pressure according to the temperature of the flow. Vapour bubbles are created and then they flow through the areas with higher pressure. The bubbles collapse rapidly generating pressure wave, noise and vibration. Working under cavitation condition is very dangerous to a pump and can significantly shorten its lifetime. The investigated centrifugal pump consists of three two-flow rotors and stators working on a single shaft. The modelling process started with grid independence study. When the grid was chosen, the pump performance curve was obtained using the single phase fluid model. Next, using the results from pump performance curve calculations, the cavitation characteristic was obtained. The constant capacity was held when the pressure at the inlet was reduced. The two - phase model was used with Zwart cavitation model. The results indicate that the pump work in safe range of parameters. The analysis also provides wide range of information about the areas of vapour appearance. The most endangered regions are leading edges of rotor. When pressure at the inlet drops to about one third of pressure that calculations started from the cavitation cloud appears in whole rotor. The intense of vapour bubbles creation is greater near the shroud of the pump, rather than near the hub. As cavitation is strongly unsteady phenomena, the transient calculations were performed to check if the results are close to those obtained using the steady state type. The differences are not significant.

  16. Active magnetic bearings: As applied to centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelik, Lev; Cooper, Paul; Jones, Graham; Galecki, Dennis; Pinckney, Frank; Kirk, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    Application of magnetic bearings to boiler feed pumps presents various attractive features, such as longer bearing life, lower maintenance costs, and improved operability through control of the rotordynamics. Magnetic bearings were fitted to an eight-stage, 600 hp boiler feed pump, which generates 2600 ft of heat at 680 gpm and 3560 rpm. In addition to the varied and severe operating environment in steady state operation of this pump in a power plant, it is also subjected to transient loads during frequent starts and stops. These loads can now be measured by the in-built instrumentation of the magnetic bearings. Following site installation, a follow-up bearing tune-up was performed, and pump transient response testing was conducted. The bearing response was completely satisfactory, ensuring trouble-free pump operation even in the range of reduced load. The experience gained so far through design and testing proves feasibility of magnetic bearings for boiler feed pumps, which sets the stage for application of even higher energy centrifugal pumps equipped with magnetic bearings.

  17. Study of blade clearance effects on centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoshide, R. K.; Nielson, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    A program of analysis, design, fabrication, and testing has been conducted to develop and experimentally verify analytical models to predict the effects of impeller blade clearance on centrifugal pumps. The effect of tip clearance on pump efficiency, and the relationship between the head coefficient and torque loss with tip clearance was established. Analysis were performed to determine the cost variation in design, manufacture, and test that would occur between unshrouded and shrouded impellers. An impeller, representative of typical rocket engine impellers, was modified by removing its front shroud to permit variation of its blade clearances. It was tested in water with special instrumentation to provide measurements of blade surface pressures during operation. Pump performance data were obtained from tests at various impeller tip clearances. Blade pressure data were obtained at the nominal tip clearance. Comparisons of predicted and measured data are given.

  18. Cavitation Performance of a Centrifugal Pump with Water and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammitt, F. G.; Barton, R. K.; Cramer, V. F.; Robinson, M. J.

    1961-01-01

    The cavitation performance of a given centrifugal pump with water (hot and cold) and mercury is compared. It is found that there are significant scale effects with all fluids tested, with the Thoma cavitation parameter decreasing in all cases for increased pump speed or fluid Reynolds' number. The data for a fixed flow coefficient fall into a single curve when plotted against pump speed (or fluid velocity), rather than against Reynolds' number. Conversely, the Thoma parameter for a given Reynolds' number is approximately twice as large for mercury as for water. The direction of this variation is as predicted from consideration of the cavitation thermodynamic parameters which vary by a factor of 10(exp 7) between these fluids. No difference in cavitation performance between hot and cold water (approximately 160 F and 80 F) was observed, However, the thermodynamic parameters vary only by a factor of 5.

  19. Simulation of operation modes of a centrifugal conductive magnetohydrodynamic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsnelson, S. S.; Pozdnyakov, G. A.

    2013-09-01

    A mathematical model of a centrifugal conductive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pump that calculates the distributions of velocity, current density, and pressure along the channel is developed. The viscous forces in the original system of MHD equations are taken into account on the basis of the known square law of the drag for a turbulent flow in a pipe, generalized for the case of plane flows in a channel. Dependences of the drag coefficient on the main governing parameters (metal flow rate, current intensity, and intensity of magnetic induction), which provide the agreement of the calculated and experimental data on the pressure at the pump outlet for different operation modes, are obtained. It is shown that these dependences have a universal character and the proposed model can be used to design pumps of this type and to manage their operation in production industry.

  20. Characteristics of a nonocclusive pressure-regulated blood roller pump.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Yves

    2013-01-01

    For decades, extracorporeal life support (ECLS) systems have relied on pumps designed for short-term cardiopulmonary bypass. In the past, occlusive roller pumps were the standard. They are being progressively replaced by centrifugal pumps and devices developed specifically for ECLS. However, the ideal pump for long-term bypass is yet to be created. One interesting alternative is the Rhône-Poulenc 06 pump that is a nonocclusive pressure-regulated blood pump developed in France in the 1970s. This pump is composed of a double-stage rotor with three rollers at each level. The raceway tubing is stretched on the roller and pump occlusivity depends on the tension of the chamber on the rotor. The pump is able to deliver physiological blood flow values without generating dangerous negative or positive pressures. The specific design of the chamber allows the pump to generate a pulsatile flow, inducing minimal blood trauma, and to act as a bubble trap, making it inherently safe. This pump has been used for cardiopulmonary bypass, extracorporeal lung support, and more specifically single-lumen single-cannula venovenous membrane oxygenation for neonates, left-heart or right-heart assist, and venovenous bypass during liver transplant. In conclusion, this old-fashion pump is perfectly adapted for any kind of short- or long-term bypass. PMID:23305578

  1. Analyses of hydrodynamic radial forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adkins, D. R.; Brennen, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the hydrodynamic interactions occurring between a centrifugal pump impeller and a volute is presented. The theoretical analysis provides a quasi-one-dimensional treatment of the flow in the volute, and it is extended to include the hydrodynamic force perturbations caused by the impeller whirling eccentrically in the volute. It is noted that these perturbations are often destabilizing. The theoretical models were found to accurately predict the radial forces caused by the flow through the impeller. The pressure acting on the front shroud of the impeller is shown to have a significant effect on the destabilizing hydrodyamic forces.

  2. Evaluation of a multiple disk centrifugal pump as an artificial ventricle.

    PubMed

    Miller, G E; Sidhu, A; Fink, R; Etter, B D

    1993-07-01

    A multiple-disk centrifugal pump based on the Tesla Turbine design has been modified for potential use as an artificial ventricle or ventricular assist device. The pump consists of a series of interconnected parallel disks placed within a spiral volute housing. This pump normally operates as a continuous flow device; however, a controller circuit has been developed to also allow for pulsatile operation. Frequency, systolic duration, systolic rise time, and diastolic decay time can be independently controlled to produce a wide range of pulsatile pressures and flows. This pumping system was tested in vitro on a mock circulatory system using a blood analogue. Inlet and outlet pressures, outlet flow, and motor rotations per minute were continually monitored over a wide range of physiologic operating conditions. The disk pump output was compared with that of other artificial ventricles and produced favorable results. Direct experimental comparisons were made with a Harvard Apparatus pulsatile piston pump. Unlike the Harvard pump, the disk pump does not use valves. Rather, a slight forward rotation of the disks is used to offset the adverse diastolic pressure gradient, which avoids backflow through the device. PMID:8338431

  3. Axial and centrifugal continuous-flow rotary pumps: a translation from pump mechanics to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Moazami, Nader; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Kobayashi, Mariko; Smedira, Nicholas G; Hoercher, Katherine J; Massiello, Alex; Lee, Sangjin; Horvath, David J; Starling, Randall C

    2013-01-01

    The recent success of continuous-flow circulatory support devices has led to the growing acceptance of these devices as a viable therapeutic option for end-stage heart failure patients who are not responsive to current pharmacologic and electrophysiologic therapies. This article defines and clarifies the major classification of these pumps as axial or centrifugal continuous-flow devices by discussing the difference in their inherent mechanics and describing how these features translate clinically to pump selection and patient management issues. Axial vs centrifugal pump and bearing design, theory of operation, hydrodynamic performance, and current vs flow relationships are discussed. A review of axial vs centrifugal physiology, pre-load and after-load sensitivity, flow pulsatility, and issues related to automatic physiologic control and suction prevention algorithms is offered. Reliability and biocompatibility of the two types of pumps are reviewed from the perspectives of mechanical wear, implant life, hemolysis, and pump deposition. Finally, a glimpse into the future of continuous-flow technologies is presented. PMID:23260699

  4. Inlet and outlet devices for rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinwei; Wood, Houston G; Allaire, Paul E; Antaki, James F; Olsen, Don B

    2004-10-01

    The purposes of inlet and outlet devices for rotary blood pumps, including inducers and diffusers for axial pumps, inlet and exit volutes for centrifugal pumps, and inlet and outlet cannulas, are to guide the blood into the impeller, where the blood is accelerated, and to convert the high kinetic energy into pressure after the impeller discharge, respectively. The designs of the inlet and outlet devices have an important bearing on the pump performance. Their designs are highly dependent on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, guided by intuition and experience. For inlet devices, the design objectives are to eliminate separated flow, to minimize recirculation, and to equalize the radial components of velocity. For outlet devices, the design goals are to reduce speed, to minimize energy loss, and to avoid flow separation and whirl. CFD analyses indicate the velocity field and pressure distribution. Geometrical optimization of these components has been implemented in order to improve the flow pattern. PMID:15384997

  5. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  6. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  7. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  8. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  9. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  10. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN VIBRATIONS AND MECHANICAL SEAL LIFE IN CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R; Jerald Newton, J; David Stefanko, D

    2007-04-30

    A reduction of vibrations in mechanical seals increases the life of the seals in centrifugal pumps by minimizing fatigue damage. Mechanical seals consist of two smooth seal faces. one face is stationary with respect to the pump. The other rotates. Between the faces a fluid film evaporates as the fluid moves radially outward across the seal face. ideally, the film evaporates as it reaches the outer surface of the seal faces, thereby preventing leakage from the pump and effectively lubricating the two surfaces. Relative vibrations between the two surfaces affect the fluid film and lead to stresses on the seal faces, which lead to fatigue damage. As the fluid film breaks down impacts between the two seal faces create tensile stresses on the faces, which cycle at the speed of the motor rotation. These cyclic stresses provide the mechanism leading to fatigue crack growth. The magnitude of the stress is directly related to the rate of crack growth and time to failure of a seal. Related to the stress magnitude, vibration data is related to the life of mechanical seals in pumps.

  11. Sound generation by a centrifugal pump at blade passing frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Morgenroth, M.; Weaver, D.S.

    1996-12-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental study of the pressure pulsations produced by a centrifugal volute pump at its blade passing frequency and their amplification by acoustic resonance in a connected piping system. Detailed measurements were made of the pressure fluctuations in the piping as a function of pump speed and flow rate. A semi-empirical model was used to separate acoustic standing waves from hydraulic pressure fluctuations. The effects of modifying the cut-water geometry were also studied, including the use of flow visualization to observe the flow behavior at the cut-water. The results suggest that the pump may act as an acoustic pressure or velocity source, depending on the flow rate. At conditions of acoustic resonance, the pump acted as an open termination of the piping, i.e., as a node in the acoustic pressure standing waves. Rounding the cut-water had the effect of reducing the amplitude of acoustic resonance, apparently because of the ability of the stagnation point to move and thereby reduce the vorticity generated. A notable example of this acoustic resonance in the Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system at Ontario Hydro`s Darlington nuclear power station.

  12. Influence of clearance model on numerical simulation of centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Gao, B.; Yang, L.; Du, W. Q.

    2016-05-01

    Computing models are always simplified to save the computing resources and time. Particularly, the clearance that between impeller and pump casing is always ignored. But the completer model is, the more precise result of numerical simulation is in theory. This paper study the influence of clearance model on numerical simulation of centrifugal pump. We present such influence via comparing performance, flow characteristic and pressure pulsation of two cases that the one of two cases is the model pump with clearance and the other is not. And the results show that the head decreases and power increases so that efficiency decreases after computing with front and back cavities. Then no-leakage model would improve absolute velocity magnitude in order to reach the rated flow rate. Finally, more disturbance induced by front cavity flow and wear-ring flow would change the pressure pulsation of impeller and volute. The performance of clearance flow is important for the whole pump in performance, flow characteristic, pressure pulsation and other respects.

  13. Method for Reducing Pumping Damage to Blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Robert J. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods are provided for minimizing damage to blood in a blood pump wherein the blood pump comprises a plurality of pump components that may affect blood damage such as clearance between pump blades and housing, number of impeller blades, rounded or flat blade edges, variations in entrance angles of blades, impeller length, and the like. The process comprises selecting a plurality of pump components believed to affect blood damage such as those listed herein before. Construction variations for each of the plurality of pump components are then selected. The pump components and variations are preferably listed in a matrix for easy visual comparison of test results. Blood is circulated through a pump configuration to test each variation of each pump component. After each test, total blood damage is determined for the blood pump. Preferably each pump component variation is tested at least three times to provide statistical results and check consistency of results. The least hemolytic variation for each pump component is preferably selected as an optimized component. If no statistical difference as to blood damage is produced for a variation of a pump component, then the variation that provides preferred hydrodynamic performance is selected. To compare the variation of pump components such as impeller and stator blade geometries, the preferred embodiment of the invention uses a stereolithography technique for realizing complex shapes within a short time period.

  14. Small centrifugal pumps for low-thrust rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furst, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    Six small, low specific speed centrifugal pump configurations were designed, fabricated, and tested. The configurations included shrouded, and 25 and 100% admission open face impellers with 2 inch tip diameters; 25, 50, and 100% emission vaned diffusers; and volutes with conical exits. Impeller tip widths varied from 0.030 inch to 0.052 inch. Design specific speeds (N sub s = RPM*GPM**0.5.FT**0.75) were 430 (four configurations) and 215 (two configurations). The six configurations were tested with water as the pumped fluid. Noncavitating performance results are presented for the design speed of 24,500 rpm over a flowrate range from 1 to 6 gpm for the N sub s = 430 configurations and test speeds up to 29,000 rpm over a flowrate range from 0.3 to 1.2 gpm for the N sub s = 215 configurations. Cavitating performance results are presented over a flowrate range from 60 to 120% of design flow. Fabrication of the small pump conponents is also discussed.

  15. Origins of hydrodynamic forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Brennen, Christopher E.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions that occur between a centrifugal pump impeller and volute are experimentally and theoretically investigated. The theoretical analysis considers the inability of the blades to perfectly guide the flow through the impeller, and also includes a quasi-one dimensional treatment of the flow in the volute. The disturbance at the impeller discharge and the resulting forces are determined by the theoretical model. The model is then extended to obtain the hydrodynamic force perturbations that are caused by the impeller whirling eccentrically in the volute. Under many operating conditions, these force perturbations were found to be destablizing. Comparisons are made between the theoretical model and the experimental measurements of pressure distributions and radial forces on the impeller. The theoretical model yields fairly accurate predictions of the radial forces caused by the flow through the impeller. However, it was found that the pressure acting on the front shroud of the impeller has a substantial effect on the destablizing hydrodynamic forces.

  16. Research on energy conversion mechanism of rotodynamic pump and design of non-overload centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. L.; Hu, S. B.; Shen, Z. Z.; Wu, S. P.; Li, K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made for the calculation of an expression for the intrinsic law of input power which has not yet been given by current theory of Rotodynamic pump. By adequate recognition of the characteristics of non-inertial system within the rotating impeller, it is concluded that the input power consists of two power components, the first power component, whose magnitude increases with the increase of the flow rate, corresponds to radial velocity component, and the second power component, whose magnitude decreases with the increase of the flow rate, corresponds to tangential velocity component, therefore, the law of rise, basic levelness and drop of input power curves of centrifugal pump, mixed-flow pump and axial-flow pump can be explained reasonably. Through further analysis, the main ways for realizing non-overload of centrifugal pump are obtained, and its equivalent design factor is found out, the factor correlates with the outlet angle of leading face and back face of the blade, wrap angle, number of blades, outlet width, area ratio, and the ratio of operating flow rate to specified flow rate and so on. These are verified with actual example.

  17. Numerical simulation of flow in centrifugal pump with complex impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Bao-ling; Lin, Yong-gang; Jin, Ying-zi

    2011-03-01

    Based on the Navier-Stokes equations and the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model, three dimensional turbulent flow fields in centrifugal pump with long-mid-short blade complex impeller are calculated and analyzed numerically. The relative velocity and pressure distributions in the flowpart are obtained. It is found that the flow in the passage of the complex impeller is unsymmetrical due to the joint action between volute and impeller. The back-flow region is at inlet of long-blade suction side, near middle part of long-blade pressure side and outlet of short-blade suction side. The flow near volute throat is affected greatly by volute. The relative velocity is large and it is easy to bring back flow at outlet of the complex impeller near volute throat. The static and total pressure rise uniformly from inlet to outlet in the impeller. At impeller outlet, the pressure periodically decreases from pressure side to suction side, and then the static pressure sharply rise near the throat. The experimental results show that the back flow in the impeller has an important influence on the performance of pump.

  18. Numerical studies in a centrifugal pump with the improved blade considering cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, P. F.; Zhang, Y. X.; Xu, C.; Zhou, X.; Zhang, J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a centrifugal pump with the improved blade for cavitation is studied numerically. A 3D impeller with logarithmic spiral blade profile was designed by the in-house hydraulic design code using a centrifugal pump geometric parameters, and the blade profile curve of suction side on the designed impeller is replaced by a combination of tangent line and circle arc line. The cavitation flows in the centrifugal pump with designed impeller, modified impeller and centrifugal pump spectrum impeller are respectively calculated by two-phase CFD simulation at three flow rates. The tests of the centrifugal pump have been conducted to verify numerical simulation. The effects of designed impeller and modified impeller on hydraulic efficiency, critical cavitation number, cavitation length, head drop performance and vapor cavity distribution in impeller are investigated. The results show that the modification of blade profile curve of suction side can improve the cavitation performance of an impeller and hydraulic efficiency of centrifugal pump. Compared with designed impeller, the critical cavitation number of centrifugal pump with modified impeller decrease by 26.5% under the same flow rate coefficient, and the cavitation intensity in the modified impeller is weakened effectively. The hydraulic efficiency of modified impeller also increases by 4.9%.

  19. Optimization and analysis of centrifugal pump considering fluid-structure interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Hu, Sanbao; Zhang, Yunqing; Chen, Liping

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the optimization of vibrations of centrifugal pump considering fluid-structure interaction (FSI). A set of centrifugal pumps with various blade shapes were studied using FSI method, in order to investigate the transient vibration performance. The Kriging model, based on the results of the FSI simulations, was established to approximate the relationship between the geometrical parameters of pump impeller and the root mean square (RMS) values of the displacement response at the pump bearing block. Hence, multi-island genetic algorithm (MIGA) has been implemented to minimize the RMS value of the impeller displacement. A prototype of centrifugal pump has been manufactured and an experimental validation of the optimization results has been carried out. The comparison among results of Kriging surrogate model, FSI simulation, and experimental test showed a good consistency of the three approaches. Finally, the transient mechanical behavior of pump impeller has been investigated using FSI method based on the optimized geometry parameters of pump impeller. PMID:25197690

  20. Optimization and Analysis of Centrifugal Pump considering Fluid-Structure Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sanbao

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the optimization of vibrations of centrifugal pump considering fluid-structure interaction (FSI). A set of centrifugal pumps with various blade shapes were studied using FSI method, in order to investigate the transient vibration performance. The Kriging model, based on the results of the FSI simulations, was established to approximate the relationship between the geometrical parameters of pump impeller and the root mean square (RMS) values of the displacement response at the pump bearing block. Hence, multi-island genetic algorithm (MIGA) has been implemented to minimize the RMS value of the impeller displacement. A prototype of centrifugal pump has been manufactured and an experimental validation of the optimization results has been carried out. The comparison among results of Kriging surrogate model, FSI simulation, and experimental test showed a good consistency of the three approaches. Finally, the transient mechanical behavior of pump impeller has been investigated using FSI method based on the optimized geometry parameters of pump impeller. PMID:25197690

  1. Numerical Study of a Fuel Centrifugal Pump with Variable Impeller Width for Aero-engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Guan, Huasheng; Ye, Zhifeng

    2015-12-01

    As typical pump with large flow rate and high reliability, centrifugal pumps in fuel system of aero-engines mostly regulate flow rate by flow bypass, which leads to low efficiency and large fuel temperature rise especially at low flow rate. An innovative fuel centrifugal pump with variable impeller width is a more effective way to regulate flow rate than flow bypass. To find external characteristics of the centrifugal pump with variable impeller width proposed in this paper, flow domain within the pump is simulated numerically and some primary performance parameters and their correlation are analyzed. Results show that flow rate of the pump can be regulated by variable impeller width and that efficiency for this scheme is higher than that for flow bypass. The higher outlet static pressure the pump runs at, the wider range of flow rates can be obtained with stronger nonlinear relationship between flow rate and impeller width.

  2. Roller and Centrifugal Pumps: A Retrospective Comparison of Bleeding Complications in Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Halaweish, Ihab; Cole, Adam; Cooley, Elaine; Lynch, William R; Haft, Jonathan W

    2015-01-01

    Centrifugal pumps are increasingly used for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) rather than roller pumps. However, shear forces induced by these types of continuousflow pumps are associated with acquired von Willebrand factor deficiency and bleeding complications. This study was undertaken to compare adverse bleeding complications with the use of centrifugal and roller pumps in patients on prolonged ECMO support. The records of all adult ECMO patients from June 2002 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed using the University of Michigan Health System database and the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization registry, focusing on patients supported for at least 5 days. Ninety-five ECMO patients met criteria for inclusion (48 roller vs. 47 centrifugal pump). Indications included pulmonary (79%), cardiac (15%), and extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (6%), without significant difference between the two groups. Despite lower heparin anticoagulation (10.9 vs. 13.7 IU/kg/hr) with centrifugal pumps, there was a higher incidence of nonsurgical bleeding (gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and neurological) in centrifugal pump patients (26.1 vs. 9.0 events/1,000 patient-days, p = 0.024). In conclusion, in our historical comparison, despite reduced anticoagulation, ECMO support using centrifugal pumps was associated with a higher incidence of nonsurgical bleeding. The mechanisms behind this are multifactorial and require further investigation. PMID:25914954

  3. Performance of enlarged blood pump models with five different impellers.

    PubMed

    Chua, L P; Yu, S C; Leo, H L

    2000-01-01

    In earlier studies, a 5:1 enlarged pump model of the Kyoto-NTN Magnetically Suspended Centrifugal Blood Pump had been constructed and the flow characteristics investigated. Although the results obtained were satisfactory, the medium used was air. A 5:1 enlarged pump model using water as the medium thus was designed and constructed. Five different impeller blade profile designs were used in the present study. By varying (1) the blade profile design: forward, radial, and backward, (2) the number of blades used, and (3) the rotating speed, the flow characteristics of the pump were investigated. It was found that the impeller with the higher number of blades, used in the forward and straight blade profiles, have the best performance. PMID:10999376

  4. Numerical experiment optimization to obtain the characteristics of the centrifugal pump steps package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyrev, S. V.; Boldyrev, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    The numerical simulation method of turbulent flow in a running space of the working-stage in a centrifugal pump using the periodicity conditions has been formulated. The proposed method allows calculating the characteristic indices of one pump step at a lower computing resources cost. The comparison of the pump characteristics' calculation results with pilot data has been conducted.

  5. Performance and internal flow condition of mini centrifugal pump with splitter blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigemitsu, T.; Fukutomi, J.; Kaji, K.; Wada, T.

    2012-11-01

    Mini centrifugal pumps having a diameter smaller than 100mm are employed in many fields. But the design method for the mini centrifugal pump is not established because the internal flow condition for these small-sized fluid machines is not clarified and conventional theory is not suitable for small-sized pumps. Therefore, mini centrifugal pumps with simple structure were investigated by this research. Splitter blades were adopted in this research to improve the performance and the internal flow condition of mini centrifugal pump which had large blade outlet angle. The original impeller without the splitter blades and the impeller with the splitter blades were prepared for an experiment. The performance tests are conducted with these rotors in order to investigate the effect of the splitter blades on performance and internal flow condition of mini centrifugal pump. On the other hand, a three dimensional steady numerical flow analysis is conducted with the commercial code (ANSYS-CFX) to investigate the internal flow condition in detail. It is clarified from the experimental results that the performance of the mini centrifugal pump is improved by the effect of the splitter blades. The blade-to-blade low velocity regions are suppressed in the case with the splitter blades and the total pressure loss regions are decreased. The effects of the splitter blades on the performance and the internal flow condition are discussed in this paper.

  6. Experimental study of characteristic curves of centrifugal pumps working as turbines in different specific speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Derakhshan, Shahram; Nourbakhsh, Ahmad

    2008-01-15

    Pump manufacturers do not normally provide the characteristic curves of their pumps working as turbines. Therefore, establishing a correlation between the performances of direct (pump) and reverse (turbine) modes is essential in selecting the proper machine. In this paper, several centrifugal pumps (N{sub s} < 60 (m, m{sup 3}/s)) were tested as turbines. Using experimental data, some relations were derived to predict the best efficiency point of a pump working as a turbine, based on pump hydraulic characteristics. Validity of the presented method was shown using some referenced experimental data. Two equations were presented to estimate the complete characteristic curves of centrifugal pumps as turbines based on their best efficiency point. Deviations of suggested method from experimental data were considered and discussed. Finally, a procedure was presented for selecting a suitable pump to work as a turbine in a small hydro-site. (author)

  7. Hydraulic design, numerical simulation and BVF diagnosis of high efficiency centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. X.; Chen, L.; Zhou, X.; Jiangand, C. W.; Su, M.

    2012-11-01

    Under the Two-dimensional Flow Theory and the Velocity Coefficient Theory, a centrifugal-pump impeller has been designed, based on the parameters of IS150-125-250 centrifugal pump. And self-compiled programs have been used to complete the hydraulic design of the whole flow passage of centrifugal pump. The space bending and twisting characteristics of the design blade are more obvious. Then, numerical simulation is applied to the inner flow field of the two pumps using RANS (Reynolds Averaged N-S) Equation with a standard k-ε two-equation turbulence model. The compare of the numerical simulation data of two centrifugal pumps, getting from 13 working points including design condition, shows that, the design pump has higher head and efficiency in the range of lower flow rate. Based on the numerical results of the inner flow of the design pump and model pump, the boundary vorticity flux (BVF) diagnostics has been used to analyze the BVF distribution of suction surface and pressure surface of two pumps. The result shows that, the BVF distribution of the design pump is more uniform and smooth, with smaller peak value.

  8. Applicability of eddy viscosity turbulence models in low specific speed centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wang, W. J.

    2012-11-01

    The accuracy of numerical simulation determines the performance prediction whether to be successful or not in the research of centrifugal pump. In order to study the applicability of different turbulence models in the low specific speed centrifugal pump, the object was based on XST45-200 stamping and welding centrifugal pump. Five different kinds of standards which are k-epsilon model, RNG k-epsilon model, Realizable k-epsilon model, Standard k-ω model and SST k-ω model are adopted in steady numerical simulations of the centrifugal pump flow fields. Then, inner and outside characteristics of the centrifugal pump were gotten .And it also provides the calculation of pressure distribution using different turbulence models in the five conditions. Lastly, the performance curves of head, power and efficiency are compared with the test. The results show a good agreement between five kinds of turbulence models and tests obtained in small flow and design condition. In large flow, the standard k-ε model is worse than the other four, which is larger than the tested head with a relative deviation of 47.9% and efficiency with 50%.The calculation accuracy which used RNG k-epsilon model is highest. SST k-ω model takes the second place. Standard k-ω model can be used for the numerical simulation in the low specific speed centrifugal pump.

  9. Centrifugal pump and roller pump in adult cardiac surgery: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Saczkowski, Richard; Maklin, Michelle; Mesana, Thierry; Boodhwani, Munir; Ruel, Marc

    2012-08-01

    Centrifugal pump (CP) and roller pump (RP) designs are the dominant main arterial pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Trials reporting clinical outcome measures comparing CP and RP are controversial. Therefore, a meta-analysis was undertaken to evaluate clinical variables from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Keyword searches were performed on Medline (1966-2011), EmBase (1980-2011), and CINAHL (1981-2011) for studies comparing RP and CP as the main arterial pump in adult CPB. Pooled fixed-effects estimates for dichotomous and continuous data were calculated as an odds ratio and weighted-mean difference, respectively. The P value was utilized to assess statistical significance (P < 0.05) between CP and RP groups. Eighteen RCTs met inclusion criteria, which represented 1868 patients (CP = 961, RP = 907). The prevailing operation was isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CP = 88%, RP = 87%). Fixed-effects pooled estimates were performed for end-of-CPB (ECP) and postoperative day one (PDO) for platelet count (ECP: P = 0.51, PDO: P = 0.16), plasma free hemoglobin (ECP: P = 0.36, PDO: P = 0.24), white blood cell count (ECP: P = 0.21, PDO: P = 0.66), and hematocrit (ECP: P = 0.06, PDO: P = 0.51). No difference was demonstrated for postoperative blood loss (P = 0.65) or red blood cell transfusion (P = 0.71). Intensive care unit length of stay (P = 0.30), hospital length of stay (P = 0.33), and mortality (P = 0.91) were similar between the CP and RP groups. Neurologic outcomes were not amenable to pooled analysis; nevertheless, the results were inconclusive. There was no reported pump-related malfunction or mishap. The meta-analysis of RCTs comparing CP and RP in adult cardiac surgery suggests no significant difference for hematological variables, postoperative blood loss, transfusions, neurological outcomes, or mortality. PMID:22804106

  10. Hemocompatibility of Axial Versus Centrifugal Pump Technology in Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices.

    PubMed

    Schibilsky, David; Lenglinger, Matthias; Avci-Adali, Meltem; Haller, Christoph; Walker, Tobias; Wendel, Hans Peter; Schlensak, Christian

    2015-08-01

    The hemocompatible properties of rotary blood pumps commonly used in mechanical circulatory support (MCS) are widely unknown regarding specific biocompatibility profiles of different pump technologies. Therefore, we analyzed the hemocompatibility indicating markers of an axial flow and a magnetically levitated centrifugal device within an in vitro mock loop. The HeartMate II (HM II; n = 3) device and a CentriMag (CM; n = 3) adult pump were investigated in a human whole blood mock loop for 360 min using the MCS devices as a driving component. Blood samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for markers of coagulation, complement system, and inflammatory response. There was a time-dependent activation of the coagulation (thrombin-antithrombin complexes [TAT]), complement (SC5b-9), and inflammation system (polymorphonuclear [PMN] elastase) in both groups. The mean value of TAT (CM: 4.0 μg/L vs. 29.4 μg/L, P < 0.001; HM II: 4.5 μg/L vs. 232.2 μg/L, P < 0.05) and PMN elastase (CM: 53.4 ng/mL vs. 253.8 ng/mL, P < 0.05; HM II: 28.0 ng/mL vs. 738.8 ng/mL, P < 0.001) significantly increased from baseline until the end of the experiments (360 min). After 360 min, TAT and PMN values were significantly higher in the HM II group compared with the values in the CM adult group. The values of SC5b-9 increased from baseline to 360 min in the CM group (CM: 141.8 ng/mL vs. 967.9 ng/mL, P < 0.05) and the HM II group. However, the increase within the HM II group (97.3 vs. 2462.0, P = 0.06) and the comparison of the 360-min values between CM group and HM II group did not reach significance (P = 0.18). The activation of complement, coagulation, and inflammation system showed a time-dependent manner in both devices. The centrifugal CM device showed significantly lower activation of coagulation and inflammation than that of the HM II axial flow pump. Both HM II and CM have demonstrated an acceptable

  11. In vitro testing of a novel blood pump designed for temporary extracorporeal support.

    PubMed

    Spurlock, David J; Ranney, David N; Fracz, Emilia M; Mazur, Daniel E; Bartlet, R H; Haft, Jonathan W

    2012-01-01

    Extracorporeal blood pumps are used as temporary ventricular assist devices or for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The ideal pump would be intrinsically self-regulating, carry no risk of cavitation or excessive inlet suction, be afterload insensitive, and valveless thus reducing thrombogenicity. Currently used technology, including roller, centrifugal, and pneumatic pulsatile pumps, does not meet these requirements. We studied a nonocclusive peristaltic pump (M-Pump) in two mock circulatory loops and compared the performance to a frequently used centrifugal pump and a modified prototype of the M-Pump (the BioVAD). The simple resistance loop consisted of the investigated pump, a fixed height reservoir at 150 mm Hg, and a variable inflow reservoir. The pulsatile circulation used a mock patient simulator with adjustable resistance elements connected to a pneumatic pulsatile pump. The M-Pump intrinsically regulated flow with changing preload, was afterload insensitive, and did not cavitate, unlike the centrifugal pump. The BioVAD also demonstrated these features and could augment output with the use of vacuum assistance. A nonocclusive peristaltic pump may be superior for short-term extracorporeal circulatory assist by mitigating risks of excessive inlet suction, afterload sensitivity, and thrombosis. PMID:22236624

  12. In Vitro Testing of a Novel Blood Pump Designed for Temporary Extracorporeal Support

    PubMed Central

    Spurlock, DJ; Ranney, DN; Fracz, E; Mazur, DE; Bartlett, RH; Haft, JW

    2012-01-01

    Extracorporeal blood pumps are used as temporary ventricular assist devices or for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The ideal pump would be intrinsically self-regulating, carry no risk of cavitation or excessive inlet suction, be afterload insensitive, and valveless thus reducing thrombogenicity. Currently used technology, including roller, centrifugal, and pneumatic pulsatile pumps, does not meet these requirements. We studied a non-occlusive peristaltic pump (M-Pump) in two mock circulatory loops, and compared the performance to a frequently used centrifugal pump and a modified prototype of the M-Pump (the BioVAD). The simple resistance loop consisted of the investigated pump, a fixed height reservoir at 150 mmHg, and a variable inflow reservoir. The pulsatile circulation utilized a mock patient simulator with adjustable resistance elements connected to a pneumatic pulsatile pump. The M-Pump intrinsically regulated flow with changing preload, was afterload insensitive, and did not cavitate, unlike the centrifugal pump. The BioVAD also demonstrated these features, and could augment output with use of vacuum assistance. A non-occlusive peristaltic pump may be superior for short term extracorporeal circulatory assist by mitigating risks of excessive inlet suction, afterload sensitivity, and thrombosis. PMID:22236624

  13. Unsteady internal flow conditions of mini-centrifugal pump with splitter blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigemitsu, T.; Fukutomi, J.; Kaji, K.; Wada, T.

    2013-02-01

    Mini centrifugal pumps having a diameter smaller than 100mm are employed in many fields. But the design method for the mini centrifugal pump is not established because the internal flow condition for these small-sized fluid machines is not clarified and conventional theory is not suitable for small-sized pumps. Therefore, mini centrifugal pumps with simple structure were investigated by this research. Splitter blades were adopted in this research to improve the performance and the internal flow condition of mini centrifugal pump which had large blade outlet angle. The original impeller without the splitter blades and the impeller with the splitter blades were prepared for experiment. The performance tests are conducted with these rotors in order to investigate the effect of the splitter blades on performance and internal flow condition of mini centrifugal pump. On the other hand, a three dimensional unsteady numerical flow analysis was conducted to investigate the change of the internal flow according to the rotor rotation. It is clarified from the experimental results that the performance of the mini centrifugal pump is improved by the splitter blades. The blade-to-blade low velocity region was suppressed in the case with the splitter blades. In addition to that, the unsteady flows near the volute casing tongue were suppressed due to the splitter blades. In the present paper, the performance of the mini centrifugal pump is shown and the unsteady flow condition is clarified with the results of the numerical flow analysis. Furthermore, the effects of the splitter blades on the performance and the unsteady internal flow condition are investigated.

  14. Research on energy conversion mechanism of a screw centrifugal pump under the water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, H.; Li, R. N.; Su, Q. M.; Han, W.; Cheng, X. R.; Shen, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    In order to research screw centrifugal pump impeller power capability and energy conversion mechanism, we used Navier-Stokes equation and standard k-ε equation turbulence model on the basis of the Euler equations to carry out screw centrifugal pump internal flow numerical simulation. This was explored by simulating specific design conditions; the medium is water, variation of speed and pressure of flow filed under the action of the impeller, and the screw centrifugal impeller shroud line and wheel line segment take monitoring sites. The monitoring points are between dynamic head and static head change to analyze the energy conversion capability along the impeller corners of screw centrifugal pump. The results show that the energy of fluid of the screw centrifugal pump is provided by spiral segment, the spiral segment in front of the impeller has played a multi-level role, it has significant reference value to research the energy conversion mechanism of screw centrifugal pump under solid-liquid two phase.

  15. Optimization of Centrifugal Pump Characteristic Dimensions for Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices.

    PubMed

    Korakianitis, Theodosios; Rezaienia, Mohammad A; Paul, Gordon M; Rahideh, Akbar; Rothman, Martin T; Mozafari, Sahand

    2016-01-01

    The application of artificial mechanical pumps as heart assist devices impose power and size limitations on the pumping mechanism, and therefore requires careful optimization of pump characteristics. Typically new pumps are designed by relying on the performance of other previously designed pumps of known performance using concepts of fluid dynamic similarity. Such data are readily available for industrial pumps, which operate in Reynolds numbers region of 10. Heart assist pumps operate in Reynolds numbers of 10. There are few data available for the design of centrifugal pumps in this characteristic range. This article develops specific speed versus specific diameter graphs suitable for the design and optimization of these smaller centrifugal pumps concentrating in dimensions suitable for ventricular assist devices (VADs) and mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices. A combination of experimental and numerical techniques was used to measure and analyze the performance of 100 optimized pumps designed for this application. The data are presented in the traditional Cordier diagram of nondimensional specific speed versus specific diameter. Using these data, nine efficient designs were selected to be manufactured and tested in different operating conditions of flow, pressure, and rotational speed. The nondimensional results presented in this article enable preliminary design of centrifugal pumps for VADs and MCS devices. PMID:27258221

  16. Transformation of vibration signals in rotary blood pumps: the diagnostic potential of pump failure.

    PubMed

    Kawahito, Koji

    2013-09-01

    Although non-destructive and continuous monitoring is indispensable for long-term circulatory support with rotary blood pumps, a practical monitoring system has not yet been developed. The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of detecting pump failure caused by thrombus formation through the monitoring of vibration signals. The data acquisition equipment included vibration pickups, a charge amplifier, vibration analysis systems, and exclusive hardware. A pivot-bearing centrifugal pump with a mock circuit was investigated for vibration analysis. To simulate the four common areas of thrombus formation, we used a piece of silicon attached to each of the following four locations: the total area of the bottom of the impeller, an eccentric shape on the bottom of the impeller, a circular shape around the shaft top, and an eccentric shape on the top of the impeller. Vibration signals were picked up, and the power spectrum density analysis was performed at pump rotational speeds of 2100, 2400, and 3000 rpm. In this study, pump failure could be detected, and the types of imitation thrombi could be determined. We conclude that vibration detection with a computerized analysis system is a potentially valuable diagnostic tool for long-term circulatory support with rotary blood pumps. PMID:23625149

  17. Flow instability of a centrifugal pump determined using the energy gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Dong, Wenlong; He, Zhaohui; Huang, Yuanmin; Jiang, Xiaojun

    2015-02-01

    The stability of the centrifugal pump has not been well revealed because of the complexity of internal flow. To analyze the flow characteristics of a centrifugal pump operating at low capacity, methods of numerical simulation and experimental research were adopted in this paper. Characteristics of the inner flow were obtained. Standard k-ɛ turbulence models were used to calculate the inner flow of the pump under off-design conditions. The distribution of the energy gradient function K was obtained by three-dimensional numerical simulation at different flow rates. The relative velocity component was acquired from the absolute velocity obtained in particle image velocimetry. By comparing with experimental results, it was found that flow instability occurs at the position of maximum K. The flow stability reduces with an increasing flow rate. The research results provide a theoretical basis for the optimization design of a centrifugal pump.

  18. Performance analysis on solid-liquid mixed flow in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, C.; Wang, Y.

    2016-05-01

    In order to study the solid-liquid mixed flow hydraulic characteristics of centrifugal pump, the Pro/E software was used for three-dimensional modeling of centrifugal pump chamber. By using the computational fluid dynamics software CFX, the numerical simulation calculation of solid-liquid two-phase flow within whole flow passage of centrifugal pump was conducted. Aim at different particle diameters, the Reynolds-averaged N-S equations with the RNG k-Ɛ turbulence model and SIMPLEC algorithm were used to simulate the two-phase flow respectively on the condition of different volume fraction. The influence of internal flow characteristic on pump performance was analyzed. On the conditions of different particle diameter and different volume fraction, the turbulence kinetic energy and particle concentration are analyzed. It can be found that the erosion velocity ratio on the flow channel wall increases along with the increasing of the volume fraction

  19. Critical cavitation coefficient analysis of a space low specific centrifugal pump with micro gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. T.; Li, Y.; Gao, Y.; Hu, Q.; Zhou, C.; Wu, Y. L.

    2016-05-01

    Centrifugal pump was used in the loop as a baselined unit. The flow rate of the pump was very small, while the head was high. This space pump must work stable for a long time (more than a year), so the performance of the pump attracted public attention. The rotational speed of the impeller was limited for stability, so the pump belonged to low specific centrifugal pump. In this paper, a single-phase centrifugal pump, which was designed for single-phase fluid loops in satellites, was modeled for numerical simulation. The hydraulic region of the pump was discretized by structured mesh. Three dimensional (3-D) flow in the pump was studied by the use of computational fluid dynamics. Partially-Averaged Navier- Stokes (PANS) model based on RNG k-ε turbulence model was developed for the simulation of the unsteady flow. Velocity inlet and pressure outlet was used as the boundary conditions. Interface was used between the impeller and the casing, as well as the impeller and inlet pipe. Performances and pressure fluctuation of the pump were investigated. The dominant frequency of the pressure fluctuation is blade passing frequency at the region close to the tongue of the casing, while it is twice of blade passing frequency at the other region.

  20. Preclinical study of a novel hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal pump for long-term cardiopulmonary support : In vivo performance during percutaneous cardiopulmonary support.

    PubMed

    Tsukiya, Tomonori; Mizuno, Toshihide; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2015-12-01

    An extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump with a hydrodynamically levitated impeller was developed for use in a durable extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) system. The present study examined the biocompatibility of the blood pump during long-term use by conducting a series of 30-day chronic animal experiments. The ECMO system was used to produce a percutaneous venoarterial bypass between the venae cavae and carotid artery in adult goats. No anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy was administered during the experiments. Three out of four animals survived for the scheduled 30-day period, and the blood pumps and membrane oxygenators both exhibited sufficient hydrodynamic performance and good antithrombogenicity, while one animal died of massive bleeding from the outflow cannulation site. The animals' plasma free hemoglobin had returned to within the normal range by 1 week after the surgical intervention, and their hemodynamic and biochemistry parameters remained within their normal ranges throughout the experiment. The explanted centrifugal blood pumps did not display any trace of thrombus formation. Based on the biocompatibility demonstrated in this study, the examined centrifugal blood pump, which includes a hydrodynamically levitated impeller, is suitable for use in durable ECMO systems. PMID:25975380

  1. Suppression of secondary flows in a double suction centrifugal pump with different loading distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, H. F.; Wang, F. J.; Zhang, Z. C.; Yao, Z. F.; Zhou, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary flow is one of the main reasons for low efficiency in double suction centrifugal pump. In a 3-D inverse design method, the pump blade could be designed by a specified loading distribution to control the flow field in pump. In order to study the influence of loading distribution on secondary flow of a double suction centrifugal pump, the external characteristics and the internal flow field of the pump with three kinds of loading distributions are analysed by using CFD approach. According to the simulation results, it is found that the form of fore-loading distribution at shroud and aft-loading distribution at hub could improve the optimal efficiency and broaden the high efficiency area of the pump. Furthermore, the secondary flow in impeller exit region and volute could be significantly suppressed if the slope of loading distribution curve of shroud is set to be -0.7.

  2. Hydrogen test of a small, low specific speed centrifugal pump stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A small, low specific speed centrifugal pump stage with a 2 inch tip diameter, .030 inch tip width shrouded impeller and volute collector was tested with liquid hydrogen as the pumped fluid. The hydrodynamic design of the pump stage is summarized and the noncavitating and cavitating performance results are presented. Test speeds were 60 and 80 percent of the 77,000 rpm design speed. Liquid hydrogen test results are compared with data from previous tests of the stage in water.

  3. Response of a radial-bladed centrifugal pump to sinusoidal disturbances for noncavitating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. A.; Blade, R. J.; Stevans, W.

    1971-01-01

    A radial-bladed centrifugal pump was run in water with sinusoidal fluctuations of pressure and flow rate imposed at the pump inlet. Since the flow was noncavitating, zero gain was assumed in computing pump impedance. The inertive reactance became greater than the resistance at relatively low frequencies. An electric circuit model was developed in order to explain the trends of inertance and resistance with frequency.

  4. Numerical simulation of an axial blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chua, Leok Poh; Su, Boyang; Lim, Tau Meng; Zhou, Tongming

    2007-07-01

    The axial blood pump with a magnetically suspended impeller is superior to other artificial blood pumps because of its small size. In this article, the distributions of velocity, path line, pressure, and shear stress in the straightener, the rotor, and the diffuser of the axial blood pump, as well as the gap zone were obtained using the commercial software, Fluent (version 6.2). The main focus was on the flow field of the blood pump. The numerical results showed that the axial blood pump could produce 5.14 L/min of blood at 100 mm Hg through the outlet when rotating at 11,000 rpm. However, there was a leakage flow of 1.06 L/min in the gap between the rotor cylinder and the pump housing, and thus the overall flow rate the impeller could generate was 6.2 L/min. The numerical results showed that 75% of the scalar shear stresses (SSs) were less than 250 Pa, and 10% were higher than 500 Pa within the whole pump. The high SS region appeared around the blade tip where a large variation of velocity direction and magnitude was found, which might be due to the steep angle variation at the blade tip. Because the exposure time of the blood cell at the high SS region within the pump was relatively short, it might not cause serious damage to the blood cells, but the improvement of blade profile should be considered in the future design of the axial pump. PMID:17584481

  5. A Method to Determine the Slip Factor of Centrifugal Pumps through Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Liang; Zhu, Zu-Chao; Dou, Hua-Shu; Cui, Bao-Ling; Li, Yi; Xiao, Jun-Jian

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a method to determine the slip factor of centrifugal impellers is proposed based on the experimental result of the external performance of centrifugal pumps. This proposed method is superior to the conventional experimental method, which needs not to measure the flow parameters at impeller outlet. The results show that the present method can be used to obtain the slip factor at offdesign condition in a wide range of flow rate besides at the design point.

  6. Open-cycle centrifugal vapor-compression heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgmeier, L. R.; Horner, J. E.

    1987-11-01

    The objectives of the program were: (1) to develop an open cycle, high lift, centrifugal steam compressor system that can be efficiently retrofitted to existing multi-effect and high temperature differential evaporators while maintaining the cost benefits of a single stage centrifugal compressor, and (2) to demonstrate the energy saving cost benefits of driving the compressor with a natural gas fueled gas turbine engine. The turbine exhaust was to be used for final drying of the product that was evaporated. The installation of the system is described along with the test activities through May 1987.

  7. The valvo-pump. An axial, nonpulsatile blood pump.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Y; Yozu, R; Tanaka, T; Yamazaki, K

    1991-01-01

    The valvo-pump, an axial, nonpulsatile blood pump implanted at the heart valve position while preserving diseased heart muscle, has several advantages over an artificial heart replacement, including 1) a good anatomic fit to the natural heart, 2) less blood contacting surface, and 3) ease of implantation. The housing for the pump is a tube, 37 mm in diameter (maximum) and 33 mm in length. Within the housing there is an impeller with either 10 vanes (33 mm in diameter) or 5 vanes (22 mm in diameter). The impeller is connected to a samarium-cobalt-rare-earth magnet direct current (DC) brushless motor measuring 23.8 mm in diameter and 30.2 mm in length. Sealing is achieved by means of a magnetic fluid seal. A guiding wheel with 4 vanes is located behind the impeller. The pump was studied on a hydraulic mock circulatory system to evaluate its performance characteristics. A pump flow of 6.9 L/min was obtained at a pump differential pressure of 48 mmHg, and flow of 3.1 L/min was obtained at 58 mmHg. The valvo-pump can be made feasible by developing a small, high-output, power motor and an endurable seal, as well as by optimizing the impeller design. PMID:1751257

  8. Cavitation performance and flow characteristic in a centrifugal pump with inlet guide vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Zha, L.; Cao, S. L.; Wang, Y. C.; Gui, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of prewhirl regulation by inlet guide vanes (IGVs) on cavitation performance and flow characteristic in a centrifugal pump is investigated. At the impeller inlet, the streamlines are regulated by the IGVs, and the axial velocity distribution is also influenced by the IGVs. Due to the total pressure loss on the IGVs, the cavitation performance of the centrifugal pump degrades. The cavitation area in impeller with IGVs is larger than one without IGVs. The specify values of total pressure loss between the suction pipe inlet and impeller inlet for three cavitation conditions show that the IGVs will generate additional pressure loss, which is related to the IGVs angles and cavitation conditions.

  9. Numerical simulation and analysis of cavitation flows in a double suction centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, G.; Tan, L.; Cao, S. L.; Jian, W.; Liu, W. W.; Jiang, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation is an unsteady phenomenon, which is nearly inevitable in pumps. It would degrade the pump performance, generate vibrations and noises, and even erode pump flow passage components. The double suction centrifugal pump at design flow rate and large flow rate is numerically simulated using the k-ω turbulence model and the mass transport cavitation model. As a result, the calculated variation of pump head with pump inlet pressure agreed well with the experimental data. The results demonstrate that the numerical model and method can accurately predict the cavitation flows in a double suction centrifugal pump. The cavitation characteristics are analysed in great details. In addition, based on the calculation results, the reason that the plunge of pump head curve is revealed. It is found that the steep fall of pump head happens when the cavity reaches the blade to blade throat and the micro-vortex group appears at the back of the blade suction side. At the same time, this practice can provide guidance for the optimal design of double suction pumps.

  10. Experimental testing of centrifugal pump: small and medium sized enterprise product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, R.; Paddiyatu, F.; Khafidh, M.; Nugroho, S.; Sugiyanto, S.; Jamari, J.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the experimental testing for centrifugal pump for fisherman ship, manufactured by small and medium sized enterprises in Central Java Province, Indonesia. The research covers material analysis, component observation, endurance and vibration test. Six centrifugal pumps are tested and three main pump components are discussed: shaft, bearings and seals. The results show that the material of the shaft is predicted to support and transmit the load from the engine to impeller. The problem found in the tolerance and geometry accuracy of the shaft which causes difficulties during assembling process, excessive wear and leakage during testing. From the endurance and vibration test, the ball bearings fail and lock the shaft due to the fatigue on the rolling elements and raceways. The oil seal and water seal also fail in maintaining the oil and water in the chamber and induce the unlubricated system for the ball bearings. Some suggestions are delivered to improve the product quality of the centrifugal pump. A good quality of the centrifugal pump for fishermen ship and long life span is expected to be produced by local SMEs to win the free trade competition in the Indonesian market.

  11. A concept for improving efficiency of multistage centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardy, H. F.

    1970-01-01

    Multichannel impeller consists of successive stage impellers arranged concentrically without clearances between them. Reduction in friction is predicted to increase pump efficiency by 5 to 10 percent.

  12. Research on the noise induced by cavitation under the asymmetric cavitation condition in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. X.; Yuan, S. Q.; Yuan, J. P.; Ren, X. D.; Pei, J.; Si, Q. R.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to research the noise induced by cavitation under the asymmetric cavitation (AC) condition in a centrifugal pump. The acoustic pressure signals at the pump inlet and outlet were measured respectively during the development of cavitation in a closed hydraulic test rig. It could be found that both the pump inlet and outlet acoustic pressures changed obviously with the development of cavitation. The time domain and the power spectrum density of the pump inlet and outlet acoustic pressure pulsations were analyzed. The broadband pulses of the acoustic pressure pulsations were found and the reasons for the phenomenon were given.

  13. Platelet function during cardiopulmonary bypass using multiple electrode aggregometry: comparison of centrifugal and roller pumps.

    PubMed

    Kehara, Hiromu; Takano, Tamaki; Ohashi, Noburo; Terasaki, Takamitsu; Amano, Jun

    2014-11-01

    Blood trauma may be lower with centrifugal pumps (CPs) than with roller pumps (RPs) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), because, unlike RPs, CPs do not compress the tubing, and shear stress is considered lower in CPs than in RPs. However, relative platelet function remains unclear. Using multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA), we compared platelet function with CP and RP. Ten swine underwent CPB for 3 h, with five weaned off using CP and five using RP. Platelet function was measured using MEA, as were hemoglobin concentration and platelet count, before sternotomy, after heparin infusion, 30 min and 3 h after starting CPB, after protamine infusion, and 60 min after stopping CPB. Platelet activation was initiated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid (AA), and thrombin receptor-activating protein 6 (TRAP). Fibrinogen, platelet factor 4 (PF4), and β-thromboglobin (β-TG) concentrations were measured before sternotomy and 60 min after stopping CPB. In the CP group and using ADP, aggregation was significantly reduced 30 min (P = 0.019) and 3 h (P = 0.027) after starting CPB, recovering to baseline 60 min after CPB was stopped. In the RP group, aggregation was significantly decreased 30 min (P = 0.007) and 3 h (P = 0.003) after starting CPB and after protamine administration (P = 0.028). With AA, aggregation significantly decreased 30 min after starting CPB in both the CP (P = 0.012) and RP (P = 0.016) groups, slightly increasing 3 h after starting CPB and after protamine infusion, and recovering to baseline 60 min after CPB cessation. With TRAP, aggregation in the CP and RP groups decreased 30 min after starting the pump, although changes were not significant; aggregation gradually recovered after 3 h and returned to baseline 60 min after the pumps were stopped. There were no significant differences at all sampling points of MEA. In both groups, fibrinogen, PF4, and β-TG concentrations were similar 60 min after pump cessation and before sternotomy

  14. Hydraulic performance of a low specific speed centrifugal pump with Spanwise-Slotted Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, D. X.; Li, H.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The hydraulic efficiency of a low specific speed centrifugal pump is low because of the long and narrow meridian flow passage, and the severe disk friction. Spanwise slotted blade flow control technology has been applied to the low specific speed centrifugal pump. This paper concluded that spanwise slotted blades can improve the pump performance in both experiments and simulations. In order to study the influence to the impeller and volute by spanwise slotted blade, impeller efficiency and volute efficiency were defined. The minimum volute efficiency and the maximum pump efficiency appear at the same time in the design flow condition in the unsteady simulation. The mechanism of spanwise slotted blade flow control technology should be researched furthermore.

  15. Application of two turbulence models for computation of cavitating flows in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, M.; Guo, Q.; Zhou, L. J.; Wang, Z. W.; Wang, X.

    2013-12-01

    To seek a better numerical method to simulate the cavitating flow field in a centrifugal pump, the applications between RNG k- ε and LES turbulence model were compared by using the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model. It was found that both the models give almost the same results with respect to pump performance and cavitation evolutions including growth, local contraction, stability and separation in the impeller passage. But the LES model can not only capture the pump suction recirculation and the low frequency fluctuation caused by it, but also combine the changes of the shaft frequency amplitude acting on the impeller with the cavitation unstable characteristics. Thus the LES model has more advantages than RNG k- ε model in calculating the unsteady cavitating flow in a centrifugal pump.

  16. Numerical identification of blade exit angle effect on the performance for a multistage centrifugal pump impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayigit, Osman; Kocaaslan, Osman; Hilmi Aksoy, Muharrem; Melih Guleren, Kursad; Ozgoren, Muammer

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, single and multistage centrifugal pumps are widely used in industrial and mining enterprises. One of the most important components of a centrifugal pump is the impeller. The performance characteristics are related to the pump comprising the head and the overall efficiency rely a great deal on the impeller geometry. In this work, effects of blade exit angle change on hydraulic efficiency of a multi stage pump impeller are investigated via Ansys-Fluent computational fluid dynamics software for constant width impeller entrance and exit gates, blade numbers and blade thickness. Firstly, the flow volume of a centrifugal pump impeller is generated and then mesh structure is formed for the full impeller flow volume. Secondly, rotational periodic flow model are adopted in order to examine the effect of periodic flow assumption on the performance predictions. Corresponding to the available experimental data, inlet mass flow rate, outlet static pressure and rotation of impeller are taken as 0.02m3s-1, 450 kPa and 2950 rpm, respectively for the water fluid. No slip boundary condition is exposed to all solid of surface in the flow volume. The continuity and Navier-Stokes equations with the k-ɛ turbulence model and the standard wall functions are used. During the study, numerical analyses are conducted for the blade exit angle values of 18°, 20°, 25°, 30° and 35°. In consequence of the performed analyses, it is determined that hydraulic efficiency of the pump impeller value is changed between 81.0-84.6%. The most convenient blade exit angle that yields 84.6% hydraulic efficiency at is 18°. The obtained results show that the blade exit angle range has an impact on the centrifugal pump performance describing the pump head and the hydraulic efficiency.

  17. Investigation of CFD calculation method of a centrifugal pump with unshrouded impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dazhuan; Yang, Shuai; Xu, Binjie; Liu, Qiaoling; Wu, Peng; Wang, Leqin

    2014-03-01

    Currently, relatively large errors are found in numerical results in some low-specific-speed centrifugal pumps with unshrouded impeller because the effect of clearances and holes are not accurately modeled. Establishing an accurate analytical model to improve performance prediction accuracy is therefore necessary. In this paper, a three-dimensional numerical simulation is conducted to predict the performance of a low-specific-speed centrifugal pump, and the modeling, numerical scheme, and turbulent selection methods are discussed. The pump performance is tested in a model pump test bench, and flow rate, head, power and efficiency of the pump are obtained. The effect of taking into consideration the back-out vane passage, clearance, and balance holes is analyzed by comparing it with experimental results, and the performance prediction methods are validated by experiments. The analysis results show that the pump performance can be accurately predicted by the improved method. Ignoring the back-out vane passage in the calculation model of unshrouded impeller is found to generate better numerical results. Further, the calculation model with the clearances and balance holes can obviously enhance the numerical accuracy. The application of disconnect interface can reduce meshing difficulty but increase the calculation error at the off-design operating point at the same time. Compared with the standard k-ɛ, renormalization group k-ɛ, and Spalart-Allmars models, the Realizable k-ɛ model demonstrates the fastest convergent speed and the highest precision for the unshrouded impeller flow simulation. The proposed modeling and numerical simulation methods can improve the performance prediction accuracy of the low-specific-speed centrifugal pumps, and the modeling method is especially suitable for the centrifugal pump with unshrouded impeller.

  18. Numerical analysis of the flow field in the pump chamber of a centrifugal pump with back blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, L.; Wang, Z. W.; Y Luo, Y.; Liu, M.

    2013-12-01

    Black blade is frequently used as a non-contact seal structure in centrifugal pumps transporting solid-liquid two-phase flow. However, it will disturb the flow in the pump and affect the pump performance. Numerical simulation for 3D turbulence in whole flow passage of a centrifugal pump with back blades was carried out based on RANS method, with SST k-ω turbulence model and SIMPLEC algorithm. Calculation for a similar pump without back blades was also carried out as a comparison. Boundary condition was improved due to the existence of back blade. The influence of back blades on the flow field was analysed qualitatively for three typical conditions. Meanwhile the leakage rate was calculated for several conditions and the effect of back blades was discussed. According to the results, compared with the condition without back blades, it could be seen that back blade apparently changed the flow state in the front chamber, improved near the front shroud and worsened near the pump cover. Velocity was increased and more fluid, which flowed into the front chamber from the pump cover side, flowed back to the spiral casing from the impeller shroud side. With the increase of discharge, the absolute value of leakage rate first went up and then dropped, as a consequence of the combination of two factors, discharge and differential pressure between the impeller outlet and inlet. The seal effect of back blades is most obvious under small discharge condition, and the leakage loss diminished as discharge increased.

  19. Method of investigation of vibroacoustic characteristics of centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pokrovskiy, B. V.; Rubinov, V. Y.; Yurgin, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    A method for acoustical diagnostics of pumps is described which consists of taking sonograms of the pump, by means of an audio spectrograph. In distinction from usual analyzers, the spectrograph makes it possible to obtain a three-dimensional image of the signal being analyzed, in which its frequency-amplitude characteristics developed over time are depicted with a resolving power of 0.004 sec. As an example, a sonogram of an electrically driven pump, in the 40-4000 Hz frequency range, is presented. The amplitude ratios are determined on the sonogram by the contrast of individual contours, with an accuracy of 6 db.

  20. Experimental and numerical investigation of centrifugal pumps with asymmetric inflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittag, Sten; Gabi, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Most of the times pumps operate off best point states. Reasons are changes of operating conditions, modifications, pollution and wearout or erosion. As consequences non-rotational symmetric flows, transient operational conditions, increased risk of cavitation, decrease of efficiency and unpredictable wearout can appear. Especially construction components of centrifugal pumps, in particular intake elbows, contribute to this matter. Intake elbows causes additional losses and secondary flows, hence non-rotational velocity distributions as intake profile to the centrifugal pump. As a result the impeller vanes experience permanent changes of the intake flow angle and with it transient flow conditions in the blade channels. This paper presents the first results of a project, experimentally and numerically investigating the consequences of non-rotational inflow to leading edge flow conditions of a centrifugal pump. Therefore two pumpintake- elbow systems are compared, by only altering the intake elbow geometry: a common single bended 90° elbow and a numerically optimized elbow (improved regarding rotational symmetric inflow conditions and friction coefficient). The experiments are carried out, using time resolved stereoscopic PIV on a full acrylic pump with refractions index matched (RIM) working fluid. This allows transient investigations of the flow field simultaneously for all blade leading edges. Additional CFD results are validated and used to further support the investigation i.e. for comparing an analog pump system with ideal inflow conditions.

  1. 77 FR 65360 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status (Centrifugal and Submersible Pumps); Auburn, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ..., filed 10-21-2011); Whereas, notice inviting public comment has been given in the Federal Register (76 FR... subzone at the centrifugal and submersible pump manufacturing and warehousing facilities of Xylem Water... Xylem Water Systems U.S.A., LLC, facilities located in Auburn, New York (Subzone 37D), as described...

  2. Numerical investigation of nonlinear vibration for rotor-seal system of centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W. J.; Yang, Y. C.; Xing, G. K.; Wang, L. Q.

    2013-12-01

    The exciting force in the seal is an important factor for the stability of a multiple stage centrifugal pump. With the speed increasing, the rotor system of multiple stage centrifugal pump presents some nonlinear characters. In order to provide supports for the research of nonlinear characters of multiple stage centrifugal pump, a rotor-seal system model of centrifugal pump is presented and the Muszynska nonlinear seal model is used to express the seal exciting force with multiple parameters in the paper. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta method is also used to determine the vibration response at the impeller place and obtain bifurcation diagram, axis orbit, phase diagram as well as Poincaré Map. The bifurcation results show that the rotor-seal system would be stable under a lower speed and change to be unstable as the rotor speed increases. Various multi-periodic motions and quasi-periodic motions are found showing the complicated motions in the rotor-seal system under nonlinear seal forces.

  3. CENTRIFUGE APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.; Urey, H.C.; Cohen, K.

    1960-08-01

    A high-speed centrifuge for the separation of gaseous isotopes is designed comprising a centrifugal pump mounted on the outlet of a centrifuge bowl and arranged to pump the heavy and light fractions out of the centrifuge bowl in two separate streams.

  4. Influence of the empirical coefficients of cavitation model on predicting cavitating flow in the centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hou-lin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Hua; Huang, Haoqin

    2014-03-01

    The phenomenon of cavitation is an unsteady flow, which is nearly inevitable in pump. It would degrade the pump performance, produce vibration and noise and even damage the pump. Hence, to improve accuracy of the nu¬merical prediction of the pump cavitation performance is much desirable. In the present work, a homogenous model, the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model, is considered to investigate the influence of the empirical coefficients on predicting the pump cavitation performance, concerning a centrifugal pump. Three coefficients are analyzed, namely the nucleation site radius, evaporation and condensation coefficients. Also, the experiments are carried out to validate the numerical simulations. The results indicate that, to get a precise prediction, the approaches of declining the initial bubble radius, the condensation coefficient or increasing the evaporation coefficient are all feasible, especially for de¬clining the condensation coefficient, which is the most effective way.

  5. A survey of instabilities within centrifugal pumps and concepts for improving the flow range of pumps in rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    1992-01-01

    Design features and concepts that have primary influence on the stable operating flow range of propellant-feed centrifugal turbopumps in a rocket engine are discussed. One of the throttling limitations of a pump-fed rocket engine is the stable operating range of the pump. Several varieties of pump hydraulic instabilities are mentioned. Some pump design criteria are summarized and a qualitative correlation of key parameters to pump stall and surge are referenced. Some of the design criteria were taken from the literature on high pressure ratio centrifugal compressors. Therefore, these have yet to be validated for extending the stable operating flow range of high-head pumps. Casing treatment devices, dynamic fluid-damping plenums, backflow-stabilizing vanes and flow-reinjection techniques are summarized. A planned program was undertaken at LeRC to validate these concepts. Technologies developed by this program will be available for the design of turbopumps for advanced space rocket engines for use by NASA in future space missions where throttling is essential.

  6. A study on energy saving rate for variable speed condition of multistage centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Sang-Ho; Rakibuzzaman; Kim, Kyung-Wuk; Kim, Hyoung-Ho; Yoon, In Sik; Cho, Min-Tae

    2015-11-01

    Centrifugal pumps are being widely used in many industrial and commercial applications. Many of these pumps are being operated at constant speed but could provide energy savings through adjustable speed operations. The purpose of this study was to get the energy saving rates of the multistage centrifugal pump with variable speed conditions. For this investigation an experimental set up of variable flow and pressure system was made to get energy saving rates and numerical analyses are applied to validate the pump performance. The energy saving and therefore the cost saving depends on the specific duty cycle of which the machine operates. Duty cycle is the proportion of time during which a component, device and system is operated. The duty cycle segmented into different flow rates and weighting the average value for each segment by the interval time. The system was operated at 50% or less of the pump capacity. The input power of the system was carried out by pump characteristics curve of each operating point. The energy consumption was done by the product of specific duty cycle and the input power of the system for constant speed and variable speed drive operation. The total energy consumed for constant speed drive pump was 75,770 kW.hr and for variable speed drive pump was 31,700 kW.hr. The total energy saving of the system was 44,070 kW.hr or 58.16% annually. So, this paper suggests a method of implementing an energy saving on variable-flow and pressure system of the multistage centrifugal pump.

  7. An original versatile nonocclusive pressure-regulated blood roller pump for extracorporeal perfusion.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Yves; Wang, Shigang; Ündar, Akif

    2014-06-01

    Currently, only a small number of centrifugal pumps are being used for hemodynamic and/or respiratory support, but all of them have limitations. This article aims to present the Rhône-Poulenc 06 nonocclusive pressure-regulated blood pump. This pump was developed in France in the 1970s and used for decades in perfusion for cardiopulmonary bypass procedures, cardiac or lung assist as well as venovenous bypass during liver transplant. The intrinsic properties of this pump allowed us to describe a new technique for extracorporeal lung support in the 1980s, using a single cannula tidal flow venovenous bypass. This pump compared favorably with conventional pumps in terms of flow and pressure, hemolysis, pulsatility, safety, and cost-effectiveness. We believe that this simple pump could be an alternative to more sophisticated and expensive devices. PMID:24125196

  8. An assessment of liquid-metal centrifugal pumps at three fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.S.; Wood, D.H.; Drischler, J.D. )

    1993-10-01

    The results of an analysis using data reports submitted to the Centralized Reliability Data Organization (CREDO) to predict the onset of the wearout life period for large sodium centrifugal pumps is described. For CREDO data collection and analysis purposes, a mechanical pump'' includes the pumping unit, its driver, and the coupling between the two. Statistical data were compiled from event reports received from three fast reactors: the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) in the US and the JOYO Experimental Fast Reactor operated by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan. Cumulative event rates were calculated for the investigated pumps at each facility and for the entire population. For all pumps, the event rate was computed as 34.4 event/million operating hours with 5 and 95% one-sided confidence limits of 26.3 and 44.4 event/million operating hours, respectively. The cumulative event rates for EBR-II, FFTF, and JOYO were computed as 30.0, 32.4, and 40.6 event/million pump operating hours, respectively. Results from EBR-II indicate that there is a definite time-dependent relationship between event rates and pump age; the common event mode at EBR-II is pump binding or seizing due to the buildup of sodium deposits in the vicinity of the lower labyrinth seal. There is no indication from FFTF that the six centrifugal pumps have reached the end of their useful life; these pumps have been event free for their last 40,000 operating hours. Following a 50,000-h even-free operating period at JOYO, bearings in the secondary pumps required additional unscheduled maintenance. However, there is no indication that these pumps have entered into the wearout life period; more data are required to draw any such conclusion.

  9. Performance of a small centrifugal pump in He I and He II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludtke, P. R.; Daney, D. E.; Steward, W. G.

    1988-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a small centrifugal pump in He I and He II are determined over the temperature range of 1.6 to 4.2 K. The single-stage pump is powered by a close-coupled cryogenic induction motor. In the absence of cavitation, pump performance (head and capacity) was found to be identical for He I and He II. Developed heads up to 16 m and capacities of up to 900 liters/hr are obtained at 7000 rpm. A three-blade screw inducer was shown to require much less suction head than a six-blade propeller inducer.

  10. Blade design loads on the flow exciting force in centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Yang, A. L.; Langand, D. P.; Dai, R.

    2012-11-01

    The three-dimensional viscous flow field of two centrifugal pumps, which have the same volute, design head, design flow rate and rotational speed but the blade design load, are analyzed based on large eddy simulation. The comparisons are implemented including the hydraulic efficiencies, flow field characteristics, pressure pulsations and unsteady forces applied on the impellers to investigate the effect of the design blade load on hydraulic performance and flow exciting force. The numerical results show that the efficiency of the pump, the impeller blade of which has larger design load, is improved by 1.1%~2.9% compared to the centrifugal pump with lower blade design load. The pressure fluctuation of the pump with high design load is more remarkable. Its maximum amplitude of coefficient of static pressure is higher by 43% than the latter. At the same time the amplitude of unsteady radial force is increased by 11.6% in the time domain. The results also imply that the blade design load is an important factor on the excitation force in centrifugal pumps.

  11. Unsteady diffuser vane pressure and impeller wake measurements in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, N.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1987-01-01

    Unsteady surface pressure measurements on a vaned diffuser of a centrifugal pump, and wake measurements of the flow exiting a centrifugal impeller into a vaneless diffuser are presented. Frequency spectra and ensemble averages are given for the unsteady measurements. Two different impellers were used, the pump impeller of the HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine) and a two-dimensional impeller. The magnitude of the unsteady total pressure measured in the stationary frame at the impeller exit was found to be of the same order of magnitude as the total pressure rise across the pump. The magnitude of the unsteady diffuser vane pressures was observed to be significantly different on suction and pressure side of the vane, attaining its largest value on the suction side the leading edge while decreasing along the vane.

  12. CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping mechanism for damping vibration forces occurring during the operation of a centrifuge is described. The vibration damping mechanism comprises a plurality of nested spaced cylindrical elements surrounding the rotating shaft of the centrifuge. Some of the elements are held substantially stationary while the others are held with respect to a pair of hearings spaced along the rotating shaft. A fluid is retained about the cylindrical elements.

  13. Variations in Battery Life of a Heart—Lung Machine Using Different Pump Speeds, Pressure Loads, Boot Material, Centrifugal Pump Head, Multiple Pump Usage, and Battery Age

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Cornelius; Hargrove, Martin; O’Donnell, Aonghus; Aherne, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: Electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has previously been reported to occur in 1 of every 1500 cases. Most heart—lung machine pump consoles are equipped with built-in battery back-up units. Battery run times of these devices are variable and have not been reported. Different conditions of use can extend battery life in the event of electrical failure. This study was designed to examine the run time of a fully charged battery under various conditions of pump speed, pressure loads, pump boot material, multiple pump usage, and battery life. Battery life using a centrifugal pump also was examined. The results of this study show that battery life is affected by pump speed, circuit pressure, boot stiffness, and the number of pumps in service. Centrifugal pumps also show a reduced drain on battery when compared with roller pumps. These elements affect the longevity and performance of the battery. This information could be of value to the individual during power failure as these are variables that can affect the battery life during such a challenging scenario. PMID:16350380

  14. Successful application of horizontal multistage centrifugal pumps in lean amine service

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, M.; Goodwin, B.

    1998-12-31

    Installation of horizontal multistage centrifugal pumps in lean amine service has proven to be extremely successful and economical at Union Pacific Resources (UPR) East Texas Gas Plant (ETGP) located in Carthage, Texas. In the past, UPR used either vertical can pumps or positive displacement (PD) pumps for amine circulation in their gas treating operations. When the need to replace a PD pump in the No. 4 Amine Plant arose, UPR solicited bids from both traditional pump suppliers. Additionally, UPR solicited a bid from REDA for their Horizontal Pumping System (HPS) based on previous success of this type of pump at ETGP in salt water disposal service. Pump system cost comparisons revealed that REDA`s HPS had a cost savings of approximately 35% over the PD or vertical can pump options. In addition, the installation cost of the REDA pump showed a significant savings versus a vertical can pump. Thus UPR opted to install and evaluate the performance of the HPS in amine service. This was the first installation of a horizontal multistage pump for amine service in UPR`s gas treating plants and was also REDA`s first use of its HPS in this type of application. The first pump was installed in May 1996 and designed to circulate a maximum of 80 gpm. Since installation of the pump in No. 4 Amine Treating Unit, UPR has not experienced any downtime and has realized a significant cost savings on maintenance labor and parts over the previous positive displacement installation. The success of this HPS in amine service has led UPR to invest in five additional HPS pumps for the ETGP in amine service.

  15. Theoretical, numerical and experimental investigation of centrifugal pumps in reverse operation

    SciTech Connect

    Derakhshan, Shahram; Nourbakhsh, Ahmad

    2008-09-15

    When a pump works as a turbine, its hydraulic behavior will be changed. Several methods have been developed to predict the best efficiency of pumps running as turbines but their results are not in good coincidence with experimental data for all pumps. Therefore, study and investigation of hydraulic behavior of pumps in reverse operation can be useful. In this study, the best efficiency point of an industrial centrifugal pump running as turbine was achieved using a theoretical analysis. This method tries to estimate hydraulic components of reverse (turbine) mode using direct (pump) mode. In the next step, the pump was simulated in direct and reverse modes by computational fluid dynamics. 3D full Navier-Stokes equations were solved using FineTurbo V.7 flow solver. Using numerical results, complete characteristic curves of the pump in direct and reverse modes were obtained. For experimental verification of theoretical and numerical results, the pump was tested as a turbine in a test rig. All required parameters were measured to achieve complete characteristic curves of the reverse pump. The theoretical and numerical results were compared with experimental data and some other methods. (author)

  16. Cavitation improvement of double suction centrifugal pump HPP Fuhren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škerlavaj, A.; Titzschkau, M.; Pavlin, R.; Vehar, F.; Mežnar, P.; Lipej, A.

    2012-11-01

    A double suction storage pump has been refurbished because of the strong cavitation which resulted in cavitation damage on blade and consequently in frequent repairs of the impeller. The analyses of the old and the new impeller were done by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD), performing transient simulations with the commercial solver Ansys CFX. In the simulations, the scale-adaptive-simulation with the curvature correction (SAS-CC) turbulence model was used. No model tests were carried out. Additionally, observations with the digital camera were made through the specially designed plexi-glass window, mounted at the lid at the suction side. The predicted pump head at the operating point agrees well with the pump characteristics measurements, performed with the direct thermodynamic method. The extent of the cavitation predicted by CFD is smaller than the observed one because the cloud cavitation was not predicted. The observations of the cavitation extent show that the impeller design is better than the old one, which was also possible to anticipate based on the CFD results.

  17. Measurements of enlarged blood pump models using Laser Doppler Anemometer.

    PubMed

    Chua, L P; Yu, S C; Leo, H L

    2000-01-01

    In an earlier study (Chua et al., 1998, 1999a), a 5:1 enlarged model of the Kyoto-NTN Magnetically Suspended Centrifugal Blood Pump (Akamatsu et al., 1995) with five different impeller blade profiles was designed and constructed. Their respective flow characteristics with respect to (1) the three different blade profile designs: forward, radial, and backward, (2) the number of blades used, and (3) the rotating speed were investigated. Among the five impeller designs, the results obtained suggested that impellers A and C designs should be adopted if higher head is required. Impellers A and C therefore were selected for the flow in between their blades to be measured using Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA), so as to have a better understanding of the flow physics with respect to the design parameters. PMID:10999377

  18. Unsteady flow characteristic of low-specific-speed centrifugal pump under different flow-rate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Baoling; Chen, Desheng; Xu, Wenjing; Jin, Yingzi; Zhu, Zuchao

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the unsteady flow characteristics in centrifugal pump, the flow field in a low-specific-speed centrifugal pump with complex impeller is numerically simulated under different conditions. The RNG κ-ɛ turbulence model and sliding mesh are adopted during the process of computation. The results show that the interaction between impeller and volute results in the unstable flow of the fluid, which causes the uneven distribution of pressure fluctuations around the circumference of volute. Besides the main frequency and its multiple frequency of pressure fluctuations in the centrifugal pump, the frequency caused by the long blades of complex impeller also plays a dominant role in the low-frequency areas. Furthermore, there exists biggish fluctuation phenomenon near the tongue. The composition of static pressure fluctuations frequency on the volute wall and blade outlet is similar except that the fluctuation amplitude near the volute wall reduces. In general, the different flow rates mainly have influence on the amplitude of fluctuation frequency in the pump, while have little effect on the frequency composition.

  19. Numerical prediction and performance experiment in a deep-well centrifugal pump with different impeller outlet width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Weidong; Zhou, Ling; Lu, Weigang; Pei, Bing; Lang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    The existing research of the deep-well centrifugal pump mainly focuses on reduce the manufacturing cost and improve the pump performance, and how to combine above two aspects together is the most difficult and important topic. In this study, the performances of the deep-well centrifugal pump with four different impeller outlet widths are studied by the numerical, theoretical and experimental methods in this paper. Two stages deep-well centrifugal pump equipped with different impellers are simulated employing the commercial CFD software to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for three-dimensional incompressible steady flow. The sensitivity analyses of the grid size and turbulence model have been performed to improve numerical accuracy. The flow field distributions are acquired and compared under the design operating conditions, including the static pressure, turbulence kinetic energy and velocity. The prototype is manufactured and tested to certify the numerical predicted performance. The numerical results of pump performance are higher than the test results, but their change trends have an acceptable agreement with each other. The performance results indicted that the oversize impeller outlet width leads to poor pump performances and increasing shaft power. Changing the performance of deep-well centrifugal pump by alter impeller outlet width is practicable and convenient, which is worth popularizing in the engineering application. The proposed research enhances the theoretical basis of pump design to improve the performance and reduce the manufacturing cost of deep-well centrifugal pump.

  20. Centrifugal and Axial Pump Design and Off-Design Performance Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    1995-01-01

    A meanline pump-flow modeling method has been developed to provide a fast capability for modeling pumps of cryogenic rocket engines. Based on this method, a meanline pump-flow code PUMPA was written that can predict the performance of pumps at off-design operating conditions, given the loss of the diffusion system at the design point. The design-point rotor efficiency and slip factors are obtained from empirical correlations to rotor-specific speed and geometry. The pump code can model axial, inducer, mixed-flow, and centrifugal pumps and can model multistage pumps in series. The rapid input setup and computer run time for this meanline pump flow code make it an effective analysis and conceptual design tool. The map-generation capabilities of the code provide the information needed for interfacing with a rocket engine system modeling code. The off-design and multistage modeling capabilities of PUMPA permit the user to do parametric design space exploration of candidate pump configurations and to provide head-flow maps for engine system evaluation.

  1. Investigation on impeller radial force for double-suction centrifugal pump with staggered blade arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. C.; Wang, F. J.; Yao, Z. F.; Leng, H. F.; Zhou, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    In order to find the effects of blade arrangement on impeller radial force, a double-suction centrifugal pump with two impeller configurations is investigated by using CFD approach. The two impeller have same geometry, same blade number, and different blade arrangement. One is staggered impeller in which the blades are arranged with half of blade phase angle staggered in circular direction, another is traditional symmetrical impeller with symmetrical blade arrangement. Results show that the radial force vector diagram for symmetrical impeller is a hexagonal, while it is nearly a circle for staggered impeller. The staggered impeller results no radial force saltation which exists in symmetrical impeller. The blade passing frequency dominates the radial force fluctuation in symmetrical impeller, while this frequency is almost not existed in staggered impeller. The results indicate that staggered blade arrangement can significantly reduce radial force fluctuation in double-suction centrifugal pump.

  2. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Cavitating Characteristics in Centrifugal Pump with Gap Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bing; Chen, Hongxun; Wei, Qun

    2014-06-01

    This paper is to study the cavitating characteristics in a low specific speed centrifugal pump with gap structure impeller experimentally and numerically. A scalable DES numerical method is proposed and developed by introducing the von Karman scale instead of the local grid scale, which can switch at the RANS and LES region interface smoothly and reasonably. The SDES method can detect and grasp unsteady scale flow structures, which were proved by the flow around a triangular prism and the cavitation flow in a centrifugal pump. Through numerical and experimental research, it's shown that the simulated results match qualitatively with tested cavitation performances and visualization patterns, and we can conclude that the gap structure impeller has a superior feature of cavitation suppression. Its mechanism may be the guiding flow feature of the small vice blade and the pressure auto-balance effect of the gap tunnel.

  3. Effect of fluid forces on rotor stability of centrifugal compressors and pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colding-Jorgensen, J.

    1980-01-01

    A simple two dimensional model for calculating the rotordynamic effects of the impeller force in centrifugal compressors and pumps is presented. It is based on potential flow theory with singularities. Equivalent stiffness and damping coefficients are calculated for a machine with a vaneless volute formed as a logarithmic spiral. It is shown that for certain operating conditions, the impeller force has a destablizing effect on the rotor.

  4. A theoretical relationship between NPSH and erosion rate for a centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, R.D.; Sreedhar, B.K.

    1994-12-31

    Cavitation in turbomachines adversely affects not only the performance of the machine but is also detrimental to equipment life. The practice of ensuring NPSH{sub av} > NPSH{sub 3%} does not eliminate cavitation erosion as cavitation inception is found to occur at much higher values of the available NPSH. This paper attempts to develop a theoretical relationship between the erosion rate and NPSH for a centrifugal pump as this can be of immense value in correlating the maximum erosion rate NPSH with NPSH{sub 3%}. This is pertinent for liquid metal fast breeder reactor pumping systems.

  5. Experimental investigation of rotor-stator interaction in a centrifugal pump with several vaned diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, N.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    Steady and unsteady diffuser vane pressure measurements have been conducted with a two-dimensional test impeller, in an experimental investigation of rotor-stator interaction within a centrifugal pump having several vaned diffusers, under conditions of different flow coefficients and different radial gaps between the impeller blade trailing edge and the diffuser vane leading edge. The largest pressure fluctuations on the diffuser vanes and the impeller blades were found to be of the same order of magnitude as the total pressure rise across the pump. Increasing the number of diffuser vanes was found to result in a significant decrease of impeller blade pressure fluctuations.

  6. Generation and control of pressure pulsations emitted from centrifugal pumps: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Rzentkowski, G.

    1996-12-01

    Pressure pulsations emitted by centrifugal pumps may strongly interact with a piping system, leading to excessive vibration and alternating stresses beyond endurance limits. Several cases of this nature were reported, especially in chemical, petro-chemical and power generation industries, causing costly repairs and loss of power. In the past, research attention was primary focused on corrective actions involving the design and installation of piping elements to absorb acoustic energy emitted by pumps. Currently, more emphasis is placed on developing analytical tools to predict piping system acoustics and avoid undesirable resonance effects. Little attention has been directed towards preventive actions, leading to a better understanding of pumps as an acoustic source. This paper provides an overview of the underlying excitation mechanisms and modelling techniques, and explores the role of pump design parameters in controlling pressure pulsations. The application here is to primary heat transport system of CANDU reactor.

  7. Cavitation characteristics of a small centrifugal pump in He I and He II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludtke, P. R.; Daney, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    The cavitation characteristics of a small preinduced centrifugal pump operating in He I and He II over the temperature range 1.8-4.2 K are presented. The pump and close-coupled induction motor operate immersed in liquid helium. A six-blade propeller inducer and a three-blade screw inducer were both tested. With this pump configuration using either inducer, there is a tremendous difference between the cavitation characteristics of He I and He II. The net positive suction head requirements for this pump with the screw inducer could not be determined for He I, but it is less than -100 mm and, depending on flow rate, ranges between 35 and 165 mm for He II.

  8. A 2.5D Single Passage CFD Model for Centrifugal Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura S.; Ding, W.; Yano, K.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the single passage model based on CFD to analyze the flow in blade passages of a centrifugal pump. The model consists of the flow passage between two impeller blades and the spaces in the inlet eye as well as in the volute. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the conservation form are solved by a finite difference method. The code is designed to investigate the velocity and pressure distributions and intended to investigate how the pump design affects fluid flow through the rotor as well as the pump performance. An early part of the paper investigates the behavior of the model as well as validity of the assumptions made in the model. Then, applications to a rotodynamic heart pump are presented.

  9. Influence of blade outlet angle on performance of low-specific-speed centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Baoling; Wang, Canfei; Zhu, Zuchao; Jin, Yingzi

    2013-04-01

    In order to analyze the influence of blade outlet angle on inner flow field and performance of low-specific-speed centrifugal pump, the flow field in the pump with different blade outlet angles 32.5° and 39° was numerically calculated. The external performance experiment was also carried out on the pump. Based on SIMPLEC algorithm, time-average N-S equation and the rectified k-ɛ turbulent model were adopted during the process of computation. The distributions of velocity and pressure in pumps with different blade outlet angles were obtained by calculation. The numerical results show that backflow areas exist in the two impellers, while the inner flow has a little improvement in the impeller with larger blade outlet angle. Blade outlet angle has a certain influence on the static pressure near the long-blade leading edge and tongue, but it has little influence on the distribution of static pressure in the passages of impeller. The experiment results show that the low-specific-speed centrifugal pump with larger blade outlet angle has better hydraulic performance.

  10. Dynamic stress analysis of sewage centrifugal pump impeller based on two-way coupling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ji; Yuan, Shouqi; Yuan, Jianping

    2014-03-01

    Current research on the operational reliability of centrifugal pumps has mainly focused on hydrodynamic instability. However, the interaction between the fluid and structure has not been sufficiently considered; this interaction can cause vibration and dynamic stress, which can affect the reliability. In this study, the dynamic stresses in a single-blade centrifugal pump impeller are analysed under different operating conditions; the two-way coupling method is used to calculate the fluid-structure interaction. Three-dimensional unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved with the SST k-ω turbulence model for the fluid in the whole flow passage, while transient structure dynamic analysis is used with the finite element method for the structure side. The dynamic stresses in the rotor system are computed according to the fourth strength theory. The stress results show that the highest stress is near the loose bearing and that the equivalent stress increases with the flow rate because the dynamic stresses are closely related to the pressure load. The stress distributions on the blade pressure side, suction side, leading edge, and trailing edge are each analysed for different flow rates; the highest stress distribution is found on the pressure side. On the blade pressure side, a relatively large stress is found near the trailing edge and hub side. Based on these results, a stress distribution prediction method is proposed for centrifugal pumps, which considers the interaction between the fluid and structure. The method can be used to check the dynamic stress at different flow rates when optimising the pump design to increase the pump reliability.

  11. Fluid seals development for coal liquefaction slurry pumps. Quarterly technical progress report No. 10, 1 January 1985-31 March 1985. [Reciprocating and centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Burcham, R.E.

    1985-04-22

    This quarterly progress report covers the work performed during the period January 1, 1985 to March 31, 1985 on the Fluid Seals Development for Coal Liquefaction Slurry Pumps Program. The work was sponsored by the Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Technology Center, to develop technology for hydrostatic fluid seals to be used in coal slurry centrifugal and reciprocating pumps. The scope of the program consists of the following tasks: (1) Task 1A, survey of current practices for centrifugal and reciprocating coal slurry pump seals; (2) Task 1B, preliminary evaluation of three alternative centrifugal and reciprocating fluid seal concepts; (3) Task 2, detail evaluation of the best two centrifugal and reciprocating fluid seal concepts; (4) Task 3A, design and fabrication of the selected centrifugal and reciprocating fluid seal concept, design and fabrication of the centrifugal and reciprocating seal testers; (5) Task 3B, laboratory seal testing of the centrifugal and reciprocating fluid seals; (6) Task 4, field testing of the centrifugal and reciprocating fluid seals. Tasks 1, 2, 3A, and 3B have been completed. Task 4 is pending Department of Energy approval. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Quality evaluation of energy consumed in flow regulation method by speed variation in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, S.; Culman, M.; Acevedo, C.; Rey, C.

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, energy efficiency and the Electric Power Quality are two inseparable issues in the evaluation of three-phase induction motors, framed within the program of Rational and Efficient Use of Energy (RUE).The use of efficient energy saving devices has been increasing significantly in RUE programs, for example the use of variable frequency drives (VFD) in pumping systems.The overall objective of the project was to evaluate the impact on power quality and energy efficiency in a centrifugal pump driven by an induction three-phase motor, using the flow control method of speed variation by VFD. The fundamental purpose was to test the opinions continuously heard about the use of flow control methods in centrifugal pumps, analyzing the advantages and disadvantages that have been formulated deliberately in order to offer support to the industry in taking correct decisions. The VFD changes the speed of the motor-pump system increasing efficiency compared to the classical methods of regulation. However, the VFD originates conditions that degrade the quality of the electric power supplied to the system and therefore its efficiency, due to the nonlinearity and presence of harmonic currents. It was possible to analyze the power quality, ensuring that the information that comes to the industry is generally biased.

  13. Improved Outcome of Cardiac Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Infants and Children Using Magnetic Levitation Centrifugal Pumps.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Giovanni Battista; Hoxha, Stiljan; Torre, Salvatore; Rungatscher, Alessio; Menon, Tiziano; Barozzi, Luca; Faggian, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has traditionally been and, for the most part, still is being performed using roller pumps. Use of first-generation centrifugal pumps has yielded controversial outcomes, perhaps due to mechanical properties of the same and the ensuing risk of hemolysis and renal morbidity. Latest-generation centrifugal pumps, using magnetic levitation (ML), exhibit mechanical properties which may have overcome limitations of first-generation devices. This retrospective study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of veno-arterial (V-A) ECMO for cardiac indications in neonates, infants, and children, using standard (SP) and latest-generation ML centrifugal pumps. Between 2002 and 2014, 33 consecutive neonates, infants, and young children were supported using V-A ECMO for cardiac indications. There were 21 males and 12 females, with median age of 29 days (4 days-5 years) and a median body weight of 3.2 kg (1.9-18 kg). Indication for V-A ECMO were acute circulatory collapse in ICU or ward after cardiac repair in 16 (49%) patients, failure to wean after repair of complex congenital heart disease in 9 (27%), fulminant myocarditis in 4 (12%), preoperative sepsis in 2 (6%), and refractory tachy-arrhythmias in 2 (6%). Central cannulation was used in 27 (81%) patients and peripheral in 6. Seven (21%) patients were supported with SP and 26 (79%) with ML centrifugal pumps. Median duration of support was 82 h (range 24-672 h), with 26 (79%) patients weaned from support. Three patients required a second ECMO run but died on support. Seventeen (51%) patients required peritoneal dialysis for acute renal failure. Overall survival to discharge was 39% (13/33 patients). All patients with fulminant myocarditis and with refractory arrhythmias were weaned, and five (83%) survived, whereas no patient supported for sepsis survived. Risk factors for hospital mortality included lower (<2.5 kg) body weight (P = 0.02) and rescue ECMO after cardiac

  14. Experimental measurements of hydrodynamic radial forces and stiffness matrices for a centrifugal pump-impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamieh, D. S.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the steady-state hydrodynamic forces on a centrifugal pump impeller are presented as a function of position within two geometrically different volutes. These correspond to the forces experienced by the impeller at zero whirl frequency. The hydrodynamic force matrices derived from these measurements exhibit both diagonal and off-diagonal terms of substantial magnitude. These terms are of the form which would tend to excite a whirl motion in a rotordynamic analysis of the pump; this may be the cause of 'rough running' reported in many pumps. Static pressure measurements in the impeller discharge flow show that the hydrodynamic force on the impeller contains a substantial component due to the nonisotropy of the net momentum flux leaving the impeller. A similar breakdown of the contributions to the stiffness matrices reveals that the major component of these matrices results from the nonisotropy of the momentum flux.

  15. Numerical investigation of unsteady turbulent flow in a centrifugal pump at partial load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, T.; Baoshan, Z.; ShuLiang, C.; Yuchuan, W.; Xuhe, W.

    2014-03-01

    The unsteady non-cavitation and cavitation turbulent flows in a centrifugal pump at partial load condition are numerically investigated by CFX 13.0. The numerical framework employs the combination of RNG k-ε turbulence model and transport equation cavitation model, in which the effects of compressibility of fluid on cavitation region and pressure fluctuation on saturation pressure are both taken into consideration. The good agreement between the numerical and experimental values validates that the numerical framework can accurately predict the turbulent flows in the centrifugal pump. The complex flow characteristics in impeller at non-cavitation and cavitation conditions are revealed. For the noncavitation flow, the dominant frequencies of pressure fluctuation of monitoring points in impeller are all the Impeller Rotation Frequency 24.17Hz. The maximum value of pressure fluctuation on the blade pressure side appears at the 0.8 chord length from the blade leading edge due to a clockwise rotating vortex, which incepts, develops and disappears when the corresponding blade passes through the volute tongue. The dominant frequencies of pressure fluctuation of monitoring points in volute are the Blade Pass Frequency 145 Hz or twice of it. The maximum value of pressure fluctuation in the volute appears near the tongue region, where the flow fields are uneven with strong second flow in the cross section. For the cavitation flow, as the cavitation develops at the blade leading edge, the turbulent flows in the impeller are greatly influenced by the bubble shedding and collapse. The maximum values of pressure fluctuation in impeller increase with the development of cavitation, and reach the largest magnification of about 2.0 in comparison to the non-cavitation flow when the pressure at the pump inlet is very low. The complicated phenomenon of unsteady turbulent flow in a centrifugal pump indicates that the vortex has great influence on the flow pattern.

  16. Application of Drag-Reducing Polymer Solutions as Test Fluids for In Vitro Evaluation of Potential Blood Damage in Blood Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Amanda R.; Sobajima, Hideo; Olia, Salim E.; Takatani, Setsuo; Kameneva, Marina V.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro evaluation of the potential of a circulatory-assist device to damage blood cells has generally been performed using blood from various species. Problems with this approach include the variability of blood sensitivity to mechanical stress in different species, preparation of blood including the adjustment of hematocrit to a standard value, changes in the mechanical properties of blood that occur during storage, and necessity to pool blood samples to obtain an adequate amount of blood for in vitro circulating systems. We investigated whether the mechanical degradation of a drag-reducing polymer (DRP) solution resulting in the loss of drag-reducing ability can indicate the degree of shear-induced blood damage within blood pumps. DRP solution (polyethylene oxide, 4,500 kDa, 1,000 ppm) or porcine blood were driven through a turbulent flow system by a centrifugal pump, either the Bio-Pump BPX-80 (Medtronic, Inc.) or CentriMag (Levitronix LLC) at a constant pressure gradient of 300 mm Hg for 120 minutes. DRP mechanical degradation was evaluated by reduction of flow rate and solution viscosity. A proposed index of DRP mechanical degradation (PDI) is similar to the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) typically used to quantify the results of in vitro testing of blood pumps. Results indicate that the mechanical degradation of DRP solutions may provide a sensitive standard method for the evaluation of potential blood trauma produced by blood pumps without the use of blood. PMID:20019596

  17. New mechanism to reduce the size of the monopivot magnetic suspension blood pump: direct drive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Nishida, M; Kijima, T; Maekawa, J

    1997-07-01

    Size reduction of the monopivot magnetic suspension blood pump has been achieved by reducing the size of the magnetic suspension and employing a direct drive mechanism in place of a brushless DC motor and a magnetic coupling. The flow has also been improved using a closed hollow impeller to remove flow obstruction at the inlet and using radial straight vanes to reduce the impeller speed by 30%. Hemolysis testing was conducted for the new models. Results showed that model DD1 presented only a slightly higher level of hemolysis than a regular extracorporeal centrifugal pump. PMID:9212927

  18. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of blade tip clearances on hemodynamic performance and blood damage in a centrifugal ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingchun; Paden, Bradley E; Borovetz, Harvey S; Antaki, James F

    2010-05-01

    An important challenge facing the design of turbodynamic ventricular assist devices (VADs) intended for long-term support is the optimization of the flow path geometry to maximize hydraulic performance while minimizing shear-stress-induced hemolysis and thrombosis. For unshrouded centrifugal, mixed-flow and axial-flow blood pumps, the complex flow patterns within the blade tip clearance between the lengthwise upper surface of the rotating impeller blades and the stationary pump housing have a dramatic effect on both the hydrodynamic performance and the blood damage production. Detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were performed in this study to investigate such flow behavior in blade tip clearance region for a centrifugal blood pump representing a scaled-up version of a prototype pediatric VAD. Nominal flow conditions were analyzed at a flow rate of 2.5 L/min and rotor speed of 3000 rpm with three blade tip clearances of 50, 100, and 200 microm. CFD simulations predicted a decrease in the averaged tip leakage flow rate and an increase in pump head and axial thrust with decreasing blade tip clearances from 200 to 50 microm. The predicted hemolysis, however, exhibited a unimodal relationship, having a minimum at 100 microm compared to 50 microm and 200 microm. Experimental data corroborate these predictions. Detailed flow patterns observed in this study revealed interesting fluid dynamic features associated with the blade tip clearances, such as the generation and dissipation of tip leakage vortex and its interaction with the primary flow in the blade-blade passages. Quantitative calculations suggested the existence of an optimal blade tip clearance by which hydraulic efficiency can be maximized and hemolysis minimized. PMID:19832736

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Blade Tip Clearances on Hemodynamic Performance and Blood Damage in a Centrifugal Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingchun; Paden, Bradley E.; Borovetz, Harvey S.; Antaki, James F.

    2011-01-01

    An important challenge facing the design of turbodynamic ventricular assist devices (VADs) intended for long-term support is the optimization of the flow path geometry to maximize hydraulic performance while minimizing shear-stress-induced hemolysis and thrombosis. For unshrouded centrifugal, mixed-flow and axial-flow blood pumps, the complex flow patterns within the blade tip clearance between the lengthwise upper surface of the rotating impeller blades and the stationary pump housing have a dramatic effect on both the hydrodynamic performance and the blood damage production. Detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were performed in this study to investigate such flow behavior in blade tip clearance region for a centrifugal blood pump representing a scaled-up version of a prototype pediatric VAD. Nominal flow conditions were analyzed at a flow rate of 2.5 L/min and rotor speed of 3000 rpm with three blade tip clearances of 50, 100, and 200 μm. CFD simulations predicted a decrease in the averaged tip leakage flow rate and an increase in pump head and axial thrust with decreasing blade tip clearances from 200 to 50 μm. The predicted hemolysis, however, exhibited a unimodal relationship, having a minimum at 100 μm compared to 50 μm and 200 μm. Experimental data corroborate these predictions. Detailed flow patterns observed in this study revealed interesting fluid dynamic features associated with the blade tip clearances, such as the generation and dissipation of tip leakage vortex and its interaction with the primary flow in the blade-blade passages. Quantitative calculations suggested the existence of an optimal blade tip clearance by which hydraulic efficiency can be maximized and hemolysis minimized. PMID:19832736

  20. Accuracy details in realistic CFD modeling of an industrial centrifugal pump in direct and reverse modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páscoa, J. C.; Silva, F. J.; Pinheiro, J. S.; Martins, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Numerical computation of the flowfield inside a pump is herein used as a numerical laboratory, subject to the limitations of modeling assumptions and to experimental verification. A numerical computation of the flow inside a real industrial centrifugal pump is performed that includes a very sophisticated geometry. Conversely to other computations, in this test case no simplification of the geometry was introduced. Numerical computations are obtained using Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. A detailed analysis of the turbulent flowstructure is performed for the design point and two off design conditions. Additional computations were performed in order to compare the numerical and experimental pump characteristics; these were obtained under normalized testing conditions. Further computations are presented for the pump working in reverse turbine mode (PAT). Detailed analyses of the flow allow a comparison of the internal flow losses when the pump is operating in direct and reverse mode. This is also useful to help in the selection of an adequate pump geometry that can work in both modes with best efficiency.

  1. Centrifugal slurry pump wear and hydraulic studies. Phase II report. Experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, D.; Cooper, P.; Biswas, C.; Sloteman, D.; Onuschak, A.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the work performed by Ingersoll-Rand Research, Inc., under Phase II, Experimental Studies for the contract entitled, Centrifugal Slurry Pump Wear and Hydraulic Studies. This work was carried out for the US Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC-82PC50035. The basic development approach pursued this phase is presented, followed by a discussion on wear relationships. The analysis, which resulted in the development of a mathematical wear model relating pump life to some of the key design and operating parameters, is presented. The results, observations, and conclusions of the experimental investigation on small scale pumps that led to the selected design features for the prototype pump are discussed. The material investigation was performed at IRRI, ORNL and Battelle. The rationale for selecting the materials for testing, the test methods and apparatus used, and the results obtained are presented followed by a discussion on materials for a prototype pump. In addition, the prototype pump test facility description, as well as the related design and equipment details, are presented. 20 references, 53 figures, 13 tables.

  2. Transient Stress- and Strain-Based Hemolysis Estimation in a Simplified Blood Pump

    PubMed Central

    Pauli, L.; Nam, J.; Pasquali, M.; Behr, M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We compare two approaches to numerical estimation of mechanical hemolysis in a simplified blood pump model. The stress-based model relies on the instantaneous shear stress in the blood flow, whereas the strain-based model uses an additional tensor equation to relate distortion of red blood cells to a shear stress measure. We use the newly proposed least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) to prevent negative concentration fields and show a stable and volume preserving LSFEM for the tensor equation. Application of both models to a simplified centrifugal blood pump at three different operating conditions show that the stress-based model overestimates the rate of hemolysis. The strain-based model is found to deliver lower hemolysis rates since it incorporates a more detailed description of biophysical phenomena into the simulation process. PMID:23922311

  3. Transient stress-based and strain-based hemolysis estimation in a simplified blood pump.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Lutz; Nam, Jaewook; Pasquali, Matteo; Behr, Marek

    2013-10-01

    We compare two approaches to numerical estimation of mechanical hemolysis in a simplified blood pump model. The stress-based model relies on the instantaneous shear stress in the blood flow, whereas the strain-based model uses an additional tensor equation to relate distortion of red blood cells to a shear stress measure. We use the newly proposed least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) to prevent negative concentration fields and show a stable and volume preserving LSFEM for the tensor equation. Application of both models to a simplified centrifugal blood pump at three different operating conditions shows that the stress-based model overestimates the rate of hemolysis. The strain-based model is found to deliver lower hemolysis rates because it incorporates a more detailed description of biophysical phenomena into the simulation process. PMID:23922311

  4. Research on the characteristics of quasi-steady cavitation in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. X.; Yuan, S. Q.; Li, X. J.; Si, Q. R.; Luo, Y.

    2015-01-01

    With the pressure decreasing, the process of cavitation in a centrifugal pump could be summarized as incipient cavitation, quasi-steady cavitation and unsteady cavitation. Quasi-steady cavitation is the condition that is between the incipient cavitation and unsteady cavitation in a centrifugal pump. Under this condition, the intensity of cavitation is relatively weak, and the head of the pump almost remains unchanged, but the cavitation exists, causing damage to the impeller by pitting and erosion. So it is important to investigate the quasi-steady cavitation. In this paper, both the numerical and experimental methods had been carried out to investigate the characteristics of quasi-steady cavitation. The internal flow in the pump, the performance of cavitation and the inlet and outlet pressure pulsation of the pump measured through experimental method have been studied under different NPSHa conditions. It was found that the head decreases about 0.77%-1.38% from non-cavitation condition and it could be regarded as the quasi-steady cavitation. Little change has been found from the internal flow between non-cavitation condition and quasi-steady cavitation condition. The period of inlet pressure pulsation changes from the time that the blade passes by to the period of shaft rotating with the development of cavitation. The dominant frequency of the inlet pressure pulsation is two times of shaft frequency whose amplitudes decrease firstly and then increase to a peak value, followed by a decrease to a low value in quasi-steady cavitation conditions. The dominant frequency of the outlet pressure pulsation is blade passing frequency whose amplitudes increase firstly and then decrease gradually with the decrease of NPSHa.

  5. Numerical performance evaluation of design modifications on a centrifugal pump impeller running in reverse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassanos, Ioannis; Chrysovergis, Marios; Anagnostopoulos, John; Papantonis, Dimitris; Charalampopoulos, George

    2016-06-01

    In this paper the effect of impeller design variations on the performance of a centrifugal pump running as turbine is presented. Numerical simulations were performed after introducing various modifications in the design for various operating conditions. Specifically, the effects of the inlet edge shape, the meridional channel width, the number of blades and the addition of splitter blades on impeller performance was investigated. The results showed that, an increase in efficiency can be achieved by increasing the number of blades and by introducing splitter blades.

  6. The rotordynamic forces on a centrifugal pump impeller in the presence of cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, R.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    Fluid-induced rotordynamic forces on a centrifugal pump impeller whirling along a trajectory eccentric to its undeflected position in the presence of cavitation were measured using the experimental facility described by Jery (1987). The force measured is a combination of a steady radial force due to the volute asymmetries and an unsteady force due to the eccentric motion of the rotor. It was found that, compared to the noncavitation condition, a cavitation corresponding to a head loss of 3 percent had little effect upon the unsteady force. However, a lesser degree of cavitation at the design point, was found to increase the destabilizing force for a particular set of whirl ratios.

  7. Modeling erosion in a centrifugal pump in an Eulerian-Lagrangian frame using OpenFOAM®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Alejandro; Stickland, Matthew; Dempster, William

    2015-07-01

    Erosion induced by solid particle impingement is a very commonwear mechanism in turbomachinery and Computational Fluid Dynamics is one of the most widely used tools for its prediction. In this article, erosion is modeled in one of the channels of a centrifugal pump using OpenFOAM®,which is an Open Source CFD package. A review of some of the most commonly used erosion models is carried out in an Eulerian-Lagrangian frame along with a comparative study of the erosion rates obtained with each model. Results yielded some disparities between models due to the different factors taken into consideration. The mesh is then deformed to obtain the resulting eroded geometry.

  8. Blood Pump Having a Magnetically Suspended Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antaki, James F. (Inventor); Paden, Bradley (Inventor); Burgreen, Gregory (Inventor); Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A blood pump preferably has a magnetically suspended rotor that rotates within a housing. The rotor may rotate about a stator disposed within the housing. Radial magnetic bearings may be defined within the stator and the rotor in order to suspend the rotor. The radial magnetic bearings may be passive magnetic bearings that include permanent magnets disposed within the stator and the rotor or active magnetic bearings. The pump may further include an axial magnetic bearing that may be either a passive or an active magnetic bearing. A motor that drives the rotor may be disposed within the housing in order to more easily dissipate heat generated by the motor. A primary flow path is defined between the rotor and the stator, and a secondary flow path is defined between the stator and the rotor. Preferably, a substantial majority of blood passes through the primary flow path. The secondary flow path is large enough so that it provides adequate flushing of the secondary flow path while being small enough to permit efficient operation of the radial magnet bearings across the secondary flow path.

  9. Blood Pump Having a Magnetically Suspended Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antaki, James F. (Inventor); Paden, Bradley (Inventor); Burgreen, Gregory (Inventor); Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A blood pump preferably has a magnetically suspended rotor that rotates within a housing. The rotor may rotate about a stator disposed within the housing. Radial magnetic bearings may be defined within the stator and the rotor in order to suspend the rotor. The radial magnetic bearings may be passive magnetic bearings that include permanent magnets disposed within the stator and the rotor or active magnetic bearings. The pump may further include an axial magnetic bearing that may be either a passive or an active magnetic bearing. A motor that drives the rotor may be disposed within the housing in order to more easily dissipate heat generated by the motor. A primary flow path is defined between the rotor and the stator, and a secondary flow path is defined between the stator and the rotor. Preferably, a substantial majority of blood passes through the primary flow path. The secondary flow path is large enough so that it provides adequate flushing of the secondary flow path while being small enough to permit efficient operation of the radial magnet bearings across the secondary flow path.

  10. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the axial and radial force of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W. G.; Y He, M.; Qi, C. X.; Li, Y. B.

    2013-12-01

    Varying of the wear-ring clearance not only has a distinct effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump including the axial and radial forces. Comparing with the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some special advantages, such as the low cost, fast and high efficiency, and convenient to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study in recent years. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the force performance of the centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump with three variable styles of the wear-rings was simulated: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Comparing with the experiment, numerical results show a good agreement. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the axial force of the centrifugal pump, while has tiny effect on the radial force for all the conditions.

  11. Numerical investigation of the effects of splitter blades on the cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Yuan, S. Q.; Zhang, J. F.; Feng, Y. N.; Lu, J. X.

    2014-03-01

    For the centrifugal pump, additional splitter blades are sometimes necessary in order to improve the head and efficiency. On the other hand, the additional splitter blades will have effect on the cavitation performance due to the changes at the impeller inlet channel. In order to investigate this influence, three impeller schemes were proposed based on a model pump IS50-32-160, one without splitter blades and another two with splitter blades of different inlet diameters. Numerical simulations were carried out to investigate the characteristics of internal flow and the pump cavitation performances at different NPSHA with the CFD technique. The results show that the additional splitter blades will have some positive effect on the pump cavitation performance if the inlet diameter of the splitter blade is properly selected. The reason behind such improvement is that it helps to avoid the flow blocking at the impeller inlet and the vortex cavitation inside the blade passages effectively. For the pump model under our investigation, the cavitation performance reaches its best when the inlet diameter of the splitter blade is 0.725D2.

  12. Installation and Test of a Helium Centrifugal Pump into the TOSKA Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, G. R.; Dittrich, G.; Lietzow, R.; Meyer, I.; Specht, E.; Süßer, M.

    2006-04-01

    Up to now He piston pumps were used in the TOSKA facility of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe for circulating supercritical He in a secondary cooling loop. The performance of these pumps was a mass flow rate up to 150 g/s each, a pressure head of up to 0.3 MPa and an operation in the temperature range between 1.8 K and 5 K. For redundancy reasons, a centrifugal pump, developed by industry, was installed in an extension of the control cryostat, integrated into the existing cooling system, and tested in 2004. During the first tests, large oscillations and a huge heat input to the cooling circuit prevented operation of the pump. After some modifications by the supplying company, the pump was tested again with very promising test results. The results are in very good agreement with the predictions of the supplier. Details of the installation, the integration into the cooling system as well as the operational experience and test results will be outlined.

  13. Feasibility of the optical imaging of thrombus formation in a rotary blood pump by near-infrared light.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu

    2014-09-01

    Blood coagulation is one of the primary concerns when using mechanical circulatory support devices such as blood pumps. Noninvasive detection and imaging of thrombus formation is useful not only for the development of more hemocompatible devices but also for the management of blood coagulation to avoid risk of infarction. The objective of this study is to investigate the use of near-infrared light for imaging of thrombus formation in a rotary blood pump. The optical properties of a thrombus at wavelengths ranging from 600 to 750 nm were analyzed using a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) system. A specially designed hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a visible bottom area was used. In vitro antithrombogenic testing was conducted five times with the pump using bovine whole blood in which the activated blood clotting time was adjusted to 200 s prior to the experiment. Two halogen lights were used for the light sources. The forward scattering through the pump and backward scattering on the pump bottom area were imaged using the HSI system. HSI showed an increase in forward scattering at wavelengths ranging from 670 to 750 nm in the location of thrombus formation. The time at which the thrombus began to form in the impeller rotating at 2780 rpm could be detected. The spectral difference between the whole blood and the thrombus was utilized to image thrombus formation. The results indicate the feasibility of dynamically detecting and imaging thrombus formation in a rotary blood pump. PMID:25234757

  14. The effect of inlet swirl on the dynamics of long annular seals in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, M.; Brown, R. D.; France, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes additional results from a continuing research program which aims to identify the dynamics of long annular seals in centrifugal pumps. A seal test rig designed at Heriot-Watt University and commissioned at Weir Pumps Research Laboratory in Alloa permits the identification of mass, stiffness, and damping coefficients using a least-squares technique based on the singular value decomposition method. The analysis is carried out in the time domain using a multi-fiequency forcing function. The experimental method relies on the forced excitation of a flexibly supported stator by two hydraulic shakers. Running through the stator embodying two symmetrical balance drum seals is a rigid rotor supported in rolling element bearings. The only physical connection between shaft and stator is the pair of annular gaps filled with pressurized water discharged axially. The experimental coefficients obtained from the tests are compared with theoretical values.

  15. The effect of inlet swirl on the rotordynamic shroud forces in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, A.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.; Caughey, T. K.

    1992-06-01

    The role played by fluid forces in determining the rotordynamic stability of a centrifugal pump is gaining increasing attention. The present research investigates the contributions to the rotordynamic forces from the discharge-to-suction leakage flows between the front shroud of the rotating impeller and the stationary pump casing. In particular, the dependency of the rotordynamic characteristics of leakage flows on the swirl at the inlet to the leakage path was examined. An inlet guide vane was designed for the experiment so that swirl could be introduced at the leakage flow inlet. The data demonstrates substantial rotordynamic effects and a destabilizing tangential force for small positive whirl ratios; this force decreased with increasing flow rate. The effect of swirl on the rotordynamic forces was found to be destabilizing.

  16. The effect of inlet swirl on the rotordynamic shroud forces in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginzburg, A.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.; Caughey, T. K.

    1992-01-01

    The role played by fluid forces in determining the rotordynamic stability of a centrifugal pump is gaining increasing attention. The present research investigates the contributions to the rotordynamic forces from the discharge-to-suction leakage flows between the front shroud of the rotating impeller and the stationary pump casing. In particular, the dependency of the rotordynamic characteristics of leakage flows on the swirl at the inlet to the leakage path was examined. An inlet guide vane was designed for the experiment so that swirl could be introduced at the leakage flow inlet. The data demonstrates substantial rotordynamic effects and a destabilizing tangential force for small positive whirl ratios; this force decreased with increasing flow rate. The effect of swirl on the rotordynamic forces was found to be destabilizing.

  17. Development of a pump flow estimator for rotary blood pumps to enhance monitoring of ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Granegger, Marcus; Moscato, Francesco; Casas, Fernando; Wieselthaler, Georg; Schima, Heinrich

    2012-08-01

    Estimation of instantaneous flow in rotary blood pumps (RBPs) is important for monitoring the interaction between heart and pump and eventually the ventricular function. Our group has reported an algorithm to derive ventricular contractility based on the maximum time derivative (dQ/dt(max) as a substitute for ventricular dP/dt(max) ) and pulsatility of measured flow signals. However, in RBPs used clinically, flow is estimated with a bandwidth too low to determine dQ/dt(max) in the case of improving heart function. The aim of this study was to develop a flow estimator for a centrifugal pump with bandwidth sufficient to provide noninvasive cardiac diagnostics. The new estimator is based on both static and dynamic properties of the brushless DC motor. An in vitro setup was employed to identify the performance of pump and motor up to 20 Hz. The algorithm was validated using physiological ventricular and arterial pressure waveforms in a mock loop which simulated different contractilities (dP/dt(max) 600 to 2300 mm Hg/s), pump speeds (2 to 4 krpm), and fluid viscosities (2 to 4 mPa·s). The mathematically estimated pump flow data were then compared to the datasets measured in the mock loop for different variable combinations (flow ranging from 2.5 to 7 L/min, pulsatility from 3.5 to 6 L/min, dQ/dt(max) from 15 to 60 L/min/s). Transfer function analysis showed that the developed algorithm could estimate the flow waveform with a bandwidth up to 15 Hz (±2 dB). The mean difference between the estimated and measured average flows was +0.06 ± 0.31 L/min and for the flow pulsatilities -0.27 ± 0.2 L/min. Detection of dQ/dt(max) was possible up to a dP/dt(max) level of 2300 mm Hg/s. In conclusion, a flow estimator with sufficient frequency bandwidth and accuracy to allow determination of changes in ventricular contractility even in the case of improving heart function was developed. PMID:22882439

  18. Numerical simulation of cavitation effects influenced by centrifugal pump inlet parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L. F.; Wang, Y.; Ning, C.; Liu, Z. C.; Zhu, Z. T.; Xie, S. F.

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation has great influence on performance of the centrifugal pump. However, there is still no effective design to overcome this problem. Blade leading edge of centrifugal pump impeller is the initial position of cavitation. The leading edge geometry shape not only has a great influence on the cavitation inception and its development, but also a great influence on the flow state near the impeller inlet. In this paper, the numerical simulation method is adopted. Cavitation of four different models (including rectangular-shape blade model, circular-arc-shape blade model, elliptical-shape blade model and cusp-shape blade model) are simulated under the same condition by changing the NPSHA value. The influence of different blade models on cavitation performance is analyzed. The results show that the deviation between the simulated data and experimental data is within the deviation range. The head of rectangular-shape blade model and circular-arc-shape blade model are higher than those of elliptical-shape blade model and cusp-shape blade model. However, the head of rectangular-shape blade model and circular-arc-shape blade model is smaller than the latter under the low effective cavitation margin. What's more, the head of the models with trimmed blade are higher than the head of the models with untrimmed blade under the working condition but are smaller under the low effective cavitation margin.

  19. Suppression of the secondary flow in a suction channel of a large centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, D.; Nagahara, T.; Okihara, T.

    2013-12-01

    The suction channel configuration of a large centrifugal pump with a 90-degree bend was studied in detail to suppress the secondary flow at the impeller inlet for improving suction performance. Design of experiments (DOE) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) were used to evaluate the sensitivity of several primary design parameters of the suction channel. A DOE is a powerful tool to clarify the sensitivity of objective functions to design parameters with a minimum of trials. An L9 orthogonal array was adopted in this study and nine suction channels were designed, through which the flow was predicted by steady state calculation. The results indicate that a smaller bend radius with a longer straight nozzle, distributed between the bend and the impeller, suppresses the secondary flow at the impeller inlet. An optimum ratio of the cross sectional areas at the bend inlet and outlet was also confirmed in relationship to the contraction rate of the downstream straight nozzle. These findings were obtained by CFD and verified by experiments. The results will aid the design of large centrifugal pumps with better suction performance and higher reliability.

  20. Analysis of silt abrasion of the impeller ring in a centrifugal pump with J-grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Z. D.; Wang, Z. Y.; Guo, Z. W.; Dong, J.; Lu, J.

    2016-05-01

    The water flow and movement of silt in a prototype double-suction centrifugal pump was simulated using an Euler-Lagrange multiphase flow model. J-Grooves were adopted to protect the impeller ring from silt abrasion. The influence of J-grooves on the silt concentration and pump efficiency was analyzed. The results show that the radial component of the relative velocity around the impeller ring is too low to move the silt out of the spacing between the impeller plate and the casing. The high silt concentration around the impeller ring is the major contributor to silt abrasion of the impeller ring. The J-grooves induce two strong vortices, which increase the radial component of the relative velocity of water and reduce the silt concentration around the impeller ring, but additional friction losses are introduced and the pump efficiency is decreased. Optimization of the number and shape of J-grooves decreases losses in the efficiency of the pump, and effectively protects the impeller ring. Case 4 was found the most effective configuration in this study.

  1. Parametric study of blade tip clearance, flow rate, and impeller speed on blood damage in rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nahn Ju; Diao, Chenguang; Ahn, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Seung Jong; Kameneva, Marina V; Antaki, James F

    2009-06-01

    Phenomenological studies on mechanical hemolysis in rotary blood pumps have provided empirical relationships that predict hemoglobin release as an exponential function of shear rate and time. However, these relations are not universally valid in all flow circumstances, particularly in small gap clearances. The experiments in this study were conducted at multiple operating points based on flow rate, impeller speed, and tip gap clearance. Fresh bovine red blood cells were resuspended in phosphate-buffered saline at about 30% hematocrit, and circulated for 30 min in a centrifugal blood pump with a variable tip gap, designed specifically for these studies. Blood damage indices were found to increase with increased impeller speed or decreased flow rate. The hemolysis index for 50-microm tip gap was found to be less than 200-microm gap, despite increased shear rate. This is explained by a cell screening effect that prevents cells from entering the smaller gap. It is suggested that these parameters should be reflected in the hemolysis model not only for the design, but for the practical use of rotary blood pumps, and that further investigation is needed to explore other possible factors contributing to hemolysis. PMID:19473143

  2. Research of fluid-induced pressure fluctuation due to impeller-volute interaction in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. Z.; Yang, K.; Y Li, D.; Gong, R. Z.

    2013-12-01

    The fluid pressure fluctuation generated by unsteady flow is a very important factor to induce vibration of the centrifugal pump. The relative movement between impeller and volute generates an unsteady interaction which affects not only the overall pump performance, but is also responsible for pressure fluctuations. Pressure fluctuations interact with the volute casing or even with the circuit and give rise to dynamic effects over the mechanical parts, which are one of the most important sources of vibration and hydraulic noise. To investigate the flow characteristic in the centrifugal pump, the unsteady flow is simulated by CFD methods in this paper. Unsteady flow characteristic in the centrifugal pump is obtained considering the impeller-volute interaction in the whole flow field. Based on the unsteady flow simulation, amplitude-frequency characteristics of the pressure fluctuation in the centrifugal pump are obtained through setting up monitoring point at the impeller outlet. The research shows that the frequency component include the blade passing frequency as the main component, the multiplication of blade passing frequency, and the harmonic interference due to the unsteady flow.

  3. A teaspoon pump for pumping blood with high hydraulic efficiency and low hemolysis potential.

    PubMed

    Dame, D

    1996-06-01

    Virtually all blood pumps contain some kind of rubbing, sliding, closely moving machinery surfaces that are exposed to the blood being pumped. These valves, internal bearings, magnetic bearing position sensors, and shaft seals cause most of the problems with blood pumps. The original teaspoon pump design prevented the rubbing, sliding machinery surfaces from contacting the blood. However, the hydraulic efficiency was low because the blood was able to "slip around" the rotating impeller so that the blood itself never rotated fast enough to develop adequate pressure. An improved teaspoon blood pump has been designed and tested and has shown acceptable hydraulic performance and low hemolysis potential. The new pump uses a nonrotating "swinging" hose as the pump impeller. The fluid enters the pump through the center of the swinging hose; therefore, there can be no fluid slip between the revolving blood and the revolving impeller. The new pump uses an impeller that is comparable to a flexible garden hose. If the free end of the hose were swung around in a circle like half of a jump rope, the fluid inside the hose would rotate and develop pressure even though the hose impeller itself did not "rotate"; therefore, no rotating shaft seal or internal bearings are required. PMID:8817965

  4. Effect of blade outlet angle on radial thrust of single-blade centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Y.; Fukutomi, J.; Fujiwara, R.

    2012-11-01

    Single-blade centrifugal pumps are widely used as sewage pumps. However, a large radial thrust acts on a single blade during pump operation because of the geometrical axial asymmetry of the impeller. This radial thrust causes vibrations of the pump shaft, reducing the service life of bearings and shaft seal devices. Therefore, to ensure pump reliability, it is necessary to quantitatively understand the radial thrust and clarify the behavior and generation mechanism. This study investigated the radial thrust acting on two kinds of single-blade centrifugal impellers having different blade outlet angles by experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Furthermore, the radial thrust was modeled by a combination of three components, inertia, momentum, and pressure, by applying an unsteady conservation of momentum to this impeller. As a result, the effects of the blade outlet angle on both the radial thrust and the modeled components were clarified. The total head of the impeller with a blade outlet angle of 16 degrees increases more than the impeller with a blade outlet angle of 8 degrees at a large flow rate. In this case, since the static pressure of the circumference of the impeller increases uniformly, the time-averaged value of the radial thrust of both impellers does not change at every flow rate. On the other hand, since the impeller blade loading becomes large, the fluctuation component of the radial thrust of the impeller with the blade outlet angle of 16 degrees increases. If the blade outlet angle increases, the fluctuation component of the inertia component will increase, but the time-averaged value of the inertia component is located near the origin despite changes in the flow rate. The fluctuation component of the momentum component becomes large at all flow rates. Furthermore, although the time-averaged value of the pressure component is almost constant, the fluctuation component of the pressure component becomes large at a large flow rate

  5. Analysis on the blade inlet pressure fluctuation of the centrifugal pump based on LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. J.; Cui, Y. R.; Wang, Y.; Li, G. D.; Liang, Q. H.; Yin, G.

    2013-12-01

    In order to study the characteristics of the blade inlet pressure fluctuation under unsteady flow in centrifugal pump, a three-dimensional model of a pump ns=50 was built. Based on large eddy simulation (LES), the inner flow field of the pump was simulated by the flow field simulation software Fluent in design condition and off-design conditions. The pressure fluctuation of the monitored points was obtained at the blade suction surface and pressure surface at impeller inlet, which was analyzed by time and frequency domain with Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT). The results show that the pressure fluctuation of inlet and outlet in large flow rate is more obvious than low flow rate. It is easily found that the static pressure of outlet in 1.2Qd condition has five peaks and five valleys, but this phenomenon does not exist in 0.6 Qd condition. In the time domain spectrums, the static pressure curve has five peaks and five valleys that the maximum pressure is positive number and the minimum pressure is negative number. In the frequency domains spectrums, the frequency of FFT factors peak is lower than the blade passing frequency 241.65Hz.

  6. Experimental study of unsteady hydrodynamic force matrices on whirling centrifugal pump impellers. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belgacem, Jery

    1986-01-01

    An experimental facility was constructed and instrumented. A set of centrifugal flow pumps whose impellers were made to follow a controlled circular whirl motion were studied. The aim was to characterize the steady and unsteady fluid forces measured on the impeller under various pump operating conditions. The postulation was that the unsteady lateral forces result from interactions between the impeller and the surrounding diffuser and/or volute (via the working fluid), and that under certain flow regimes these forces can drive unstable lateral motions of the pump rotor. The lateral hydrodynamic forces were decomposed into their steady and unsteady parts, the latter being further expressed in terms of a generalized fluid stiffness matrix. Conclusions regarding the effect of impeller geometry could not be reached given the similarity of the tested designs. However, other results on phenomena such as skin friction and leakage flow are presented. Some of the findings are compared to experimental and theoretical data from other sources. Finally, the rotordynamic consequences of the results are discussed as the present data were applied to the case of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP).

  7. Multi-objective optimization of a low specific speed centrifugal pump using an evolutionary algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Zhao; Zhounian, Lai; Peng, Wu; Linlin, Cao; Dazhuan, Wu

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the shape optimization of a low specific speed centrifugal pump at the design point. The target pump has already been manually modified on the basis of empirical knowledge. A genetic algorithm (NSGA-II) with certain enhancements is adopted to improve its performance further with respect to two goals. In order to limit the number of design variables without losing geometric information, the impeller is parametrized using the Bézier curve and a B-spline. Numerical simulation based on a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulent model is done in parallel to evaluate the flow field. A back-propagating neural network is constructed as a surrogate for performance prediction to save computing time, while initial samples are selected according to an orthogonal array. Then global Pareto-optimal solutions are obtained and analysed. The results manifest that unexpected flow structures, such as the secondary flow on the meridian plane, have diminished or vanished in the optimized pump.

  8. Multi-level 3D implementation of thermo-pneumatic pumping on centrifugal microfluidic CD platforms.

    PubMed

    Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Soin, Norhayati; Abdul Kahar, Maria Kahar Bador; Madou, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Thermo-pneumatic (TP) pumping is a method employing the principle of expanding heated air to transfer fluids back towards the CD center on the centrifugal microfluidic CD platform. While the TP features are easy to fabricate as no moving parts are involved, it consumes extra real estate on the CD, and because heating is involved, it introduces unnecessary heating to the fluids on the CD. To overcome these limitations, we introduce a multi-level 3D approach and implement forced convection heating. In a multi-level 3D CD, the TP features are relocated to a separate top level, while the microfluidic process remains on a lower bottom level. This allows for heat shielding of the fluids in the microfluidic process level, and also improve usage of space on the CD. To aid in future implementations of TP pumping on a multi-level 3D CD, studies on the effect of heat source setting, and the effect of positioning the TP feature (it distance from the CD center) on CD surface heating are also presented. In this work, we successfully demonstrate a multi-level 3D approach to implement TP pumping on the microfluidic CD platform. PMID:24110985

  9. A fluid dynamic analysis of a rotary blood pump for design improvement.

    PubMed

    Treichler, J; Rosenow, S E; Damm, G; Naito, K; Ohara, Y; Mizuguchi, K; Makinouchi, K; Takatani, S; Nosé, Y

    1993-09-01

    The proper design of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) requires an understanding of the pump's fluid dynamic and biocompatible properties. A hydraulically efficient system minimizes the power required for pumping. Biocompatibility refers to the ability to pump blood with minimal hemolysis and thrombus formation. Typically, shear stresses below a threshold level will not damage blood significantly. A fluid dynamic analysis of a prototype centrifugal pump designed for use as an LVAD was performed to establish flow characteristics. A flow visualization technique using Amberlite particles suspended in a glycerin/water blood analogue was used. The system was illuminated with a 1 mm planar beam strobed helium-neon laser, and the results were recorded photographically. An analysis of photographs revealed laminar and turbulent flows with vortices within an illuminated plane in both the inlet and outlet port areas. From these data, velocity and shear stress profiles were generated that showed possible areas of improvement. It was concluded that the outlet port design could be improved by changing its angle and the continuity of its expansion. The inlet port could also be improved by smoothing the transition area between the inlet tube and the pump body to allow for gradual acceleration of the entering fluid. PMID:8240074

  10. Numerical and experimental study on flow-induced noise at blade-passing frequency in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Yuan, Shouqi; Yuan, Jianping; Si, Qiaorui; Pei, Ji

    2014-05-01

    With the increasing noise pollution, low noise optimization of centrifugal pimps has become a hot topic. However, experimental study on this problem is unacceptable for industrial applications due to unsustainable cost. A hybrid method that couples computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with computational aeroacoustic software is used to predict the flow-induced noise of pumps in order to minimize the noise of centrifugal pumps in actual projects. Under Langthjem's assumption that the blade surface pressure is the main flow-induced acoustic source in centrifugal pumps, the blade surface pressure pulsation is considered in terms of the acoustical sources and simulated using CFX software. The pressure pulsation and noise distribution in the near-cutoff region are examined for the blade-passing frequency (BPF) noise, and the sound pressure level (SPL) reached peaks near the cutoff that corresponded with the pressure pulsation in this region. An experiment is performed to validate this prediction. Four hydrophones are fixed to the inlet and outlet ports of the test pump to measure the flow-induced noise from the four-port model. The simulation results for the noise are analyzed and compared with the experimental results. The variation in the calculated noise with changes in the flow agreed well with the experimental results. When the flow rate was increased, the SPL first decreased and reached the minimum near the best efficient point (BEP); it then increased when the flow rate was further increased. The numerical and experimental results confirmed that the BPF noise generated by a blade-rotating dipole roughly reflects the acoustic features of centrifugal pumps. The noise simulation method in current study has a good feasibility and suitability, which could be adopted in engineering design to predict and optimize the hydroacoustic behavior of centrifugal pumps.