Science.gov

Sample records for ceramic channel electron

  1. Ceramic Electron Multiplier

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Comby, G.

    1996-10-01

    The Ceramic Electron Multipliers (CEM) is a compact, robust, linear and fast multi-channel electron multiplier. The Multi Layer Ceramic Technique (MLCT) allows to build metallic dynodes inside a compact ceramic block. The activation of the metallic dynodes enhances their secondary electron emission (SEE). The CEM can be used in multi-channel photomultipliers, multi-channel light intensifiers, ion detection, spectroscopy, analysis of time of flight events, particle detection or Cherenkov imaging detectors. (auth)

  2. Creep in electronic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  3. Electronic ceramics in high temperature environments

    SciTech Connect

    Searcy, A.W.; Meschi, D.J.

    1980-11-01

    Simple thermodynamic means are described for understanding and predicting the influence of temperature changes in various environments on electronic properties of ceramics. Thermal gradients, thermal cycling and vacuum annealing are discussed, as well as the variations of activities and solubilities with temperature.

  4. PAC spectroscopy of electronic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.A.; Wang, Ruiping; Schwenker, R.; Evenson, W.E.; Rasera, R.L.; Sommers, J.A.

    1991-12-31

    Dilute indium dopants in cerium oxides and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} have been studied by{sup 111}In/Cd Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) spectroscopy. By controlling oxygen vacancy concentration in the cerium oxides through doping or high-temperature vacuum annealing, we have found that indium always forms a defect complex unless the sample is doped to reduce greatly the oxygen vacancy concentration. Three different vacancy-associated complexes are found with concentrations that depend on doping and oxygen stoichiometry. Another defect complex occurs in samples having negligible vacancy concentration. At low temperatures, evidence is found of interaction with an electronic hole trapped by {sup 111}Cd after the radioactive decay of the {sup 111}In parent. In YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} the indium substitutes preferentially at the Y site but has measurable probability of substitution in at least one of the two copper sites. A symmetry change near 650 {degree}C is consistent with the well-documented orthorhombic/tetragonal transition for samples in air or oxygen.

  5. PAC spectroscopy of electronic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.A.; Wang, Ruiping; Schwenker, R. . Dept. of Physics); Evenson, W.E. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Rasera, R.L. . Dept. of Physics); Sommers, J.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Dilute indium dopants in cerium oxides and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} have been studied by{sup 111}In/Cd Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) spectroscopy. By controlling oxygen vacancy concentration in the cerium oxides through doping or high-temperature vacuum annealing, we have found that indium always forms a defect complex unless the sample is doped to reduce greatly the oxygen vacancy concentration. Three different vacancy-associated complexes are found with concentrations that depend on doping and oxygen stoichiometry. Another defect complex occurs in samples having negligible vacancy concentration. At low temperatures, evidence is found of interaction with an electronic hole trapped by {sup 111}Cd after the radioactive decay of the {sup 111}In parent. In YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} the indium substitutes preferentially at the Y site but has measurable probability of substitution in at least one of the two copper sites. A symmetry change near 650 {degree}C is consistent with the well-documented orthorhombic/tetragonal transition for samples in air or oxygen.

  6. Cleaning of contaminated channel electron multiplier arrays.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlow, F. E.; Hunter, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    Polymerized organic materials found in vacuum systems frequently contaminate the individual channels (which can be as small as 15 microns) of an oil-pumped channel electron multiplier array used as a vacuum UV- to visible-radiation conversion device. It is shown that exposure to an oxygen plasma is an effective means of decontaminating the channels, thereby restoring the sensitivity of the device.

  7. Electron channeling radiation experiments at very high electron bunch charges

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Freudenberger, J.; Fritzler, S.; Genz, H.; Richter, A.; Ushakov, A.; Zilges, A.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    2003-12-01

    Plasmas offer the possibility of high acceleration gradients. An intriguing suggestion is to use the higher plasma densities possible in solids to get extremely high gradients. Although solid-state plasmas might produce high gradients they would pose daunting problems. Crystal channeling has been suggested as one mechanism to address these challenges. There is no experimental or theoretical guidance on channeling for intense electron beams. A high-density plasma in a crystal lattice could quench the channeling process. An experiment has been carried out at the Fermilab NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory to observe electron channeling radiation at high bunch charges. An electron beam with up to 8 nC per electron bunch was used to investigate the electron-crystal interaction. No evidence was found of quenching of channeling at charge densities two orders of magnitude larger than that in earlier experiments.

  8. Electronically conductive ceramics for high temperature oxidizing environments

    DOEpatents

    Kucera, Gene H.; Smith, James L.; Sim, James W.

    1986-01-01

    A high temperature, ceramic composition having electronic conductivity as measured by resistivity below about 500 ohm-cm, chemical stability particularly with respect to cathode conditions in a molten carbonate fuel cell, and composed of an alkali metal, transition metal oxide containing a dopant metal in the crystalline structure to replace a portion of the alkali metal or transition metal.

  9. Electronically conductive ceramics for high temperature oxidizing environments

    DOEpatents

    Kucera, G.H.; Smith, J.L.; Sim, J.W.

    1983-11-10

    This invention pertains to a high temperature, ceramic composition having electronic conductivity as measured by resistivity below about 500 ohm-cm, chemical stability particularly with respect to cathode conditions in a molten carbonate fuel cell, and composed of an alkali metal, transition metal oxide containing a dopant metal in the crystalline structure to replace a portion of the alkali metal or transition metal.

  10. Chemistry of electronic ceramic materials. Proceedings of the International Conference on the Chemistry of Electronic Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, P. K.; Roth, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    The conference was held at Jackson Hole, Wyoming from August 17 to 22, 1990, and in an attempt to maximize the development of this rapidly moving, multidisciplinary field, this conference brought together major national and international researchers to bridge the gap between those primarily interested in the pure chemistry of inorganic solids and those interested in the physical and electronic properties of ceramics. With the many major discoveries that have occurred over the last decade, one of the goals of this meeting was to evaluate the current understanding of the chemistry of electronic ceramic materials, and to assess the state of a field that has become one of the most important areas of advanced materials research. The topics covered include: crystal chemistry; dielectric ceramics; low temperature synthesis and characterization; solid state synthesis and characterization; surface chemistry; superconductors; theory and modeling.

  11. Emission of an intense electron beam from a ceramic honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, M.; Myers, M.; Hegeler, F.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Sethian, J. D.; Ludeking, L.

    2003-01-01

    Inserting a slab of honeycomb ceramic in front of the emitting surface of a large-area cathode improves the electron beam emission uniformity, decreases the beam current rise and fall times, and maintains a more constant diode impedance. Moreover, changing the cathode material from velvet to carbon fiber achieved a more robust cathode that starts to emit at a higher electric field without a degradation in beam uniformity. In addition, an 80% reduction in the postshot diode pressure was also observed when gamma alumina was deposited on the ceramic. A possible explanation is that reabsorption and recycling of adsorbed gases takes place.

  12. Feasibility of ceramic joining with high energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Halbleib, J.A.; Helmich, D.R.; Loehman, R.E.; Clifford, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Joining structural ceramics is possible using high melting point metals such as Mo and Pt that are heated with a high energy electron beam, with the potential for producing joints with high temperature capability. A 10 MeV electron beam can penetrate through 1 cm of ceramic, offering the possibility of buried interface joining. Because of transient heating and the lower heat capacity of the metal relative to the ceramic, a pulsed high power beam has the potential for melting the metal without decomposing or melting the adjacent ceramic. The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of the process with a series of 10 MeV, 1 kW electron beam experiments. Shear strengths up to 28 NTa have been measured for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Mo-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. These modest strengths are due to beam non-uniformity and the limited area of bonding. The bonding mechanism appears to be a thin silicide reaction layer. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} joints with no metal layer were also produced, apparently bonded an yttrium apatite grain boundary phase.

  13. Magnetoacoustic transport in narrow electron channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizin, Gregory; Gumbs, Godfrey; Pepper, M.

    2000-03-01

    We develop a theory of the effect due to a small perpendicular magnetic field on the quantized acoustoelectric current induced by a surface acoustic wave (SAW) in a narrow electron channel. The quasi one-dimensional channel is formed in a piezoelectric GaAs/AlGaAs semiconductor structure by a split gate technique with the gate voltage beyond pinch-off. The current is the result of the trapping of electrons in the SAW induced moving quantum dots and the transfer of electrons residing in these dots through the channel. It has been observed recently (J. Cunningham, et al., Phys. Rev.B, 1999) that in small magnetic fields the acoustoelectric current oscillates as a function of magnetic field. Based on a simple model for the quantized acoustoelecric transport in a narrow channel (G. Gumbs et al., Phys. Rev.B, Rapid Commun., 60, N20, R13954, 1999) we develop a theory for these oscillations. The case when one electron is captured in the dot is considered, and the period, the amplitude, and the phase of the current oscillations as a function of the system's parameters are obtained and analyzed.

  14. Mixed oxygen ion/electron-conducting ceramics for oxygen separation

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, J.W.; Armstrong, T.R.; Armstrong, B.L.

    1996-08-01

    Mixed oxygen ion and electron-conducting ceramics are unique materials that can passively separate high purity oxygen from air. Oxygen ions move through a fully dense ceramic in response to an oxygen concentration gradient, charge-compensated by an electron flux in the opposite direction. Compositions in the system La{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}Co{sub 1{minus}y{minus}z}Fe{sub y}N{sub z}O{sub 3{minus}{delta}}, perovskites where M=Sr, Ca, and Ba, and N=Mn, Ni, Cu, Ti, and Al, have been prepared and their electrical, oxygen permeation, oxygen vacancy equilibria, and catalytic properties evaluated. Tubular forms, disks, and asymmetric membrane structures, a thin dense layer on a porous support of the same composition, have been fabricated for testing purposes. In an oxygen partial gradient, the passive oxygen flux through fully dense structures was highly dependent on composition. An increase in oxygen permeation with increased temperature is attributed to both enhanced oxygen vacancy mobility and higher vacancy populations. Highly acceptor-doped compositions resulted in oxygen ion mobilities more than an order of magnitude higher than yttria-stabilized zirconia. The mixed conducting ceramics have been utilized in a membrane reactor configuration to upgrade methane to ethane and ethylene. Conditions were established to balance selectivity and throughput in a catalytic membrane reactor constructed from mixed conducting ceramics.

  15. Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, Tang; Feng, Si; Ying-xiang, Li; He-tuo, Chen; Xiao, Zhang; Shu-ren, Zhang

    2014-11-01

    The effects of Ta2O5/Y2O3 codoping on the microstructure and microwave dielectric properties of Ba(Co0.56Zn0.40)1/3Nb2/3O3- xA- xB (A = 0.045 wt.% Ta2O5; B = 0.113 wt.% Y2O3) ceramics ( x = 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32) prepared according to the conventional solid-state reaction technique were investigated. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that the main crystal phase in the sintered ceramics was BaZn0.33Nb0.67O3-Ba3CoNb2O9. The additional surface phase of Ba8CoNb6O24 and trace amounts of Ba5Nb4O15 second phase were present when Ta2O5/Y2O3 was added to the ceramics. The 1:2 B-site cation ordering was affected by the substitution of Ta5+ and Y3+ in the crystal lattice, especially for x = 4. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the optimally doped ceramics sintered at 1340°C for 20 h showed a compact microstructure with crystal grains in dense contact. Though the dielectric constant increased with the x value, appropriate addition would result in a tremendous modification of the Q × f and τ f values. Excellent microwave dielectric properties ( ɛ r = 35.4, Q × f = 62,993 GHz, and τ f = 2.6 ppm/°C) were obtained for the ceramic with x = 0.4 sintered in air at 1340°C for 20 h.

  16. Laser-driven electron acceleration in an inhomogeneous plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rong; Cheng, Li-Hong; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2015-12-15

    We study the laser-driven electron acceleration in a transversely inhomogeneous plasma channel. We find that, in inhomogeneous plasma channel, the developing of instability for electron acceleration and the electron energy gain can be controlled by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of plasma channel. That is, we can short the accelerating length and enhance the energy gain in inhomogeneous plasma channel by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of the plasma channel.

  17. Atom location by electron channeling analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    For many years the orientation dependence of the characteristic x-ray emission close to a Bragg reflection has been regarded as a hindrance to accurate microanalysis, and a random incident beam direction has always been recommended for accurate composition analysis. However, this orientation dependence can be put to use to extract information on the lattice location of foreign atoms within the crystalline matrix. Here a generalization of the technique is described which is applicable to any crystal structure including monatomic crystals, and can quantitatively determine substitutional fractions of impurities. The technique was referred to as electron channeling analysis, by analogy with the closely related and widely used bulk technique of ion channeling analysis, and was developed for lattice location studies of dopants in semiconductors at high spatial resolution. Only two spectra are required for each channeling analysis, one in each of the channeling conditions described above. If the matrix and dopant x-ray yields vary identically between the two orientations then the dopant necessarily lies within the reflecting matrix planes. If the dopant x-ray yield does not vary the dopant atoms are randomly located with respect to the matrix planes. 10 references, 2 figures.

  18. Analytical electron microscopy study of radioactive ceramic waste form

    SciTech Connect

    O'Holleran, T. P.; Sinkler, W.; Moschetti, T. L.; Johnson, S. G.; Goff, K. M.

    1999-11-11

    A ceramic waste form has been developed to immobilize the halide high-level waste stream from electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. Analytical electron microscopy studies, using both scanning and transmission instruments, have been performed to characterize the microstructure of this material. The microstructure consists primarily of sodalite granules (containing the bulk of the halides) bonded together with glass. The results of these studies are discussed in detail. Insight into the waste form fabrication process developed as a result of these studies is also discussed.

  19. Secondary Electron Emission Properties of Plasma Facing Ceramic Materials at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Dourbal, Paul; Spektor, Rostislav

    2015-11-01

    The plasma-wall interaction in the presence of strong secondary electron emission (SEE) has been studied theoretically and experimentally both as a basic phenomenon and in relation to numerous plasma applications such as, for example, fusion devices and Hall thrusters. Herein, we report on SEE measurements for boron nitride (BN) ceramics, which are commonly used as channel wall materials for Hall thrusters. Measurements were conducted for BN ceramics of three different grades with different fractions (0, 1% and 40%) and phases of different binder additions (calcium borate, silicon oxide) and as a function of the sample temperature relevant to the thruster operation (about 600K). For all three grades, the energy at which the yield equals to 1 at room temperature was measured to be near 40 V. This result is in agreement with previous measurements. At the elevated temperature, the yield was slightly different for these ceramics, but lower than at the room temperature. This temperature effect was not as strong as measured in. Analysis of these results and their implication on plasma-surface interactions in Hall thrusters and other related devices are presented. This work was partially supported by the Aerospace Corporation and by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. Mixed ionic and electronic conducting ceramic membranes for hydrocarbon processing

    DOEpatents

    Van Calcar, Pamela; Mackay, Richard; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to mixed phase materials for the preparation of catalytic membranes which exhibit ionic and electronic conduction and which exhibit improved mechanical strength compared to single phase ionic and electronic conducting materials. The mixed phase materials are useful for forming gas impermeable membranes either as dense ceramic membranes or as dense thin films coated onto porous substrates. The membranes and materials of this invention are useful in catalytic membrane reactors in a variety of applications including synthesis gas production. One or more crystalline second phases are present in the mixed phase material at a level sufficient to enhance the mechanical strength of the mixture to provide membranes for practical application in CMRs.

  1. Sintering of oxide and carbide ceramics by electron beam at forevacuum pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvilis, E.; Tolkachev, O.; Burdovitsin, V.; Khasanov, A.; Petyukevich, M.

    2016-02-01

    Novel approaches for electron beam sintering of zirconia and silicon carbide ceramics have been investigated: application of forevacuum pressure plasma-cathode to compensate the charge induced by the electron beam on the green compact surface, and previous dry powder compaction under powerful ultrasound assistance. Dense YSZ ceramics with submicron and micron grains have been consolidated by electron beam sintering after powder compaction using ultrasound.

  2. Pulse propagation and electron acceleration in a corrugated plasma channel.

    PubMed

    Palastro, J P; Antonsen, T M; Morshed, S; York, A G; Milchberg, H M

    2008-03-01

    A preformed plasma channel provides a guiding structure for laser pulses unbound by the intensity thresholds of standard waveguides. The recently realized corrugated plasma channel [Layer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 035001 (2007)] allows for the guiding of laser pulses with subluminal spatial harmonics. These spatial harmonics can be phase matched to high energy electrons, making the corrugated plasma channel ideal for the acceleration of electrons. We present a simple analytic model of pulse propagation in a corrugated plasma channel and examine the laser-electron beam interaction. Simulations show accelerating gradients of several hundred MeV/cm for laser powers much lower than required by standard laser wakefield schemes. PMID:18517531

  3. Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lichun; Yang, Jian; Qiu, Tai

    2014-09-01

    The effects of CuO addition on phase composition, microstructure, sintering behavior, and microwave dielectric properties of 0.80Sm(Mg0.5Ti0.5)O3-0.20 Ca0.8Sr0.2TiO3(8SMT-2CST) ceramics prepared by a conventional solid-state ceramic route have been studied. CuO addition shows no obvious influence on the phase of the 8SMT-2CST ceramics and all the samples exhibit pure perovskite structure. Appropriate CuO addition can effectively promote sintering and grain growth, and consequently improve the dielectric properties of the ceramics. The sintering temperature of the ceramics decreases by 50°C by adding 1.00 wt.%CuO. Superior microwave dielectric properties with a ɛ r of 29.8, Q × f of 85,500 GHz, and τ f of 2.4 ppm/°C are obtained for 1.00 wt.%CuO doped 8SMT-2CST ceramics sintered at 1500°C, which shows dense and uniform microstructure as well as well-developed grain growth.

  4. Emergency Dosimetry Using Ceramic Components in Personal Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouroukla, E. C.; Bailiff, I. K.; Terry, I.

    2014-02-01

    The rapid assessment of radiation dose to members of the public exposed to significant levels of ionizing radiation during a radiological incident presents a significant difficulty in the absence of planned radiation monitoring. However, within most personal electronic devices components such as resistors with alumina substrates can be found that have potentially suitable properties as solid state dosimeters using luminescence measurement techniques. The suitability of several types of ceramic-based components (e.g., resonators, inductors and resistors) has been previously examined using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (TL) techniques to establish their basic characteristics for the retrospective determination of absorbed dose. In this paper, we present results obtained with aluminum oxide surface mount resistors extracted from mobile phones that further extend this work. Very encouraging results have been obtained related to the measurement of luminescence sensitivity, dose response, reusability, limit of detection, signal reproducibility and known-dose recovery. However, the alumina exhibits a rapid loss of the latent luminescence signal with time following irradiation attributed to athermal (or anomalous) fading. The issues related to obtaining a reliable correction protocol for this loss and the detailed examinations required of the fading behavior are discussed.

  5. Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Song; Zhu, De-Gui; Cai, Xu-Sheng

    2014-08-01

    The dense monoclinic-SrAl2Si2O8 ceramics have been prepared by a two-step sintering process at a sintering temperature of 1173 K (900 °C). Firstly, the pre-sintered monoclinic-SrAl2Si2O8 powders containing small SiO2·Al2O3 crystal phases were obtained by continuously sintering a powder mixture of SrCO3 and kaolin at 1223 K (950 °C) for 6 hours and 1673 K (1400 °C) for 4 hours, respectively. Subsequently, by the combination of the pre-sintered ceramic powders with the composite flux agents, which are composed of a SrO·3B2O3 flux agent and α-Al2O3, the low-temperature densification sintering of the monoclinic-SrAl2Si2O8 ceramics was accomplished at 1173 K (900 °C). The low-temperature sintering behavior and microstructure evolvement of the monoclinic-SrAl2Si2O8 ceramics have been investigated in terms of Al2O3 in addition to the composite flux agents. It shows that due to the low-meting characteristics, the SrO·3B2O3 flux agent can urge the dense microstructure formation of the monoclinic-SrAl2Si2O8 ceramics and the re-crystallization of the grains via a liquid-phase sintering. The introduction of α-Al2O3 to the SrO·3B2O3 flux agent can apparently lead to more dense microstructures for the monoclinic-SrAl2Si2O8 ceramics but also cause the re-precipitation of SiO2·Al2O3 compounds because of an excessive Al2O3 content in the SrO·3B2O3 flux agent.

  6. POES MEPED differential flux retrievals and electron channel contamination correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, E. D.; Randall, C. E.; Green, J. C.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Rodger, C. J.

    2015-06-01

    A correction method to remove proton contamination from the electron channels of the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites Medium Energy Proton/Electron Detector (MEPED) is described. Proton contamination estimates are based on measurements in five of the MEPED proton spectral channels. A constrained inversion of the MEPED proton channel response function matrix is used to calculate proton differential flux spectra. In this inversion, the proton energy distribution is described by a weighted combination of exponential, power law, and Maxwellian distributions. Proton contamination in the MEPED electron spectral channels is derived by applying the electron channel proton sensitivities to the proton fluxes from the best fit proton spectra. Once the electron channel measurements are corrected for proton contamination, an inversion of the electron channel response function matrix is used to calculate electron differential flux spectra. A side benefit of the method is that it yields an estimate for the integrated electron flux in the energy range from 300 keV to 2.5 MeV with a center energy at ~800 keV. The final product is a differential spectrum of electron flux covering the energy range from about 10 keV to 2.5 MeV that is devoid of proton contamination except during large solar proton events. Comparisons of corrected MEPED differential fluxes to the Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions Instrument for Detecting Particles show that MEPED fluxes are greater than what is expected from altitude-induced particle population changes; this is attributed at least partially to measurement differences in pitch angle range.

  7. Characterization of ion beam modified ceramic wear surfaces using Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, W.; Lankford, J.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of the surface chemistry and morphology of the wear surfaces of ceramic material surfaces modified by ion beam mixing has been conducted using Auger electron spectroscopy and secondary electron microscopy. Studies have been conducted on ceramic/ceramic friction and wear couples made up of TiC and NiMo-bonded TiC cermet pins run against Si3N4 and partially stabilized zirconia disc surfaces modified by the ion beam mixing of titanium and nickel, as well as ummodified ceramic/ceramic couples in order to determine the types of surface changes leading to the improved friction and wear behavior of the surface modified ceramics in simulated diesel environments. The results of the surface analyses indicate that the formation of a lubricating oxide layer of titanium and nickel, is responsible for the improvement in ceramic friction and wear behavior. The beneficial effect of this oxide layer depends on several factors, including the adherence of the surface modified layer or subsequently formed oxide layer to the disc substrate, the substrate materials, the conditions of ion beam mixing, and the environmental conditions.

  8. Time dependent electronic transport in chiral edge channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.

    2016-02-01

    We study time dependent electronic transport along the chiral edge channels of the quantum Hall regime, focusing on the role of Coulomb interaction. In the low frequency regime, the a.c. conductance can be derived from a lumped element description of the circuit. At higher frequencies, the propagation equations of the Coulomb coupled edge channels need to be solved. As a consequence of the interchannel coupling, a charge pulse emitted in a given channel fractionalized in several pulses. In particular, Coulomb interaction between channels leads to the fractionalization of a charge pulse emitted in a given channel in several pulses. We finally study how the Coulomb interaction, and in particular the fractionalization process, affects the propagation of a single electron in the circuit. All the above-mentioned topics are illustrated by experimental realizations.

  9. Reprint of : Time dependent electronic transport in chiral edge channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.

    2016-08-01

    We study time dependent electronic transport along the chiral edge channels of the quantum Hall regime, focusing on the role of Coulomb interaction. In the low frequency regime, the a.c. conductance can be derived from a lumped element description of the circuit. At higher frequencies, the propagation equations of the Coulomb coupled edge channels need to be solved. As a consequence of the interchannel coupling, a charge pulse emitted in a given channel fractionalized in several pulses. In particular, Coulomb interaction between channels leads to the fractionalization of a charge pulse emitted in a given channel in several pulses. We finally study how the Coulomb interaction, and in particular the fractionalization process, affects the propagation of a single electron in the circuit. All the above-mentioned topics are illustrated by experimental realizations.

  10. Photoionization of few electron systems: a hybrid coupled channels approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramod Majety, Vinay; Zielinski, Alejandro; Scrinzi, Armin

    2015-06-01

    We present the hybrid anti-symmetrized coupled channels method for the calculation of fully differential photo-electron spectra of multi-electron atoms and small molecules interacting with strong laser fields. The method unites quantum chemical few-body electronic structure with strong-field dynamics by solving the time dependent Schrödinger equation in a fully anti-symmetrized basis composed of multi-electron states from quantum chemistry and a one-electron numerical basis. Photoelectron spectra are obtained via the time dependent surface flux (tSURFF) method. Performance and accuracy of the approach are demonstrated for spectra from the helium and beryllium atoms and the hydrogen molecule in linearly polarized laser fields at wavelengths from 21 to 400 nm. At long wavelengths, helium and the hydrogen molecule at equilibrium inter-nuclear distance can be approximated as single channel systems whereas beryllium needs a multi-channel description.

  11. Channeling of relativistic laser pulses, surface waves, and electron acceleration.

    PubMed

    Naseri, N; Pesme, D; Rozmus, W; Popov, K

    2012-03-01

    The interaction of a high-energy relativistic laser pulse with an underdense plasma is studied by means of 3-dimensional particle in cell simulations and theoretical analysis. For powers above the threshold for channeling, the laser pulse propagates as a single mode in an electron-free channel during a time of the order of 1 picosecond. The steep laser front gives rise to the excitation of a surface wave along the sharp boundaries of the ion channel. The surface wave first traps electrons at the channel wall and preaccelerates them to relativistic energies. These particles then have enough energy to be further accelerated in a second stage through an interplay between the acceleration due to the betatron resonance and the acceleration caused by the longitudinal part of the surface wave electric field. It is necessary to introduce this two-stage process to explain the large number of high-energy electrons observed in the simulations. PMID:22463415

  12. Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enzhu; Zou, Mengying; Duan, Shuxin; Xu, Ning; Yuan, Ying; Zhou, Xiaohua

    2014-11-01

    The effects of excess Li content on the phase structure and microwave dielectric properties, especially on the temperature coefficient, of LiNb0.6 Ti0.5O3 (LNT) ceramics were studied. The results show that small amounts of Li effectively enhanced the sintering process due to the compensation of high volatility of Li, leading to a densification and homogenous microstructure, and therefore enhanced the dielectric properties. However, too much Li leads to a secondary phase and cause abnormal grain growth. The LNT + 5 wt.% Li ceramic sintered at 1075°C in the air shows the best properties of ɛ r = 69.73, Q × f = 5543 GHz, and τ f = -4.4 ppm/°C.

  13. Electron irradiation of YBa2CU3O7 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konczykowski, Marcin; Gilchrist, John

    1991-11-01

    Irradiation treatments generally have three effects on the superconducting properties of high T_c ceramics. The superconductivity of the grains is modified, as witnessed by a shift in T_c. The mixed-state properties of the grains are changed due to the additional pinning centres, and inter-granular links are modified by the accumulation of irradiation defects at the grain boundaries. These effects are discussed with particular reference to the irradiation of polycrystalline YBa2CU3O7 at low temperature with 2-3 MeV electrons, which initially produces a random distribution of Frenkel defects. We draw attention to several kinds of measurements which can be made in situ or after transferring the sample to a measuring cryostat : the transfer allows the defects to recombine or migrate. Various DC and AC measurement methods are compared, and the three effects of irradiation are demonstrated. The irreversibility line is found to shift with T_c. Les propriétés supraconductrices des céramiques à haut T_c, sont généralement influencées dans trois domaines distincts par les irradiations. D'une part la supraconductivité des grains est modifiée, comme en témoigne le changement de T_c. D'autre part les propriétés à l'état mixte des grains sont modifiées par la présence de nouveaux centres de piégeage. Enfin les liaisons inter-granulaires sont altérées par l'accumulation de défauts d'irradiation aux joints de grains. Nous insistons particulièrement sur l'irradiation de YBa2CU3O7 polycristallin à basse température avec des électrons de 2 à 3 MeV, ce qui produit, en premier lieu, des défauts de Frenkel à répartition aléatoire. Plusieurs types de mesures peuvent être faites soit in situ, soit après transfert de l'échantillon dans un cryostat de mesures: le transfert permet la recombinaison ou la migration des défauts. Différentes méthodes en courant continu et en alternatif sont comparées, et les effets de l'irradiation sur les trois domaines ci

  14. Laser induced electron acceleration in an ion-channel guiding

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi; Taghavi, Amin; Hanifpour, Maryam

    2011-09-15

    Direct electron acceleration by a propagating laser pulse of circular polarization in an ion-channel guiding is studied by developing a relativistic three-dimensional single particle code. The electron chaotic dynamic is also studied using time series, power spectrum, and Liapunov exponent. It is found that the electron motion is regular (non-chaotic) for laser pulse with short time duration, while for long enough time duration, the electron motion may be chaotic. In the case of non-chaotic motion, the electron can gain and retain very high energy in the presence of ion-channel before reaching the steady-state, whereas in the case of chaotic motion, the electron gains energy and then loses it very rapidly in an unpredictable manner.

  15. Peculiarities of Angular Distribution of Electrons at Si <100> Channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, O. V.; Pivovarov, Yu L.; Takabayashi, Y.; Tukhfatullin, T. A.

    2012-05-01

    The properties of both angular and spatial distribution of 255 MeV electrons at <100> channeling in silicon crystal has been investigated experimentally at the linac injector of SAGA light source and by computer simulations. The simulation of trajectories, angular and spatial distributions of electrons on the screen monitor has been performed taking into account initial spatial as well as angular beam divergence of electron beam. Both experimental data and simulations show the brilliant effect of so-called "doughnut scattering".

  16. Process development for electron beam joining of ceramic and glass components

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Yang, P.; Gerstle, F.P.; Halbleib, J.A.; Voth, T.E.; McKenzie, B.; Clifford, J.R.; Habiger, K.

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and extend the electron beam joining process to applications related to Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} cermets for neutron tube fabrication, glass seals for flat panel displays, and ceramics for structural applications. The key issue is the identification of the allowable operating ranges that produce thermal conditions favorable to robust joining and sealing. High strength, hermetic braze joints between ceramic components have been produced using high energy electron beams. With a penetration depth into a typical ceramic of {approximately} 1 cm for a 10 MeV electron beam, this method provides the capability for rapid, transient brazing operations where temperature control of heat sensitive components is essential. The method deposits energy directly into a buried joint, allowing otherwise inaccessible interfaces to be brazed. The combination of transient heating, with higher thermal conductivity, lower heat capacity, and lower melting temperature of braze metals relative to the ceramic materials, enables a pulsed high power beam to melt a braze metal without producing excessive ceramic temperatures. The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of this process related to ceramic coupons a well as ceramic and glass tubes and cylindrical shapes. The transient thermal response was predicted, using as input the energy absorption predicted from the coupled electron-photon and thermal transport analysis. The joining experiments were conducted with an RF linear accelerator at 10--13 MV. Joining experiments have provided high strength joints between alumina and alumina and between alumina and cermet joints in cylindrical geometry. These joints provided good hermetic seals.

  17. Direct Acceleration of Electrons in a Corrugated Plasma Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Palastro, J. P.; Antonsen, T. M.; Morshed, S.; York, A. G.; Layer, B.; Aubuchon, M.; Milchberg, H. M.; Froula, D. H.

    2009-01-22

    Direct laser acceleration of electrons provides a low power tabletop alternative to laser wakefield accelerators. Until recently, however, direct acceleration has been limited by diffraction, phase matching, and material damage thresholds. The development of the corrugated plasma channel [B. Layer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 035001 (2007)] has removed all of these limitations and promises to allow direct acceleration of electrons over many centimeters at high gradients using femtosecond lasers [A. G. York et al., Phys Rev. Lett 100, 195001 (2008), J. P. Palastro et al., Phys. Rev. E 77, 036405 (2008)]. We present a simple analytic model of laser propagation in a corrugated plasma channel and examine the laser-electron beam interaction. Simulations show accelerating gradients of several hundred MeV/cm for laser powers much lower than required by standard laser wakefield schemes. In addition, the laser provides a transverse force that confines the high energy electrons on axis, while expelling low energy electrons.

  18. Precipitation of nanocrystals in glasses by electron irradiation: An alternative path to form glass ceramics?

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, N.; Wu, B.; Qiu, J.; Spence, J. C. H.

    2007-04-16

    This letter demonstrates an alternative method to form gallium silicate glass ceramics using high-energy electron irradiation. Compared with glass ceramics obtained from the conventional thermal treatment method, the distribution and crystal sizes of the precipitated Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles are the same. An advantage of this method is that the spatial distribution of the precipitated nanoparticles can be easily controlled. However, optically active dopants Ni{sup 2+} ions do not participate in the precipitation during electron irradiation.

  19. Magnetic Field Generation and Electron Acceleration in Relativistic Laser Channel

    SciTech Connect

    I.Yu. Kostyukov; G. Shvets; N.J. Fisch; J.M. Rax

    2001-12-12

    The interaction between energetic electrons and a circularly polarized laser pulse inside an ion channel is studied. Laser radiation can be resonantly absorbed by electrons executing betatron oscillations in the ion channel and absorbing angular momentum from the laser. The absorbed angular momentum manifests itself as a strong axial magnetic field (inverse Faraday effect). The magnitude of this magnetic field is calculated and related to the amount of the absorbed energy. Absorbed energy and generated magnetic field are estimated for the small and large energy gain regimes. Qualitative comparisons with recent experiments are also made.

  20. Manual modification and plasma exposure of boron nitride ceramic to study Hall effect thruster plasma channel material erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satonik, Alexander J.

    Worn Hall effect thrusters (HET) show a variety of unique microstructures and elemental compositions in the boron nitride thruster channel walls. Worn thruster channels are typically created by running test thrusters in vacuum chambers for hundreds of hours. Studies were undertaken to manually modify samples of boron nitride without the use of a hall effect thruster. Samples were manually abraded with an abrasive blaster and sandpaper, in addition to a vacuum heater. Some of these samples were further exposed to a xenon plasma in a magnetron sputter device. Sandpaper and abrasive blaster tests were used to modify surface roughness values of the samples from 10,000 A to 150,000 A, matching worn thruster values. Vacuum heat treatments were performed on samples. These treatments showed the ability to modify chemical compositions of boron nitride samples, but not in a manner matching changes seen in worn thruster channels. Plasma erosion rate was shown to depend on the grade of the BN ceramic and the preparation of the surface prior to plasma exposure. Abraded samples were shown to erode 43% more than their pristine counterparts. Unique surface features and elemental compositions on the worn thruster channel samples were overwritten by new surface features on the ceramic grains. The microscope images of the ceramic surface show that the magnetron plasma source rounded the edges of the ceramic grains to closely match the worn HET surface. This effect was not as pronounced in studies of ion beam bombardment of the surface and appears to be a result of the quasi-neutral plasma environment.

  1. Laser Triggered Electron Injection into a Channel Guided Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Filip, C.

    2005-10-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated the generation of narrow energy spread (˜ few %) electron beams with considerable amount of charge (>100 pC). Stability of laser-plasma accelerators, as in the conventional accelerators, requires highly synchronized injection of electrons into the structured accelerating field. The Colliding Pulse Method[1] with pre-formed plasma channel guiding [2] can result in jitter-free injection in a dark-current-free accelerating structure. We report on experimental progress of laser triggered injection of electrons into a laser wakefield, where an intense laser pulse is guided by a pre-formed plasma channel. The experiments use the multi-beam, multi-terawatt Ti:Al2O3 laser at LOASIS facility of LBNL. The ignitor-heater method is used to first produce a pre-formed plasma channel in a hydrogen gas jet. Two counter propagating beams (wakefield driver:100-500mJ-50fs, injector:50-300mJ-50fs) then are focused onto the entrance of the channel. Preliminary results indicate that electron beam properties are affected by the second beam. Details of the experiment will be presented. [1]G.Fubiani, et al, Phys. Rev. E 70, 016402 (2004). [2]C.G.R. Geddes et al, Nature 431, 538 (2004). This work is supported by DoE under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  2. Non-nuclear electron transport channels in hollow molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2014-08-01

    Electron transport in inorganic semiconductors and metals occurs through delocalized bands formed by overlapping electron orbitals. Strong correlation of electronic wave functions with the ionic cores couples the electron and lattice motions, leading to efficient interaction and scattering that degrades coherent charge transport. By contrast, unoccupied electronic states at energies near the vacuum level with diffuse molecular orbitals may form nearly-free-electron bands with density maxima in non-nuclear interstitial voids, which are subject to weaker electron-phonon interaction. The position of such bands typically above the frontier orbitals, however, renders them unstable with respect to electronic interband relaxation and therefore unsuitable for charge transport. Through electronic-structure calculations, we engineer stable, non-nuclear, nearly-free-electron conduction channels in low-dimensional molecular materials by tailoring their electrostatic and polarization potentials. We propose quantum structures of graphane-derived Janus molecular sheets with spatially isolated conducting and insulating regions that potentially exhibit emergent electronic properties, as a paradigm for molecular-scale non-nuclear charge conductors; we also describe tuning of their electronic properties by application of external fields and calculate their electron-acoustic-phonon interaction.

  3. Superior transport properties of InGaN channel heterostructure with high channel electron mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yachao; Zhou, Xiaowei; Xu, Shengrui; Zhang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Jincheng; Hao, Yue

    2016-06-01

    A high-quality AlGaN/InGaN heterostructure is grown by pulsed metal organic chemical vapor deposition on a sapphire substrate. A two-step AlN interlayer is adopted to improve the interface morphology and protect the high-quality InGaN channel. Temperature-dependent Hall measurement shows superior transport properties compared with the traditional GaN channel heterostructure at elevated temperatures. Further, a record highest channel electron mobility of 1681 cm2/(V·s) at room temperature for an InGaN channel heterostructure is obtained. We attribute the excellent transport properties to the improvement in the material quality, as well as the rationally designed epitaxial structure and well-controlled growth condition.

  4. Non-nuclear Electron Transport Channels in Hollow Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2014-08-15

    Electron transport in inorganic semiconductors and metals occurs through delocalized bands formed by overlapping electron orbitals. Strong correlation of electronic wave functions with the ionic cores couples the electron and lattice motions, leading to efficient interaction and scattering that degrades coherent charge transport. By contrast, unoccupied electronic states at energies near the vacuum level with diffuse molecular orbitals may form nearly-free-electron bands with density maxima in non-nuclear interstitial voids, which are subject to weaker electron-phonon interaction. The position of such bands typically above the frontier orbitals, however, renders them unstable with respect to electronic interband relaxation and therefore unsuitable for charge transport. Through electronic-structure calculations, we engineer stable, non-nuclear, nearly-free-electron conduction channels in low-dimensional molecular materials by tailoring their electrostatic and polarization potentials. We propose quantum structures of graphane-derived Janus molecular sheets with spatially isolated conducting and insulating regions that potentially exhibit emergent electronic properties, as a paradigm for molecular-scale non-nuclear charge conductors; we also describe tuning of their electronic properties by application of external fields and calculate their electron–acoustic-phonon interaction.

  5. Preparation of cross-sectional specimens of ceramic thermal barrier coatings for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Unal, O; Heuer, A H; Mitchell, T E

    1990-04-01

    During the microstructural examination of ceramic thermal barrier coatings by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), initial efforts for the preparation of cross-sectional thin foils from interface regions by conventional means were mostly failures. Delamination of the Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 ceramic coating from the nickel-base alloy substrate sometimes occurred during fine polishing at around 80 microns thickness but mostly occurred during dimpling. Because of this sensitivity, special techniques for mechanical handling were developed so that ion milling could give thin enough regions of the metal-ceramic interface. TEM showed convincingly that the highly fragile nature of the coatings is in fact due to the extensive porosity at the interface developed as a result of heat treatment. PMID:2332805

  6. Electron mobility enhancement in (100) oxygen-inserted silicon channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nuo; Takeuchi, Hideki; Hytha, Marek; Cody, Nyles W.; Stephenson, Robert J.; Kwak, Byungil; Cha, Seon Yong; Mears, Robert J.; King Liu, Tsu-Jae

    2015-09-01

    High performance improvement (+88% in peak Gm and >30% in linear and saturation region drain currents) was observed for N-MOSFETs with Oxygen-Inserted (OI) Si channel. From TCAD analysis of the C-V measurement data, the improvement was confirmed to be due to electron mobility enhancement of the OI Si channel (+75% at Ninv = 4.0 × 1012 cm-2 and +25% at Ninv = 8.0 × 1012 cm-2). Raman and high-resolution Rutherford backscattering measurements confirmed that negligible strain is induced in the OI Si layer, and hence, it cannot be used to explain the origin of mobility improvement. Poisson-Schrödinger based quantum mechanical simulation was performed, taking into account phonon, surface roughness and Coulomb scatterings. The OI layer was modeled as a "quasi barrier" region with reference to the Si conduction band edge to confine inversion electrons. Simulation explains the measured electron mobility enhancement as the confinement effect of inversion electrons while the formation of an super-steep retrograde well doping profile in the channel (as a result of dopant diffusion blocking effect accompanied by introduction of the OI layer) also contributes 50%-60% of the mobility improvement.

  7. Electron mobility enhancement in (100) oxygen-inserted silicon channel

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Nuo; King Liu, Tsu-Jae; Takeuchi, Hideki; Hytha, Marek; Cody, Nyles W.; Stephenson, Robert J.; Mears, Robert J.; Kwak, Byungil; Cha, Seon Yong

    2015-09-21

    High performance improvement (+88% in peak G{sub m} and >30% in linear and saturation region drain currents) was observed for N-MOSFETs with Oxygen-Inserted (OI) Si channel. From TCAD analysis of the C-V measurement data, the improvement was confirmed to be due to electron mobility enhancement of the OI Si channel (+75% at N{sub inv} = 4.0 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} and +25% at N{sub inv} = 8.0 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}). Raman and high-resolution Rutherford backscattering measurements confirmed that negligible strain is induced in the OI Si layer, and hence, it cannot be used to explain the origin of mobility improvement. Poisson-Schrödinger based quantum mechanical simulation was performed, taking into account phonon, surface roughness and Coulomb scatterings. The OI layer was modeled as a “quasi barrier” region with reference to the Si conduction band edge to confine inversion electrons. Simulation explains the measured electron mobility enhancement as the confinement effect of inversion electrons while the formation of an super-steep retrograde well doping profile in the channel (as a result of dopant diffusion blocking effect accompanied by introduction of the OI layer) also contributes 50%–60% of the mobility improvement.

  8. All-optical control of electron trapping in plasma channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, Serguei Y.; Shadwick, Bradley A.; Davoine, Xavier

    2013-10-01

    Generation of background-free, polychromatic electron beams using laser plasma acceleration in longitudinally uniform, mm-length dense plasma channels is demonstrated. Periodic self-injection and acceleration transfers up to 10 percents of the drive pulse energy to several 100-pC charge, GeV-scale-energy electron bunches, each having a few-percent energy spread. Negative chirp of the broad-bandwidth (up to 400 nm), few-Joule-energy driver reduces the nonlinear frequency red-shift, preventing rapid self-steepening of the pulse, whereas the channel suppresses diffraction of the pulse leading edge. The pulse thus remains uncompressed through electron dephasing, strongly reducing unwanted continuous injection. As a bonus, delayed self-compression of the driver extends the dephasing length, boosting electron energy to the GeV level. The number of the quasi-monoenergetic bunches, their charge, energy, and energy separation can be controlled by varying the channel radius and the acceleration length, whereas accumulation of the noise (viz. continuously injected charge) is prevented by the proper dispersion control via negative chirp of the pulse. These clean polychromatic beams can drive tunable, multi-color gamma-ray Compton sources. Supported by the U.S. DOE Grant DE-SC0008382, NSF Grant PHY-1104683, and DOD AFOSR Grant FA9550-11-1-0157. The CALDER-Circ simulations were performed using HPC resources of GENCI-CCRT and GENCI-CINES (grant 2013-057027).

  9. Synchrotron radiation from electron beams in plasma-focusing channels.

    PubMed

    Esarey, E; Shadwick, B A; Catravas, P; Leemans, W P

    2002-05-01

    Spontaneous radiation emitted from relativistic electrons undergoing betatron motion in a plasma-focusing channel is analyzed, and applications to plasma wake-field accelerator experiments and to the ion-channel laser (ICL) are discussed. Important similarities and differences between a free electron laser (FEL) and an ICL are delineated. It is shown that the frequency of spontaneous radiation is a strong function of the betatron strength parameter a(beta), which plays a role similar to that of the wiggler strength parameter in a conventional FEL. For a(beta) > or approximately 1, radiation is emitted in numerous harmonics. Furthermore, a(beta) is proportional to the amplitude of the betatron orbit, which varies for every electron in the beam. The radiation spectrum emitted from an electron beam is calculated by averaging the single-electron spectrum over the electron distribution. This leads to a frequency broadening of the radiation spectrum, which places serious limits on the possibility of realizing an ICL. PMID:12059723

  10. Electronic transport of titanate heterostructures and their potential as channels on (001) Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kornblum, Lior Jin, Eric N.; Walker, Fred J.; Shoron, Omor; Boucherit, Mohamed; Rajan, Siddharth; Ahn, Charles H.

    2015-09-14

    Perovskite oxides and their heterostructures have demonstrated considerable potential for devices that require high carrier densities. These oxides are typically grown on ceramic substrates that suffer from low thermal conductivity, which limits performance under high currents, and from the limited size of substrates, which precludes large scale integration and processing. We address both of these hurdles by integrating oxide heterostructures with high carrier density 2D electron gases (2DEGs) directly on (001) Si. 2DEGs grown on Si show significant improvement of the high current performance over those grown on oxide substrates, a consequence of the higher thermal conductivity of the substrate. Hall analysis, transmission line measurements, and the conductance technique are employed for a detailed analysis of the carrier density, contact resistance, mobility, and electron drift velocities. Current densities of 10 A/cm are observed at room temperature with 2.9 × 10{sup 14} electrons/cm{sup 2} at a drift velocity exceeding 3.5 × 10{sup 5 }cm/s. These results highlight the promise of oxide 2DEGs integration on Si as channels for high electron density devices.

  11. Self-mixing differential vibrometer based on electronic channel subtraction.

    PubMed

    Donati, Silvano; Norgia, Michele; Giuliani, Guido

    2006-10-01

    An instrument for noncontact measurement of differential vibrations is developed, based on the self-mixing interferometer. As no reference arm is available in the self-mixing configuration, the differential mode is obtained by electronic subtraction of signals from two (nominally equal) vibrometer channels, taking advantage that channels are servo stabilized and thus insensitive to speckle and other sources of amplitude fluctuation. We show that electronic subtraction is nearly as effective as field superposition. Common-mode suppression is 25-30 dB, the dynamic range (amplitude) is in excess of 100 microm, and the minimum measurable (differential) amplitude is 20 nm on a B = 10 kHz bandwidth. The instrument has been used to measure vibrations of two metal samples kept in contact, revealing the hysteresis cycle in the microslip and gross-slip regimes, which are of interest in the study of friction induced vibration damping of gas turbine blades for aircraft applications. PMID:16983412

  12. Characterization of encapsulated quantum dots via electron channeling contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deitz, Julia I.; Carnevale, Santino D.; De Graef, Marc; McComb, David W.; Grassman, Tyler J.

    2016-08-01

    A method for characterization of encapsulated epitaxial quantum dots (QD) in plan-view geometry using electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) is presented. The efficacy of the method, which requires minimal sample preparation, is demonstrated with proof-of-concept data from encapsulated (sub-surface) epitaxial InAs QDs within a GaAs matrix. Imaging of the QDs under multiple diffraction conditions is presented, establishing that ECCI can provide effectively identical visualization capabilities as conventional two-beam transmission electron microscopy. This method facilitates rapid, non-destructive characterization of sub-surface QDs giving immediate access to valuable nanostructural information.

  13. Electronic crosstalk characterization of Terra MODIS long wave infrared channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, Sriharsha; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Sun, Junqiang; Chiang, Kwofu; Wu, Aisheng

    2015-09-01

    Terra (T) MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), a heritage Earth observing sensor has completed 15 years of operation as of December 18 2014. T-MODIS has 36 spectral channels designed to monitor the land, ocean, and atmosphere. The long term climate data record from T-MODIS is an important dataset for global change monitoring. Sixteen of the spectral channels fall in the Mid (M) (3.7-4.5μm) to Long (L) (6.7-14.1μm)Wave InfraRed (M/LWIR) wavelengths, which are also referred to as the Thermal Emissive Bands (TEBs). To date the TEBs have very satisfactory performance which is attributed to the scan-by-scan calibration using an on-board BlackBody whose temperature is traceable to the NIST temperature standards. However, with an aging instrument, it was observed from 2010 onwards that the Photo Voltaic LWIR channels (Bands 27-30) have suffered significantly from electronic crosstalk. This is mainly due to the deterioration of the electronic circuits of the relevant bands in the LWIR Focal Plane Array (FPA). In this paper, we report the characterization of the electronic crosstalk in the above-mentioned bands using the well characterized test site such as Dome Concordia (C). Such characterization can be used to reduce the effects of crosstalk when implemented in the future Level 1B reprocessing and thereby increasing the radiometric fidelity of the concerned bands.

  14. Electromagnetic instability in an electron beam-ion channel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, D.; Tang, C. J.

    2009-05-01

    The transverse electromagnetic instability in the electron beam-ion channel system is investigated using kinetic theory. The equilibrium distribution function of a relativistic electron beam, which takes into account a strong ion channel effect, is obtained. The linearized Vlasov equation is solved and the dispersion relation of the system is derived by perturbing the equilibrium with a high frequency electromagnetic wave (EMW). Analysis of the dispersion relation shows that the coupling of the electron beam with the transverse high frequency EMW is achieved through the deflection of the beam electrons due to the synergistic effects of the transverse high frequency EMW and transverse betatron oscillation. The numerical calculation finds that a branch of slow wave instability (SWI) with a wide frequency band is excited. The attenuation index of the SWI increases and its frequency band broadens as the normalized beam radii increases. Besides, the SWI will be suppressed as the longitudinal velocity of the electron beam increases to a certain value; meanwhile, a bunch of fast wave instability (FWI) is excited, which is equal to the increase of the relativistic factor. Also both the SWI and the FWI reach maximum when the EMW frequency meets a resonance condition.

  15. Application of ionic and electronic conducting ceramics in solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, S.C.

    1997-12-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer a pollution-free technology to electrochemically generate electricity at high efficiencies. These fuel cells consist of an oxygen ion conducting electrolyte, electronic or mixed electronic and ionic conducting electrodes, and an electronic conducting interconnection. This paper reviews the ceramic materials used for the different cell components, and discusses the performance of cells fabricated using these materials. The paper also discusses the materials and processing studies that are underway to reduce the cell cost, and summarizes the recently built power generation systems that employed state-of-the-art SOFCs.

  16. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Diestler, D J

    2012-03-22

    The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (j(e)), =1/2∫dR[Δ(b) (x;R) - Δ(a) (x;R)] even though the electrons certainly move in response to the movement of the nuclei. This article, the first of a pair, proposes a quantum-mechanical "coupled-channels" (CC) theory that allows the approximate extraction of j(e) from the electronically adiabatic BO wave function . The CC theory is detailed for H(2)(+), in which case j(e) can be resolved into components associated with two channels α (=a,b), each of which corresponds to the "collision" of an "internal" atom α (proton a or b plus electron) with the other nucleus β (proton b or a). The dynamical role of the electron, which accommodates itself instantaneously to the motion of the nuclei, is submerged in effective electronic probability (population) densities, Δ(α), associated with each channel (α). The Δ(α) densities are determined by the (time-independent) BO electronic energy eigenfunction, which depends parametrically on the configuration of the nuclei, the motion of which is governed by the usual BO nuclear Schrödinger equation. Intuitively appealing formal expressions for the electronic flux density are derived for H(2)(+). PMID:22103768

  17. Mass-dependent channel electron multiplier operation. [for ion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, S. A.; Burch, J. L.; Oran, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    The absolute counting efficiency and pulse height distributions of a continuous-channel electron multiplier used in the detection of hydrogen, argon and xenon ions are assessed. The assessment technique, which involves the post-acceleration of 8-eV ion beams to energies from 100 to 4000 eV, provides information on counting efficiency versus post-acceleration voltage characteristics over a wide range of ion mass. The charge pulse height distributions for H2 (+), A (+) and Xe (+) were measured by operating the experimental apparatus in a marginally gain-saturated mode. It was found that gain saturation occurs at lower channel multiplier operating voltages for light ions such as H2 (+) than for the heavier ions A (+) and Xe (+), suggesting that the technique may be used to discriminate between these two classes of ions in electrostatic analyzers.

  18. Channelling and related effects in electron microscopy: The current status

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, K.M.

    1989-05-01

    Channelling or Borrmann effect in electron diffraction has been developed into a versatile, high spatial resolution, crystallographic technique with demonstrated applicability in solving a variety of materials problems. In general, either the characteristic x-ray emissions or the electron energy-loss intensities are monitored as a function of the orientation of the incident beam. The technique, as formulated in the planar geometry has found wide applications in specific site occupancy and valence measurements, determination of small atomic displacements and crystal polarity studies. For site occupancy studies, the appropriate orientations in most cases can be determined by inspection and the analysis carried out according to a simple classification of the crystal structure discussed in this paper. Concentration levels as low as 0.1 wt% can be easily detected. The reciprocity principle may be used to advantage in all these studies, if electron energy-loss spectra are monitored, as both the channelling of the incoming beam and the blocking of the outgoing beam are included in the formulation and analysis. The formulation in the axial geometry is an useful alternative, particularly for monatomic crystals. Localization effects are important if, either the experiment is performed in the axial geometry or if low atomic number elements (z < 11) are detected. In general, the sensitivity to L-shells is lower compared to K-shell excitations. Other experimental parameters to be considered include temperature of the sample, the acceleration voltage and parallelism of the incident beam. Any detrimental effects of channelling on conventional microanalysis can be minimized either by tilting the crystal to an orientation where no lower order diffraction vectors are excited or by using a convergent probe such that a large range of incident beam orientations are averaged in the analysis. 49 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Effect of ceramic membrane channel geometry and uniform transmembrane pressure on limiting flux and serum protein removal during skim milk microfiltration.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael C; Hurt, Emily E; Barbano, David M

    2015-11-01

    Our objectives were to determine the effects of a ceramic microfiltration (MF) membrane's retentate flow channel geometry (round or diamond-shaped) and uniform transmembrane pressure (UTP) on limiting flux (LF) and serum protein (SP) removal during skim milk MF at a temperature of 50°C, a retentate protein concentration of 8.5%, and an average cross-flow velocity of 7 m·s(-1). Performance of membranes with round and diamond flow channels was compared in UTP mode. Performance of the membrane with round flow channels was compared with and without UTP. Using UTP with round flow channel MF membranes increased the LF by 5% when compared with not using UTP, but SP removal was not affected by the use of UTP. Using membranes with round channels instead of diamond-shaped channels in UTP mode increased the LF by 24%. This increase was associated with a 25% increase in Reynolds number and can be explained by lower shear at the vertices of the diamond-shaped channel's surface. The SP removal factor of the diamond channel system was higher than the SP removal factor of the round channel system below the LF. However, the diamond channel system passed more casein into the MF permeate than the round channel system. Because only one batch of each membrane was tested in our study, it was not possible to determine if the differences in protein rejection between channel geometries were due to the membrane design or random manufacturing variation. Despite the lower LF of the diamond channel system, the 47% increase in membrane module surface area of the diamond channel system produced a modular permeate removal rate that was at least 19% higher than the round channel system. Consequently, using diamond channel membranes instead of round channel membranes could reduce some of the costs associated with ceramic MF of skim milk if fewer membrane modules could be used to attain the required membrane area. PMID:26298765

  20. On electronic structure of polymer-derived amorphous silicon carbide ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kewei; Li, Xuqin; Ma, Baisheng; Wang, Yiguang; Zhang, Ligong; An, Linan

    2014-06-01

    The electronic structure of polymer-derived amorphous silicon carbide ceramics was studied by combining measurements of temperature-dependent conductivity and optical absorption. By comparing the experimental results to theoretical models, electronic structure was constructed for a carbon-rich amorphous silicon carbide, which revealed several unique features, such as deep defect energy level, wide band-tail band, and overlap between the band-tail band and defect level. These unique features were discussed in terms of the microstructure of the material and used to explain the electric behavior.

  1. LASER-ELECTRON COMPTON INTERACTION IN PLASMA CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    POGORELSKY,I.V.

    1998-10-01

    A concept of high intensity femtosecond laser synchrotron source (LSS) is based on Compton backscattering of focused electron and laser beams. The short Rayleigh length of the focused laser beam limits the length of interaction to a few picoseconds. However, the technology of the high repetition rate high-average power picosecond lasers required for high put through LSS applications is not developed yet. Another problem associated with the picosecond laser pulses is undesirable nonlinear effects occurring when the laser photons are concentrated in a short time interval. To avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering, the laser beam has to be split, and the required hard radiation flux is accumulated over a number of consecutive interactions that complicates the LSS design. In order to relieve the technological constraints and achieve a practically feasible high-power laser synchrotron source, we propose to confine the laser-electron interaction region in the extended plasma channel. This approach permits to use nanosecond laser pulses instead of the picosecond pulses. That helps to avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering regime and allows to utilize already existing technology of the high-repetition rate TEA CO{sub 2} lasers operating at the atmospheric pressure. We demonstrate the advantages of the channeled LSS approach by the example of the prospective polarized positron source for Japan Linear Collider.

  2. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of residual stresses in ceramics: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu

    1992-01-01

    Several reviews have highlighted a number of applications of scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) to metals and semiconductors which show that SEAM can provide new information on surface and near-surface features of such materials, but there have been few studies attempting to determine the capabilities of SEAM for characterizing ceramic materials. We have recently observed image contrast in SEAM from residual stress fields induced in brittle materials by Vickers indentations that is strongly dependent on the electron beam chopping frequency. We have also recently developed a three-dimensional mathematical model of signal generation and contrast in SEAM, appropriate to the brittle materials studied, that we use as a starting point in this paper for modeling the effect of residual stress fields on the generated electron acoustic signal. The influence of the electron beam chopping frequency is also considered under restrictive assumptions.

  3. Electron channeling in TiO2 coated Cu layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Pengyuan; Zhou, Tianji; Gall, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Electron transport in metal conductors with ∼5–30 nm width is dominated by surface scattering. In situ transport measurements as a function of surface chemistry demonstrate that the primary parameter determining the surface scattering specularity is the localized surface density of states at the Fermi level N(E f ). In particular, the measured sheet resistance of epitaxial Cu(001) layers with thickness d Cu = 9–25 nm increases when coated with d Ti = 0.1–4.0 monolayers (MLs) of Ti, but decreases again during exposure to 37 Pa of O2. These resistivity changes are a function of d Cu and d Ti and are due to a transition from partially specular electron scattering at the Cu surface to completely diffuse scattering at the Cu–Ti interface, and the recovery of surface specularity as the Ti is oxidized. X-ray reflectivity and photoelectron spectroscopy indicate the formation of a 0.47 ± 0.03 nm thick Cu2O surface layer on top of the TiO2–Cu2O during air exposure, while density functional calculations of TiO x cap layers as a function of x = 0–2 and d Ti = 0.25–1.0 ML show a reduction of N(E f ) by up to a factor of four. This reduction is proposed to be the key cause for the recovery of surface specularity and results in electron confinement and channeling in the Cu layer upon Ti oxidation. Transport measurements at 293 and 77 K confirm the channeling and demonstrate the potential for high-conductivity metal nanowires by quantifying the surface specularity parameter p = 0.67 ± 0.05, 0.00 ± 0.05, and 0.35 ± 0.05 at the Cu–vacuum, Cu–Ti, and Cu–TiO2 interfaces.

  4. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S.; Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F.; Darbal, A. D.; Weiss, J. K.

    2014-08-04

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio.

  5. Method of forming a dense, high temperature electronically conductive composite layer on a porous ceramic substrate

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical device, containing a solid oxide electrolyte material and an electrically conductive composite layer, has the composite layer attached by: (A) applying a layer of LaCrO.sub.3, YCrO.sub.3 or LaMnO.sub.3 particles (32), on a portion of a porous ceramic substrate (30), (B) heating to sinter bond the particles to the substrate, (C) depositing a dense filler structure (34) between the doped particles (32), (D) shaving off the top of the particles, and (E) applying an electronically conductive layer over the particles (32) as a contact.

  6. Method of forming a dense, high temperature electronically conductive composite layer on a porous ceramic substrate

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, A.O.

    1992-04-21

    An electrochemical device, containing a solid oxide electrolyte material and an electrically conductive composite layer, has the composite layer attached by: (A) applying a layer of LaCrO[sub 3], YCrO[sub 3] or LaMnO[sub 3] particles, on a portion of a porous ceramic substrate, (B) heating to sinter bond the particles to the substrate, (C) depositing a dense filler structure between the doped particles, (D) shaving off the top of the particles, and (E) applying an electronically conductive layer over the particles as a contact. 7 figs.

  7. Electron channeling contrast imaging studies of nonpolar nitrides using a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Naresh-Kumar, G.; Kraeusel, S.; Bruckbauer, J.; Edwards, P. R.; Hourahine, B.; Trager-Cowan, C.; Mauder, C.; Heuken, M.; Wang, K. R.; Trampert, A.; Kalisch, H.; Vescan, A.; Giesen, C.; Day, A. P.

    2013-04-08

    Threading dislocations, stacking faults, and associated partial dislocations significantly degrade the optical and electrical properties of materials such as non-polar III-nitride semiconductor thin films. Stacking faults are generally difficult to detect and quantify with existing characterization techniques. We demonstrate the use of electron channeling contrast imaging in the scanning electron microscope to non-destructively reveal basal plane stacking faults terminated by partial dislocations in m-plane GaN and InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures grown on {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy.

  8. Multi-photon absorption in the channeling of electrons in an external field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaralov, V.

    2016-07-01

    Following the methods developed for atom ionization by alternating electric field the probability of multi-photon absorption of photons of the strong external laser field by channeled electron (extraction of electron from the channel) have been calculated for different strengths of the monochromatic external field. The emission spectra of 54 MeV electron channeled in diamond crystal planes (110) are shown for different values of the resonant laser field of a frequency close to the transition frequency in the channel taking into account multi-photon absorption. It is shown that the multi-photon phenomena give some contribution to the total level width.

  9. Theoretical Studies on the Electronic Structures and Properties of Complex Ceramic Crystals and Novel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, Wai-Yim

    2012-01-14

    This project is a continuation of a long program supported by the Office of Basic Energy Science in the Office of Science of DOE for many years. The final three-year continuation started on November 1, 2005 with additional 1 year extension to October 30, 2009. The project was then granted a two-year No Cost Extension which officially ended on October 30, 2011. This report covers the activities within this six year period with emphasis on the work completed within the last 3 years. A total of 44 papers with acknowledgement to this grant were published or submitted. The overall objectives of this project are as follows. These objectives have been evolved over the six year period: (1) To use the state-of-the-art computational methods to investigate the electronic structures of complex ceramics and other novel crystals. (2) To further investigate the defects, surfaces/interfaces and microstructures in complex materials using large scale modeling. (3) To extend the study on ceramic materials to more complex bioceramic crystals. (4) To initiate the study on soft condensed matters including water and biomolecules. (5) To focus on the spectroscopic studies of different materials especially on the ELNES and XANES spectral calculations and their applications related to experimental techniques. (6) To develop and refine computational methods to be effectively executed on DOE supercomputers. (7) To evaluate mechanical properties of different crystals and those containing defects and relate them to the fundamental electronic structures. (8) To promote and publicize the first-principles OLCAO method developed by the PI (under DOE support for many years) for applications to large complex material systems. (9) To train a new generation of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in modern computational materials science and condensed matter physics. (10) To establish effective international and domestic collaborations with both experimentalists and theorists in materials

  10. Quantum Features of PXRC Angular Distributions From Relativistic Channeled Electrons in a Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotchenko, K. B.; Pivovarov, Yu L.

    2014-05-01

    We predict quantum features in angular distributions of parametric X-radiation from channeled relativistic electrons (PXRC). The effect is connected with the number of quantum states of channeled electrons, form-factors of the transverse quantum channeling states and initial populations of these quantum states. The main motivation of this work is theoretical prediction for the future experiment at the SAGA-LS facility.

  11. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of indentation-induced cracks and residual stresses in ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu; Ravichandran, M. V.; Knowles, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) to characterize ceramic materials is assessed. SEAM images of Vickers indentations in SiC whisker-reinforced alumina clearly reveal not only the radial cracks, the length of which can be used to estimate the fracture toughness of the material, but also reveal strong contrast, interpreted as arising from the combined effects of lateral cracks and the residual stress field left in the SiC whisker-reinforced alumina by the indenter. The strong contrast is removed after the material is heat treated at 1000 C to relieve the residual stresses around the indentations. A comparison of these observations with SEAM and reflected polarized light observations of Vickers indentations in soda-lime glass both before and after heat treatment confirms the interpretation of the strong contrast.

  12. Ceramic Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In developing its product line of specialty ceramic powders and related products for government and industrial customers, including companies in the oil, automotive, electronics and nuclear industries, Advanced Refractory Technologies sought technical assistance from NERAC, Inc. in specific areas of ceramic materials and silicon technology, and for assistance in identifying possible applications of these materials in government programs and in the automotive and electronics industry. NERAC conducted a computerized search of several data bases and provided extensive information in the subject areas requested. NERAC's assistance resulted in transfer of technologies that helped ART staff develop a unique method for manufacture of ceramic materials to precise customer specifications.

  13. Ceramic Processing

    SciTech Connect

    EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    1999-11-24

    Ceramics represent a unique class of materials that are distinguished from common metals and plastics by their: (1) high hardness, stiffness, and good wear properties (i.e., abrasion resistance); (2) ability to withstand high temperatures (i.e., refractoriness); (3) chemical durability; and (4) electrical properties that allow them to be electrical insulators, semiconductors, or ionic conductors. Ceramics can be broken down into two general categories, traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics include common household products such as clay pots, tiles, pipe, and bricks, porcelain china, sinks, and electrical insulators, and thermally insulating refractory bricks for ovens and fireplaces. Advanced ceramics, also referred to as ''high-tech'' ceramics, include products such as spark plug bodies, piston rings, catalyst supports, and water pump seals for automobiles, thermally insulating tiles for the space shuttle, sodium vapor lamp tubes in streetlights, and the capacitors, resistors, transducers, and varistors in the solid-state electronics we use daily. The major differences between traditional and advanced ceramics are in the processing tolerances and cost. Traditional ceramics are manufactured with inexpensive raw materials, are relatively tolerant of minor process deviations, and are relatively inexpensive. Advanced ceramics are typically made with more refined raw materials and processing to optimize a given property or combination of properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, thermal, physical, and/or magnetic) for a given application. Advanced ceramics generally have improved performance and reliability over traditional ceramics, but are typically more expensive. Additionally, advanced ceramics are typically more sensitive to the chemical and physical defects present in the starting raw materials, or those that are introduced during manufacturing.

  14. The structure and properties of boron carbide ceramics modified by high-current pulsed electron-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yuri; Tolkachev, Oleg; Petyukevich, Maria; Teresov, Anton; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina; Polisadova, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    The present work is devoted to numerical simulation of temperature fields and the analysis of structural and strength properties of the samples surface layer of boron carbide ceramics treated by the high-current pulsed electron-beam of the submillisecond duration. The samples made of sintered boron carbide ceramics are used in these investigations. The problem of calculating the temperature field is reduced to solving the thermal conductivity equation. The electron beam density ranges between 8…30 J/cm2, while the pulse durations are 100…200 μs in numerical modelling. The results of modelling the temperature field allowed ascertaining the threshold parameters of the electron beam, such as energy density and pulse duration. The electron beam irradiation is accompanied by the structural modification of the surface layer of boron carbide ceramics either in the single-phase (liquid or solid) or two-phase (solid-liquid) states. The sample surface of boron carbide ceramics is treated under the two-phase state (solid-liquid) conditions of the structural modification. The surface layer is modified by the high-current pulsed electron-beam produced by SOLO installation at the Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia. The elemental composition and the defect structure of the modified surface layer are analyzed by the optical instrument, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Mechanical properties of the modified layer are determined measuring its hardness and crack resistance. Research results show that the melting and subsequent rapid solidification of the surface layer lead to such phenomena as fragmentation due to a crack network, grain size reduction, formation of the sub-grained structure due to mechanical twinning, and increase of hardness and crack resistance.

  15. Theoretical studies on the electronic structure and properties of complex ceramic crystals and glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, Wai-Yim.

    1991-01-24

    This progress report summarizes the accomplishment of the DOE-support research program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City for the period July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992. This is the second year of a three-year renewal. The major accomplishments for the year are: (a) Initiation of fundamental studies on the electronic properties of C{sub 60} and related crystals; (b) study of electronic structures and optical properties of several important ceramic crystals, especially on AlN, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; (c) first-principles calculation of total energies and structural phase transitions in oxides, nitrides, and borides; (d) theory of magnetism in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B permanent magnetic alloy. The major focus for the next year's effort will be on the following areas: (1) Continuation of the fundamental studies on the buckminsterfullerene system with particular emphasis on the alkali-doped superconducting fullerides. (2) Fundamental studies on the structure and properties of Boron and B-related compounds. (3) Basic studies on the structural and electronic properties of metallic glasses with particular emphasis on the magnetic glasses. (4) Further development of the first-principles OLCAO method for applications to super-complex systems.

  16. a Study of the Electronic Characteristics and Photoelectrochemical Activity of Extrinsic Ceramic Strontium - and Titanium Dioxide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odekirk, Bruce

    1983-01-01

    A study of the characteristics of extrinsic, ceramic SrTiO(,3) and TiO(,2) is presented. These materials have been known to assist in the photoelectrochemical dissociation of water without undergoing decomposition, but their wide intrinsic bandgaps (3.0-3.2 eV) make them unsuitable for efficient solar energy conversion. Consequently, a wide variety of samples were studied in the highly extrinsic state, produced both by the introduction of impurities and by strong reduction. Electrical conductivity (throughout the range 10 (LESSTHEQ) T (LESSTHEQ) 500 K), thermopower, and photoconductivity were all measured, and compared to photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell performance. Single crystal samples of strongly reduced TiO(,2) were similarly examined for comparison with the ceramic materials. It was found that oxygen vacancies produced upon high temperature reduction of undoped SrTiO(,3) form O(,V) -impurity bands, with activation energies in the range 0.03 -0.075 eV (for n = 10('17) - 10('13) cm('-3)). Impurity band formation was also found in La-doped SrTiO(,3) for {La} (GREATERTHEQ) 0.2%, and the spectral response confirmed expectations from dark conductivity measurements that the conduction and impurity bands are fully merged with a substantial band tail when {La} = 1.0%. This resulted in the diminution of the optical bandgap from (DBLTURN) 3.2 eV to (DBLTURN) 2.8 eV, and with that, significantly enhanced photoanode performance was obtained. The behavior of (sigma) with reduction for La:SrTiO(,3) confirmed that the defect structure at room temperature consists of controlled atomic imperfection under oxidizing conditions, which gives way to a controlled valency mechanism upon reduction. This transition produces a semiconducting material. High temperature reduction of undoped TiO(,2) was found to produce a large number of donor defects, with room temperature conductionband electron densities in the range n = 10('17) - 10('19 )cm('-3). Ta-doped TiO(,2) ceramics demonstrated

  17. Comparative analysis of electrophysical properties of ceramic tantalum pentoxide coatings, deposited by electron beam evaporation and magnetron sputtering methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkov, N.; Mateev, E.; Safonov, V.; Zykova, A.; Yakovin, S.; Kolesnikov, D.; Sudzhanskaya, I.; Goncharov, I.; Georgieva, V.

    2014-12-01

    Ta2O5 ceramic coatings have been deposited on glass substrates by e-beam evaporation and magnetron sputtering methods. For the magnetron sputtering process Ta target was used. X-ray diffraction measurements show that these coatings are amorphous. XPS survey spectra of the ceramic Ta2O5 coatings were obtained. All spectra consist of well-defined XPS lines of Ta 4f, 4d, 4p and 4s; O 1s; C 1s. Ta 4f doublets are typical for Ta2O5 coatings with two main peaks. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images of the e-beam evaporated and magnetron sputtered Ta2O5 ceramic coatings have revealed a relatively flat surface with no cracks. The dielectric properties of the tantalum pentoxide coatings have been investigated in the frequency range of 100 Hz to 1 MHz. The electrical behaviour of e-beam evaporated and magnetron sputtered Ta2O5 ceramic coatings have also been compared. The deposition process conditions principally effect the structure parameters and electrical properties of Ta2O5 ceramic coatings. The coatings deposited by different methods demonstrate the range of dielectric parameters due to the structural and stoichiometric composition changes

  18. Non-cross talk multi-channel photomultiplier using guided electron multipliers

    DOEpatents

    Gomez, J.; Majewski, S.; Weisenberger, A.G.

    1995-09-26

    An improved multi-channel electron multiplier is provided that exhibits zero cross-talk and high rate operation. Resistive material input and output masks are employed to control divergence of electrons. Electron multiplication takes place in closed channels. Several embodiments are provided for these channels including a continuous resistive emissive multiplier and a discrete resistive multiplier with discrete dynode chains interspaced with resistive layers-masks. Both basic embodiments provide high gain multiplication of electrons without accumulating surface charges while containing electrons to their proper channels to eliminate cross-talk. The invention can be for example applied to improve the performance of ion mass spectrometers, positron emission tomography devices, in DNA sequencing and other beta radiography applications and in many applications in particle physics. 28 figs.

  19. Non cross talk multi-channel photomultiplier using guided electron multipliers

    DOEpatents

    Gomez, Javier; Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    1995-01-01

    An improved multi-channel electron multiplier is provided that exhibits zero cross-talk and high rate operation. Resistive material input and output masks are employed to control divergence of electrons. Electron multiplication takes place in closed channels. Several embodiments are provided for these channels including a continuous resistive emissive multiplier and a discrete resistive multiplier with discrete dynode chains interspaced with resistive layers-masks. Both basic embodiments provide high gain multiplication of electrons without accumulating surface charges while containing electrons to their proper channels to eliminate cross-talk. The invention can be for example applied to improve the performance of ion mass spectrometers, positron emission tomography devices, in DNA sequencing and other beta radiography applications and in many applications in particle physics.

  20. Nonlinear study of an ion-channel guiding free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Zhengbiao; Zhang, Shi-Chang

    2015-04-15

    A nonlinear model and simulations of the output power of an ion-channel guiding free-electron laser (FEL) are presented in this paper. Results show that the nonlinear output power of an ion-channel guiding FEL is comparable to that of an axial guide magnetic field FEL. Compared to an axial guide magnetic field FEL, an ion-channel guiding FEL substantially weakens the negative effect of the electron-beam energy spread on the output power due to its advantageous focusing mechanism on the electron motion.

  1. Angular distributions of relativistic electrons under channeling in half-wavelength crystal and corresponding radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takabayashi, Y.; Bagrov, V. G.; Bogdanov, O. V.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.; Tukhfatullin, T. A.

    2015-07-01

    New experiments on channeling of 255 MeV electrons in a half-wavelength crystals (HWC) were performed at SAGA Light Source facilities. The simulations of trajectories for (2 2 0) and (1 1 1) planar channeling in Si were performed using the computer code BCM-1.0. Comparison of experimental and theoretical results shows a good agreement. The results of calculations of spectral distribution of radiation in forward direction (θ = 0°) from 255 MeV electrons at (2 2 0) channeling in HWC silicon are presented. Qualitative comparison with radiation spectrum from an electron moving in an arc is performed.

  2. Electronic identification of cattle: interference in the reading of ceramic bolus transponders in the presence of ruminal magnets.

    PubMed

    Ferri, N; Marchi, E; Di Mattia, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors assess the reading performances of electronic transponders encased in ceramic boluses, utilised as identification (ID) instruments for production ruminants, and the possible influence of the magnet, which is located in the fore-stomach of ruminants. Research has been conducted in free-range Friesian dairy herds in the Teramo Province. The use of the electronic bolus to identify cattle appears to provide better guarantees than the traditional methods used and meets the requirements of identifying individual animals at the farm level. Results demonstrate how the presence of both the magnet and the ceramic bolus, equipped with a transponder, makes it difficult, and sometimes impossible, to read the code. However, the electronic ID system is the best instrument currently available. The authors confirm the validity of this method and highlight some problems that still need to be solved. PMID:20437387

  3. Compositions and chemical bonding in ceramics by quantitative electron energy-loss spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, J.; Horton, L.L.; McHargue, C.J.; McKernan, S.; Carter, C.B.; Revcolevschi, A.; Tanaka, S.; Davis, R.F.

    1993-12-31

    Quantitative electron energy-loss spectrometry was applied to a range of ceramic materials at a spatial resolution of <5 nm. Analysis of Fe L{sub 23} white lines indicated a low-spin state with a charge transfer of {approximately}1.5 electrons/atom onto the Fe atoms implanted into (amorphized) silicon carbide. Gradients of 2 to 5% in the Co:O stoichiometry were measured across 100-nm-thick Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} layers in an oxidized directionally solidified CoO-ZrO{sub 2} eutectic, with the highest O levels near the ZrO{sub 2}. The energy-loss near-edge structures were dramatically different for the two cobalt oxides; those for CO{sub 3}O{sub 4} have been incorrectly ascribed to CoO in the published literature. Kinetically stabilized solid solubility occurred in an AlN-SiC film grown by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on {alpha}(6H)-SiC, and no detectable interdiffusion occurred in couples of MBE-grown AlN on SiC following annealing at up to 1750C. In diffusion couples of polycrystalline AlN on SiC, interfacial 8H sialon (aluminum oxy-nitride) and pockets of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rich {beta}{prime} sialon in the SiC were detected.

  4. Low-Pressure Gas Effects on the Potency of an Electron Beam Against Ceramic Cloth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C. K.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Fragomeni, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    An 8-kv electron beam with a current in the neighborhood of 100 mA from the Ukrainian space welding "Universal Hand Tool" (UHT) burned holes in Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1,427 C. The burnthrough time was on the order of 8 scc at standoff distances between UHT and cloth ranging from 6-24 in. At both closer (2 in.) and farther (48 in.) standoff distances the potency of the beam against the cloth declined and the burnthrough time went up significantly. Prior to the test it had been expected that the beam would lay down a static charge on the cloth and be deflected without damaging the cloth. The burnthrough is thought to be an effect of partial transmission of beam power by a stream of positive ions generated by the high-voltage electron beam from contaminant gas in the "vacuum" chamber. A rough quantitative theoretical computation appears to substantiate this possibility.

  5. The design of an asymmetric bionic branching channel for electronic chips cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shanglong; Qin, Jie; Guo, Wei; Fang, Kuang

    2013-06-01

    Inspired by the wing vein of Lepidoptera, a designment of asymmetric bionic branching channel for electronic chips cooling is developed. Lepidoptera vein D was chosen to measure the angle of first and second branch level. Based on these regular patterns, an asymmetric bionic branching channel is designed in a 35 mm × 35 mm chip. Comparing with fractal-like branching channel, it provides a stronger heat transfer capability, lower pressure drop and lower flow resistance in the experiment.

  6. Quantum ballistic transport by interacting two-electron states in quasi-one-dimensional channels

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Danhong; Gumbs, Godfrey; Abranyos, Yonatan; Pepper, Michael; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2015-11-15

    For quantum ballistic transport of electrons through a short conduction channel, the role of Coulomb interaction may significantly modify the energy levels of two-electron states at low temperatures as the channel becomes wide. In this regime, the Coulomb effect on the two-electron states is calculated and found to lead to four split energy levels, including two anticrossing-level and two crossing-level states. Moreover, due to the interplay of anticrossing and crossing effects, our calculations reveal that the ground two-electron state will switch from one anticrossing state (strong confinement) to a crossing state (intermediate confinement) as the channel width gradually increases and then back to the original anticrossing state (weak confinement) as the channel width becomes larger than a threshold value. This switching behavior leaves a footprint in the ballistic conductance as well as in the diffusion thermoelectric power of electrons. Such a switching is related to the triple spin degeneracy as well as to the Coulomb repulsion in the central region of the channel, which separates two electrons away and pushes them to different channel edges. The conductance reoccurrence region expands from the weak to the intermediate confinement regime with increasing electron density.

  7. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    DOEpatents

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  8. COUNTER PROPAGATION OF ELECTRON AND CO2 LASER BEAMS IN A PLASMA CHANNEL.

    SciTech Connect

    HIROSE,T.; POGORELSKY,I.V.; BEN ZVI,I.; YAKIMENKO,V.; KUSCHE,K.; SIDDONS,P.; KUMITA,T.; KAMIYA,Y.; ZIGLER,A.; GREENBERG,B.; ET AL

    2002-11-12

    A high-energy CO{sub 2} laser is channeled in a capillary discharge. Occurrence of guiding conditions at a relatively low plasma density (<10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}) is confirmed by MHD simulations. Divergence of relativistic electron beam changes depending on the plasma density. Counter-propagation of the electron and laser beams inside the plasma channel results in intense x-ray generation.

  9. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Heating Studies of Particle Coalescence and Microstructure Evolution in Nanosized Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    2006-06-02

    Final report on in-situ transmission microscopy heating studies of particle coalescence and microstructure evolution in nanosized ceramics. Report includes summary of work on particle shape changes and stress effects, and novel infiltration techniques in the processing of alumina based ceramics.

  10. Atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy of the intergranular structure of a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-silicon nitride ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, A.; Kisielowski, C.; Hoffmann, M.J.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2002-05-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) employing focus-variation phase-reconstruction methods is used to image the atomic structure of grain boundaries in a silicon nitride ceramic at a resolution of 0.8 Angstrom

  11. Selection and design of the secondary electron channel of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishkova, T. Ya.; Basalaev, A. A.; Kuz'michev, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Computer simulation is carried out for selecting a compact electron-optical system of the channel for detecting secondary electrons formed during the interaction of xenon atoms or ions with energy of 1-30 keV with Xe atoms. The solid angle of passage of secondary electron beams in a wide range of their initial energies is calculated. The energy spectrum of secondary electrons with various energies is determined by constructing their deceleration curve.

  12. Electron acceleration in preformed plasma channels with terawatt CO{sub 2} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1995-02-01

    Extended cylindrical plasma channels produced under gas breakdown by axicon-focused laser beams may be used as optical waveguides in laser-driven electron accelerators. Plasma channeling of the laser beams will help to maintain a high acceleration gradient over many Rayleigh lengths. In addition, the rarefied gas density channel produced after the optical gas breakdown, and followed by a plasma column expansion, reduces multiple scattering of the electron beam. A high-power picosecond C0{sub 2}laser operational at the ATF and being further upgraded to the 1 TW level is considered as the source for a plasma channel formation and as the laser accelerator driver. We show how various laser accelerator schemes including beat wave, wake field, and Inverse Cherenkov accelerator benefit from using a channeled short-pulse C0{sub 2}laser as a driver.

  13. Micromechanisms of brittle fracture: Acoustic emissions and electron channeling analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, W.W.

    1990-06-01

    The objectives of this work are to: (i) Evaluate the initial stages of cleavage nucleation in single and polycrystalline samples; (ii) Determine the controlling event(s) which lead(s) to unstable cleavage (is it an unstable cluster'' of microcracks or a crack-tip opening displacement criterion for an array of ligaments surrounding these microcracks ); (iii) Determine how the process zone, which depends upon microstructure and processing history, affects the controlling event(s); (iv) Use selected area channeling patterns (SACP's) to assist in an independent measure of the cleavage fracture stress of grains cleaved at or just outside the elastic-plastic boundary; also, use it to evaluate static and dynamic strain distributions; and (v) Evaluate the effects of dislocation shielding and overload using combined methods of computational mechanics with discretized dislocation arrays and direct observations of dislocations using channeling, etch pit and birefringence methods. Accomplishments are discussed. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Three-dimensional electron paramagnetic resonance imaging technique for mapping porosity in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kordas, G.; Kang, Y.H. )

    1991-04-01

    This paper reports on a three-dimensional (3D) electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) method which was developed to probe the structure and size of pores in ceramic materials. The imaging device that was added to the EPR instrument consisted of a computer-controlled current source and magnetic field gradient. This add-on facility was tested using a well-defined diphenlpicrylhydrazzyl phantom sample. Pumice was then used to demonstrate the potential of the technique. This stone was immersed in a 0.5 mm {sup 15}N-substituted per-deutereted tempone water solution to fill the pores with spin labels. Images were reconstructed using a filtered back-projection technique. A two-dimensional (2D) imaging plane was constructed by collecting 33 projection planes over 180 {degrees}. A 3D image was derived from 22 planes each constructed by 22 projections. At present, the facility allows a resolution of 69 and 46 {mu}m for 2D and 3D imaging, respectively. Advancements of the imaging apparatus, software, and line width of the spin labels will be needed to enhance the resolution of this technique.

  15. Enhancement of laser-driven electron acceleration in an ion channel

    SciTech Connect

    Arefiev, Alexey V.; Khudik, Vladimir N.; Schollmeier, Marius

    2014-03-15

    A laser beam with duration longer than the period of plasma oscillations propagating through an underdense plasma produces a steady-state positively charged channel in the electron density. We consider a test electron in the two-dimensional plane channel under the combined action of the laser field and the transverse static electric field of the channel. At ultrarelativistic laser wave amplitude (a≫1), the electron is pushed primarily forward. As the electron gradually dephases from the wave, the field it samples and its relativistic γ-factor strongly oscillate. The natural frequency of electron oscillations across the channel (betatron frequency) depends on γ, which couples the betatron oscillations to the longitudinal motion induced by the wave. We show that the modulation of the natural frequency makes the oscillations unstable. The resulting amplification of the oscillations across the channel reduces the axial dephasing between the electron and the wave, leading to a considerable electron energy enhancement well above the ponderomotive energy. We find that there is a well-pronounced laser amplitude threshold a{sub *}, above which the enhancement takes place, that scales as a{sub *}∝1/√(n{sub 0}), where n{sub 0} is the ion density. The presented mechanism of energy enhancement is robust with respect to a longitudinal variation of the density, because it relies on a threshold phenomenon rather than on a narrow linear resonance.

  16. Enhancement of laser-driven electron acceleration in an ion channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefiev, Alexey V.; Khudik, Vladimir N.; Schollmeier, Marius

    2014-03-01

    A laser beam with duration longer than the period of plasma oscillations propagating through an underdense plasma produces a steady-state positively charged channel in the electron density. We consider a test electron in the two-dimensional plane channel under the combined action of the laser field and the transverse static electric field of the channel. At ultrarelativistic laser wave amplitude (a ≫1), the electron is pushed primarily forward. As the electron gradually dephases from the wave, the field it samples and its relativistic γ-factor strongly oscillate. The natural frequency of electron oscillations across the channel (betatron frequency) depends on γ, which couples the betatron oscillations to the longitudinal motion induced by the wave. We show that the modulation of the natural frequency makes the oscillations unstable. The resulting amplification of the oscillations across the channel reduces the axial dephasing between the electron and the wave, leading to a considerable electron energy enhancement well above the ponderomotive energy. We find that there is a well-pronounced laser amplitude threshold a*, above which the enhancement takes place, that scales as a*∝1/√n0 , where n0 is the ion density. The presented mechanism of energy enhancement is robust with respect to a longitudinal variation of the density, because it relies on a threshold phenomenon rather than on a narrow linear resonance.

  17. Measuring Fracture Times Of Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Bister, Leo; Bickler, Donald G.

    1989-01-01

    Electrical measurements complement or replace fast cinematography. Electronic system measures microsecond time intervals between impacts of projectiles on ceramic tiles and fracture tiles. Used in research on ceramics and ceramic-based composite materials such as armor. Hardness and low density of ceramics enable them to disintegrate projectiles more efficiently than metals. Projectile approaches ceramic tile specimen. Penetrating foil squares of triggering device activate display and recording instruments. As ceramic and resistive film break oscilloscope plots increase in electrical resistance of film.

  18. Electron interferometry in integer quantum Hall edge channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rech, J.; Wahl, C.; Jonckheere, T.; Martin, T.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the electronic analog of the Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer from quantum optics. In this realistic condensed matter device, single electrons are injected and travel along opposite chiral edge states of the integer quantum Hall effect, colliding at a quantum point contact (QPC). We monitor the fate of the colliding excitations by calculating zero-frequency current correlations at the output of the QPC. In the simpler case of filling factor $\

  19. Electronic Literacies and TESOL Graduate Students from Korea: New Channels for Navigating Cultures of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skilton-Sylvester, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Drawing on the ethnography of communication, addresses the role of electronic channels for meaning making among Korean students in graduate TESOL classes in the United States. Looks at the ways that these electronic literacies provide opportunities for navigating Korean and U.S. cultures of learning. (Author/VWL)

  20. E-beam ionized channel guiding of an intense relativistic electron beam

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Charles A.; Godfrey, Brendon B.; Kiekel, Paul D.; Shope, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    An IREB is guided through a curved path by ionizing a channel in a gas with electrons from a filament, and confining the electrons to the center of the path with a magnetic field extending along the path. The magnetic field is preferably generated by a solenoid extending along the path.

  1. E-beam ionized channel guiding of an intense relativistic electron beam

    DOEpatents

    Frost, C.A.; Godfrey, B.B.; Kiekel, P.D.; Shope, S.L.

    1988-05-10

    An IREB is guided through a curved path by ionizing a channel in a gas with electrons from a filament, and confining the electrons to the center of the path with a magnetic field extending along the path. The magnetic field is preferably generated by a solenoid extending along the path. 2 figs.

  2. Stable laser-pulse propagation in plasma channels for GeV electron acceleration

    PubMed

    Sprangle; Hafizi; Penano; Hubbard; Ting; Zigler; Antonsen

    2000-12-11

    To achieve multi-GeV electron energies in the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) it is necessary to propagate an intense laser pulse long distances in plasma without disruption. A 3D envelope equation for a laser pulse in a tapered plasma channel is derived, which includes wakefields and relativistic and nonparaxial effects, such as finite pulse length and group velocity dispersion. It is shown that electron energies of approximately GeV in a plasma-channel LWFA can be achieved by using short pulses where the forward Raman and modulation nonlinearities tend to cancel. Further energy gain can be achieved by tapering the plasma density to reduce electron dephasing. PMID:11102198

  3. Enhanced acceleration of injected electrons in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

    PubMed

    Tochitsky, S Ya; Narang, R; Filip, C V; Musumeci, P; Clayton, C E; Yoder, R B; Marsh, K A; Rosenzweig, J B; Pellegrini, C; Joshi, C

    2004-03-01

    Enhanced energy gain of externally injected electrons by a approximately 3 cm long, high-gradient relativistic plasma wave (RPW) is demonstrated. Using a CO2 laser beat wave of duration longer than the ion motion time across the laser spot size, a laser self-guiding process is initiated in a plasma channel. Guiding compensates for ionization-induced defocusing (IID) creating a longer plasma, which extends the interaction length between electrons and the RPW. In contrast to a maximum energy gain of 10 MeV when IID is dominant, the electrons gain up to 38 MeV energy in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel. PMID:15089478

  4. Energy relaxation of electrons impacts on channel quantization in nano-MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ling-Feng

    2014-09-01

    The effects of the rising electron temperature due to the energy relaxation on the quantization of the inversion layer in a nano-metal-oxide-semiconductor field transistor (MOSFET) with p-type silicon substrate have been theoretically investigated via self-consistent solution to the coupled Schrödinger equation with considering quantum coupling effects and Poisson equation. The first quantized energy level in the inversion layer rises from 3.6 to 211.4 %, and the total number of the inversion channel electron decreases from 95.7 to 6.5 % relative to those neglecting energy relaxation of channel electrons when the channel electric field increases from 10 to 55 kV/cm. The output characteristic of MOSFET will be largely affected by the energy relaxation when the channel electric field is higher than 10 kV/cm. All these suggest that the energy relaxation of channel electrons should be considered in the modeling of MOSFETs for higher channel electric field.

  5. Energy relaxation of electrons impacts on channel quantization in nano-MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ling-Feng

    2014-12-01

    The effects of the rising electron temperature due to the energy relaxation on the quantization of the inversion layer in a nano-metal-oxide-semiconductor field transistor (MOSFET) with p-type silicon substrate have been theoretically investigated via self-consistent solution to the coupled Schrödinger equation with considering quantum coupling effects and Poisson equation. The first quantized energy level in the inversion layer rises from 3.6 to 211.4 %, and the total number of the inversion channel electron decreases from 95.7 to 6.5 % relative to those neglecting energy relaxation of channel electrons when the channel electric field increases from 10 to 55 kV/cm. The output characteristic of MOSFET will be largely affected by the energy relaxation when the channel electric field is higher than 10 kV/cm. All these suggest that the energy relaxation of channel electrons should be considered in the modeling of MOSFETs for higher channel electric field.

  6. Composition and microstructure of maiolica from the museum of ceramics in Ascoli Piceno (Italy): evidences by electron microscopy and microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulmini, M.; Scognamiglio, F.; Roselli, G.; Vaggelli, G.

    2015-09-01

    The present work focuses on majolica objects from the collection of the museum of ceramic in Ascoli Piceno (Italy). The scientific investigation was performed on fragments detached from seven maiolicas attributed to the Castelli production (Abruzzi region) and one majolica from the Ascoli Piceno production (Marche region). The Castelli artifacts (late sixteenth-early eighteenth century) belong to the decorated style known as " compendiario." The piece from Ascoli Piceno recalls the decoration style of the other considered objects and is attributable to the "Paci" manufacture (first half of the nineteenth century). The selected objects were investigated by fiber optics reflectance spectroscopy, micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled with electron-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The ceramic bodies of all objects are calcareous, whereas the glazes are lead-alkali type opacified by tin dioxide. Blue and purplish-red decorations were obtained by cobalt and manganese compounds dissolved in the glaze, respectively. Yellow and orange decorations were obtained by particles of lead antimonate and hematite. Finally, black decorations were obtained using compounds rich in manganese and iron. The study contributes to knowledge on the production of Castelli ceramics and presents first archaeometric data on the maiolica production from Ascoli Piceno. The scientific examination highlights continuity with the Renaissance production, and the joint contribution of the three analytical techniques suggests distinctive features among different productions, thus integrating and refining the information obtained by the art-historical study.

  7. Boosting the Detection Potential of Liquid Chromatography-Electron Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using a Ceramic Coated Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Laura; Famiglini, Giorgio; Palma, Pierangela; Termopoli, Veronica; Cappiello, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Detection of target and non-target substances and their characterization in complex samples is a challenging task. Here we demonstrate that coating the electron ionization (EI) ion source of an LC-MS system with a sol-gel ceramic film can drastically improve the detection of high-molecular weight and high-boiling analytes. A new ion source coated with a ceramic material was developed and tested with a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) with an increasing number of rings. Comparison of the results obtained with those for an uncoated stainless steel (SS) ion source shows a dramatic improvement in the MS signals, with a nearly 40-fold increase of the signal-to-noise ratio. We also demonstrate the ability of the new system to produce excellent chromatographic profiles for hard-to-detect hormones.

  8. Boosting the Detection Potential of Liquid Chromatography-Electron Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using a Ceramic Coated Ion Source.

    PubMed

    Magrini, Laura; Famiglini, Giorgio; Palma, Pierangela; Termopoli, Veronica; Cappiello, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Detection of target and non-target substances and their characterization in complex samples is a challenging task. Here we demonstrate that coating the electron ionization (EI) ion source of an LC-MS system with a sol-gel ceramic film can drastically improve the detection of high-molecular weight and high-boiling analytes. A new ion source coated with a ceramic material was developed and tested with a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) with an increasing number of rings. Comparison of the results obtained with those for an uncoated stainless steel (SS) ion source shows a dramatic improvement in the MS signals, with a nearly 40-fold increase of the signal-to-noise ratio. We also demonstrate the ability of the new system to produce excellent chromatographic profiles for hard-to-detect hormones. PMID:26350384

  9. Simulation of a prebunched free-electron laser with planar wiggler and ion channel guiding

    SciTech Connect

    Rouhani, M. H.; Maraghechi, B.

    2010-02-15

    A one-dimensional and nonlinear simulation of a free-electron laser with a prebunched electron beam, a planar wiggler, and ion-channel guiding is presented. Using Maxwell's equations and full Lorentz force equation of motion for the electron beam, a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations is derived in slowly varying amplitude and wave number approximation and is solved numerically. This set of equations describes self-consistently the longitudinal dependence of radiation amplitude, growth rates, space-charge amplitude, and wave numbers together with the evolution of the electron beam. Because of using full Lorentz force equation of motion, it is possible to treat the injection of the beam into the wiggler. The electron beam is assumed cold, propagates with a relativistic velocity, ions are assumed immobile, and slippage is ignored. The effect of prebunched electron beam on saturation is studied. Ion-channel density is varied and the results for groups I and II orbits are compared with the case when the ion channel is absent. It is found that by using an ion channel/a prebunched electron beam growth rate can be increased, saturation length can be decreased, and the saturated amplitude of the radiation can be increased.

  10. A Study Comparing Electronic Mail and Voice Messaging Channels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Myke; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes a study that explored differences in computer-mediated communication messaging by comparing electronic mail and voice messaging used for giving directions. Highlights include a computational linguistic framework that examines differences between written and oral English, models of direction provision, and hypotheses based on preliminary…

  11. Electron energy balance and ionization in the channel of a stationary plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovzorov, A. N.; Pogorelov, A. A.; Svirskiy, E. B.; Smirnov, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents results of numerical simulations of the electron dynamics in the field of the azimuthal and longitudinal waves excited in the channel of a stationary plasma thruster (SPT). The simulations are based on the experimentally determined wave characteristics. The simulation results show that the azimuthal wave displayed as ionization instability enhances electron transport along the thruster channel. It is established that the electron transport rate in the azimuthal wave increases as compared to the rate of diffusion caused by electron scattering from neutral atoms in proportion to the ratio between the times of electron- neutral collisions responsible for ionization and elastic electron scattering, respectively. An expression governing the plasma conductivity is derived with allowance for electron interaction with the azimuthal wave. The Hall parameter, the electron component of the discharge current, and the electron heating power in the thruster channel are calculated for two model SPTs operating with krypton and xenon. The simulation results agree well with the results of experimental studies of these two SPTs.

  12. Electronic effects of defects in one-dimensional channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Elliot J.; Pan, Deng; Corso, Brad L.; Gul, O. Tolga; Collins, Philip G.

    2013-09-01

    As electronic devices shrink to the one-dimensional limit, unusual device physics can result, even at room temperature. Nanoscale conductors like single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are particularly useful tools for experimentally investigating these effects. Our characterization of point defects in SWNTs has focused on these electronic consequences. A single scattering site in an otherwise quasi-ballistic SWNT introduces resistance, transconductance, and chemical sensitivity, and here we investigate these contributions using a combination of transport and scanning probe techniques. The transport measurements determine the two-terminal contributions over a wide range of bias, temperature, and environmental conditions, while the scanning probe work provides complementary confirmation that the effects originate at a particular site along the conduction path in a SWNT. Together, the combination proves that single point defects behave like scattering barriers having Poole-Frenkel transport characteristics. The Poole-Frenkel barriers have heights of 10 - 30 meV and gate-dependent widths that grow as large as 1 μm due to the uniquely poor screening in one dimension. Poole-Frenkel characteristics suggest that the barriers contain at least one localized electronic state, and that this state primarily contributes to conduction under high bias or high temperature conditions. Because these localized states vary from one device to another, we hypothesize that each might be unique to a particular defect's chemical type.

  13. Parametric Channeling Radiation and its Application to the Measurement of Electron Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Takabayashi, Y.

    2010-06-23

    We have proposed a method for observing parametric channeling radiation (PCR) and of applying it to the measurement of electron beam energy. The PCR process occurs if the energy of the channeling radiation coincides with the energy of the parametric X-ray radiation (PXR). The PCR process can be regarded as the diffraction of 'virtual channeling radiation'. We developed a scheme for beam energy measurement and designed an experimental setup. We also estimated the beam parameters, and calculated the angular distributions of PXR and PCR. These considerations indicate that the observation of PCR is promising.

  14. Electron Acceleration in Cavitated Channels Formed by a Petawatt Laser in Low-Density Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mangles, S.P.D.; Walton, B.R.; Najmudin, Z.; Dangor, A.E.; Gopal, A.; Rozmus, W.; Tatarakis, M.; Thomas, A.G.R.; Wei, M.S.; Krushelnick, K.; Tzoufras, M.; Mori, W.B.; Tsung, F.S.; Clarke, R.J.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Evans, R.G.; Fritzler, S.

    2005-06-24

    The spectra of energetic electrons produced by a laser interaction with underdense plasma have been measured at intensities >3x10{sup 20} W cm{sup -2}. Electron energies in excess of 300 MeV have been observed. Measurements of the transmitted laser spectrum indicate that there is no correlation between the acceleration of electrons and plasma wave production. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the laser ponderomotive force produces an ion channel. The interaction of the laser field with the nonlinear focusing force of the channel leads to electron acceleration. The majority of the electrons never reach the betatron resonance but those which gain the highest energies do so. The acceleration process exhibits a strong sensitivity to initial conditions with particles that start within a fraction of a laser wavelength following completely different trajectories and gaining markedly different energies.

  15. Electron capture acceleration channel in a slit laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P. X.; Scheid, W.; Ho, Y. K.

    2007-03-12

    Using numerical simulations, the authors find that the electrons can be captured and accelerated to high energies (GeV) in a slit laser beam with an intensity of I{lambda}{sup 2}{approx}10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} {mu}m{sup 2}, where {lambda} is the laser wavelength in units of {mu}m. The range of the optimum incident energy is very wide, even up to GeV. These results are of interest for experiments because the relatively low intensity can be achieved with present chirped pulse amplification technique and a wide range of incident energies means that a multistage acceleration is possible.

  16. Solution-based deposition of ceramic thin films for electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shijun

    With the requirement of a low-temperature process which is compatible with flexible electronics, solution-based processes for ceramic thin films have received substantial attention in recent years. In this study, two different variations of solution processing were explored. Liquid phase deposition (LPD) was used to prepare for F-doped SiO2 and F-doped SnO2, and hydrothermal processing was used to prepare ZnO thin films consisting of vertically aligned nanorods. F-doped SiO2 thin films were developed from supersaturated hydrofluorosilicic acid (H2SiF6) solution with the addition of boric acid (H3BO3). The microstructure dependence of LPD SiO2 films on solution parameters and deposition temperature was systematically investigated. The dielectric constant is lower than that of thermal SiO2, resulting from the fluorine doping. The remarkably low dielectric constant, relatively low leakage current and fairly high elastic modulus make these low temperature processed LPD SiO2 films very promising for an interlayer dielectric for flexible substrates. Using the same LPD method, smooth SnO2 films were deposited on both silicon and glass substrates at 60 ºC through supersaturated solutions of SnF 2 with a concentration range from 10 mM to 40 mM. They consist of nanoscale crystallites and the degree of crystallinity increase with annealing temperature. A hydrothermal process was employed to deposit ZnO films for energy harvesting devices. A polymer mask was patterned on top of a zinc acetate seed layer to generate a regular array of open holes (200 nm in diameter) using a nanoimprint. Vertically aligned ZnO nanorod arrays were grown on these open holes that expose the seed layer. The morphology and microstrucutre of the nanorods were studied according to chemical composition of the solution. Equimolar reduce of the concentration of ZnAc and HMTA results in decrease in nanorod diameter, as well as in length. The nanorods become thinner and slightly better aligned with

  17. Insights into channel potentials and electron quasi-Fermi potentials for DG tunnel FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menka; Bulusu, Anand; Dasgupta, S.

    2015-01-01

    A detailed investigation carried out, with the help of extensive simulations using the TCAD device simulator Sentaurus, with the aim of achieving an understanding of the effects of variations in gate and drain potentials on the device characteristics of a silicon double-gate tunnel field effect transistor (Si-DG TFET) is reported in this paper. The investigation is mainly aimed at studying electrical properties such as the electric potential, the electron density, and the electron quasi-Fermi potential in a channel. From the simulation results, it is found that the electrical properties in the channel region of the DG TFET are different from those for a DG MOSFET. It is observed that the central channel potential of the DG TFET is not pinned to a fixed potential even after the threshold is passed (as in the case of the DG MOSFET); instead, it initially increases and later on decreases with increasing gate voltage, and this is also the behavior exhibited by the surface potential of the device. However, the drain current always increases with the applied gate voltage. It is also observed that the electron quasi-Fermi potential (eQFP) decreases as the channel potential starts to decrease, and there are hiphops in the channel eQFP for higher applied drain voltages. The channel regime resistance is also observed for higher gate length, which has a great effect on the I-V characteristics of the DG TFET device. These channel regime electrical properties will be very useful for determining the tunneling current; thus these results may have further uses in developing analytical current models.

  18. Enhancing oxygen transport through Mixed-Ionic-and-Electronic-Conducting ceramic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Anthony S.

    Ceramic membranes based on Mixed-Ionic-and-Electronic-Conducting (MIEC) oxides are capable of separating oxygen from air in the presence of an oxygen partial-pressure gradient. These MIEC membranes show great promise for oxygen consuming industrial processes, such as the production of syngas from steam reforming of natural gas (SRM), as well as for electricity generation in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). For both applications, the overall performance is dictated by the rate of oxygen transport across the membrane. Oxygen transport across MIEC membranes is composed of a bulk oxygen-ion diffusion process and surface processes, such as surface reactions and adsorption/desorption of gaseous reactants/products. The main goal of this thesis was to determine which process is rate-limiting in order to significantly enhance the overall rate of oxygen transport in MIEC membrane systems. The rate-limiting step was determined by evaluating the total resistance to oxygen transfer, Rtot. Rtot is the sum of a bulk diffusion resistance in the membrane itself, Rb, and interfacial loss components, Rs. Rb is a function of the membrane's ionic conductivity and thickness, while Rs arises primarily from slow surface-exchange kinetics that cause the P(O2) at the surfaces of the membrane to differ from the P(O 2) in the adjacent gas phases. Rtot can be calculated from the Nernst potential across the membrane and the measured oxygen flux. The rate-limiting process can be determined by evaluating the relative contributions of the various losses, Rs and Rb, to Rtot. Using this method, this thesis demonstrates that for most membrane systems, Rs is the dominating factor. In the development of membrane systems with high oxygen transport rates, thin membranes with high ionic conductivities are required to achieve fast bulk oxygen-ion diffusion. However, as membrane thickness is decreased, surface reaction kinetics become more important in determining the overall transport rate. The two

  19. [Comparison of interfaces between a NiCr alloy and various dental ceramics using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and 3-point bending test].

    PubMed

    Hegedüs, Csaba; Daróczi, Lajos; Deák, György; Beke, Dezsö

    2003-12-01

    Several methods (e.g. tensile strength, shear bond strength) have been used in testing metal-ceramic bonds. However, in the interface, structural and analytical investigations can be applied in determining the chemical and phase structure of substances making up the bond. The aim of the present study is to assess the interface between Wiron 99 (Bego) alloy and Vision (Wohlwend) VITA VMK68 (Vita), Carat (Dentsply/DeTrey) ceramic using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and 3-point bending test. In the case of NiCr alloys, morphologically similar but structurally varying phases developed in all of the ceramics. In each case, a Cr2O3 layer consisting of small crystals (10-20 nm) was noticed with a series of underlying bubble-like amorphous inclusions. The exact three dimensional (3D) location of these structures and their relation to the glass-phase of the ceramic, as well as its role in the nanomechanical anchoring of the ceramic are still to be clarified. The values of debonding stress were 41.67 +/- 5.01 MPa, 52.89 +/- 8.06 MPa and 56.58 +/- 10.21 MPa for Carat, VITA VMK68 ceramic and Vision, respectively. These parameters do not present significant difference at p > or = 0.05 among the three types of ceramics. Based on our measurements it is highly likely that the micromorphology of interface is basically determined by the composition of the alloy while in the chemical composition of the newly developed phases the ceramic and the parameters of firing (temperature, magnitude of vacuum and firing time) play an important role. Values of cracking and morphological resemblance suggest that the superficial micromorphological and nanomorphological structures, acting as mechanical anchoring elements, play an important role in fixing the ceramic. PMID:14971264

  20. Laser-driven electron acceleration in a plasma channel with an additional electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Li-Hong; Xue, Ju-Kui; Liu, Jie

    2016-05-01

    We examine the electron acceleration in a two-dimensional plasma channel under the action of a laser field and an additional static electric field. We propose to design an appropriate additional electric field (its direction and location), in order to launch the electron onto an energetic trajectory. We find that the electron acceleration strongly depends on the coupled effects of the laser polarization, the direction, and location of the additional electric field. The additional electric field affects the electron dynamics by changing the dephasing rate. Particularly, a suitably designed additional electric field leads to a considerable energy gain from the laser pulse after the interaction with the additional electric field. The electron energy gain from the laser with the additional electric field can be much higher than that without the additional electric field. This engineering provides a possible means for producing high energetic electrons.

  1. Transformation of the plasmon spectrum in a grating-gate transistor structure with spatially modulated two-dimensional electron channel

    SciTech Connect

    Fateev, D. V. Popov, V. V.; Shur, M. S.

    2010-11-15

    We present the theory of plasmon excitation in a grating-gate transistor structure with spatially modulated 2D electron channel. The plasmon spectrum varies depending on the electron density modulation in the transistor channel. We report on the frequency ranges of plasmon mode excitation in the gated and ungated regions of the channel and on the interaction of these different types of plasmon modes. We show that a constructive influence of the ungated regions of the electron channel considerably increases the intensity of the gated plasmon resonances and reduces the plasmon-resonance linewidth in the grating-gated transistor structure.

  2. Numerical study of the generation of runaway electrons in a gas diode with a hot channel

    SciTech Connect

    Lisenkov, V. V.; Shklyaev, V. A.

    2015-11-15

    A new method for increasing the efficiency of runaway electron beam generation in atmospheric pressure gas media has been suggested and theoretically proved. The method consists of creating a hot region (e.g., a spark channel or a laser plume) with a decreased numerical density of gas molecules (N) near the cathode. In this method, the ratio E/N (E—electric field strength) is increased by decreasing N instead of increasing E, as has been done in the past. The numerical model that is used allows the simultaneous calculation of the formation of a subnanosecond gas discharge and the generation of runaway electrons in gas media. The calculations have demonstrated the possibility of obtaining current pulses of runaway electrons with amplitudes of hundred of amperes and durations of more than 100 ps. The influence of the hot channel geometry on the parameters of the generated beam has been investigated.

  3. Electron channelling contrast observations in deformed Mg alloys prepared with ion milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaboli, S.; Pinard, P. T.; Su, J.; Yue, S.; Gauvin, R.

    2014-03-01

    Electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI) was used in the cold-field emission scanning electron microscope (CFE-SEM) to image the microstructure on deformed bulk specimen. Imaging was conducted with a pole-piece mounted silicon photodiode detector at 5 keV to collect backscattered electrons generated from a low-tilted (0 - 3 degrees) specimen. Broad ion beam milling surface preparation technique was used to remove surface layers and reveal near-surface deformation features. The uniaxial hot-compression tests were conducted on Mg-0.3 wt% Al-0.2 wt% Ca alloy. ECCI observations on deformed bulk specimen showed irregular and complex channelling contrast variations inside parent grains and low angle grain boundaries originated from parent grain boundaries. ECCI on an ion milled prepared surface provides non-destructive and rapid visualisation and characterisation of strain fields along with near-surface deformation substructures in CFE-SEM.

  4. Implementation of multi-channel electronics system for astrophysical reaction studies at ORNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, S. H.; Jones, K. L.; Matos, M.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chae, K. Y.; Smith, M. S.; Varner, R. J.; Elson, J. M.; Famiano, M. A.

    2010-11-01

    The development of large area, high-granularity silicon detector arrays has created opportunities to study transfer reactions in inverse kinematics with low-intensity radioactive beams. We are developing a new detector array comprised of 24 double-sided silicon strip detectors that will allow measurements with lower thresholds and better resolution than current detectors at ORNL. To instrument this new array, we are implementing ˜2000 channels of signal processing electronics based on application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) designed at Washington University. The ASICs handle pulse shaping, timing, triggering, and digitization of 32 channels all on a single chip. In addition, a Real-Time Executive for Multiprocessor Systems (RTEMS) is used for a network communication between the electronics and data acquisition server. Details of the electronics setup and a status report on the devices will be presented. We will also discuss plans to utilize this system for experiments of transfer reactions using radioactive ion beams.

  5. Electron-electron scattering-induced channel hot electron injection in nanoscale n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors with high-k/metal gate stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Liu, Kuan-Ju; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Liu, Xi-Wen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Ching-En; Ho, Szu-Han; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Lu, Ching-Sen

    2014-10-06

    This work investigates electron-electron scattering (EES)-induced channel hot electron (CHE) injection in nanoscale n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (n-MOSFETs) with high-k/metal gate stacks. Many groups have proposed new models (i.e., single-particle and multiple-particle process) to well explain the hot carrier degradation in nanoscale devices and all mechanisms focused on Si-H bond dissociation at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. However, for high-k dielectric devices, experiment results show that the channel hot carrier trapping in the pre-existing high-k bulk defects is the main degradation mechanism. Therefore, we propose a model of EES-induced CHE injection to illustrate the trapping-dominant mechanism in nanoscale n-MOSFETs with high-k/metal gate stacks.

  6. Channeling experiments with sub-GeV electrons in flat silicon single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backe, H.; Lauth, W.

    2015-07-01

    Various planar channeling experiments, performed at the Mainz Microtron MAMI with electrons at silicon single crystals, have been reanalyzed. Two types of signals have been employed. The low energy loss signal originates from emission of channeling radiation in the energy domain between 0.4 and 9 MeV while the high energy loss signal from electrons which have lost about 50% of their primary energy by emission of bremsstrahlung photons. The (1 1 0) planar channeling data, taken at a beam energy of 855 MeV with the former signal, can well be described on the basis of the solution of the classical Fokker-Planck equation. The measurements with the latter signal at beam energies between 195 and 855 MeV indicate quantum state phenomena. For (1 1 1) planar channeling calculations with the Fokker-Planck equation have also been performed at a beam energy of 6.3 GeV. The results indicate that data taken with a crystal of 60 μm thickness [U. Wienands et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 074801 (2015)] are probably not suited to determine the predicted "asymptotic" dechanneling length of 265 μm which applies for about 48% of all electrons.

  7. Using Electronic Properties of Adamantane Derivatives to Analyze their Ion Channel Interactions: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacum, Jason

    2013-03-01

    The derivatives of adamantane, which is a cage-like diamondoid structure, can be used as pharmaceuticals for the treatment of various diseases and disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. These drugs interact with ion channels, and they act by electronically and physically hindering the ion transport. The electronic properties of each compound influence the location and level of ion channel hindrance, and the specific use of each compound depends on the functional groups that are attached to the adamantane base chain. Computational analysis and molecular simulations of these different derivatives and the ion channels can provide useful insight into the effect that the functional groups have on the properties of the compounds. Using this information, conclusions can be made about the pharmaceutical mechanisms, as well as how to improve them or create new beneficial compounds. Focusing on the electronic properties, such as the dipole moments of the derivatives and amino acids in the ion channels, can provide more efficient predictions of how these drugs work and how they can be enhanced. Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-06ER46304

  8. Use of channel electron multipliers as secondary standard detectors at EUV wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Lapson, L. B.

    1974-01-01

    The procedures available for photometric calibration at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths are outlined and the requirements for a secondary standard EUV photomultiplier defined. The performance of a number of commercially available channel electron multipliers over the 304-1350-A wavelength range is described, and their suitability for use as secondary standards is discussed in detail. Although none of the multipliers evaluated fully met the requirements for a secondary standard, it proved possible to calibrate absolutely a Mullard cone channel over the required wavelength range to an accuracy of plus or minus 9% and to employ it as a secondary standard in the calibration of a series of sounding rocket spectrometers.

  9. Use of Channel Electron Multipliers as Secondary Standard Detectors at EUV Wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Timothy, J G; Lapson, L B

    1974-06-01

    The procedures available for photometric calibration at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths are outlined and the requirements for a secondary standard EUV photomultiplier defined. The performance of a number of commercially available channel electron multipliers over the 304-1350-A wavelength range is described and their suitability for use as secondary standards discussed in detail. Although none of the multipliers evaluated fully met the requirements for a secondary standard it proved possible to calibrate absolutely a Mullard cone channel over the required wavelength range to an accuracy of +/-9% and to employ it as a secondary standard in the calibration of a series of sounding rocket spectrometers. PMID:20126208

  10. Influence of finite radial geometry on the growth rate of ion-channel free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bahmani, Mohammad; Hamzehpour, Hossein; Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-11-15

    The influence of finite radial geometry on the instability of a tenuous relativistic electron beam propagating in an ion-channel in a waveguide is investigated. The instability analysis is based on the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations for the perturbation about a self-consistent beam equilibrium. With the help of characteristic method the dispersion relation for the TE-mode is derived and analyzed through the numerical solutions. It is found that the positioning of the beam radius R{sub b} relative to the waveguide radius R{sub c}, and the ion-channel frequency can have a large influence on the maximum growth rate and corresponding wave number.

  11. Microstructure and properties of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamano, K.

    1984-01-01

    The history of research into the microstructure and properties of ceramic ware is discussed; methods of producing ceramics with particular characteristics are investigated. Bubbles, sintering, cracks, and electron microscopy are discussed.

  12. First-principles calculation of electronic stopping contributions from core electrons and off-channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Alfredo; Schleife, Andre; Kanai, Yosuke

    2014-03-01

    In order to understand the interaction of projectile atoms with targets under particle radiation in materials, e.g. in space applications or nuclear reactors, it is critical to investigate electronic and ionic contributions to stopping power. The goal of such efforts is detailed understanding of radiation damages as well as fundamental effects such as ion-electron interaction. While ionic stopping has been successfully modeled by molecular dynamics in the past, only recently a computational framework came within reach that is capable of accurately describing electronic stopping from first principles. Using our large-scale implementation of real-time time-dependent density functional theory in non-adiabatic Ehrenfest molecular dynamics, we are able to gain deep insight into electronic stopping for systems with hundreds of atoms and thousands of electrons, taking into account their quantum-mechanical electron-electron interaction. We discuss distinct contributions of valence and core electrons of aluminum target atoms to electronic stopping, and we study their importance for different projectile (hydrogen and helium atoms) velocities. There is striking influence of the stopping geometry especially for fast projectiles, and we find excellent agreement with experiment. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Numerical simulation of the creation of a hollow neutral-hydrogen channel by an electron beam.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V V; Antsiferov, P S; Koshelev, K N; Akdim, M R; Bijkerk, F

    2006-11-17

    An experimental method is proposed for the creation of plasma optical waveguides at low electron densities. The method consists of creating a hollow neutral-hydrogen channel by means of fast local heating of a hydrogen volume by a needlelike electron beam, followed by laser ionization of the hydrogen to provide the plasma waveguide. Results of numerical simulations are presented which show that guiding with an axial electron density in the range of 10(17) cm-3 can be achieved with a matched spot size of 30 microm. Its application for laser wakefield acceleration of electrons is discussed. The method would enable guiding lengths up to 30 cm at maximal energies of accelerated electrons in the range 10-100 GeV. PMID:17155692

  14. Digitally controlled high-performance dc SQUID readout electronics for a 304-channel vector magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechstein, S.; Petsche, F.; Scheiner, M.; Drung, D.; Thiel, F.; Schnabel, A.; Schurig, Th

    2006-06-01

    Recently, we have developed a family of dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) readout electronics for several applications. These electronics comprise a low-noise preamplifier followed by an integrator, and an analog SQUID bias circuit. A highly-compact low-power version with a flux-locked loop bandwidth of 0.3 MHz and a white noise level of 1 nV/√Hz was specially designed for a 304-channel low-Tc dc SQUID vector magnetometer, intended to operate in the new Berlin Magnetically Shielded Room (BMSR-2). In order to minimize the space needed to mount the electronics on top of the dewar and to minimize the power consumption, we have integrated four electronics channels on one 3 cm × 10 cm sized board. Furthermore we embedded the analog components of these four channels into a digitally controlled system including an in-system programmable microcontroller. Four of these integrated boards were combined to one module with a size of 4 cm × 4 cm × 16 cm. 19 of these modules were implemented, resulting in a total power consumption of about 61 W. To initialize the 304 channels and to service the system we have developed software tools running on a laptop computer. By means of these software tools the microcontrollers are fed with all required data such as the working points, the characteristic parameters of the sensors (noise, voltage swing), or the sensor position inside of the vector magnetometer system. In this paper, the developed electronics including the software tools are described, and first results are presented.

  15. Green apatites: hydride ions, electrons and their interconversion in the crystallographic channel.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Katsuro; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-03-01

    Hydride (H(-)) ions and electrons in channel sites of the lattice of calcium phosphate apatites are characterized. Solid-state chemical reduction using TiH2 is effective for doping of H(-) ions into apatites. Irradiation of the H(-) ion-doped apatite with ultraviolet (UV) light induces green coloration. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) reveals that this colour centre is attributed to electrons captured at a vacant anion site in the crystallographic channel, forming F(+) centres. Transient H(0) atoms are detected at low temperatures by EPR. The concentration of UV-induced electrons in the apatite at room temperature decays according to second-order kinetics because of the chemical reactions involving two electrons; overall, electron generation and thermal decay can be described as: H(-) + O(2-) ↔ 2e(-) + OH(-). (1)H magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to identify H(-) ions in the apatite, which are characterized by a chemical shift of +3.4 ppm. Various types of O-H groups including OH(-) ions in the channel and protons bound to phosphate groups are concurrently formed, and are identified by considering the relationship between the O-H stretching frequency and the (1)H chemical shift. The complementary results obtained by EPR and NMR reveal that the H(-) ions and transient H(0) atoms are located at the centre of Ca3 triangles in the apatite, while the electrons are located in the centre of Ca6 octahedra. These findings provide an effective approach for identifying new classes of mixed-oxide-hydride or -electride crystals. PMID:26928237

  16. Computer simulation of electron-positron pair production by channeling radiation in amorphous converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdrashitov, S. V.; Bogdanov, O. V.; Dabagov, S. B.; Pivovarov, Yu L.; Tukhfatullin, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the radiator-converter approach at 200 MeV channeled electrons (the SPARC_LAB LNF facility energies) for the case of using W crystalline radiator and W amorphous converter. A comparison of the positron production by the axial channeling radiation and the bremsstrahlung is performed. The positron stopping in the convertor is studied by means of computer simulations. It is shown that for the maximum yield of positrons the thickness of the W amorphous converter should be taken 0.35 cm in the case of using the axial channeling radiation resulting to total yield of positrons 5 10-3 e+/e- and 0.71 cm in the case of using the bremsstrahlung resulting to total yield of positrons 3.3 10-3 e+/e-.

  17. Single particle electron cryo-microscopy of a mammalian ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Maofu; Cao, Erhu; Julius, David; Cheng, Yifan

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family is large and functionally diverse, second only to potassium channels. Despite their prominence within the animal kingdom, TRP channels have resisted crystallization and structural determination for many years. This barrier was recently broken when the three-dimensional structure of the vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) was determined by single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM). Moreover, this is the first example in which the near atomic resolution structure of an integral membrane protein was elucidated by this technique and in a manner not requiring crystals, demonstrating the transformative power of single particle cryo-EM for revealing high-resolution structures of integral membrane proteins, particularly those of mammalian origin. Here we summarize technical advances, in both biochemistry and cryo-EM, that led to this major breakthrough. PMID:24681231

  18. Modeling of high composition AlGaN channel high electron mobility transistors with large threshold voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, Sanyam Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Akyol, Fatih; Nath, Digbijoy; Rajan, Siddharth

    2014-12-29

    We report on the potential of high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) consisting of high composition AlGaN channel and barrier layers for power switching applications. Detailed two-dimensional (2D) simulations show that threshold voltages in excess of 3 V can be achieved through the use of AlGaN channel layers. We also calculate the 2D electron gas mobility in AlGaN channel HEMTs and evaluate their power figures of merit as a function of device operating temperature and Al mole fraction in the channel. Our models show that power switching transistors with AlGaN channels would have comparable on-resistance to GaN-channel based transistors for the same operation voltage. The modeling in this paper shows the potential of high composition AlGaN as a channel material for future high threshold enhancement mode transistors.

  19. Gating machinery of InsP3R channels revealed by electron cryomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guizhen; Baker, Matthew L.; Wang, Zhao; Baker, Mariah R.; Sinyagovskiy, Pavel A.; Chiu, Wah; Ludtke, Steven J.; Serysheva, Irina I.

    2016-01-01

    Inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP3Rs) are ubiquitous ion channels responsible for cytosolic Ca2+ signalling and essential for a broad array of cellular processes ranging from contraction to secretion, and from proliferation to cell death. Despite decades of research on InsP3Rs, a mechanistic understanding of their structure–function relationship is lacking. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, near-atomic (4.7 Å) resolution electron cryomicroscopy structure of the tetrameric mammalian type 1 InsP3R channel in its apo-state. At this resolution, we are able to trace unambiguously ~85% of the protein backbone, allowing us to identify the structural elements involved in gating and modulation of this 1.3-megadalton channel. Although the central Ca2+-conduction pathway is similar to other ion channels, including the closely related ryanodine receptor, the cytosolic carboxy termini are uniquely arranged in a left-handed α-helical bundle, directly interacting with the amino-terminal domains of adjacent subunits. This configuration suggests a molecular mechanism for allosteric regulation of channel gating by intracellular signals. PMID:26458101

  20. Gating machinery of InsP3R channels revealed by electron cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guizhen; Baker, Matthew L; Wang, Zhao; Baker, Mariah R; Sinyagovskiy, Pavel A; Chiu, Wah; Ludtke, Steven J; Serysheva, Irina I

    2015-11-19

    Inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP3Rs) are ubiquitous ion channels responsible for cytosolic Ca(2+) signalling and essential for a broad array of cellular processes ranging from contraction to secretion, and from proliferation to cell death. Despite decades of research on InsP3Rs, a mechanistic understanding of their structure-function relationship is lacking. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, near-atomic (4.7 Å) resolution electron cryomicroscopy structure of the tetrameric mammalian type 1 InsP3R channel in its apo-state. At this resolution, we are able to trace unambiguously ∼85% of the protein backbone, allowing us to identify the structural elements involved in gating and modulation of this 1.3-megadalton channel. Although the central Ca(2+)-conduction pathway is similar to other ion channels, including the closely related ryanodine receptor, the cytosolic carboxy termini are uniquely arranged in a left-handed α-helical bundle, directly interacting with the amino-terminal domains of adjacent subunits. This configuration suggests a molecular mechanism for allosteric regulation of channel gating by intracellular signals. PMID:26458101

  1. The 384-channel prototype of DM Electronics for ELT AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputa, Kris; Atwood, Jenny; Herriot, Glen; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Spanò, Paolo; Zielinski, Adam

    2014-08-01

    High order AO subsystems of the ELT require technological advancements in the Deformable Mirror (DM) construction and corresponding improvements in the drive electronics. Advanced prototyping is currently under way at NSI-Herzberg to reduce risks of deploying untried technology in the TMT AO subsystem NFIRAOS. We have developed a 96-channel output module and constructed a sub-scale DM Electronics prototype NDME384 with 384 output channels based on 4 such modules. French DM vendor Cilas has fabricated the NFIRAOS DM Breadoboard with 360 piezoelectric actuators in a 60×6 matrix, to demonstrate the DM technology to be deployed in NFIRAOS wavefront correctors. We present the results of testing our NDME384 prototype while driving the NFIRAOS DM Breadoboard.

  2. Multi-Channel Electronically Scanned Cryogenic Pressure Sensor And Method For Making Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Hopson, Purnell, Jr. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A miniature, multi-channel, electronically scanned pressure measuring device uses electrostatically bonded silicon dies in a multi-element array. These dies are bonded at specific sites on a glass, pre-patterned substrate. Thermal data is multiplexed and recorded on each individual pressure measuring diaphragm. The device functions in a cryogenic environment without the need of heaters to keep the sensor at constant temperatures.

  3. Mixed-Color Multiphoton Transitions as Additional Quantum Channels for Electron Photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wayne; Becker, Maria; Beck, Joshua; Batelaan, Herman

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate mixed-color electron photoemission from tungsten nanotips. In the experiment, second-harmonic photons were introduced to modify the multiphoton emission process. A twofold increase in quantum efficiency results from the opening up of an additional three-photon quantum channel. The super-additive photoelectron signal can be controlled by input power, field polarization, and pulse overlap. The results of our study provide new prospects for quantum photonics, multiphoton microscopy, and spin-polarized electron sources. We acknowledge supports from NSF, Grant Number 1306565, 1430519. NSF Grant Number 1306565, 1430519.

  4. GeV electron beams from cm-scale channel guided laser wakefieldaccelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura,K.; Nagler, B.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Schroeder,C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Gonsalves, A.J.; Hooker, S.M.

    2007-02-20

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFA) can produce electricfields of order 10-100 GV/m suitable for acceleration of electrons torelativistic energies. The wakefields are excited by a relativisticallyintense laser pulse propagating through a plasma and have a phasevelocity determined by the group velocity of the light pulse. Twoimportant effects that can limit the acceleration distanceand hence thenet energy gain obtained by an electron are diffraction of the drivelaser pulse and particle-wake dephasing. Diffraction of a focusedultra-short laser pulse can be overcome by using preformed plasmachannels. The dephasing limit can be increased by operating at a lowerplasma density, since this results in an increase in the laser groupvelocity. Here we present detailed results on the generation of GeV-classelectron beams using an intense femtosecond laser beamand a 3.3 cm longpreformed discharge-based plasma channel [W.P. Leemans et al., NaturePhysics 2, 696-699 (2006)]. The use of a discharge-based waveguidepermitted operation at an order ofmagnitude lower density and 15 timeslonger distance than in previous experiments that relied on laserpreformed plasma channels. Laser pulses with peak power ranging from10-50 TW were guided over more than 20 Rayleigh ranges and high-qualityelectron beams with energy up to 1 GeV were obtained by channelling a 40TW peak power laser pulse. The dependence of the electron beamcharacteristics on capillary properties, plasma density,and laserparameters are discussed.

  5. The Low Pressure Gas Effects On The Potency Of An Electron Beam On Ceramic Fabric Materials For Space Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Fragomeni, James M.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to evaluate if molten metal or electron beam impingement could damage or burn through the fabric of the astronauts Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) during electron beam welding exercises performed in space. An 8 kilovolt electron beam with a current in the neighborhood of 100 milliamps from the Ukrainian space welding "Universal Hand Tool" burned holes in Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1427 C. The burnthrough time was on the order of 8 seconds at standoff distances between UHT and cloth ranging from 6 to 24 inches. At both closer (2") and farther (48") standoff distances the potency of the beam against the cloth declined and the burnthrough time went up significantly. Prior to the test it had been expected that the beam would lay down a static charge on the cloth and be deflected without damaging the cloth. The burnthrough is thought to be an effect of partial transmission of beam power by a stream of positive ions generated by the high voltage electron beam from contaminant gas in the "vacuum" chamber. A rough quantitative theoretical computation appears to substantiate this possibility.

  6. Channel-resolved photo- and Auger-electron spectroscopy of halogenated hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, Utuq; Kaderiya, B.; Kumarapan, V.; Kushawaha, R.; Rudenko, A.; Rolles, D.; Xiong, H.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Savelyev, E.; Kilcoyne, D.

    2016-05-01

    Inner-shell photoelectron and Auger electron spectra of polyatomic molecules such as halogenated hydrocarbons are typically hard to interpret and assign due to many overlapping states that form broad bands even in high-resolution measurements. With the help of electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements performed using the velocity map imaging technique, we are able to detect high-energy (<= 150 eV) photo- and Auger electrons in coincidence with two- or many-body ionic fragmentation channels. Such channel-resolved measurements allow disentangling the overlapping electronic structures and help assigning individual components of the electron spectra to specific potential surfaces and final states. In this work, we present measurements on CH3 I, CH2 IBr, and CH2 ICl molecules in the gas-phase using soft x-ray light provided by the Advanced Light Source at LBNL. This project is supported by the DOE, Office of Science, BES, Division of Chemical, Geological and Biological Sciences under Award Number DE-FG02-86ER13491 (U.A., B.K., V.K., A.R., D.R.) and Award Number DE-SC0012376 (H.X., N.B.).

  7. High quality electron beams from a plasma channel guided laser wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Toth, Cs.; van Tilborg, J.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Bruhwiler, D.; Nieter, C.; Cary, J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2004-07-08

    Laser driven accelerators, in which particles are accelerated by the electric field of a plasma wave driven by an intense laser, have demonstrated accelerating electric fields of hundreds of GV/m. These fields are thousands of times those achievable in conventional radiofrequency (RF) accelerators, spurring interest in laser accelerators as compact next generation sources of energetic electrons and radiation. To date however, acceleration distances have been severely limited by lack of a controllable method for extending the propagation distance of the focused laser pulse. The ensuing short acceleration distance results in low energy beams with 100% electron energy spread, limiting applications. Here we demonstrate that a relativistically intense laser can be guided by a preformed plasma density channel and that the longer propagation distance can result in electron beams of percent energy spread with low emittance and increased energy, containing >10{sup 9} electrons above 80 MeV. The preformed plasma channel technique forms the basis of a new class of accelerators, combining beam quality comparable to RF accelerators with the high gradients of laser accelerators to produce compact tunable high brightness electron and radiation sources.

  8. Generation of X-ray radiation during planar channeling of relativistic electrons in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashmakov, Yu. A.; Bondarenko, T. V.; Polozov, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    A classical model of the emission of radiation by relativistic electrons in a crystal has been developed using the form of the potential maximally close to its actual form. The dynamics of electrons with energies 20-25 MeV performing channeling in crystals is simulated numerically. The generation of electromagnetic radiation that accompanies this motion has been considered. It has been shown that, in the given electron energy range, this radiation corresponds to the X-ray spectral band with characteristic photon energies of up to 40 keV. The radiation yield is estimated. The requirements to the electron beam parameters are formulated based on the results of the simulation. It has been shown that numerical simulation gives results that correlate with the analytic results obtained earlier and with the experimental data.

  9. Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03693 Channel

    This channel is located south of Iani Chaos.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -10.9N, Longitude 345.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Application of graphite-based sacrificial layers for fabrication of LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) membranes and micro-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birol, H.; Maeder, T.; Ryser, P.

    2007-01-01

    Fabrication of sensors and micro-fluidic structures from low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) sheets is a growing interest in the micro-packaging community. Such devices usually have inner cavities, whose production is quite complicated. The most elegant method to build such structures so far achieved is by a fugitive phase that is introduced into the multilayer and removed during firing. This paper, therefore, is aimed to introduce the graphite-based sacrificial paste developed for this purpose, and it is constructed in two sections: (i) selection of paste and determination of LTCC open-porosity elimination temperature, and (ii) fabrication and characterization of pressure sensitive LTCC membranes. In the former section, it is shown that increased heating rates (and decreasing tape thickness) shift the open porosity elimination temperature of LTCC by 20 °C, which is small compared to the shift of graphite oxidation temperature (about 100 °C). In the latter section, three parameters affecting the balance between the graphite oxidation and LTCC sintering are studied: heating rate, graphite phase thickness and width of the membrane inlet/outlet channels. As expected, larger heating rates and narrow inlet/outlet channels are found to hinder the oxidation of graphite and evacuation of the resulting products, which results in swollen membranes. Large graphite thickness, through the increased channel height, results in lower swelling in spite of the larger amount of graphite to be oxidized. Membranes with low swelling are found to exhibit excellent pressure sensing characteristics, whereas those with high swelling display hysteretic behavior.

  11. Simulation of planar channeling-radiation spectra of relativistic electrons and positrons channeled in a diamond-structure or tungsten single crystal (classical approach)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadegan, B.; Wagner, W.

    2015-01-01

    We present a Mathematica package for simulation of spectral-angular distributions and energy spectra of planar channeling radiation of relativistic electrons and positrons channeled along major crystallographic planes of a diamond-structure or tungsten single crystal. The program is based on the classical theory of channeling radiation which has been successfully applied to study planar channeling of light charged particles at energies higher than 100 MeV. Continuous potentials for different planes of diamond, Si, Ge and W single crystals are calculated using the Doyle-Turner approximation to the atomic scattering factor and taking thermal vibrations of the crystal atoms into account. Numerical methods are applied to solve the classical one-dimensional equation of motion. The code is designed to calculate the trajectories, velocities and accelerations of electrons (positrons) channeled by the planar continuous potential. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, these data allow realistic simulations of spectral-angular distributions and energy spectra of planar channeling radiation. Since the generated output is quantitative, the results of calculation may be useful, e.g., for setup configuration and crystal alignment in channeling experiments, for the study of the dependence of channeling radiation on the input parameters of particle beams with respect to the crystal orientation, but also for the simulation of positron production by means of pair creation what is mandatory for the design of efficient positron sources necessary in high-energy and collider physics. Although the classical theory of channeling is well established for long time, there is no adequate library program for simulation of channeling radiation up to now, which is commonly available, sufficiently simple and effective to employ and, therefore, of benefit as for special investigations as for a quick overview of basic features of this type of radiation.

  12. Effects of Co doping on electronic structure and electric/magnetic properties of La0.1Bi0.9FeO3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, ShouYu; Feng, Yu; Liu, WeiFang; Yu, DaShu; Li, DeJun

    2013-10-01

    In this work, we report the influence of Co-doping on the electronic band structure, dielectric and magnetic properties of La0.1Bi0.9Fe1- x Co x O3 ceramics. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigation shows that Co dopant can shift the valence band spectrum and core-level lines of constituent elements towards higher bind energy regions simultaneously increase the concentration of oxygen vacancies in ceramics. The effects of dopant are discussed with focus given to the Co-doping induced enhancement of electrical conductivity and resistive switching phenomena.

  13. Electron temperature measurements during electron cyclotron heating on PDX using a ten channel grating polychromator

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, A.; Hsuan, H.; Boyd, D.; Grek, B.; Johnson, D.; Kritz, A.; Mikkelsen, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Takahashi, H.

    1984-10-01

    During first harmonic electron cyclotron heating (ECH) on the Princeton Divertor Experiment (PDX) (R/sub 0/ = 137 cm, a = 40 cm), electron temperature was monitored using a grating polychromator which measured second harmonic electron cyclotron emission from the low field side of the tokamak. Interference from the high power heating pulse on the broadband detectors in the grating instrument was eliminated by using a waveguide filter in the transmission line which brought the emission signal to the grating instrument. Off-axis (approx. 4 cm) location of the resonance zone resulted in heating without sawtooth or m = 1 activity. However, heating with the resonance zone at the plasma center caused very large amplitude sawteeth accompanied by strong m = 1 activity: ..delta..T/T/sub MAX/ approx. = 0.41, sawtooth period approx. = 4 msec, m = 1 period approx. = 90 ..mu.. sec, (11 kHz). This is the first time such intense MHD activity driven by ECH has been observed. (For both cases there was no sawtooth activity in the ohmic phase of the discharge before ECH.) At very low densities there is a clear indication that a superthermal electron population is created during ECH.

  14. Laser fabricated microchannels inside photostructurable glass-ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Serrano, D.; Serra, P.; Morenza, J. L.

    2009-03-01

    Microchannels have been fabricated by laser direct-write in photostructurable glass-ceramic (Foturan) for their application in 3D-microfluidic systems. A Nd:YAG laser delivering 10 ns pulses at 355 nm wavelength has been used for irradiation. Afterwards, thermal treatment and chemical etching have been required for channel formation. The kinetics of channel formation and the channel morphology have been studied by optical and electron microscopy. A minimum accumulated energy (pulse energy multiplied by the number of pulses in a same site) is required to induce channel formation. Channels with symmetric round apertures at both ends can be obtained when using low pulse energies. On the contrary, irradiation with too high energetic pulses produces direct material damage in Foturan and provokes the formation of non-symmetric channels. One millimetre long channels with a minimum radius of 15 μm can be opened through Foturan slides after 15 min of chemical etching.

  15. Energetics, bonding mechanism and electronic structure of metal/ceramic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    Progress are reported on: electronic structure of PdO, PtO, and AgO (band structure calculations); ab initio calculations of electronic structure of TiO{sub 2}(110) surface; and electronic structure of VO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} thin films and multilayers. (DLC)

  16. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  17. Density-functional theory study of gramicidin A ion channel geometry and electronic properties

    PubMed Central

    Todorović, Milica; Bowler, David R.; Gillan, Michael J.; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying ion channel function from the atomic-scale requires accurate ab initio modelling as well as careful experiments. Here, we present a density functional theory (DFT) study of the ion channel gramicidin A (gA), whose inner pore conducts only monovalent cations and whose conductance has been shown to depend on the side chains of the amino acids in the channel. We investigate the ground state geometry and electronic properties of the channel in vacuum, focusing on their dependence on the side chains of the amino acids. We find that the side chains affect the ground state geometry, while the electrostatic potential of the pore is independent of the side chains. This study is also in preparation for a full, linear scaling DFT study of gA in a lipid bilayer with surrounding water. We demonstrate that linear scaling DFT methods can accurately model the system with reasonable computational cost. Linear scaling DFT allows ab initio calculations with 10 000–100 000 atoms and beyond, and will be an important new tool for biomolecular simulations. PMID:24068174

  18. Micromechanisms of brittle fracture: STM, TEM and electron channeling analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, W.W.

    1997-01-01

    The original thrust of this grant was to apply newly developed techniques in scanning tunneling and transmission electron microscopy to elucidate the mechanism of brittle fracture. This grant spun-off several new directions in that some of the findings on bulk structural materials could be utilized on thin films or intermetallic single crystals. Modeling and material evaluation efforts in this grant are represented in a figure. Out of this grant evolved the field the author has designated as Contact Fracture Mechanics. By appropriate modeling of stress and strain distribution fields around normal indentations or scratch tracks, various measures of thin film fracture or decohesion and brittle fracture of low ductility intermetallics is possible. These measures of fracture resistance in small volumes are still evolving and as such no standard technique or analysis has been uniformly accepted. For brittle ceramics and ceramic films, there are a number of acceptable analyses such as those published by Lawn, Evans and Hutchinson. For more dissipative systems involving metallic or polymeric films and/or substrates, there is still much to be accomplished as can be surmised from some of the findings in the present grant. In Section 2 the author reviews the funding history and accomplishments associated mostly with bulk brittle fracture. This is followed by Section 3 which covers more recent work on using novel techniques to evaluate fracture in low ductility single crystals or thin films using micromechanical probes. Basically Section 3 outlines how the recent work fits in with the goals of defining contact fracture mechanics and gives an overview of how the several examples in Section 4 (the Appendices) fit into this framework.

  19. Microfluidic CODES: a scalable multiplexed electronic sensor for orthogonal detection of particles in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruxiu; Wang, Ningquan; Kamili, Farhan; Sarioglu, A Fatih

    2016-04-21

    Numerous biophysical and biochemical assays rely on spatial manipulation of particles/cells as they are processed on lab-on-a-chip devices. Analysis of spatially distributed particles on these devices typically requires microscopy negating the cost and size advantages of microfluidic assays. In this paper, we introduce a scalable electronic sensor technology, called microfluidic CODES, that utilizes resistive pulse sensing to orthogonally detect particles in multiple microfluidic channels from a single electrical output. Combining the techniques from telecommunications and microfluidics, we route three coplanar electrodes on a glass substrate to create multiple Coulter counters producing distinct orthogonal digital codes when they detect particles. We specifically design a digital code set using the mathematical principles of Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) telecommunication networks and can decode signals from different microfluidic channels with >90% accuracy through computation even if these signals overlap. As a proof of principle, we use this technology to detect human ovarian cancer cells in four different microfluidic channels fabricated using soft lithography. Microfluidic CODES offers a simple, all-electronic interface that is well suited to create integrated, low-cost lab-on-a-chip devices for cell- or particle-based assays in resource-limited settings. PMID:27021807

  20. Industrial Ceramics: Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The expanding use of ceramic products in today's world can be seen in the areas of communications, construction, aerospace, textiles, metallurgy, atomic energy, and electronics. The demands of science have brought ceramics from an art to an industry using mass production and automated processes which requires the services of great numbers as the…

  1. Probing the Structure of the Mechanosensitive Channel of Small Conductance in Lipid Bilayers with Pulsed Electron-Electron Double Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Richard; Pliotas, Christos; Branigan, Emma; Hacker, Christian; Rasmussen, Akiko; Hagelueken, Gregor; Booth, Ian R.; Miller, Samantha; Lucocq, John; Naismith, James H.; Schiemann, Olav

    2014-01-01

    Mechanosensitive channel proteins are important safety valves against osmotic shock in bacteria, and are involved in sensing touch and sound waves in higher organisms. The mechanosensitive channel of small conductance (MscS) has been extensively studied. Pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR or DEER) of detergent-solubilized protein confirms that as seen in the crystal structure, the outer ring of transmembrane helices do not pack against the pore-forming helices, creating an apparent void. The relevance of this void to the functional form of MscS in the bilayer is the subject of debate. Here, we report PELDOR measurements of MscS reconstituted into two lipid bilayer systems: nanodiscs and bicelles. The distance measurements from multiple mutants derived from the PELDOR data are consistent with the detergent-solution arrangement of the protein. We conclude, therefore, that the relative positioning of the transmembrane helices is preserved in mimics of the cell bilayer, and that the apparent voids are not an artifact of detergent solution but a property of the protein that will have to be accounted for in any molecular mechanism of gating. PMID:24559986

  2. Probing the structure of the mechanosensitive channel of small conductance in lipid bilayers with pulsed electron-electron double resonance.

    PubMed

    Ward, Richard; Pliotas, Christos; Branigan, Emma; Hacker, Christian; Rasmussen, Akiko; Hagelueken, Gregor; Booth, Ian R; Miller, Samantha; Lucocq, John; Naismith, James H; Schiemann, Olav

    2014-02-18

    Mechanosensitive channel proteins are important safety valves against osmotic shock in bacteria, and are involved in sensing touch and sound waves in higher organisms. The mechanosensitive channel of small conductance (MscS) has been extensively studied. Pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR or DEER) of detergent-solubilized protein confirms that as seen in the crystal structure, the outer ring of transmembrane helices do not pack against the pore-forming helices, creating an apparent void. The relevance of this void to the functional form of MscS in the bilayer is the subject of debate. Here, we report PELDOR measurements of MscS reconstituted into two lipid bilayer systems: nanodiscs and bicelles. The distance measurements from multiple mutants derived from the PELDOR data are consistent with the detergent-solution arrangement of the protein. We conclude, therefore, that the relative positioning of the transmembrane helices is preserved in mimics of the cell bilayer, and that the apparent voids are not an artifact of detergent solution but a property of the protein that will have to be accounted for in any molecular mechanism of gating. PMID:24559986

  3. Observation of strong reflection of electron waves exiting a ballistic channel at low energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Canute I.; Liu, Changze; Campbell, Jason P.; Ryan, Jason T.; Southwick, Richard G., III; Gundlach, David; Oates, Anthony S.; Huang, Ru; Cheung, Kin. P.

    2016-06-01

    Wave scattering by a potential step is a ubiquitous concept. Thus, it is surprising that theoretical treatments of ballistic transport in nanoscale devices, from quantum point contacts to ballistic transistors, assume no reflection even when the potential step is encountered upon exiting the device. Experiments so far seem to support this even if it is not clear why. Here we report clear evidence of coherent reflection when electron wave exits the channel of a nanoscale transistor and when the electron energy is low. The observed behavior is well described by a simple rectangular potential barrier model which the Schrodinger's equation can be solved exactly. We can explain why reflection is not observed in most situations but cannot be ignored in some important situations. Our experiment also represents a direct measurement of electron injection velocity - a critical quantity in nanoscale transistors that is widely considered not measurable.

  4. A spherical electron-channelling pattern map for use in quartz petrofabric analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lloyd, G.E.; Ferguson, C.C.

    1986-01-01

    Electron channelling patterns (ECP's) are formed in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) by the interaction between the incident electrons and the lattice of crystalline specimens. The patterns are unique for a particular crystallographic orientation and are therefore of considerable potential in petrofabric studies provided they can be accurately indexed. Indexing requires an ECP-map of the crystallographic stereogram or unit triangle covering all possible orientations and hence ECP patterns. Due to the presence of long-range distortions in planar ECP-maps, it is more convenient to construct the maps over a spherical surface. This also facilitates the indexing of individual ECP's. A spherical ECP-map for quartz is presented together with an example of its use in petrofabric analysis. ?? 1986.

  5. Channeling, Volume Reection and Gamma Emission Using 14GeV Electrons in Bent Silicon Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Brandon

    2015-08-14

    High energy electrons can be deflected with very tight bending radius using a bent silicon crystal. This produces gamma radiation. As these crystals can be thin, a series of bent silicon crystals with alternating direction has the potential to produce coherent gamma radiation with reasonable energy of the driving electron beam. Such an electron crystal undulator offers the prospect for higher energy radiation at lower cost than current methods. Permanent magnetic undulators like LCLS at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are expensive and very large (about 100 m in case of the LCLS undulator). Silicon crystals are inexpensive and compact when compared to the large magnetic undulators. Additionally, such a high energy coherent light source could be used for probing through materials currently impenetrable by x-rays. In this work we present the experimental data and analysis of experiment T523 conducted at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We collected the spectrum of gamma ray emission from 14 GeV electrons on a bent silicon crystal counting single photons. We also investigated the dynamics of electron motion in the crystal i.e. processes of channeling and volume reflection at 14 GeV, extending and building off previous work. Our single photon spectrum for the amorphous crystal orientation is consistent with bremsstrahlung radiation and the volume reflection crystal orientation shows a trend consistent with synchrotron radiation at a critical energy of 740 MeV. We observe that in these two cases the data are consistent, but we make no further claims because of statistical limitations. We also extended the known energy range of electron crystal dechanneling length and channeling efficiency to 14 GeV.

  6. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  7. Experimental and theoretical study of PXRC (Parametric X-Radiation at Channeling) from 255 MeV electrons in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotchenko, K. B.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.; Takabayashi, Y.

    2013-08-01

    The X-radiation from relativistic channeled electrons at the Bragg angles - Parametric X-Radiation at Channeling (PXRC) - is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The experiment was carried out using a 255 MeV electron beam from a Linac at newly constructed beam line for the study of interactions between a relativistic electron beam and crystals at the SAGA Light Source. The observed asymmetry of PXRC angular distribution at (2 2 0) planar channeling in a 20 μm Si is explained taking account of two quantum effects: initial populations and transverse form-factors of the quantum states of planar channeled electrons. Further perspectives for PXRC studies at SAGA-LS are analyzed.

  8. A multi-channel readout electronics system for GEM and MICROMEGAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z.; Li, Y. L.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Luo, J.; Liu, Y. N.

    2009-11-01

    A multi-channel readout electronics system for GEM and MICROMEGAS has been developed. It consists of a front-end ASIC, a multi-channel ADC and a FPGA to sample the signal waveforms in real time. The gain of the front-end ASIC can be programmable from 1 mV/fC to 19 mV/fC and the output pulse width can be adjusted from 200 ns to 800 ns. The ENC is measured to be below 2000 e for Cin < 20 pF and below 5000 e for Cin < 60 pF. Detailed circuit performance and test results with detectors will be described in this paper.

  9. Synaptic Ribbons Require Ribeye for Electron Density, Proper Synaptic Localization, and Recruitment of Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Lv, Caixia; Stewart, William J; Akanyeti, Otar; Frederick, Courtney; Zhu, Jie; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Sheets, Lavinia; Liao, James C; Zenisek, David

    2016-06-21

    Synaptic ribbons are structures made largely of the protein Ribeye that hold synaptic vesicles near release sites in non-spiking cells in some sensory systems. Here, we introduce frameshift mutations in the two zebrafish genes encoding for Ribeye and thus remove Ribeye protein from neuromast hair cells. Despite Ribeye depletion, vesicles collect around ribbon-like structures that lack electron density, which we term "ghost ribbons." Ghost ribbons are smaller in size but possess a similar number of smaller vesicles and are poorly localized to synapses and calcium channels. These hair cells exhibit enhanced exocytosis, as measured by capacitance, and recordings from afferent neurons post-synaptic to hair cells show no significant difference in spike rates. Our results suggest that Ribeye makes up most of the synaptic ribbon density in neuromast hair cells and is necessary for proper localization of calcium channels and synaptic ribbons. PMID:27292637

  10. Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seungho; Yun, Chao; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Kursumovic, Ahmed; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lu, Ping; Jia, Quanxi; Fan, Meng; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Hofmann, Stephan; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.

    2016-01-01

    Resistive switches are non-volatile memory cells based on nano-ionic redox processes that offer energy efficient device architectures and open pathways to neuromorphics and cognitive computing. However, channel formation typically requires an irreversible, not well controlled electroforming process, giving difficulty to independently control ionic and electronic properties. The device performance is also limited by the incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Here, we report a novel memristive model material system based on self-assembled Sm-doped CeO2 and SrTiO3 films that allow the separate tailoring of nanoscale ionic and electronic channels at high density (∼1012 inch−2). We systematically show that these devices allow precise engineering of the resistance states, thus enabling large on–off ratios and high reproducibility. The tunable structure presents an ideal platform to explore ionic and electronic mechanisms and we expect a wide potential impact also on other nascent technologies, ranging from ionic gating to micro-solid oxide fuel cells and neuromorphics. PMID:27491392

  11. Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seungho; Yun, Chao; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Kursumovic, Ahmed; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lu, Ping; Jia, Quanxi; Fan, Meng; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Hofmann, Stephan; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.

    2016-08-01

    Resistive switches are non-volatile memory cells based on nano-ionic redox processes that offer energy efficient device architectures and open pathways to neuromorphics and cognitive computing. However, channel formation typically requires an irreversible, not well controlled electroforming process, giving difficulty to independently control ionic and electronic properties. The device performance is also limited by the incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Here, we report a novel memristive model material system based on self-assembled Sm-doped CeO2 and SrTiO3 films that allow the separate tailoring of nanoscale ionic and electronic channels at high density (~1012 inch-2). We systematically show that these devices allow precise engineering of the resistance states, thus enabling large on-off ratios and high reproducibility. The tunable structure presents an ideal platform to explore ionic and electronic mechanisms and we expect a wide potential impact also on other nascent technologies, ranging from ionic gating to micro-solid oxide fuel cells and neuromorphics.

  12. Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seungho; Yun, Chao; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Kursumovic, Ahmed; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lu, Ping; Jia, Quanxi; Fan, Meng; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Hofmann, Stephan; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L

    2016-01-01

    Resistive switches are non-volatile memory cells based on nano-ionic redox processes that offer energy efficient device architectures and open pathways to neuromorphics and cognitive computing. However, channel formation typically requires an irreversible, not well controlled electroforming process, giving difficulty to independently control ionic and electronic properties. The device performance is also limited by the incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Here, we report a novel memristive model material system based on self-assembled Sm-doped CeO2 and SrTiO3 films that allow the separate tailoring of nanoscale ionic and electronic channels at high density (∼10(12) inch(-2)). We systematically show that these devices allow precise engineering of the resistance states, thus enabling large on-off ratios and high reproducibility. The tunable structure presents an ideal platform to explore ionic and electronic mechanisms and we expect a wide potential impact also on other nascent technologies, ranging from ionic gating to micro-solid oxide fuel cells and neuromorphics. PMID:27491392

  13. Analytic theory for betatron radiation from relativistic electrons in ion plasma channels with magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H. C.; Jiang, T. F.

    2010-11-15

    We analytically solve the relativistic equation of motion for an electron in ion plasma channels and calculate the corresponding trajectory as well as the synchrotron radiation. The relativistic effect on a trajectory is strong, i.e., many high-order harmonic terms in the trajectory, when the ratio of the initial transverse velocity (v{sub x0}) to the longitudinal velocity (v{sub z0}) of the electron injected to ion plasma channels is high. Interestingly, these high-order harmonic terms result in a quite broad and intense radiation spectrum, especially at an oblique angle, in contrast to an earlier understanding. As the initial velocity ratio (v{sub x0}:v{sub z0}) decreases, the relativistic effect becomes weak; only the first and second harmonic terms remain in the transverse and longitudinal trajectories, respectively, which coincides with the result of Esarey et al. [Phys. Rev. E 65, 056505 (2002)]. Our formalism also allows the description of electron's trajectory in the presence of an applied magnetic field. Critical magnetic fields for cyclotron motions are figured out and compared with semiclassical results. The cyclotron motion leads to more high-order harmonic terms than the trajectory without magnetic fields and causes an immensely broad spectrum with vastly large radiation amplitude for high initial velocity ratios (v{sub x0}:v{sub z0}). The radiation from hard x-ray to gamma-ray regions can be generated with a broad radiation angle, thus available for applications.

  14. A ceramic radial insulation structure for a relativistic electron beam vacuum diode.

    PubMed

    Xun, Tao; Yang, Hanwu; Zhang, Jiande; Liu, Zhenxiang; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Yansong

    2008-06-01

    For one kind of a high current diode composed of a small disk-type alumina ceramic insulator water/vacuum interface, the insulation structure was designed and experimentally investigated. According to the theories of vacuum flashover and the rules for radial insulators, a "cone-column" anode outline and the cathode shielding rings were adopted. The electrostatic field along the insulator surface was obtained by finite element analysis simulating. By adjusting the outline of the anode and reshaping the shielding rings, the electric fields were well distributed and the field around the cathode triple junction was effectively controlled. Area weighted statistical method was applied to estimate the surface breakdown field. In addition, the operating process of an accelerator based on a spiral pulse forming line (PFL) was simulated through the PSPICE software to get the waveform of charging and diode voltage. The high voltage test was carried out on a water dielectric spiral PFL accelerator with long pulse duration, and results show that the diode can work stably in 420 kV, 200 ns conditions. The experimental results agree with the theoretical and simulated results. PMID:18601401

  15. Quantum efficiency of a channel electron multiplier in the far ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paresce, F.

    1975-01-01

    Variation of the quantum efficiency of a channel electron multiplier (CEM) in the wavelength range from 1200 to 2536 A is studied. Emphasis is on measurement of CEM sensitivity longward of 1500 A. Results indicate an overall rapid decrease in quantum efficiency with increasing wavelength, with little evidence for a possible change in slope in the range from 2000 to 2500 A. The lowest efficiency measured is 4.5 + or -2.5 times 10 to the minus ninth count/photon at 2536 A. These efficiencies should ensure that unwanted radiation longward of 1500 A can be effectively removed from the bandpass of the instrument.

  16. Characteristics of four-channel Cherenkov-type detector for measurements of runaway electrons in the ISTTOK tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Plyusnin, V. V.; Duarte, P.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.

    2010-10-15

    A diagnostics capable of characterizing the runaway and superthermal electrons has been developing on the ISTTOK tokamak. In previous paper, a use of single-channel Cherenkov-type detector with titanium filter for runaway electron studies in ISTTOK was reported. To measure fast electron populations with different energies, a prototype of a four-channel detector with molybdenum filters was designed. Test-stand studies of filters with different thicknesses (1, 3, 7, 10, 20, 50, and 100 {mu}m) have shown that they should allow the detection of electrons with energies higher than 69, 75, 87, 95, 120, 181, and 260 keV, respectively. First results of measurements with the four-channel detector revealed the possibility to measure reliably different fast electrons populations simultaneously.

  17. Electron transfer activation of a second water channel for proton transport in [FeFe]-hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Sode, Olaseni; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-12-14

    Hydrogenase enzymes are important because they can reversibly catalyze the production of molecular hydrogen. Proton transport mechanisms have been previously studied in residue pathways that lead to the active site of the enzyme via residues Cys299 and Ser319. The importance of this pathway and these residues has been previously exhibited through site-specific mutations, which were shown to interrupt the enzyme activity. It has been shown recently that a separate water channel (WC2) is coupled with electron transport to the active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase. The water-mediated proton transport mechanisms of the enzyme in different electronic states have been studied using the multistate empirical valence bond reactive molecular dynamics method, in order to understand any role WC2 may have in facilitating the residue pathway in bringing an additional proton to the enzyme active site. In a single electronic state A{sup 2−}, a water wire was formed through which protons can be transported with a low free energy barrier. The remaining electronic states were shown, however, to be highly unfavorable to proton transport in WC2. A double amino acid substitution is predicted to obstruct proton transport in electronic state A{sup 2-} by closing a cavity that could otherwise fill with water near the proximal Fe of the active site.

  18. High-quality electron beams from a laser wakefield accelerator using plasma-channel guiding.

    PubMed

    Geddes, C G R; Toth, C S; Van Tilborg, J; Esarey, E; Schroeder, C B; Bruhwiler, D; Nieter, C; Cary, J; Leemans, W P

    2004-09-30

    Laser-driven accelerators, in which particles are accelerated by the electric field of a plasma wave (the wakefield) driven by an intense laser, have demonstrated accelerating electric fields of hundreds of GV m(-1) (refs 1-3). These fields are thousands of times greater than those achievable in conventional radio-frequency accelerators, spurring interest in laser accelerators as compact next-generation sources of energetic electrons and radiation. To date, however, acceleration distances have been severely limited by the lack of a controllable method for extending the propagation distance of the focused laser pulse. The ensuing short acceleration distance results in low-energy beams with 100 per cent electron energy spread, which limits potential applications. Here we demonstrate a laser accelerator that produces electron beams with an energy spread of a few per cent, low emittance and increased energy (more than 10(9) electrons above 80 MeV). Our technique involves the use of a preformed plasma density channel to guide a relativistically intense laser, resulting in a longer propagation distance. The results open the way for compact and tunable high-brightness sources of electrons and radiation. PMID:15457252

  19. Nonnuclear Nearly Free Electron Conduction Channels Induced by Doping Charge in Nanotube–Molecular Sheet Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jin; Zheng, Qijing; Petek, Hrvoje; Yang, Jinlong

    2014-09-04

    Nearly free electron (NFE) states with density maxima in nonnuclear (NN) voids may have remarkable electron transport properties ranging from suppressed electron–phonon interaction to Wigner crystallization. Such NFE states, however, usually exist near the vacuum level, which makes them unsuitable for transport. Through first principles calculations on nanocomposites consisting of carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays sandwiched between boron nitride (BN) sheets, we describe a stratagem for stabilizing the NN-NFE states to below the Fermi level. By doping the CNTs with negative charge, we establish Coulomb barriers at CNTs walls that, together with the insulating BN sheets, define the transverse potentials of one-dimensional (1D) transport channels, which support the NN-NFE states.

  20. Ultra-short channel GaN high electron mobility transistor-like Gunn diode with composite contact

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Lin'an Wang, Zhizhe; Chen, Qing; Huang, Yonghong; Dai, Yang; Chen, Haoran; Zhao, Hongliang; Hao, Yue

    2014-09-07

    We present a numerical analysis on an ultra-short channel AlGaN/GaN HEMT-like planar Gunn diode based on the velocity-field dependence of two-dimensional electron gas (2-DEG) channel accounting for the ballistic electron acceleration and the inter-valley transfer. In particular, we propose a Schottky-ohmic composite contact instead of traditional ohmic contact for the Gunn diode in order to significantly suppress the impact ionization at the anode side and shorten the “dead zone” at the cathode side, which is beneficial to the formation and propagation of dipole domain in the ultra-short 2-DEG channel and the promotion of conversion efficiency. The influence of the surface donor-like traps on the electron domain in the 2-DEG channel is also included in the simulation.

  1. Multiscale modeling and computation of nano-electronic transistors and transmembrane proton channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Duan

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic transistors, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. In biology, proton dynamics and transport across membrane proteins are of paramount importance to the normal function of living cells. Similar physical characteristics are behind the two subjects, and model simulations share common mathematical interests/challenges. In this thesis work, multiscale and multiphysical models are proposed to study the mechanisms of nanotransistors and proton transport in transmembrane at the atomic level. For nano-electronic transistors, we introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions on an equal footing at nano-scale. Additionally, this model includes layered structures and random doping effect of nano-transistors. For transmembrane proton channels, we describe proton dynamics quantum mechanically via a density functional approach while implicitly treat numerous solvent molecules as a dielectric continuum. The densities of all other ions in the solvent are assumed to obey the Boltzmann distribution. The impact of protein molecular structure and its charge polarization on the proton transport is considered in atomic details. We formulate a total free energy functional to include kinetic and potential energies of protons, as well as electrostatic energy of all other ions on an equal footing. For both nano-transistors and proton channels systems, the variational principle is employed to derive nonlinear governing equations. The Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations are derived for nano-transistors while the generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and Kohn-Sham equation are obtained for proton channels. Related numerical

  2. Preparation of a dense, polycrystalline ceramic structure

    DOEpatents

    Cooley, Jason; Chen, Ching-Fong; Alexander, David

    2010-12-07

    Ceramic nanopowder was sealed inside a metal container under a vacuum. The sealed evacuated container was forced through a severe deformation channel at an elevated temperature below the melting point of the ceramic nanopowder. The result was a dense nanocrystalline ceramic structure inside the metal container.

  3. Trapping and Acceleration of Nonideal Injected Electron Bunches in Channel-Guided LWFAs

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, R.F.; Gordon, D.F.; Jones, T.G.; Sprangle, P.; Ting, A.; Cooley, J.H.; Hafizi, B.; Zigler, A.; Kaganovich, D.

    2004-12-07

    The standard regime for the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) usually requires external injection of MeV electrons. Ideally, the injected electron bunch should be injected into the proper phase of the accelerating wake, have a bunch length that is small compared with the plasma wavelength, and a low emittance and energy spread. This paper reports Hamiltonian analysis and simulation studies of two 'nonideal' injection schemes that demonstrate strong phase bunching and good accelerated beam quality in a channel-guided laser wakefield accelerator. For the case of monoenergetic, unphased (long bunch) injection, there is an optimum range of injection energies for which the LWFA can trap a significant fraction of the injected pulse while producing an ultrashort, high-quality accelerated pulse. Phased and unphased injection in a channel-guided LWFA with a broad injected energy spread has also been simulated. Although the trapping fraction is generally much smaller than in the monoenergetic case, some simulations exhibit final accelerated bunches with remarkably small energy spread. These results suggest that relatively poor quality injection pulses may still be useful in LWFA demonstration experiments. Implications for planned LWFA experiments at NRL are discussed.

  4. A Mathematica package for calculation of planar channeling radiation spectra of relativistic electrons channeled in a diamond-structure single crystal (quantum approach)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadegan, B.

    2013-03-01

    The presented Mathematica code is an efficient tool for simulation of planar channeling radiation spectra of relativistic electrons channeled along major crystallographic planes of a diamond-structure single crystal. The program is based on the quantum theory of channeling radiation which has been successfully applied to study planar channeling at electron energies between 10 and 100 MeV. Continuum potentials for different planes of diamond, silicon and germanium single crystals are calculated using the Doyle-Turner approximation to the atomic scattering factor and taking thermal vibrations of the crystal atoms into account. Numerical methods are applied to solve the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation. The code is designed to calculate the electron wave functions, transverse electron states in the planar continuum potential, transition energies, line widths of channeling radiation and depth dependencies of the population of quantum states. Finally the spectral distribution of spontaneously emitted channeling radiation is obtained. The simulation of radiation spectra considerably facilitates the interpretation of experimental data. Catalog identifier: AEOH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 446 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 209805 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica. Computer: Platforms on which Mathematica is available. Operating system: Operating systems on which Mathematica is available. RAM: 1 MB Classification: 7.10. Nature of problem: Planar channeling radiation is emitted by relativistic charged particles during traversing a single crystal in direction parallel to a crystallographic plane. Channeling is modeled as the motion

  5. Comment on ''Chaotic electron trajectories in an electromagnetic wiggler free-electron laser with ion-channel guiding'' [Phys. Plasmas 17, 093103 (2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Nasr, N.; Hasanbeigi, A.

    2011-05-15

    The chaotic electron dynamics in a free-electron laser with electromagnetic-wave wiggler and ion-channel has been recently reported by A. Taghavi et al.[Phys. Plasmas 17, 093103 (2010)]. We comment on the authors use of a set of initial condition that is not correct based on the dispersion relation and steady-state orbits.

  6. Intense laser-induced electron emission from prepoled lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, K.; Gundel, H.; Riege, H.; Handerek, J.

    1990-03-01

    A sample of lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT 9/65/35) has been exposed to 6-ns-long laser pulses of 266 nm wavelength. The maximum output pulse energy of the laser beam was 300 μJ, the output power density on the sample 5×105 W/cm2, and the beam diameter 3 mm. By applying a moderate extraction voltage of several kilovolts, intense electron beam pulses are emitted from the free sample surface. Their time structure corresponds to the time structure of the laser pulse. Electron beam current intensities of up to 0.1 A and 2 A/cm2 and total charges of 1 nC (corresponding to 20 nC/cm2 ) were measured with a simple Faraday cup. In the range where the parameters of laser intensity and of extraction voltage could be varied their influence on the emitted electron beam current amplitude was determined.

  7. Ionization Cross Sections and Dissociation Channels of DNA Bases by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    Free secondary electrons are the most abundant secondary species in ionizing radiation. Their role in DNA damage, both direct and indirect, is an active area of research. While indirect damage by free radicals, particularly by the hydroxyl radical generated by electron collision with water. is relatively well studied, damage by direct electron collision with DNA is less well understood. Only recently Boudaiffa et al. demonstrated that electrons at energies well below ionization thresholds can induce substantial yields of single- and double-strand breaks in DNA by a resonant, dissociative attachment process. This study attracted renewed interest in electron collisions with DNA, especially in the low energy region. At higher energies ionization becomes important. While Monte Carlo track simulations of radiation damage always include ionization, the probability of dissociative ionization, i.e., simultaneous ionization and dissociation, is ignored. Just like dissociative attachment, dissociative ionization may be an important contributor to double-strand breaks since the radicals and ions produced by dissociative ionization, located in the vicinity of the DNA coil, can readily interact with other parts of the DNA. Using the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) formulation, we calculated the ionization cross sections of the four DNA bases, adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine, by electrons at energies from threshold to 1 KeV. The present calculation gives cross sections approximately 20% lower than the results by Bemhardt and Paretzke using the Deutsch-Mark and Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The difference is most likely due to the lack of a shielding term in the dipole potential used in the Deutsch-Mark and BEB formalisms. The dissociation channels of ionization for the bases are currently being studied.

  8. Investigation of a novel protonic/electronic ceramic composite material as a candidate for hydrogen separation membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fish, Jason S.

    A novel ceramic protonic/electronic conductor composite BaCe 0.2Zr0.7Y0.1O3-delta / Sr0.95 Ti0.9Nb0.1O3-delta (BCZY27/STN95: BS27) has been synthesized, and its electrical properties and hydrogen permeability have been investigated. The volume ratio of the STN95 phase was varied from 50 - 70 % to test the effects on conductivity and hydrogen permeability. BCZY27 and STN95 powders were prepared by solid-state reaction, and membrane samples were fabricated through conventional and spark plasma sintering techniques. The phase composition, density, and microstructure were compared between the sintering methodologies. Total conductivities of 0.01 - 0.06 S·cm -1 were obtained in wet (+1 % H2O) dilute H2/(N 2, He, Ar) from 600 - 800 °C for 50 volume % STN95. With increasing STN content (60 and 70 volume %), conductivity generally increased, though remained lower than predicted by standard effective medium models, even at 70 volume % STN95. A new effective medium model was proposed, which accounted for an interfacial resistance term associated with the heterojunctions formed between the BCZY27 and STN95 phases. Better fits for the measured data were achieved with this new method, although some effects remain unexplained. Discrepancies between the model and experiment were attributed to space charge effects, grain boundary resistances, and insulating impurity phase formation during synthesis. Dense BS27 samples were tested for high-temperature hydrogen permeation and a measured flux of 0.006 mumol·cm-2·s -1 was recorded for a 50 volume % STN95 sample at 700 °C, using dry argon as a sweep gas. This value represents a modest improvement on other ceramic composite membranes, but remains short of targets for commercialization. Persistent leaks in the flux experiments generated a shallower hydrogen gradient across the samples, although this p(H2) on the sweep side simultaneously decreased the oxygen partial pressure gradient across the sample and preserved the reduced state

  9. Magnetic-Field Asymmetry of Electron Wave Packet Transmission in Bent Channels Capacitively Coupled to a Metal Gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalina, R.; Szafran, B.; Bednarek, S.; Peeters, F. M.

    2009-02-01

    We study the electron wave packet moving through a bent channel. We demonstrate that the packet transmission probability becomes an asymmetric function of the magnetic field when the electron packet is capacitively coupled to a metal plate. The coupling occurs through a nonlinear potential which translates a different kinetics of the transport for opposite magnetic-field orientations into a different potential felt by the scattered electron.

  10. Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging for Rapid III-V Heteroepitaxial Characterization.

    PubMed

    Deitz, Julia I; Carnevale, Santino D; Ringel, Steven A; McComb, David W; Grassman, Tyler J

    2015-01-01

    Misfit dislocations in heteroepitaxial layers of GaP grown on Si(001) substrates are characterized through use of electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). ECCI allows for imaging of defects and crystallographic features under specific diffraction conditions, similar to that possible via plan-view transmission electron microscopy (PV-TEM). A particular advantage of the ECCI technique is that it requires little to no sample preparation, and indeed can use large area, as-produced samples, making it a considerably higher throughput characterization method than TEM. Similar to TEM, different diffraction conditions can be obtained with ECCI by tilting and rotating the sample in the SEM. This capability enables the selective imaging of specific defects, such as misfit dislocations at the GaP/Si interface, with high contrast levels, which are determined by the standard invisibility criteria. An example application of this technique is described wherein ECCI imaging is used to determine the critical thickness for dislocation nucleation for GaP-on-Si by imaging a range of samples with various GaP epilayer thicknesses. Examples of ECCI micrographs of additional defect types, including threading dislocations and a stacking fault, are provided as demonstration of its broad, TEM-like applicability. Ultimately, the combination of TEM-like capabilities - high spatial resolution and richness of microstructural data - with the convenience and speed of SEM, position ECCI as a powerful tool for the rapid characterization of crystalline materials. PMID:26274560

  11. Joining of ceramics for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilpas, Martti

    1987-01-01

    Summarized is a literature survey of the methods for joining ceramics to ceramics or ceramics to metals for high temperature applications. Also mechanical properties and potential applications of the joints are considered. The joining of ceramics is usually carried out by brazing or diffusion bonding. Especially the latter has been found useful, increasing the application of bonded ceramics. The possibility of using electron beam and laser beam welding for joining ceramics has also recently been investigated. The bonding of ceramics has found numerous applications typical for high operating temperatures, i.e., sensors and thermocouples.

  12. Electron and Light Microscopy Techniques Suitable for Studying Fatigue Damage in a Crystallized Glass Ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrell, Shelley; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1961-01-01

    The crystals of Pyroceram are randomly oriented and highly reflective so that standard microscopy techniques are not satisfactory for studying this material. Standard replicating procedures proved difficult to use. New microscopy techniques and procedures have therefore been developed. A method for locating, orienting, and identifying specific areas to be viewed with an electron microscope is described. This method not require any special equipment. Plastic replicas were found to be unsatisfactory because of their tendency to adhere to Pryoceram. This caused them to tear when released or resulted in artifacts. Preshadowed silicon monoxide replicas were satisfactory but required a releasing agent. A method of depositing the releasing agent is described. To polish specimens without evidence of fire-polishing, it was found necessary to use a vibratory polishing technique. Chrome oxide was used as the abrasive and either water or kerosene as the lubricant. Vibratory polishing is extremely slow, but surfaces so polished show no evidence of fire polishing, even when examined by electron microscopy. The most satisfactory etching process used for Pyroceram 9608 consisted of a primary etch of 5 milliliters of hydrochloric acid (concentrated), 5 milliliters of hydrogen fluoride (45 percent), and 45 milliliters of water, and a secondary etch with methyl alcohol replacing the water. Best results were obtained with total etching times from 25 to 30 seconds. Staining of the Pyroceram surface with a Sanford's marker was found to be an expedient way to reduce the glare of reflected light.

  13. Channel electron multiplier compatibility with Viton and Apiezon-L vacuum grease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D. J.; Baldonado, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Barraclough, B. L.

    1987-01-01

    Clean Viton and Viton coated with Apiezon-L vacuum grease were tested for their noncontaminating compatibility with channel electron multipliers (CEMs). The test setup and procedure were the same as those used previously in conjunction with CEM compatibility tests of certain epoxies, solder, and fluorocarbon polymer materials useful for construction of spaceflight sensors. While some CEM gain degradation was noted during exposure to Viton and Apiezon-L, the present tests indicate that, at least over instrument lifetimes of about 2 x 10 to the 12th counts, these materials should be suitable for (1) preflight space sensor testing systems, (2) hermetic seals for CEM-based space sensors, and (3) terrestrial CEM-based instrumentation.

  14. Emittance growth of an nonequilibrium intense electron beam in a transport channel with discrete focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-02-01

    The author analyzes the emittance growth mechanisms for a continuous, intense electron beam in a focusing transport channel, over distances short enough that the beam does not reach equilibrium. The emittance grows from the effect of nonlinear forces arising from (1) current density nonuniformities, (2) energy variations leading to nonlinearities in the space-charge force even if the current density is uniform, (3) axial variations in the radial vector potential, (4) an axial velocity shear along the beam, and (5) an energy redistribution of the beam as the beam compresses or expands. The emittance growth is studied analytically and numerically for the cases of balanced flow, tight focusing, and slight beam scalloping, and is additionally studied numerically for an existing 6-MeV induction linear accelerator. Rules for minimizing the emittance along a beamline are established. Some emittance growth will always occur, both from current density nonuniformities that arise along the transport and from beam radius changes along the transport.

  15. WIMAGINE: an implantable electronic platform for wireless 64-channel ECoG recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foerster, M.; Porcherot, J.; Robinet, S.; D'Errico, R.; Josselin, V.; Sauter, F.; Mestais, C.; Charvet, G.

    2013-05-01

    The WIMAGINE platform was developed as a proof of concept and first functional prototype of an implantable device for recording ECoG signals on a large number of electrodes. The designed system provides the means of recording wirelessly up to 64 ECoG channels. Two ASIC CINESIC32 ensure the amplification and digitization of the neurosignals which are then transmitted to a PC using a ZL70102 transceiver in the MICS band. An MSP430 handles the communication protocol, configures the ASICs and gives access to various sensor information. The electronics are packaged hermetically in a biocompatible titanium housing encapsulated medical grade silicone. The whole device is powered remotely over an inductive link at 13.56MHz and complies with the regulations applicable to class III AIMD.

  16. Polishing methods for metallic and ceramic transmission electron microscopy specimens: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kestel, B.J.

    1986-03-01

    In recent years, the increasing sophistication of transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies of materials has necessitated more exacting methods of specimen preparation. The present report describes improved equipment and techniques for electropolishing and chemically polishing a wide variety of specimens. Many of the specimens used in developing or improving the techniques to be described were irradiated with heavy ions such as nickel or vanadium to study radiation damage. The high cost of these specimens increased the need for reproducible methods of initial preparation postirradiation processing, and final thinning for TEM examination. A technique was also developed to salvage specimens that had previously been thinned but were unusable for various reasons. Jet polishing is, in general, the method of choice for surface polishing, sectioning, and thinning. The older beaker electropolishing method is included in this report because it is inexpensive and simple, and gives some insight into how the more recent methods were developed.

  17. Simulation of positron energy spectra generated by channeling radiation of GeV electrons in a tungsten single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadegan, B.; Mahdipou, S. A.; Wagner, W.

    2014-05-01

    Positron production based on the generation of channeling radiation by relativistic electrons channeled along the (110) crystallographic plane of a W crystal and the subsequent conversion of radiation into e+e--pairs in an amorphous tungsten target is described. Electron dechanneling is considered by solving of the Fokker-Planck equation. The continuous potential of the channeling plane is calculated using the Doyle-Turner approximation to the atomic scattering factor taking into account thermal vibrations of the crystal atoms. The trajectories, velocities and accelerations of planar channeled electrons are obtained by solving the classical equation of motion. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, the spectral-energy distribution of radiation is obtained from the Fourier transforms of realistic electron trajectories, velocities and accelerations within the W crystal. The calculations of channeling radiation and dechanneling are carried out by means of our Mathematica codes. The conversion of radiation into e+e--pairs and the energy distributions of produced positrons are simulated using the GEANT4 package.

  18. Generation of a pulsed low-energy electron beam using the channel spark device

    SciTech Connect

    Elgarhy, M. A. I. Hassaballa, S. E.; Rashed, U. M.; ElSabbagh, M. M.; Saudy, A. H.; Soliman, H. M.

    2015-12-15

    For the generation of low-energy electron beam, the design and characteristics of channel spark discharge (CSD) operating at a low voltage are presented in this paper. The discharge voltage, discharge current, X-ray emissions, and electron beam current were experimentally determined. The effects of the applied voltage, working gas pressure, and external capacitance on the CSD and beam parameters were measured. At an applied voltage of 11 kV, an oxygen gas pressure of 25 mTorr, and an external capacitance of 16.45 nF, the maximum measured current was 900 A. The discharge current increased with the increase in the pressure and capacitance, while its periodic time decreased with the increase in the pressure. Two types of the discharge were identified and recorded: the hollow cathode discharge and the conduction discharge. A Faraday cup was used to measure the beam current. The maximum measured beam current was 120 A, and the beam signal exhibited two peaks. The increase in both the external capacitance and the applied discharge voltage increased the maximum electron beam current. The electron-beam pulse time decreased with the increase in the gas pressure at a constant voltage and increased with the decrease in the applied discharge voltage. At an applied voltage of 11 kV and an oxygen gas pressure of 15 mTorr, the maximum beam energy was 2.8 keV. The X-ray signal intensity decreased with the increase in the gas pressure and increased with the increase in the capacitance.

  19. Generation of a pulsed low-energy electron beam using the channel spark device.

    PubMed

    Elgarhy, M A I; Hassaballa, S E; Rashed, U M; ElSabbagh, M M; Soliman, H M; Saudy, A H

    2015-12-01

    For the generation of low-energy electron beam, the design and characteristics of channel spark discharge (CSD) operating at a low voltage are presented in this paper. The discharge voltage, discharge current, X-ray emissions, and electron beam current were experimentally determined. The effects of the applied voltage, working gas pressure, and external capacitance on the CSD and beam parameters were measured. At an applied voltage of 11 kV, an oxygen gas pressure of 25 mTorr, and an external capacitance of 16.45 nF, the maximum measured current was 900 A. The discharge current increased with the increase in the pressure and capacitance, while its periodic time decreased with the increase in the pressure. Two types of the discharge were identified and recorded: the hollow cathode discharge and the conduction discharge. A Faraday cup was used to measure the beam current. The maximum measured beam current was 120 A, and the beam signal exhibited two peaks. The increase in both the external capacitance and the applied discharge voltage increased the maximum electron beam current. The electron-beam pulse time decreased with the increase in the gas pressure at a constant voltage and increased with the decrease in the applied discharge voltage. At an applied voltage of 11 kV and an oxygen gas pressure of 15 mTorr, the maximum beam energy was 2.8 keV. The X-ray signal intensity decreased with the increase in the gas pressure and increased with the increase in the capacitance. PMID:26724026

  20. Generation of a pulsed low-energy electron beam using the channel spark device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgarhy, M. A. I.; Hassaballa, S. E.; Rashed, U. M.; ElSabbagh, M. M.; Soliman, H. M.; Saudy, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    For the generation of low-energy electron beam, the design and characteristics of channel spark discharge (CSD) operating at a low voltage are presented in this paper. The discharge voltage, discharge current, X-ray emissions, and electron beam current were experimentally determined. The effects of the applied voltage, working gas pressure, and external capacitance on the CSD and beam parameters were measured. At an applied voltage of 11 kV, an oxygen gas pressure of 25 mTorr, and an external capacitance of 16.45 nF, the maximum measured current was 900 A. The discharge current increased with the increase in the pressure and capacitance, while its periodic time decreased with the increase in the pressure. Two types of the discharge were identified and recorded: the hollow cathode discharge and the conduction discharge. A Faraday cup was used to measure the beam current. The maximum measured beam current was 120 A, and the beam signal exhibited two peaks. The increase in both the external capacitance and the applied discharge voltage increased the maximum electron beam current. The electron-beam pulse time decreased with the increase in the gas pressure at a constant voltage and increased with the decrease in the applied discharge voltage. At an applied voltage of 11 kV and an oxygen gas pressure of 15 mTorr, the maximum beam energy was 2.8 keV. The X-ray signal intensity decreased with the increase in the gas pressure and increased with the increase in the capacitance.

  1. Measurement of brightness temperature of two-dimensional electron gas in channel of a high electron mobility transistor at ultralow dissipation power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, A. M.; Shulga, V. M.; Turutanov, O. G.; Shnyrkov, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    A technically simple and physically clear method is suggested for direct measurement of the brightness temperature of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the channel of a high electron mobility transistor (HEMT). The usage of the method was demonstrated with the pseudomorphic HEMT as a specimen. The optimal HEMT dc regime, from the point of view of the "back action" problem, was found to belong to the unsaturated area of the static characteristics possibly corresponding to the ballistic electron transport mode. The proposed method is believed to be a convenient tool to explore the ballistic transport, electron diffusion, 2DEG properties and other electrophysical processes in heterostructures.

  2. Asymmetry of the angular distribution of radiation of channeled relativistic electrons in optically transparent crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotchenko, K. B.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that optical and ultraviolet radiation from relativistic electrons at planar channeling in optically transparent crystals is characterized by an unusual dependence on the polar and azimuth angles. A fraction of radiation with the frequency ω near which the derivative of the refractive index is nonzero, n'(ω) = dn(ω)/ dω ≠ 0, should be observed at an angle close to π/2 with respect to the electron beam. For normal dispersion ( n'(ω) > 0), this angle is smaller than π/2, whereas for anomalous dispersion ( n'(ω) < 0), it is larger than π/2 ("backward" radiation). A pronounced dependence of the radiation intensity on the azimuth angle φ, i.e., azimuthal asymmetry, appears beyond the region of normal and anomalous dispersion at a fixed polar angle θ. In particular, the ratio of radiation intensities at angles φ = 0 and π/2 at θ = π/2 reaches a maximum value of about the square of the refractive index.

  3. AlGaN/GaN current aperture vertical electron transistors with regrown channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Yaacov, Ilan; Seck, Yee-Kwang; Mishra, Umesh K.; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2004-02-01

    AlGaN/GaN current aperture vertical electron transistors with regrown aperture and source regions have been fabricated and tested. A 2 μm thick GaN:Si drain region followed by a 0.4 μm GaN:Mg current-blocking layer were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on a c-plane sapphire substrate. Channel apertures were etched, and a maskless regrowth was performed to grow unintentionally doped GaN inside the aperture as well as above the insulating layer, and to add an AlGaN cap layer. Cl2 reactive ion etching was used to pattern the device mesa, and source, drain, and gate metals were then deposited. Devices were achieved with a maximum source-drain current of 750 mA/mm, an extrinsic transconductance of 120 mS/mm, and a 2-terminal gate breakdown of 65 V while exhibiting almost no DC-RF dispersion for 80 μs pulsed I-V curves. The suppression of DC-RF dispersion was shown to result from the absence of the large electric fields at the surface on the drain-side edge of the gate that are present in high electron mobility transistors. Parasitic leakage currents, which were present in all devices, have been studied in detail. Three leakage paths have been identified, and methods to eliminate them are discussed.

  4. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    DOEpatents

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  5. On Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents four ceramics activities for secondary-level art classes. Included are directions for primitive kiln construction and glaze making. Two ceramics design activities are described in which students make bizarrely-shaped lidded jars, feet, and footwear. (AM)

  6. Coherent bremsstrahlung and channeling radiation from electrons of one to three MeV in silicon and gold

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, James Edwin

    1981-01-01

    The observation of sharp peaks in the x-ray spectrum from 1 to 3 MeV electrons striking thin single crystals of silicon and gold is reported. These peaks were observed in the range 1 to 25 keV. The peaks are of two different origins, both direct results of the periodic nature of the target crystals. The first kind of radiation is caused by the interference of incoming and scattered electron wave functions. Because of the periodicity of the target material there is a coherence effect for certain bremsstrahlung wave vectors. This coherent bremsstrahlung, though well known at very high electron energies, has never been adequately studied at electron energies below several hundred MeV. Detailed agreement between theoretical prediction and observation in silicon is shown. The second kind of radiation is caused by electrons channeled along major crystal axes. The electrons enter certain quantized orbits as they channel and may emit photons as a consequence of transitions between the various orbits. Observations of channeling radiation for various crystal axes in silicon are presented. Both phenomena were observed in gold, the first such observation for any metallic target.

  7. Threshold field for soft damage and electron drift velocity in InGaN two-dimensional channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardaravičius, L.; Kiprijanovič, O.; Liberis, J.; Šermukšnis, E.; Matulionis, A.; Ferreyra, R. A.; Avrutin, V.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.

    2015-10-01

    Experimental investigation of electron transport along a two-dimensional channel confined in an InGaN alloy of Al{}0.82In{}0.18N/AlN/In{}0.1Ga{}0.9N/GaN structure was performed at room temperature under near-equilibrium thermal-bath temperature. A soft damage was observed at a threshold electric field applied in the channel plane. The threshold current for soft damage and the supplied electric power were lower in the channels with a higher electron density. The results are interpreted in terms of plasmon-assisted heat dissipation. In agreement with ultra-fast decay of hot phonons in the vicinity of the resonance with plasmons, the electron drift velocity acquires a highest value of ˜2 × 107 cm s-1 at 180 kV cm-1 in channels with 1 × 1013 cm-2 and decreases as the electron density increases. No negative differential resistance is observed. The effective hot-phonon lifetime is estimated as ˜ 2 ps at 1.6 × 1013 cm-2 at low electric fields and is found to decrease as the field increases.

  8. Structural Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of abstracts and slides of papers presented at the NASA Lewis Structural Ceramics Workshop. Collectively, these papers depict the scope of NASA Lewis' structural ceramics program. The technical areas include monolithic SiC and Si3N4 development, ceramic matrix composites, tribology, design methodology, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), fracture mechanics, and corrosion.

  9. In situ transmission electron microscopy study of the electric field-induced transformation of incommensurate modulations in a Sn-modified lead zirconate titanate ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, H.; Tan, X.

    2004-10-01

    Electric field-induced transformation of incommensurate modulations in a Sn-modified lead zirconate titanate ceramic was investigated with an electric field in situ transmission electron microscopy technique. It is found that the spacing between the (1/x){110} satellite spots and the fundamental reflections do not change with external electric field, indicating that the modulation wavelength stays constant under applied field. The intensity of these satellites starts to decrease when the field level reaches a critical value. Further increase in the field strength eventually leads to the complete disappearance of the satellite reflections. In addition, the 1/2 {111}-type superlattice reflections showed no response to electrical stimuli.

  10. Electronic structure of the LiAA‧O6 (A = Nb, Ta, and A‧ = W, Mo) ceramics by modified Becke-Johnson potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Zahid; Khan, Imad; Rahman, Mazhar; Ahmad, Rashid; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2016-08-01

    DFT is used to study various transition metal based ceramics LiAA‧O6 (A = Nb, Ta, and A‧ = W, Mo) in tetragonal phase with space group 421 m (No. 113). The calculated structural and geometrical parameters are found in closed agreement with the experiments. Electronic clouds explain the chemical bonding and reveal that Li atom occupy central position and form ionic bond. Other bonds in these compounds are significantly covalent due to the sharing of electrons between O and A/A‧. The electronic properties demonstrate that these compounds are wide bandgap semiconductors in the energy range of 2.18-2.60 eV. These bandgap energies confirm the suitability of these oxides in optoelectronic devices operating in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  11. Channel electron multipliers - Detection efficiencies with opaque MgF2 photocathodes at XUV wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapson, L. B.; Timothy, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    Detection efficiencies of channel electron multipliers (CEM) with opaque MgF2 photocathodes obtained in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV), 44 A to 990 A, are reported. A stable highly efficient response is reported for that interval, with no adverse effects on CEM performance. Efficiencies twice those of uncoated CEMs are obtained for 50 A to 350 A. The Mullard B419BL and Galileo 4510WL single-stage cone-cathode CEMs were used in the experiments. A rare-gas double ionization chamber was employed as absolute standard detector for 406 A to 990 A, and a flow Geiger counter filled with 96% argon and 4% isobutane for 44 A to 256 A. Absolute detection efficiencies are 10% higher from 67 A to 990 A when photocathodes are illuminated at an angle of incidence 45 deg. The photocathodes suffered no loss of response in storage (in vacuum or air) after an initial aging period. Effects of scattered UV radiation are greatly reduced when MgF2-coated CEMs are used in the XUV.

  12. Rapid misfit dislocation characterization in heteroepitaxial III-V/Si thin films by electron channeling contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Santino D.; Deitz, Julia I.; Carlin, John A.; Picard, Yoosuf N.; De Graef, Marc; Ringel, Steven A.; Grassman, Tyler J.

    2014-06-09

    Electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) is used to characterize misfit dislocations in heteroepitaxial layers of GaP grown on Si(100) substrates. Electron channeling patterns serve as a guide to tilt and rotate sample orientation so that imaging can occur under specific diffraction conditions. This leads to the selective contrast of misfit dislocations depending on imaging conditions, confirmed by dynamical simulations, similar to using standard invisibility criteria in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The onset and evolution of misfit dislocations in GaP films with varying thicknesses (30 to 250 nm) are studied. This application simultaneously reveals interesting information about misfit dislocations in GaP/Si layers and demonstrates a specific measurement for which ECCI is preferable versus traditional plan-view TEM.

  13. Channel Strain in Advanced Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors Measured Using Nano-Beam Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Akio; Nakamura, Hidetatsu; Fukai, Toshinori; Ikarashi, Nobuyuki

    2008-04-01

    Using high-precision nano-beam electron diffraction (NBD), we clarified the influences of stress liner and the stress of shallow trench isolation on channel strain in advanced metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). For systematic strain measurements, we improved the precision of NBD by observing large reciprocal lattice vectors under appropriate diffraction conditions. The absolute value of the channel strain increases by stress liner as gate length decreases, although the drive current increase due to stress liner saturates at a shorter channel length. The normal strain in the gate length direction is inversely proportional to the distance from the gate electrode to the shallow trench isolation (STI). Furthermore, the relationship between measured channel strain induced by STI and drive current change was shown. The drive current of n- and p-MOSFET changes about 5% with 2×10-3 channel strain variation. This result suggests that reducing the shallow trench isolation stress is effective for controlling the drive current change, depending on the active region layout. We conclude that the experimental measurement of channel strain is necessary for device and circuit design.

  14. Ferroelectric ceramics in a pyroelectric accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shchagin, A. V.; Miroshnik, V. S.; Volkov, V. I.; Oleinik, A. N.

    2015-12-07

    The applicability of polarized ferroelectric ceramics as a pyroelectric in a pyroelectric accelerator is shown by experiments. The spectra of X-ray radiation of energy up to tens of keV, generated by accelerated electrons, have been measured on heating and cooling of the ceramics in vacuum. It is suggested that curved layers of polarized ferroelectric ceramics be used as elements of ceramic pyroelectric accelerators. Besides, nanotubes and nanowires manufactured from ferroelectric ceramics are proposed for the use in nanometer-scale ceramic pyroelectric nanoaccelerators for future applications in nanotechnologies.

  15. Uses of ceramics in microelectronics: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratschun, W. R.; Mountvala, A. J.; Pincus, A. G.

    1971-01-01

    The properties and behavior of ceramic materials used in components for electronic circuitry are examined to appraise the present and future directions for microelectronics, and to suggest further product development, and how innovations may be useful in other technologies. Ceramic and glass insulators, resistors, capacitors, and the use of ceramics and glasses in microcircuitry are discussed along with technology transfer to nonaerospace uses.

  16. Reliability and Lifetime Prediction for Ceramic Components

    SciTech Connect

    Vedula, V.R.; Glass, S.J.; Monroe, S.L.; Neilsen, M.K.; Newton, C.

    1999-01-11

    Ceramic materials are used extensively in non-nuclear components in the weapons stockpile including neutron tubes, stronglinks, weaklinks, batteries, and current/voltage stacks. Ceramics also perform critical functions in electronics, passively as insulators and actively as resistors and capacitors, Glass and ceramic seals also provide hermetic electrical feedthrus in connectors for many weapons components.

  17. Weak antilocalization and electron-electron interaction in coupled multiple-channel transport in a Bi2Se3 thin film.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yumei; Huang, Shaoyun; Zhang, Kai; Wu, Jinxiong; Guo, Yunfan; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan; Xu, H Q

    2016-01-28

    The electron transport properties of a topological insulator Bi2Se3 thin film are studied in Hall-bar geometry. The film with a thickness of 10 nm is grown by van der Waals epitaxy on fluorophlogopite mica and Hall-bar devices are fabricated from the as-grown film directly on the mica substrate. Weak antilocalization and electron-electron interaction effects are observed and analyzed at low temperatures. The phase-coherence length extracted from the measured weak antilocalization characteristics shows a strong power-law increase with decreasing temperature and the transport in the film is shown to occur via coupled multiple (topological surface and bulk states) channels. The conductivity of the film shows a logarithmical decrease with decreasing temperature and thus the electron-electron interaction plays a dominant role in quantum corrections to the conductivity of the film at low temperatures. PMID:26733366

  18. Weak antilocalization and electron-electron interaction in coupled multiple-channel transport in a Bi2Se3 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Yumei; Huang, Shaoyun; Zhang, Kai; Wu, Jinxiong; Guo, Yunfan; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-01-01

    The electron transport properties of a topological insulator Bi2Se3 thin film are studied in Hall-bar geometry. The film with a thickness of 10 nm is grown by van der Waals epitaxy on fluorophlogopite mica and Hall-bar devices are fabricated from the as-grown film directly on the mica substrate. Weak antilocalization and electron-electron interaction effects are observed and analyzed at low temperatures. The phase-coherence length extracted from the measured weak antilocalization characteristics shows a strong power-law increase with decreasing temperature and the transport in the film is shown to occur via coupled multiple (topological surface and bulk states) channels. The conductivity of the film shows a logarithmical decrease with decreasing temperature and thus the electron-electron interaction plays a dominant role in quantum corrections to the conductivity of the film at low temperatures.

  19. Ceramic component for electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.

    1979-01-01

    A ceramic component suitable for preparing MHD generator electrodes consists of HfO.sub.2 and sufficient Tb.sub.4 O.sub.7 to stabilize at least 60 volume percent of the HfO.sub.2 into the cubic structure. The ceramic component may also contain a small amount of PrO.sub.2, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 or a mixture of both to improve stability and electronic conductivity of the electrode. The component is highly resistant to corrosion by molten potassium seed and molten coal slag in the MHD fluid and exhibits both ionic and electronic conductivity.

  20. A low noise front end electronics for micro-channel plate detector with wedge and strip anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, K.; Li, F.; Liang, F.; Chen, L.; Jin, G.

    2016-03-01

    A low noise Front End Electronics (FEE) for two-dimensional position sensitive Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detector has been developed. The MCP detector is based on Wedge and Strip Anode (WSA) with induction readout mode. The WSA has three electrodes, the wedge electrode, the strip electrode, and the zigzag electrode. Then, three readout channels are designed in the Printed Circuit Board (PCB). The FEE is calibrated by a pulse generator from Agilent. We also give an analysis of the charge loss from the CSA. The noise levels of the three channels are less than 1 fC RMS at the shaping time of 200 ns. The experimental result shows that the position resolution of the MCP detector coupled with the designed PCB can reach up to 110 μm.

  1. AlGaN Channel High Electron Mobility Transistors: Device Performance and Power-Switching Figure of Merit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Ajay; Dasgupta, Sansaptak; Rajan, Siddharth; Speck, James S.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, AlGaN channels for high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) have been evaluated based on a power device figure of merit. AlGaN-channel HEMTs grown on SiC substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) were fabricated. Maximum saturation current of 0.55 A/mm was obtained at VGS=1 V. Current-gain cutoff ( ft) and power-gain cutoff ( fmax) frequencies obtained from small signal measurements were ft=13.2 GHz and fmax=41 GHz. Pulsed current-voltage (I-V) measurements at 200 ns showed no dispersion in I-V curves. Large signal continuous wave (CW) measurement yielded an output power density of 4.5 W/mm with power added efficiency (PAE) of 59% at 4 GHz. This work demonstrates the potential of AlGaN channel HEMTs for high voltage switching and microwave power applications.

  2. Controlled generation of comb-like electron beams in plasma channels for polychromatic inverse Thomson γ-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, S. Y.; Davoine, X.; Ghebregziabher, I.; Lehe, R.; Lifschitz, A. F.; Shadwick, B. A.

    2016-03-01

    Propagating a relativistically intense, negatively chirped laser pulse (the bandwidth  >150 nm) in a plasma channel makes it possible to generate background-free, comb-like electron beams—sequences of synchronized bunches with a low phase-space volume and controlled energy spacing. The tail of the pulse, confined in the accelerator cavity (an electron density ‘bubble’), experiences periodic focusing, while the head, which is the most intense portion of the pulse, steadily self-guides. Oscillations of the cavity size cause periodic injection of electrons from the ambient plasma, creating an electron energy comb with the number of components, their mean energy, and energy spacing dependent on the channel radius and pulse length. These customizable electron beams enable the design of a tunable, all-optical source of pulsed, polychromatic γ-rays using the mechanism of inverse Thomson scattering, with up to  ˜10-5 conversion efficiency from the drive pulse in the electron accelerator to the γ-ray beam. Such a source may radiate  ˜107 quasi-monochromatic photons per shot into a microsteradian-scale cone. The photon energy is distributed among several distinct bands, each having sub-30% energy spread, with a highest energy of 12.5 MeV.

  3. A wireless 64-channel ECoG recording electronic for implantable monitoring and BCI applications: WIMAGINE.

    PubMed

    Charvet, G; Foerster, M; Chatalic, G; Michea, A; Porcherot, J; Bonnet, S; Filipe, S; Audebert, P; Robinet, S; Josselin, V; Reverdy, J; D'Errico, R; Sauter, F; Mestais, C; Benabid, A L

    2012-01-01

    A wireless, low power, 64-channel data acquisition system named WIMAGINE has been designed for ElectroCorticoGram (ECoG) recording. This system is based on a custom integrated circuit (ASIC) for amplification and digitization on 64 channels. It allows the RF transmission (in the MICS band) of 32 ECoG recording channels (among 64 channels available) sampled at 1 kHz per channel with a 12-bit resolution. The device is powered wirelessly through an inductive link at 13.56 MHz able to provide 100mW (30mA at 3.3V). This integration is a first step towards an implantable device for brain activity monitoring and Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) applications. The main features of the WIMAGINE platform and its architecture will be presented, as well as its performances and in vivo studies. PMID:23366009

  4. Lateral tunneling through the controlled barrier between edge channels in a two-dimensional electron gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashkin, A. A.; Dolgopolov, V. T.; Deviatov, E. V.; Irmer, B.; Haubrich, A. G. C.; Kotthaus, J. P.; Bichler, M.; Wegscheider, W.

    1999-12-01

    We study the lateral tunneling through the gate-voltage-controlled barrier, which arises as a result of partial elimination of the donor layer of a heterostructure along a fine strip using an atomic force microscope, between edge channels at the depletion-induced edges of a gated two-dimensional electron system. For a sufficiently high barrier a typical current-voltage characteristic is found to be strongly asymmetric and includes, apart from a positive tunneling branch, the negative branch that corresponds to the current overflowing the barrier. We establish that the barrier height depends linearly on both gate voltage and magnetic field and we describe the data in terms of electron tunneling between the outermost edge channels.

  5. Fabrication of high-power piezoelectric transformers using lead-free ceramics for application in electronic ballasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Song-Ling; Chen, Shih-Ming; Tsai, Cheng-Che; Hong, Cheng-Shong; Chu, Sheng-Yuan

    2013-02-01

    CuO is doped into (Na(0.5)K(0.5))NbO(3) (NKN) ceramics to improve the piezoelectric properties and thus obtain a piezoelectric transformer (PT) with high output power. In X-ray diffraction patterns, the diffraction angles of the CuO-doped NKN ceramics shift to lower values because of an expansion of the lattice volume, thus inducing oxygen vacancies and enhancing the mechanical quality factor. A homogeneous microstructure is obtained when NKN is subjected to CuO doping, leading to improved electrical properties. PTs with different electrode areas are fabricated using the CuO-doped NKN ceramics. Considering the efficiency, voltage gain, and temperature rise of PTs at a load resistance of 1 kΩ, PTs with an electrode with an inner diameter of 15 mm are combined with the circuit design for driving a 13-W T5 fluorescent lamp. A temperature rise of 6°C and a total efficiency of 82.4% (PT and circuit) are obtained using the present PTs. PMID:23357915

  6. Ceramic burner

    SciTech Connect

    Laux, W.; Hebel, R.; Artelt, P.; Esfeld, G.; Jacob, A.

    1981-03-31

    Improvements in the mixing body and supporting structure of a molded-ceramic-brick burner enable the burner to withstand the vibrations induced during its operation. Designed for the combustion chambers of air heaters, the burner has a mixing body composed of layers of shaped ceramic bricks that interlock and are held together vertically by a ceramic holding bar. The mixing body is shaped like a mushroom - the upper layers have a larger radius than the lower ones.

  7. Ceramic joining

    SciTech Connect

    Loehman, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  8. Channeling of electron transport to improve collection efficiency in mesoporous titanium dioxide dye sensitized solar cell stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakharuddin, Azhar; Ahmed, Irfan; Khalidin, Zulkeflee; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Jose, Rajan

    2014-02-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) modules are generally made by interconnecting large photoelectrode strips with optimized thickness (˜14 μm) and show lower current density (JSC) compared with their single cells. We found out that the key to achieving higher JSC in large area devices is optimized photoelectrode volume (VD), viz., thickness and area which facilitate the electron channeling towards working electrode. By imposing constraints on electronic path in a DSC stack, we achieved >50% increased JSC and ˜60% increment in photoelectric conversion efficiency in photoelectrodes of similar VD (˜3.36 × 10-4 cm3) without using any metallic grid or a special interconnections.

  9. Efficiency enhancement in free-electron laser amplifier with one dimensional helical wiggler and ion-channel guiding

    SciTech Connect

    Jafari Bahman, F.; Maraghechi, B.

    2012-01-15

    A method for efficiency enhancement in free-electron laser is studied which uses both tapered wiggler magnetic field and ion-channel density. Derivation of a set of nonlinear and coupled differential equations leads to the self-consistent description of the evolution of both an ensemble of electrons and the electromagnetic radiation. Numerical solution of these equations reveals considerable enhancements of the interaction efficiency. In order to obtain a better insight into physical basis of the problem, a modified pendulum equation for the interaction is derived and a small signal theory of the efficiency enhancement is developed.

  10. Ceramic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    Filters were formed from ceramic fibers, organic fibers, and a ceramic bond phase using a papermaking technique. The distribution of particulate ceramic bond phase was determined using a model silicon carbide system. As the ceramic fiber increased in length and diameter the distance between particles decreased. The calculated number of particles per area showed good agreement with the observed value. After firing, the papers were characterized using a biaxial load test. The strength of papers was proportional to the amount of bond phase included in the paper. All samples exhibited strain-tolerant behavior.

  11. X-ray fluorescence (conventional and 3D) and scanning electron microscopy for the investigation of Portuguese polychrome glazed ceramics: Advances in the knowledge of the manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilherme, A.; Coroado, J.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Lühl, L.; Wolff, T.; Kanngießer, B.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2011-05-01

    This work shows the first analytical results obtained by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) (conventional and 3D) and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive System (SEM-EDS) on original Portuguese ceramic pieces produced between the 16th and 18th centuries in Coimbra and Lisbon. Experts distinguished these productions based only on the color, texture and brightness, which originates mislabeling in some cases. Thanks to lateral and spatial resolution in the micrometer regime, the results obtained with μ-XRF were essential in determining the glaze and pigment thicknesses by monitoring the profile of the most abundant element in each "layer". Furthermore, the dissemination of these elements throughout the glaze is different depending on the glaze composition, firing temperature and on the pigment itself. Hence, the crucial point of this investigation was to analyze and understand the interfaces color/glaze and glaze/ceramic support. Together with the XRF results, images captured by SEM and the corresponding semi-quantitative EDS data revealed different manufacturing processes used by the two production centers. Different capture modes were suitable to distinguish different crystals from the minerals that confer the color of the pigments used and to enhance the fact that some of them are very well spread through the glassy matrix, sustaining the theory of an evolved and careful procedure in the manufacturing process of the glaze.

  12. Rare reaction channels in real-time time-dependent density functional theory: the test case of electron attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Lionel; Dinh, P. Huong Mai; Reinhard, Paul-Gerhard; Suraud, Eric; Sanche, Leon

    2015-08-01

    We present an extension of standard time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to include the evaluation of rare reaction channels, taking as an example of application the theoretical modelling of electron attachment to molecules. The latter process is of great importance in radiation-induced damage of biological tissue for which dissociative electron attachment plays a decisive role. As the attachment probability is very low, it cannot be extracted from the TDDFT propagation whose mean field provides an average over various reaction channels. To extract rare events, we augment TDDFT by a perturbative treatment to account for the occasional jumps, namely electron capture in our test case. We apply the modelling to electron attachment to H2O, H3O+, and (H2O)2. Dynamical calculations have been done at low energy (3-16 eV). We explore, in particular, how core-excited states of the targets show up as resonances in the attachment probability. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García, Eugene Surdutovich.

  13. Injection and acceleration of quasimonoenergetic relativistic electron beams using density gradients at the edges of a plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Faure, J.; Rechatin, C.; Lundh, O.; Ammoura, L.; Malka, V.

    2010-08-15

    The injection of quasimonoenergetic electron beams into a laser wakefield accelerator is demonstrated experimentally using density gradients at the edges of a plasma channel. In the experiment, two laser pulses are used; the main laser pulse drives a wakefield, while a second countercrossing laser beam produces a plasma whose expansion creates a channel with significant density gradients. Local injection of electrons in the wakefield is triggered by wave breaking in the density ramp. The injection is localized spatially and leads to the generation of collimated and narrow energy spread relativistic electron beams at the 100 MeV level, with charges in the range of 20-100 pC. The stability of this injection process is compared to the stability of the colliding pulse injection process and is found to be inferior for our experimental conditions. On the other hand, it is found that as the electron beam divergence is smaller in the case of gradient injection, the transverse emittance might be better.

  14. Three-dimensional nonlinear efficiency enhancement analysis in free-electron laser amplifier with prebunched electron beam and ion-channel guiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari Bahman, F.; Maraghechi, B.

    2013-02-01

    Efficiency enhancement in free-electron laser is studied by three-dimensional and nonlinear simulation using tapered helical wiggler magnetic field or tapered ion-channel density. In order to reduce the saturation length, prebunched electron beam is used. A set of nonlinear and coupled differential equations are derived that provides the self-consistent description of the evolution of both an ensemble of electrons and the electromagnetic radiation. These equations are solved numerically to show that the combined effect of tapering and prebunching results in significant enhancement of power and considerable reduction of the saturation length. To have a deeper insight into the problem, an analytical treatment is also presented that uses the small signal theory to derive a modified pendulum equation.

  15. Three-dimensional nonlinear efficiency enhancement analysis in free-electron laser amplifier with prebunched electron beam and ion-channel guiding

    SciTech Connect

    Jafari Bahman, F.; Maraghechi, B.

    2013-02-15

    Efficiency enhancement in free-electron laser is studied by three-dimensional and nonlinear simulation using tapered helical wiggler magnetic field or tapered ion-channel density. In order to reduce the saturation length, prebunched electron beam is used. A set of nonlinear and coupled differential equations are derived that provides the self-consistent description of the evolution of both an ensemble of electrons and the electromagnetic radiation. These equations are solved numerically to show that the combined effect of tapering and prebunching results in significant enhancement of power and considerable reduction of the saturation length. To have a deeper insight into the problem, an analytical treatment is also presented that uses the small signal theory to derive a modified pendulum equation.

  16. Electron mobility in ultra-thin InGaAs channels: Impact of surface orientation and different gate oxide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivec, Sabina; Poljak, Mirko; Suligoj, Tomislav

    2016-01-01

    Electron mobility is investigated in sub-20 nm-thick InGaAs channels, sandwiched between different gate oxides (SiO2, Al2O3, HfO2) and InP as substrate, using physics-based numerical modeling. Effects of body thickness downscaling to 2 nm, different gate oxides, and surface orientation [(1 0 0) and (1 1 1)] are examined by including all electron valleys and all relevant scattering mechanisms. We report that ultra-thin (1 1 1) Al2O3-InGaAs-InP devices offer greater electron mobility than (1 0 0) devices even in the extremely-thin channels. Furthermore, ultra-thin (1 0 0) InGaAs devices outperform SOI in terms of electron mobility for body thicknesses above ∼4 nm, while (1 1 1) InGaAs channels are superior to SOI for all body thickness values above ∼3 nm. The study of different gate oxides indicates that HfO2 is the optimum gate dielectric regardless of device orientation, offering a mobility improvement of up to 124% for (1 1 1) and 149% for (1 0 0) surface orientation, when compared to the initial Al2O3-InGaAs-InP structure. The (1 1 1) orientation offers improvement over (1 0 0) device irrespective of the body thickness and gate oxide material, with the highest difference reported for SiO2, followed by Al2O3 and HfO2.

  17. Channeling, volume reflection, and volume capture study of electrons in a bent silicon crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wistisen, T. N.; Uggerhøj, U. I.; Wienands, U.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Noble, R. J.; Benson, B. C.; Smith, T.; Bagli, E.; Bandiera, L.; Germogli, G.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Holtzapple, R.; Tucker, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present the experimental data and analysis of experiments conducted at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory investigating the processes of channeling, volume-reflection and volume-capture along the (111) plane in a strongly bent quasimosaic silicon crystal. These phenomena were investigated at 5 energies: 3.35, 4.2, 6.3, 10.5, and 14.0 GeV with a crystal with bending radius of 0.15 m, corresponding to curvatures of 0.053, 0.066, 0.099, 0.16, and 0.22 times the critical curvature, respectively. Based on the parameters of fitting functions we have extracted important parameters describing the channeling process such as the dechanneling length, the angle of volume reflection, the surface transmission, and the widths of the distribution of channeled particles parallel and orthogonal to the plane.

  18. Vacuum channeling radiation by relativistic electrons in a transverse field of a laser-based Bessel beam.

    PubMed

    Schächter, L; Kimura, W D

    2015-05-15

    Relativistic electrons counterpropagating through the center of a radially polarized J_{1} optical Bessel beam in vacuum will emit radiation in a manner analogous to the channeling radiation that occurs when charged particles traverse through a crystal lattice. However, since this interaction occurs in vacuum, problems with scattering of the electrons by the lattice atoms are eliminated. Contrary to inverse Compton scattering, the emitted frequency is also determined by the amplitude of the laser field, rather than only by its frequency. Adjusting the value of the laser field permits the tuning of the emitted frequency over orders of magnitude, from terahertz to soft X rays. High flux intensities are predicted (~100 MW/cm^{2}). Extended interaction lengths are feasible due to the diffraction-free properties of the Bessel beam and its radial field, which confines the electron trajectory within the center of the Bessel beam. PMID:26024179

  19. Ab initio Computations of the Electronic, Mechanical, and Thermal Properties of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTC) ZrB2 and HfB2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, John W.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Daw, Murray

    2011-01-01

    Refractory materials such as metallic borides, often considered as ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC), are characterized by high melting point, high hardness, and good chemical inertness. These materials have many applications which require high temperature materials that can operate with no or limited oxidation. Ab initio, first principles methods are the most accurate modeling approaches available and represent a parameter free description of the material based on the quantum mechanical equations. Using these methods, many of the intrinsic properties of these material can be obtained. We performed ab initio calculations based on density functional theory for the UHTC materials ZrB2 and HfB2. Computational results are presented for structural information (lattice constants, bond lengths, etc), electronic structure (bonding motifs, densities of states, band structure, etc), thermal quantities (phonon spectra, phonon densities of states, specific heat), as well as information about point defects such as vacancy and antisite formation energies.

  20. Characterization of oxygen vacancy defects in Ba1-xCaxTiO3 insulating ceramics using electron paramagnetic resonance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Da-Yong; Yuan, Long-Fei; Liang, Wei-Na; Zhu, Zhao-Bin

    2016-01-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique was employed to detect oxygen vacancy defects in the tetragonal Ba1-xCaxTiO3 (x = 0.03) ceramics (BCa3T) prepared via the mixed oxide route at 1300-1500 °C. In the rhombohedral phase below -100 °C, an EPR signal at g = 1.955 appeared in the insulating BCa3T with an electrical resistivity of 108 Ω cm and was assigned to ionized oxygen vacancy defects. BCa3T prepared at 1300 °C showed a temperature-stable X6S dielectric specification (ɛ‧ = 1750). Three types of vacancy defect, namely, Ba, Ti, and O vacances, could coexist in BCa3T owing to the partial Ti-site occupation by Ca2+.

  1. Channeling, volume reflection and gamma emission using 14GeV electrons in bent silicon crystals - Oral presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Brandon

    2015-08-23

    High energy electrons can be deflected with very tight bending radius using a bent silicon crystal. This produces gamma radiation. As these crystals can be thin, a series of bent silicon crystals with alternating direction has the potential to produce coherent gamma radiation with reasonable energy of the driving electron beam. Such an electron crystal undulator offers the prospect for higher energy radiation at lower cost than current methods. Permanent magnetic undulators like LCLS at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are expensive and very large (about 100 m in case of the LCLS undulator). Silicon crystals are inexpensive and compact when compared to the large magnetic undulators. Additionally, such a high energy coherent light source could be used for probing through materials currently impenetrable by x-rays. In this work we present the experimental data and analysis of experiment T523 conducted at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We collected the spectrum of gamma ray emission from 14 GeV electrons on a bent silicon crystal counting single photons. We also investigated the dynamics of electron motion in the crystal i.e. processes of channeling and volume reflection at 14 GeV, extending and building off previous work. Our single photon spectrum for the amorphous crystal orientation is consistent with bremsstrahlung radiation and the volume reflection crystal orientation shows a trend consistent with synchrotron radiation at a critical energy of 740 MeV. We observe that in these two cases the data are consistent, but we make no further claims because of statistical limitations. We also extended the known energy range of electron crystal dechanneling length and channeling efficiency to 14 GeV.

  2. Inexpensive read-out for coincident electron spectroscopy with a transmission electron microscope at nanometer scale using micro channel plates and multistrip anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollander, R. W.; Bom, V. R.; van Eijk, C. W. E.; Faber, J. S.; Hoevers, H.; Kruit, P.

    1994-09-01

    The elemental composition of a sample at nanometer scale is determined by measurement of the characteristic energy of Auger electrons, emitted in coincidence with incoming primary electrons from a microbeam in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Single electrons are detected with position sensitive detectors, consisting of MicroChannel Plates (MCP) and MultiStrip Anodes (MSA), one for the energy of the Auger electrons (Auger-detector) and one for the energy loss of primary electrons (EELS-detector). The MSAs are sensed with LeCroy 2735DC preamplifiers. The fast readout is based on LeCroy's PCOS III system. On the detection of a coincidence (Event) energy data of Auger and EELS are combined with timing data to an Event word. Event words are stored in list mode in a VME memory module. Blocks of Event words are scanned by transputers in VME and two-dimensional energy histograms are filled using the timing information to obtain a maximal true/accidental ratio. The resulting histograms are stored on disk of a PC-386, which also controls data taking. The system is designed to handle 10 5 Events per second, 90% of which are accidental. In the histograms the "true" to "accidental" ratio will be 5. The dead time is 15%.

  3. Registration characteristics of neutral particles with power 0.6 - 2.0 keV channel electron multiplier with funnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruntman, M. A.; Kalinin, A. P.

    1978-01-01

    Operating a channel electron multiplier with a VEU-6 funnel shaped opening is studied. Different procedures were used when recording neutral particles. The results obtained make it possible to optimally use the multiplier in actual physical studies.

  4. Timing Performance of a MCP Photon Detector Read Out with Multi-Channel Electronics for the Torch System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo García, L.; Fopma, J. M.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Piedigrossi, D.

    2014-06-01

    As part of the R&D phase of the (Time Of internally Reflected Cherenkov light) TORCH project, 8×8 pad micro-channel plate photon detectors are being characterized. Multichannel electronics based on fast amplifier discriminator and time digitization conversion ASICs are used to read out and time the charge signals from single photoelectrons. The MCP performance is investigated with a 20ps pulsed blue laser diode. A time resolution of 90ps is achieved. Timing properties are obtained at modest MCP gain, without time walk correction and no fine calibration of the time-to-digital converter circuit. The reference time is provided by a single-channel MCP photon detector coupled to a Constant Fraction Discriminator. Photoelectron detection efficiencies and back-scattering effect are discussed together with the laser source influence on the timing performance.

  5. The influence of magnetised electron transport on thermal self-focusing and channelling of nanosecond laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Martin; Kingham, Robert; Bissell, John

    2016-05-01

    The propagation of a nanosecond IR laser pulse through an under-dense (0.01 — 0.1ncr) magnetised laser-plasma is considered. The interplay between magnetised transport, B-field evolution and plasma hydrodynamics in the presence of a dynamically evolving beam are investigated by means of a paraxial wave solving module coupled to CTC, a 2D MHD code including Braginskii electron transport and IMPACT, a 2D implicit Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (VFP) code with magnetic fields. Magnetic fields have previously been shown to improve density channel formation for plasma waveguides however fluid simulations presented here indicate that Nernst advection can result in the rapid cavitation of magnetic field in the laser-heated region resulting in beam defocusing. Kinetic simulations indicate that strong non-local transport is present leading to the fluid code overestimating heat-flow and magnetic field advection and resulting in the recovery of beam channelling for the conditions considered.

  6. The effects of temperature and magnetic flux on electron transport through a four-channel DNA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sunhee; Hedin, Eric; Joe, Yong

    2010-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the conductivity of lambda phage DNA has been measured by Tran et al [1] experimentally, where the conductivity displayed strong (weak) temperature dependence above (below) a threshold temperature. In order to understand the temperature effects of electron transport theoretically, we study a two-dimensional and four-channel DNA model using a tight-binding (TB) Hamiltonian. The thermal effects within a TB model are incorporated into the hopping integral and the relative twist angle from its equilibrium value between base-pairs. Since these thermal structural fluctuations localize the electronic wave functions in DNA, we examine a temperature-dependent localization length, a temperature-driven transmission, and current-voltage characteristics in this system. In addition, we incorporate magnetic field effects into the analysis of the transmission through DNA in order to modulate the quantum interference between the electron paths that comprise the 4-channel structure. [1] P. Tran, B. Alavi, and G. Gruner, PRL 85, 1564 (2000).

  7. Energetics, bonding mechanism and electronic structure of metal/ceramic interfaces. Annual progress report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, A.J.

    1993-12-31

    Progress are reported on: electronic structure of PdO, PtO, and AgO (band structure calculations); ab initio calculations of electronic structure of TiO{sub 2}(110) surface; and electronic structure of VO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} thin films and multilayers. (DLC)

  8. Theoretical studies on the electronic structure and properties of complex ceramic crystals and glasses. Annual progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, Wai-Yim

    1991-01-24

    This progress report summarizes the accomplishment of the DOE-support research program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City for the period July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992. This is the second year of a three-year renewal. The major accomplishments for the year are: (a) Initiation of fundamental studies on the electronic properties of C{sub 60} and related crystals; (b) study of electronic structures and optical properties of several important ceramic crystals, especially on AlN, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; (c) first-principles calculation of total energies and structural phase transitions in oxides, nitrides, and borides; (d) theory of magnetism in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B permanent magnetic alloy. The major focus for the next year`s effort will be on the following areas: (1) Continuation of the fundamental studies on the buckminsterfullerene system with particular emphasis on the alkali-doped superconducting fullerides. (2) Fundamental studies on the structure and properties of Boron and B-related compounds. (3) Basic studies on the structural and electronic properties of metallic glasses with particular emphasis on the magnetic glasses. (4) Further development of the first-principles OLCAO method for applications to super-complex systems.

  9. Electron microscopic studies of the antiferroelectric phase in Sr 0.60Ca 0.40TiO 3 ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Shahid; Lalla, N. P.

    2008-05-01

    The structural variants and their coexistence across the antiferroelectric phase transition in Sr 0.60Ca 0.40TiO 3 ceramic has been studied through transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at room temperature and ˜100 °C. A clear evidence of the presence of superlattice reflections, corresponding to the cell doubling along the c-axis of Pbnm (or b-axis along Pnma), occurring during paraelectric to antiferroelectric transition, has been obtained through selected area electron diffraction, convergent beam electron diffraction and lattice-resolution imaging. Coexistence of the Pbnm and Pbcm phases at room temperature has been observed and attributed to the strain/disorder-induced broadening of the first-order antiferroelectric phase transition. Drastic changes in the domain structure during Pbnm to Pbcm transformation have been observed. This clearly indicates that the antiferrodistortive transition responsible for the occurrence of the antiferroelectric phase is of completely different origin and it is not just an additional follow-up of the already-existing ordering due to a-a-c+ tilt schemes in the Pbnm domain. Thermal cycling studies on microstructural changes indicate some kind of memory mechanism, which retains the memory of the original a-a-c+ tilt schemes in the Pbnm phase. This has been attributed to the symmetry conforming short-range order (SC-SRO) of the point defects.

  10. Multi-channel electronic and vibrational dynamics in polyatomic resonant high-order harmonic generation

    PubMed Central

    Ferré, A.; Boguslavskiy, A. E.; Dagan, M.; Blanchet, V.; Bruner, B. D.; Burgy, F.; Camper, A.; Descamps, D.; Fabre, B.; Fedorov, N.; Gaudin, J.; Geoffroy, G.; Mikosch, J.; Patchkovskii, S.; Petit, S.; Ruchon, T.; Soifer, H.; Staedter, D.; Wilkinson, I.; Stolow, A.; Dudovich, N.; Mairesse, Y.

    2015-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation in polyatomic molecules generally involves multiple channels of ionization. Their relative contribution can be strongly influenced by the presence of resonances, whose assignment remains a major challenge for high-harmonic spectroscopy. Here we present a multi-modal approach for the investigation of unaligned polyatomic molecules, using SF6 as an example. We combine methods from extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy, above-threshold ionization and attosecond metrology. Fragment-resolved above-threshold ionization measurements reveal that strong-field ionization opens at least three channels. A shape resonance in one of them is found to dominate the signal in the 20–26 eV range. This resonance induces a phase jump in the harmonic emission, a switch in the polarization state and different dynamical responses to molecular vibrations. This study demonstrates a method for extending high-harmonic spectroscopy to polyatomic molecules, where complex attosecond dynamics are expected. PMID:25608712

  11. Multi-channel electronic and vibrational dynamics in polyatomic resonant high-order harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Ferré, A; Boguslavskiy, A E; Dagan, M; Blanchet, V; Bruner, B D; Burgy, F; Camper, A; Descamps, D; Fabre, B; Fedorov, N; Gaudin, J; Geoffroy, G; Mikosch, J; Patchkovskii, S; Petit, S; Ruchon, T; Soifer, H; Staedter, D; Wilkinson, I; Stolow, A; Dudovich, N; Mairesse, Y

    2015-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation in polyatomic molecules generally involves multiple channels of ionization. Their relative contribution can be strongly influenced by the presence of resonances, whose assignment remains a major challenge for high-harmonic spectroscopy. Here we present a multi-modal approach for the investigation of unaligned polyatomic molecules, using SF6 as an example. We combine methods from extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy, above-threshold ionization and attosecond metrology. Fragment-resolved above-threshold ionization measurements reveal that strong-field ionization opens at least three channels. A shape resonance in one of them is found to dominate the signal in the 20-26 eV range. This resonance induces a phase jump in the harmonic emission, a switch in the polarization state and different dynamical responses to molecular vibrations. This study demonstrates a method for extending high-harmonic spectroscopy to polyatomic molecules, where complex attosecond dynamics are expected. PMID:25608712

  12. Processing ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moritoki, M.; Fujikawa, T.; Miyanaga, J.

    1984-01-01

    A method of hot hydrostatic pressing of ceramics is described. A detailed description of the invention is given. The invention is explained through an example, and a figure illustrates the temperature and pressure during the hot hydrostatic pressing treatment.

  13. Effects of electromagnetic wiggler and ion channel guiding on equilibrium orbits and waves propagation in a free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amri, Hassan Ehsani; Mohsenpour, Taghi

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, an analysis of equilibrium orbits for electrons by a simultaneous solution of the equation of motion and the dispersion relation for electromagnetic wave wiggler in a free-electron laser (FEL) with ion-channel guiding has been presented. A fluid model has been used to investigate interactions among all possible waves. The dispersion relation has been derived for electrostatic and electromagnetic waves with all relativistic effects included. This dispersion relation has been solved numerically. For group I and II orbits, when the transverse velocity is small, only the FEL instability is found. In group I and II orbits with relatively large transverse velocity, new couplings between other modes are found.

  14. Dynamics of the microstructure of current channels and the generation of high-energy electrons in nanosecond discharges in air

    SciTech Connect

    Karelin, V. I.; Trenkin, A. A. Fedoseev, I. G.

    2015-12-15

    The results of the three-dimensional numerical simulation of the dynamics of the microstructure of high-voltage nanosecond discharges in air at atmospheric pressure are presented. It is established that the fast (at a time of ≈10 ns) broadening and significant decrease in the gas concentration in the microchannels occur as a result of the ohmic heating of microchannels with the diameter of 1–30 μm. It was shown that the broadening of microchannels in a nanosecond diffusive discharge provides an increase in the ratio of the electric field strength to the gas concentration in microchannels to values sufficient for the generation highenergy electron beams and X-ray bremsstrahlung in them. Features of the dynamics of the system of microchannels and its effect on the efficiency of the generation of high-energy electrons in discharges developing in the microstructuring regime of the current channels are considered.

  15. Channeling of electron transport to improve collection efficiency in mesoporous titanium dioxide dye sensitized solar cell stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Fakharuddin, Azhar; Ahmed, Irfan; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Jose, Rajan E-mail: joserajan@gmail.com; Khalidin, Zulkeflee

    2014-02-03

    Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) modules are generally made by interconnecting large photoelectrode strips with optimized thickness (∼14 μm) and show lower current density (J{sub SC}) compared with their single cells. We found out that the key to achieving higher J{sub SC} in large area devices is optimized photoelectrode volume (V{sub D}), viz., thickness and area which facilitate the electron channeling towards working electrode. By imposing constraints on electronic path in a DSC stack, we achieved >50% increased J{sub SC} and ∼60% increment in photoelectric conversion efficiency in photoelectrodes of similar V{sub D} (∼3.36 × 10{sup −4} cm{sup 3}) without using any metallic grid or a special interconnections.

  16. Pulsed electron-electron double-resonance determination of spin-label distances and orientations on the tetrameric potassium ion channel KcsA.

    PubMed

    Endeward, Burkhard; Butterwick, Joel A; MacKinnon, Roderick; Prisner, Thomas F

    2009-10-28

    Pulsed electron-electron double-resonance (PELDOR) measurements are presented from the potassium ion channel KcsA both solubilized in detergent and reconstituted in lipids. Site-directed spin-labeling using (1-oxyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-3-pyrrolin-3-yl)methyl methanethiosulfonate was performed with a R64C mutant of the protein. The orientations of the spin-labels in the tetramer were determined by PELDOR experiments performed at two magnetic field strengths (0.3 T/X-band and 1.2 T/Q-band) and variable probe frequency. Quantitative simulation of the PELDOR data supports a strongly restricted nitroxide, oriented at an angle of 65 degrees relative to the central channel axis. In general, poorer quality PELDOR data were obtained from membrane-reconstituted preparations compared to soluble proteins or detergent-solubilized samples. One reason for this is the reduced transverse spin relaxation time T(2) of nitroxides due to crowding of tetramers within the membrane that occurs even at low protein to lipid ratios. This reduced T(2) can be overcome by reconstituting mixtures of unlabeled and labeled proteins, yielding high-quality PELDOR data. Identical PELDOR oscillation frequencies and their dependencies on the probe frequency were observed in the detergent and membrane-reconstituted preparations, indicating that the position and orientation of the spin-labels are the same in both environments. PMID:19919160

  17. Pulsed Electron-Electron Double Resonance Determination of Spin Label Distances and Orientations on the Tetrameric Potassium Ion Channel KcsA

    PubMed Central

    Endeward, Burkhard; Butterwick, Joel A.; MacKinnon, Roderick; Prisner, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Pulsed Electron-Electron Double Resonance (PELDOR) measurements are presented from the potassium ion channel KcsA both solubilized in detergent and reconstituted in lipids. Site-directed spin labeling using MTSL was performed with a R64C mutant of the protein. The orientations of the spin labels in the tetramer were determined by PELDOR experiments performed at two magnetic field strengths (0.3 T / X-band and 1.2 T / Q-band) and variable probe frequency. Quantitative simulation of the PELDOR data supports a strongly restricted nitroxide, oriented at an angle of 65 degrees relative to the central channel axis. In general, poorer quality PELDOR data was obtained from membrane-reconstituted preparations compared to soluble proteins or detergent-solubilized samples. One reason for this is the reduced transverse spin relaxation time T2 of nitroxides due to crowding of tetramers within the membrane that occurs even at low protein to lipid ratios. This reduced T2 can be overcome by reconstituting mixtures of unlabeled and labeled proteins, yielding high-quality PELDOR data. Identical PELDOR oscillation frequencies and their dependencies on the probe frequency were observed in the detergent and membrane-reconstituted preparations indicating that the position and orientation of the spin labels are the same in both environments. PMID:19919160

  18. Electron doping through lithium intercalation to interstitial channels in tetrahedrally bonded SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Yuki; Oshiyama, Atsushi

    2015-11-07

    We report on first-principles calculations that clarify the effect of lithium atom intercalation into zinc blende 3C-silicon carbide (3C-SiC) on electronic and structural properties. Lithium atoms inside 3C-SiC are found to donate electrons to 3C-SiC that is an indication of a new way of electron doping through the intercalation. The electrons doped into the conduction band interact with lithium cations and reduce the band spacing between the original valence and conduction bands. We have also found that a silicon monovacancy in 3C-SiC promotes the lithium intercalation, showing that the vacancy generation makes SiC as a possible anode material for lithium-ion battery.

  19. Electron doping through lithium intercalation to interstitial channels in tetrahedrally bonded SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yuki; Oshiyama, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    We report on first-principles calculations that clarify the effect of lithium atom intercalation into zinc blende 3C-silicon carbide (3C-SiC) on electronic and structural properties. Lithium atoms inside 3C-SiC are found to donate electrons to 3C-SiC that is an indication of a new way of electron doping through the intercalation. The electrons doped into the conduction band interact with lithium cations and reduce the band spacing between the original valence and conduction bands. We have also found that a silicon monovacancy in 3C-SiC promotes the lithium intercalation, showing that the vacancy generation makes SiC as a possible anode material for lithium-ion battery.

  20. Structural Ceramics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  1. Dependence on channel potential structures of I-V characteristics in InAlAs/InGaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Narihiko; Ito, Hiroshi; Enoki, Takatomo; Ishii, Yasunobu

    1997-02-01

    We have systematically examined the relationship between channel potential structures and dc device performances in the InP-based pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors, in order to obtain a guideline for improving the channel potential structures. Based on the self-consistent calculation of the quantum states in the channel, we have designed and fabricated several pseudomorphic devices with different channel potential structures where the quantum states were systematically changed. By comparing the I-V characteristics in terms of the transconductance, the drain conductance, and the shape of the I-V curve, we have successfully extracted information on the states of channel electrons under actual device operation. Not only the design for the ground state but also that for the excited states has been shown to be important for improving the transconductance. The drain conductance was shown to improve by reducing the total channel thickness, probably due to the enhanced recombination of electrons and holes. One of the channel designs, 20 Å In0.53Ga0.47As/30 Å InAs/70 Å In0.7Ga0.3As, was shown to yield a high transconductance of 1240 mS/mm and a low drain conductance of 40 mS/mm simultaneously, for a 0.7 μm gate length device.

  2. Performance characteristics of high-conductivity channel electron multipliers. [as UV and x ray detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Bybee, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a new type of continuous channel multiplier (CEM) fabricated from a low-resistance glass to produce a high-conductivity channel section and thereby obtain a high count-rate capability. The flat-cone cathode configuration of the CEM is specifically designed for the detection of astigmatic exit images from grazing-incidence spectrometers at the optimum angle of illumination for high detection efficiencies at XUV wavelengths. Typical operating voltages are in the range of 2500-2900 V with stable counting plateau slopes in the range 3-6% per 100-V increment. The modal gain at 2800 V was typically in the range (50-80) million. The modal gain falls off at count rates in excess of about 20,000 per sec. The detection efficiency remains essentially constant to count rates in excess of 2 million per sec. Higher detection efficiencies (better than 20%) are obtained by coating the CEM with MgF2. In life tests of coated CEMs, no measurable change in detection efficiency was measured to a total accumulated signal of 2 times 10 to the 11th power counts.

  3. The Arabidopsis Thylakoid Chloride Channel AtCLCe Functions in Chloride Homeostasis and Regulation of Photosynthetic Electron Transport

    PubMed Central

    Herdean, Andrei; Nziengui, Hugues; Zsiros, Ottó; Solymosi, Katalin; Garab, Győző; Lundin, Björn; Spetea, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    Chloride ions can be translocated across cell membranes through Cl− channels or Cl−/H+ exchangers. The thylakoid-located member of the Cl− channel CLC family in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtCLCe) was hypothesized to play a role in photosynthetic regulation based on the initial photosynthetic characterization of clce mutant lines. The reduced nitrate content of Arabidopsis clce mutants suggested a role in regulation of plant nitrate homeostasis. In this study, we aimed to further investigate the role of AtCLCe in the regulation of ion homeostasis and photosynthetic processes in the thylakoid membrane. We report that the size and composition of proton motive force were mildly altered in two independent Arabidopsis clce mutant lines. Most pronounced effects in the clce mutants were observed on the photosynthetic electron transport of dark-adapted plants, based on the altered shape and associated parameters of the polyphasic OJIP kinetics of chlorophyll a fluorescence induction. Other alterations were found in the kinetics of state transition and in the macro-organization of photosystem II supercomplexes, as indicated by circular dichroism measurements. Pre-treatment with KCl but not with KNO3 restored the wild-type photosynthetic phenotype. Analyses by transmission electron microscopy revealed a bow-like arrangement of the thylakoid network and a large thylakoid-free stromal region in chloroplast sections from the dark-adapted clce plants. Based on these data, we propose that AtCLCe functions in Cl− homeostasis after transition from light to dark, which affects chloroplast ultrastructure and regulation of photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:26904077

  4. Cryo-electron microscopy structure of the TRPV2 ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ben C; Liu, Zhirui; Lander, Gabriel C; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) cation channels are polymodal sensors involved in a variety of physiological processes. TRPV2, a member of the TRPV family, is regulated by temperature, by ligands, such as probenecid and cannabinoids, and by lipids. TRPV2 has been implicated in many biological functions, including somatosensation, osmosensation and innate immunity. Here we present the atomic model of rabbit TRPV2 in its putative desensitized state, as determined by cryo-EM at a nominal resolution of ~4 Å. In the TRPV2 structure, the transmembrane segment 6 (S6), which is involved in gate opening, adopts a conformation different from the one observed in TRPV1. Structural comparisons of TRPV1 and TRPV2 indicate that a rotation of the ankyrin-repeat domain is coupled to pore opening via the TRP domain, and this pore opening can be modulated by rearrangements in the secondary structure of S6. PMID:26779611

  5. Interband electronic transitions and phase transformation of multiferroic Bi1-xLaxFe1-yTiyO3 ceramics revealed by temperature-dependent spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L. P.; Zhang, L. L.; Jiang, P. P.; Yu, J.; Duan, Z. H.; Hu, Z. G.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Chu, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Optical properties and phase transition of Bi1-xLaxFe1-yTiyO3 (BLFTO) ceramics with different composition (0.02 ≤ x ≤ 0.10, 0.01 ≤ y ≤ 0.06) have been investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in the temperature range of -70-450 °C. The real part of the complex dielectric function ɛ1 increases with the temperature. Meanwhile, the imaginary part ɛ2 in the low-energy region decreases with the temperature and has an opposite trend in the high-energy side. Four typical interband transitions (Ea ˜ 2.50 eV, Eb ˜ 2.70 eV, Ec ˜ 3.60 eV, and Ed ˜ 4.25 eV) can be observed from the second derivative of the complex dielectric functions with aid of the standard critical point model. The critical point (CP) transition becomes broadening and shifts to a lower energy side as La and Ti compositions increase. Moreover, the CP transition energies show a red-shift trend with increasing the temperature until 320 °C, due to the lattice thermal expansion and electron-phonon interaction. The typical interband transitions and partial spectral weight present anomalies in the proximity of antiferromagnetic transition owing to the coupling between magnetic and ferroelectric order parameters and spin-lattice coupling for BLFTO multiferroic materials. It was found that the Néel temperature of BLFTO ceramics decreases from 364 to 349 °C with increasing doping composition of La and Ti elements. These phenomena can be attributed to the modification of electronic structure and magnetic order because the differences of electronegativity and ionic radii between Bi and La, Fe and Ti induce the variations on the bond angle and bond length between cations and anions. Moreover, the substitution for magnetic Fe3+ ions with nonmagnetic Ti4+ ions can reduce the exchange interaction between adjacent magnetic moments. Therefore, SE technique can be sensitive for detecting the phase/structural transitions of multiferroic oxides.

  6. Ionization Cross Sections and Dissociation Channels of the DNA Sugar-Phosphate Backbone by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher; Huo, Winifred M.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in living cells are not caused by the highly energetic incident radiation, but rather are induced by less energetic secondary species generated, the most abundant of which are free electrons.' The secondary electrons will further react to cause DNA damage via indirect and direct mechanisms. Detailed knowledge of these mechanisms is ultimately important for the development of global models of cellular radiation damage. We are studying one possible mechanism for the formation cf DNA strand breaks involving dissociative ionization of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone induced by secondary electron co!lisions. We will present ionization cross sections at electron collision energies between threshold and 10 KeV using the improved binary encounter dipole (iBED) formulation' Preliminary results of the possible dissociative ionization pathways will be presented. It is speculated that radical fragments produced from the dissociative ionization can further react, providing a possible mechanism for double strand breaks and base damage.

  7. Ceramics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Lewis Research Center developed the CARES/LIFE software, which predicts the performance of brittle structures over time, such as ceramic compounds. Over 300 companies have used a version of the code, including Philips Display Components Company, AlliedSignal, Solar Turbines Incorporated, and TRW, Inc. for everything from engines to television tubes. The software enables a designer to test a variety of configurations for probability of failure and to adjust the structure's geometry to minimize the predicted failure or maximize durability for the lifetime of the ceramic component.

  8. Research of transportation efficiency of low-energy high- current electron beam in plasma channel in external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagin, E. S.; Grigoriev, V. P.

    2015-11-01

    Effective high current (5-20 kA) and low energy (tens of keV) electrons beam transportation is possible only with almost complete charging neutralization. It is also necessary to use quite high current neutralization for elimination beam self-pinching effect. The research is based on the self-consistent mathematical model that takes into account beam and plasma particles dynamic, current and charge neutralization of electron beam and examines the transportation of electron beam into a chamber with low-pressure plasma in magnetic field. A numerical study was conducted using particle in cell (PIC) method. The study was performed with various system parameters: rise time and magnitude of the beam current, gas pressure and plasma density and geometry of the system. Regularities of local virtual cathode field generated by the beam in the plasma channel, as well as ranges of parameters that let transportation beam with minimal losses, depending on the external magnetic field were determined through a series of numerical studies. In addition, the assessment of the impact of the plasma ion mobility during the transition period and during steady beam was performed.

  9. New electronics of the spectrometric channel for the SND detector electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achasov, M. N.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Korol, A. A.; Koshuba, S. V.; Kovrizhin, D. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Surin, I. K.; Tekut`ev, A. I.; Usov, Yu. V.

    2016-07-01

    The Spherical Neutral Detector (SND) is intended for study of electron-positron annihilation at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider (BINP, Novosibirsk) in the center-of-mass energy region below 2 GeV. The main part of the detector is a three-layer electromagnetic calorimeter based on NaI(Tl) crystals. The physics program of the SND experiment includes a high statistics study of neutron-antineutron production near threshold, for which time measurements in the calorimeter are required. In this paper we describe new shaping and digitizing calorimeter electronics, which allow to reach a time resolution of about 1 ns for 100 MeV signal and an amplitude resolution of about 250 keV.

  10. Electron crystallography of PhoE porin, an outer membrane, channel- forming protein from E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Walian, P.J.

    1989-11-01

    One approach to studying the structure of membrane proteins is the use of electron crystallography. Dr. Bing Jap has crystallized PhoE pore-forming protein (porin) from the outer membrane of escherichia coli (E. coli) into monolayer crystals. The findings of this research and those of Jap (1988, 1989) have determined these crystals to be highly ordered, yielding structural information to a resolution of better than 2.8 angstroms. The task of this thesis has been to collect and process the electron diffraction patterns necessary to generate a complete three-dimensional set of high resolution structure factor amplitudes of PhoE porin. Fourier processing of these amplitudes when combined with the corresponding phase data is expected to yield the three-dimensional structure of PhoE porin at better than 3.5 angstroms resolution. 92 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs. (CBS)

  11. Drawing the geometry of 3d transition metal-boron pairs in silicon from electron emission channeling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, D. J.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Augustyns, V.; Lima, T. A. L.; Costa, A.; Bosne, E.; da Silva, M. R.; Araújo, J. P.; Pereira, L. M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Although the formation of transition metal-boron pairs is currently well established in silicon processing, the geometry of these complexes is still not completely understood. We investigated the lattice location of the transition metals manganese, iron, cobalt and nickel in n- and p+ -type silicon by means of electron emission channeling. For manganese, iron and cobalt, we observed an increase of sites near the ideal tetrahedral interstitial position by changing the doping from n- to p+ -type Si. Such increase was not observed for Ni. We ascribe this increase to the formation of pairs with boron, driven by Coulomb interactions, since the majority of iron, manganese and cobalt is positively charged in p+ -type silicon while Ni is neutral. We propose that breathing mode relaxation around the boron ion within the pair causes the observed displacement from the ideal tetrahedral interstitial site. We discuss the application of the emission channeling technique in this system and, in particular, how it provides insight on the geometry of such pairs.

  12. The structure of the lipid-embedded potassium channel voltage sensor determined by double-electron–electron resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vamvouka, Magdalini; Cieslak, John; Van Eps, Ned; Hubbell, Wayne; Gross, Adrian

    2008-01-01

    A four-pulse electron paramagnetic resonance experiment was used to measure long-range inter-subunit distances in reconstituted KvAP, a voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channel. The measurements have allowed us to reach the following five conclusions about the native structure of the voltage sensor of KvAP. First, the S1 helix of the voltage sensor engages in a helix packing interaction with the pore domain. Second, the crystallographically observed antiparallel helix-turn-helix motif of the voltage-sensing paddle is retained in the membrane-embedded voltage sensor. Third, the paddle is oriented in such a way as to expose one face to the pore domain and the opposite face to the membrane. Fourth, the paddle and the pore domain appear to be separated by a gap that is sufficiently wide for lipids to penetrate between the two domains. Fifth, the critical voltage-sensing arginine residues on the paddle appear to be lipid exposed. These results demonstrate the importance of the membrane for the native structure of Kv channels, suggest that lipids are an integral part of their native structure, and place the voltage-sensing machinery into a complex lipid environment near the pore domain. PMID:18287283

  13. Electron Spin-Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) Reveals Water and Phosphate Interactions with the KcsA Potassium Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslak, John A.; Focia, Pamela J.; Gross, Adrian

    2010-08-13

    Electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy is a well-established technique for the study of naturally occurring paramagnetic metal centers. The technique has been used to study copper complexes, hemes, enzyme mechanisms, micellar water content, and water permeation profiles in membranes, among other applications. In the present study, we combine ESEEM spectroscopy with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and X-ray crystallography in order to evaluate the technique's potential as a structural tool to describe the native environment of membrane proteins. Using the KcsA potassium channel as a model system, we demonstrate that deuterium ESEEM can detect water permeation along the lipid-exposed surface of the KcsA outer helix. We further demonstrate that {sup 31}P ESEEM is able to identify channel residues that interact with the phosphate headgroup of the lipid bilayer. In combination with X-ray crystallography, the {sup 31}P data may be used to define the phosphate interaction surface of the protein. The results presented here establish ESEEM as a highly informative technique for SDSL studies of membrane proteins.

  14. Design and characterization of a 32-channel heterodyne radiometer for electron cyclotron emission measurements on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Han, X.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. Li, E. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Gao, X.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-07-15

    A 32-channel heterodyne radiometer has been developed for the measurement of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). This system collects X-mode ECE radiation spanning a frequency range of 104–168 GHz, where the frequency coverage corresponds to a full radial coverage for the case with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.3 T. The frequency range is equally spaced every 2 GHz from 105.1 to 167.1 GHz with an RF bandwidth of ∼500 MHz and the video bandwidth can be switched among 50, 100, 200, and 400 kHz. Design objectives and characterization of the system are presented in this paper. Preliminary results for plasma operation are also presented.

  15. Temperature and magnetic field effects on electron transport through DNA molecules in a two-dimensional four-channel system.

    PubMed

    Joe, Yong S; Lee, Sun H; Hedin, Eric R; Kim, Young D

    2013-06-01

    We utilize a two-dimensional four-channel DNA model, with a tight-binding (TB) Hamiltonian, and investigate the temperature and the magnetic field dependence of the transport behavior of a short DNA molecule. Random variation of the hopping integrals due to the thermal structural disorder, which partially destroy phase coherence of electrons and reduce quantum interference, leads to a reduction of the localization length and causes suppressed overall transmission. We also incorporate a variation of magnetic field flux density into the hopping integrals as a phase factor and observe Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations in the transmission. It is shown that for non-zero magnetic flux, the transmission zero leaves the real-energy axis and moves up into the complex-energy plane. We also point out that the hydrogen bonds between the base pair with flux variations play a role to determine the periodicity of AB oscillations in the transmission. PMID:23862423

  16. Design and characterization of a 32-channel heterodyne radiometer for electron cyclotron emission measurements on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    PubMed

    Han, X; Liu, X; Liu, Y; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Li, E Z; Hu, L Q; Gao, X

    2014-07-01

    A 32-channel heterodyne radiometer has been developed for the measurement of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). This system collects X-mode ECE radiation spanning a frequency range of 104-168 GHz, where the frequency coverage corresponds to a full radial coverage for the case with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.3 T. The frequency range is equally spaced every 2 GHz from 105.1 to 167.1 GHz with an RF bandwidth of ~500 MHz and the video bandwidth can be switched among 50, 100, 200, and 400 kHz. Design objectives and characterization of the system are presented in this paper. Preliminary results for plasma operation are also presented. PMID:25085139

  17. Reduced thermal resistance in AlGaN/GaN multi-mesa-channel high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Asubar, Joel T. Yatabe, Zenji; Hashizume, Tamotsu

    2014-08-04

    Dramatic reduction of thermal resistance was achieved in AlGaN/GaN Multi-Mesa-Channel (MMC) high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) on sapphire substrates. Compared with the conventional planar device, the MMC HEMT exhibits much less negative slope of the I{sub D}-V{sub DS} curves at high V{sub DS} regime, indicating less self-heating. Using a method proposed by Menozzi and co-workers, we obtained a thermal resistance of 4.8 K-mm/W at ambient temperature of ∼350 K and power dissipation of ∼9 W/mm. This value compares well to 4.1 K-mm/W, which is the thermal resistance of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs on expensive single crystal diamond substrates and the lowest reported value in literature.

  18. Recent progress in ceramic joining

    SciTech Connect

    Loehman, R.E.

    1998-09-01

    Both fundamental and practical aspects of ceramic joining are understood well enough for many, if not most, applications requiring moderate strengths at room temperature. This paper argues that the two greatest needs in ceramic joining are for techniques to join buried interfaces by selective heating, and methods for joining ceramics for use at temperatures of 800 to 1,200 C. Heating with microwave radiation or with high-energy electron beams has been used to join buried ceramic interfaces, for example SiC to SiC. Joints with varying levels of strength at temperatures of 600 to 1,000 C have been made using four techniques: (1) transient liquid phase bonding; (2) joining with refractory braze alloys; (3) joining with refractory glass compositions; and (4) joining using preceramic polymers. Joint strengths as high as 550 MPa at 1,000 C have been reported for silicon nitride-silicon nitride bonds tested in four-point flexure.

  19. Electronic and optical properties of ceramic Sc2O3 and Y2O3: Compton spectroscopy and first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Babu Lal; Sharma, Sonu; Heda, Narayan Lal; Tiwari, Shailja; Kumar, Kishor; Meena, Bhoor Singh; Bhatt, Samir

    2016-05-01

    We present the first-ever experimental Compton profiles (CPs) of Sc2O3 and Y2O3 using 740 GBq 137Cs Compton spectrometer. The experimental momentum densities have been compared with the theoretical CPs computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) within density functional theory (DFT). Further, the energy bands, density of states (DOS) and Mulliken's population (MP) data have been calculated using LCAO method with different exchange and correlation approximations. In addition, the energy bands, DOS, valence charge density (VCD), dielectric function, absorption coefficient and refractive index have also been computed using full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method with revised functional of Perdew-Becke-Ernzerhof for solids (PBEsol) and modified Becke Johnson (mBJ) approximations. Both the ab-initio calculations predict wide band gaps in Sc2O3 and Y2O3. The band gaps deduced from FP-LAPW (with mBJ) are found to be close to available experimental data. The VCD and MP data show more ionic character of Sc2O3 than Y2O3. The ceramic properties of both the sesquioxides are explained in terms of their electronic and optical properties.

  20. Near-GeV-Energy Laser-Wakefield Acceleration of Self-Injected Electrons in a Centimeter-Scale Plasma Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsung, F. S.; Narang, Ritesh; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2004-10-01

    The first three-dimensional, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of laser-wakefield acceleration of self-injected electrons in a 0.84cm long plasma channel are reported. The frequency evolution of the initially 50fs (FWHM) long laser pulse by photon interaction with the wake followed by plasma dispersion enhances the wake which eventually leads to self-injection of electrons from the channel wall. This first bunch of electrons remains spatially highly localized. Its phase space rotation due to slippage with respect to the wake leads to a monoenergetic bunch of electrons with a central energy of 0.26GeV after 0.55cm propagation. At later times, spatial bunching of the laser enhances the acceleration of a second bunch of electrons to energies up to 0.84GeV before the laser pulse intensity is significantly reduced.

  1. Near-GeV-energy laser-wakefield acceleration of self-injected electrons in a centimeter-scale plasma channel.

    PubMed

    Tsung, F S; Narang, Ritesh; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2004-10-29

    The first three-dimensional, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of laser-wakefield acceleration of self-injected electrons in a 0.84 cm long plasma channel are reported. The frequency evolution of the initially 50 fs (FWHM) long laser pulse by photon interaction with the wake followed by plasma dispersion enhances the wake which eventually leads to self-injection of electrons from the channel wall. This first bunch of electrons remains spatially highly localized. Its phase space rotation due to slippage with respect to the wake leads to a monoenergetic bunch of electrons with a central energy of 0.26 GeV after 0.55 cm propagation. At later times, spatial bunching of the laser enhances the acceleration of a second bunch of electrons to energies up to 0.84 GeV before the laser pulse intensity is significantly reduced. PMID:15525172

  2. Fundamental radiation effects parameters in metals and ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1998-03-01

    Useful information on defect production and migration can be obtained from examination of the fluence-dependent defect densities in irradiated materials, particularly when a transition from linear to sublinear accumulation is observed. Further work is needed on several intriguing reported radiation effects in metals. The supralinear defect cluster accumulation regime in thin foil irradiated metals needs further experimental confirmation, and the physical mechanisms responsible for its presence need to be established. Radiation hardening and the associated reduction in strain hardening capacity in FCC metals is a serious concern for structural materials. In general, the loss of strain hardening capacity is associated with dislocation channeling, which occurs when a high density of small defect clusters are produced (stainless steel irradiated near room temperature is a notable exception). Detailed investigations of the effect of defect cluster density and other physical parameters such as stacking fault energy on dislocation channeling are needed. Although it is clearly established that radiation hardening depends on the grain size (radiation-modified Hall-Petch effect), further work is needed to identify the physical mechanisms. In addition, there is a need for improved hardening superposition models when a range of different obstacle strengths are present. Due to a lack of information on point defect diffusivities and the increased complexity of radiation effects in ceramics compared to metals, many fundamental radiation effects parameters in ceramics have yet to be determined. Optical spectroscopy data suggest that the oxygen monovacancy and freely migrating interstitial fraction in fission neutron irradiated MgO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are {approximately}10% of the NRT displacement value. Ionization induced diffusion can strongly influence microstructural evolution in ceramics. Therefore, fundamental data on ceramics obtained from highly ionizing radiation sources

  3. Effects, determination, and correction of count rate nonlinearity in multi-channel analog electron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Reber, T. J.; Plumb, N. C.; Waugh, J. A.; Dessau, D. S.

    2014-04-15

    Detector counting rate nonlinearity, though a known problem, is commonly ignored in the analysis of angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy where modern multichannel electron detection schemes using analog intensity scales are used. We focus on a nearly ubiquitous “inverse saturation” nonlinearity that makes the spectra falsely sharp and beautiful. These artificially enhanced spectra limit accurate quantitative analysis of the data, leading to mistaken spectral weights, Fermi energies, and peak widths. We present a method to rapidly detect and correct for this nonlinearity. This algorithm could be applicable for a wide range of nonlinear systems, beyond photoemission spectroscopy.

  4. GaN-based multi-two-dimensional-electron-gas-channel diodes on sapphire substrates with breakdown voltage of over 3 kV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terano, Akihisa; Tsuchiya, Tomonobu; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Shigehisa; Nakamura, Tohru

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the achievability of low specific on-resistance and high breakdown voltage by GaN diodes consisting of three, five, and eight two-dimensional-electron-gas (2DEG) channels. The anode Schottky electrode and cathode Ohmic electrode were formed on each side wall of the multi-2DEG-channel and the n-type region was formed by Si-ion implantation in the cathode electrode-formation area of each multi-2DEG-channel. With increasing number of 2DEG channels of the diodes, specific on-resistance (RonA) showed a tendency to decrease; RonA of eight-2DEG-channel diodes was as low as 12.1 mΩ cm2. The breakdown voltage of all the fabricated diodes exceeded 3 kV. Although the electrical characteristics of the multi-2DEG-channel diodes fabricated on sapphire substrates were demonstrated, the number of cracks appearing on the epitaxial layer surface was found to increase with increasing number of 2DEG channels. Such crack formation was concluded to govern the practical limit for the number of 2DEG channels.

  5. Co-continuous Metal-Ceramic Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; Harley, Gabriel; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2005-01-31

    A room temperature technique was developed to produce continuous metal nanowires embedded in random nanoporous ceramic skeletons. The synthesis involves preparation of uniform, nanoporous ceramic preforms, and subsequent electrochemical metal infiltration at room temperature, so to avoid materials incompatibilities frequently encountered in traditional high temperature liquid metal infiltration. Structure and preliminary evaluations of mechanical and electronic properties of copper/alumina nanocomposites are reported.

  6. Cooperative absorption of terahertz radiation by plasmon modes in an array of field-effect transistors with two-dimensional electron channel

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, V. V.; Tsymbalov, G. M.; Fateev, D. V.; Shur, M. S.

    2006-09-18

    The authors computer simulations show that plasmon modes excited in an array of field-effect transistors with two-dimensional electron channel strongly couple to terahertz radiation due to the synchronization of plasma oscillations in different unit cells of the array. It is shown that in such a device the higher-order plasmon modes are excited much more effectively than in a large area two-dimensional electron channel coupled to terahertz radiation by a slit-grating gate. Effective excitation of the higher-order plasmon modes makes it possible to design terahertz plasmonic devices with operating frequencies up to 15 THz or even higher.

  7. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the structural, chemical, electronic, and high frequency dielectric properties of barium cadmium tantalate-based ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaojun; Taylor, Richard; Petrovic, Novak S.; Budd, Louisa; Van Schilfgaarde, Mark; Newman, N.

    2005-01-01

    Single-phase Ba(Cd1/3Ta2/3)O3 powder was produced using conventional solid state reaction methods. Ba(Cd1/3Ta2/3)O3 ceramics with 2wt% ZnO as sintering additive sintered at 1550°C exhibited a dielectric constant of ˜32 and loss tangent of 5×10-5 at 2GHz. X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric measurements were used to characterize the structural and thermodynamic properties of the material. Ab initio electronic structure calculations were used to give insight into the unusual properties of Ba(Cd1/3Ta2/3)O3, as well as a similar and more widely used material Ba(Zn1/3Ta2/3)O3. While both compounds have a hexagonal Bravais lattice, the P321 space group of Ba(Cd1/3Ta2/3)O3 is reduced from P3&barbelow;m1 of Ba(Zn1/3Ta2/3)O3 as a result of a distortion of oxygen away from the symmetric position between the Ta and Cd ions. Both of the compounds have a conduction band minimum and valence band maximum composed of mostly weakly itinerant Ta5d and Zn3d /Cd4d levels, respectively. The covalent nature of the directional d-electron bonding in these high-Z oxides plays an important role in producing a more rigid lattice with higher melting points and enhanced phonon energies, and is suggested to play an important role in producing materials with a high dielectric constant and low microwave loss.

  8. Applications of focused ion beam for preparation of specimens of ancient ceramic for electron microscopy and synchrotron X-ray studies.

    PubMed

    Sciau, Ph; Salles, Ph; Roucau, C; Mehta, A; Benassayag, G

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the capabilities of FIB systems as a tool for TEM studies of ancient pottery are explored, especially when the amount of available material is very limited and when, for instance, there is stringent demand for very accurate location of the electron-transparent area as is the case for investigation of outer surface layers, such as slips and patinas. The advantages of the two main FIB milling techniques (H-bar and Lift-out) are discussed in detail and illustrated through the study of metallic lustre decorations and a particular type of Roman Terra Sigillata coating. The H-bar technique is ideal for investigations where the features of interest are near the edges of a ceramic fragment. A significantly large area of surface decoration can be studied without any restriction on the size and the shape of fragment. On the other hand, the Lift-out technique is very powerful for extracting TEM membranes far from the edges. An added advantage of this technique is that the thickness of the foil is very uniform and that allows large tilts and makes it possible to obtain electron diffraction patterns of several zones axes from the same crystal, making crystallographic phase identification easier and precise, and identification of complex structures possible. We also show that the FIB system can be used to deposit very precise registration marks, allowing an experimenter to correlate results from TEM measurements with other complementary techniques, such as synchrotron based microdiffraction and microXANES. Combination of these complementary techniques is becoming a very powerful approach to probe the chemical and morphological microstructure of heterogeneous and complex material from the nanometre to millimetre scale. PMID:19342248

  9. Fabrication and characterization of InAlN/GaN-based double-channel high electron mobility transistors for electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, JunShuai; Zhang, JinCheng; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Yi; Zhang, LinXia; Ma, XiaoHua; Li, XiaoGang; Meng, FanNa; Hao, Yue

    2012-06-01

    In our previous work [J. S. Xue et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 013507 (2012)], superior electron-transport properties are obtained in InAlN/GaN/InAlN/GaN double-channel (DC) heterostructures grown by pulsed metal organic chemical vapor deposition (PMOCVD). In this paper, we present a detailed fabrication and systematic characterization of high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) fabricated on these heterostructures. The device exhibits distinct DC behavior concerning with both static-output and small-signal performance, demonstrating an improved maximum drain current density of 1059 mA/mm and an enhanced transconductance of 223 mS/mm. Such enhancement of device performance is attributed to the achieved low Ohmic contact resistance as low as 0.33 ± 0.05 Ω.mm. Moreover, very low gate diode reverse leakage current is observed due to the high quality of InAlN barrier layer deposited by PMOCVD. A current gain frequency of 10 GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency 21 GHz are also observed, which are comparable to the state-of-the-art AlGaN/GaN-based DC HEMT found in the literature. The results demonstrate the great potential of PMOCVD for application in InAlN-related device's epitaxy.

  10. Engineering the (In, Al, Ga)N back-barrier to achieve high channel-conductivity for extremely scaled channel-thicknesses in N-polar GaN high-electron-mobility-transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jing Zheng, Xun; Guidry, Matthew; Denninghoff, Dan; Ahmadi, Elahe; Lal, Shalini; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K.; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2014-03-03

    Scaling down the channel-thickness (t{sub ch}) in GaN/(In, Al, Ga)N high-electron-mobility-transistors (HEMTs) is essential to eliminating short-channel effects in sub 100 nm gate length HEMTs. However, this scaling can degrade both charge density (n{sub s}) and mobility (μ), thereby reducing channel-conductivity. In this study, the back-barrier design in N-polar GaN/(In, Al, Ga)N was engineered to achieve highly conductive-channels with t{sub ch} < 5-nm using metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Compositional-grading was found to be the most effective approach in reducing channel-conductivity for structures with t{sub ch} ∼ 3-nm. For a HEMT with 3-nm-thick-channel, a sheet-resistance of 329 Ω/◻ and a peak-transconductance of 718 mS/mm were demonstrated.

  11. O/S-1/ interactions - The product channels. [collisional electron quenching and chemical reaction pathway frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Black, G.

    1978-01-01

    The first measurements are reported of the reaction pathways for the interaction between oxygen atoms in the 4.19 eV S-1 state, and four molecules, N2O, CO2, H2O, and NO. Distinction is made between three possible paths - quenching to O(D-1), quenching to O(P-3), and chemical reaction. With N2O, the most reasonable interpretation of the data indicates that there no reaction, in sharp contrast with the interaction between O(D-1) and N2O, which proceeds entirely by reaction. Similarly, there is no reaction with CO2. With H2O, the reactive pathway is the dominant one, although electronic quenching is not negligible. With NO, O(D-1) is the preferred product.

  12. Laser in Ceramics Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Bajrang; Jain, Pankaj

    LASER, an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation have unique properties, Which make it differ from ordinary light such as it is highly coherent, monochromatic, negligible divergence and scattering loss and a intense beam of electromagnetic radiation or light. It also occur in a wide range of wavelength/frequency (from Ultraviolet to Infrared), energy/power and beam-mode/configurations ; Due to these unique properties, it have use in wide application of ceramic processing for industrial manufacturing, fabrication of electronic circuit such as marking, serializing, engraving, cutting, micro-structuring because laser only produces localized heating, without any contact and thermal stress on the any part during processing. So there is no risk of fracturing that occurs during mechanical sawing and also reduce Cost of processing. The discussion in this paper highlight the application of laser in ceramics processing.

  13. Suppression of surface-originated gate lag by a dual-channel AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistor architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deen, David A.; Storm, David F.; Scott Katzer, D.; Bass, R.; Meyer, David J.

    2016-08-01

    A dual-channel AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) architecture is demonstrated that leverages ultra-thin epitaxial layers to suppress surface-related gate lag. Two high-density two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) channels are utilized in an AlN/GaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure wherein the top 2DEG serves as a quasi-equipotential that screens potential fluctuations resulting from distributed surface and interface states. The bottom channel serves as the transistor's modulated channel. Dual-channel AlN/GaN heterostructures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on free-standing hydride vapor phase epitaxy GaN substrates. HEMTs fabricated with 300 nm long recessed gates demonstrated a gate lag ratio (GLR) of 0.88 with no degradation in drain current after bias stressed in subthreshold. These structures additionally achieved small signal metrics ft/fmax of 27/46 GHz. These performance results are contrasted with the non-recessed gate dual-channel HEMT with a GLR of 0.74 and 82 mA/mm current collapse with ft/fmax of 48/60 GHz.

  14. Simulation of ultra-relativistic electrons and positrons channeling in crystals with MBN EXPLORER

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, Gennady B.; Bezchastnov, Victor G.; Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Korol, Andrei V.; Greiner, Walter; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2013-11-01

    A newly developed code, implemented as a part of the MBN EXPLORER package (Solov'yov et al., 2012; (http://www.mbnexplorer.com/), 2012) [1,2] to simulate trajectories of an ultra-relativistic projectile in a crystalline medium, is presented. The motion of a projectile is treated classically by integrating the relativistic equations of motion with account for the interaction between the projectile and crystal atoms. The probabilistic element is introduced by a random choice of transverse coordinates and velocities of the projectile at the crystal entrance as well as by accounting for the random positions of the atoms due to thermal vibrations. The simulated trajectories are used for numerical analysis of the emitted radiation. Initial approbation and verification of the code have been carried out by simulating the trajectories and calculating the radiation emitted by ε=6.7 GeV and ε=855 MeV electrons and positrons in oriented Si(110) crystal and in amorphous silicon. The calculated spectra are compared with the experimental data and with predictions of the Bethe–Heitler theory for the amorphous environment.

  15. X-ray diffraction and electron microscope studies of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) ceramic coatings exposed to vanadia. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kondos, K.G.

    1992-09-01

    The U.S. Navy sometimes has the requirement to use low cost fuels containing significant amounts of vanadium and sulfur in gas turbine engines. Unfortunately the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) witch is used as a thermal barrier coating on gas turbine blades can be severely attacked by vanadia. Powders of YSZ containing 8-mol% Y203 and pure zirconia containing various and mounts Of V205 were annealed at 900 deg. C. These were then examined by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, as well as single crystals of pure Zro2 and YSZ ( 20% Wt Y203 ) exposed to V205 Melts, to study how the vanadia degrades the YSZ by reacting with the stabilizer to form YVO4 and how the vanadium transforms the cubic and tetragonal YSZ crystal structures to monoclinic which degrades rapidly as a gas turbine blade coating.

  16. Hot-electron real-space transfer and longitudinal transport in dual AlGaN/AlN/{AlGaN/GaN} channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šermukšnis, E.; Liberis, J.; Matulionis, A.; Avrutin, V.; Ferreyra, R.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.

    2015-03-01

    Real-space transfer of hot electrons is studied in dual-channel GaN-based heterostructure operated at or near plasmon-optical phonon resonance in order to attain a high electron drift velocity at high current densities. For this study, pulsed electric field is applied in the channel plane of a nominally undoped Al0.3Ga0.7N/AlN/{Al0.15Ga0.85N/GaN} structure with a composite channel of Al0.15Ga0.85N/GaN, where the electrons with a sheet density of 1.4 × 1013 cm-2, estimated from the Hall effect measurements, are confined. The equilibrium electrons are situated predominantly in the Al0.15Ga0.85N layer as confirmed by capacitance-voltage experiment and Schrödinger-Poisson modelling. The main peak of the electron density per unit volume decreases as more electrons occupy the GaN layer at high electric fields. The associated decrease in the plasma frequency induces the plasmon-assisted decay of non-equilibrium optical phonons (hot phonons) confirmed by the decrease in the measured hot-phonon lifetime from 0.95 ps at low electric fields down below 200 fs at fields of E \\gt 4 kV cm-1 as the plasmon-optical phonon resonance is approached. The onset of real-space transfer is resolved from microwave noise measurements: this source of noise dominates for E \\gt 8 kV cm-1. In this range of fields, the longitudinal current exceeds the values measured for a mono channel reference Al0.3Ga0.7N/AlN/GaN structure. The results are explained in terms of the ultrafast decay of hot phonons and reduced alloy scattering caused by the real-space transfer in the composite channel.

  17. Capacitor Test, Evaluation. and Modeling Within NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program. "Why Ceramic Capacitors Fracture During Manual Soldering and How to Avoid Failures"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Presentation discusses: (1) Why Multi-Layer Ceramic Capacitors(MLCCs) crack during manual soldering? Workmanship and parts issues. (2) Do existing qualification requirements assure crack-free soldering? MIL-spec Thermal Shock (TS) testing. MIL-spec Resistance to Soldering Heat (RSH) test. (3) What test can assure reliable soldering? Mechanical characteristics of ceramics. Comparison of three TS techniques: LND, TSD, and IWT. (4) Simulation of TS conditions.

  18. Auto-thermal reforming using mixed ion-electronic conducting ceramic membranes for a small-scale H₂ production plant.

    PubMed

    Spallina, Vincenzo; Melchiori, Tommaso; Gallucci, Fausto; van Sint Annaland, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The integration of mixed ionic electronic conducting (MIEC) membranes for air separation in a small-to-medium scale unit for H2 production (in the range of 650-850 Nm3/h) via auto-thermal reforming of methane has been investigated in the present study. Membranes based on mixed ionic electronic conducting oxides such as Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (BSCF) give sufficiently high oxygen fluxes at temperatures above 800 °C with high purity (higher than 99%). Experimental results of membrane permeation tests are presented and used for the reactor design with a detailed reactor model. The assessment of the H2 plant has been carried out for different operating conditions and reactor geometry and an energy analysis has been carried out with the flowsheeting software Aspen Plus, including also the turbomachines required for a proper thermal integration. A micro-gas turbine is integrated in the system in order to supply part of the electricity required in the system. The analysis of the system shows that the reforming efficiency is in the range of 62%-70% in the case where the temperature at the auto-thermal reforming membrane reactor (ATR-MR) is equal to 900 °C. When the electric consumption and the thermal export are included the efficiency of the plant approaches 74%-78%. The design of the reactor has been carried out using a reactor model linked to the Aspen flowsheet and the results show that with a larger reactor volume the performance of the system can be improved, especially because of the reduced electric consumption. From this analysis it has been found that for a production of about 790 Nm3/h pure H2, a reactor with a diameter of 1 m and length of 1.8 m with about 1500 membranes of 2 cm diameter is required. PMID:25793545

  19. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics on microwave processing of ceramics: Microwave-material interactions; anticipated advantage of microwave sintering; ceramic sintering; and ceramic joining. 24 refs., 4 figs. (LSP)

  20. Computational study of structural, elastic and electronic properties of lithium disilicate (Li(2)Si(2)O(5)) glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    Biskri, Zine Elabidine; Rached, Habib; Bouchear, Merzoug; Rached, Djamel

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate theoretically the structural, elastic and electronic properties of Lithium Disilicate (LD) crystal (Li2Si2O5), using the pseudo potential method based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) with the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA). The calculated structural properties namely the equilibrium lattice parameters and cell volume are in good agreement with the available experimental results. However, for the LD crystal elastic moduli: Shear modulus G, Young's modulus E and Poisson's ratio ν we have found a discrepancy between our theoretical values and experimental ones reported in polycrystalline sample containing LD crystals. The calculated elastic properties show that LD is more rigid compared with other components. We also investigated the mechanical stability of Li2Si2O5 compound and we have noticed that this compound is stable against elastic deformations. On the basis of shear to bulk modulus ratio analysis, we inferred that Li2Si2O5 compound is brittle in nature. In order to complete the fundamental characteristics of this compound we have measured the elastic anisotropy. Our results for the energy band structure and Density of States (DOS) show that Li2Si2O5 compound has an insulator characteristic. PMID:24411692

  1. Metal/Ceramic Adhesion at the Fe/TiN Interface: Electronic and Magnetic Structure, and Effect of S Impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joo-Hyoung; Freeman, A. J.; Olson, G. B.

    2004-03-01

    As part of our ongoing effort in steel research to design a new class of materials with advanced fracture toughness and strength, we performed first-principles calculations on the Fe matrix/TiN fine particle interface with the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method for film geometry(Wimmer, Krakauer, Weinert, and Freeman, Phys. Rev. B, 24), 864 (1981) within the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA(J. Perdew, K. Burke, and M. Ernzerhof, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77), 3865 (1996)), and compared the results with those found previously for Fe/TiC(T. Shishidou,Joo-Hyoung Lee, Yu-Jun Zhao, A. J. Freeman, and G. B. Olson, unpublished). The work of adhesion (3.82 J/m^2 for Fe/TiC, and 3.79 J/m^2 for Fe/TiN) and their calculated force separation laws are very close to each other, but the induced Ti magnetic moment at the interface shows a large difference (-0.02 μ_B for Fe/TiC, and -0.19 μ_B for Fe/TiN). In order to investigate impurity effects, 25% of S atoms were inserted at the interface; results of calculations (now in progress) on the effects of S will be analyzed and discussed.

  2. Comparing the Marginal Adaptation of Cold Ceramic and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate by Means of Scanning Electron Microscope: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Modaresi, Jalil; Javadi, Gholamreza; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term success of endodontic surgeries is often influenced by the type of root-end filling material (RFM). The aim of present study was to compare the marginal adaptation of two different RFM, cold ceramic (CC) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods: About 20 extracted human single-rooted teeth were collected and stored into sodium hypochlorite 5.25%. The teeth were decronated from the cemento-enamel junction to prepare 16 mm roots. The working length was measured, and 1/3 coronal of the canal was prepared by Gates-Glidden drills. Apical flaring was followed by K file size # 40-70 based on step back technique. After filling of the canals, 3 mm above the apex was cut at 90° to the long axis. Furthermore, 3 mm of the filling was removed from the apical part using the ultrasonic device. All of the prepared specimens were divided into two groups and were retro filled by MTA and CC. The roots were cut horizontally from 1 mm above the apical part, and dentin-filling material interface was observed by SEM. Finally, the collected data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney test and using SPSS software version 18 at a significant level of 0.05. Results: The mean interfacial adaptation was higher in CC group. However, no significant differences were observed by statistical test (P = 0.35). Conclusion: Both CC and MTA had similar marginal adaptation as RFM however in vivo studies are recommended for better determination. PMID:26435608

  3. A multi-channel opto-electronic sensor to accurately monitor heart rate against motion artefact during exercise.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Abdullah; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Barrett, Laura; Esliger, Dale; Hayes, Matthew; Akbare, Shafique; Achart, Jérôme; Kuoch, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the use of a multi-channel opto-electronic sensor (OEPS) to effectively monitor critical physiological parameters whilst preventing motion artefact as increasingly demanded by personal healthcare. The aim of this work was to study how to capture the heart rate (HR) efficiently through a well-constructed OEPS and a 3-axis accelerometer with wireless communication. A protocol was designed to incorporate sitting, standing, walking, running and cycling. The datasets collected from these activities were processed to elaborate sport physiological effects. t-test, Bland-Altman Agreement (BAA), and correlation to evaluate the performance of the OEPS were used against Polar and Mio-Alpha HR monitors. No differences in the HR were found between OEPS, and either Polar or Mio-Alpha (both p > 0.05); a strong correlation was found between Polar and OEPS (r: 0.96, p < 0.001); the bias of BAA 0.85 bpm, the standard deviation (SD) 9.20 bpm, and the limits of agreement (LOA) from -17.18 bpm to +18.88 bpm. For the Mio-Alpha and OEPS, a strong correlation was found (r: 0.96, p < 0.001); the bias of BAA 1.63 bpm, SD 8.62 bpm, LOA from -15.27 bpm to +18.58 bpm. These results demonstrate the OEPS to be capable of carrying out real time and remote monitoring of heart rate. PMID:26473860

  4. A Multi-Channel Opto-Electronic Sensor to Accurately Monitor Heart Rate against Motion Artefact during Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Alzahrani, Abdullah; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Barrett, Laura; Esliger, Dale; Hayes, Matthew; Akbare, Shafique; Achart, Jérôme; Kuoch, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the use of a multi-channel opto-electronic sensor (OEPS) to effectively monitor critical physiological parameters whilst preventing motion artefact as increasingly demanded by personal healthcare. The aim of this work was to study how to capture the heart rate (HR) efficiently through a well-constructed OEPS and a 3-axis accelerometer with wireless communication. A protocol was designed to incorporate sitting, standing, walking, running and cycling. The datasets collected from these activities were processed to elaborate sport physiological effects. t-test, Bland-Altman Agreement (BAA), and correlation to evaluate the performance of the OEPS were used against Polar and Mio-Alpha HR monitors. No differences in the HR were found between OEPS, and either Polar or Mio-Alpha (both p > 0.05); a strong correlation was found between Polar and OEPS (r: 0.96, p < 0.001); the bias of BAA 0.85 bpm, the standard deviation (SD) 9.20 bpm, and the limits of agreement (LOA) from −17.18 bpm to +18.88 bpm. For the Mio-Alpha and OEPS, a strong correlation was found (r: 0.96, p < 0.001); the bias of BAA 1.63 bpm, SD 8.62 bpm, LOA from −15.27 bpm to +18.58 bpm. These results demonstrate the OEPS to be capable of carrying out real time and remote monitoring of heart rate. PMID:26473860

  5. Channel electron multiplier operated on a sounding rocket without a cryogenic vacuum pump from 120 to 80 km altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Shannon; Gausa, Michael; Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that a channel electron multiplier (CEM) can be operated on a sounding rocket in the pulse-counting mode from 120 km to 80 km altitude without the cryogenic evacuation used in the past. Evacuation of the CEM is provided only by aerodynamic flow around the rocket. This demonstration is motivated by the need for additional flights of mass spectrometers to clarify the fate of metallic compounds and ions ablated from micrometeorites and their possible role in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds. The CEMs were flown as guest instruments on two sounding rockets to the mesosphere. Modeling of the aerodynamic flow around the payload with Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) code showed that the pressure is reduced below ambient in the void behind (relative to the direction of motion) an aft-facing surface. An enclosure containing the CEM was placed forward of an aft-facing deck and a valve was opened during flight to expose the CEM to the aerodynamically evacuated region behind it. The CEM operated successfully from apogee down to ∼80 km. A Pirani gauge confirmed pressures reduced to as low as 20% of ambient with the extent of reduction dependent upon altitude and velocity. Additional DSMC simulations indicate that there are alternate payload designs with improved aerodynamic pumping for forward mounted instruments such as mass spectrometers.

  6. Channel electron multiplier operated on a sounding rocket without a cryogenic vacuum pump from 120 - 75 km altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, S.; Gausa, M. A.; Robertson, S. H.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate that a channel electron multiplier (CEM) can be operated on a sounding rocket in the pulse-counting mode from 120 km to 75 km altitude without the cryogenic evacuation used in the past. Evacuation of the CEM is provided only by aerodynamic flow around the rocket. This demonstration is motivated by the need for additional flights of mass spectrometers to clarify the fate of metallic compounds and ions ablated from micrometeorites and their possible role in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds. The CEMs were flown as guest instruments on the two sounding rockets of the CHAMPS (CHarge And mass of Meteoritic smoke ParticleS) rocket campaign which were launched into the mesosphere in October 2011 from Andøya Rocket Range, Norway. Modeling of the aerodynamic flow around the payload with Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) code showed that the pressure is reduced below ambient in the void beneath an aft-facing surface. An enclosure containing the CEM was placed above an aft-facing deck and a valve was opened on the downleg to expose the CEM to the aerodynamically evacuated region below. The CEM operated successfully from apogee down to ~75 km. A Pirani gauge confirmed pressures reduced to as low as 20% of ambient with the extent of reduction dependent upon altitude and velocity. Additional DSMC simulations indicate that there are alternate payload designs with improved aerodynamic pumping for forward mounted instruments such as mass spectrometers.

  7. Dissociative electron attachment to DNA-diamine thin films: Impact of the DNA close environment on the OH{sup −} and O{sup −} decay channels

    SciTech Connect

    Boulanouar, Omar; Fromm, Michel; Mavon, Christophe; Cloutier, Pierre; Sanche, Léon

    2013-08-07

    We measure the desorption of anions stimulated by the impact of 0–20 eV electrons on highly uniform thin films of plasmid DNA-diaminopropane. The results are accurately correlated with film thickness and composition by AFM and XPS measurements, respectively. Resonant structures in the H{sup −}, O{sup −}, and OH{sup −} yield functions are attributed to the decay of transient anions into the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) channel. The diamine induces ammonium-phosphate bridges along the DNA backbone, which suppresses the DEA O{sup −} channel and in counter-part increases considerably the desorption of OH{sup −}. The close environment of the phosphate groups may therefore play an important role in modulating the rate and type of DNA damages induced by low energy electrons.

  8. Dissociative electron attachment to DNA-diamine thin films: Impact of the DNA close environment on the OH- and O- decay channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanouar, Omar; Fromm, Michel; Mavon, Christophe; Cloutier, Pierre; Sanche, Léon

    2013-08-01

    We measure the desorption of anions stimulated by the impact of 0-20 eV electrons on highly uniform thin films of plasmid DNA-diaminopropane. The results are accurately correlated with film thickness and composition by AFM and XPS measurements, respectively. Resonant structures in the H-, O-, and OH- yield functions are attributed to the decay of transient anions into the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) channel. The diamine induces ammonium-phosphate bridges along the DNA backbone, which suppresses the DEA O- channel and in counter-part increases considerably the desorption of OH-. The close environment of the phosphate groups may therefore play an important role in modulating the rate and type of DNA damages induced by low energy electrons.

  9. Mode couplings in a two-stream free-electron laser with a helical wiggler and an ion-channel guiding

    SciTech Connect

    Mohsenpour, Taghi Alirezaee, Hajar

    2014-08-15

    In this study, the method of perturbation has been applied to obtain the dispersion relation (DR) of a two-stream free-electron laser (FEL) with a helical wiggler and an ion-channel with all relativistic effects on waves. This DR has been solved numerically to find the unstable modes and their growth rate. Numerical solutions of DR show that the growth rate is considerably enhanced in comparison with single-stream free-electron laser. In group II orbits, with relatively large wiggler induced velocities, new couplings are found. The effect of the velocity difference of the two electron beams on the instabilities has also been investigated in this study. Moreover, the effect of the ion-channel density on the maximum growth rate of FEL resonance has been analyzed.

  10. Dissociative electron attachment to DNA-diamine thin films: Impact of the DNA close environment on the OH− and O− decay channels

    PubMed Central

    Boulanouar, Omar; Fromm, Michel; Mavon, Christophe; Cloutier, Pierre; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    We measure the desorption of anions stimulated by the impact of 0–20 eV electrons on highly uniform thin films of plasmid DNA-diaminopropane. The results are accurately correlated with film thickness and composition by AFM and XPS measurements, respectively. Resonant structures in the H−, O−, and OH− yield functions are attributed to the decay of transient anions into the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) channel. The diamine induces ammonium-phosphate bridges along the DNA backbone, which suppresses the DEA O− channel and in counter-part increases considerably the desorption of OH−. The close environment of the phosphate groups may therefore play an important role in modulating the rate and type of DNA damages induced by low energy electrons. PMID:23927286

  11. Kinetic description of a free electron laser with an electromagnetic-wave wiggler and ion-channel guiding by using the Einstein coefficient technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdian, H.; AbasiRostami, S.; Hasanbeigi, A.

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical study of electron trajectories and gain in a free electron laser (FEL) with an electromagnetic-wave wiggler and ion-channel guiding is presented based on the Einstein coefficient method. The laser gain in the low-gain regime is obtained for the case of a cold tenuous relativistic electron beam, where the beam plasma frequency is much less than the radiation frequency propagating in this configuration. The resulting gain equation is analyzed numerically over a wide range of system parameters.

  12. Two dimensional electron gas in a hybrid GaN/InGaN/ZnO heterostructure with ultrathin InGaN channel layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmaca, G.; Narin, P.; Sarikavak-Lisesivdin, B.; Lisesivdin, S. B.

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the influence of an ultrathin InGaN channel layer on two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) properties in a newly proposed hybrid GaN/InxGa1-xN/ZnO heterostructure using numerical methods. We found that 2DEG carriers were confined at InGaN/ZnO and GaN/InGaN interfaces. Our calculations show that the probability densities of 2DEG carriers at these interfaces are highly influenced by the In mole fraction of the InGaN channel layer. Therefore, 2DEG carrier confinement can be adjustable by using the In mole fraction of the InGaN channel layer. The influence of an ultrathin InGaN channel layer on 2DEG carrier mobility is also discussed. Usage of an ultrathin InGaN channel layer with a low indium mole fraction in these heterostructures can help to reduce the short-channel effects by improvements such as providing 2DEG with higher sheet carrier density which is close to the surface and has better carrier confinement.

  13. Ceramic stove

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, M.

    1984-12-24

    A ceramic stove that may be supplied in kit form includes a base frame, a cast iron firebox secured on the base frame, a top frame attached to and surrounding the top of the firebox, and ceramic panels extending between and held by the frames in spaced relation from the firebox. The ceramic panels are ''ship-lapped'' relative to each other and are not cemented or otherwise positively attached to each other. Logs may be fed as fuel into the fire box door from one side of the stove allowing longer logs to be burned. The logs rest on a grate which includes a ''shakable'' portion for shaking ashes onto an ash pan located below the grate. A separate, small door into the firebox is provided for starting the fire and that door is covered by another, safety door which also closes the scape through whic the ash pan is removed for emptying. An outer screen gate is provided to overlie the firebox doors and the entire side of the firebos. Products of combustion rise in the firebox and are guided by a baffle in a desired serpentine path prolonging their containment, until they reach an outlet at the top of the fire box where they are then carried downwardly by a flue formed in part by a portion of the back wall of the firebox. A heat shield covers the back wall of the firebox including the flue whose outlet extends through the heat shield at mid elevation. Other features and advantages are also disclosed.

  14. Monolithic ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, Thomas P.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    A development history and current development status evaluation are presented for SiC and Si3N4 monolithic ceramics. In the absence of widely sought improvements in these materials' toughness, and associated reliability in structural applications, uses will remain restricted to components in noncritical, nonman-rated aerospace applications such as cruise missile and drone gas turbine engine components. In such high temperature engine-section components, projected costs lie below those associated with superalloy-based short-life/expendable engines. Advancements are required in processing technology for the sake of fewer and smaller microstructural flaws.

  15. Nondestructive evaluation of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, Stanley J.; Baaklini, George Y.; Abel, Phillip B.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented on research and development of techniques for nondestructive evaluation and characterization of advanced ceramics for heat engine applications. Highlighted in this review are Lewis Research Center efforts in microfocus radiography, scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM), scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM), scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM), and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). The techniques were evaluated by applying them to research samples of green and sintered silicon nitride and silicon carbide in the form of modulus-of-rupture bars containing seeded voids. Probabilities of detection of voids were determined for diameters as small as 20 microns for microfucus radiography, SLAM, and SAM. Strengths and limitations of the techniques for ceramic applications are identified. Application of ultrasonics for characterizing ceramic microstructures is also discussed.

  16. Combining electron crystallography and X-ray crystallography to study the MlotiK1 cyclic nucleotide-regulated potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Gina M.; Aller, Steve G.; Wang, Jimin; Unger, Vinzenz; Morais-Cabral, João H.

    2010-01-01

    We have recently reported the X-ray structure of the cyclic nucleotide regulated potassium channel, MlotiK1. Here we describe the application of both electron and X-ray crystallography to obtain high quality crystals. We suggest that the combined application of these techniques provides a useful strategy for membrane protein structure determination. We also present negative stain projection and cryo-data projection maps. These maps provide new insights about the properties of the MlotiK1 channel. In particular, a comparison of a 9 Å cryo-data projection with calculated model maps strongly suggests that there is a very weak interaction between the pore and the S1-S4 domains of this 6 TM tetrameric cation channel and that the S1-S4 domains can adopt multiple orientations relative to the pore. PMID:19545635

  17. Rietveld refinement, electronic structure and ionic conductivity of Sr4La6(SiO4)6F2 and Sr4La6(SiO4)6O ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughzala, Khaled; Debbichi, Mourad; Njema, Hela; Bouzouita, Khaled

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report the effect of the tunnel anions on the ionic conductivity of Strontium-Lanthanum silicate apatites. The Sr4La6(SiO4)6F2 and Sr4La6(SiO4)6O ceramics were prepared by the solid state reaction method. X-ray diffraction, NMR spectroscopy and Raman measurements were performed to investigate the crystal structure and vibrational active modes. Moreover, the electronic structures of the crystals were evaluated by the first-principles quantum mechanical calculation based on the density functional theory. Finally, the ionic conductivity was studied according to the complex impedance method.

  18. Ceramic fiber ceramic matrix filter development

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Stinton, D.P.; Smith, R.G.; Fischer, E.M.

    1994-09-01

    The objectives of this project were to develop a novel type of candle filter based on a ceramic fiber-ceramic matrix composite material, and to extend the development to full-size, 60-mm OD by 1-meter-long candle filters. The goal is to develop a ceramic filter suitable for use in a variety of fossil energy system environments such as integrated coal gasification combined cycles (IGCC), pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), and other advanced coal combustion environments. Further, the ceramic fiber ceramic matrix composite filter, hereinafter referred to as the ceramic composite filter, was to be inherently crack resistant, a property not found in conventional monolithic ceramic candle filters, such as those fabricated from clay-bonded silicon carbide. Finally, the adequacy of the filters in the fossil energy system environments is to be proven through simulated and in-plant tests.

  19. Environmental durability of ceramics and ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the current understanding of the environmental durability of both monolithic ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites, with a view to the prospective development of methods for the characterization, prediction, and improvement of ceramics' environmental durability. Attention is given to the environmental degradation behaviors of SiC, Si3N4, Al2O3, and glass-ceramic matrix compositions. The focus of corrosion prevention in Si-based ceramics such as SiC and Si3N4 is on the high and low sulfur fuel combustion-product effects encountered in heat engine applications of these ceramics; sintering additives and raw material impurities are noted to play a decisive role in ceramics' high temperature environmental response.

  20. Electron microscopy of X7R and Y5V type barium titanate multilayer ceramic capacitors with noble and base metal electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qiquan

    Two types of multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs), Y5V with Ni electrodes and X7R with Ag/Pd electrodes, were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and showed quite different microstructures which determined their dielectric behaviors. In X7R-type MLCCs, core-shell structures were observed. The flat dielectric constant-temperature curves obtained from these materials can be interpreted in terms of the internal stress states in individual grains. The stress states were observed using weak beam dark field (WBDF) microscopy. The strain contours observed were formed by distorted crystal planes and were dependent on the stress state of the crystal instead of crystal symmetry. The stress distribution in individual grains was determined by both the thickness ratio of shell and core and the geometrical relationship of the core and the shell. (111) lamella twins and dislocation loops in the paraelectric phases of BaTiO3 doped with Bi2O3 were analyzed by TEM under two-beam conditions. Y5V-type MLCCs based on re-oxidized Ba(Ti 0.88,Zr0.12)O3 (BTZ) materials exhibited frequency relaxation effects. Multi-domain structures coexisting in one grain were observed at dynamical diffraction conditions. Uneven distribution of internal stress and coexistence of multi-phases and multi-domains in individual grains were considered to be responsible for the frequency relaxor behavior observed in these materials. The compatibility of electrodes and dielectrics in cofired MLCCs with both Ni and Ag/Pd electrodes was characterized by TEM using tripod polished samples. NiO lamellae and P-rich intermediate layers were found in highly accelerated life tested (HALT) MLCCs with Ni electrodes. It is believed that Mn ions were reduced by the Ni electrodes, as P-rich and Mn-rich segregated layers were observed in the virginal non-life tested MLCCs. No silver diffusion was found in either the BaTiO3 based perovskite lattices or the flux phases in air-fired X7R type MLCCs.

  1. Performance of ceramic membrane filters

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.; Geyer, H.K.; Shelleman, D.L.; Tressler, R.E.

    1996-08-01

    CeraMem Corp.`s ceramic-membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters offer a promising alternative to ceramic candle filters providing long-term operational and reliability issues are resolved: regenerability of filter passages by back pulse cleaning, tolerance to alkali-containing combustion gas and thermal/chemical aging. ANL is responsible for analytical modeling of filtration and pulse cleaning operations, flow-through testing, and prediction of filter response to thermal cycling under realistic service conditions. A test apparatus was built to expose ceramic filter specimens to chemical environments simulating operation of pressurized fluidized bed and integrated gasification combined cycle plants. Four long-duration tests have been conducted in which 100-cpsi channel filters were exposed to ash collected downstream of the cyclone separator at the PFBC plant at Tidd. Results are discussed. Focus has now shifted to exposing the advanced candle filter specimens to reducing gas environments containing NaCl, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}O, and gasification ash.

  2. Nanosecond photoreduction of cytochrome p450cam by channel-specific Ru-diimine electron tunneling wires.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Alexander R; Dmochowski, Ivan J; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B

    2003-10-15

    We report the synthesis and characterization of Ru-diimine complexes designed to bind to cytochrome p450cam (CYP101). The sensitizer core has the structure [Ru(L(2))L'](2+), where L' is a perfluorinated biphenyl bridge (F(8)bp) connecting 4,4'-dimethylbipyridine to an enzyme substrate (adamantane, F(8)bp-Ad), a heme ligand (imidazole, F(8)bp-Im), or F (F(9)bp). The electron-transfer (ET) driving force (-deltaG degrees ) is varied by replacing the ancillary 2,2'-bipyridine ligands with 4,4',5,5'-tetramethylbipyridine (tmRu). The four complexes all bind p450cam tightly: Ru-F(8)bp-Ad (1, K(d) = 0.077 microM); Ru-F(8)bp-Im (2, K(d) = 3.7 microM); tmRu-F(9)bp (3, K(d) = 2.1 microM); and tmRu-F(8)bp-Im (4, K(d) = 0.48 microM). Binding is predominantly driven by hydrophobic interactions between the Ru-diimine wires and the substrate access channel. With Ru-F(8)bp wires, redox reactions can be triggered on the nanosecond time scale. Ru-wire 2, which ligates the heme iron, shows a small amount of transient heme photoreduction (ca. 30%), whereas the transient photoreduction yield for 4 is 76%. Forward ET with 4 occurs in roughly 40 ns (k(f) = 2.8 x 10(7) s(-)(1)), and back ET (Fe(II) --> Ru(III), k(b) approximately 1.7 x 10(8) s(-)(1)) is near the coupling-limited rate (k(max)). Direct photoreduction was not observed for 1 or 3. The large variation in ET rates among the Ru-diimine:p450 conjugates strongly supports a through-bond model of Ru-heme electronic coupling. PMID:14531688

  3. Electron Mobility Exceeding 10 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and Band-Like Charge Transport in Solution-Processed n-Channel Organic Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaomin; Yao, Yifan; Shan, Bowen; Gu, Xiao; Liu, Danqing; Liu, Jinyu; Xu, Jianbin; Zhao, Ni; Hu, Wenping; Miao, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Solution-processed n-channel organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) that exhibit a field-effect mobility as high as 11 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature and a band-like temperature dependence of electron mobility are reported. By comparison of solution-processed OTFTs with vacuum-deposited OTFTs of the same organic semiconductor, it is found that grain boundaries are a key factor inhibiting band-like charge transport. PMID:27151777

  4. Generalization of the Bennett equilibrium condition for a relativistic electron beam propagating in the Ohmic plasma channel and ion focusing regime along an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, E. K.; Manuilov, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    The problem of formulating the generalization of the Bennett equilibrium condition is considered for a relativistic electron beam propagating in the Ohmic plasma channel, as well as in the ion focusing regime in the presence of an external longitudinal uniform magnetic field. We assume that the electron component of the background plasma is not completely removed from the region occupied by the beam. This equilibrium condition is derived using the mass and momentum transport equations obtained for a paraxial monoenergetic beam from the Fokker-Planck kinetic equation.

  5. Experimental and numerical investigation of flow field and heat transfer from electronic components in a rectangular channel with an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calisir, Tamer; Fevzi Koseoglu, M.; Kilic, Mustafa; Baskaya, Senol

    2015-05-01

    Thermal control of electronic components is a continuously emerging problem as power loads keep increasing. The present study is mainly focused on experimental and numerical investigation of impinging jet cooling of 18 (3 × 6 array) flash mounted electronic components under a constant heat flux condition inside a rectangular channel in which air, following impingement, is forced to exit in a single direction along the channel formed by the jet orifice plate and impingement plate. Copper blocks represent heat dissipating electronic components. Inlet flow velocities to the channel were measured by using a Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) system. Flow field observations were performed using a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and thermocouples were used for temperature measurements. Experiments and simulations were conducted for Re = 4000 - 8000 at fixed value of H = 10 × Dh. Flow field results were presented and heat transfer results were interpreted using the flow measurement observations. Numerical results were validated with experimental data and it was observed that the results are in agreement with the experiments.

  6. Dental ceramics: An update

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Arvind; Shenoy, Nina

    2010-01-01

    In the last few decades, there have been tremendous advances in the mechanical properties and methods of fabrication of ceramic materials. While porcelain-based materials are still a major component of the market, there have been moves to replace metal ceramics systems with all ceramic systems. Advances in bonding techniques have increased the range and scope for use of ceramics in dentistry. In this brief review, we will discuss advances in ceramic materials and fabrication techniques. Examples of the microstructure property relationships for these ceramic materials will also be addressed. PMID:21217946

  7. Ceramic inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Werve, Michael E.

    2006-05-16

    A system for inspecting a ceramic component. The ceramic component is positioned on a first rotary table. The first rotary table rotates the ceramic component. Light is directed toward the first rotary table and the rotating ceramic component. A detector is located on a second rotary table. The second rotary table is operably connected to the first rotary table and the rotating ceramic component. The second rotary table is used to move the detector at an angle to the first rotary table and the rotating ceramic component.

  8. Microstructural characterization of nuclear-waste ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F.J.; Clarke, D.R.

    1982-09-22

    Characterization of nuclear waste ceramics requires techniques possessing high spatial and x-ray resolution. XRD, SEM, electron microprobe, TEM and analytical EM techniques are applied to ceramic formulations designed to immobilize both commercial and defense-related reactor wastes. These materials are used to address the strengths and limitations of the techniques above. An iterative approach combining all these techniques is suggested. 16 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Monolithic ceramic capacitors for high reliability applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornley, E. B.

    1981-01-01

    Monolithic multi-layer ceramic dielectric capacitors are widely used in high reliability applications in spacecraft, launch vehicles, and military equipment. Their relatively low cost, wide range of values, and package styles are attractive features that result in high usage in electronic circuitry in these applications. Design and construction of monolithic ceramic dielectric capacitors, defects that can lead to failure, and methods for defect detection that are being incorporated in military specifications are discussed.

  10. Phase transformation in multiferroic Bi{sub 5}Ti{sub 3}FeO{sub 15} ceramics by temperature-dependent ellipsometric and Raman spectra: An interband electronic transition evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, P. P.; Duan, Z. H.; Xu, L. P.; Zhang, X. L.; Li, Y. W.; Hu, Z. G. Chu, J. H.

    2014-02-28

    Thermal evolution and an intermediate phase between ferroelectric orthorhombic and paraelectric tetragonal phase of multiferroic Bi{sub 5}Ti{sub 3}FeO{sub 15} ceramic have been investigated by temperature-dependent spectroscopic ellipsometry and Raman scattering. Dielectric functions and interband transitions extracted from the standard critical-point model show two dramatic anomalies in the temperature range of 200–873 K. It was found that the anomalous temperature dependence of electronic transition energies and Raman mode frequencies around 800 K can be ascribed to intermediate phase transformation. Moreover, the disappearance of electronic transition around 3 eV at 590 K is associated with the conductive property.

  11. Joining Ceramics By Brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Sudsina, Michael W.

    1992-01-01

    Certain ceramic materials tightly bond together by brazing with suitable alloys. Enables fabrication of parts of wide variety of shapes from smaller initial pieces of ceramics produced directly in only limited variety of shapes.

  12. Study of gamma-ray generation from channeled electrons and positrons. Final report, 1 Mar 86-28 Feb 91

    SciTech Connect

    Pantell.

    1991-02-28

    The primary purpose of the experiments on the linac were to demonstrate that channeling radiation can be an inexpensive source of bright, hard x-rays with picosecond duration. Channeled particle trajectories are similar to the trajectories in a magnetic wiggler, but the equivalent magnetic field would have to be about ten megagauss. Indeed, a photon flux of 10 to the 19th power photons/sr-keV-sec was measured over a picosecond duration at a wavelength of 0.42 A. The authors peak current levels were about 10 to the 13th power times greater than the currents used in previous channeling experiments and average currents were about 10 to the 8th power times greater. To perform these measurement a spectrometer was developed capable of operating at high photon fluxes with several percent energy resolution at x-ray wavelengths, and in a bremsstrahlung background. This was accomplished using a graphite crystal Bragg reflector, a photomultiplier detector, and specially designed. In addition to the high power channeling radiation research, they also studied channeling radiation in superlattices, both theoretically and experimentally. Superlattices offer a means for increasing the radiation, utilizing the periodicity of the layers. The Madey storage ring was to provide a bright positron current source for seeking x-ray laser action by means of channeling radiation. A current density of 10 to 100 million A/sq cm could be obtained, which would provide significant stimulated gain over a picosecond time interval. (The time duration is determined by the interval over which the crystal remains intact.)

  13. Ceramic electrolyte coating methods

    DOEpatents

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2004-10-12

    Processes for preparing aqueous suspensions of a nanoscale ceramic electrolyte material such as yttrium-stabilized zirconia. The invention also includes a process for preparing an aqueous coating slurry of a nanoscale ceramic electrolyte material. The invention further includes a process for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material on pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  14. Brittleness of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroupa, F.

    1984-01-01

    The main characteristics of mechanical properties of ceramics are summarized and the causes of their brittleness, especially the limited mobility of dislocations, are discussed. The possibility of improving the fracture toughness of ceramics and the basic research needs relating to technology, structure and mechanical properties of ceramics are stressed in connection with their possible applications in engineering at high temperature.

  15. Ceramic to metal seal

    DOEpatents

    Snow, Gary S.; Wilcox, Paul D.

    1976-01-01

    Providing a high strength, hermetic ceramic to metal seal by essentially heating a wire-like metal gasket and a ceramic member, which have been chemically cleaned, while simultaneously deforming from about 50 to 95 percent the metal gasket against the ceramic member at a temperature of about 30 to 75 percent of the melting temperature of the metal gasket.

  16. Electron power loss in the (100) n channel of a Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor. I. Intrasubband phonon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krowne, Clifford M.

    1983-05-01

    The electron energy relaxation is studied as a function of the ``electron temperature'' Te in the n channel of a (100) surface silicon MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor) device by inspecting the phenomenological energy relaxation time τɛ(Te) at 4.2 °K, 77 °K, and 300 °K lattice temperatures. τɛ is theoretically calculated in order to determine the relative contributions of shear horizontal (SH), pressure-shear vertical (P-SV), shear vertical-pressure (SV-P), total reflection shear vertical pressure (TR), and Rayleigh (R) surface acoustic phonon modes to the electron energy relaxation at the interface. Two-dimensional electron transport is assumed and the effects of subbanding near the interface are included. Only electron scatter events within subbands are studied (intrasubband). This exhaustive study finds that surface modes do not dominate the electron energy relaxation at the Si-SiO2 interface at TL =4.2 °K. Some other mechanism(s) must predominate at TL =4.2 °K.

  17. An electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy investigation of the retention mechanisms of Mn and Cu in the nanopore channels of three zeolite minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Daniel R.; Schulthess, Cristian P.; Amonette, James E.; Walter, Eric D.

    2012-12-01

    The adsorption mechanisms of divalent cations in zeolite nanopore channels can vary as a function of their pore dimensions. The nanopore inner-sphere enhancement (NISE) theory predicts that ions may dehydrate inside small nanopore channels in order to adsorb more closely to the mineral surface if the nanopore channel is sufficiently small. The results of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy study of Mn and Cu adsorption on the zeolite minerals zeolite Y (large nanopores), ZSM-5 (intermediate nanopores), and mordenite (small nanopores) are presented. The Cu and Mn cations both adsorbed via an outer-sphere mechanism on zeolite Y based on the similarity between the adsorbed spectra and the aqueous spectra. Conversely, Mn and Cu adsorbed via an inner-sphere mechanism on mordenite based on spectrum asymmetry and peak broadening of the adsorbed spectra. However, Mn adsorbed via an outer-sphere mechanism on ZSM-5, whereas Cu adsorbed on ZSM-5 shows a high degree of surface interaction that indicates that it is adsorbed closer to the mineral surface. Evidence of dehydration and immobility was more readily evident in the spectrum of mordenite than ZSM-5, indicating that Cu was not as close to the surface on ZSM-5 as it was when adsorbed on mordenite. Divalent Mn cations are strongly hydrated and are held strongly only in zeolites with small nanopore channels. Divalent Cu cations are also strongly hydrated, but can dehydrate more easily, presumably due to the Jahn-Teller effect, and are held strongly in zeolites with medium sized nanopore channels or smaller.

  18. Interband electronic transitions and phase diagram of PbZr1‑x Ti x O3 (0.05 ≤ x ≤ 0.70) ceramics: ellipsometric experiment and first-principles theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. J.; Xu, L. P.; Shi, K.; Zhang, J. Z.; Chen, X. F.; Hu, Z. G.; Dong, X. L.; Chu, J. H.

    2016-07-01

    The thermal evolutions of optical properties and phase transitions of PbZr1‑x Ti x O3 (PZT) ceramics as the functions of Ti compositions have been systemically explored by means of temperature dependent ellipsometric spectra and first-principles calculations. Two interband electronic transitions have been obtained by fitting the second derivatives of the complex dielectric functions and the physical origins can be explained with the aid of theoretical calculations. Based on the interband transitions, the phase diagram of PZT ceramics can be well-established. Importantly, dramatic Zr-rich ion clusters at 70 K and two intermediate regions are captured. The Zr-side intermediate phase is attributed to the tilting competitions of high [FER(HT)] and low [FER(LT)] temperature rhombohedral structures. Moreover, a wider range of the monoclinic (M) region from x  =  0.28 to 0.50 has been determined than previously reported. Interestingly, one can conclude that a more superior performance of PZT may be obtained with the larger M domains relying on external strains or fields.

  19. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  20. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    DOEpatents

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  1. Additive manufacturing of polymer-derived ceramics.

    PubMed

    Eckel, Zak C; Zhou, Chaoyin; Martin, John H; Jacobsen, Alan J; Carter, William B; Schaedler, Tobias A

    2016-01-01

    The extremely high melting point of many ceramics adds challenges to additive manufacturing as compared with metals and polymers. Because ceramics cannot be cast or machined easily, three-dimensional (3D) printing enables a big leap in geometrical flexibility. We report preceramic monomers that are cured with ultraviolet light in a stereolithography 3D printer or through a patterned mask, forming 3D polymer structures that can have complex shape and cellular architecture. These polymer structures can be pyrolyzed to a ceramic with uniform shrinkage and virtually no porosity. Silicon oxycarbide microlattice and honeycomb cellular materials fabricated with this approach exhibit higher strength than ceramic foams of similar density. Additive manufacturing of such materials is of interest for propulsion components, thermal protection systems, porous burners, microelectromechanical systems, and electronic device packaging. PMID:26721993

  2. Additive manufacturing of polymer-derived ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckel, Zak C.; Zhou, Chaoyin; Martin, John H.; Jacobsen, Alan J.; Carter, William B.; Schaedler, Tobias A.

    2016-01-01

    The extremely high melting point of many ceramics adds challenges to additive manufacturing as compared with metals and polymers. Because ceramics cannot be cast or machined easily, three-dimensional (3D) printing enables a big leap in geometrical flexibility. We report preceramic monomers that are cured with ultraviolet light in a stereolithography 3D printer or through a patterned mask, forming 3D polymer structures that can have complex shape and cellular architecture. These polymer structures can be pyrolyzed to a ceramic with uniform shrinkage and virtually no porosity. Silicon oxycarbide microlattice and honeycomb cellular materials fabricated with this approach exhibit higher strength than ceramic foams of similar density. Additive manufacturing of such materials is of interest for propulsion components, thermal protection systems, porous burners, microelectromechanical systems, and electronic device packaging.

  3. The A-site driven phase transition procedure of (Pb0.97La0.02)(Zr0.42Sn0.40Ti0.18)O3 ceramics: An evidence from electronic structure variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Jiang, P. P.; Duan, Z. H.; Hu, Z. G.; Chen, X. F.; Wang, G. S.; Dong, X. L.; Chu, J. H.

    2013-11-01

    The transition of (Pb0.97La0.02)(Zr0.42Sn0.40Ti0.18)O3 (PLZST) ceramic has been investigated by temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction (XRD) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). The rhombohedral and tetragonal symmetries are confirmed by XRD analysis. Two interband transitions (Ecp1 and Ecp2) located at about 3.7 and 5.2 eV can be derived from the second derivative of the complex dielectric functions using the standard critical point (SCP) model. Except for the negative temperature coefficient parts, the transitions present additional parts corresponding to appearance of the antiferroelectric (AFE) phase. The phenomena can be attributed to variation of the electronic structure during A-site driven phase transition.

  4. Flow-Induced Vibration of a Reed in a Channel: Effect of Reed Shape on Convective Heat Transfer with Application to Electronic Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rips, Aaron; Shoele, Kourosh; Glezer, Ari; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-11-01

    Flow-induced vibration of a reed (a thin plate or flag) in a channel can improve heat transfer efficiency in forced convection applications, allowing for more heat transfer for the same fan power. Such systems have wide ranging applications in electronic and power cooling. We investigate the effect of 3D reed shape on heat transfer enhancement. To study 3D effects, we first use 2D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations of an optimized reed (in terms of mass and stiffness) to generate a prescribed reed motion. We then apply that motion to a pseudo 3D reed (i.e. infinitely stiff in the spanwise direction) and study the heat transfer enhancement in a 3D channel. This method allows us to explore a large parameter space exhaustively, and using this method, we examine the effect of several parameters, such as reed planform and spanwise gap, on the heat transfer enhancements for forced convection in a channel. Simulations indicate that these geometrical feature have a significant effect on the vortex dynamics in the wake as well as the heat transfer efficiency. This work was supported by grants from AFOSR, EPRI and NSF.

  5. Channeling of high-power radio waves under conditions of strong anomalous absorption in the presence of an averaged electron heating source

    SciTech Connect

    Vas'kov, V. V.; Ryabova, N. A.

    2010-02-15

    Strong anomalous absorption of a high-power radio wave by small-scale plasma inhomogeneities in the Earth's ionosphere can lead to the formation of self-consistent channels (solitons) in which the wave propagates along the magnetic field, but has a soliton-like intensity distribution across the field. The structure of a cylindrical soliton as a function of the wave intensity at the soliton axis is analyzed. Averaged density perturbations leading to wave focusing were calculated using the model proposed earlier by Vas'kov and Gurevich (Geomagn. Aeron. 16, 1112 (1976)), in which an averaged electron heating source was used. It is shown that, under conditions of strong electron recombination, the radii of individual solitons do not exceed 650 m.

  6. High-efficient photo-electron transport channel in SiC constructed by depositing cocatalysts selectively on specific surface sites for visible-light H2 production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da; Peng, Yuan; Wang, Qi; Pan, Nanyan; Guo, Zhongnan; Yuan, Wenxia

    2016-04-01

    Control cocatalyst location on a metal-free semiconductor to promote surface charge transfer for decreasing the electron-hole recombination is crucial for enhancing solar energy conversion. Based on the findings that some metals have an affinity for bonding with the specific atoms of polar semiconductors at a heterostructure interface, we herein control Pt deposition selectively on the Si sites of a micro-SiC photocatalyst surface via in-situ photo-depositing. The Pt-Si bond forming on the interface constructs an excellent channel, which is responsible for accelerating photo-electron transfer from SiC to Pt and then reducing water under visible-light. The hydrogen production is enhanced by two orders of magnitude higher than that of bare SiC, and 2.5 times higher than that of random-depositing nano-Pt with the same loading amount.

  7. Electron detrapping characteristics in positive bias temperature stressed n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with ultrathin HfSiON gate dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shiyang; Nakajima, Anri

    2007-07-01

    Electrons trapped in the HfSiON gate dielectrics of n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors induced by positive bias temperature stress start to decay when the stress is interrupted or an opposite (recovery) voltage is applied. The decay begins with a quick detrapping within tens of nanoseconds followed by a slow detrapping. The quick detrapping depends on the recovery voltage and the trapping history, whereas the slow detrapping obeys approximately a logarithmic dependence on time with an almost identical slope before saturation. The observed detrapping behavior can be explained by a spatial and/or energetic distribution of trapped electrons in the HfSiON film. The device degradation under various dynamic stresses is found to be almost independent of frequency ranging from 0.001to1MHz, while it is slightly enhanced at 10MHz, probably due to insufficient recovery at the recovering half cycle.

  8. Ceramic membranes for methane conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Mieville, R.L.; Maiya, P.S.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Pei, S.; Kobylinski, T.P.; Udovich, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    In conventional conversion of methane to syngas, a significant cost of the partial oxidation process is that of the oxygen plant. In this report, the authors offer a technology that is based on dense ceramic membranes and that uses air as the oxidant for methane-conversion reactions, thus eliminating the need for the oxygen plant. Certain ceramic materials exhibit both electronic and ionic conductivities (of particular interest is oxygen-ion conductivity). These materials transport not only oxygen ions (functioning as selective oxygen separators) but also electrons back from the reactor side to the oxygen/reduction interface. No external electrodes are required and if the driving potential of transport is sufficient, the partial-oxidation reactions should be spontaneous. Such a system will operate without an externally applied potential. Oxygen is transported across the ceramic material in the form of oxygen anions, not oxygen molecules. Long tubes of Sr-Fe-Co-O (SFC) membrane were fabricated by plastic extrusion, and thermal stability of the tubes was studied as a function of oxygen partial pressure and high-temperature XRD. Mechanical properties were measured and found to be acceptable for a reactor material. Fracture of certain SFC tubes was the consequence of an oxygen gradient that introduced a volumetric lattice difference between the inner and outer walls. However, tubes made with a particular stoichiometry (SFC-2) provided methane conversion efficiencies of >99% in a reactor and some of these tubes have operated for up to {approx}1,000 h.

  9. Electron power loss in the (100) n channel of a Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor. II. Intersubband phonon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krowne, Clifford M.

    1983-05-01

    A simple matrix element is used to approximate electron-acoustic phonon scattering between different electron subbands i in the n channel of a (100) surface silicon MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor) device. This matrix element is used to determine the form of the electron power loss Pij in a i→j intersubband transition. P10 is calculated for TL =4.2 °K lattice temperature and electron temperatures Te between 4.4 °K and 18 °K when the electron inversion density Ninv =(3.76-10.0)×1011 cm-2 and an acceptor density NA =1014/cm3, and compared to Fang and Fowler's experimental data (which is put into the form of an experimental power loss Pexp). This is justified since the total power loss P due to intrasubband scattering as well as other Pij terms besides P10 is small. It is found that good to excellent fits between P10 and Pexp occur by adjusting the separation Δɛ10 between the lowest two circular subband edges. Δɛ10 is between 5.2 and 9.4 meV, and the electron-phonon deformation coupling constant D≊3.5 eV. The values of Δɛ10 obtained in such a manner roughly agree with Stern's theoretical self-consistent results. P10 is very sensitive to both Δɛ10 and to the effective mass for motion parallel to the surface m1 with the results implying that m1≊0.19m0 (m0=free electron rest mass). If one wants to find the contribution of intersubband scattering to P at higher TL, the formalism should still be applicable, although the approach could be much more complicated due to the addition of new Pij terms coming from both higher subbands and new scattering agents such as optical modes.

  10. The g-factor of quasi-two-dimensional electrons in InAs/InGaAs/InAlAs inserted-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakmehr, Mehdi; Khaetskii, A.; McCombe, B. D.; Bhandari, N.; Cahay, M.; Chiatti, Olivio; Fischer, S. F.; Heyn, C.; Hansen, W.

    2015-08-01

    We have measured the Landau-level spin-splitting of two-dimensional electrons in the composite InAs/InGaAs channels of two InAs/InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructures with different alloy compositions by magnetotransport and THz magneto-photoconductivity in magnetic fields up to 10 T. The structures differ importantly in the mobility of the channel, the electron density and the composition of the barriers. The magnitudes of the experimental g-factors for B along the quantization axis and their anisotropies are larger by at least a factor of 2 than the corresponding calculated single particle values. The angular dependence of many-body exchange contributions and the effects of broadening of Landau-level densities of states are necessary for understanding this behaviour. We find evidence for a marked decrease of the exchange contribution at low perpendicular magnetic fields in the higher mobility sample from coincidence measurements, but no indications of such behaviour in the lower mobility sample.

  11. The g-factor of quasi-two-dimensional electrons in InAs/InGaAs/InAlAs inserted-channels

    SciTech Connect

    Pakmehr, Mehdi; Khaetskii, A.; McCombe, B. D.; Bhandari, N.; Cahay, M.; Chiatti, Olivio; Fischer, S. F.; Heyn, C.; Hansen, W.

    2015-08-24

    We have measured the Landau-level spin-splitting of two-dimensional electrons in the composite InAs/InGaAs channels of two InAs/InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructures with different alloy compositions by magnetotransport and THz magneto-photoconductivity in magnetic fields up to 10 T. The structures differ importantly in the mobility of the channel, the electron density and the composition of the barriers. The magnitudes of the experimental g-factors for B along the quantization axis and their anisotropies are larger by at least a factor of 2 than the corresponding calculated single particle values. The angular dependence of many-body exchange contributions and the effects of broadening of Landau–level densities of states are necessary for understanding this behaviour. We find evidence for a marked decrease of the exchange contribution at low perpendicular magnetic fields in the higher mobility sample from coincidence measurements, but no indications of such behaviour in the lower mobility sample.

  12. Trap states in enhancement-mode double heterostructures AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with different GaN channel layer thicknesses

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yunlong; Wang, Chong Li, Xiangdong; Zhao, Shenglei; Mi, Minhan; Pei, Jiuqing; Zhang, Jincheng; Hao, Yue; Li, Peixian; Ma, Xiaohua

    2015-08-10

    This is the report on trap states in enhancement-mode AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN double heterostructures high electron mobility transistors by fluorine plasma treatment with different GaN channel layer thicknesses. Compared with the thick GaN channel layer sample, the thin one has smaller 2DEG concentration, lower electron mobility, lower saturation current, and lower peak transconductance, but it has a higher threshold voltage of 1.2 V. Deep level transient spectroscopy measurements are used to obtain the accurate capture cross section of trap states. By frequency dependent capacitance and conductance measurements, the trap state density of (1.98–2.56) × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} is located at E{sub T} in a range of (0.37–0.44) eV in the thin sample, while the trap state density of (2.3–2.92) × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} is located at E{sub T} in a range of (0.33–0.38) eV in the thick one. It indicates that the trap states in the thin sample are deeper than those in the thick one.

  13. Trap states in enhancement-mode double heterostructures AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with different GaN channel layer thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunlong; Li, Peixian; Wang, Chong; Li, Xiangdong; Zhao, Shenglei; Mi, Minhan; Pei, Jiuqing; Zhang, Jincheng; Ma, Xiaohua; Hao, Yue

    2015-08-01

    This is the report on trap states in enhancement-mode AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN double heterostructures high electron mobility transistors by fluorine plasma treatment with different GaN channel layer thicknesses. Compared with the thick GaN channel layer sample, the thin one has smaller 2DEG concentration, lower electron mobility, lower saturation current, and lower peak transconductance, but it has a higher threshold voltage of 1.2 V. Deep level transient spectroscopy measurements are used to obtain the accurate capture cross section of trap states. By frequency dependent capacitance and conductance measurements, the trap state density of (1.98-2.56) × 1012 cm-2 eV-1 is located at ET in a range of (0.37-0.44) eV in the thin sample, while the trap state density of (2.3-2.92) × 1012 cm-2 eV-1 is located at ET in a range of (0.33-0.38) eV in the thick one. It indicates that the trap states in the thin sample are deeper than those in the thick one.

  14. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, Gordon; Crum, Jarrod; Turo, Laura; Riley, Brian; Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James

    2014-05-01

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (∼1-5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  15. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, G. D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin M.; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James C.

    2014-02-03

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (~1–5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  16. Application of dry-polishing techniques to water-soluble glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, J.T.; McAllaster, M.E.

    1981-04-01

    A dry polishing technique is presented for the preparation of glass ceramics for microstructural characterization. The technique is shown to be applicable to water soluble phosphate based glass ceramics and also to a non-water soluble zinc silicate glass ceramic. Microstructural characterization is performed primarily with composition backscattered electron imaging in the scanning electron microscopy. Some relief is observed on the polished surface utilizing topographical backscattered electron imaging.

  17. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel-based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.

  18. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1993-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.

  19. Comparative study of donor-induced quantum dots in Si nano-channels by single-electron transport characterization and Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tyszka, K.; Moraru, D.; Samanta, A.; Mizuno, T.; Tabe, M.; Jabłoński, R.

    2015-06-28

    We comparatively study donor-induced quantum dots in Si nanoscale-channel transistors for a wide range of doping concentration by analysis of single-electron tunneling transport and surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). By correlating KPFM observations of donor-induced potential landscapes with simulations based on Thomas-Fermi approximation, it is demonstrated that single-electron tunneling transport at lowest gate voltages (for smallest coverage of screening electrons) is governed most frequently by only one dominant quantum dot, regardless of doping concentration. Doping concentration, however, primarily affects the internal structure of the quantum dot. At low concentrations, individual donors form most of the quantum dots, i.e., “donor-atom” quantum dots. In contrast, at high concentrations above metal-insulator transition, closely placed donors instead of individual donors form more complex quantum dots, i.e., “donor-cluster” quantum dots. The potential depth of these “donor-cluster” quantum dots is significantly reduced by increasing gate voltage (increasing coverage of screening electrons), leading to the occurrence of multiple competing quantum dots.

  20. Ceramic tamper-revealing seals

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Sheen, Shuh-Haw

    1992-01-01

    A flexible metal or ceramic cable with composite ceramic ends, or a u-shaped ceramic connecting element attached to a binding element plate or block cast from alumina or zirconium, and connected to the connecting element by shrink fitting.

  1. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sabloff, J A

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  2. Superconductive ceramic oxide combination

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, D.K.; Mehrotra, A.K.; Mir, J.M.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes the combination of a superconductive ceramic oxide which degrades in conductivity upon contact of ambient air with its surface and, interposed between the ceramic oxide surface and ambient air in the amount of at least 1 mg per square meter of surface area of the superconductive ceramic oxide, a passivant polymer selected from the group consisting of a polyester ionomer and an alkyl cellulose.

  3. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  4. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J.

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  5. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Alexander, Kathleen B.; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.; Waters, Shirley B.

    1996-01-01

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite.

  6. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  7. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1992-11-17

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density. 2 figs.

  8. Ceramic brush seals development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Harold

    1994-01-01

    The following topics are discussed in this viewgraph presentation: ceramic brush seals, research and development, manufacturing, brazed assembly development, controlling braze flow, fiber selection, and braze results.

  9. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  10. Dry pressing technical ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, W.A. Jr.

    1996-04-01

    Dry pressing of technical ceramics is a fundamental method of producing high-quality ceramic components. The goals of dry pressing technical ceramics are uniform compact size and green density, consistent part-to-part green density and defect-free compact. Dry pressing is the axial compaction of loosely granulated dry ceramic powders (< 3% free moisture) within a die/punch arrangement. The powder, under pressure, conforms to the specific shape of the punch faces and die. Powder compaction occurs within a rigid-walled die and usually between a top and bottom punch. Press configurations include anvil, rotary, multiple-punch and multiple-action.

  11. Defect production in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Kinoshita, C.

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  12. Fabrication and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube channel and graphene electrode based transistors; Toward all carbon electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Wook; Seo, Miri; Na, Junhong; Kim, Yong Hyeon; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Kim, Jin-Ju; Yun, Hoyeol; Kim, Hakseong; Yoon, Ho-Ang; Kim, Keun Soo; Jeong, Goo-Hwan; Kim, Gyu Tae

    2014-03-01

    A transistor structure composed of an individual single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) channel with a graphene electrode was demonstrated. The integrated arrays of transistor devices were prepared by transferring patterned graphene electrode array on top of the pre-deposited SWNTs which were aligned along one direction. Aligned arrays of SWNTs were synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method on quartz substrate. The micro scale contact electrodes and following circuit structures were defined by photo lithography on the large area graphene produced by CVD. Both of the single and multi layer graphene were used for the electrode materials. In this presentation, the device fabrication procedure, the contact properties, and the transistor performances of the device structures were discussed. This work was supported by NRF.

  13. Phase Equilibria and Crystallography of Ceramic Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Ng, W.; Roth, R. S.; Vanderah, T. A.; McMurdie, H. F.

    2001-01-01

    Research in phase equilibria and crystallography has been a tradition in the Ceramics Division at National Bureau of Standards/National Institute of Standatrds and Technology (NBS/NIST) since the early thirties. In the early years, effort was concentrated in areas of Portland cement, ceramic glazes and glasses, instrument bearings, and battery materials. In the past 40 years, a large portion of the work was related to electronic materials, including ferroelectrics, piezoelectrics, ionic conductors, dielectrics, microwave dielectrics, and high-temperature superconductors. As a result of the phase equilibria studies, many new compounds have been discovered. Some of these discoveries have had a significant impact on US industry. Structure determinations of these new phases have often been carried out as a joint effort among NBS/NIST colleagues and also with outside collaborators using both single crystal and neutron and x-ray powder diffraction techniques. All phase equilibria diagrams were included in Phase Diagrams for Ceramists, which are collaborative publications between The American Ceramic Society (ACerS) and NBS/NIST. All x-ray powder diffraction patterns have been included in the Powder Diffraction File (PDF). This article gives a brief account of the history of the development of the phase equilibria and crystallographic research on ceramic oxides in the Ceramics Division. Represented systems, particularly electronic materials, are highlighted. PMID:27500068

  14. Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  15. Spectroscopic investigations on glasses, glass-ceramics and ceramics developed for nuclear waste immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurant, D.

    2014-05-01

    Highly radioactive nuclear waste must be immobilized in very durable matrices such as glasses, glass-ceramics and ceramics in order to avoid their dispersion in the biosphere during their radioactivity decay. In this paper, we present various examples of spectroscopic investigations (optical absorption, Raman, NMR, EPR) performed to study the local structure of different kinds of such matrices used or envisaged to immobilize different kinds of radioactive wastes. A particular attention has been paid on the incorporation and the structural role of rare earths—both as fission products and actinide surrogates—in silicate glasses and glass-ceramics. An example of structural study by EPR of a ceramic (hollandite) irradiated by electrons (to simulate the effect of the β-irradiation of radioactive cesium) is also presented.

  16. THz Magneto-Photoresponse Spectroscopy of Two-Dimensional Electrons in an InAs/InGaAs/InAlAs Inserted-Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakmehr, Mehdi; Khaetskii, A.; McCombe, B. D.; Chiatti, O.; Fischer, S. F.; Heyn, Ch.; Hansen, W.

    2015-03-01

    We have used THz magneto-photoresponse/transmission to measure various electronic parameters of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) located primarily within an InAs inserted-channel and the surrounding InGaAs well in an asymmetric InAs/InGaAs/InAlAs inserted-well heterostructure in magnetic fields up to 10 T. We have developed an analytical approach to the photoresponse based on resonant heating of the 2DEG by cyclotron resonance (CR) absorption. The analysis incorporates a resonant T-profile mimicking the CR absorption, combined with the theoretical expression for quantized resistance oscillations of a 2DEG. Fitting of an individual set of PR data vs. magnetic field can in principle, provide g-factor, cyclotron effective mass, SdH scattering time, CR scattering time and carrier density of the 2DEs. This is a temperature differential technique, which leads to enhanced sensitivity to harmonic content of the Shubnikov-deHaas (S-dH) oscillations and thus to clearer spin-splitting of the Landau levels at lower fields than is possible in direct S-dH measurements at the same bath temperature. Results show an enhanced g-factor for electrons and large g-factor anisotropy.

  17. Modeling of Noise and Resistance of Semimetal Hg1-xCdxTe Quantum Well used as a Channel for THz Hot-Electron Bolometer.

    PubMed

    Melezhik, E O; Gumenjuk-Sichevska, J V; Sizov, F F

    2016-12-01

    Noise characteristics and resistance of semimetal-type mercury-cadmium-telluride quantum wells (QWs) at the liquid nitrogen temperature are studied numerically, and their dependence on the QW parameters and on the electron concentration is established. The QW band structure calculations are based on the full 8-band k.p Hamiltonian. The electron mobility is simulated by the direct iterative solution of the Boltzmann transport equation, which allows us to include correctly all the principal scattering mechanisms, elastic as well as inelastic.We find that the generation-recombination noise is strongly suppressed due to the very fast recombination processes in semimetal QWs. Hence, the thermal noise should be considered as a main THz sensitivity-limiting mechanism in those structures. Optimization of a semimetal Hg1-xCdxTe QW to make it an efficient THz bolometer channel should include the increase of electron concentration in the well and tuning the molar composition x close to the gapless regime. PMID:27067729

  18. Effect of ceramic etching protocols on resin bond strength to a feldspar ceramic.

    PubMed

    Bottino, M A; Snellaert, A; Bergoli, C D; Özcan, M; Bottino, M C; Valandro, L F

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the resin microtensile bond strength (MTBS) stability of a leucite-reinforced ceramic after different ceramic etching protocols. The microtensile test had 40 ceramic blocks (5×5×6 mm) assigned to five groups (n=8), in accordance with the following surface etching protocols: NE nonetched (control); 9HF: hydrofluoric (HF) acid etching (9%HF)+wash/dry; 4HF: 4%HF+wash/dry; 5HF: 5%HF+wash/dry; and 5HF+N: 5%HF+neutralizer+wash/dry+ultrasonic-cleaning. Etched ceramic surfaces were treated with a silane agent. Next, resin cement blocks were built on the prepared ceramic surface and stored for 24 hours in distilled water at 37°C. The specimens were then sectioned to obtain microtensile beams (32/block), which were randomly assigned to the following conditions, nonaged (immediate test) and aged (water storage for 150 days plus 12,000 thermal cycles), before the microtensile test. Bond strength data were submitted to one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (α=0.05). Additional ceramic samples were subjected to the different ceramic etching protocols and evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (n=2) and atomic force microscopy (n=2). Aging led to a statistically significant decrease in the MTBS for all groups, except the untreated one (NE). Among the groups submitted to the same aging conditions, the untreated (NE) revealed inferior MTBS values compared to the 9HF and 4HF groups. The 5HF and 5HF+N groups had intermediate mean values, being statistically similar to the higher values presented by the 9HF and 4HF groups and to the lower value associated with the NE group. The neutralization procedure did not enhance the ceramic/resin cement bond strength. HF acid etching is a crucial step in resin/ceramic bonding. PMID:25535782

  19. Very high channel conductivity in low-defect AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dabiran, A. M.; Wowchak, A. M.; Osinsky, A.; Xie, J.; Hertog, B.; Cui, B.; Chow, P. P.; Look, D. C.

    2008-08-25

    Low defect AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures, with very high values of electron mobility (>1800 cm{sup 2}/V s) and sheet charge density (>3x10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}), were grown by rf plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on sapphire and SiC, resulting in sheet resistivity values down to {approx}100 {omega}/{open_square} at room temperature. Fabricated 1.2 {mu}m gate devices showed excellent current-voltage characteristics, including a zero gate saturation current density of {approx}1.3 A/mm and a peak transconductance of {approx}260 mS/mm. Here, an all MBE growth of optimized AlN/GaN HEMT structures plus the results of thin-film characterizations and device measurements are presented.

  20. Motion of a virtual cathode in a cylindrical channel with electron beam transport in the "compressed" state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belomyttsev, S. Ya.; Grishkov, A. A.; Kurkan, I. K.; Tsygankov, R. V.

    2014-03-01

    This paper studies the motion of a virtual cathode in a two-section drift tube with the formation and breakup of the "compressed" state of an electron beam. Experimental arrangements to intercept part of the injected current during the voltage pulse and to provide virtual cathode motion toward the collector are proposed. The arrangements were implemented on the SINUS-7 high-current electron accelerator. Theoretical and experimental dependences of the virtual cathode velocity on the injected current and cathode voltage are presented. The experimental data on virtual cathode motion agree with its theoretical model based on analytical solutions of equations assisted by computer simulation with the PIC code KARAT. The results of the work demonstrate the feasibility of controlling the virtual cathode motion which can be used in collective ion acceleration and microwave generation.

  1. Planar ceramic membrane assembly and oxidation reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Dyer, legal representative, Kathryn Beverly; Wilson, Merrill Anderson; Ohrn, Ted R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Peterson, David; Chen, Christopher M.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Dyer, Paul Nigel

    2009-04-07

    Planar ceramic membrane assembly comprising a dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material, wherein the dense layer has a first side and a second side, a porous layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material in contact with the first side of the dense layer, and a ceramic channeled support layer in contact with the second side of the dense layer. The planar ceramic membrane assembly can be used in a ceramic wafer assembly comprising a planar ceramic channeled support layer having a first side and a second side; a first dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the first side of the ceramic channeled support layer; a first outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the first dense layer; a second dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the second side of the ceramic channeled layer; and a second outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the second dense layer.

  2. Planar ceramic membrane assembly and oxidation reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Dyer, legal representative, Kathryn Beverly; Wilson, Merrill Anderson; Ohm, Ted R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Peterson, David; Chen, Christopher M.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Dyer, deceased, Paul Nigel

    2007-10-09

    Planar ceramic membrane assembly comprising a dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material, wherein the dense layer has a first side and a second side, a porous layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material in contact with the first side of the dense layer, and a ceramic channeled support layer in contact with the second side of the dense layer. The planar ceramic membrane assembly can be used in a ceramic wafer assembly comprising a planar ceramic channeled support layer having a first side and a second side; a first dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the first side of the ceramic channeled support layer; a first outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the first dense layer; a second dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the second side of the ceramic channeled layer; and a second outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the second dense layer.

  3. High electron mobility recovery in AlGaN/GaN 2DEG channels regrown on etched surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Silvia H.; Keller, Stacia; Tahhan, Maher; Li, Haoran; Romanczyk, Brian; DenBaars, Steven P.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports high two-dimensional electron gas mobility attained from the regrowth of the AlGaN gating layer on ex situ GaN surfaces. To repair etch-damaged GaN surfaces, various pretreatments were conducted via metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, followed by a regrown AlGaN/GaN mobility test structure to evaluate the extent of recovery. The developed treatment process that was shown to significantly improve the electron mobility consisted of a N2 + NH3 pre-anneal plus an insertion of a 4 nm or thicker GaN interlayer prior to deposition of the AlGaN gating layer. Using the optimized process, a high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) device was fabricated which exhibited a high mobility of 1450 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 (R sh = 574 ohm/sq) and low dispersion characteristics. The additional inclusion of an in situ Al2O3 dielectric into the regrowth process for MOS-HEMTs still preserved the transport properties near etch-impacted areas.

  4. NASA/CARES dual-use ceramic technology spinoff applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Lynn M.; Janosik, Lesley A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1994-01-01

    NASA has developed software that enables American industry to establish the reliability and life of ceramic structures in a wide variety of 21st Century applications. Designing ceramic components to survive at higher temperatures than the capability of most metals and in severe loading environments involves the disciplines of statistics and fracture mechanics. Successful application of advanced ceramics material properties and the use of a probabilistic brittle material design methodology. The NASA program, known as CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures), is a comprehensive general purpose design tool that predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component as a function of its time in service. The latest version of this software, CARESALIFE, is coupled to several commercially available finite element analysis programs (ANSYS, MSC/NASTRAN, ABAQUS, COSMOS/N4, MARC), resulting in an advanced integrated design tool which is adapted to the computing environment of the user. The NASA-developed CARES software has been successfully used by industrial, government, and academic organizations to design and optimize ceramic components for many demanding applications. Industrial sectors impacted by this program include aerospace, automotive, electronic, medical, and energy applications. Dual-use applications include engine components, graphite and ceramic high temperature valves, TV picture tubes, ceramic bearings, electronic chips, glass building panels, infrared windows, radiant heater tubes, heat exchangers, and artificial hips, knee caps, and teeth.

  5. Ceramics for engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiser, James D.; Levine, Stanley R.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's Ceramic Technology Program is focused on aerospace propulsion and power needs. Thus, emphasis is on high-temperature ceramics and their structural and environmental durability and reliability. The program is interdisciplinary in nature with major emphasis on materials and processing, but with significant efforts in design methodology and life prediction.

  6. Fabrication Of Ceramic Mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Process to make mats of fine zirconia filaments proposed. Ceramic mats formed by sintering mats of partially dried filaments extruded from slurry of ceramic powder, binder, and solvent. Mats of fine zirconia fibers easier to ball-mill than commercially available zirconia powder.

  7. Electron collisions with phenol: Total, integral, differential, and momentum transfer cross sections and the role of multichannel coupling effects on the elastic channel

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Romarly F. da; Oliveira, Eliane M. de; Lima, Marco A. P.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.; Varella, Márcio T. do N.; Jones, Darryl B.; Brunger, Michael J.; Blanco, Francisco; Colmenares, Rafael; and others

    2015-03-14

    We report theoretical and experimental total cross sections for electron scattering by phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). The experimental data were obtained with an apparatus based in Madrid and the calculated cross sections with two different methodologies, the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR), and the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP). The SMCPP method in the N{sub open}-channel coupling scheme, at the static-exchange-plus-polarization approximation, is employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies ranging from 5.0 eV to 50 eV. We discuss the multichannel coupling effects in the calculated cross sections, in particular how the number of excited states included in the open-channel space impacts upon the convergence of the elastic cross sections at higher collision energies. The IAM-SCAR approach was also used to obtain the elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) and for correcting the experimental total cross sections for the so-called forward angle scattering effect. We found a very good agreement between our SMCPP theoretical differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections and experimental data for benzene (a molecule differing from phenol by replacing a hydrogen atom in benzene with a hydroxyl group). Although some discrepancies were found for lower energies, the agreement between the SMCPP data and the DCSs obtained with the IAM-SCAR method improves, as expected, as the impact energy increases. We also have a good agreement among the present SMCPP calculated total cross section (which includes elastic, 32 inelastic electronic excitation processes and ionization contributions, the latter estimated with the binary-encounter-Bethe model), the IAM-SCAR total cross section, and the experimental data when the latter is corrected for the forward angle scattering effect [Fuss et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 042702 (2013)].

  8. Method of making a modified ceramic-ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, Billy L.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Stinton, David P.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of making a shaped ceramic-ceramic composite articles, such as gas-fired radiant heat burner tubes, heat exchangers, flame dispersers, and other furnace elements, having a formed-on ceramic-ceramic composite thereon.

  9. High resolution structure and double electron-electron resonance of the zebrafish voltage-dependent anion channel 2 reveal an oligomeric population.

    PubMed

    Schredelseker, Johann; Paz, Aviv; López, Carlos J; Altenbach, Christian; Leung, Calvin S; Drexler, Maria K; Chen, Jau-Nian; Hubbell, Wayne L; Abramson, Jeff

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a vast increase in structural and functional understanding of VDAC1, but VDAC2 and -3 have been understudied despite having many unique phenotypes. One reason for the paucity of structural and biochemical characterization of the VDAC2 and -3 isoforms stems from the inability of obtaining purified, functional protein. Here we demonstrate the expression, isolation, and basic characterization of zebrafish VDAC2 (zfVDAC2). Further, we resolved the structure of zfVDAC2 at 2.8 Å resolution, revealing a crystallographic dimer. The dimer orientation was confirmed in solution by double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy and by cross-linking experiments disclosing a dimer population of ∼20% in lauryldimethine amine oxide detergent micelles, whereas in lipidic bicelles a higher population of dimeric and higher order oligomers species were observed. The present study allows for a more accurate structural comparison between VDAC2 and its better-studied counterpart VDAC1. PMID:24627492

  10. High Resolution Structure and Double Electron-Electron Resonance of the Zebrafish Voltage-dependent Anion Channel 2 Reveal an Oligomeric Population*

    PubMed Central

    Schredelseker, Johann; Paz, Aviv; López, Carlos J.; Altenbach, Christian; Leung, Calvin S.; Drexler, Maria K.; Chen, Jau-Nian; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Abramson, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a vast increase in structural and functional understanding of VDAC1, but VDAC2 and -3 have been understudied despite having many unique phenotypes. One reason for the paucity of structural and biochemical characterization of the VDAC2 and -3 isoforms stems from the inability of obtaining purified, functional protein. Here we demonstrate the expression, isolation, and basic characterization of zebrafish VDAC2 (zfVDAC2). Further, we resolved the structure of zfVDAC2 at 2.8 Å resolution, revealing a crystallographic dimer. The dimer orientation was confirmed in solution by double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy and by cross-linking experiments disclosing a dimer population of ∼20% in lauryldimethine amine oxide detergent micelles, whereas in lipidic bicelles a higher population of dimeric and higher order oligomers species were observed. The present study allows for a more accurate structural comparison between VDAC2 and its better-studied counterpart VDAC1. PMID:24627492

  11. Ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    LaHaye, P.G.; Rahman, F.H.; Lebeau, T.P.; Severin, B.K.

    1998-06-16

    A tube containment system is disclosed. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture. 6 figs.

  12. Ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    LaHaye, Paul G.; Rahman, Faress H.; Lebeau, Thomas P. E.; Severin, Barbara K.

    1998-01-01

    A tube containment system. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture.

  13. Mounting for ceramic scroll

    DOEpatents

    Petty, Jack D.

    1993-01-01

    A mounting for a ceramic scroll on a metal engine block of a gas turbine engine includes a first ceramic ring and a pair of cross key connections between the first ceramic ring, the ceramic scroll, and the engine block. The cross key connections support the scroll on the engine block independent of relative radial thermal growth and for bodily movement toward an annular mounting shoulder on the engine. The scroll has an uninterrupted annular shoulder facing the mounting shoulder on the engine block. A second ceramic ring is captured between mounting shoulder and the uninterrupted shoulder on the scroll when the latter is bodily shifted toward the mouting shoulder to define a gas seal between the scroll and the engine block.

  14. Strain isolated ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolokan, R. P.; Brady, J. B.; Jarrabet, G. P.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are used in gas turbine engines to improve component temperature capability and cooling air efficiency. A compliant metal fiber strain isolator between a plasma sprayed ceramic coating and a metal substrate improves ceramic durability while allowing thicker coatings for better insulation. Development of strain isolated coatings has concentrated on design and fabrication of coatings and coating evaluation via thermal shock testing. In thermal shock testing, five types of failure are possible: buckling failure im compression on heat up, bimetal type failure, isothermal expansion mismatch failure, mudflat cracking during cool down, and long term fatigue. A primary failure mode for thermally cycled coatings is designated bimetal type failure. Bimetal failure is tensile failure in the ceramic near the ceramic-metal interface. One of the significant benefits of the strain isolator is an insulating layer protecting the metal substrate from heat deformation and thereby preventing bimetal type failure.

  15. Interband electronic transitions and phase transformation of multiferroic Bi{sub 1−x}La{sub x}Fe{sub 1−y}Ti{sub y}O{sub 3} ceramics revealed by temperature-dependent spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, L. P.; Jiang, P. P.; Duan, Z. H.; Hu, Z. G. Zhu, Z. Q.; Chu, J. H.; Zhang, L. L.; Yu, J.

    2013-12-21

    Optical properties and phase transition of Bi{sub 1−x}La{sub x}Fe{sub 1−y}Ti{sub y}O{sub 3} (BLFTO) ceramics with different composition (0.02 ≤ x ≤ 0.10, 0.01 ≤ y ≤ 0.06) have been investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in the temperature range of −70–450 °C. The real part of the complex dielectric function ε{sub 1} increases with the temperature. Meanwhile, the imaginary part ε{sub 2} in the low-energy region decreases with the temperature and has an opposite trend in the high-energy side. Four typical interband transitions (E{sub a} ∼ 2.50 eV, E{sub b} ∼ 2.70 eV, E{sub c} ∼ 3.60 eV, and E{sub d} ∼ 4.25 eV) can be observed from the second derivative of the complex dielectric functions with aid of the standard critical point model. The critical point (CP) transition becomes broadening and shifts to a lower energy side as La and Ti compositions increase. Moreover, the CP transition energies show a red-shift trend with increasing the temperature until 320 °C, due to the lattice thermal expansion and electron-phonon interaction. The typical interband transitions and partial spectral weight present anomalies in the proximity of antiferromagnetic transition owing to the coupling between magnetic and ferroelectric order parameters and spin-lattice coupling for BLFTO multiferroic materials. It was found that the Néel temperature of BLFTO ceramics decreases from 364 to 349 °C with increasing doping composition of La and Ti elements. These phenomena can be attributed to the modification of electronic structure and magnetic order because the differences of electronegativity and ionic radii between Bi and La, Fe and Ti induce the variations on the bond angle and bond length between cations and anions. Moreover, the substitution for magnetic Fe{sup 3+} ions with nonmagnetic Ti{sup 4+} ions can reduce the exchange interaction between adjacent magnetic moments. Therefore, SE technique can be sensitive for

  16. Nanocrystallization in Fluorochlorozirconate Glass-Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Carlos J.; Liu, Yuzi; Leonard, Russell L.; Johnson, Jacqueline A.; Petford-Long, Amanda K.

    2014-01-01

    Heat treating fluorochlorozirconate (FCZ) glasses nucleates nanocrystals in the glass matrix, resulting in a nanocomposite glass-ceramic that has optical properties suitable for use as a medical imaging plate. Understanding the way in which the nanocrystal nucleation proceeds is critical to controlling the optical behavior. The nucleation and growth of nanocrystals in FCZ glass-ceramics was investigated with in situ transmission electron microscopy heating experiments. The experiments showed the nucleation and growth of previously unreported BaF2 nanocrystals in addition to the expected BaCl2 nanocrystals. Chemical analysis of the BaF2 nanocrystals shows an association with the optically active dopant previously thought only to interact with BaCl2 nanocrystals. The association of the dopant with BaF2 crystals suggests that it plays a role in the photoluminescent (PL) properties of FCZ glass-ceramics. PMID:24707056

  17. LAMP Joining between Ceramic and Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Nishimoto, Kouji; Katayama, Seiji

    Joining of dissimilar materials is necessary and important from a manufacturing viewpoint. Therefore, the authors have developed a new laser direct joining method between a metal and a plastic which is named Laser Assisted Metal and Plastic (LAMP) joining method. In this research, LAMP joining was applied to join silicon nitride Si3N4 ceramic and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) engineering plastic, although metal was replaced by ceramic. The tensile shear strength of obtained joints was 3100 N at the maximum, which was strong enough to elongate a PET base plate of 2 mm in thickness and 30 mm in width. Moreover, transmission electron microscopes (TEM) observation demonstrates that the ceramic and the plastic are tightly bonded on atomic or molecular sized level.

  18. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1985-04-03

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  19. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1987-09-22

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate. 2 figs.

  20. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1987-01-01

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  1. Comparison of effects of MPTCP and PTCP ceramics implanted for the treatment of bone defects in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Zhu, T B; Du, J Y; Hong, G X; Sun, S Z; Xu, X H

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic porous tricalcium phosphate (MPTCP) and porous tricalcium phosphate (PTCP) ceramic cylinders were implanted into right and left bone defects of rabbits' radii in order to determine the utility of the MPTCP ceramics. Based on naked eye inspection, light and scanning electron microphotography, roentgenography, quantitative histological measurement of new bone formation and anti-break test for a period of 5 months. The results showed that the two kinds of ceramics were biocompatible with human tissue. MPTCP ceramics could induce more new bone formation than PTCP ceramics. Treatment of fractures with synthetic calcium phosphate ceramics and magnetic fields were discussed. PMID:8731962

  2. Characterization of the twin structure of TSMTG-processed Y Ba2Cu3O7-dgr ceramics by scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, F.; Harnois, C.; Monot-Laffez, I.

    2004-04-01

    Patterns looking like the polysynthetic twin structure of the Y Ba2Cu3O7-dgr compound appear in high magnification secondary electron images, obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SE-SEM), on both cleaved and polished samples. The characteristics in common between these patterns and the twins usually observed by optical or transmission electron microscopy are discussed (a wide extension, quite good homogeneity at the picture scale, presence at different topographical levels, the orientation along two nearly perpendicular directions, and the presence of tip endings). In order to determine the exact nature of these features, a comparison of images of the same areas obtained by TEM and SEM is presented. This reveals that the alternate bright and dark strips observed in SE-SEM images are clearly twin domains.

  3. Compatibility of potential reinforcing ceramics with Ni and Fe aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, J. A.; Aindow, M.; Clark, W. A. T.; Draper, S.; Fraser, H. L.

    1990-01-01

    The compatibility of candidate ceramic reinforcement materials with intermetallic matrices for high temperature composite systems has been evaluated. Powders of FeAl and NiAl were mixed with ceramic powders and consolidated by hot isostatic pressing and subsequent heat treatment. The microstructures of these composites and the nature of the ceramic/matrix interfaces were assessed using a wide variety of electron-beam techniques. The system FeAl/TiB2 was found to be particularly promising. The matrix appears to be bonded to the ceramic particles, which may be the result of diffusion of Fe into the ceramic. The particles stabilized in a previously unreported monoclinic crystal structure, rather than the equilibrium hexagonal form exhibited by the binary compound.

  4. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

    1993-11-30

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

  5. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  6. All-ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Lehner, C R; Schärer, P

    1992-06-01

    Despite the good appearance and biocompatibility of dental porcelains, failures are still of considerable concern because of some limited properties common to all-ceramic crown systems. As in the years before, pertinent scientific articles published between November 1990 and December 1991 focused on strengthening mechanisms and compared fracture toughness for different ceramic systems by using various test methods. Some evaluated the clinical implications thereon for seating and loading crowns and measured wear against different ceramic surface conditions. Recently introduced with pleasing aesthetic qualities, IPS-Empress (Ivoclar, Schaan, Liechtenstein), a new European leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic, has finally drawn attention in some journals and has been reviewed with promising in vitro test results. Using a simple press-molding technique, well-fitting crowns, inlays, and veneers can be fabricated without an additional ceramming procedure. Again, only long-term clinical trials will validate achievements compared with other all-ceramic systems and with well-established metal ceramics. PMID:1325848

  7. Ceramic-silicide composites

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1998-12-01

    The area of ceramic-silicide composites represents a merging of structural ceramics and structural silicides. Such ceramic-silicide composites can possess the desirable characteristics of both classes of compounds. Important structural ceramics are materials such as Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, SiC, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and ZrO{sub 2}, which possess covalent, ionic, or mixed covalent-ionic atomic bonding. An important structural silicide is MoSi{sub 2}, which possesses mixed covalent-metallic bonding. The arena of ceramic-silicide composites encompasses both composites where the structural silicide is the matrix and the structural ceramic is the reinforcement, and composites where the structural ceramic is the matrix and the structural silicide is the reinforcement. In the former area, MoSi{sub 2}-SiC, MoSi{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}, and MoSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites are discussed. In the latter area, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-MoSi{sub 2} composites are described.

  8. Simulation and performance study of ceramic THGEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jia-Qing; Xie, Yu-Guang; Hu, Tao; Lu, Jun-Guang; Zhou, Li; Qu, Guo-Pu; Cai, Xiao; Niu, Shun-Li; Chen, Hai-Tao

    2015-06-01

    THGEMs based on a ceramic substrate have been successfully developed for neutron and single photon detection. The influences on thermal neutron scattering and internal radioactivity of both ceramic and FR-4 substrates were studied and compared. The ceramic THGEMs are homemade, of 200 μm hole diameter, 600 μm pitch, 200 μm thickness, 80 μm rim, and 50 mm×50 mm sensitive area. FR-4 THGEMs with the same geometry were used as a reference. The gas gain, energy resolution and gain stability were measured in different gas mixtures using 5.9 keV X-rays. The maximum gain of a single layer ceramic THGEM reaches 6×104 and 1.5×104 at Ne+CH4=95:5 and Ar + i-C4H10 = 97:3, respectively. The energy resolution is better than 24%. Good gain stability was obtained during a more than 100 hour continuous test in Ar+CO2 = 80:20. By using a 239Pu source, the alpha deposited energy spectrum and gain curve of the ceramic THGEM were measured. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205173) and State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics (H9294206TD)

  9. Spacecraft ceramic protective shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larriva, Rene F. (Inventor); Nelson, Anne (M.); Czechanski, James G. (Inventor); Poff, Ray E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A low areal density protective shield apparatus, and method for making same, for protecting spacecraft structures from impact with hypervelocity objects, including a bumper member comprising a bumper ceramic layer, a bumper shock attenuator layer, and a bumper confining layer. The bumper ceramic layer can be SiC or B.sub.4 C; the bumper shock attenuator layer can be zirconia felt; and the bumper confining layer can be aluminum. A base armor member can be spaced from the bumper member and a ceramic fiber-based curtain can be positioned between the bumper and base armor members.

  10. A multienzyme complex channels substrates and electrons through acetyl-CoA and methane biosynthesis pathways in Methanosarcina.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Dillon J; Catlett, Jennifer; Madayiputhiya, Nandu; Nandakumar, Renu; Lopez, Madeline M; Metcalf, William W; Buan, Nicole R

    2014-01-01

    Multienzyme complexes catalyze important metabolic reactions in many organisms, but little is known about the complexes involved in biological methane production (methanogenesis). A crosslinking-mass spectrometry (XL-MS) strategy was employed to identify proteins associated with coenzyme M-coenzyme B heterodisulfide reductase (Hdr), an essential enzyme in all methane-producing archaea (methanogens). In Methanosarcina acetivorans, Hdr forms a multienzyme complex with acetyl-CoA decarbonylase synthase (ACDS), and F420-dependent methylene-H4MPT reductase (Mer). ACDS is essential for production of acetyl-CoA during growth on methanol, or for methanogenesis from acetate, whereas Mer is essential for methanogenesis from all substrates. Existence of a Hdr:ACDS:Mer complex is consistent with growth phenotypes of ACDS and Mer mutant strains in which the complex samples the redox status of electron carriers and directs carbon flux to acetyl-CoA or methanogenesis. We propose the Hdr:ACDS:Mer complex comprises a special class of multienzyme redox complex which functions as a "biological router" that physically links methanogenesis and acetyl-CoA biosynthesis pathways. PMID:25232733

  11. Characterization of glass-infiltrated alumina-based ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Bona, Alvaro Della; Mecholsky, John J; Barrett, Allyson A; Griggs, Jason A

    2010-01-01

    Objective characterize the microstructure, composition, and important properties of glass-infiltrated alumina-based ceramics similar to the In-Ceram system. Methods Materials used were: IA- In-Ceram Alumina (Vita); IAE- IA electrophoretically deposited (Vita); AEM- IA using a vacuum driven method (Vita); VC- Vitro-Ceram (Angelus); TC- Turkom-Cera (Turkom-Ceramic); CC- Ceramcap (Foto-Ceram); and AG- Alglass (EDG). Ceramic specimens were fabricated following manufacturers’ instructions and ISO6872 standard and polished successively through 1μm alumina abrasive. Semi-quantitative and qualitative analyses were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and stereology (Vv). The elastic modulus (E) and Poisson’s ratio (ν) were determined using time-of-flight data measured in an ultrasonic pulser/receiver and the density (ρ) was determined using a helium pycnometer. Vicker’s indentation was used to calculate hardness (H). Bar specimens (25×4×1.2mm3) were loaded in three-point bending to fracture using a universal testing machine with cross-head speed of 1mm/min. Flexural strength (σ3P) was calculated and statistically analyzed using ANOVA, Tukey (α=0.05) and Weibull (m= modulus, σ0= characteristic strength). Results SEM and EDS analyses revealed similar microstructure for all ceramics, except for a lead-based matrix in CC and a zirconia phase in VC. TC, AG and CC showed significantly lower mean σ3P values than the other ceramics (p 0.05). AEM showed the greatest m (16). Conclusion Despite few differences in microstructure and composition, the IA, IAE, AEM and VC ceramics have similar properties. Significance The glass-infiltrated alumina-based ceramics from different manufacturers presented distinct characteristics. It is necessary to characterize new commercially available materials to understand their properties. PMID:18692231

  12. RFI channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A class of channel models is presented which exhibit varying burst error severity much like channels encountered in practice. An information-theoretic analysis of these channel models is made, and conclusions are drawn that may aid in the design of coded communication systems for realistic noisy channels.

  13. Resonant coherent excitation of Mg sup 11+ : Electronic collisions of state specified short-lived excited states in a crystal channel

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, S.; Dittner, P.F.; Gomez del Campo, J.; Krause, H.F.; Rosseel, T.M.; Vane, C.R. ); Iwata, I.; Komaki, I.; Kimura, M.; Yamazaki, Y. ); Fujimoto, F.; Honda, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogenic ions passing through axial and planar channels can be excited from n = 1 to n = 2 when the frequency of perturbation by the atoms in the crystal spaced a distance d apart comes into resonance with the spacing between eigenstates i and j {Delta}E{sub ij} = hK(v{sub i}/d) where K is a harmonic 1,2,3{hor ellipsis} of the (v{sub i}/d) frequency. The degeneracy in the n = 2 levels is removed; first by the assymetry in the crystal field and second by Stark mixing of 2s with 2p{sub x} which is caused by the wake field. Thus, the resonant frequency, and hence velocity, for excitation to 2p{sub x,y} is different than that for 2p{sub x} and they can be excited selectively. In the present work we used Mg{sup 11+}, where the n = 2 ionization cross section is small enough to permit escape of some of the excited ions from the crystal without being ionized by subsequent collisions and with the subsequent emission of radiation. Since we can excite different orientations of the ion selectively by varying the velocity we can measure the separate ionization cross sections for these states by determining the yields of totally stripped ions compared to those which emit a Ly {alpha} x-ray. A comparison of the two channels shows that the probability of escape from the crystal without ionizations is greater for ions in the 2p{sub x} state than those in the 2p{sub x,y} state. These RCE data and are presented as proof of principal for experiments which measure electron bombardment ionization cross sections for short lived excited states with specific polarization.

  14. Application of Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to Determine Texture, Microtexture, and Grain Boundary Energies in Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Rohrer, G.S.; Saylor, D.M.; Vedula, V.R.

    1999-05-19

    Crystallographic orientations in alumina (Al203) and magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl204) were obtained using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) patterns. The texture and mesotexture (grain boundary misorientations) were random and no special boundaries were observed. The relative grain boundary energies were determined by thermal groove geometries using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to identify relationships between the grain boundary energies and misorientations.

  15. Ceramic Solar Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Solar receiver uses ceramic honeycomb matrix to absorb heat from Sun and transfer it to working fluid at temperatures of 1,095 degrees and 1,650 degrees C. Drives gas turbine engine or provides heat for industrial processes.

  16. Light emitting ceramic device

    DOEpatents

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  17. Ceramic breeder materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The breeding blanket is a key component of the fusion reactor because it directly involves tritium breeding and energy extraction, both of which are critical to development of fusion power. The lithium ceramics continue to show promise as candidate breeder materials. This promise was recognized by the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) design team in its selection of ceramics as the first option for the ITER breeder material. Blanket design studies have indicated properties in the candidate materials data base that need further investigation. Current studies are focusing on tritium release behavior at high burnup, changes in thermophysical properties with burnup, compatibility between the ceramic breeder and beryllium multiplier, and phase changes with burnup. Laboratory and in-reactor tests, some as part of an international collaboration for development of ceramic breeder materials, are underway. 32 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1995-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  19. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  20. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  1. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  2. Super Thin Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Video Gallery

    New technology being developed at NASA's Glenn Research Center creates super thin ceramic coatings on engine components. The Plasma Spray – Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) rig uses a powerful ...

  3. Advanced Ceramics Property Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the "what, how, how not, and why" for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committee's inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of standards in one volume.

  4. Making Ceramic Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  5. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2002-04-01

    This report covers the following tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints; Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability; Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres; Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures; Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability; and Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  6. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  7. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Yahnke, Mark S.; Shlomo, Golan; Anderson, Marc A.

    1994-01-01

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range.

  8. Hybrid membrane-microfluidic components using a novel ceramic MEMS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Brent J.; Polyakov, Oleg; Rinaldo, Chris

    2012-03-01

    A novel hybrid nano/microfabrication technology has been employed to produce unique MEMS and microfluidic components that integrate nanoporous membranes. The components are made by micromachining a self-organized nanostructured ceramic material that is biocompatible and amenable to surface chemistry modification. Microfluidic structures, such as channels and wells, can be made with a precision of <2 microns. Thin-film membranes can be integrated into the bottom of these structures, featuring a wide range of possible thicknesses, from 100 micron to <50 nm. Additionally, these membranes may be non-porous or porous (with controllable pore sizes from 200 nm to <5 nm), for sophisticated size-based separations. With previous and current support from the NIH SBIR program, we have built several unique devices, and demonstrated improved separations, cell culturing, and imaging (optical and electron microscopy) versus standard products. Being ceramic, the material is much more robust to demanding environments (e.g. high and low temperatures and organic solvents), compared to polymer-based devices. Additionally, we have applied multiple surface modification techniques, including atomic layer deposition, to manipulate properties such as electrical conductivity. This microfabrication technology is highly scaleable, and thus can yield low-cost, reliable, disposable microcomponents and devices. Specific applications that can benefit from this technology includes cell culturing and assays, imaging by cryo-electron tomography, environmental sample processing, as well as many others.

  9. All ceramic structure for molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Kucera, Eugenia H.

    1992-01-01

    An all-ceramic molten carbonate fuel cell having a composition formed of a multivalent metal oxide or oxygenate such as an alkali metal, transition metal oxygenate. The structure includes an anode and cathode separated by an electronically conductive interconnect. The electrodes and interconnect are compositions ceramic materials. Various combinations of ceramic compositions for the anode, cathode and interconnect are disclosed. The fuel cell exhibits stability in the fuel gas and oxidizing environments. It presents reduced sealing and expansion problems in fabrication and has improved long-term corrosion resistance.

  10. A new freeze casting technique for ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Kiyoshi

    A new freeze casting technique for ceramics capable of manufacturing near room temperature with a sublimable vehicle has been developed in order to eliminate expensive processes under extremely cold temperatures in the conventional freeze casting. Fluid concentrated slurries of Al2O 3 powder in molten camphene (C10H16) were successfully prepared at 55°C with a small amount of a dispersant. These slurries were quickly solidified (frozen) at room temperature to yield a rigid solid green body, where the frozen camphene was easily removed by sublimation (freeze-drying) with negligible shrinkage. Sintering was successfully conducted without any special binder burnout process to yield dense sintered bodies (over 98% T.D). An organic alloy with a eutectic composition in the naphthalene (C 10H8)-camphor (C10H16O) binary system with a eutectic temperature of 31°C was also found to be a successful vehicle for the new ceramic freeze casting. The fabrication processes are almost the same as those with camphene. It was found that vehicles with off-eutectic compositions resulted in large voids in the sintered body due to the ceramic particle rejection by pro-eutectic crystals during freezing. At the eutectic composition, fine lamellar microstructure in the solidified vehicle inhibits the particle rejection. The proposed advantages of the new freeze casting technique with a sublimable vehicle include; (1) elimination of extremely cold temperatures used in conventional freeze casting; (2) elimination of troublesome binder burnout process; and (3) fast manufacturing cycle due to quick solidification. Porous ceramic bodies with unique interconnected pore channels were fabricated by the new freeze casting with lower solid content. The unique channels surrounded by fully dense walls have nearly circular cross-sections unlike conventional aqueous freeze casting. The porosity and the channel diameters are controllable by the solid content in the slurry. The unique channels are

  11. High-Temperature, Thin-Film Ceramic Thermocouples Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali; Blaha, Charles A.; Gonzalez, Jose M.

    2005-01-01

    To enable long-duration, more distant human and robotic missions for the Vision for Space Exploration, as well as safer, lighter, quieter, and more fuel efficient vehicles for aeronautics and space transportation, NASA is developing instrumentation and material technologies. The high-temperature capabilities of thin-film ceramic thermocouples are being explored at the NASA Glenn Research Center by the Sensors and Electronics Branch and the Ceramics Branch in partnership with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). Glenn s Sensors and Electronics Branch is developing thin-film sensors for surface measurement of strain, temperature, heat flux, and surface flow in propulsion system research. Glenn s Ceramics Branch, in conjunction with CWRU, is developing structural and functional ceramic technology for aeropropulsion and space propulsion.

  12. Radiopaque Strontium Fluoroapatite Glass-Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2-Al2O3-Y2O3-SrO-Na2O-K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O-P2O5-F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: (a) Sr5(PO4)3F - leucite, KAlSi2O6, (b) Sr5(PO4)3F - leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, (c) Sr5(PO4)3F - pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, and (d) Sr5(PO4)3F - Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4. The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needle-like morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needle-like Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of leucite, pollucite, and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite - pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). These

  13. Radiopaque Strontium Fluoroapatite Glass-Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2–Al2O3–Y2O3–SrO–Na2O–K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O–P2O5–F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: (a) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, (b) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, (c) Sr5(PO4)3F – pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, and (d) Sr5(PO4)3F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4. The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needle-like morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needle-like Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of leucite, pollucite, and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  14. Enhancement of absorption and resistance of motion utilizing a multi-channel opto-electronic sensor to effectively monitor physiological signs during sport exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzahrani, Abdullah; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Barrett, Laura; Esliger, Dale; Hayes, Matthew; Akbare, Shafique; Achart, Jérôme; Kuoch, Sylvain

    2015-03-01

    This study presents an effective engineering approach for human vital signs monitoring as increasingly demanded by personal healthcare. The aim of this work is to study how to capture critical physiological parameters efficiently through a well-constructed electronic system and a robust multi-channel opto-electronic patch sensor (OEPS), together with a wireless communication. A unique design comprising multi-wavelength illumination sources and a rapid response photo sensor with a 3-axis accelerometer enables to recover pulsatile features, compensate motion and increase signal-to-noise ratio. An approved protocol with designated tests was implemented at Loughborough University a UK leader in sport and exercise assessment. The results of sport physiological effects were extracted from the datasets of physical movements, i.e. sitting, standing, waking, running and cycling. t-test, Bland-Altman and correlation analysis were applied to evaluate the performance of the OEPS system against Acti-Graph and Mio-Alpha.There was no difference in heart rate measured using OEPS and both Acti-Graph and Mio-Alpha (both p<0.05). Strong correlations were observed between HR measured from the OEPS and both the Acti-graph and Mio-Alpha (r = 0.96, p<0.001). Bland-Altman analysis for the Acti-Graph and OEPS found the bias 0.85 bpm, the standard deviation 9.20 bpm, and the limits of agreement (LOA) -17.18 bpm to +18.88 bpm for lower and upper limits of agreement respectively, for the Mio-Alpha and OEPS the bias is 1.63 bpm, standard deviation SD8.62 bpm, lower and upper limits of agreement, - 15.27 bpm and +18.58 bpm respectively. The OEPS demonstrates a real time, robust and remote monitoring of cardiovascular function.

  15. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-07-23

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite. 5 figs.

  16. Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods

    DOEpatents

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2007-08-28

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  17. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  18. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-08-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

  19. Ceramic catalyst materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J.; Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K.

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  20. Photosynthesis-dependent/independent control of stomatal responses to CO2 in mutant barley with surplus electron transport capacity and reduced SLAH3 anion channel transcript.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Javier; Molina-Cano, José-Luis; Pérez, Pilar; Morcuende, Rosa; Moralejo, Marian; Savé, Robert; Martínez-Carrasco, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms of stomatal sensitivity to CO2 are yet to be fully understood. The role of photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic factors in stomatal responses to CO2 was investigated in wild-type barley (Hordeum vulgare var. Graphic) and in a mutant (G132) with decreased photochemical and Rubisco capacities. The CO2 and DCMU responses of stomatal conductance (gs), gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and levels of ATP, with a putative transcript for stomatal opening were analysed. G132 had greater gs than the wild-type, despite lower photosynthesis rates and higher intercellular CO2 concentrations (Ci). The mutant had Rubisco-limited photosynthesis at very high CO2 levels, and higher ATP contents than the wild-type. Stomatal sensitivity to CO2 under red light was lower in G132 than in the wild-type, both in photosynthesizing and DCMU-inhibited leaves. Under constant Ci and red light, stomatal sensitivity to DCMU inhibition was higher in G132. The levels of a SLAH3-like slow anion channel transcript, involved in stomatal closure, decreased sharply in G132. The results suggest that stomatal responses to CO2 depend partly on the balance of photosynthetic electron transport to carbon assimilation capacities, but are partially regulated by the CO2 signalling network. High gs can improve the adaptation to climate change in well-watered conditions. PMID:26398787

  1. Analysis of orientation distribution in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus x polycrystals by electron channeling patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, W.J.; Yoshimi, K. ); Hanada, S.; Saito, S.; Murayama, Y.; Hayashi, S. ); Nagata, A. )

    1990-12-15

    A unit standard map for YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{ital x}} superconductors was constructed and indexed from a series of electron channeling patterns (ECPs). (001) pole figures of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{ital x}} tapes and bulk specimens with various values of critical current density ({ital J}{sub {ital c}}) were drawn by using the map covering (001-{bar 1}{bar 1}0-{bar 1}10) stereographic quadrant and ECPs taken from individual grains of the specimens. It was found that preferred orientation of (001) formed in the tape with a decreasing thickness of the tape, which raised {ital J}{sub {ital c}} significantly. It is concluded that the ECP technique is very useful for the analysis of orientation distribution in small-sized YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{ital x}} specimens such as tapes or thin films.

  2. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Gating schemes for controlling the electron wavefunction between GaAs and In0.05Ga0.95As quasi-one-dimensional channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, M. D.; Husmann, A.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.; Holmes, S. N.; Pepper, M.

    2006-03-01

    The selective composition control of the electron wavefunction in a GaAs/InGaAs double quantum well device is presented for two different gating schemes. In particular, electron-beam defined surface gates schemes allow the definition of non-ballistic quasi-one-dimensional conduction channels in each of the quantum wells and result in the ability to electrostatically move the electron wavefunction between the two materials. The use of such a device as the basis for a spin qubit, due to the differing g-factors, and the investigation of other spin-related phenomena in one-dimension are discussed.

  3. [Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA)].

    PubMed

    Sentürk, U; Perka, C

    2015-04-01

    The main reason for total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision is the wear-related aseptic loosening. Younger and active patients after total joint replacement create high demands, in particular, on the bearings. The progress, especially for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings and mixed ceramics have solved many problems of the past and lead to good in vitro results. Modern ceramics (alumina or mixed ceramics containing alumina) are extremely hard, scratch-resistant, biocompatible, offer a low coefficient of friction, superior lubrication and have the lowest wear rates in comparison to all other bearings in THA. The disadvantage of ceramic is the risk of material failure, i.e., of ceramic fracture. The new generation of mixed ceramics (delta ceramic), has reduced the risk of head fractures to 0.03-0.05 %, but the risk for liner fractures remains unchanged at about 0.02 %. Assuming a non-impinging component implantation, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have substantial advantages over all other bearings in THA. Due to the superior hardness, ceramic bearings produce less third body wear and are virtually impervious to damage from instruments during the implantation process. A specific complication for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings is "squeaking". The high rate of reported squeaking (0.45 to 10.7 %) highlights the importance of precise implant positioning and the stem and patient selection. With precise implant positioning this problem is rare with many implant designs and without clinical relevance. The improved tribology and the presumable resulting implant longevity make ceramic-on-ceramic the bearing of choice for young and active patients. PMID:25874400

  4. Measurement of the production cross section for W + {gamma} in the electron channel in {radical}s = 1.8 TeV {bar p}p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, D.P.

    1993-11-01

    The production cross section times decay branching ratio for W{sub +{gamma}} in the electron decay channel in {radical}s = 1.8 TeV {bar p}-p collisions has been measured using W {yields} e{gamma} data sample obtained from the CDF 1988--1989 Tevatron collider run. For photons in the central region ({vert_bar}{eta}{sub {gamma}}{vert_bar} < 1.1) of the CDF detector with transverse energies E{sub T}{sup {gamma}} 5.0 GeV and lepton-photon angular separation {Delta}R{sub {ell}}{gamma} > 0.7, eight electron W{sub {gamma}} candidates were observed. From these events, the production cross section times decay branching ratio for the electron sample was measured to be a {sigma} {center_dot} B(W{sub {gamma}}){sub exp} = 17.0{sub {minus}13.4}{sup +13.6}(stat. + syst.)pb. The W{sub {gamma}} cross section is sensitive to the anomalous couplings of the W boson. Using the W{sub {gamma}} cross section measurement, the absence of an excess of large E{sub T} photons accompanying the production of a W boson enables one to obtain direct limits on anomalous WW{sub {gamma}} couplings. The experimental limits on the anomalous couplings was measured to be {minus}7.2 < {Delta}{kappa} < +7.7 ({lambda} = 0) and {minus}3.5 < {lambda} < +3.4 ({Delta}{kappa} = 0) at 95% CL. These experimental limits impose contraints on possible internal structure of the W boson with compositeness scale sensitivity {Lambda}{sub W} {ge} 1 TeV for saturation of unitarity, corresponding to probing a distance scale of order L{sub W} {le} 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} fm. The experimental limits on anomalous WW{sub {gamma}} couplings place bounds on the higher-order electromagnetic moments of the W boson -- the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments and the W boson mean-squared charge radius. The experimental results presented in this thesis are in good agreement with Standard Model expectations.

  5. Surfaces and interfaces of glass and ceramics; Proceedings of the International Symposium on Special Topics in Ceramics, Alfred University, Alfred, N.Y., August 27-29, 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frechette, V. D. (Editor); Lacourse, W. C.; Burdick, V. L.

    1974-01-01

    The characterization of surfaces and interfaces is considered along with the infrared spectra of several N-containing compounds absorbed on montmorillonites, applications of surface characterization techniques to glasses, the observation of electronic spectra in glass and ceramic surfaces, a method for determining the preferred orientation of crystallites normal to a surface, and the friction and wear behavior of glasses and ceramics. Attention is given to the wear behavior of cast surface composites, an experimental investigation of the dynamic and thermal characteristics of the ceramic stock removal process, a dynamic elastic model of ceramic stock removal, and the structure and properties of solid surfaces. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  6. A glass-ceramic plate for mammography.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J. A.; Schweizer, S.; Lubinsky, A. R.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Univ. of Paderborn; State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook

    2007-01-01

    We developed translucent glass-ceramic image plates for digital mammography. The glass ceramics are based on europium-doped fluorozirconate glasses, which were additionally doped with chlorine to initiate the nucleation of barium chloride nanoparticles therein. The X-ray image is stored in the form of stable electron-hole pairs, which can be read out afterwards with a scanning laser beam in a 'photostimulated luminescence' (PSL) process. Measurements of the required stimulating exposure, integrated PSL signal, and optical light spreading of the stimulating laser light were performed to allow projection of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for the proposed X-ray storage phosphor system. The projected DQE is compared with commercially available electronic mammography systems.

  7. Piezoelectric Ceramics and Their Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flinn, I.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the piezoelectric effect in ceramics and presents a quantitative representation of this effect. Explains the processes involved in the manufacture of piezoelectric ceramics, the materials used, and the situations in which they are applied. (GS)

  8. Fundamental tribological properties of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Miyoshi, K.

    1985-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with itself, another ceramic, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. Adhesion between a ceramic and itself or another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to the interface resulting from solid state contact. Elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid-state contact are discussed as they relate to friction and wear. The contact load necessary to initiate fracture in ceramics is shown to be appreciably reduced with tangential motion. Both friction and wear of ceramics are anisotropic and relate to crystal structure as with metals. Both free energy of oxide formation and the d valence bond character of metals are related to the friction and wear characteristics for metals in contact with ceramics. Lubrication is found to increase the critical load necessary to initiate fracture of ceramics with sliding or rubbing contact.

  9. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  10. Ceramic impregnated superabrasives

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Robert P.; Sherman, Andrew

    2009-02-10

    A superabrasive fracture resistant compact is formed by depositing successive layers of ceramic throughout the network of open pores in a thermally stable self-bonded polycrystalline diamond or cubic boron nitride preform. The void volume in the preform is from approximately 2 to 10 percent of the volume of the preform, and the average pore size is below approximately 3000 nanometers. The preform is evacuated and infiltrated under at least about 1500 pounds per square inch pressure with a liquid pre-ceramic polymerizable precursor. The precursor is infiltrated into the preform at or below the boiling point of the precursor. The precursor is polymerized into a solid phase material. The excess is removed from the outside of the preform, and the polymer is pyrolized to form a ceramic. The process is repeated at least once more so as to achieve upwards of 90 percent filling of the original void volume. When the remaining void volume drops below about 1 percent the physical properties of the compact, such as fracture resistance, improve substantially. Multiple infiltration cycles result in the deposition of sufficient ceramic to reduce the void volume to below 0.5 percent. The fracture resistance of the compacts in which the pores are lined with formed in situ ceramic is generally at least one and one-half times that of the starting preforms.

  11. Ceramic combustor mounting

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Melvin G.; Janneck, Frank W.

    1982-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine includes a metal engine block including a wall portion defining a housing for a combustor having ceramic liner components. A ceramic outlet duct is supported by a compliant seal on the metal block and a reaction chamber liner is stacked thereon and partly closed at one end by a ceramic bypass swirl plate which is spring loaded by a plurality of circumferentially spaced, spring loaded guide rods and wherein each of the guide rods has one end thereof directed exteriorly of a metal cover plate on the engine block to react against externally located biasing springs cooled by ambient air and wherein the rod spring support arrangement maintains the stacked ceramic components together so that a normal force is maintained on the seal between the outlet duct and the engine block under all operating conditions. The support arrangement also is operative to accommodate a substantial difference in thermal expansion between the ceramic liner components of the combustor and the metal material of the engine block.

  12. FATIGUE OF DENTAL CERAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. Data/sources The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Conclusions Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically-assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Clinical significance Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. PMID:24135295

  13. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  14. Electron microscopy and microanalysis of the fiber-matrix interface in monolithic silicone carbide-based ceramic composite material for use in a fusion reactor application.

    PubMed

    Toplisek, Tea; Drazic, Goran; Novak, Sasa; Kobe, Spomenka

    2008-01-01

    A composite material made from continuous monolithic silicone carbide (SiC) fibers and a SiC-based matrix (SiC(f)/SiC), was prepared using a novel technique, i.e. adapted dip coating and infiltration of SiC fibers with a water suspension containing SiC particles and a sintering additive. This kind of material could be used in the first-wall blanket of a future fusion reactor. Using magnetron sputtering, the SiC fibers were coated with various thin layers (TiC, CrN, CrC, WC, DLC-diamond-like carbon) of the interface material by physical vapor deposition (PVD). Using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and microanalysis, detailed microstructural studies of the fiber-matrix interface were performed. Both samples, with coated and uncoated fibers, were examined under a load. The microcracks introduced by the Vickers indenter continued their path through the fibers, and thus caused the failure of the composite material, in the case of the uncoated fibers or deviated from their primary direction at the fiber-matrix interface in the case of the coated fibers. PMID:18172883

  15. Lightweight ceramic insulation and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, David J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for manufacturing a low density ceramic powder which can be formed to make a lightweight material for insulation or other construction. The ceramic product made from the process has a final density of less than 25 to about 1 percent of the theoretical weight of the ceramic powder. The ceramic product is lightweight and can be made to withstand high temperatures greater than 1400 C.

  16. Nondestructive evaluation of advanced ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, Stanley J.; Kautz, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    A review is presented of Lewis Research Center efforts to develop nondestructive evaluation techniques for characterizing advanced ceramic materials. Various approaches involved the use of analytical ultrasonics to characterize monolythic ceramic microstructures, acousto-ultrasonics for characterizing ceramic matrix composites, damage monitoring in impact specimens by microfocus X-ray radiography and scanning ultrasonics, and high resolution computed X-ray tomography to identify structural features in fiber reinforced ceramics.

  17. Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program evaluated the application of advanced ceramic materials to an automotive Stirling engine. The objective of the program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of utilizing advanced ceramics to increase peak engine operating temperature, and to evaluate the performance benefits of such an increase. Manufacturing cost estimates were also developed for various ceramic engine components and compared with conventional metallic engine component costs.

  18. Ceramic automotive Stirling engine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program evaluated the application of advanced ceramic materials to an automotive Stirling engine. The objective of the program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of utilizing advanced ceramics to increase peak engine operating temperature, and to evaluate the performance benefits of such an increase. Manufacturing cost estimates were also developed for various ceramic engine components and compared with conventional metallic engine component costs.

  19. Channeling of aluminum in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.G.; Hopkins, C.G.

    1985-05-15

    A systematic study of channeling of aluminum in the silicon crystal is reported. Depth distributions measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry are reported for 40-, 75-, and 150-keV aluminum channeled in the <100> and <110> directions of silicon. The profile dependence on alignment angle is shown for 150-keV aluminum in the <110> of silicon. Aluminum has low electronic stopping in silicon and corresponding deep channeled profiles are observed for aligned implants and deep channeling tails are observed on random implants. The maximum channeling range for 150-keV Al in <100> silicon is about 2.8 ..mu..m and is about 6.4 ..mu..m in <110> silicon. Some ions will reach the maximum channeling range even for 2/sup 0/ misalignment. Many of the deep channeling tails and ''supertails'' reported in earlier literature can be explained by the normal channeling of aluminum in silicon.

  20. Ceramic tamper-revealing seals

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, D.S.; Raptis, A.C.; Sheen, S.H.

    1992-12-08

    A flexible metal or ceramic cable is described with composite ceramic ends, or a U-shaped ceramic connecting element attached to a binding element plate or block cast from alumina or zirconium, and connected to the connecting element by shrink fitting. 7 figs.

  1. Assessment of ceramic membrane filters

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.; Im, K.H.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this project include the development of analytical models for evaluating the fluid mechanics of membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters, and to determine the effects of thermal and thermo-chemical aging on the material properties of emerging ceramic hot gas filters. A honeycomb cordierite monolith with a thin ceramic coating and a rigid candle filter were evaluated.

  2. Ceramic coatings on smooth surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A. (Inventor); Brindley, W. J. (Inventor); Rouge, C. J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A metallic coating is plasma sprayed onto a smooth surface of a metal alloy substitute or on a bond coating. An initial thin ceramic layer is low pressure sprayed onto the smooth surface of the substrate or bond coating. Another ceramic layer is atmospheric plasma sprayed onto the initial ceramic layer.

  3. TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalam, Kartik; Montell, Craig

    2011-01-01

    The TRP (Transient Receptor Potential) superfamily of cation channels is remarkable in that it displays greater diversity in activation mechanisms and selectivities than any other group of ion channels. The domain organizations of some TRP proteins are also unusual, as they consist of linked channel and enzyme domains. A unifying theme in this group is that TRP proteins play critical roles in sensory physiology, which include contributions to vision, taste, olfaction, hearing, touch, and thermo- and osmosensation. In addition, TRP channels enable individual cells to sense changes in their local environment. Many TRP channels are activated by a variety of different stimuli and function as signal integrators. The TRP superfamily is divided into seven subfamilies: the five group 1 TRPs (TRPC, TRPV, TRPM, TRPN, and TRPA) and two group 2 subfamilies (TRPP and TRPML). TRP channels are important for human health as mutations in at least four TRP channels underlie disease. PMID:17579562

  4. Ceramic regenerator program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Jerrold E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating an Air Turbo Ramjet (ATR) regenerator containing intricate hydraulic passages from a ceramic material in order to allow operation with high temperature combustion gas and to reduce weight as compared with metallic materials was demonstrated. Platelet technology, ceramic tape casting, and multilayer ceramic packaging techniques were used in this fabrication of subscale silicon nitride components. Proof-of-concept demonstrations were performed to simulate a methane cooled regenerator for an ATR engine. The regenerator vane was designed to operate at realistic service conditions, i.e., 600 psi in a 3500 R (3040 F), 500 fps combustion gas environment. A total of six regenerators were fabricated and tested. The regenerators were shown to be able to withstand internal pressurization to 1575 psi. They were subjected to testing in 500 fps, 3560 R (3100 F) air/propane combustion products and were operated satisfactorily for an excess of 100 hr and 40 thermal cycles which exceeded 2460 R (2000 F).

  5. Whisker reinforced glass ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschfeld, D.A.; Brown, J.J. Jr.

    1996-06-03

    The process for making an in-situ whisker reinforced glass-ceramic that is up to 1.5 times as strong as conventional glass-ceramics was developed at Virginia Tech and patented in 1993. This technology has been identified as having commercial potential for use in high temperature heat exchanger applications for the electric power generation field by the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT). This technology was licensed by MATVA, Inc., a small Virginia business, for further development. In particular, the goal of this project was to develop a property database and conduct initial testing of heat exchanger prototypes to demonstrate its potential application. This final report describes how the glass precursor was formed, physical properties of the glass-ceramic, techniques for making heat exchanger prototypes.

  6. Erosion of composite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.L.

    1992-08-01

    The theoretical basis to describe solid-particle erosion of monolithic ceramics is well developed. In many cases, the models can account for the impact velocity, impact angle and erodent-size dependencies of the steady-state erosion rate. In addition, the models account for effects of materials parameters such as fracture toughness and hardness. Steady-state erosion measurements on a wide variety of composite ceramics, including SiC whisker-reinforced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} containing Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} or SiC whiskers, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} reinforced with SiC whiskers, and duplex-microstructure Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} have been reported. The theories developed for monolithic ceramics are, however, less successful in describing the results for composites.

  7. Erosion of composite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.L.

    1992-08-01

    The theoretical basis to describe solid-particle erosion of monolithic ceramics is well developed. In many cases, the models can account for the impact velocity, impact angle and erodent-size dependencies of the steady-state erosion rate. In addition, the models account for effects of materials parameters such as fracture toughness and hardness. Steady-state erosion measurements on a wide variety of composite ceramics, including SiC whisker-reinforced Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] containing Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] or SiC whiskers, Y[sub 2]O[sub 3]-stabilized ZrO[sub 2] reinforced with SiC whiskers, and duplex-microstructure Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] have been reported. The theories developed for monolithic ceramics are, however, less successful in describing the results for composites.

  8. Ceramic vane drive joint

    DOEpatents

    Smale, Charles H.

    1981-01-01

    A variable geometry gas turbine has an array of ceramic composition vanes positioned by an actuating ring coupled through a plurality of circumferentially spaced turbine vane levers to the outer end of a metallic vane drive shaft at each of the ceramic vanes. Each of the ceramic vanes has an end slot of bow tie configuration including flared end segments and a center slot therebetween. Each of the vane drive shafts has a cross head with ends thereof spaced with respect to the sides of the end slot to define clearance for free expansion of the cross head with respect to the vane and the cross head being configured to uniformly distribute drive loads across bearing surfaces of the vane slot.

  9. Dielectric silicone elastomers with mixed ceramic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Stiubianu, George; Bele, Adrian; Cazacu, Maria; Racles, Carmen; Vlad, Stelian; Ignat, Mircea

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Composite ceramics nanoparticles (MCN) with zirconium dioxide and lead zirconate. • Dielectric elastomer films wDith PDMS matrix and MCN as dielectric filler. • Hydrophobic character—water resistant and good flexibility specific to siloxanes. • Increased value of dielectric constant with the content of MCN in dielectric films. • Increased energy output from uniaxial deformation of the dielectric elastomer films. - Abstract: A ceramic material consisting in a zirconium dioxide-lead zirconate mixture has been obtained by precipitation method, its composition being proved by wide angle X-ray powder diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The average diameter of the ceramic particles ranged between 50 and 100 nm, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy images. These were surface treated and used as filler for a high molecular mass polydimethylsiloxane-α,ω-diol (Mn = 450,000) prepared in laboratory, the resulted composites being further processed as films and crosslinked. A condensation procedure, unusual for polydimethylsiloxane having such high molecular mass, with a trifunctional silane was approached for the crosslinking. The effect of filler content on electrical and mechanical properties of the resulted materials was studied and it was found that the dielectric permittivity of nanocomposites increased in line with the concentration of ceramic nanoparticles.

  10. Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, S.

    2012-12-31

    Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

  11. Investigations of δ-Doped InAlAs/InGaAs/InP High-Electron-Mobility Transistors with Linearly Graded InxGa1-xAs Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun-Chin; Hsu, Wei-Chou; Lee, Ching-Sung; Chen, Yeong-Jia; Huang, Dong-Hai; Chen, Hsin-Hung

    2005-12-01

    Comprehensive investigations of the various static and microwave performances of InAlAs/InGaAs/InP high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) with a linearly graded InxGa1-xAs channel (LGC-HEMT) have been conducted. LGC-HEEMT was compared with the same HEMT having a conventional lattice-matched In0.53Ga0.47As channel (LM-HEMT). Improved carrier transport characteristics and confinement capability achieved by employing a linearly graded channel have contributed to a high extrinsic transconductance (gm) of 319 mS/mm, a high unity-gain cutoff frequency ( ft) of 37 GHz, and a maximum oscillation frequency ( fmax) of 51 GHz at 300 K for a gate length of 0.65 μm. The improved gate-voltage swing, turn-on and output power characteristics of LGC-HEMT have also been discussed.

  12. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Webster, E.; Anderson, M.

    1993-12-14

    A method for the formation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms. 4 figures.

  13. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Webster, Elizabeth; Anderson, Marc

    1993-01-01

    A method for permformation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms.

  14. Performance of Dental Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Rekow, E.D.; Silva, N.R.F.A.; Coelho, P.G.; Zhang, Y.; Guess, P.; Thompson, V.P.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical success of modern dental ceramics depends on an array of factors, ranging from initial physical properties of the material itself, to the fabrication and clinical procedures that inevitably damage these brittle materials, and the oral environment. Understanding the influence of these factors on clinical performance has engaged the dental, ceramics, and engineering communities alike. The objective of this review is to first summarize clinical, experimental, and analytic results reported in the recent literature. Additionally, it seeks to address how this new information adds insight into predictive test procedures and reveals challenges for future improvements. PMID:21224408

  15. Environment Conscious Ceramics (Ecoceramics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Levine, Stanley R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Environment conscious ceramics (Ecoceramics) are a new class of materials, which can be produced with renewable natural resources (wood) or wood wastes (wood sawdust). Silicon carbide-based ecoceramics have been fabricated by reactive infiltration of carbonaceous preforms by molten silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. These carbonaceous preforms have been fabricated by pyrolysis of solid wood bodies at 1000 C. The fabrication approach, microstructure, and mechanical properties of SiC-based ecoceramics are presented. Ecoceramics have tailorable properties and behave like ceramic materials manufactured by conventional approaches.

  16. Ceramic powder compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Mahoney, F.M.

    1995-12-31

    With the objective of developing a predictive model for ceramic powder compaction we have investigated methods for characterizing density gradients in ceramic powder compacts, reviewed and compared existing compaction models, conducted compaction experiments on a spray dried alumina powder, and conducted mechanical tests and compaction experiments on model granular materials. Die filling and particle packing, and the behavior of individual granules play an important role in determining compaction behavior and should be incorporated into realistic compaction models. These results support the use of discrete element modeling techniques and statistical mechanics principals to develop a comprehensive model for compaction, something that should be achievable with computers with parallel processing capabilities.

  17. Ceramic breeder materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.E.; Kummerer, K.R.; Roth, E.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramic materials are under investigation as potential breeder material in fusion reactors. This paper will review candidate materials with respect to fabrication routes and characterization, properties in as-fabricated and irradiated condition, and experimental results from laboratory and inpile investigations on tritium transport and release. Also discussed are the resources of beryllium, which is being considered as a neutron multiplier. The comparison of ceramic properties that is attempted here aims at the identification of the most-promising material for use in a tritium breeding blanket. 82 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Yahnke, M.S.; Shlomo, G.; Anderson, M.A.

    1994-08-30

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range. 2 figs.

  19. Microwave sintering of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.B.

    1989-01-01

    Successful adaptation of microwave heating to the densification of ceramic materials require a marriage of microwave and materials technologies. Using an interdisciplinary team of microwave and materials engineers, we have successfully demonstrated the ability to density ceramic materials over a wide range of temperatures. Microstructural evolution during microwave sintering has been found to be significantly different from that observed in conventional sintering. Our results and those of others indicate that microwave sintering has the potential to fabricate components to near net shape with mechanical properties equivalent to hot pressed or hot isostatically pressed material. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A CERAMIC TAMPER INDICATING SEAL: SRNL CONTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Krementz, D.; Brinkman, K.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Weeks, G.

    2013-06-03

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are collaborating on development of a Ceramic Seal, also sometimes designated the Intrinsically Tamper Indicating Ceramic Seal (ITICS), which is a tamper indicating seal for international safeguards applications. The Ceramic Seal is designed to be a replacement for metal loop seals that are currently used by the IAEA and other safeguards organizations. The Ceramic Seal has numerous features that enhance the security of the seal, including a frangible ceramic body, protective and tamper indicating coatings, an intrinsic unique identifier using Laser Surface Authentication, electronics incorporated into the seal that provide cryptographic seal authentication, and user-friendly seal wire capture. A second generation prototype of the seal is currently under development whose seal body is of Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) construction. SRNL has developed the mechanical design of the seal in an iterative process incorporating comments from the SNL vulnerability review team. SRNL is developing fluorescent tamper indicating coatings, with recent development focusing on optimizing the durability of the coatings and working with a vendor to develop a method to apply coatings on a 3-D surface. SRNL performed a study on the effects of radiation on the electronics of the seal and possible radiation shielding techniques to minimize the effects. SRNL is also investigating implementation of Laser Surface Authentication (LSA) as a means of unique identification of each seal and the effects of the surface coatings on the LSA signature.

  1. Ceramic scintillator-coupled linear array PIN photodiode for X-ray scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang Hyun; Kang, Dong-Wan; Cho, Gyuseong; Kim, Do Kyung

    2007-08-01

    In order to design the full system of dual-energy X-ray scanner, each component of the system has been fabricated and tested. The high-energy X-ray detector modules used a ceramic scintillator of Eu 3+-doped (Gd,Y) 2O 3, manufactured using Glycine Nitrate Process (GNP). This was coupled to a 16-channel linear array PIN-type photodiode. The low-energy module was a commercially available Lanex Regular screen that was also coupled to a 16-channel linear array PIN-type photodiode. The 16-channel linear array PIN-type photodiode of 1.5 mm×3.2 mm was fabricated in the process of Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI). With a data acquisition system, signal-to-noise ratio was measured at low X-ray energy and low photon flux to evaluate each scintillator-coupled detector module. Through the experiment results and analysis, we inspected each component of the system as a dual-energy single-exposure X-ray scanner.

  2. Friction and Wear Behavior of Selected Dental Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jongee; Pekkan, Gurel; Ozturk, Abdullah

    The purpose of this study was to determine the friction coefficients and wear rates of six commercially available dental ceramics including IPS Empress 2 (E2), Cergo Pressable Ceramic (CPC), Cercon Ceram (CCS) and Super porcelain EX-3 (SPE). Bovine enamel (BE) was also tested as a reference material for comparison purposes. Samples of the dental ceramics were prepared according to the instructions described by the manufacturers in disk-shape with nominal dimensions of 12 mm × 2 mm. The wear tests were performed by means of a pin-on-disk type tribometer. The friction coefficients and specific wear rates of the materials were determined at a load of 10 N and rotating speed of 0.25 cm/s without lubrication. Surface morphology of the wear tracks was examined using a scanning electron microscope. Statistical analyses were made using one-way ANOVA and Turkey's HSD (P < 0.05).

  3. Processing and characterization of functionally gradient ceramic materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, M.E.; Sengupta, L.C.; Ngo, E.; Stowell, S.; Lancto, R.

    1994-02-01

    Tape casting of ceramic materials offers the flexibility of gradually altering the electronic or structural properties of two dissimilar systems in order to improve their compatibility. This research outlines the processing and fabrication of two systems-of functionally gradient materials. The systems are both electronic ceramic composites consisting Ba(1-x)Sr(x)TiO3 (BSTO) and alumina or a second oxide additive. These composites would be used in phased array antenna systems, therefore, the electronic properties of the material have specific requirements in the microwave frequency regions. The composition of the tapes are varied to provide a graded dielectric constant, which gradually increases from that of air (dielectric constant = 1) to that of the ceramic (dielectric constant = 1500). This allows maximum penetration of incident microwave radiation as well as minimum energy dissipation and insertion loss into the entire phase shifting device.

  4. Ceramic/ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bizot, P; Nizard, R; Lerouge, S; Prudhommeaux, F; Sedel, L

    2000-01-01

    Alumina-on-alumina total hip arthroplasty has been used for 30 years, mainly in Europe. The theoretical advantages of this combination are represented by its remarkable sliding characteristics, its very low wear debris generation, and its sufficient fracture toughness. These advantages are achieved if the material is properly controlled with high density, high purity, and small grains. The authors summarize the results obtained with ceramic/ceramic total hip arthroplasty. Information is provided about in vivo behavior regarding wear debris characterization and quantification, and histological tissue examinations for inflammatory reactions, which were not encountered except when alumina debris was mixed with metal or cement. Modification of socket fixation resulted in improved clinical outcomes. With a press-fit metal shell and an alumina liner utilized for 10 years, the results are excellent especially in a young and active population. Alumina-on-alumina seems at the moment to be one of the best choices when a total hip arthroplasty has to be performed in young and active patients. PMID:11180930

  5. Tribological properties of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1989-01-01

    The tribological and lubricated behavior of both oxide and nonoxide ceramics are reviewed in this chapter. Ceramics are examined in contact with themselves, other harder materials and metals. Elastic, plastic and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid state contact is discussed. The contact load necessary to initiate fracture in ceramics is shown to be appreciably reduced with tangential motion. Both friction and wear of ceramics are anisotropic and relate to crystal structure as has been observed with metals. Grit size effects in two and three body abrasive wear are observed for ceramics. Both free energy of oxide formation and the d valence bond character of metals are related to the friction and wear characteristics for metals in contact with ceramics. Surface contaminants affect friction and adhesive wear. For example, carbon on silicon carbide and chlorine on aluminum oxide reduce friction while oxygen on metal surfaces in contact with ceramics increases friction. Lubrication increases the critical load necessary to initiate fracture of ceramics both in indentation and with sliding or rubbing. Ceramics compositions both as coatings and in composites are described for the high temperature lubrication of both alloys and ceramics.

  6. Tribological properties of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Miyoshi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The tribological and lubricated behavior of both oxide and nonoxide ceramics are reviewed in this chapter. Ceramics are examined in contact with themselves, other harder materials and metals. Elastic, plastic and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid state contact is discussed. The contact load necessary to initiate fracture in ceramics is shown to be appreciably reduced with tangential motion. Both friction and wear of ceramics are anisotropic and relate to crystal structure as has been observed with metals. Grit size effects in two and three body abrasive wear are observed for ceramics. Both free energy of oxide formation and the d valence bond character of metals are related to the friction and wear characteristics for metals in contact with ceramics. Surface contaminants affect friction and adhesive wear. For example, carbon on silicon carbide and chlorine on aluminum oxide reduce friction while oxygen on metal surfaces in contact with ceramics increases friction. Lubrication increases the critical load necessary to initiate fracture of ceramics both in indentation and with sliding or rubbing. Ceramics compositions both as coatings and in composites are described for the high temperature lubrication of both alloys and ceramics.

  7. Coupled channel calculations for electron-positron pair production in collisions of heavy ionsThis work is part of the doctoral thesis of Matthias Gail, Giessen (D26) 2001.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gail, Matthias; Grün, Norbert; Scheid, Werner

    2003-04-01

    Coupled channel calculations are performed for electron-positron pair production in relativistic collisions of heavy ions. For this purpose the wavefunction is expanded into different types of basis sets consisting of atomic wavefunctions centred around the projectile ion only and around both of the colliding nuclei. The results are compared with experimental data from Belkacem et al (1997 Phys. Rev. A 56 2807). This work is part of the doctoral thesis of Matthias Gail, Giessen (D26) 2001.

  8. Light-weight ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Ultra-high temperature, light-weight, ceramic insulation such as ceramic tile is obtained by pyrolyzing a siloxane gel derived from the reaction of at least one organo dialkoxy silane and at least one tetralkoxy silane in an acid or base liquid medium. The reaction mixture of the tetra- and dialkoxy silanes may contain also an effective amount of a mono- or trialkoxy silane to obtain the siloxane gel. The siloxane gel is dried at ambient pressures to form a siloxane ceramic precursor without significant shrinkage. The siloxane ceramic precursor is subsequently pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the black ceramic insulation comprising atoms of silicon, carbon and oxygen. The ceramic insulation, can be characterized as a porous, uniform ceramic tile resistant to oxidation at temperatures ranging as high as 1700.degree. C. and is particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft and other high-temperature insulation applications.

  9. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

    1991-08-27

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

  10. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, John V.; Novak, Robert F.; McBride, James R.

    1991-01-01

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

  11. Direct bonding of metals to ceramics: Interface investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curicuta, Victor

    There is a growing interest in metal/ceramic bonding for a wide range of applications from electronic packaging to biomedical implants. In this research work, results are reported for direct bonding of copper to ceramic (e.g., Al2O3 and ZrO) in a furnace under inert atmosphere (e.g., N2 and Ar2). Other, metals such as Cu, Ni, SS-316 were directly bonded to ceramics (e.g., α- Al2O3, sapphire) using laser heating (e.g., 247 nm and 10.6 μm wavelengths) in the presence of N2 atmosphere. Cu flakes have bean bonded to industrial alumina ceramic and sapphire in the presence of methyl, ethyl and isopropyl alcohols using a CO2 laser. All these experiments were performed by heating the metal or metal-organic media member for a sufficient time in order to create a metal-metal oxide eutectic melt at the interface with the ceramic substrate. Thermal wave imaging (TWI) was used to investigate the bonding at the metal/ceramic interface. It was found that the method of direct bonding of metals to ceramics using lasers performed better than the furnace. The properties of the copper bonded layer on alumina ceramic was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Also, the elemental distribution at the metal/ceramic interface was analyzed, using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). With the help of x-ray diffraction (XRD), the phase present at the copper/industrial alumina ceramic interface was determined to be CuAl2O4. This was different from the CuAlO2 phase found at the copper/sapphire interface for the furnace bonding case. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was also used to investigate the aspects of metal/ceramic interfaces. It was found that the samples processed by furnace heating and by laser beam heating have a diffused transition interface. The electron diffraction patterns revealed the phase present at the interface (Cu/ /alpha- Al2O3) to be a cubic one, with the CuAl2O4 crystallographic

  12. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOEpatents

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-04-07

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  13. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-05-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  14. Refractory ceramic fibers

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Refractory ceramic fibers ; CASRN Not found Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcino

  15. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

  16. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1993-04-01

    Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

  17. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, M.A.; Guangyao Sheng.

    1993-05-04

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  18. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Sheng, Guangyao

    1993-01-01

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  19. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendfra Nagabhushana

    2001-07-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  20. Silicon carbide ceramic production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    A method to produce sintered silicon carbide ceramics in which powdery carbonaceous components with a dispersant are mixed with silicon carbide powder, shaped as required with or without drying, and fired in nonoxidation atmosphere is described. Carbon black is used as the carbonaceous component.