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Sample records for cephalometry

  1. Phosphor-stimulated computed cephalometry: reliability of landmark identification.

    PubMed

    Lim, K F; Foong, K W

    1997-11-01

    The aim of this randomized, controlled, prospective study was to determine the reliability of computed lateral cephalometry (Fuji Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) in terms of landmark identification compared to conventional lateral cephalometry (CAWO, Schrobenhausen, Germany). To assess the reliability of landmark identification on lateral cephalographs, 20 computed images, taken at 30 per cent reduced radiation (70 kV, 15 mA, 0.35 s) were compared to 20 conventional images (70 kV, 15 mA, 0.5 s). The 40 lateral cephalographs were taken from 20 orthodontic patients at immediate post-treatment and 1 year after retention. The order and type of imaging was randomized. Five orthodontists identified eight skeletal, four dental and five soft tissue landmarks on each of the 40 films. The error of identification was analysed in the XY Cartesian co-ordinate following digitization. Skeletal landmarks exhibited characteristic dispersion with respect to the Cartesian co-ordinates. Root apices were more variable than crown tips. Soft tissue landmarks were more consistent in the X co-ordinate. Two-way ANOVA shows that there is no significant difference between the two imaging systems in both co-ordinates (P > 0.05). Moreover, the differences are generally small (< 0.5 mm), and are unlikely to be of clinical significance. Most of the variables attained statistical power of at least 0.8 in the X-co-ordinate while only the dental landmarks achieved statistical power of at least 0.78 in the Y-co-ordinate. Based on the results of the study: (1) computed lateral cephalographs can be taken at 30 per cent radiation reduction, compared to conventional lateral cephalograph; (2) each anatomical landmark exhibits its characteristic dispersion of error in both the Cartesian co-ordinates; (3) there is no trend between the two imaging systems, with equivocal result, and none of the landmarks attained statistical significance when both raters and imaging systems are considered as factorial

  2. [Serial determinations of serum oxytocinase and ultrasonic biparietal cephalometry in normal and high-risk pregnancies].

    PubMed

    Mansani, F E; Serventi, G; Verrelli, D; Condemi, V; Ferrari, F

    1975-01-01

    The value of sonor biparietal cephalometry and serum oxytocinase that we have obtained with weekly simultaneous determinations in 14 females with normal pregnancy and in 5 with pathological pregnancy, from 24th to 39th week, show a statical positive relation. Serum oxitocinase determination against hormonal tests of the phetoplancental function (urinary oestriol, pregnandiol, serum HCS, ecc.) give advantages: it is the easyer, faster and less espandove determination. Therefore we think that it is helpful to determin togheter serial values of sonar biparietal cephalometry and serum oxytocinase to anticipate the endouterine fetal growth retardation. PMID:1212272

  3. A reflection on radiographic cephalometry: the evaluation of sagittal discrepancy.

    PubMed

    Duterloo, Herman S

    2014-09-01

    A critical review is presented of the basic properties and applications of cephalometry as a clinical tool with a focus on the evaluation of sagittal discrepancy. Diagnostic cephalometric assessments are subjective and not based on evidence. To assess individual skeletal and/or facial soft tissue form subjectively, selected norms are used. Norms have been developed for various ethnical groups to improve clinical applicability, but subjectivity remains. That subjectivity precludes application of a modern review system, making the present review a personal account. The cephalometric evaluation of sagittal discrepancy finds its historic origin in the Angle classification. Recent publications try to improve accuracy in classifying sagittal discrepancy. It remains unclear in what sense such efforts influence treatment decisions and/or treatment effect. Almost all selected landmarks are located on or dependent upon periosteal/endosteal bone image contours. Their homology is based on circumstantial reasoning and stability over time, which is implicitly assumed. However, implant growth studies and histological investigations show most landmarks to be unstable, as they are involved in displacement and bone remodelling. These landmarks are therefore heterologous when used for individual evaluation of change over time. Notwithstanding the above-indicated limitations, diagnostic cephalometric assessments are clinically useful and help to develop perceptions of balance and harmony and communication between colleagues and patients. There is no evidence-based method to prefer one particular diagnostic method. Landmark location accuracy and geometric issues do not play a decisive role. The subjective characteristic of diagnostic evaluations limits their power to size/shape comparisons. Structural superimposition is the valid biologically evidence-based method to provide advanced insight in individual growth and/or treatment changes and their variations. PMID:24521748

  4. Correlation between nasopharyngoscopy and cephalometry in the diagnosis of hyperplasia of the pharyngeal tonsils

    PubMed Central

    Ritzel, Rodrigo Agne; Berwig, Luana Cristina; da Silva, Ana Maria Toniolo; Corrêa, Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues; Serpa, Eliane Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Hyperplasia of the pharyngeal tonsil is one of the main causes of mouth breathing, and accurate diagnosis of this alteration is important for proper therapeutic planning. Therefore, studies have been conducted in order to provide information regarding the procedures that can be used for the diagnosis of pharyngeal obstruction. Objective: To verify the correlation between nasopharyngoscopy and cephalometric examinations in the diagnosis of pharyngeal tonsil hyperplasia. Method: This was a cross-sectional, clinical, experimental, and quantitative study. Fifty-five children took part in this study, 30 girls and 25 boys, aged between 7 and 11 years. The children underwent nasofibropharyngoscopic and cephalometric evaluation to determine the grade of nasopharyngeal obstruction. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient at the 5% significance level was used to verify the correlation between these exams. Results: In the nasopharyngoscopy evaluation, most children showed grade 2 and 3 hyperplasia of the pharyngeal tonsil, which was followed by grade 1. In the cephalometry assessment, most children showed grade 1 hyperplasia of the pharyngeal tonsil, which was followed by grade 2. A statistically significant regular positive correlation was observed between the exams. Conclusion: It was concluded that the evaluation of the pharyngeal tonsil hyperplasia could be carried out by fiber optic nasopharyngoscopy and cephalometry, as these examinations were regularly correlated. However, it was found that cephalometry tended to underestimate the size of the pharyngeal tonsil relative to nasopharyngoscopy. PMID:25991937

  5. Differences of Upper Airway Morphology According to Obesity: Study with Cephalometry and Dynamic MD-CT

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Chun, Bum Soo; Lee, Ho Won

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We investigated difference of parameters of polysomnography, cephalometry and dynamic multi-detector computerized tomography (MD-CT) in wake and sleep states according to obesity. Methods We evaluated 93 patients who underwent polysomnography and cephalometry. MD-CT was performed in 68 of these 93 patients. Fifty-nine and 34 patients were classified as obese and non-obese, with obesity defined as BMI ≥25. Cephalometry results were analyzed for 12 variables. Using the MD-CT, we evaluated dynamic upper airway morphology in wake and sleep states and divided the upper airway into four parts named as high retropalatal (HRP), low retropalatal (LRP), high retroglossal (HRG), and low retroglossal (LRG). A minimal cross sectional area (mCSA) and collapsibility index (CI) were calculated for each airway level. Results Diastolic blood pressure (P=0.0005), neck circumference (P<0.0001), and apnea-hypopnea index (P<0.0001) were statistically significantly different between the obese and non-obese group. Among 12 cephalometric variables, there was a significant difference in only the distance from mandibular plane to hyoid bone (P=0.003). There was statistical difference in CI of HRG and LRG in sleep state (P=0.0449, 0.0281) but no difference in mCSA in wake and sleep states. Conclusion The obese group had more severe sleep apnea than the non-obese group. We believe that the increased severity of apnea in the obese group may be have been due to increased collapsibility of the upper airway rather than decreased size of the upper airway. PMID:20978543

  6. Applicability of the Ricketts’ posteroanterior cephalometry for sex determination using logistic regression analysis in Hispano American Peruvians

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Ivan; Chavez, Allison K.; Ponce, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Ricketts' posteroanterior (PA) cephalometry seems to be the most widely used and it has not been tested by multivariate statistics for sex determination. Objective: The objective was to determine the applicability of Ricketts' PA cephalometry for sex determination using the logistic regression analysis. Materials and Methods: The logistic models were estimated at distinct age cutoffs (all ages, 11 years, 13 years, and 15 years) in a database from 1,296 Hispano American Peruvians between 5 years and 44 years of age. Results: The logistic models were composed by six cephalometric measurements; the accuracy achieved by resubstitution varied between 60% and 70% and all the variables, with one exception, exhibited a direct relationship with the probability of being classified as male; the nasal width exhibited an indirect relationship. Conclusion: The maxillary and facial widths were present in all models and may represent a sexual dimorphism indicator. The accuracy found was lower than the literature and the Ricketts' PA cephalometry may not be adequate for sex determination. The indirect relationship of the nasal width in models with data from patients of 12 years of age or less may be a trait related to age or a characteristic in the studied population, which could be better studied and confirmed. PMID:27555732

  7. Validity of 2D lateral cephalometry in orthodontics: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lateral cephalometric radiography is commonly used as a standard tool in orthodontic assessment and treatment planning. The aim of this study was to evaluate the available scientific literature and existing evidence for the validation of using lateral cephalometric imaging for orthodontic treatment planning. The secondary objective was to determine the accuracy and reliability of this technique. We did not attempt to evaluate the value of this radiographic technique for other purposes. A literature search was performed using specific keywords on electronic databases: Ovid MEDLINE, Scopus and Web of Science. Two reviewers selected relevant articles, corresponding to predetermined inclusion criteria. The electronic search was followed by a hand search of the reference lists of relevant papers. Two reviewers assessed the level of evidence of relevant publications as high, moderate or low. Based on this, the evidence grade for diagnostic efficacy was rated as strong, moderately strong, limited or insufficient. The initial search revealed 784 articles listed in MEDLINE (Ovid), 1,034 in Scopus and 264 articles in the Web of Science. Only 17 articles met the inclusion criteria and were selected for qualitative synthesis. Results showed seven studies on the role of cephalometry in orthodontic treatment planning, eight concerning cephalometric measurements and landmark identification and two on cephalometric analysis. It is surprising that, notwithstanding the 968 articles published in peer-reviewed journals, scientific evidence on the usefulness of this radiographic technique in orthodontics is still lacking, with contradictory results. More rigorous research on a larger study population should be performed to achieve full evidence on this topic. PMID:24325757

  8. The status of cephalometry in the prediction of non-CPAP treatment outcome in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Denolf, Petra L; Vanderveken, Olivier M; Marklund, Marie E; Braem, Marc J

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is the most common sleep disordered breathing disorder (SDB) in adults and is characterized by a recurrent partial or complete collapse of the upper airway during sleep. This can be caused by many factors, sometimes interacting, such as skeletal malformations, soft tissue crowding, respiratory instability and the various effects of aging, obesity and gender that dictate craniofacial and upper airway anatomy. Research has demonstrated that the majority of patients exhibit at least one anatomical component such as retrognathia or a narrow posterior airway space that predisposes to the development of OSAS. Within the predisposing elements for OSAS many seem to point to anatomical characteristics. A standardized and relatively simple radiologic technique to evaluate anatomical craniofacial relationships is cephalometry. This has been used already for a long time in orthodontics, but is now gradually being introduced in OSAS treatment to envisage optimal treatment selection as well as to predict treatment outcomes. The purpose of the present review is to evaluate the contribution of cephalometry in the prediction of outcomes from OSAS treatments that depend on the upper airway morphology in their mechanisms of action such as oral appliances that advance the mandible as well as various surgical methods. In addition, an overview of imaging modalities and methods that currently are being used in cephalometric analysis in OSAS patients is provided. The findings indicate that isolated cephalometric parameters cannot be used to reliably predict treatment outcomes from mandibular advancement devices and surgical methods for OSAS. Extreme or outlying values of cephalometric parameters may rather be used as contra-indicators or 'red flags' instead of predictors. PMID:26452001

  9. Optimizing Hybrid Occlusion in Face-Jaw-Teeth Transplantation: A Preliminary Assessment of Real-Time Cephalometry as Part of the Computer-Assisted Planning and Execution Workstation for Craniomaxillofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Ryan J.; Basafa, Ehsan; Hashemi, Sepehr; Grant, Gerald T.; Liacouras, Peter; Susarla, Srinivas M.; Otake, Yoshito; Santiago, Gabriel; Armand, Mehran; Gordon, Chad R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aesthetic and functional outcomes surrounding Le Fort–based, face-jaw-teeth transplantation have been suboptimal, often leading to posttransplant class II/III skeletal profiles, palatal defects, and “hybrid malocclusion.” Therefore, a novel technology—real-time cephalometry—was developed to provide the surgical team instantaneous, intraoperative knowledge of three-dimensional dentoskeletal parameters. Methods Mock face-jaw-teeth transplantation operations were performed on plastic and cadaveric human donor/recipient pairs (n = 2). Preoperatively, cephalometric landmarks were identified on donor/recipient skeletons using segmented computed tomographic scans. The computer-assisted planning and execution workstation tracked the position of the donor face-jaw-teeth segment in real time during the placement/inset onto recipient, reporting pertinent hybrid cephalometric parameters from any movement of donor tissue. The intraoperative data measured through real-time cephalometry were compared to posttransplant measurements for accuracy assessment. In addition, posttransplant cephalometric relationships were compared to planned outcomes to determine face-jaw-teeth transplantation success. Results Compared with postoperative data, the real-time cephalometry–calculated intraoperative measurement errors were 1.37 ± 1.11 mm and 0.45 ± 0.28 degrees for the plastic skull and 2.99 ± 2.24 mm and 2.63 ± 1.33 degrees for the human cadaver experiments. These results were comparable to the posttransplant relations to planned outcome (human cadaver experiment, 1.39 ± 1.81 mm and 2.18 ± 1.88 degrees; plastic skull experiment, 1.06 ± 0.63 mm and 0.53 ± 0.39 degrees). Conclusion Based on this preliminary testing, real-time cephalometry may be a valuable adjunct for adjusting and measuring “hybrid occlusion” in face-jaw-teeth transplantation and other orthognathic surgical procedures. PMID:26218382

  10. [Three-dimensional cephalometry: applications in clinical practice and research].

    PubMed

    Faure, Jacques; Oueiss, Arlette; Marchal-Sixou, Christine; Braga, José; Treil, Jacques

    2008-03-01

    A 3D cephalometric analysis method from scanner acquisition has been developed thanks to a long collaboration between Dr Treil and the Department of Orthodontics in Toulouse III University. It allows a perfect knowledge of maxillo-facial architecture using fourteen landmarks related to the neuromatricial axis of facial growth. These landmarks can be identified without ambiguity. The marking of each tooth relative to dental arches (gravity centre coordinates and torque and tipping of each tooth), and the location of arches relative to maxillo-facial frame are given by the analysis. Description and reconstruction of dental and maxillo-facial anatomy are possible with three levels: maxillo-facial frame, maxillar and mandibular bases and dentoalveolar level. The method not only gives more precise information than conventional cephalometrics in anteroposterior and vertical directions, but it allows transversal analysis and asymmetry measurement. Applications are numerous in research as well as in clinical medicine: analyses of cases border line surgery, surgical set-up, facial asymmetry, analysis of dentoalveolar compensations, definition of therapeutic aims, occlusal analysis and set-up, study of evolution in anthropology-primatology, study of growth etc. This method of description using a pattern of landmarks is perfectly adapted to the last developments of modern research techniques: morphometric geometry with Procustes superimpositions, EDMA, TPS, FEM. PMID:18364213

  11. [Cystine-amino-peptidase (C.A.P.) and D.B.P. in "at risk" pregnancy with "poor intrauterine fetale growth" (P.I.F.G.) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mansani, F E; Condemi, V; Verrelli, D; Serventi, G; Chiavazza, F; Ceruti, M

    1976-01-01

    The normal range of serum cystine-amino-peptidase (C.A.P.) in 54 cases of uncomplicated pregnancies was established. 21 patients whose pregnancies were though to be "at risk" were serially monitored by sonar biparietal cephalometry and serum cystine-amino-peptidase determination. The results show that exists a correlation between C.A.P. and biparietal cephalometry values. Furthermore the "predictive power" towards neonatal conditions (by birth weight and Apgar score determination) was of 77,55% for the biparietal cephalometry and 76,10% for C.A.P. PMID:1032958

  12. Mummy of the "Elder Lady" in the tomb of Amenhotep II: Egyptian museum catalog number 61070.

    PubMed

    Harris, J E; Wente, E F; Cox, C F; Nawaway, I E; Kowalski, C J; Storey, A T; Russell, W R; Ponitz, P V; Walker, G F

    1978-06-01

    An unidentified female mummy found in a cache of great kings and queens in 1898 in the Valley of the Kings was examined from the viewpoint of Egyptology, x-ray cephalometry, biostatistics, and biochemistry. The result was the identification of Queen Tiye, of the Eighteenth Dynasty, wife of Amenhotep III and mother of Akhenaton. PMID:349693

  13. An Innovative Approach to Evaluate the Morphological Patterns of Soft Palate in Oral Submucous Fibrosis Patients: A Digital Cephalometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Ayesha Thabusum, Dharmavaram; Bhavana, Sujana Mulk

    2016-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a chronic insidious disease affecting mucosa and submucosa of oral cavity and soft palate. The present study aimed to evaluate the morphology of soft palate in normal individuals and OSMF patients using lateral cephalometry and to compare and correlate these variants of soft palate with different stages of OSMF. 100 subjects were included in the study, who were divided into two groups. Group I included 50 subjects with clinical diagnosis of OSMF and Group II included 50 normal subjects (control group). Using digital lateral cephalometry, velar length and width were measured and soft palatal patterns were categorized based on You et al.'s classification. Leaf and rat-tail patterns of soft palate were predominant in control group, whereas butt and crook shaped variants were more in study group. Anteroposterior (A-P) length of soft palate was significantly greater in stage I OSMF, while superoinferior (S-I) width was greater in stage III OSMF. Interestingly, a negative correlation was observed in staging of OSMF and A-P dimensions. As the staging of OSMF advances, the A-P length of soft palate decreases, but S-I width increases. PMID:27034975

  14. Cephalometric Assessment of Upper Airway Effects on Craniofacial Morphology.

    PubMed

    Ardehali, Mojtaba Mohamadi; Zarch, Varasteh Vakili; Joibari, Mohammad-Esmaeil; Kouhi, Ali

    2016-03-01

    To investigate craniofacial growth deformities in children with upper airway obstruction, this controlled study was performed. Cephalometry is used as a screening test for anatomic abnormalities in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Therefore, the current work selected this method to investigate the effect of upper airway obstruction on craniofacial morphology.Patients with upper airway obstruction (104) were compared with 71 controls. Patients with upper airway compromise had mandibular hypoplasia, mandibular retrognathism, and higher hard palates in comparison with controls with no history of airway obstruction. The difference was higher in the older age group.Airway obstruction has significant correlation craniofacial morphology. Our findings support the idea of early assessment and thorough management of mouth breathing in children. PMID:26967073

  15. [Cephalometric indices in patients with sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    de Vega Gómez, A; Corrales Zarauza, M; Payo Losa, F; Cobo Plana, J

    1995-02-01

    The cephalometric indexes of 16 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) were compared with those of 12 controls in order to determine if fundamental anatomical changes were present in the patients and to identify a pattern of facial features that might be characteristic of individuals with OSAS. Our results point to micrognathia of the upper maxilla in OSAS patients (indicated by significantly lower indexes for convexity, Mx 1, and the angles SNA and ANB). We also found a longer soft palate and a functionally shallower pharynx. Together theses features reduce the permeability of the posterior pharyngeal air space. Additionally, we observed a dolichocephalic facial pattern in OSAS patients, along with a tendency to morbid anterior opening. We analyze the limitations of conventional cephalometry. While recognizing its usefulness in establishing baseline indexes before treatment and in postsurgical assessment, we nevertheless point out that it cannot be relied upon as the only test for evaluating surgical correction in OSAS patients. PMID:7704391

  16. Osseous expansion of the cranial vault by craniotasis.

    PubMed

    Remmler, D; McCoy, F J; O'Neil, D; Willoughby, L; Patterson, B; Gerald, K; Morris, D C

    1992-05-01

    A study of cranial vault lengthening using a custom expandable fixation-distraction (craniotatic) appliance was performed in the young-adult rabbit model. Ten 24-week-old rabbits underwent circumferential suturectomy plus expansion (expanded group), 10 underwent circumferential suturectomy without expansion (sham control group), and 10 served as normal controls. The appliance was lengthened at a rate of 2.5 mm per week for 5 weeks. Serial lateral cephalometry, comparative dry-skull anthropometric measurements, and histologic examinations were performed. The expanded group demonstrated a significantly longer skull, cranial vault, anterior cranial base, posterior face, and orbit as compared with the control groups (p less than 0.05). Callus bone filled the distracted suturectomy and united the frontofacial complex to the posterior cranium. In conclusion, skull lengthening by distraction osteogenesis is possible in the rabbit model and offers a new technique for future investigation in the treatment of coronal synostosis. PMID:1561249

  17. Three-dimensional x-ray stereometry from paired coplanar images: a progress report.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S; Moffitt, F H; Curry, S

    1983-10-01

    More than fifty years ago, Broadbent reported the development of a three-dimensional cephalometric method which complexed information from pairs of x-ray images oriented in two planes at right angles to each other. Empirical problems have prevented the routine clinical use of this "biplanar" method, notwithstanding its obvious conceptual brilliance. The present article reports on recent work toward the development of an alternative method of three-dimensional cephalometry in which the two images of each x-ray pair are positioned in the same plane rather than being at right angles to each other. It is believed that this "coplanar" method avoids many of the technical problems that have limited the use of the Broadbent method. PMID:6578681

  18. Analysis of Soft Tissue Changes after Genioplasty in Skeletal Class III Dentofacial Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-Kwon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to measure the anteroinferior changes and the degree of vertical changes to facilitate the prediction of treatment outcome in patients undergoing genioplasty only, genioplasty with bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (BSSRO), genioplasty, or BSSRO and Lefort I osteotomy. Materials and Methods Serial cephalometry was performed on 25 patients at 1-year follow-up after genioplasty, to assess skeletal changes and relapse. Surgery was performed using conventional techniques. Results The mean ratio was 0.9 : 1 of soft tissue to skeletal movement at pogonion, but the average difference between hard and soft tissue was large; thus, the prediction of anteroposterior soft tissue changes was quite inaccurate. Conclusion We observed a good correlation between the amount of hard versus soft tissue change with surgery in the horizontal direction, but a poor correlation in the vertical plane. PMID:20046423

  19. Study between anb angle and wits appraisal in cone beam computed tomography (cbct)

    PubMed Central

    Cibrián, Rosa; Gandia, Jose L.; Paredes, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To analyse the ANB and Wits values and to study correlations between those two measurements and other measurements in diagnosing the anteroposterior maxilo-mandibular relationship with CBCT. Study Design: Ninety patients who had previously a CBCT (i-CAT®) as a diagnostic register were selected. A 3D cephalometry was designed using one software package, InVivo5®. This cephalometry included 3 planes of reference, 3 angle measurements and 1 linear measurement. The means and standard deviations of the mean of each measurement were assessed. After that, a Pearson´s correlation coefficient has been performed to analyse the significance of each relationship. Results: When classifying the sample according to the anteroposterior relationship, the values obtained of ANB (Class I: 53%; Class II: 37%; Class III: 10%) and Wits (Class I: 35%; Class II: 56%; Class III: 9%) did not coincide, except for the Class III group. However, of the patients classified differently (Class I and Class II patients) by ANB and Wits, a high percentage of individuals (n=22; 49%), had a mesofacial pattern with a mandibular plane angle within normal values. A correlation has been found between ANB and Wits (r=0,262), occlusal plane angle and ANB (r=0,426), and mandibular plane angle and Wits (r=0,242). No correlation was found between either Wits or ANB in relation with the age of the individuals. Conclusions: ANB and Wits must be included in 3D cephalometric analyses as both are necessary to undertake a more accurate diagnosis of the maxillo-mandibular relationship of the patients. Key words:Cone beam computed tomography, ANB, Wits, cephalometrics. PMID:23722136

  20. A study on the reproducibility of cephalometric landmarks when undertaking a three-dimensional (3D) cephalometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Llamas, José M.; Cibrián, Rosa; Gandia, José L.; Paredes, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Cone Beam Computerized Tomography (CBCT) allows the possibility of modifying some of the diagnostic tools used in orthodontics, such as cephalometry. The first step must be to study the characteristics of these devices in terms of accuracy and reliability of the most commonly used landmarks. The aims were 1- To assess intra and inter-observer reliability in the location of anatomical landmarks belonging to hard tissues of the skull in images taken with a CBCT device, 2- To determine which of those landmarks are more vs. less reliable and 3- To introduce planes of reference so as to create cephalometric analyses appropriated to the 3D reality. Study design: Fifteen patients who had a CBCT (i-CAT®) as a diagnostic register were selected. To assess the reproducibility on landmark location and the differences in the measurements of two observers at different times, 41 landmarks were defined on the three spatial axes (X,Y,Z) and located. 3.690 measurements were taken and, as each determination has 3 coordinates, 11.070 data were processed with SPSS® statistical package. To discover the reproducibility of the method on landmark location, an ANOVA was undertaken using two variation factors: time (t1, t2 and t3) and observer (Ob1 and Ob2) for each axis (X, Y and Z) and landmark. The order of the CBCT scans submitted to the observers (Ob1, Ob2) at t1, t2, and t3, were different and randomly allocated. Multiple comparisons were undertaken using the Bonferroni test. The intra- and inter-examiner ICC´s were calculated. Results: Intra- and inter-examiner reliability was high, both being ICC ≥ 0.99, with the best frequency on axis Z. Conclusions: The most reliable landmarks were: Nasion, Sella, Basion, left Porion, point A, anterior nasal spine, Pogonion, Gnathion, Menton, frontozygomatic sutures, first lower molars and upper and lower incisors. Those with less reliability were the supraorbitals, right zygion and posterior nasal spine. Key words:Cone Beam

  1. Heritability of Craniofacial Structures in Normal Subjects and Patients with Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Luqi; Comyn, Francois-Louis; Keenan, Brendan T.; Cater, Jacqueline; Maislin, Greg; Pack, Allan I.; Schwab, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Accumulating evidence has shown that there is a genetic contribution to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).The objectives were to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cephalometry to (1) confirm heritability of craniofacial risk factors for OSA previously shown by cephalometrics; and (2) examine the heritability of new craniofacial structures that are measurable with MRI. Design: A sib pair “quad” design examining apneics, apneic siblings, controls, and control siblings. The study design used exact matching on ethnicity and sex, frequency matching on age, and statistical control for differences in age, sex, ethnicity, height, and weight. Setting: Academic medical center. Patients: We examined 55 apneic probands (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]: 46.8 ± 33.5 events/h), 55 proband siblings (AHI: 11.1 ± 15.9 events/h), 55 controls (AHI: 2.2 ± 1.7 events/h), and 55 control siblings (AHI: 4.1 ± 4.0 events/h). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Five independent domains reflecting different aspects of the craniofacial structure were examined. We confirmed heritability of sella–nasion–subspinale (38%, P = 0.002), saddle angle (55%, P < 0.0001), mandibular length (24%, P = 0.02) and lower facial height (33%, P = 0.006) previously measured by cephalometry. In addition, the current study added new insights by demonstrating significant heritability of mandibular width (30%, P = 0.005), maxillary width (47%, P < 0.0001), distance from the hyoid bone to the retropogonion (36%, P = 0.0018) and size of the oropharyngeal space (31%, P = 0.004). Finally, our data indicate that heritability of the craniofacial structures is similar in normal patients and those with apnea. Conclusions: The data support our a priori hypothesis that the craniofacial structures that have been associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are heritable. We have demonstrated heritability for several intermediate craniofacial phenotypes for OSA. Thus, we believe that future studies

  2. The effect of anabolic steroids on mandibular growth.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Alexander; Pancherz, Hans

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of nandrolone (Deca-Durabolin, AKZO Nobel, Cambridge, United Kingdom) on mandibular growth in juvenile and adult rats with radiographic cephalometry and immunoradiology. Juvenile (n = 16) and adult (n = 16) inbred female Wistar-Kyoto rats were compared. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups with 8 experimental (E) and 8 control (C) animals in each subgroup. Lateral headfilms taken before and after the 70-day study period were analyzed. Body weight and blood serum IGF-I levels were monitored weekly. The results showed marked mandibular growth changes in both the juvenile and the adult E rats. Body weight increase was larger in the E than in the C animals. The IGF-I blood serum levels were similar in the juvenile E and C rats but higher in the adult E animals than in the adult C animals. It was found that the anabolic steroid (Deca-Durabolin) had a significant effect on mandibular growth in both juvenile and adult rats. PMID:12695771

  3. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  4. Cranial base and maxillary changes in patients treated with Frankel’s functional regulator (1b)

    PubMed Central

    Alió-Sanz, Juan J.; Iglesias-Conde, Carmen; Lorenzo-Pernía, Jose; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Mendoza-Mendoza, Asunción; Solano-Reina, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess cranial base and maxillary growth in patients with Class II-type I malocclusions when treated with Frankel’s functional regulator (FR-1b). Study Design: The treatment group was made up of 43 patients that were divided into two groups: prepubescent (n: 28), and pubescent (n: 15). The control group included 40 patients who did not receive any kind of treatment and were likewise divided into a prepubescent group (n: 19), and a pubescent group (n: 21). A computerized cephalometric study was carried out and superimpositions were done in order to assess the antero-posterior, vertical and rotational movement of the maxilla. Results: The results indicate that anterior cranial length is not affected by the regulator but the cranial deflection of the treatment group was diminished. Although a slight counterclockwise rotation effect on the upper jaw was observed due to treatment, no growth restriction of the maxilla in a vertical or antero-posterior direction was observed compared to other non-treated Class II-type I malocclusion patients. Conclusion: The functional regulator does not have any effect on anterior cranial length, but it does affect the angulation of the cranial base. According to our results, the appliance has demonstrated a flattening effect of the cranial base (p<0.05) in the treated sample. The functional regulator induces counterclockwise rotation rather than vertical or sagittal changes in the maxilla. Key words:Orthodontics, frankel regulator, class II treatment, cephalometry, superimposition. PMID:22322486

  5. Designing Orthodontic Craniofacial Templates for 8–14 year-old Iranian Girls Based on Cephalometric Norms

    PubMed Central

    Chalipa, Javad; Akhoundi, Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad; Shoshtarimoghaddam, Elinaz; Nik, Tahereh Hosseinzadeh; Imani, Mosle

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Cephalometry and its related analyses have an important role in the evaluation of orthodontic patients. Access to an analysis that gives maximum information in the least possible time is an effective way to indicate craniofacial disharmony; therefore, craniofacial templates are very useful tools. The purpose of the present study was to provide orthodontic craniofacial templates for 8–14-year-old Iranian girls. Materials and Methods: One thousand two-hundred and nine girls (age range, 8–14 years) were examined. Eighty of these cases were finally chosen for the study and their lateral cephalograms were traced. Both Basion-Nasion (Ba-N) and Sella-Nasion (S-N) lines were selected for superimposition in this study. Based on these two mentioned lines, a template for each age was designed. Simple linear regression and multivariant regression analysis were used to evaluate the angles and to landmark the vectors, respectively. Results: Findings show that most points change significantly at different ages in the S-N method. In the Ba-N method, all points except for S and Ba have significant changes at different ages. Conclusion: Templates that resulted from both methods were the same and alteration in the reference line and points does not change the total form of the average tracings of each age. PMID:23724204

  6. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy as a risk factor of dentofacial abnormality in Korean children.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Kyu; Rhee, Chae Seo; Yun, Pil-Young; Kim, Jeong-Whun

    2015-11-01

    No studies for the role of adenotonsillar hypertrophy in development of dentofacial abnormalities have been performed in Asian pediatric population. Thus, we aimed to investigate the relationship between adenotonsillar hypertrophy and dentofacial abnormalities in Korean children. The present study included consecutive children who visited a pediatric clinic for sleep-disordered breathing due to habitual mouth breathing, snoring or sleep apnea. Their palatine tonsils and adenoids were graded by oropharyngeal endoscopy and lateral cephalometry. Anterior open bite, posterior crossbite, and Angle's class malocclusions were evaluated for dentofacial abnormality. The receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was used to identify age cutoffs to predict dentofacial abnormality. A total of 1,083 children were included. The presence of adenotonsillar hypertrophy was significantly correlated with the prevalence of dentofacial abnormality [adjusted odds ratio = 4.587, 95% CI (2.747-7.658)] after adjusting age, sex, body mass index, allergy, and Korean version of obstructive sleep apnea-18 score. The cutoff age associated with dentofacial abnormality was 5.5 years (sensitivity = 75.5%, specificity = 67%) in the children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy and 6.5 years (sensitivity = 70.6%, specificity = 57%) in those without adenotonsillar hypertrophy. In conclusion, adenotonsillar hypertrophy may be a risk factor for dentofacial abnormalities in Korean children and early surgical intervention could be considered with regards to dentofacial abnormality. PMID:25490975

  7. Determination of sex in South Indians and immigrant Tibetans from cephalometric analysis and discriminant functions.

    PubMed

    Naikmasur, Venkatesh G; Shrivastava, Rahul; Mutalik, Sunil

    2010-04-15

    Skeletal components play significant role in sex determination in forensic and anthropological fields. Skull is considered second best, after pelvis, in determination of sex. Methods based on morphological characteristics and morphometry are already in use with reasonable accuracy. Standardized radiographic techniques like cephalometry have advantages of being more precise and objective when compared to morphologic methods. The present study aimed at obtaining and comparing the reliability of cranio-mandibular parameters in South Indian and Indian immigrant of Tibetan populations using lateral and postero-anterior (PA) cephalograms. A total of 11 cephalometric parameters were traced on lateral and PA cephalograms manually. Functions to aid in the sex determination were developed by subjecting the cephalometric parameters to discriminant analysis. Among the chosen parameters bizygomatic width, ramus height, depth of face contributed most for sexual dimorphism in both the populations. Upper facial height was the additional parameter for sexual dimorphism in immigrant Tibetan population. The discrimination accuracy in South Indian population was 81.5% while that of immigrant Tibetan population was 88.2%. With the current study it can be concluded that cephalometric cranio-mandibular parameters can be used to discriminate the sex using discriminant function analysis and similar cranio-mandibular parameters contribute to sex prediction across populations. PMID:20083363

  8. Relationship between growth of facial morphology and chronologic age in preschool children with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Shigeto; Ueda, Koichiro; Shinohara, Mitsuyo; Mano, Mikiko; Kanegae, Haruhide; Namaki, Shunsuke

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between facial morphology using cephalometry and chronologic age in preschool children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Materials and Methods From a group of lateral cephalometric radiographs taken of 35 children with OSA for diagnostic purposes, 15 were selected for the present investigation based on head position. The subjects consisted of preschool children with both OSA and primary dentition, all of them with a lowest documented SpO2 <90% and a lowest 0

  9. Correlation between cervical vertebral maturation and chronological age in a group of Iranian females

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Seyed Mohammadreza; Beikaii, Hanie; Hassanizadeh, Raheleh; Younessian, Farnaz; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Correlation between chronological age at different stages of cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) is important in clinical orthodontic practice. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between CVM stage and chronological age in a group of Iranian female patients. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 196 digital lateral cephalometry of female patients with the age ranged 9-14 years. The CVM stage was determined with two calibrated examiners, using the method developed by Baccetti and its correlation with mean chronological age was assessed by the Spearman rank-order. The intra and inter-agreements were evaluated by weighted Kappa statistics in overall diagnosis of stages, in addition to determination of presence or absent of concavities at the lower border of second, third and fourth cervical vertebrae and the shapes of the third and fourth vertebrae. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The correlation coefficient between CVM stages and chronological age was relatively low (r = 0.62). The least amount of inter-observer agreement was determined to be at the clinical decision of the shape of the fourth vertebra. Conclusion: Regarding the low reported correlation, the concomitant usage of other skeletal indicators seems necessary for precise determination of physiological age of the patients. PMID:26604958

  10. Comparison of the dentofacial patterns for native Greek and American-Caucasian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulos, E; Sassouni, V

    1989-03-01

    The study of the craniofacial relations and variations in man has long been used to differentiate various racial groups in physical anthropology. Morphologic features of different races and ethnic groups are not randomly distributed but appear in geographic clusters. Richardson wonders whether there is only one race, comprising ethnic groups separated by cultural, climatic, and geographic boundaries, causing subtle changes in facial morphology. Since the introduction of roentgenographic cephalometry in orthodontics, several methods of analysis have been developed for clinical diagnosis and treatment planning. Also, these methods have been used to establish the cephalometric norms of different ethnic groups: American Negro, Australian aborigine, American Mexican, Norwegian, Indian, Japanese, Swedish, and Iranian. Sassouni, Ricketts, and others have concluded that norms differ between Caucasians and other ethnic and racial groups. Ethnic differences in facial traits do exist. Awareness of the normal dentofacial pattern of each ethnic group will undoubtedly ensure better success of treatment to establish optimal facial harmony. These conclusions prompted the present investigation, which compares Greek and American-Caucasian dentofacial patterns of adolescents, and provides information on the facial characteristics of Greek adolescents. To date, no similar study has been made. PMID:2923103

  11. Anatomically Based Outcome Predictors of Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Intraoral Splint Devices: A Systematic Review of Cephalometric Studies

    PubMed Central

    Guarda-Nardini, Luca; Manfredini, Daniele; Mion, Marta; Heir, Gary; Marchese-Ragona, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this review is to summarize data from the literature on the predictive value of anatomy-based parameters, as identified by cephalometry, for the efficacy of mandibular advancement devices (MAD) for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: Articles were initially selected based on their titles or abstracts. Full articles were then retrieved and further scrutinized according to predetermined criteria. Reference lists of selected articles were searched for any missed publications. The selected articles were methodologically evaluated. Results: Of an initial 311 references, 13 were selected that assessed correlations between polysomnographic and cephalometric variables. The majority of studies demonstrated a correlation between treatment effectiveness and features as determined by cephalometric analysis, such as the mandibular plane angle, hyoid bone distance to mandible, antero-posterior diameter of the maxilla, tongue area, cranial base, and soft palate. Conclusions: The mandibular plane angle and the distance between hyoid bone and mandibular plane was found to have a predictive value for MAD effectiveness in OSA patients. However, the relative weak and somewhat inconsistent cephalometric data suggest that decisions based solely on these factors cannot be recommended, especially because an integrated analysis of other risk factors (e.g., age, sex, BMI) should also be taken into account. Citation: Guarda-Nardini L, Manfredini D, Mion M, Heir G, Marchese-Ragona R. Anatomically based outcome predictors of treatment for obstructive sleep apnea with intraoral splint devices: a systematic review of cephalometric studies. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(11):1327–1334. PMID:25979102

  12. Craniocervical Posture in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Piccin, Chaiane Facco; Pozzebon, Daniela; Scapini, Fabricio; Corrêa, Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is characterized by repeated episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep. Objective  The objective of this study is to verify the craniofacial characteristics and craniocervical posture of OSA and healthy subjects, determining possible relationships with the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI). Methods  This case-control study evaluated 21 subjects with OSA, who comprised the OSA group (OSAG), and 21 healthy subjects, who constituted the control group (CG). Cephalometry analyzed head posture measurements, craniofacial measurements, and air space. Head posture was also assessed by means of photogrammetry. Results  The groups were homogeneous regarding gender (12 men and 9 women in each group), age (OSAG = 41.86 ± 11.26 years; GC = 41.19 ± 11.20 years), and body mass index (OSAG = 25.65 ± 2.46 kg/m2; CG = 24.72 ± 3.01 kg/m2). We found significant differences between the groups, with lower average pharyngeal space and greater distance between the hyoid bone and the mandibular plane in OSAG, when compared with CG. A positive correlation was found between higher head hyperextension and head anteriorization, with greater severity of OSA as assessed by AHI. Conclusion  OSAG subjects showed changes in craniofacial morphology, with lower average pharyngeal space and greater distance from the hyoid bone to the mandibular plane, as compared with healthy subjects. Moreover, in OSA subjects, the greater the severity of OSA, the greater the head hyperextension and anteriorization. PMID:27413397

  13. Prediction of liability to orofacial clefting using genetic and craniofacial data from parents.

    PubMed Central

    Mossey, P A; Arngrimsson, R; McColl, J; Vintiner, G M; Connor, J M

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL(P)) and isolated cleft palate (CP) are separate clinical entities and for both polygenic multifactorial aetiology has been proposed. Parents of children with orofacial clefting have been shown to have distinctive differences in their facial shape when compared to matched controls. OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that genetic and morphometric factors predispose to orofacial clefting and that these markers differ for CL(P) and CP. Methods-Polymorphisms at the transforming growth factor alpha (TGFalpha) locus in 83 parents of children with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts were analysed, and their craniofacial morphology was assessed using lateral cephalometry. RESULTS: Parents of children with CL(P) and CP showed an increased frequency of the TGFalpha/TaqI C2 allele (RR=4.10, p=0.009) relative to the comparison group. Also the TGFalpha/BamHI A1 allele was more prevalent in the CP parents. MULTIVARIATE STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Using stepwise logistic regression analysis the TGFalpha/TaqI C2 polymorphism provides the best model for liability to orofacial clefting. To determine the type of clefting a model involving interaction between the parental TGFalpha/BamHI and TGFalpha/RsaI genotypes showed the best fit. Using genotype only to predict the clefting defect in the children according to parental genotype, 68.3% could be correctly classified. By adding information on craniofacial measurements in the parents, 76% of CP and 94% of CL(P) parents could be correctly classified. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a model for prediction of liability to orofacial clefting. These findings suggest that different molecular aberrations at the TGFalpha locus may modify the risk for CP and CL(P). Images PMID:9610799

  14. Higher effective oronasal versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnea: Effect of mandibular stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, M; Montpetit, A; Mathieu, A; Jobin, V; Morisson, F; Mayer, P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In some individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), oronasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) leads to poorer OSA correction than nasal CPAP. The authors hypothesized that this results from posterior mandibular displacement caused by the oronasal mask. OBJECTIVE: To test this hypothesis using a mandibular advancement device (MAD) for mandibular stabilization. METHODS: Subjects whose OSA was not adequately corrected by oronasal CPAP at pressures for which nasal CPAP was effective were identified. These subjects underwent polysomnography (PSG) CPAP titration with each nasal and oronasal mask consecutively, with esophageal pressure and leak monitoring, to obtain the effective pressure (Peff) of CPAP for correcting obstructive events with each mask (maximum 20 cmH2O). PSG titration was repeated using a MAD in the neutral position. Cephalometry was performed. RESULTS: Six subjects with mean (± SD) nasal Peff 10.4±3.0 cmH2O were studied. Oronasal Peff was greater than nasal Peff in all subjects, with obstructive events persisting at 20 cmH2O by oronasal mask in four cases. This was not due to excessive leak. With the MAD, oronasal Peff was reduced in three subjects, and Peff <20 cmH2O could be obtained in two of the four subjects with Peff >20 cmH2O by oronasal mask alone. Subjects’ cephalometric variables were similar to published norms. CONCLUSION: In subjects with OSA with higher oronasal than nasal Peff, this is partially explained by posterior mandibular displacement caused by the oronasal mask. Combination treatment with oronasal mask and MAD may be useful in some individuals if a nasal mask is not tolerated. PMID:24791252

  15. A new 3D method for measuring cranio-facial relationships with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)

    PubMed Central

    Cibrián, Rosa; Gandia, Jose L.; Paredes, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: CBCT systems, with their high precision 3D reconstructions, 1:1 images and accuracy in locating cephalometric landmarks, allows us to evaluate measurements from craniofacial structures, so enabling us to replace the anthropometric methods or bidimensional methods used until now. The aims are to analyse cranio-facial relationships in a sample of patients who had previously undergone a CBCT and create a new 3D cephalometric method for assessing and measuring patients. Study Design: 90 patients who had a CBCT (i-Cat®) as a diagnostic register were selected. 12 cephalometric landmarks on the three spatial planes (X,Y,Z) were defined and 21 linear measurements were established. Using these measurements, 7 triangles were described and analysed. With the sides of the triangles: (CdR-Me-CdL); (FzR-Me-FzL); (GoR-N-GoL); and the Gl-Me distance, the ratios between them were analysed. In addition, 4 triangles in the mandible were measured (body: GoR-DB-Me and GoL-DB-Me and ramus: KrR-CdR-GoR and KrL-CdL-GoL). Results: When analyzing the sides of the CdR-Me-CdL triangle, it was found that the 69.33% of the patients could be considered symmetric. Regarding the ratios between the sides of the following triangles: CdR-Me-CdL, FzR-Me-FzL, GoR-N-GoL and the Gl-Me distance, it was found that almost all ratios were close to 1:1 except between the CdR-CdL side with respect the rest of the sides. With regard to the ratios of the 4 triangles of the mandible, it was found that the most symmetrical relationships were those corresponding to the sides of the body of the mandible and the most asymmetrical ones were those corresponding to the base of such triangles. Conclusions: A new method for assessing cranio-facial relationshps using CBCT has been established. It could be used for diverse purposes including diagnosis and treatment planning. Key words:Craniofacial relationship, CBCT, 3D cephalometry. PMID:23524427

  16. Tongue Volume Influences Lowest Oxygen Saturation but Not Apnea-Hypopnea Index in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sang Hyeon; Kim, Jinna; Min, Hyun Jin; Chung, Hyo Jin; Hong, Jae Min; Lee, Jeung-Gweon; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Cho, Hyung-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to identify correlations between sleep apnea severity and tongue volume or posterior airway space measured via three-dimensional reconstruction of volumetric computerized tomography (CT) images in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) for use in predicting OSA severity and in surgical treatment. We also assessed associations between tongue volume and Mallampati score. Methods Snoring/OSA male patients (n = 64) who underwent polysomnography, cephalometry, and CT scans were enrolled in this retrospective study. OSA was diagnosed when the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was greater than 5 (mild 5–14; moderate 15–29; severe>30). The patients were also categorized into the normal-mild group (n = 22) and the moderate-severe group (n = 42). Using volumetric CT images with the three-dimensional reconstruction technique, the volume of the tongue, posterior airway space volume, and intra-mandibular space were measured. The volumes, polysomnographic parameters, and physical examination findings were compared, and independent factors that are related to OSA were analysed. Results No associations between tongue volume or posterior airway space and the AHI were observed. However, multivariate linear analyses showed that tongue volume had significantly negative association with lowest O2 saturation (r = 0.365, p = 0.027). High BMI was related to an increase in tongue volume. Modified Mallampati scores showed borderline significant positive correlations with absolute tongue volume (r = 0.251, p = 0.046) and standardized tongue volume (absolute tongue volume / intramandibular area; r = 0.266, p = 0.034). Between the normal-mild and moderate-severe groups, absolute tongue volumes were not different, although the standardized tongue volume in the moderate-severe group was significantly higher. Conclusion Absolute tongue volume showed stronger associations with lowest O2 saturation during sleep than with the severity of AHI. We also found that

  17. The effect of dam strain on the craniofacial morphogenesis of CL/Fr mouse fetuses.

    PubMed

    Martin, D A; Nonaka, K; Yanagita, K; Nakata, M

    1995-01-01

    The embryo transfer technique and cephalometry were used to investigate the effect of dam strain in intrauterine craniofacial growth and the severity of cleft lip and palate (CLP) in a CLP-susceptible CL/Fr strain of embryos. The CL/Fr strain of embryos at early blastocyst stage was transferred to the same dam strain and to the CLP-resistant C57BL dam strain. On the 18th gestational day, each dam was laparotomized to take out the fetuses. The spontaneous incidence of CLP in the fetuses was checked and a cephalometric observation of the craniofacial complex of each fetus was done just after laparotomy. The dorsoventral craniofacial size of the unaffected fetuses and the severity of CLP i the affected ones were compared between both dam strains. The following results were obtained: 1) The overall craniofacial sizes of the unaffected fetuses observed in the CL/Fr dam strain were significantly smaller than those seen in the C57/BL dam strain. Those of the affected fetuses observed in the CL/Fr dam strain were smaller than those seen in the C57BL dam strain although the interstrain difference was not significant. 20 The dam strain had a highly significant effect on the craniofacial size of the unaffected fetuses. 3) The CLP frequency in the CL/Fr dam strain was significantly higher than that in the C57BL dam strain. 4) The severity of CLP in the affected fetuses observed in the CL/Fr dam strain was significantly more serious than that seen in the C57BL dam strain. These results indicated that the CLP-susceptible CL/Fr dam strain retarded the intrauterine craniofacial growth of the fetuses and that the cleft condition in the affected fetuses observed in the CL/Fr dam strain was more seriously affected than that seen in the CLP-resistant C57BL dam strain. Thus, it can be concluded that the effect of the dam strain played an important role in the craniofacial morphogenesis of the CL/Fr strain of mouse fetuses that developed from the embryo transferred to the CL/Fr and C57

  18. Frontal soft tissue analysis using a 3 dimensional camera following two-jaw rotational orthognathic surgery in skeletal class III patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Woo; Lee, Jang Yeol; Oh, Tae-Suk; Kwon, Soon Man; Yang, Sung Joon; Koh, Kyung Suk

    2014-04-01

    Although two dimensional cephalometry is the standard method for analyzing the results of orthognathic surgery, it has potential limits in frontal soft tissue analysis. We have utilized a 3 dimensional camera to examine changes in soft tissue landmarks in patients with skeletal class III dentofacial deformity who underwent two-jaw rotational setback surgery. We assessed 25 consecutive Asian patients (mean age, 22 years; range, 17-32 years) with skeletal class III dentofacial deformities who underwent two-jaw rotational surgery without maxillary advancement. Using a 3D camera, we analyzed changes in facial proportions, including vertical and horizontal dimensions, facial surface areas, nose profile, lip contour, and soft tissue cheek convexity, as well as landmarks related to facial symmetry. The average mandibular setback was 10.7 mm (range: 5-17 mm). The average SNA changed from 77.4° to 77.8°, the average SNB from 89.2° to 81.1°, and the average occlusal plane from 8.7° to 11.4°. The mid third vertical dimension changed from 58.8 mm to 57.8 mm (p = 0.059), and the lower third vertical dimension changed from 70.4 mm to 68.2 mm (p = 0.0006). The average bigonial width decreased from 113.5 mm to 109.2 mm (p = 0.0028), the alar width increased from 34.7 mm to 36.1 mm (p-value = 0.0002), and lip length was unchanged. Mean mid and lower facial surface areas decreased significantly, from 171.8 cm(2) to 166.2 cm(2) (p = 0.026) and from 71.23 cm(2) to 61.9 cm(2) (p < 0.0001), respectively. Cheek convexity increased significantly, from 171.8° to 155.9° (p = 0.0007). The 3D camera was effective in frontal soft tissue analysis for orthognathic surgery, and enabled quantitative analysis of changes in frontal soft tissue landmarks and facial proportions that were not possible with conventional 2D cephalometric analysis. PMID:23870714